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Sample records for testing blended risk

  1. Optimized periodic verification testing blended risk and performance-based MOV inservice test program an application of ASME code case OMN-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellers, C.; Fleming, K.; Bidwell, D.; Forbes, P. [and others

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents an application of ASME Code Case OMN-1 to the GL 89-10 Program at the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS). Code Case OMN-1 provides guidance for a performance-based MOV inservice test program that can be used for periodic verification testing and allows consideration of risk insights. Blended probabilistic and deterministic evaluation techniques were used to establish inservice test strategies including both test methods and test frequency. Described in the paper are the methods and criteria for establishing MOV safety significance based on the STPEGS probabilistic safety assessment, deterministic considerations of MOV performance characteristics and performance margins, the expert panel evaluation process, and the development of inservice test strategies. Test strategies include a mix of dynamic and static testing as well as MOV exercising.

  2. Optimized periodic verification testing blended risk and performance-based MOV inservice test program an application of ASME code case OMN-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, C.; Fleming, K.; Bidwell, D.; Forbes, P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an application of ASME Code Case OMN-1 to the GL 89-10 Program at the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS). Code Case OMN-1 provides guidance for a performance-based MOV inservice test program that can be used for periodic verification testing and allows consideration of risk insights. Blended probabilistic and deterministic evaluation techniques were used to establish inservice test strategies including both test methods and test frequency. Described in the paper are the methods and criteria for establishing MOV safety significance based on the STPEGS probabilistic safety assessment, deterministic considerations of MOV performance characteristics and performance margins, the expert panel evaluation process, and the development of inservice test strategies. Test strategies include a mix of dynamic and static testing as well as MOV exercising

  3. Repeated testing improves achievement in a blended learning approach for risk competence training of medical students: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreckelsen, C; Juenger, J

    2017-09-26

    Adequate estimation and communication of risks is a critical competence of physicians. Due to an evident lack of these competences, effective training addressing risk competence during medical education is needed. Test-enhanced learning has been shown to produce marked effects on achievements. This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated tests implemented on top of a blended learning program for risk competence. We introduced a blended-learning curriculum for risk estimation and risk communication based on a set of operationalized learning objectives, which was integrated into a mandatory course "Evidence-based Medicine" for third-year students. A randomized controlled trial addressed the effect of repeated testing on achievement as measured by the students' pre- and post-training score (nine multiple-choice items). Basic numeracy and statistical literacy were assessed at baseline. Analysis relied on descriptive statistics (histograms, box plots, scatter plots, and summary of descriptive measures), bootstrapped confidence intervals, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and effect sizes (Cohen's d, r) based on adjusted means and standard deviations. All of the 114 students enrolled in the course consented to take part in the study and were assigned to either the intervention or control group (both: n = 57) by balanced randomization. Five participants dropped out due to non-compliance (control: 4, intervention: 1). Both groups profited considerably from the program in general (Cohen's d for overall pre vs. post scores: 2.61). Repeated testing yielded an additional positive effect: while the covariate (baseline score) exhibits no relation to the post-intervention score, F(1, 106) = 2.88, p > .05, there was a significant effect of the intervention (repeated tests scenario) on learning achievement, F(1106) = 12.72, p training can improve relevant components of risk competence of medical students. An already promising overall effect of the blended learning

  4. Test Record of Flight Tests Using Alcohol-to-Jet/JP-8 Blended Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    SPECIAL REPORT RDMR-AE-15-02 TEST RECORD OF FLIGHT TESTS USING ALCOHOL -TO-JET/JP-8 BLENDED FUEL Franklin D Cox and George...2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Record of Flight Tests Using Alcohol -to-Jet/JP-8 Blended Fuel 5...be certified for use in these air vehicles. 14. SUBJECT TERMS UH-60, CH-47, alternative fuel , Alcohol -to-Jet, ATJ blend, flight test, longevity

  5. Generator Set Durability Testing Using 25% ATJ Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    additional check, the crankcase blow-by filter was replaced at the 16 hour mark, and checked for excessive oil at the end of test. No excess oil was found on...blended fuel in a 30kW AMMPS Generator utilizing a Cummins 3.3L QSB engine . In general, fuel compatibility within the bounds of the presented tests...seemed acceptable since there was no baseline data available to compare. The largest differences in engine operation may be attributed to the extreme

  6. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  7. Blended Risk Approach in Applying PSA Models to Risk-Based Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, V. B.; Chapman, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the authors will discuss a modern approach in applying PSA models in risk-based regulation. The Blended Risk Approach is a combination of traditional and probabilistic processes. It is receiving increased attention in different industries in the U. S. and abroad. The use of the deterministic regulations and standards provides a proven and well understood basis on which to assess and communicate the impact of change to plant design and operation. Incorporation of traditional values into risk evaluation is working very well in the blended approach. This approach is very application specific. It includes multiple risk attributes, qualitative risk analysis, and basic deterministic principles. In blending deterministic and probabilistic principles, this approach ensures that the objectives of the traditional defense-in-depth concept are not compromised and the design basis of the plant is explicitly considered. (author)

  8. Health risk assessment of arsenic from blended water in distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Kai; Wang, Wen D

    2017-12-06

    In a water distribution system with different sources, water blending occurs, causing specific variations of the arsenic level. This study was undertaken to investigate the concentration and cancer risk of arsenic in blended water in Xi'an city. A total of 672 tap water samples were collected from eight sampling points in the blending zones for arsenic determination. The risk was evaluated through oral ingestion and dermal absorption, separately for males and females, as well as with respect to seasons and blending zones. Although the arsenic concentrations always fulfilled the requirements of the World Health Organization (WHO) (≤10 μg L -1 ), the total cancer risk value was higher than the general guidance risk value of 1.00 × 10 -6 . In the blending zone of the Qujiang and No.3 WTPs (Z2), the total cancer risk value was over 1.00 × 10 -5 , indicating that public health would be affected to some extent. More than 99% of the total cancer risk was from oral ingestion, and dermal absorption had a little contribution. With higher exposure duration and lower body weight, women had a higher cancer risk. In addition, due to several influential factors, the total cancer risk in the four blending zones reached the maximum in different seasons. The sensitivity analysis by the tornado chart proved that body weight, arsenic concentration and ingestion rate significantly contributed to cancer risk. This study suggests the regular monitoring of water blending zones for improving risk management.

  9. Development And Testing Of Biogas-Petrol Blend As An Alternative Fuel For Spark Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awogbemi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research is on the development and testing of a biogas-petrol blend to run a spark ignition engine. A2080 ratio biogaspetrol blend was developed as an alternative fuel for spark ignition engine test bed. Petrol and biogas-petrol blend were comparatively tested on the test bed to determine the effectiveness of the fuels. The results of the tests showed that biogas petrol blend generated higher torque brake power indicated power brake thermal efficiency and brake mean effective pressure but lower fuel consumption and exhaust temperature than petrol. The research concluded that a spark ignition engine powered by biogas-petrol blend was found to be economical consumed less fuel and contributes to sanitation and production of fertilizer.

  10. Performance Testing of Diesel Engine using Cardanol-Kerosene oil blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness of environmental pollution and fossil fuel depletion has necessitated the use of biofuels in engines which have a relatively cleaner emissions. Cardanol is a biofuel, abundantly available in India, which is a by-product of cashew processing industries. In this study performance of raw Cardanol blended with kerosene has been tested in diesel engine. Volumetric blend BK30 (30% kerosene and 70% Cardanol has been used for the test. The properties like flash point, viscosity and calorific value of the blend have been determined. The test was carried out in four stroke diesel engine connected with an eddy current dynamometer. Performance of the engine has been analysed by finding the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC and brake thermal efficiency (BTE. The results showed that the brake thermal efficiency of the blend is 29.87%, with less CO and smoke emission compared to diesel. The results were also compared with the performance of Cardanol diesel blend and Cardanol camphor oil blend, which were already tested in diesel engines by other researchers. Earlier research work reveals that the blend of 30% camphor oil and 70% Cardanol performs very closer to diesel fuel with a thermal efficiency of 29.1%. Similarly, higher brake thermal efficiency was obtained for 20% Cardanol and 80% diesel blend.

  11. Engineered Option Treatment of Remediated Nitrate Salts: Surrogate Batch-Blending Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from batch-blending test work for remediated nitrate salt (RNS) treatment. Batch blending was identified as a preferred option for blending RNS and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) material with zeolite to effectively safe the salt/Swheat material identified as ignitable (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency code D001). Blending with zeolite was the preferred remediation option identified in the Options Assessment Report and was originally proposed as the best option for remediation by Clark and Funk in their report, Chemical Reactivity and Recommended Remediation Strategy for Los Alamos Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) Wastes, and also found to be a preferred option in the Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing. This test work evaluated equipment and recipe alternatives to achieve effective blending of surrogate waste with zeolite.

  12. ROTARY FUEL INJECTION PUMP WEAR TESTING USING A 30 %/ 70% ATJ/F-24 FUEL BLEND

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Table Page Table 1 . 30% ATJ Blend & Neat F-24 Chemical & Physical Properties ..................................... 3 Table 2 . Bulk Modulus of...has included basic chemical and physical property investigation to identify surrogate fuel sources with similar properties as traditional petroleum... chemical and physical properties of the neat F-24 (AF-9623) and the tested 30% ATJ blend (AF-9625). Table 2 shows the speed of sound and bulk modulus

  13. Seismic risk perception test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The perception of risks involves the process of collecting, selecting and interpreting signals about uncertain impacts of events, activities or technologies. In the natural sciences the term risk seems to be clearly defined, it means the probability distribution of adverse effects, but the everyday use of risk has different connotations (Renn, 2008). The two terms, hazards and risks, are often used interchangeably by the public. Knowledge, experience, values, attitudes and feelings all influence the thinking and judgement of people about the seriousness and acceptability of risks. Within the social sciences however the terminology of 'risk perception' has become the conventional standard (Slovic, 1987). The mental models and other psychological mechanisms which people use to judge risks (such as cognitive heuristics and risk images) are internalized through social and cultural learning and constantly moderated (reinforced, modified, amplified or attenuated) by media reports, peer influences and other communication processes (Morgan et al., 2001). Yet, a theory of risk perception that offers an integrative, as well as empirically valid, approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing". To understand the perception of risk is necessary to consider several areas: social, psychological, cultural, and their interactions. Among the various research in an international context on the perception of natural hazards, it seemed promising the approach with the method of semantic differential (Osgood, C.E., Suci, G., & Tannenbaum, P. 1957, The measurement of meaning. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press). The test on seismic risk perception has been constructed by the method of the semantic differential. To compare opposite adjectives or terms has been used a Likert's scale to seven point. The test consists of an informative part and six sections respectively dedicated to: hazard; vulnerability (home and workplace); exposed value (with reference to

  14. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, A. L. II [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-03-03

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  15. Polypropylene-rubber blends b 3: the effect of test speed on the fracture behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, A.; Wal, A.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Polypropylene–EPDM blends were prepared on a twin screw extruder with a rubber content 0–40 vol%. On these materials the yield strength and the notched tensile behaviour was studied as function of test speed (10−4–10 m/s). With an infrared temperature camera the heat development in the notched

  16. A Science and Risk-Based Pragmatic Methodology for Blend and Content Uniformity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed-Desta, Naheed; Pazhayattil, Ajay Babu; Collins, Jordan; Doshi, Chetan

    2017-12-06

    This paper describes a pragmatic approach that can be applied in assessing powder blend and unit dosage uniformity of solid dose products at Process Design, Process Performance Qualification, and Continued/Ongoing Process Verification stages of the Process Validation lifecycle. The statistically based sampling, testing, and assessment plan was developed due to the withdrawal of the FDA draft guidance for industry "Powder Blends and Finished Dosage Units-Stratified In-Process Dosage Unit Sampling and Assessment." This paper compares the proposed Grouped Area Variance Estimate (GAVE) method with an alternate approach outlining the practicality and statistical rationalization using traditional sampling and analytical methods. The approach is designed to fit solid dose processes assuring high statistical confidence in both powder blend uniformity and dosage unit uniformity during all three stages of the lifecycle complying with ASTM standards as recommended by the US FDA.

  17. Legacy Vehicle Fuel System Testing with Intermediate Ethanol Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G. W.; Hoff, C. J.; Borton, Z.; Ratcliff, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effects of E10 and E17 on legacy fuel system components from three common mid-1990s vintage vehicle models (Ford, GM, and Toyota) were studied. The fuel systems comprised a fuel sending unit with pump, a fuel rail and integrated pressure regulator, and the fuel injectors. The fuel system components were characterized and then installed and tested in sample aging test rigs to simulate the exposure and operation of the fuel system components in an operating vehicle. The fuel injectors were cycled with varying pulse widths during pump operation. Operational performance, such as fuel flow and pressure, was monitored during the aging tests. Both of the Toyota fuel pumps demonstrated some degradation in performance during testing. Six injectors were tested in each aging rig. The Ford and GM injectors showed little change over the aging tests. Overall, based on the results of both the fuel pump testing and the fuel injector testing, no major failures were observed that could be attributed to E17 exposure. The unknown fuel component histories add a large uncertainty to the aging tests. Acquiring fuel system components from operational legacy vehicles would reduce the uncertainty.

  18. Blended-Wing-Body Low-Speed Flight Dynamics: Summary of Ground Tests and Sample Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicroy, Dan D.

    2009-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests of a Blended-Wing-Body tri-jet configuration to evaluate the low-speed static and dynamic stability and control characteristics over the full envelope of angle of attack and sideslip are summarized. These data were collected for use in simulation studies of the edge-of-the-envelope and potential out-of-control flight characteristics. Some selected results with lessons learned are presented.

  19. Blended head analyses to reduce uncertainty in packer testing in fractured-rock boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Patryk; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2016-02-01

    Open boreholes in fractured rock often cross-connect fractures with differing hydraulic head and the head differences between these fractures cause vertical flow in the water column. This cross-connection has potential to bias transmissivity ( T) values obtained from straddle packer tests. This study demonstrates how measurements of the blended head in the open-hole segments above and below the straddle-packer test interval can be used to correct packer tests for cross-connection effects. A pressure response observed in the open-hole segment above and/or below the packers isolating a test interval during a hydraulic test indicates short-circuiting of water from the injection interval through the vertically connected fracture network to the open-hole segments, resulting in the overestimation of T. A method is presented using blended head concepts to minimize this error using a trial-and-error procedure to determine the short-circuiting flow rate to account for the head conditions in the open-hole segments during each hydraulic test. Observed differences between the measured head and the calculated blended head in the open-hole segments above and below the test interval are attributed to cross-connection effects around the 1-m-long packers. The head and corrected T values determined from packer tests are used to estimate the flow in and out of the open hole at each of the intervals tested for assessing the cross-connection effects under open borehole conditions. Understanding open-hole flow dynamics gives insight about the potential for vertical cross connection of chemical constituents caused by the open hole.

  20. Degradation of PVC/HC blends. II. Terrestrial plant growth test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Mihaela; Agafiţei, Gabriela-Elena; Profire, Lenuţa; Vasile, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    The behavior at degradation by soil burial of some plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) based blends with a variable content of hydrolyzed collagen (HC) has been followed. The modifications induced in the environment by the polymer systems (pH variation, physiologic state of the plants, assimilatory pigments) were studied. Using the growth test of the terrestrial plants, we followed the development of Triticum (wheat), Helianthus annus minimus (little sunflower), Pisum sativum (pea), and Vicia X hybrida hort, during a vegetation cycle. After the harvest, for each plant, the quantities of chlorophyll and carotenoidic pigments and of trace- and macroelements were determined. It was proved that, in the presence of polymer blends, the plants do not suffer morphological and physiological modifications, the products released in the culture soil being not toxic for the plants growth.

  1. Nylon-6/rubber blends: 6. Notched tensile impact testing of nylon-6(ethylene-propylene rubber) blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Krijn; Dijkstra, K.; ter Laak, J.A.; ter Laak, J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The deformation and fracture behaviour of nylon-6/EPR (ethylene-propylene rubber) blends is studied as a function of strain rate and rubber content. Therefore, tensile experiments are conducted on notched specimens over a broad range of draw speeds (including strain rates as encountered in normal

  2. In situ coronary stent paving by Pluronic F127-alginate gel blends: Formulation and erosion tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmoro, Annalisa; Barba, Anna Angela; Grassi, Mario; Grassi, Gabriele; Lamberti, Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    In this work the development of an experimental protocol to perform the in situ gel-paving of coronary stent is presented. Biocompatible aqueous blends of Pluronic F127 and sodium alginates are used as potential drug dosage system for pharmacological in situ treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis. Pluronic F127/alginate aqueous blend has the unique characteristic to be liquid at room condition and to form gel at physiological temperature. The proposed protocol is based on the blend injection on stent wall previously implanted in a flexible silicon pipe mimicking the coronary artery. Injected blend is warmed up until human body temperature achieving a soft gel, then it is reticulated by copper bivalent ions to obtain an hard gel. To test the gel paving resistance to erosion phenomena when it is exposed to fluid flux (i.e. blood flux) a dedicated device, (the Simulated Artery Device, SAD), was built to simulate the human circulatory apparatus. The SAD is an hydraulic circuit in which a buffer solution (at pH 7.4) was fluxed by a peristaltic pump through the pipe hosting the covered stent. Erosion tests were performed monitoring, by gravimetric and spectrophotometric methods, the residual mass anchored to stent mesh after given times. The obtained results showed that the in situ gel-paving developed protocol was efficacious and reliable. The gel-paving was completely eroded in a time of the same order of magnitude of the physiological period required to restore the coronary lesion (subsequent to the atheroma removal) and of a pharmacological therapy to inhibit the in-stent-restenosis pathology. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1013-1022, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Results of Aging Tests of Vendor-Produced Blended Feed Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, Renee L.; Buchmiller, William C.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is procuring through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) a minimum of five 3,500 gallon batches of waste simulant for Phase 1 testing in the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). To make sure that the quality of the simulant is acceptable, the production method was scaled up starting from laboratory-prepared simulant through 15-gallon vendor prepared simulant and 250-gallon vendor prepared simulant before embarking on the production of the 3500-gallon simulant batch by the vendor. The 3500-gallon PEP simulant batches were packaged in 250-gallon high molecular weight polyethylene totes at NOAH Technologies. The simulant was stored in an environmentally controlled environment at NOAH Technologies within their warehouse before blending or shipping. For the 15-gallon, 250-gallon, and 3500-gallon batch 0, the simulant was shipped in ambient temperature trucks with shipment requiring nominally 3 days. The 3500-gallon batch 1 traveled in a 70-75 F temperature controlled truck. Typically the simulant was uploaded in a PEP receiving tank within 24-hours of receipt. The first uploading required longer with it stored outside. Physical and chemical characterization of the 250-gallon batch was necessary to determine the effect of aging on the simulant in transit from the vendor and in storage before its use in the PEP. Therefore, aging tests were conducted on the 250-gallon batch of the vendor-produced PEP blended feed simulant to identify and determine any changes to the physical characteristics of the simulant when in storage. The supernate was also chemically characterized. Four aging scenarios for the vendor-produced blended simulant were studied: (1) stored outside in a 250-gallon tote, (2) stored inside in a gallon plastic bottle, (3) stored inside in a well mixed 5-L tank, and (4) subject to extended temperature cycling under summer temperature conditions in a gallon plastic bottle. The following

  4. Test reactor risk assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, R.H.; Rawlins, J.K.; Stewart, M.E.

    1976-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the identification of accident initiating events and the fault modeling of systems, including common mode identification, as these methods are applied in overall test reactor risk assessment. The methods are exemplified by a determination of risks to a loss of primary coolant flow in the Engineering Test Reactor

  5. Test reactor risk assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, R.H.; Rawlins, J.K.; Stewart, M.E.

    1976-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the identification of accident initiating events and the fault modeling of systems, including common mode identification, as these methods are applied in overall test reactor risk assessment. The methods are exemplified by a determination of risks to a loss of primary coolant flow in the Engineering Test Reactor.

  6. Production and Testing of Coconut Oil Biodiesel Fuel and its Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguntola J ALAMU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have successfully worked on generating energy from different alternative sources including solar and biological sources such as the conversion of trapped energy from sunlight to electricity and conversion of some renewable agricultural products to fuel. This work considers the use of coconut oil for the production of alternative renewable and environmental friendly biodiesel fuel as an alternative to conventional diesel fuel. Test quantities of coconut oil biodiesel were produced through transesterification reaction using 100g coconut oil, 20.0% ethanol (wt% coconut oil, 0.8% potassium hydroxide catalyst at 65°C reaction temperature and 120 min. reaction time. The experiment was carried out three times and average results evaluated. Low yield of the biodiesel (10.4% was obtained. The coconut oil biodiesel produced was subsequently blended with petroleum diesel and characterized as alternative diesel fuel through some ASTM standard fuel tests. The products were further evaluated by comparing specific gravity and viscosity of the biodiesel blend, the raw coconut oil and conventional petroleum diesel.

  7. Blended-Wing-Body Transonic Aerodynamics: Summary of Ground Tests and Sample Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Patel, Dharmendra

    2009-01-01

    The Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) concept has shown substantial performance benefits over conventional aircraft configuration with part of the benefit being derived from the absence of a conventional empennage arrangement. The configuration instead relies upon a bank of trailing edge devices to provide control authority and augment stability. To determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft, several wind tunnel tests were conducted with a 2% model of Boeing's BWB-450-1L configuration. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility and the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Characteristics of the configuration and the effectiveness of the elevons, drag rudders and winglet rudders were measured at various angles of attack, yaw angles, and Mach numbers (subsonic to transonic speeds). The data from these tests will be used to develop a high fidelity simulation model for flight dynamics analysis and also serve as a reference for CFD comparisons. This paper provides an overview of the wind tunnel tests and examines the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, pitch-pause versus continuous sweep data acquisition and compares the data from the two wind tunnels.

  8. POWER PERFOMANCE UNDER CONSTANT SPEED TEST WITH PALM OIL BIODIESEL AND ITS BLENDS WITH DIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. U. U. Ituen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The torque and power performance tests were carried out with a single cylinder techno four-stroke diesel engine under constant speeds of 2000, 1500 and 1100 rpm. Five fuels, the Dura Palm Oil biodiesel/diesel blend at 10/90 vol/vol, B210 and the diesel or Automotive gas oil (ago, the reference fuel, were involved. Brake torque and brake power data were plotted against brake mean effective pressure (Bmep since the latter is independent of engine speed and size and it is an indication of how power and torque are obtained per litre of fuel. The curves for the torque versus Bmep for the five fuels merged into single straight line curve which extended to the origin and with a gradient of 0.0719 m3 for all the three speed tests of 2000, 1500 and 1100 rpm. Similarly, the power versus Bmep curves for the five fuels merged into one straight curve which also extended to the origin but with different gradients of 0.0151, 0.0113, 0.0083 for 2000, 1500 and 1100 rpm respectively. Therefore, the five fuels had similar torque and power performance characteristics in the engine. The straight line curve which can be extrapolated to any value can be used for the engine designs, that is determining vd from the relation, T=V/4 or Bp=VdN/2

  9. An efficient, maintenance free and approved method for spectroscopic control and monitoring of blend uniformity: The moving F-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besseling, Rut; Damen, Michiel; Tran, Thanh; Nguyen, Thanh; van den Dries, Kaspar; Oostra, Wim; Gerich, Ad

    2015-10-10

    Dry powder mixing is a wide spread Unit Operation in the Pharmaceutical industry. With the advent of in-line Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopy and Quality by Design principles, application of Process Analytical Technology to monitor Blend Uniformity (BU) is taking a more prominent role. Yet routine use of NIR for monitoring, let alone control of blending processes is not common in the industry, despite the improved process understanding and (cost) efficiency that it may offer. Method maintenance, robustness and translation to regulatory requirements have been important barriers to implement the method. This paper presents a qualitative NIR-BU method offering a convenient and compliant approach to apply BU control for routine operation and process understanding, without extensive calibration and method maintenance requirements. The method employs a moving F-test to detect the steady state of measured spectral variances and the endpoint of mixing. The fundamentals and performance characteristics of the method are first presented, followed by a description of the link to regulatory BU criteria, the method sensitivity and practical considerations. Applications in upscaling, tech transfer and commercial production are described, along with evaluation of the method performance by comparison with results from quantitative calibration models. A full application, in which end-point detection via the F-test controls the blending process of a low dose product, was successfully filed in Europe and Australia, implemented in commercial production and routinely used for about five years and more than 100 batches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Degradation of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) / hydrolyzed collagen (HC) blends active sludge test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafiţei, Gabriela-Elena; Pascu, Mihaela; Cazacu, Georgeta; Vasile, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers represent a solution for the environment protection: they decrease the landfill space, by declining the petrochemical sources, and offer also an alternative solution for the recycling. The behavior during degradation in the presence of active sludge of some polyvinyl chloride (PVC) based blends with variable content of hydrolyzed collagen (HC) has been followed. Some samples were subjected to UV irradiation, for 30 hours. The modifications induced in the environment by the polymer systems (pH variation, bacterial composition), as well as the changes of the properties of the blends (weight losses, aspect etc.) were studied. During the first moments of degradation in active sludge, all the samples absorbed water, behavior which favored the biodegradation. The bacteriological analysis of the sludge indicates the presence of some microbiological species. Generally, the populations of microorganisms decrease, excepting the sulphito-reducing anaerobic bacteria, the actinomycetes and other anaerobic bacteria. PVC/HC blends are degraded with a significant rate in active sewage sludge. More susceptible for the degradation are the UV irradiated blends. After the migration of the components with a small molecular mass in the environment, the natural polymer is degraded. The degradation effect increases with the content in the natural polymer.

  11. The use of synthetic blended fibers to reduce cracking risk in high performance concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate a relatively new technique to control early-age cracking; the : use of blended size polypropylene fibers in high performance concrete mixtures. The key findings : from this work were that the use of drying s...

  12. Blended Course Design: Where's the Pedagogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Blended or hybrid course design is generally considered to involve a combination of online and classroom activities. However defining blended courses solely based on delivery mode suggests there is nothing more to a blended course than where students meet and how they use technology. Ultimately there is a risk that blended courses defined in this…

  13. Risk effectiveness evaluation of surveillance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Martorell, S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    To address the concerns about nuclear power plant surveillance tests, i.e., their adverse safety impact due to negative effects and too burdensome requirements, it is necessary to evaluate the safety significance or risk effectiveness of such tests explicitly considering both negative and positive effects. This paper defines the negative effects of surveillance testing from a risk perspective, and then presents a methodology to quantify the negative risk impact, i.e., the risk penalty or risk increase caused by the test. The method focuses on two important kinds of negative effects, namely, test-caused transients and test-caused equipment degradations. The concepts and quantitative methods for the risk evaluation can be used in the decision-making process to establish the safety significance of the tests and to screen the plant-specific surveillance test requirements. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Blended Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Baaren, John

    2009-01-01

    Van der Baaren, J. (2009). Blended Learning. Presentation given at the Mini symposium 'Blended Learning the way to go?'. November, 5, 2009, The Hague, The Netherlands: Netherlands Defence Academy (NDLA).

  15. Overview of Low-Speed Aerodynamic Tests on a 5.75% Scale Blended-Wing-Body Twin Jet Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Dickey, Eric; Princen, Norman; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project sponsored a series of computational and experimental investigations of the propulsion and airframe integration issues associated with Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) or Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) configurations. NASA collaborated with Boeing Research and Technology (BR&T) to conduct this research on a new twin-engine Boeing BWB transport configuration. The experimental investigations involved a series of wind tunnel tests with a 5.75-percent scale model conducted in two low-speed wind tunnels. This testing focused on the basic aerodynamics of the configuration and selection of the leading edge Krueger slat position for takeoff and landing. This paper reviews the results and analysis of these low-speed wind tunnel tests.

  16. Regularly consuming a green/roasted coffee blend reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarriá, Beatriz; Martínez-López, Sara; Sierra-Cinos, José Luis; García-Diz, Luis; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo-Clemente, Laura

    2018-02-01

    Preventive health effects of coffee could have a widespread impact on public health. Green coffee has more phenols than roasted, and thus is healthier, although with less acceptable organoleptic properties. Therefore, the effects of regularly consuming a green/roasted coffee blend (35/65) on the main components of MetS in humans were evaluated. A crossover, randomized, controlled study was performed in 25 normocholesterolaemic and 27 hypercholesterolaemic men and women aged 18-45 years with BMI 18-25 kg/m 2 . Three servings/day of the blend, providing 510.6 mg hydroxycinnamic acids and 121.2 mg caffeine/day, were consumed versus a control drink, during 8 weeks each. Polyphenol and methylxanthine-rich foods were restricted along the study. At the beginning (baseline) and end of the control and coffee interventions, blood samples were collected and glucose, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), resistin and visfatin were analysed; waist circumference, %body fat, and blood pressure were measured and dietary records and physical activity questionnaires completed. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased (p = 0.001 and p coffee consumption. Glucose concentration (p = 0.030) and insulin resistance (p = 0.011; HOMA-IR) also decreased, as well as triglyceride levels (p = 0.017), so that the reduction was much greater in the hypercholesterolaemics (group effect, p = 0.027). Regular consumption of the green/roasted coffee blend may be recommended to healthy and hypercholesterolaemic subjects to prevent MetS, as it produces positive effects on blood pressure, glucose and triglyceride levels.

  17. Steady, dynamic, creep/recovery, and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends: Temperature sweep tests and applicability of Cox-Merz rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Ali; Bayrambaş, Kadir; Eroglu, Zeynep; Toker, Omer S; Yilmaz, Mustafa T; Karaman, Safa; Dogan, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    In this study, physicochemical, rheological (steady, dynamic, and creep/recovery), and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends (0, 5, 10, and 15% molasses) were investigated. The blends showed shear thinning behavior, as described by Ostwald de Waele model (R(2) ( )≥ 0.955). Consistency coefficient value (K) of the blends decreased with increasing molasses concentration in the sample. Storage modulus (G') of blends was higher than loss modulus (G″), exhibiting weak gel-like behavior. Molasses addition decreased G' and G″ values. Temperature sweep tests indicated that blends followed Arrhenius relationship. A modified Cox-Merz rule was applicable using shift factors. Compliance values (J(t)) increased as molasses concentration increased, revealing that deformation stability and internal viscosity (η1) decreased with concentration. Creep behavior was characterized using Burger model. Obtained J data as a function of time could be satisfactorily fitted to Burger model (R(2) ( )≥ 0.994). The final percentage recovery of blends remarkably decreased with the increase of molasses concentration. Firmness, consistency, cohesiveness, and viscosity index values decreased with molasses addition. According to the results of the current study, molasses amount to be added to the yoghurt should be determined regarding rheological properties since resistance of the sample to deformation decreased with increase in molasses concentration. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Drivers of Microbial Risk for Direct Potable Reuse and de Facto Reuse Treatment Schemes: The Impacts of Source Water Quality and Blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Rabia M; Hamilton, Kerry A; Haas, Charles N; Nelson, Kara L

    2017-06-13

    Although reclaimed water for potable applications has many potential benefits, it poses concerns for chemical and microbial risks to consumers. We present a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) Monte Carlo framework to compare a de facto water reuse scenario (treated wastewater-impacted surface water) with four hypothetical Direct Potable Reuse (DPR) scenarios for Norovirus, Cryptosporidium , and Salmonella . Consumer microbial risks of surface source water quality (impacted by 0-100% treated wastewater effluent) were assessed. Additionally, we assessed risks for different blending ratios (0-100% surface water blended into advanced-treated DPR water) when source surface water consisted of 50% wastewater effluent. De facto reuse risks exceeded the yearly 10 -4 infections risk benchmark while all modeled DPR risks were significantly lower. Contamination with 1% or more wastewater effluent in the source water, and blending 1% or more wastewater-impacted surface water into the advanced-treated DPR water drove the risk closer to the 10 -4 benchmark. We demonstrate that de facto reuse by itself, or as an input into DPR, drives microbial risks more so than the advanced-treated DPR water. When applied using location-specific inputs, this framework can contribute to project design and public awareness campaigns to build legitimacy for DPR.

  19. Drivers of Microbial Risk for Direct Potable Reuse and de Facto Reuse Treatment Schemes: The Impacts of Source Water Quality and Blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Rabia M.; Hamilton, Kerry A.; Haas, Charles N.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2017-01-01

    Although reclaimed water for potable applications has many potential benefits, it poses concerns for chemical and microbial risks to consumers. We present a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) Monte Carlo framework to compare a de facto water reuse scenario (treated wastewater-impacted surface water) with four hypothetical Direct Potable Reuse (DPR) scenarios for Norovirus, Cryptosporidium, and Salmonella. Consumer microbial risks of surface source water quality (impacted by 0–100% treated wastewater effluent) were assessed. Additionally, we assessed risks for different blending ratios (0–100% surface water blended into advanced-treated DPR water) when source surface water consisted of 50% wastewater effluent. De facto reuse risks exceeded the yearly 10−4 infections risk benchmark while all modeled DPR risks were significantly lower. Contamination with 1% or more wastewater effluent in the source water, and blending 1% or more wastewater-impacted surface water into the advanced-treated DPR water drove the risk closer to the 10−4 benchmark. We demonstrate that de facto reuse by itself, or as an input into DPR, drives microbial risks more so than the advanced-treated DPR water. When applied using location-specific inputs, this framework can contribute to project design and public awareness campaigns to build legitimacy for DPR. PMID:28608808

  20. Risk based surveillance test interval optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepin, M.; Mavko, B.

    1995-01-01

    First step towards the risk based regulation is to determine the optimal surveillance test intervals for the safety equipment which is tested at nuclear power plant operation. In the paper we have presented the process of optimal surveillance test interval optimization from our perspective. It consist of three levels: component level, system level and plant level. It bases on the results of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment and is focused to minimize risk. At component and system level the risk measure is component or system mean unavailability respectively. At plant level the risk measure is core damage frequency. (author)

  1. Risk Based Optimal Fatigue Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Faber, M.H.; Kroon, I.B.

    1992-01-01

    Optimal fatigue life testing of materials is considered. Based on minimization of the total expected costs of a mechanical component a strategy is suggested to determine the optimal stress range levels for which additional experiments are to be performed together with an optimal value of the maxi......Optimal fatigue life testing of materials is considered. Based on minimization of the total expected costs of a mechanical component a strategy is suggested to determine the optimal stress range levels for which additional experiments are to be performed together with an optimal value...

  2. Risk Based Optimal Fatigue Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Faber, M.H.; Kroon, I.B.

    1992-01-01

    Optimal fatigue life testing of materials is considered. Based on minimization of the total expected costs of a mechanical component a strategy is suggested to determine the optimal stress range levels for which additional experiments are to be performed together with an optimal value...

  3. Blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    of navigating different learning environment. Blended learning is conceptualized as an ecological learning process where sociality, mobility, interactionality, structures, spatiality, identity and emotionality are central dimension affiliated to blended learning as way-finding. Based on the findings......Blended Learning has been implemented, evaluated and researched for the last decades within different educational areas and levels. Blended learning has been coupled with different epistemological understandings and learning theories, but the fundamental character and dimensions of learning...... in blended learning are still insufficient. Moreover, blended learning is a misleading concept described as learning, despite the fact that it fundamentally is an instructional and didactic approach (Oliver & Trigwell, 2005) addressing the learning environment (Inglis, Palipoana, Trenhom & Ward, 2011...

  4. Polymer blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Naik, Sanjeev

    2017-08-22

    The present invention provides, among other things, extruded blends of aliphatic polycarbonates and polyolefins. In one aspect, provided blends comprise aliphatic polycarbonates such as poly(propylene carbonate) and a lesser amount of a crystalline or semicrystalline polymer. In certain embodiments, provided blends are characterized in that they exhibit unexpected improvements in their elongation properties. In another aspect, the invention provides methods of making such materials and applications of the materials in applications such as the manufacture of consumer packaging materials.

  5. Polypropylene-rubber blends 4: the effect of the rubber particle size on the fracture behaviour at low and high test speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, A.; Wal, A.; Verheul, A.J.J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the rubber particle size and rubber content on the fracture behaviour of polypropylene–EPR blends was studied at low and high test speeds. The particle size was varied by changing the molecular weight of the EPR phase, and ranged from about 0.5 to around 4.0 μm. The fracture behaviour

  6. Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbriale, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Teachers always have been and always will be the essential element in the classroom. They can create magic inside four walls, but they have never been able to create learning environments outside the classroom like they can today, thanks to blended learning. Blended learning allows students and teachers to break free of the isolation of the…

  7. Blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Forsøg på at indkredse begrebet blended learning i forbindelse med forberedelsen af projekt FlexVid.......Forsøg på at indkredse begrebet blended learning i forbindelse med forberedelsen af projekt FlexVid....

  8. Comparative analysis of emission characteristics and noise test of an I.C. engine using different biodiesel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Alamgir; Rahman, Fariha; Mamun, Maliha; Naznin, Sadia; Rashid, Adib Bin

    2017-12-01

    Biodiesel is a captivating renewable resource providing the potential to reduce particulate emissions in compressionignition engines. A comparative study is conducted to evaluate the effects of using biodiesel on exhaust emissions. Exhaust smokiness, noise and exhaust regulated gas emissions such as carbon di oxides, carbon monoxide and oxygen are measured. It is observed that methanol-biodiesel blends (mustard oil, palm oil) cause reduction of emissions remarkably. Most of the harmful pollutants in the exhaust are reduced significantly with the use of methanol blended fuels. Reduction in CO emission is more with mustard oil blend compared to palm oil blend. Comparatively clean smoke is observed with biodiesel than diesel. It is also observed that, there is a decrease of noise while performing with biodiesel blends which is around 78 dB whereas noise caused by diesel is 80 dB. Biodiesel, more importantly mustard oil is a clean burning fuel that does not contribute to the net increase of carbon dioxide.

  9. Blended Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen giver en grundlæggende introduktion til begrebet blended learning og sætter fokus på didaktiske spørgsmål som: Hvad er blended learning? Hvilke forskellige former ser vi i dag i danske uddannelser? Hvorfor udbydes uddannelser i stigende grad i et blended learning format? Hvilke didaktiske...... principper kan man som underviser tage i brug, når man skal designe et blended learning forløb? Hvad er den grundlæggende didaktiske forskel på tilstedeværelsesundervisning og netbaseret undervisning? Og hvilke kritiske perspektiver er det vigtigt at have med, når en uddannelsesinstitution beslutter sig...... for at re-designe traditionel tilstedeværelsesundervisning til blended learning?...

  10. Fuel and Fuel Additive Registration Testing of Ethanol-Diesel Blend for O2Diesel, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanick, E. R.

    2004-02-01

    O2 Diesel Inc. (formerly AAE Technologies Inc.) tested a heavy duty engine with O2Diesel (diesel fuel with 7.7% ethanol and additives) for regulated emissions and speciation of vapor-phase and semi-volatile hydrocarbon compounds. This testing was performed in support of EPA requirements for registering designated fuels and fuel additives as stipulated by sections 211(b) and 211(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  11. Properties, degradation and high temperature fuel cell test of different types of PBI and PBI blend membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, Hans Christian; Chromik, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) with synthetically modified structures and their blends with a partially fluorinated sulfonated aromatic polyether have been prepared and characterized for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Significant improvement in the polymer chemical stability...... to further improve the polymer stability and assist maintaining the membrane integrity. Upon acid doping the membrane swelling was reduced for the modified PBI and their blend membranes, which, in turn, results in enhancement of the mechanical strength, proton conductivity and high temperature fuel cell...

  12. Blending science and community voices for multi-scale disaster risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper documents the experience of CARE International in Ethiopia in facilitating bottom-up approaches to promote community-led disaster risk management and climate change adaptation planning through a participator scenario planning (PSP) methodology. PSP is a coordinated approach which leverages a variety ...

  13. Analysis and Test Correlation of Proof of Concept Box for Blended Wing Body-Low Speed Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Regina L.

    2003-01-01

    The Low Speed Vehicle (LSV) is a 14.2% scale remotely piloted vehicle of the revolutionary Blended Wing Body concept. The design of the LSV includes an all composite airframe. Due to internal manufacturing capability restrictions, room temperature layups were necessary. An extensive materials testing and manufacturing process development effort was underwent to establish a process that would achieve the high modulus/low weight properties required to meet the design requirements. The analysis process involved a loads development effort that incorporated aero loads to determine internal forces that could be applied to a traditional FEM of the vehicle and to conduct detailed component analyses. A new tool, Hypersizer, was added to the design process to address various composite failure modes and to optimize the skin panel thickness of the upper and lower skins for the vehicle. The analysis required an iterative approach as material properties were continually changing. As a part of the material characterization effort, test articles, including a proof of concept wing box and a full-scale wing, were fabricated. The proof of concept box was fabricated based on very preliminary material studies and tested in bending, torsion, and shear. The box was then tested to failure under shear. The proof of concept box was also analyzed using Nastran and Hypersizer. The results of both analyses were scaled to determine the predicted failure load. The test results were compared to both the Nastran and Hypersizer analytical predictions. The actual failure occurred at 899 lbs. The failure was predicted at 1167 lbs based on the Nastran analysis. The Hypersizer analysis predicted a lower failure load of 960 lbs. The Nastran analysis alone was not sufficient to predict the failure load because it does not identify local composite failure modes. This analysis has traditionally been done using closed form solutions. Although Hypersizer is typically used as an optimizer for the design

  14. Polymeric Endoaortic Paving (PEAP): Mechanical, Thermoforming, and Degradation Properties of Polycaprolactone/Polyurethane Blends for Cardiovascular Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, John H.; Mertz, James A. M.; Harper, John L.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Mills, Joseph L.; McGrath, Dominic V.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric endoaortic paving (PEAP) is a process by which a polymer is endovascularly delivered and thermoformed to coat or “pave” the lumen of the aorta. This method may offer an improvement to conventional endoaortic therapy in allowing conformal graft application with reduced risk of endoleak and customization to complex patient geometries. Polycaprolactone (PCL)/polyurethane (PU) blends of various blend ratios were assessed as a potential material for PEAP by characterizing their mechanical, thermoforming, and degradation properties. Biaxial tension testing revealed that the blends' stiffness is similar to that of aortic tissue, is higher for blends with more PCL content, and may be affected by thermoforming and degradation. Tubes of blends were able to maintain a higher diameter increase after thermoforming at higher PCL content and higher heating temperatures; 50/50 blend tubes heated to 55°C were able to maintain 90% of the diameter increase applied. Delamination forces of the blends ranged from 41 to 235 N/m2. In a Pseudomonas lipase solution, the 50/50 blend had a 94% lower degradation rate than pure PCL, and the 10/90 blend exhibited no degradation. These results indicate that PEAP, consisting of a PCL/PU blend, may be useful in developing the next generation of endoaortic therapy. PMID:20832506

  15. Strain rate effects in polycarbonate/ABS blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inberg, J.P.F.; Takens, A.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene was blended in polycarbonate using a twin-screw extruder, producing dispersed and co-continuous blends. The blends were injection moulded into test bars. These materials were tested in single edge notch tensile tests as a function of test speed over a test speed range

  16. Performance Test on Compression Ignition Engine by Blending Ethanol and Waste Plastic Pyrolysis Oil with Cetane Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Ganesan, S.; Jeswin Arputhabalan, J.; Chithrala, Varun; Ganesh Bairavan, P.

    2017-05-01

    The demand for diesel fuel is higher than that of petrol throughout the world hence seeking alternative to mineral diesel is a natural choice. Alternative fuels should be easily available at lower cost, environment friendly and fulfill energy needs without modifying engine’s operational parameters. Waste to energy is the trend in the selection of alternate fuels. In this work, Waste Plastic Pyrolysis oil (WPPO), Ethanol, Diesel blend with Cetane additive has been attempted as an alternative fuel. A Twin cylinder, Direct Injection engine was used to assess the engine performance and emission characteristics of waste plastic pyrolysis oil with cetane additive. Experimental results of blended plastic fuel and diesel fuel were compared.

  17. Risk of reproductive complications following chlamydia testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Bethan; Turner, Katy M E; Frølund, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainty in the risk of reproductive complications (pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and tubal factor infertility) following chlamydia infection and repeat infection hampers the design of evidence-based chlamydia control programmes. We estimate the association between...... diagnosed chlamydia and episodes of hospital health care (inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department) for a reproductive complication. METHODS: We constructed and analysed a retrospective population-based cohort of women aged 15-44 years from administrative records in Denmark (1995-2012). We used...... a subset of the national Danish Chlamydia Study. The master dataset contains all residents of Denmark (including Greenland) who had a positive chlamydia test recorded by a public health microbiology laboratory from Jan 1, 1992, to Nov 2, 2011. Individuals were randomly matched (by age and sex) to four...

  18. Blended learning in anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    behind DBR is that new knowledge is generated through processes that simultaneously develop, test and improve a design, in this case, an educational design (1) The main principles used in the project is blended learning and flipped learning (2). …"I definitely learn best in practice, but the theory...... in working with the assignments in the classroom."... External assesor, observer and interviewer Based on the different evaluations, the conclusion are that the blended learning approach combined with the ‘flipped classroom’ is a very good way to learn and apply the anatomy, both for the students......The aim of the project was to bridge the gap between theory and practice by working more collaboratively, both peer-to-peer and between student and lecturer. Furthermore the aim was to create active learning environments. The methodology of the project is Design-Based Research (DBR). The idea...

  19. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid

  20. Code cases for implementing risk-based inservice testing in the ASME OM code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Historically inservice testing has been reasonably effective, but quite costly. Recent applications of plant PRAs to the scope of the IST program have demonstrated that of the 30 pumps and 500 valves in the typical plant IST program, less than half of the pumps and ten percent of the valves are risk significant. The way the ASME plans to tackle this overly-conservative scope for IST components is to use the PRA and plant expert panels to create a two tier IST component categorization scheme. The PRA provides the quantitative risk information and the plant expert panel blends the quantitative and deterministic information to place the IST component into one of two categories: More Safety Significant Component (MSSC) or Less Safety Significant Component (LSSC). With all the pumps and valves in the IST program placed in MSSC or LSSC categories, two different testing strategies will be applied. The testing strategies will be unique for the type of component, such as centrifugal pump, positive displacement pump, MOV, AOV, SOV, SRV, PORV, HOV, CV, and MV. A series of OM Code Cases are being developed to capture this process for a plant to use. One Code Case will be for Component Importance Ranking. The remaining Code Cases will develop the MSSC and LSSC testing strategy for type of component. These Code Cases are planned for publication in early 1997. Later, after some industry application of the Code Cases, the alternative Code Case requirements will gravitate to the ASME OM Code as appendices.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of surveillance test intervals including test-caused risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Martorell, S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1992-02-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse safety impact of surveillance testing and generally overburdensome surveillance requirements. To evaluate these concerns, the risk-effectiveness with the beneficial risk impact. This report defines the adverse effects of surveillance testing from a risk perspective, and then presents the methodology by which the adverse risk impact can be quantified, focusing on two important kinds of adverse risk impact of surveillance testing: risk impact of test-caused trips and risk impact of test-caused equipment wear. Using the methodology presented, these risk impacts are evaluated for a selected set of surveillance tests for demonstration examples. The results of the risk-effectiveness evaluation are provided along with the insights from the sensitivity analyses

  2. Channelopathies, genetic testing and risk stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Amin, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases with (disease-) specific electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics and a disease-specific risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This group includes the Long QT Syndromes (LQTS), Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT), Brugada

  3. Co-continuous polycarbonate/ABS blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inberg, J.P.F.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Co-continuous PC/ABS (50/50) blends were studied with a variable polybutadiene (PB) content (0–40%) in ABS. Polycarbonate (PC), styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) and PB were blended in two steps using a twin screw extruder. Rectangular bars were injection moulded and notched Izod impact tested at

  4. Measuring the Outcome of At-Risk Students on Biology Standardized Tests When Using Different Instructional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Dana

    Over the last two decades, online education has become a popular concept in universities as well as K-12 education. This generation of students has grown up using technology and has shown interest in incorporating technology into their learning. The idea of using technology in the classroom to enhance student learning and create higher achievement has become necessary for administrators, teachers, and policymakers. Although online education is a popular topic, there has been minimal research on the effectiveness of online and blended learning strategies compared to the student learning in a traditional K-12 classroom setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in standardized test scores from the Biology End of Course exam when at-risk students completed the course using three different educational models: online format, blended learning, and traditional face-to-face learning. Data was collected from over 1,000 students over a five year time period. Correlation analyzed data from standardized tests scores of eighth grade students was used to define students as "at-risk" for failing high school courses. The results indicated a high correlation between eighth grade standardized test scores and Biology End of Course exam scores. These students were deemed "at-risk" for failing high school courses. Standardized test scores were measured for the at-risk students when those students completed Biology in the different models of learning. Results indicated significant differences existed among the learning models. Students had the highest test scores when completing Biology in the traditional face-to-face model. Further evaluation of subgroup populations indicated statistical differences in learning models for African-American populations, female students, and for male students.

  5. Radon risk perception and testing: Sociodemographic correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, M.T.; Warner, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    While numerous health education campaigns have been carried out to alert the public to radon's potential dangers and to encourage testing and mitigation, there has been little follow-up to determine which segments of the public are now most aware of the possible hazards of radon. Using information from the 1990 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the authors have examined beliefs regarding radon and radon-testing activities among different sociodemographic groups. They used logistic regression to determine the relationship between these beliefs and actions and age, gender, education, income, minority status, and smoking status. The results suggest relatively superficial knowledge regarding radon, and very little testing, within the survey population. In particular, significantly less knowledge was observed among female and minority respondents, while less testing behavior was seen among older respondents. Lower educational levels and lower family income were associated with both decreased knowledge and testing. Recommendations for future education campaigns are discussed

  6. Polypropylene-rubber blends 2: the effect of the rubber content and temperature on the fracture behaviour at low and high test speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, A.; van der Wal, A.; Nijhof, R.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the rubber content on the deformation and impact behaviour of polypropylene–EPDM rubber blends is studied. The blends are made on a twin screw extruder. The rubber content ranged from 0 to 40 vol.%. The tensile modulus and the yield stress decrease linearly with increasing rubber

  7. Interpreting a Successful Testing Process: Risk and Actual Coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Timmer, Mark; Chin, W.N.; Qin, S.

    Testing is inherently incomplete; no test suite will ever be able to test all possible usage scenarios of a system. It is therefore vital to assess the implication of a system passing a test suite. This paper quantifies that implication by means of two distinct, but related, measures: the risk

  8. Channelopathies, genetic testing and risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Amin, Ahmad

    2017-06-15

    The cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases with (disease-) specific electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics and a disease-specific risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This group includes the Long QT Syndromes (LQTS), Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT), Brugada Syndrome (BrS), Short QT Syndromes (SQTS), and Early Repolarization Syndrome (ERS). In the past 2 decades the genetic basis for these disease entities has largely been unraveled and that, together with the identification of the genetic basis of the cardiomyopathies, has paved the way for the complete new field of Cardiogenetics. By virtue of the identification of the genetic underpinning of a given disease, presymptomatic carriers of the genetic aberrancy can be identified and timely treatment can be installed. In addition, it has become clear that the pathophysiological substrate of some diseases previously considered to be one disease is not identical, and this has led to gene-specific treatment in some and complete new treatment, based on the newly developed insight, in others. Finally, the genetic information proved to be important in the prediction of risk on lethal ventricular arrhythmias of affected individuals and that is the topic of this brief review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of three attractant blends tested in combination with carbon dioxide against natural populations of mosquitoes and biting flies at the Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Daniel L; Bernier, Ulrich R; Hogsette, Jerome A

    2012-06-01

    Synthetic blends of chemicals identified previously from human skin emanations were evaluated against mosquito and biting fly populations at the Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge near Cedar Key, FL. Mosquito Magnet-Experimental traps were baited with the Red (400 ml acetone: 10 ml 1-hexen-3-ol:10 ml 1-octen-3-ol), Blue (400 ml acetone: 1 g/liter lactic acid:20 ml glycolic acid), or Green blend (400 ml acetone:1.5 g/liter lactic acid:20 ml dimethyl disulfide) plus CO2 or with CO2 alone (control). A relative index of efficacy was determined by dividing each mean blend trap catch by the mean control trap catch. Five mosquitoes (Aedes infirmatus, Ae. taeniorhynchus, Ae. triseriatus, Anopheles crucians, and Culex nigripalpus), 2 ceratopogonid (Culicoides floridensis and C. furens), and 1 tabanid (Diachlorus ferrugatus) and phlebotomine (Lutzomyia shannoni) species were trapped. The Red blend + CO2 treatment significantly increased collections of Ae. taeniorhynchus (3.4x), An. crucians (2.8X), total mosquitoes (2.7x), C. furens (17.6x), and L. shannoni (10.8x) compared with control traps. Traps baited with either the Blue or Green blends generally captured fewer insects than traps baited with the other 2 treatments. However, traps baited with the Green blend caught 7 x as many C. furens as the control traps. Responses clearly varied according to species; therefore, "one size does not fit all" when it comes to attractant blends.

  10. Bankruptcy risk model and empirical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M; Urosevic, Branko; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-10-26

    We analyze the size dependence and temporal stability of firm bankruptcy risk in the US economy by applying Zipf scaling techniques. We focus on a single risk factor--the debt-to-asset ratio R--in order to study the stability of the Zipf distribution of R over time. We find that the Zipf exponent increases during market crashes, implying that firms go bankrupt with larger values of R. Based on the Zipf analysis, we employ Bayes's theorem and relate the conditional probability that a bankrupt firm has a ratio R with the conditional probability of bankruptcy for a firm with a given R value. For 2,737 bankrupt firms, we demonstrate size dependence in assets change during the bankruptcy proceedings. Prepetition firm assets and petition firm assets follow Zipf distributions but with different exponents, meaning that firms with smaller assets adjust their assets more than firms with larger assets during the bankruptcy process. We compare bankrupt firms with nonbankrupt firms by analyzing the assets and liabilities of two large subsets of the US economy: 2,545 Nasdaq members and 1,680 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) members. We find that both assets and liabilities follow a Pareto distribution. The finding is not a trivial consequence of the Zipf scaling relationship of firm size quantified by employees--although the market capitalization of Nasdaq stocks follows a Pareto distribution, the same distribution does not describe NYSE stocks. We propose a coupled Simon model that simultaneously evolves both assets and debt with the possibility of bankruptcy, and we also consider the possibility of firm mergers.

  11. Blended food for enteral feeding via a gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Suzanne

    2014-11-01

    A blended diet for enteral nutrition is defined as home-made everyday food blended to a smooth 'single cream' consistency. At present, blended food is not recommended as a first choice. However, the wishes of parents who prefer to use blended food for their child need to be respected, and hospice policy for Children's Hospice South West is to replicate home conditions as far as possible. Therefore guidelines have been created for use of a blended diet. However, benefits in physical and emotional health need to be balanced against risks of tube blockage, contamination and digestive upsets.

  12. Formulation, physicochemical characterization, and in vitro study of chitosan/HPMC blends-based herbal blended patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksaeree, Jirapornchai; Monton, Chaowalit; Madaka, Fameera; Chusut, Tun; Saingam, Worawan; Pichayakorn, Wiwat; Boonme, Prapaporn

    2015-02-01

    The current work prepared chitosan/hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) blends and studied the possibility of chitosan/HPMC blended patches for Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. The blended patches without/with crude Z. cassumunar oil were prepared by homogeneously mixing the 3.5% w/v of chitosan solution and 20% w/v of HPMC solution, and glycerine was used as plasticizer. Then, they were poured into Petri dish and produced the blended patches in hot air oven at 70 ± 2°C. The blended patches were tested and evaluated by the physicochemical properties: moisture uptake, swelling ratio, erosion, porosity, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction, and photographed the surface and cross-section morphology under SEM technique. Herbal blended patches were studied by the in vitro release and skin permeation of active compound D. The blended patches could absorb the moisture and became hydrated patches that occurred during the swelling of blended patches. They were eroded and increased by the number of porous channels to pass through out for active compound D. In addition, the blended patches indicated the compatibility of the blended ingredients and homogeneous smooth and compact. The blended patches made from chitosan/HPMC blends provide a controlled release and skin permeation behavior of compound D. Thus, the blended patches could be suitably used for herbal medicine application.

  13. Reducing eating disorder risk factors: a controlled investigation of a blended task-shifting/train-the-trainer approach to dissemination and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpela, Lisa Smith; Hill, Kaitlin; Kelly, Mackenzie C; Elmquist, Joanna; Ottoson, Paige; Keith, Demetra; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Becker, Carolyn Black

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in psychological intervention research have led to an increase in evidence-based interventions (EBIs), yet there remains a lag in dissemination and implementation of EBIs. Task-shifting and the train-the-trainer (TTT) model offer two potential strategies for enhancing reach of EBIs. The Body Project, an EBI found to prevent onset of eating disorders, served as the vehicle for this dissemination/implementation study. The primary aim of this study was to determine if training of peer-leaders for the Body Project could be task-shifted to undergraduate students using a hybrid task-shifting/TTT model. Our secondary aim was to determine if subgroups of participants evidenced different trajectories of change through 14-month follow-up. Regarding the first aim, we found almost no evidence to suggest that a presence of a doctoral-level trainer yielded superior participant outcomes compared to training by undergraduates alone. Regarding Aim 2, almost all classes for all variables evidenced improvement or a benign response. Additionally, for three key risk factors (thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, and ED symptoms) virtually all trajectories showed improvement. This study provides initial support for the use of a blended task-shifting/TTT approach to dissemination and implementation within prevention generally, and further support for broad dissemination of the Body Project specifically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Negative HPV screening test predicts low cervical cancer risk better than negative Pap test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on a study that included more than 1 million women, investigators at NCI have determined that a negative test for HPV infection compared to a negative Pap test provides greater safety, or assurance, against future risk of cervical cancer.

  15. Risk factors for positive tuberculin tests in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo Sidhi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Tuberculosis (TB is a chronic infectious disease and a public health problem. The World Health Organization (WHO declared TB to be a global emergency because of currently increasing rates of disease and drug resistance. Two million people die annually because of TB. Children are one of the highest groups at risk for TB infection. An effort to define risk factors is needed for effective intervention. Objective To identify risk factors for positive tuberculin tests in children. Methods This case control study was done in elementary school children aged 8–12 years in areas served by three community health centers in Semarang. Twenty-nine subjects were Mantoux positive and 29 others served as controls. Consecutive sampling was used for all negative Mantoux test results. Pulmonary TB was diagnosed using the TB scoring system, including the Mantoux test. Statistical bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results History of household TB contact as a risk factor for positive tuberculin test in children resulted in an OROR of 3.76 (95% CI 1.059 to 13.342, P=0.040. History of illness at the time of testing resulted in an OR of 10.23 (95% CI 1.138 to 91.930, P=0.038. The probability of positive tuberculin testing was 90.7% if both these variables were positive. Conclusion History of household TB contact and the history of illness at the time of testing were risk factors for positive tuberculin tests in children.

  16. Stress Testing as a Tool of Bank Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonyuk Oksana I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is development of theoretical, methodological and practical recommendations on the use of stress testing by Ukrainian commercial banks. Stress testing is defined as a part of bank risk management on the basis of scientific studies of domestic and foreign scientists. The article marks the essence of the bank stress testing and identifies its role in the structure of banks’ risk management in Ukraine. It considers goals of conducting stress testing in banking institutions. It identifies main aspects and specific features of conducting stress testing of bank risks. It characterises main advantages and shortcomings of use of stress testing in the modern bank risk management. It generalises the world and European approaches to the methods of conducting stress testing in commercial banks in comparison with the Ukrainian methodical recommendations. It shows that results of stress testing have practical value, since they help to preliminary assess influence of potentially negative events upon the state of the loan portfolio of the bank and make relevant managerial decisions.

  17. Committee Opinion No. 724: Consumer Testing for Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    With the increased emphasis on patient-driven health care and readily available access to patients through the internet and media, many genetic testing companies have begun to market directly to consumers. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing raises unique concerns and considerations, including limited knowledge among patients and health care providers of available genetic tests, difficulty in interpretation of genetic test results, lack of oversight of companies that offer genetic testing, and issues of privacy and confidentiality. When undergoing any direct-to-consumer genetic testing, the consumer should be apprised of risk from screening or susceptibility test results that can neither prove nor eliminate disease potential. Because ordering an appropriate genetic test and interpretation of genetic test results are complex, an obstetrician-gynecologist or other health care provider with knowledge of genetics should be involved in ordering and interpreting the results of any genetic test with medical implications. When an individual presents test results to a health care provider from a direct-to-consumer genomic test that putatively assesses the risk of specific diseases, the patient should be referred to an obstetrician-gynecologist or other health care provider who is skilled in risk assessment for the diseases of interest and interpretation of genetic testing results in the context of the individual's relevant medical and family history. Because of these considerations and in view of the fact that the interpretation of the results requires specific training and medical knowledge, direct-to-consumer genetic testing should be discouraged because of the potential harm of a misinterpreted or inaccurate result.

  18. Committee Opinion No. 724 Summary: Consumer Testing for Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    With the increased emphasis on patient-driven health care and readily available access to patients through the internet and media, many genetic testing companies have begun to market directly to consumers. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing raises unique concerns and considerations, including limited knowledge among patients and health care providers of available genetic tests, difficulty in interpretation of genetic test results, lack of oversight of companies that offer genetic testing, and issues of privacy and confidentiality. When undergoing any direct-to-consumer genetic testing, the consumer should be apprised of risk from screening or susceptibility test results that can neither prove nor eliminate disease potential. Because ordering an appropriate genetic test and interpretation of genetic test results are complex, an obstetrician-gynecologist or other health care provider with knowledge of genetics should be involved in ordering and interpreting the results of any genetic test with medical implications. When an individual presents test results to a health care provider from a direct-to-consumer genomic test that putatively assesses the risk of specific diseases, the patient should be referred to an obstetrician-gynecologist or other health care provider who is skilled in risk assessment for the diseases of interest and interpretation of genetic testing results in the context of the individual's relevant medical and family history. Because of these considerations and in view of the fact that the interpretation of the results requires specific training and medical knowledge, direct-to-consumer genetic testing should be discouraged because of the potential harm of a misinterpreted or inaccurate result.

  19. Pain on Functional Movement Screen Tests and Injury Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Timothy T; Grier, Tyson L; Canham-Chervak, Michelle C; Anderson, Morgan K; North, William J; Jones, Bruce H

    2015-11-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a tool intended to evaluate limitations or asymmetries of movement to detect individuals at risk for exercise- and sports-related injury. The purpose was to determine the association and predictive value of specific FMS tests with injury risk in physically active men. Soldiers aged 18-57 years completed the FMS (n = 2,476). Demographic and fitness data were collected by survey. Medical record data for any, overuse, and traumatic injury 6 months after the assessment were obtained. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were calculated along with receiver operator characteristics to determine area under the curve (AUC). Risks, risk ratios, odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to assess injury risks. Multivariate logistic regression identified that pain on 5 of the 7 tests was associated with greater risk for any injury (OR = 1.50-3.51): deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, trunk stability push-up, and rotary stability. However, FMS registered low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC for all 7 tests for the 3 injury types (2-24% sensitivity, 16-74% PPV, and 50-58% AUC). Although the presence of pain was associated with a higher risk of injury on 5 tests, a low sensitivity, PPV, and AUC were displayed. Therefore, caution is advised when implementing the FMS as a screening tool in an Army or similarly active population as it could lead to prevention and treatment resources being directed toward individuals who are not at greater risk for injury.

  20. Modification of risk assessment value to test industry reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshian, Shahryar

    2015-05-01

    This paper is in a form of a technical note, in which modified method of industry reliability analysis is reviewed. This paper introduces a multi-expert approach group decision making analysis for Risk Assessment Value (RAV), which directly tests the reliability of the system (industry). A case of construction industry has been studied for verification of the method. Reviewed RAV modified technique helps to assess the value of industry reliability; and brings contribution to the body of risk management knowledge.

  1. Testing the cultural theory of risk in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenot, J.; Bonnefous, S. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nuclaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Marris, C. [Economie-Humanisme, Lyon (France)

    1998-12-01

    Cultural Theory, as developed by Mary Douglas, argues that differing risk perceptions can be explained by reference to four distinct cultural biases: hierarchy, egalitarianism, individualism, and fatalism. This paper presents empirical results from a quantitative survey based on a questionnaire devised by Karl Dake to measure these cultural biases. A large representative sample was used to test this instrument in the French social context. Correlations between cultural biases and perceptions of 20 social and environmental risks were examined. These correlations were very weak, but were statistically significant: cultural biases explained 6%, at most, of the variance in risk perceptions. Standard socio-demographic variables were also weakly related to risk perceptions (especially gender, social class, and education), and cultural biases and socio-demographic variables were themselves intercorrelated (especially with age, social class, and political outlook). The authors compare these results with surveys conducted in other countries using the same instrument and conclude that new methods, more qualitative and contextual, still need to be developed to investigate the cultural dimensions of risk perceptions. The paper also discusses relationships between perceptions of personal and residual risk, and between perceived risk and demand for additional safety measures. These three dimensions were generally closely related, but interesting differences were observed for some risk issues. Included in the list of risk perceptions were pollution, hazardous materials, and radioactive wastes.

  2. Testing the cultural theory of risk in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenot, J.; Bonnefous, S.; Marris, C.

    1998-01-01

    Cultural Theory, as developed by Mary Douglas, argues that differing risk perceptions can be explained by reference to four distinct cultural biases: hierarchy, egalitarianism, individualism, and fatalism. This paper presents empirical results from a quantitative survey based on a questionnaire devised by Karl Dake to measure these cultural biases. A large representative sample was used to test this instrument in the French social context. Correlations between cultural biases and perceptions of 20 social and environmental risks were examined. These correlations were very weak, but were statistically significant: cultural biases explained 6%, at most, of the variance in risk perceptions. Standard socio-demographic variables were also weakly related to risk perceptions (especially gender, social class, and education), and cultural biases and socio-demographic variables were themselves intercorrelated (especially with age, social class, and political outlook). The authors compare these results with surveys conducted in other countries using the same instrument and conclude that new methods, more qualitative and contextual, still need to be developed to investigate the cultural dimensions of risk perceptions. The paper also discusses relationships between perceptions of personal and residual risk, and between perceived risk and demand for additional safety measures. These three dimensions were generally closely related, but interesting differences were observed for some risk issues. Included in the list of risk perceptions were pollution, hazardous materials, and radioactive wastes

  3. Identifying Some Risk Factors for the Time to Death of the Elderly Using the Semi-Parametric Blended Model of Survival Analysis With Competing Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samane Hajiabbasi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion In single-variable fitting, age, history of myocardial infarction, history of stroke, and kidney problems were identified to have significant effects on the time to death of the elderly. Based on one-variable semi-parametric competing risk mixture fitted models, more significant risk factors for the time to death of elderly was identified when compared with a fitted multivariate mode to the data. This implies that the role of some independent variables can be explained by other independent variables.

  4. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Risk Reduction Cryo Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Scorse, Thomas R.; Spina, John A.; Noel, Darin M.; Havey, Keith A., Jr.; Huguet, Jesse A.; Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Walker, Chanda B.; Lunt, Sharon; hide

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Optical Ground Support Equipment was integrated into the large cryo vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center (JSC) and an initial Chamber Commissioning Test was completed. This insured that the support equipment was ready for the three Pathfinder telescope cryo tests. The Pathfinder telescope which consists of two primary mirror segment assemblies and the secondary mirror was delivered to JSC in February 2015 in support of this critical risk reduction test program prior to the flight hardware. This paper will detail the Chamber Commissioning and first optical test of the JWST Pathfinder telescope.

  5. Tuning the Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    "Tuning the blend" is a phrase that educators hear a lot these days. It refers to finding the correct balance of online activities and face-to-face instruction in hybrid--or blended--courses. Finding a mix that meets the needs of both faculty and students requires experimentation, experience, and constant tweaking. And, as with coffee, the same…

  6. Investigation of diesel-ethanol blended fuel properties with palm methyl ester as co-solvent and blends enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Taib Norhidayah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engine is known as the most efficient engine with high efficiency and power but always reported as high fuel emission. Malaysia National Automotive Policy (NAP was targeting to improve competitive regional focusing on green technology development in reducing the emission of the engine. Therefore, ethanol was introduced to reduce the emission of the engine and while increasing its performance, Palm methyl ester was introduced as blend enhancer to improve engine performance and improve diesel-ethanol blends stability. This paper aimed to study the characteristics of the blends and to prove the ability of palm-methyl-ester as co-solvent in ethanol-diesel blends. Stability and thermophysical test were carried out for different fuel compositions. The stability of diesel-ethanol blended was proved to be improved with the addition of PME at the longer period and the stability of the blends changed depending on temperature and ethanol content. Density and viscosity of diesel-ethanol-PME blends also give higher result than diesel-ethanol blends and it's proved that PME is able to increase density and viscosity of blends. Besides, heating value of the blends also increases with the increasing PME in diesel-ethanol blends.

  7. Efficacy of three attractant blends tested in combination with carbon dioxide against natural populations of mosquitoes and biting flies at the lower suwannee wildlife refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic blends composed of chemicals identified previously as emanations from human skin were evaluated against natural populations of mosquitoes and biting flies at the Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge located near Cedar Key, FL. Mosquito Magnet™-Experimental (MM-X) traps were baited with one of t...

  8. Comparative effectiveness of 50g glucose challenge test and risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Gestational diabeles mellitus (GDM) complicates 3- 5% of pregnancies. Prompt diagnosis helps to prevent its subsequent complications and one-step effective screening method is desirable for our environment. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of 50g glucose challenge test (GCT) with risk factors alone in ...

  9. Population-based, risk-stratified genetic testing for ovarian cancer risk: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, S F; Side, L; Fraser, L; Gessler, S; Wardle, J; Lanceley, A

    2013-01-01

    A population-based risk stratification programme for ovarian cancer (OC) may improve OC survival by identifying women at increased risk and implementing an appropriate risk management strategy. The present study explored attitudes towards an OC risk stratification programme incorporating predictive genetic testing and risk-stratified screening as part of a larger study investigating OC screening. Focus groups consisting of 56 members of the general public (mean age 45 years; 34% non-white) were conducted using a hypothetical scenario. The group sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework Analysis. There was strong support for the proposed programme. Genetic testing and risk-stratified screening was thought to raise awareness, offer reassurance and offer opportunities for early intervention. Anxiety was only mentioned in relation to receiving a diagnosis of OC and not with screening per se. Perhaps because lay models of cancer already embrace both environmental and genetic factors, a low-risk result was not anticipated to result in a false sense of immunity. Unexpectedly, participants also wanted to receive cancer prevention advice in conjunction with genetic testing; screening alone was not regarded as sufficient. The encouraging results from this small study warrant further large-scale research into risk-stratified OC screening. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-01-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety

  11. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-12-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety.

  12. Kinetic and morphological differentiation of Ettringites in plain and blended Portland cements using Metakaolin and the ASTM C 452-68 test. Part I: kinetic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talero, R.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this first part of the study, the results obtained in prior research with XRD and SEM, as well as the Le Chatelier-Ansttet test were confirmed with the ASTM C 452-68 test. To this end, 20%, 30% and 40% metakaolin (MK was added to ten Portland cements, six OPCs and four SRPCs. Both the ten plain PCs and the 30 metakaolin (MK blends were tested for two years under ASTM C 452-68 specifications, determining not only the percentage increase in length, ΔL(%, of the specimens, but also the sulphate content in the curing water. Other parameters studied included: chemical analysis of the cementitious materials used and specific properties of some of the cements tested.The experimental results, ΔL(% versus time, re-confirmed that the formation rate of ettringite from the reactive alumina, Al2O3r-, present in the pozzolan must be substantially higher than the formation rate of ettringite from the C3A present in the PC. This was verified by the variation of the sulphate content in the specimen curing water throughout the test. In light of those findings, in this article these two types of ettringite are denominated rapid forming ettringite or ett-rf, and slow forming ettringite or ett-lf.En esta Parte I de la investigación, se han logrado verificar mediante el ensayo ASTM C 452-68, los resultados obtenidos en anteriores investigaciones realizadas con DRX y SEM y el ensayo Le Chatelier-Ansttet. Para ello, a 10 cementos Portland –6 CPO y 4 CPRS– se les añadió 20%, 30% y 40% de metakaolín (MK. Tanto los 10 CP como los 30 de sus mezclas con metakaolín (MK, se ensayaron durante 2 años, mediante dicho método ASTM C 452-68, y a sus probetas no sólo se les determinó su incremento porcentual de longitud, ΔL(%, sino además, el contenido de sulfatos de sus aguas de conservación. Otras determinaciones complementarias fueron: análisis químico de los materiales cementiceos utilizados y propiedades específicas de algunos cementos ensayados

  13. Investigations on the effects of ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends in a spark-ignition engine: Performance and emissions analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Elfasakhany, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    This study discusses performance and exhaust emissions from spark-ignition engine fueled with ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends. The test results obtained with the use of low content rates of ethanol–methanol blends (3–10 vol.%) in gasoline were compared to ethanol–gasoline blends, methanol–gasoline blends and pure gasoline test results. Combustion and emission characteristics of ethanol, methanol and gasoline and their blends were evaluated. Results showed that when the vehicle was fueled wit...

  14. Systematic Methodology for Design of Tailor-Made Blended Products: Fuels and Other Blended Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza Binti

    A tailor-made blended liquid product is defined as a formulation of various chemicals in the liquid state to obtain a liquid mixture with a specific set of desired characteristics and qualities. Examples of blended liquid products are synthetic fuels and lubricants. This type of products is very ...... methodology and tools was tested through two case studies. In the first case study, two different gasoline blend problems have been solved. In the second case study, four different lubricant design problems have been solved....

  15. Emissions characteristics of higher alcohol/gasoline blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, M.; Martin, D.W.; Carder, D.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the emissions characteristics of higher alcohols and gasoline (UTG96) blends. While lower alcohols (methanol and ethanol) have been used in blends with gasoline, very little work has been done or reported on higher alcohols (propanol, butanol and pentanol). Comparisons of emissions and fuel characteristics between higher alcohol/gasoline blends and neat gasoline were made to determine the advantages and disadvantages of blending higher alcohols with gasoline. All tests were conducted on a single-cylinder Waukesha Cooperative Fuel Research engine operating at steady state conditions and stoichiometric air-fuel (A/F) ratio. Emissions test were conducted at the optimum spark timing-knock limiting compression ratio combination for the particular blend being tested. The cycle emission [mass per unit time (g/h)] of CO, CO 2 and organic matter hydrocarbon equivalent (OMHCE) from the higher alcohol/gasoline blends were very similar to those from neat gasoline. Cycle emissions of NO x from the blends were higher than those from neat gasoline. However, for all the emissions species considered, the brake specific emissions (g/kW h) were significantly lower for the higher alcohol/gasoline blends than for neat gasoline. This was because the blends had greater resistance to knock and allowed higher compression ratios, which increased engine power output. The contribution of alcohols and aldehydes to the overall OMHCE emissions was found to be minimal. Cycle fuel consumption (g/h) of higher alcohol/gasoline blends was slightly higher than with neat gasoline due to the lower stoichiometric A/F ratios required by the blends. However, the brake specific fuel consumption (g/kW h) for the blends was significantly lower than that for neat gasoline. (Author)

  16. Ethnicity and HIV risk behaviour, testing and knowledge in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tory M; Hembling, John; Bertrand, Jane T

    2015-01-01

    To describe levels of risky sexual behaviour, HIV testing and HIV knowledge among men and women in Guatemala by ethnic group and to identify adjusted associations between ethnicity and these outcomes. Data on 16,205 women aged 15-49 and 6822 men aged 15-59 from the 2008-2009 Encuesta Nacional de Salud Materno Infantil were used to describe ethnic group differences in sexual behaviour, HIV knowledge and testing. We then controlled for age, education, wealth and other socio-demographic factors in a multivariate logistic regression model to examine the effects of ethnicity on outcomes related to age at sexual debut, number of lifetime sex partners, comprehensive HIV knowledge, HIV testing and lifetime sex worker patronage (men only). The data show low levels of risky sexual behaviour and low levels of HIV knowledge among indigenous women and men, compared to other respondents. Controlling for demographic factors, indigenous women were more likely than other women never to have been tested for HIV and to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge. They were less likely to report early sexual debut and three or more lifetime sexual partners. Indigenous men were more likely than other men to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge and demonstrated lower odds of early sexual debut, 10 or more lifetime sexual partners and sex worker patronage. The Mayan indigenous population in Guatemala, while broadly socially vulnerable, does not appear to be at elevated risk for HIV based on this analysis of selected risk factors. Nonetheless, low rates of HIV knowledge and testing may be cause for concern. Programmes working in indigenous communities should focus on HIV education and reducing barriers to testing. Further research into the factors that underlie ethnic self-identity and perceived ethnicity could help clarify the relative significance of these measures for HIV risk and other health outcomes.

  17. MOOC Blended learning ontwikkelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verjans, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Presentatie over het ontwerpen van leeractiviteiten (learning design) tijdens de zesde live sessie van de MOOC Blended learning ontwikkelen. Met gebruikmaking van presentatiematerialen van Diana Laurillard, Grainne Conole, Helen Beetham, Jos Fransen, Pieter Swager, Helen Keegan, Corinne Weisgerber.

  18. Fuel Property Blend Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagnon, Scott J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Kuiwen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kukkadapu, Goutham [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    The object of this project is to develop chemical models and associated correlations to predict the blending behavior of bio-derived fuels when mixed with conventional fuels like gasoline and diesel fuels.

  19. Market risk stress testing for internationally active financial institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Petar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper develops a comprehensive framework for market risk stress testing in internationally active financial institutions. We begin by defining the scope and type of the stress test and explaining how to select risk factors and the stress time horizon. We then address challenges related to data gathering, followed by in-depth discussion of techniques for developing realistic shock scenarios. Next the process of shock application to a particular portfolio is described, followed by determination of portfolio profit and loss. We conclude by briefly discussing the issue of assigning probability to stress scenarios. We illustrate the framework by considering the development of a ‘worst case’ scenario using global financial market data from Thomson Reuters Datastream.

  20. Polyethylene/hydrophilic polymer blends for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynda, E; Houska, M; Novikova, S P; Dobrova, N B

    1987-01-01

    Polyethylene blends with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [poly(HEMA)] or poly(2,3-dihydroxypropyl methacrylate) [poly(DHPMA)] were prepared by swelling polyethylene with HEMA or 2,3-epoxypropyl methacrylate (EPMA) and by polymerization of the respective monomers. Poly(EPMA) in blends was hydrolysed to poly(DHPMA) with acetic acid. The blends had similar surface and bulk compositions. Swelling with water and surface wettability were proportional to the content of the hydrophilic component; at the same content the polyethylene/poly(DHPMA) blends appeared more hydrophilic than those of polyethylene/poly(HEMA). Thrombus formation in contact with blood examined ex vivo and in vivo was considerably slower on the blends than on unmodified polyethylene. The tests indicated optima in composition; the best biological response was achieved with the blends containing about 14% poly(HEMA) or 16% poly(DHPMA).

  1. Oxidative stability of fish oil blended with butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, M; Konishi, H; Tatsumi, K

    1999-09-01

    The oxidative stability of fish oil blended with milk products was evaluated. Oxidation of the oil blend was determined by peroxide value and rancimat test. Improved oxidative stability was observed for fish oil blended with butter. Unsalted and salted butters showed no difference in improvement of effect on oxidative stability of fish oil. No influence on oxidative stability for the fish oil was observed with butter oil, which was the oil fraction of butter. These studies suggested that the improved oxidative stability of fish oil-butter blend was due to the hydrophilic fraction of butter and that butter could improve the oxidative stability of polyunsaturated oils such as fish oil.

  2. Would you test for 5000 Shillings? HIV risk and willingness to accept HIV testing in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Jan; Brown, Derek S; Mühlbacher, Axel; Njau, Bernard; Thielman, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    Despite substantial public health efforts to increase HIV testing, testing rates have plateaued in many countries and rates of repeat testing for those with ongoing risk are low. To inform policies aimed at increasing uptake of HIV testing, we identified characteristics associated with individuals' willingness-to-accept (WTA) an HIV test in a general population sample and among two high-risk populations in Moshi, Tanzania. In total, 721 individuals, including randomly selected community members (N = 402), female barworkers (N = 135), and male Kilimanjaro mountain porters (N = 184), were asked in a double-bounded contingent valuation format if they would test for HIV in exchange for 2000, 5000 or 10,000 Shillings (approximately $1.30, $3.20, and $6.40, respectively). The study was conducted between September 2012 and February 2013. More than one quarter of participants (196; 27 %) stated they would be willing to test for Tanzania Shilling (TSH) 2000, whereas one in seven (98; 13.6 %) required more than TSH 10,000. The average WTA estimate was TSH 4564 (95 % Confidence Interval: TSH 4201 to 4927). Significant variation in WTA estimates by gender, HIV risk factors and other characteristics plausibly reflects variation in individuals' valuations of benefits of and barriers to testing. WTA estimates were higher among males than females. Among males, WTA was nearly one-third lower for those who reported symptoms of HIV than those who did not. Among females, WTA estimates varied with respondents' education, own and partners' HIV testing history, and lifetime reports of transactional sex. For both genders, the most significant association was observed with respondents' perception of the accuracy of the HIV test; those believing HIV tests to be completely accurate were willing to test for approximately one third less than their counterparts. The mean WTA estimates identified in this study suggest that within the study population, incentivized universal HIV

  3. Mistura de biodiesel de sebo bovino em motor diesel durante 600 horas Blend of biodiesel from beef tallow in a diesel engine during 600 hours of tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ila Maria Corrêa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available O biodiesel de sebo bovino é considerado uma alternativa de baixo custo e de grande disponibilidade por ser resíduo da produção agropecuária brasileira, que é uma das maiores do mundo. Raros são os trabalhos que mostram a utilização do biodiesel de sebo bovino em motores diesel. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar o efeito da mistura de biodiesel bovino na proporção de 5% ao óleo diesel comercial no desempenho do motor, possíveis consequências internas no motor e nas características do óleo lubrificante após o uso prolongado em motor diesel. Foram realizados ensaios em bancada dinamométrica utilizando um trator agrícola. O desempenho do motor foi determinado através da tomada de potência (TDP. O motor foi operado por 600h durante as quais foi determinada a potência, o consumo de combustível e analisadas as amostras de óleo lubrificante a cada 100h. Ao final do ensaio, o motor foi aberto e inspecionado. A análise do óleo lubrificante mostrou nível de contaminação crítico a partir das 400h, mas a inspeção visual do motor não detectou nenhum desgaste interno. O motor funcionou normalmente, embora tenha ocorrido tendência de redução na potência e aumento de consumo de combustível ao longo das 600h.Biodiesel from beef tallow has been considered a low-cost and high availability alternative due to be residue from the Brazilian livestock production, one of the world's largest. Papers that show the use of biodiesel from beef tallow in diesel engine are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of blend of biodiesel from beef tallow (B5 in commercial diesel oil on engine performance, analyzing possible internal consequences and characteristics of lubricating oil after the prolonged use in a diesel engine. Engine performance was evaluated through tractor power take off (PTO tests. The engine was operated for 600 hours. Power and fuel consumption were measured. Samples of lubricating oil were

  4. Preoperative testing before low-risk surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Kyle R.; Wijeysundera, Duminda N.; Pendrith, Ciara; Ng, Ryan; Tu, Jack V.; Laupacis, Andreas; Schull, Michael J.; Levinson, Wendy; Bhatia, R. Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is concern about increasing utilization of low-value health care services, including preoperative testing for low-risk surgical procedures. We investigated temporal trends, explanatory factors, and institutional and regional variation in the utilization of testing before low-risk procedures. Methods: For this retrospective cohort study, we accessed linked population-based administrative databases from Ontario, Canada. A cohort of 1 546 223 patients 18 years or older underwent a total of 2 224 070 low-risk procedures, including endoscopy and ophthalmologic surgery, from Apr. 1, 2008, to Mar. 31, 2013, at 137 institutions in 14 health regions. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to assess patient- and institution-level factors associated with electrocardiography (ECG), transthoracic echocardiography, cardiac stress test or chest radiography within 60 days before the procedure. Results: Endoscopy, ophthalmologic surgery and other low-risk procedures accounted for 40.1%, 34.2% and 25.7% of procedures, respectively. ECG and chest radiography were conducted before 31.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30.9%–31.1%) and 10.8% (95% CI 10.8%–10.8%) of procedures, respectively, whereas the rates of preoperative echocardiography and stress testing were 2.9% (95% CI 2.9%–2.9%) and 2.1% (95% CI 2.1%–2.1%), respectively. Significant variation was present across institutions, with the frequency of preoperative ECG ranging from 3.4% to 88.8%. Receipt of preoperative ECG and radiography were associated with older age (among patients 66–75 years of age, for ECG, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 18.3, 95% CI 17.6–19.0; for radiography, adjusted OR 2.9, 95% CI 2.8–3.0), preoperative anesthesia consultation (for ECG, adjusted OR 8.7, 95% CI 8.5–8.8; for radiography, adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 2.1–2.2) and preoperative medical consultation (for ECG, adjusted OR 6.8, 95% CI 6.7–6.9; for radiography, adjusted OR 3.6, 95% CI 3.5–3.6). The median ORs

  5. Enhancing Student Teachers' Teaching Skills through a Blended Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albhnsawy, Abeer Abdalhalim; Aliweh, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a blended learning program on student teachers' teaching skills in an undergraduate microteaching course. The blended learning program lasted for nine weeks. This program aimed at integrating social network tasks and face-to-face teaching activities. Pre- and post-tests were administered to assess student…

  6. The behaviour of coal blends in power station boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, W.R.; Horne, P.A.; McGhee, B.F.; Gibson, J.R. [Mitsui Babcock Energy Ltd., Renfrew (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    The milling characteristics of coal blends were studied to provide quantitative information which allows the calculation of the Hardgrove Index (HGI) values of coal blends from those of the constituent coals; to provide data on the power requirement to produce a given mill output fineness, and abrasion rates of mill components when milling coal blends, relative to the behaviour of the constituent coals; to investigate the combustion behaviour of coal blends in pulverized fuel-fired systems by carrying out testwork in a semi-industrial combustion test facility, and to assess the deposition characteristics and the potential for utilization of the ashes produced by the combustion of coal blends. It was found that both the HGI and the Abrasion Index values of coals are additive properties. There were linear correlations between the slope of the Rosin-Rammler plot of the Mini-mill product size distribution and both the blend compositions and the HGI values of the coals and coal blends. Investigations showed that the fusion behaviour of the coal ash blends is rather complex, and that the characteristic ash fusion temperature are not additive in a simple way. A number of correlations were found between the ash fusion temperatures of the coals and coal ash blends. 1 ref., 45 figs., 10 tabs., 1 app.

  7. Silk fibroin and sodium alginate blend: Miscibility and physical characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini de Moraes, Mariana; Silva, Mariana Ferreira; Weska, Raquel Farias; Beppu, Marisa Masumi, E-mail: beppu@feq.unicamp.br

    2014-07-01

    Films of silk fibroin (SF) and sodium alginate (SA) blends were prepared by solution casting technique. The miscibility of SF and SA in those blends was evaluated and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that SF/SA 25/75 wt.% blends underwent microscopic phase separation, resulting in globular structures composed mainly of SF. X-ray diffraction indicated the amorphous nature of these blends, even after a treatment with ethanol that turned them insoluble in water. Thermal analyses of blends showed the peaks of degradation of pristine SF and SA shifted to intermediate temperatures. Water vapor permeability, swelling capacity and tensile strength of SF films could be enhanced by blending with SA. Cell viability remained between 90 and 100%, as indicated by in vitro cytotoxicity test. The SF/SA blend with self-assembled SF globules can be used to modulate structural and mechanical properties of the final material and may be used in designing high performance wound dressing. - Highlights: • Blend films of fibroin and alginate were prepared with microscopic phase separation; • Self-assembled globular microdomains were mainly composed by fibroin; • It was possible to obtain a film with better mechanical and physical properties; • Blend films of fibroin and alginate represent a novel material in biomaterials field.

  8. Studies on the Mechanical and Water uptake Properties of Some Polyolefins / Corn Starch Blends (1)

    OpenAIRE

    Ifeoma Perpetua Oragwu

    2013-01-01

    Corn starch blends of high density- and low density polyethylene have been prepared by injection moulding technique. Maleic anhydrides- graft-polyethylene was used as a compatibilizers. The effect of corn starch content on the blends was evaluated by mechanical property measurements and water uptake tests. Results indicated that the tensile strength of the blends decreased with increase in corn starch contents. While the elongation at break of low density polyethylene-corn starch blends dec...

  9. Supporting School Leaders in Blended Learning with Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, Lauren; Gibson, Theresa; Mangum, Nancy; Wolf, Mary Ann; Kellogg, Shaun; Branon, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a mixed-methods case-study design evaluation of the Leadership in Blended Learning (LBL) program. The LBL program uses blended approaches, including face-to-face and online, to prepare school leaders to implement blended learning initiatives in their schools. This evaluation found that the program designers effectively…

  10. Blended Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise

    2015-01-01

    University College Lillebaelt has decided that 30 percent of all educational elements must be generated as blended learning by the end of the year 2015 as part of a modernization addressing following educational needs: 1. Blended learning can help match the expectations of the future students who...... learning. 4. Blended learning can contribute to supporting and improving efficiency of educational efforts. This can for instance be done through programmes for several classes by using video conferencing, allocating traditional face to face teaching to synchronous and asynchronous study activities produce...... digital materials which can be employed didactically and reused by the teachers. This can also mean that the particular competencies which teaches have in Svendborg can be used at other locations in UCL and disseminated to a larger group of students without further costs. Educational Innovation...

  11. AKRO/SF: Blend System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Blend was the system used by the NMFS Alaska Regional Office to monitor groundfish catch from 1991 until 2002. The Blend system combined data from industry...

  12. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ VIEWS ON BLENDED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Umit YAPICI,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed to determine the high school students’ views on blended learning. The study was carried out in biology course for the lesson unit of “Classification of Living Things and Biodiversity” with 47 9th grade students attending Nevzat Ayaz Anatolian High School in the second term of the academic year of 2009-2010. The lessons were taught in a way appropriate to the blended learning model both via the Internet and on face-to-face basis. As the online dimension of the blended learning model, Moodle, a Learning Management System (LMS, was used. The application lasted 10 weeks. The scale of learners’ views on blended learning was applied and interviews were held to determine the views. As a result of the analysis of the scale, it was seen that their views were “highly” positive. The interviews held with the students revealed that the blended learning model provided students with various opportunities such as getting prepared for the lessons, reviewing the lessons as many times as wanted, reaching the subject-related materials without being dependent on time and place, testing oneself and communicating with the teacher and other students out of the school. The interviews also revealed that there were various problems though such as lack of Internet connection at home and problems experienced while playing the videos.

  13. PSA testing for men at average risk of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce K Armstrong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing of men at normal risk of prostate cancer is one of the most contested issues in cancer screening. There is no formal screening program, but testing is common – arguably a practice that ran ahead of the evidence. Public and professional communication about PSA screening has been highly varied and potentially confusing for practitioners and patients alike. There has been much research and policy activity relating to PSA testing in recent years. Landmark randomised controlled trials have been reported; authorities – including the 2013 Prostate Cancer World Congress, the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia, Cancer Council Australia, and the National Health and Medical Research Council – have made or endorsed public statements and/or issued clinical practice guidelines; and the US Preventive Services Task Force is revising its recommendations. But disagreement continues. The contention is partly over what the new evidence means. It is also a result of different valuing and prioritisation of outcomes that are hard to compare: prostate cancer deaths prevented (a small and disputed number; prevention of metastatic disease (somewhat more common; and side-effects of treatment such as incontinence, impotence and bowel trouble (more common again. A sizeable proportion of men diagnosed through PSA testing (somewhere between 20% and 50% would never have had prostate cancer symptoms sufficient to prompt investigation; many of these men are older, with competing comorbidities. It is a complex picture. Below are four viewpoints from expert participants in the evolving debate, commissioned for this cancer screening themed issue of Public Health Research & Practice. We asked the authors to respond to the challenge of PSA testing of asymptomatic, normal-risk men. They raise important considerations: uncertainty, harms, the trustworthiness and interpretation of the evidence, cost (e.g. of using multiparametric

  14. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  15. Alternative Testing Methods for Predicting Health Risk from Environmental Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Colacci

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alternative methods to animal testing are considered as promising tools to support the prediction of toxicological risks from environmental exposure. Among the alternative testing methods, the cell transformation assay (CTA appears to be one of the most appropriate approaches to predict the carcinogenic properties of single chemicals, complex mixtures and environmental pollutants. The BALB/c 3T3 CTA shows a good degree of concordance with the in vivo rodent carcinogenesis tests. Whole-genome transcriptomic profiling is performed to identify genes that are transcriptionally regulated by different kinds of exposures. Its use in cell models representative of target organs may help in understanding the mode of action and predicting the risk for human health. Aiming at associating the environmental exposure to health-adverse outcomes, we used an integrated approach including the 3T3 CTA and transcriptomics on target cells, in order to evaluate the effects of airborne particulate matter (PM on toxicological complex endpoints. Organic extracts obtained from PM2.5 and PM1 samples were evaluated in the 3T3 CTA in order to identify effects possibly associated with different aerodynamic diameters or airborne chemical components. The effects of the PM2.5 extracts on human health were assessed by using whole-genome 44 K oligo-microarray slides. Statistical analysis by GeneSpring GX identified genes whose expression was modulated in response to the cell treatment. Then, modulated genes were associated with pathways, biological processes and diseases through an extensive biological analysis. Data derived from in vitro methods and omics techniques could be valuable for monitoring the exposure to toxicants, understanding the modes of action via exposure-associated gene expression patterns and to highlight the role of genes in key events related to adversity.

  16. Blended Learning over Two Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhonggen, Yu; Yuexiu, Zhejiang

    2015-01-01

    The 21st century has witnessed vast amounts of research into blended learning since the conception of online learning formed the possibility of blended learning in the early 1990s. The theme of this paper is blended learning in mainstream disciplinary communities. In particular, the paper reports on findings from the last two decades which looked…

  17. Studies of PVC/ENR blends: blend compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantara Thevy Ratnam; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan; Nasir, M.; Baharin, A.

    2002-01-01

    Blends of poly(vinyl chloride/epoxidized natural rubber (PVC/ENR) were prepared by using Bra bender Plasticorder at compositions ranging from 0-100% PVC. They were blended at 150 degree C mixing temperature, 50 rpm rotor speed and 10 minutes mixing time. The blends were characterized for tensile strength , elongation at break, glass transition temperatures and Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR). Results revealed that as the PVC content increases the blend behaviour changes from elastomeric to glassy. However the blends found to be compatible at all compositions. (Author)

  18. Biodegradability of diesel and biodiesel blends

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... The biodegradability of pure diesel and biodiesel and blends with different proportions of biodiesel (2%. (commercial); 5% and 20%) was evaluated employing the respirometric method and the redox indicator. 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) test. In the former, experiments simulating the ...

  19. NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamani, Raj K.; Latchireddi, Sanjeeva; Devrani, Vikas; Sethi, Harappan; Henry, Roger; Chipman, Nate

    2003-01-01

    DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide

  20. NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

    2003-08-01

    DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide

  1. Risk based test interval and maintenance optimisation - Application and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparre, E.

    1999-10-01

    The project is part of an IAEA co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Development of Methodologies for Optimisation of Surveillance Testing and Maintenance of Safety Related Equipment at NPPs'. The purpose of the project is to investigate the sensitivity of the results obtained when performing risk based optimisation of the technical specifications. Previous projects have shown that complete LPSA models can be created and that these models allow optimisation of technical specifications. However, these optimisations did not include any in depth check of the result sensitivity with regards to methods, model completeness etc. Four different test intervals have been investigated in this study. Aside from an original, nominal, optimisation a set of sensitivity analyses has been performed and the results from these analyses have been compared to the original optimisation. The analyses indicate that the result of an optimisation is rather stable. However, it is not possible to draw any certain conclusions without performing a number of sensitivity analyses. Significant differences in the optimisation result were discovered when analysing an alternative configuration. Also deterministic uncertainties seem to affect the result of an optimisation largely. The sensitivity of failure data uncertainties is important to investigate in detail since the methodology is based on the assumption that the unavailability of a component is dependent on the length of the test interval

  2. The Sensor Test for Orion RelNav Risk Mitigation Development Test Objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, John A.; Hinkel, Heather; Maguire, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The Sensor Test for Orion Relative-Navigation Risk Mitigation (STORRM) Development Test Objective (DTO) ew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-134, and was designed to characterize the performance of the ash LIDAR being developed for the Orion. This ash LIDAR, called the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS), will be the primary navigation instrument used by the Orion vehicle during rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking. This paper provides an overview of the STORRM test objectives and the concept of operations. It continues with a description of the STORRM's major hardware compo nents, which include the VNS and the docking camera. Next, an overview of crew and analyst training activities will describe how the STORRM team prepared for flight. Then an overview of how insight data collection and analysis actually went is presented. Key ndings and results from this project are summarized, including a description of "truth" data. Finally, the paper concludes with lessons learned from the STORRM DTO.

  3. Development of toughened polyamide-based blends via reactive compatibilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Ryan Ashok

    Different methods for toughening nylon 6 have been explored through the incorporation of various dispersed phases and appropriate compatibilization strategies. Maleated polyethylenes were effective in toughening nylon 6 and provided blends with excellent low temperature, provided their melt viscosity is sufficiently high. Incorporation of independently dispersed rubbery and rigid phases to nylon 6 led to blends with excellent combinations of stiffness and toughness over a limited composition range. The impact properties of blends of nylon 6 with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, ABS, polymers were dependent on ABS and compatibilizer type, compatibilizer content, and processing history. Copolymers of glycidyl methacrylate and methyl methacrylate were generally ineffective as compatibilizers for toughening these blends. The reactive nature of the compatibilizer induced crosslinking-type effects which led to a poor dispersion of butadiene rubber particles and poor low temperature toughness. Nylon 6/ABS blends compatibilized with an imidized acrylic (IA) polymer were super tough over a broad range of compositions. ABS materials with low viscosities and a monodisperse population of rubber particles led to blends with superior low temperature toughness than materials with higher viscosities and broad particle size distributions. The effect of multiple extrusions on the morphology and mechanical properties of nylon 6/ABS blends was explored using IA and a styrene-acrylonitrile-maleic anhydride (SANMA) terpolymer as compatibilizing agents. Blends with high IA contents were morphologically unstable and the low temperature ductility of these blends was severely compromised by multiple extrusions steps; analogous blends containing SANMA were morphologically stable and retained their low temperature ductility. The fracture properties of nylon 6/ABS/IA blends was characterized using instrumented impact testing and single-edge notch, three-point bend (SEN3PB) specimens. The

  4. Mechanical and thermal properties of physically-blended-plastic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Issa, M. S.

    1983-10-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and isotactic polypropylene (PP) blend were produced in film form and were characterized by a number of techniques such as wide-angle x-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and instron tensile testing. Results of WAXD and DTA showed conclusively that the two components in the blend are incompatible. SEM micrographs indicated that the 60/40 and 40/60 PP/PE blends show approximately fine homogeneous dispersion of the minor component into the matrix of the major component. The mechanical properties of the blend films improved with respect to the PE homo polymer. The improvement was more remarkable with the increase of the PP component in the blend. Results obtained in this work were explained in terms of crystallinity and the crystallite orientation. 28 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (A.M.H.)

  5. NOx emissions and combustibility characteristics of coal blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Arenillas, A.; Arias, B.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain). Dept. of Energy and Environment

    2001-07-01

    In this work, a series of coals with different origin and rank were blended and several aspects of the resultant blends were studied. This included determination of the grindability of individual coals and blends by means of the Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI), and temperature programmed combustion test, which were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyser (TG) coupled to a quadruple mass spectrometer (MS) for evolved gas analysis. Special attention was paid to the combustibility parameters and the NO emissions during blends combustion. It was found that while some coal blends present interaction between the individual coals, others do not. This behaviour was assumed to be due to the differences in coal structure and functional groups composition. 18 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The Perception and Needs of Psychologists Toward Blended Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksman, Ies; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Spigt, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Blended care, meaning that online (Internet) components are used in combination with face-to-face contact, in mental health is increasingly encouraged, but research about the needs of psychologists is scarce. We assessed the perceptions, design, and barriers toward blended care among members of the Dutch Association of Psychologists through an e-mailed survey. Mean scores (SD) and answer percentages were calculated. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to investigate differences between users and nonusers and primary- and secondary care professionals. Generally, psychologists (63% response rate) had a positive perception toward blended care and they intended to use it in future (M = 3.71, SD = 1.19). Users of blended care and secondary care professionals were more positive toward blended care than nonusers and primary care professionals. Online psychoeducation, diary forms, and exercises for different therapeutic approaches and communication technology configurations were most welcomed. Still, quite some barriers were mentioned before professionals would use blended care. Psychologists had a positive perception toward blended care, as long as attention is paid to the perceived barriers. Results of this survey could be used in the development of online components that correspond to the needs of professionals. Reviewing the needs of psychologists, e-health components of different therapeutic approaches, apart from cognitive behavioral therapy, are welcomed. Future research is necessary to gain insight in the (cost) effectiveness of blended care for different types of patients (e.g., transdiagnostic interventions) and of different therapeutic approaches.

  7. Polymer blend membranes for CO2 separation from natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, H.; Mannan, H. A.; Minh, D.; Nasir, R.; Moshshim, D. F.; Murugesan, T.

    2016-06-01

    Polymeric membranes are dominantly used in industrial gas separation membrane processes. Enhancement in membranes permeability and/or selectivity is a key challenge faced by membrane researchers. The current work represents the effect of poyetherimide blending on separation performance of polysulfone membranes. Polysulfone/poyetherimide (PSF/PEI) blend flat sheet dense membranes were synthesized and tested for permeation analysis of CO2 and CH4 gases at 6, 8 and 10 bar pressure and 25oC temperature. Morphology and thermal properties of membranes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) respectively. Blend membranes were dense and homogeneous as deduced from FESEM analysis. Thermal stability of synthesized blend membranes was maintained by blending with PEI as characterized by TGA results. Decrease in permeability of both gases was observed by the addition of PEI due to rigidity of PEI chains. Additionally, selectivity of synthesized blend membranes was enhanced by blending PEI and blend membranes show improved selectivity over pure PSF membrane. This new material has the capability to be used as gas separation membrane material.

  8. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Unsaturated Polyester/Vinyl Ester Blends Cured at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhyananta, H.; Puspadewa, F. D.; Wicaksono, S. T.; Widyastuti; Wibisono, A. T.; Kurniawan, B. A.; Ismail, H.; Salsac, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Unsaturated polyester (UP) resin containing aromatic ring was blended with vinyl ester (VE) at wide range composition (10, 20, 30, 40,and 80 wt.%) using mechanical blending method. The blends were cured at room temperature using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) (4 wt.%) as catalyst initiator without the presence of catalystaccelerator. The effect of vinyl ester composition on theenhancement of mechanical and thermal properties of unsaturated polyester/vinyl ester blends was investigated. The polymer blends were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR)spectroscopy, tensile testing, hardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). IR spectra showed UP and VE peaks. The curing copolymerization reactionoccurred at vinyl (C=C) bonds. The addition of vinyl esters enhanced mechanical and thermal properties. The UP/VE blends showed homogeneous morphology, transparent and copolymer thermoset blend.

  9. The Role of Alternative Testing Strategies in Environmental Risk Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Hjorth, Rune; Holden, Patricia; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Colman, Ben; Grieger, Khara; Hendren, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Within toxicology there is a pressure to find new test systems and organisms to replace, reduce and refine animal testing. In nanoecotoxicology the need for alternative testing strategies (ATS) is further emphasized as the validity of tests and risk assessment practices developed for dissolved chemicals are challenged. Nonetheless, standardized whole organism animal testing is still considered the gold standard for environmental risk assessment. Advancing risk analysis of engineered nanomater...

  10. Multi-model blending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Hendrik F.; Hwang, Youngdeok; van Kessel, Theodore G.; Khabibrakhmanov, Ildar K.; Muralidhar, Ramachandran

    2016-10-18

    A method and a system to perform multi-model blending are described. The method includes obtaining one or more sets of predictions of historical conditions, the historical conditions corresponding with a time T that is historical in reference to current time, and the one or more sets of predictions of the historical conditions being output by one or more models. The method also includes obtaining actual historical conditions, the actual historical conditions being measured conditions at the time T, assembling a training data set including designating the two or more set of predictions of historical conditions as predictor variables and the actual historical conditions as response variables, and training a machine learning algorithm based on the training data set. The method further includes obtaining a blended model based on the machine learning algorithm.

  11. Mill performance of coal blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.A. Bennett; G. O' Brien; D. Holcombe [CoalTech Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    Evaluating the potential performance of coal blends for use as pulverised fuel (PF) in power plants and pulverised coal injection (PCI) into blast furnaces requires knowledge of the size distribution of the organic and mineral matter components of a blend, especially when there are significant differences in the Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI) of the component coals. The size distribution of the organic matter impacts on combustibility of thermal and PCI coal blends and handleability of PCI coal blends. Petrography techniques were used to examine four size fractions from the PF of single coals and blends to measure the size distribution of maceral groups. For most coals, a good estimate of a blend's size distribution can be made assuming that the size distribution of the individual coals, milled under the same conditions, are added together in the proportions of the blend. The exception is when a very soft coal (HGI 90) is blended with a very hard coal (HGI 35). In this case preferential milling (more reporting to the smaller size fractions) of the softer coal occurred. All coals studied in this project show some sign of preferential grinding of the softer maceral group when the coal was milled individually or in a blend. It is only when there is a large difference in the relative strength of the maceral groups of the coals blended that the preferential milling of a coal in a blend is observed in the size distribution of the blend. The results indicate that the breakage characteristics (change in size reduction per unit of energy) of maceral groups in individual coals do not change when they are blended with other coals. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Diagnosis and Tests: Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a physical therapist, who can evaluate your fall risk. If your healthcare provider concludes that you are ... to check for things that can impact your fall risk, such as electrolyte balance and the possibility of ...

  13. Blending for dollars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieclaw, C.; Hickinbotham, A. [Ready Engineering Corp. (US)

    2004-09-01

    An automated coal blending and analysis system at TransAlta's Sundance plant units 1 and 2 has reduced derates, improved coal quality control, and together with a capital maintenance program, saved the utility nearly $1 million. The system was supplied by Ready Engineering Corporation to the power plant situated near Lake Wabamun, 60 miles west of Edmonton, Alberta. The article describes the system and reports on its performance. 4 figs.

  14. Common Risk Criteria Standards for National Test Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    of the risk criterion), AFSPCMAN 91-710V1, Attachment 4, page 11 states “A4.4.2.2. Hazard Risks >10 through 30 in 1,000,000 (EC > 10×10−6 through 30...20RISK%20MANEGEMENT.pdf. Environmental Protection Agency. “Risk Characterization Handbook .” EPA 100-B-00-002. December 2000. May be superseded by

  15. Investigations on the effects of ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends in a spark-ignition engine: Performance and emissions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Elfasakhany

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses performance and exhaust emissions from spark-ignition engine fueled with ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends. The test results obtained with the use of low content rates of ethanol–methanol blends (3–10 vol.% in gasoline were compared to ethanol–gasoline blends, methanol–gasoline blends and pure gasoline test results. Combustion and emission characteristics of ethanol, methanol and gasoline and their blends were evaluated. Results showed that when the vehicle was fueled with ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends, the concentrations of CO and UHC (unburnt hydrocarbons emissions were significantly decreased, compared to the neat gasoline. Methanol–gasoline blends presented the lowest emissions of CO and UHC among all test fuels. Ethanol–gasoline blends showed a moderate emission level between the neat gasoline and ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends, e.g., ethanol–gasoline blends presented lower CO and UHC emissions than those of the neat gasoline but higher emissions than those of the ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends. In addition, the CO and UHC decreased and CO2 increased when ethanol and/or methanol contents increased in the fuel blends. Furthermore, the effects of blended fuels on engine performance were investigated and results showed that methanol–gasoline blends presents the highest volumetric efficiency and torque; ethanol–gasoline blends provides the highest brake power, while ethanol–methanol–gasoline blends showed a moderate level of volumetric efficiency, torque and brake power between both methanol–gasoline and ethanol–gasoline blends; gasoline, on the other hand, showed the lowest volumetric efficiency, torque and brake power among all test fuels.

  16. Mixing Online and Face-to-Face Therapy: How to Benefit From Blended Care in Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzel, Jobke; van der Vaart, Rosalie; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C

    2016-02-09

    Blended care, a combination of online and face-to-face therapy, is increasingly being applied in mental health care to obtain optimal benefit from the advantages these two treatment modalities have. Promising results have been reported, but a variety in descriptions and ways of operationalizing blended care exists. Currently, what type of "blend" works for whom, and why, is unclear. Furthermore, a rationale for setting up blended care is often lacking. In this viewpoint paper, we describe postulates for blended care and provide an instrument (Fit for Blended Care) that aims to assist therapists and patients whether and how to set up blended care treatment. A review of the literature, two focus groups (n=5 and n=5), interviews with therapists (n=14), and interviews with clients (n=2) were conducted to develop postulates of eHealth and blended care and an instrument to assist therapists and clients in setting up optimal blended care. Important postulates for blended care are the notion that both treatment modalities should complement each other and that set up of blended treatment should be based on shared decision making between patient and therapist. The "Fit for Blended Care" instrument is presented which addresses the following relevant themes: possible barriers to receiving blended treatment such as the risk of crisis, issues in communication (at a distance), as well as possible facilitators such as social support. More research into the reasons why and for whom blended care works is needed. To benefit from blended care, face-to-face and online care should be combined in such way that the potentials of both treatment modalities are used optimally, depending on patient abilities, needs, and preferences. To facilitate the process of setting up a personalized blended treatment, the Fit for Blended Care instrument can be used. By applying this approach in research and practice, more insight into the working mechanisms and optimal (personal) "blends" of online and

  17. The Sensor Test for Orion RelNav Risk Mitigation (STORRM) Development Test Objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, John A.; Hinkel, Heather; D'Souza, Christopher N.; Maguire, Sean; Patangan, Mogi

    2011-01-01

    The Sensor Test for Orion Relative-Navigation Risk Mitigation (STORRM) Development Test Objective (DTO) flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-134 in May- June 2011, and was designed to characterize the performance of the flash LIDAR and docking camera being developed for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. The flash LIDAR, called the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS), will be the primary navigation instrument used by the Orion vehicle during rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking. The DC will be used by the Orion crew for piloting cues during docking. This paper provides an overview of the STORRM test objectives and the concept of operations. It continues with a description of STORRM's major hardware components, which include the VNS, docking camera, and supporting avionics. Next, an overview of crew and analyst training activities will describe how the STORRM team prepared for flight. Then an overview of in-flight data collection and analysis is presented. Key findings and results from this project are summarized. Finally, the paper concludes with lessons learned from the STORRM DTO.

  18. Computed Tomography Window Blending: Feasibility in Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Jacob C; Wortman, Jeremy R; Rocha, Tatiana C; Folio, Les R; Andriole, Katherine P; Khurana, Bharti

    2018-02-07

    This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of processing computed tomography (CT) images with a custom window blending algorithm that combines soft-tissue, bone, and lung window settings into a single image; to compare the time for interpretation of chest CT for thoracic trauma with window blending and conventional window settings; and to assess diagnostic performance of both techniques. Adobe Photoshop was scripted to process axial DICOM images from retrospective contrast-enhanced chest CTs performed for trauma with a window-blending algorithm. Two emergency radiologists independently interpreted the axial images from 103 chest CTs with both blended and conventional windows. Interpretation time and diagnostic performance were compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and McNemar test, respectively. Agreement with Nexus CT Chest injury severity was assessed with the weighted kappa statistic. A total of 13,295 images were processed without error. Interpretation was faster with window blending, resulting in a 20.3% time saving (P window-blended cases was 82.7%, compared to 81.6% for conventional windows. The specificity of the window-blended cases was 93.1%, compared to 90.5% for conventional windows. All injuries of major clinical significance (per Nexus CT Chest criteria) were correctly identified in all reading sessions, and all negative cases were correctly classified. All readers demonstrated near-perfect agreement with injury severity classification with both window settings. In this pilot study utilizing retrospective data, window blending allows faster preliminary interpretation of axial chest CT performed for trauma, with no significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to conventional window settings. Future studies would be required to assess the utility of window blending in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  19. VAR, stress-testing and supplementary methodologies: uses and constraints in energy risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior, Brian

    1999-01-01

    This chapter lists some of the special risks associated with a range of energy markets, and questions what is risk. Market risk, the use of value-at-risk (VAR) for measuring and managing market risk, use of VAR in the banking sector, back-testing of VAR, the corporate sector, making investment decisions, and the need for additional methods of risk analysis are discussed. Scenario analysis and stress testing, liquidity, and combining VAR and stress-testing are described. Credit risk and the quantitative analysis of credit risk are addressed, and operational risk, and organisational challenges are considered. Panels present examples of a simple VAR calculation and give descriptions of VAR in corporate decisions, the measurement of liquidity, and the use of the Greeks in decisions on day to day trading and risk management

  20. effect of effect of blend ratio on blend ratio on characteristics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Thermo-physical properties of bread made from w physical properties of bread made from w investigation, t investigation, the organoleptic acceptance organoleptic acceptance blend ratios were exposed to equal heating rate du substituted by composite cassava and soy at levels organoletically organoletically tested using ...

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels in Fuel Grade Ethanol and Blends - Study to Evaluate Alternate Standard Tests and Phenomenological Understanding of SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-30

    Main aim of this project was to evaluate alternate standard test methods for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and compare them with the results from slow strain rate test (SSRT) results under equivalent environmental conditions. Other important aim of...

  2. Tests of control in the Audit Risk Model : Effective? Efficient?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokdijk, J.H. (Hans)

    2004-01-01

    Lately, the Audit Risk Model has been subject to criticism. To gauge its validity, this paper confronts the Audit Risk Model as incorporated in International Standard on Auditing No. 400, with the real life situations faced by auditors in auditing financial statements. This confrontation exposes

  3. Improving STD testing behavior among high-risk young adults by offering STD testing at a vocational school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spauwen, Laura W L; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Brouwers, Elfi E H G; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H T M

    2011-09-30

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection (CT) is the most prevalent bacterial STD. Sexually active adolescents and young adults are the main risk group for CT. However, STD testing rates in this group are low since exposed individuals may not feel at risk, owing-at least in part-to the infection's largely asymptomatic nature. Designing new testing environments that are more appealing to young people who are most at risk of acquiring chlamydia can be an important strategy to improve overall testing rates. Here we evaluate the effect of a school-based sexual health program conducted among vocational school students, aiming to obtain better access for counseling and enhance students' STD testing behavior. Adolescents (median age 19 years) attending a large vocational school were provided with sexual health education. Students filled in a questionnaire measuring CT risk and were offered STD testing. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we assessed differences between men and women in STD-related risk behavior, sexual problems, CT testing behavior and determinants of CT testing behavior. Of 345 participants, 70% were female. Of the 287 sexually active students, 75% were at high risk for CT; one third of women reported sexual problems. Of sexually active participants, 61% provided a self-administered specimen for STD testing. Independent determinants for testing included STD related symptoms and no condom use. All CT diagnoses were in the high-CT-risk group. In the high-risk group, STD testing showed an increased uptake, from 27% (previous self-reported test) to 65% (current test). CT prevalence was 5.7%. Vocational school students are a target population for versatile sexual health prevention. When provided with CT testing facilities and education, self selection mechanisms seemed to increase CT testing rate dramatically in this high-CT-risk population expressing sexual problems. Considering the relative ease of testing and treating large numbers of young adults, offering

  4. Combustion performance of pyrolysis oil/ethanol blends in a residential-scale oil-fired boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 40 kWth oil-fired commercial boiler was fueled with blends of biomass pyrolysis oil (py-oil) and ethanol to determine the feasibility of using these blends as a replacement for fuel oil in home heating applications. An optimal set of test parameters was determined for the combustion of these blend...

  5. Blended Learning on Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of a large-scale project implementing information and communication technology at Roskilde University, Denmark, this paper discusses ways of introducing technology-based blended learning in academic life. We examine some examples of use of systems for computer-mediated collabora......-tive learning and work in Danish Open University education as well as in courses on campus. We further suggest some possi-bilities for using technology in innovative ways, arguing that innovation is to be found, not in isolated instantiations of sys-tems, but in the form of a deliberate integration of all...

  6. Blended Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise

    2015-01-01

    learning. 4. Blended learning can contribute to supporting and improving efficiency of educational efforts. This can for instance be done through programmes for several classes by using video conferencing, allocating traditional face to face teaching to synchronous and asynchronous study activities produce...... digital materials which can be employed didactically and reused by the teachers. This can also mean that the particular competencies which teaches have in Svendborg can be used at other locations in UCL and disseminated to a larger group of students without further costs. Educational Innovation...

  7. Virtual reality training versus blended learning of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Brzoska, Julia Anja; Gondan, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared virtual reality (VR) training with low cost blended learning (BL) in a structured training program. Background: Training of laparoscopic skills outside the operating room is mandatory to reduce operative times and risks. Methods: Laparoscopy-naïve medical students...... were randomized in two groups stratified for gender. The BL group (n = 42) used E-learning for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and practiced basic skills with box trainers. The VR group (n = 42) trained basic skills and LC on the LAP Mentor II (Simbionix, Cleveland, USA). Each group trained 3×4 hours...... followed by a knowledge test concerning LC. Blinded raters assessed the operative performance of cadaveric porcine LC using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). The LC was discontinued when it was not completed within 80 minutes. Students evaluated their training modality...

  8. Effects of blended-cement paste chemical composition changes on some strength gains of blended-mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirgiz, Mehmet Serkan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC) on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG) were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC) were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP) or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP) for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min). Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC) and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS) and flexural strengths (FS) of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O), and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2) at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM) in comparison with reference mortars (RM) at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement.

  9. Value of routine blood tests for prediction of mortality risk in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosfeldt, Mathias; Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission.......There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission....

  10. Evaluation of rail test frequencies using risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-03

    Several industries now use risk analysis to develop : inspection programs to ensure acceptable mechanical integrity : and reliability. These industries include nuclear and electric : power generation, oil refining, gas processing, onshore and : offsh...

  11. Stress and Coping in Genetic Testing for Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coyne, James

    1997-01-01

    .... In the absence of a large body of relevant prior research, we are faced with an urgent need for basic descriptive data concerning women at high-risk for early onset breast cancer and their families...

  12. Common Risk Criteria Standards for National Test Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    someone acted with negligence. The reasonable person acts sensibly, does things without serious delay, and takes proper but not excessive precautions...provides a common set of range safety policies, risk criteria, and guidelines for managing risk to people and assets during manned and unmanned...involuntary acceptance) and mission-essential personnel (MEP) (voluntary acceptance), excluding people in the launch or reentry vehicle; b. Debris injury

  13. Electrically Conducting Polyaniline Microtube Blends

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hopkins, A

    2004-01-01

    .... When microtubes were solution-blended with polyurethane, a highly dispersed fractal network of tubes was observed, and the resulting blend conductivity was 1 x 10(exp-3) S/cm and 1 x l0(exp-3) S/cm for 0.5% and 2%(wt/wt...

  14. Blended Learning: A Dangerous Idea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, Patsy; Dziuban, Charles; Hartman, Joel

    2013-01-01

    The authors make the case that implementation of a successful blended learning program requires alignment of institutional, faculty, and student goals. Reliable and robust infrastructure must be in place to support students and faculty. Continuous evaluation can effectively track the impact of blended learning on students, faculty, and the…

  15. Classifying K-12 Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staker, Heather; Horn, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online learning in the K-12 sector is occurring both remotely through virtual schools and on campuses through blended learning. In emerging fields, definitions are important because they create a shared language that enables people to talk about the new phenomena. The blended-learning taxonomy and definitions presented in this paper…

  16. Empowering Learners through Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owston, Ron

    2018-01-01

    Blended learning appears to facilitate learner empowerment more readily than either face-to-face or fully online courses. This contention is supported by a review of literature on the affordances of blended learning that support Thomas and Velthouse's (1990) four conditions of empowerment: choice, meaningfulness, competence, and impact. Blended…

  17. Blended Learning Improves Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Brent R; Stockwell, Melissa S; Cennamo, Michael; Jiang, Elise

    2015-08-27

    Blended learning is an emerging paradigm for science education but has not been rigorously assessed. We performed a randomized controlled trial of blended learning. We found that in-class problem solving improved exam performance, and video assignments increased attendance and satisfaction. This validates a new model for science communication and education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blended Learning: An Innovative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalima; Dangwal, Kiran Lata

    2017-01-01

    Blended learning is an innovative concept that embraces the advantages of both traditional teaching in the classroom and ICT supported learning including both offline learning and online learning. It has scope for collaborative learning; constructive learning and computer assisted learning (CAI). Blended learning needs rigorous efforts, right…

  19. Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J.; Soong, D.

    1982-01-01

    Viscosity, shear modulus and other viscoelastic properties of multicomponent polymer blends are predicted from behavior of individual components, using a mathematical model. Model is extension of two-component-blend model based on Rouse-Bueche-Zimm theory of polymer viscoelasticity. Extension assumes that probabilities of forming various possible intracomponent and intercomponent entanglements among polymer molecules are proportional to relative abundances of components.

  20. Engineering Polymer Blends for Impact Damage Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L.; Smith, Russell W.; Working, Dennis C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Structures containing polymers such as DuPont's Surlyn® 8940, demonstrate puncture healing when impacted by a 9 millimeter projectile traveling from speeds near 300 meters per second (1,100 feet per second) to hypervelocity impacts in the micrometeoroid velocity range of 5 kilometers per second (16,000 feet per second). Surlyn® 8940 puncture heals over a temperature range of minus 30 degrees Centigrade to plus 70 degrees Centigrade and shows potential for use in pressurized vessels subject to impact damage. However, such polymers are difficult to process and limited in applicability due to their low thermal stability, poor chemical resistance and overall poor mechanical properties. In this work, several puncture healing engineered melt formulations were developed. Moldings of melt blend formulations were impacted with a 5.56 millimeter projectile with a nominal velocity of 945 meters per second (3,100 feet per second) at about 25 degrees Centigrade, 50 degrees Centigrade and 100 degrees Centigrade, depending upon the specific blend being investigated. Self-healing tendencies were determined using surface vacuum pressure tests and tensile tests after penetration using tensile dog-bone specimens (ASTM D 638-10). For the characterization of tensile properties both pristine and impacted specimens were tested to obtain tensile modulus, yield stress and tensile strength, where possible. Experimental results demonstrate a range of new puncture healing blends which mitigate damage in the ballistic velocity regime.

  1. [Caries risk assessment - are saliva tests as well as microbiological and clinical test procedures worthwhile?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, S; Bizhang, M; Barthel, C; Raab, W H-M

    2008-11-01

    The recent representative survey has proven once more that people in Germany are affected by caries to a very different extent. Since caries can be prevented by risk-adjusted preventive programs, it would be helpful to have a possibility to determine the individual caries risk before cavities occur. Determination of a relative risk, risk screening and risk diagnosis are different levels of caries risk assessment. The present article provides information about which caries risk assessment options are available for different populations. A relative risk can be determined by the detection of Mutants Streptococci in caries-free 2-5-year-old children. With Dentoprog, a valid instrument for caries risk screening is available for 6-12-year-old school children. With respect to all other patients, a quantitative risk diagnosis can be roughly performed using the Cariogram which is based on the assessment of multiple risk parameters. The conclusion is that several options for caries risk assessment for different age groups are available. Nevertheless, there is no solution to how often a patient should appear for prevention in a dental office nor which preventive measures have to be taken to keep him/her healthy. Therefore it seems reasonable to roughly determine the recall frequency on the basis of the respective risk assessment and to adjust this frequency over time after the evaluation of disease progression.

  2. HIV testing week 2015: lowering barriers for HIV testing among high-risk groups in Amsterdam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelsman, M; Joore, I K; van Bergen, J E; Hogewoning, A A; Zuure, F R; van Veen, M G

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of the HIV Testing Week (HTW) 2015 in Amsterdam: the number of (positive) tested persons, characteristics and testing history of the tested population, the differences in attendance per location and the healthcare workers' experiences and opinions concerning the HTW.

  3. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder K A; Pillai, Sharmila G K; Tan, Sin Thien; Tai, Chu Chiau; Shahar, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Physical performance and balance declines with aging and may lead to increased risk of falls. Physical performance tests may be useful for initial fall-risk screening test among community-dwelling older adults. Physiological profile assessment (PPA), a composite falls risk assessment tool is reported to have 75% accuracy to screen for physiological falls risk. PPA correlates with Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. However, the association between many other commonly used physical performance tests and PPA is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between physiological falls risk measured using PPA and a battery of physical performance tests. One hundred and forty older adults from a senior citizens club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (94 females, 46 males), aged 60 years and above (65.77±4.61), participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were screened for falls risk using PPA. A battery of physical performance tests that include ten-step test (TST), short physical performance battery (SPPB), functional reach test (FRT), static balance test (SBT), TUG, dominant hand-grip strength (DHGS), and gait speed test (GST) were also performed. Spearman's rank correlation and binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the significantly associated independent variables (physical performance tests) with falls risk (dependent variable). Approximately 13% older adults were at high risk of falls categorized using PPA. Significant differences (Page, TST, SPPB, FRT, SBT, TUG between high and low falls risk group. A significant (Pphysiological falls risk (Pfalls screening to categorize high and low physiological falls risk among community-dwelling older adults. A more comprehensive assessment of falls risk can be performed thereafter for more specific intervention of underlying impairments.

  4. Study of the conductivity of Nylon 6/ABS blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Mansor Mohamad

    In this research project the study was conducted on conductivity of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)/Nylon 6 blend with carbon black as conductive filler. Three different blends of ABS/carbon black, Nylon 6/carbon black and ABS/Nylon 6/carbon black with various compositions were prepared by mixing together by using a single screw extruder. Each compound was reblended to achieve homogeneous mixture and the effect of processing was studied.Conductivity of the low resistance of blends were obtained by measuring sheet resistance using four-point probe as according to ASTM F 1529. The sheet resistance could only be detected for ABS/carbon black 20 wt % and above, and ABS/Nylon 6 with 80:20 ratio with 10 wt % of carbon black. Whereas, for Nylon 6/carbon black blends and the others high resistance of blends, their resistances were measured by Teraohmeter according to ASTM D 257 method. Percolation threshold (critical volume fraction) of the blends was studied to find actual conductive filler contents to avoid deterioration of mechanical properties. In this case, tensile tests were conducted according to ASTM D 638 to establish their mechanical properties. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of blended polymers, interface of polymer/carbon black and aggregation phenomenon between carbon black and polymers. The correlation between conductivity, mechanical properties and morphological characterisation of all the blends was studied.The results show that, the addition of carbon black up to 10%, increases conductivity and tensile strength of ABS/carbon black and Nylon 6/carbon black blends. Conductivity continues to increase with further addition of carbon black, but at the expense of tensile strength reduction due to the effect of brittle nature of carbon black.By adding ABS in ABS/Nylon 6/carbon black blends, conductivity increases, whereas tensile strength decreases. However, tensile strength of ABS/Nylon 6/carbon black blends

  5. Blend or not to blend: a study investigating faculty members perceptions of blended teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A Ocak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined faculty members’ perceptions of blended teaching from several perspectives. A total of 73 faculty members in Turkish Higher Education context participated in the study by completing an online survey that combined quantitative and qualitative approaches. Based on a data analysis, the faculty members’ perceptions were sorted into six categories: (a satisfaction with blended teaching, (b perceived impact on the role of the faculty, (c perceived impact on student learning, (d perceived impact on student motivation, (e advantages of blended teaching, and (f disadvantages of blended teaching. Findings indicated that faculty members were likely to agree that blended teaching provides a high degree of satisfaction and that it requires more time and commitment from the faculty. The faculty members perceived that blended teaching improves student learning and, to some extent, improves motivation. The faculty members also emphasized the importance of institutional support and the use of technology to mitigate student problems. This study presents these faculty members’ perceptions, which are helpful for those planning to implement a blended teaching approach, and makes suggestions for trouble-shooting and taking advantage of the opportunities in a blended environment successfully.

  6. Profiling Student Behaviour in a Blended Course: Closing the Gap Between Blended Teaching and Blended Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Nynke; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2018-01-01

    Blended learning is often associated with student-oriented learning in which students have varying degrees of control over their learning process. However, the current notion of blended learning is often a teacher- oriented approach in which the teacher identifies the used learning technologies and

  7. Study on properties of poly(vinyl alcohol/polyacrylonitrile blend film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoquan Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA/polyacrylonitrile (PAN blend films with different PAN mole contents were prepared by casting the polymer blend solution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. Surface morphologies of PVA/PAN blend films were analyzed by Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties of PVA/PAN blend films were investigated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, Tensile Tests, and Surface Contact Angle Tests. The results showed that the introduction of PAN could exert marked effects on the properties of PVA films.

  8. Chemical and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Polyurethane/Polylactide Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Brzeska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyether-esterurethanes containing synthetic poly[(R,S-3-hydroxybutyrate] (R,S-PHB and polyoxytetramethylenediol in soft segments and polyesterurethanes with poly(ε-caprolactone and poly[(R,S-3-hydroxybutyrate] were blended with poly([D,L]-lactide (PLA. The products were tested in terms of their oil and water absorption. Oil sorption tests of polyether-esterurethane revealed their higher response in comparison to polyesterurethanes. Blending of polyether-esterurethanes with PLA caused the increase of oil sorption. The highest water sorption was observed for blends of polyether-esterurethane, obtained with 10% of R,S-PHB in soft segments. The samples mass of polyurethanes and their blends were almost not changed after incubation in phosphate buffer and trypsin and lipase solutions. Nevertheless the molecular weight of polymers was significantly reduced after degradation. It was especially visible in case of incubation of samples in phosphate buffer what suggested the chemical hydrolysis of polymer chains. The changes of surface of polyurethanes and their blends, after incubation in both enzymatic solutions, indicated on enzymatic degradation, which had been started despite the lack of mass lost. Polyurethanes and their blends, contained more R,S-PHB in soft segments, were degraded faster.

  9. Environmental risk assessment and management of engineered nanomaterials - The role of ecotoxicity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune

    the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) launched a seven year long testing programme around the use of standardized OECD test guidelines (TGs) for ENMs, which concluded that the TGs are generally applicable to ENMs, this thesis argues that it is not possible to offer any conclusions based...... to these is the continued examination of the applicability of ecotoxicity testing to encompass the testing of particles, as the tests originally are developed for dissolved chemicals. Furthermore, the ability of such testing to inform environmental risk assessment and environmental risk management, including...... the applicability of these concepts, has been questioned. The present thesis provides an overview of the challenges facing ecotoxicity testing of ENMs and investigates whether we can rely on such testing to inform risk assessment and eventually management of the potential environmental risk of ENMs. Although...

  10. A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz, S.; Sela, E.; Blaha, L.; Braunbeck, T.; Galay-Burgos, M.; Garcia-Franco, M.; Guinea, J.; Kluver, N.; Schirmer, K.; Tanneberger, K.; Tobor-Kaplon, M.; Witters, H.; Belanger, S.; Benfenati, E.; Creton, S.; Cronin, M.T.D.; Eggen, R.I.L.; Embry, M.; Ekman, D.; Gourmelon, A.; Halder, M.; Hardy, B.; Hartung, T.; Hubesch, B.; Jungmann, D.; Lampi, M.A.; Lee, van L.; Leonard, M.; Kuster, E.; Lillicrap, A.; Luckenbach, T.; Murk, A.J.; Navas, J.M.; Peijnenburg, W.; Repetto, G.; Salinas, E.; Schuurmann, G.; Spielmann, H.; Tollefsen, K.E.; Walter-Rohde, S.; Whale, G.; Wheeler, J.R.; Winter, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Electrospun Wool Keratin/Poly(vinyl alcohol Blend Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool keratin/poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA blend nanofibers were fabricated using the electrospinning method in formic acid solutions with different weight ratios of keratin to PVA. The resultant blend nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, and tensile test. SEM images showed that the diameter of the blend nanofibers was affected by the content of keratin in blend solution. FTIR and XRD analyses data demonstrated that there were good interactions between keratin and PVA in the blended nanofibers caused by possibly hydrogen bonds. The TGA study revealed that the thermal stability of the blend nanofibers was between those of keratin and PVA. Tensile test indicated that the addition of PVA was able to improve the mechanical properties of the electrospun nanofibers.

  12. Agarose and methylcellulose hydrogel blends for nerve regeneration applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Benton C.; Minner, Eric J.; Wiseman, Sherri L.; Klank, Rebecca L.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2008-06-01

    Trauma sustained to the central nervous system is a debilitating problem for thousands of people worldwide. Neuronal regeneration within the central nervous system is hindered by several factors, making a multi-faceted approach necessary. Two factors contributing to injury are the irregular geometry of injured sites and the absence of tissue to hold potential nerve guides and drug therapies. Biocompatible hydrogels, injectable at room temperature, that rapidly solidify at physiological temperatures (37 °C) are beneficial materials that could hold nerve guidance channels in place and be loaded with therapeutic agents to aid wound healing. Our studies have shown that thermoreversible methylcellulose can be combined with agarose to create hydrogel blends that accommodate these properties. Three separate novel hydrogel blends were created by mixing methylcellulose with one of the three different agaroses. Gelation time tests show that the blends solidify at a faster rate than base methylcellulose at 37 °C. Rheological data showed that the elastic modulus of the hydrogel blends rapidly increases at 37 °C. Culturing experiments reveal that the morphology of dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons was not altered when the hydrogels were placed onto the cells. The different blends were further assessed using dissolution tests, pore size evaluations using scanning electron microscopy and measuring the force required for injection. This research demonstrates that blends of agarose and methylcellulose solidify much more quickly than plain methylcellulose, while solidifying at physiological temperatures where agarose cannot. These hydrogel blends, which solidify at physiological temperatures naturally, do not require ultraviolet light or synthetic chemical cross linkers to facilitate solidification. Thus, these hydrogel blends have potential use in delivering therapeutics and holding scaffolding in place within the nervous system.

  13. Development of a multimedia-based interactive eLearning programme combined with the conception of online tests as a supplement to the optional course “Laboratory diagnostics for viral infections in horses” in a context of blended learning

    OpenAIRE

    Lesser, Anja Karen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this doctoral thesis was to supplement the traditional optional compulsory course “Laboratory diagnostics for viral infections in horses” with eLearning components in a context of blended learning. Blended learning is a form of eLearning which combines training ses¬sions with compulsory attendance and computer-aided, internet-based learning. The work consisted of four essential parts: 1.) development of the eLearning programme with prior determination of requirements, 2.) de...

  14. Chronic disease risk management: Combining genetic testing with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrigenetics has been used for decades to prevent rare monogenic disorders such as phenylketonuria. Gene-diet interaction can now also be targeted to prevent or reduce the risk of many chronic conditions long before clinical manifestation. This multidisciplinary approach unites conventional medicine with genetics and ...

  15. Morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of PVC/MMT nanocomposites prepared by solution blending and solution blending + melt compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madaleno, Liliana Andreia Oliveira; Schjødt-Thomsen, Jan; Pinto, José Cruz

    2010-01-01

    and solution blending + melt compounding The effects on morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of the PVC/MMT nanocomposites were studied by varying the amount of Na-MMT and OMMT in both methods SEM and XRD analysis revealed that possible intercalated and exfoliated structures were obtained in all....../MMT nanocomposites prepared by solution blending Vicar tests revealed a significant decrease in Vicar softening temperature of PVC/MMT nanocomposites prepared by solution blending + melt compounding compared to unfilled PVC The mechanical properties of the PVC/MMT nanocomposites were, in general, greatly improved......Two types of montmorillonite (MMT), natural sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT), in different amounts of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 25 phr (parts per hundred resin), were dispersed in rigid poly (vinyl chloride) by two different methods solution blending...

  16. Correlates of sexually transmissible infection testing among a sample of at-risk young Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Caitlin H; Vella, Alyce M; Hellard, Margaret E; Lim, Megan S C

    2017-07-01

    Annual chlamydia testing is recommended for all sexually active Australians aged 15-29 years; however, the testing rate is below recommended levels. Three surveys at a Melbourne music festival were conducted over 2012-14 to identify correlates of sexually transmissible infection (STI) testing among young people at risk of STIs. In total, 3588 participants were recruited; 72% reported having sex in the past year. Based on sexual behaviours, 38% of sexually active participants were classified as at risk of contracting STIs. In the past year, at-risk participants had significantly higher odds of reporting a STI test (37%) than participants classified as not at risk (24%) (OR=1.9; CI=1.6-2.3). Among at-risk participants, correlates of STI testing in the past year included being aged 20-24 years, visiting a GP, higher knowledge levels, earlier sexual debut and reporting more than five lifetime partners. Testing rates in our sample did not meet levels required to reduce chlamydia prevalence. However, the testing rate was higher in at-risk participants than participants who were not at risk. Future programs aiming to increase chlamydia testing should improve knowledge and promote the importance of testing after risk exposure, particularly among 16- to 19-year-olds.

  17. Mechanical properties, morphology, and hydrolytic degradation behavior of polylactic acid / natural rubber blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Y. F.; Aznan, A. N. A.; Anuar, H.

    2018-01-01

    Due to its biodegradability and renewability, polylactic acid (PLA) has been receiving enormous attention as a potential candidate to replace petroleum based polymers. However, PLA has limitation due to its inherent brittleness. In order to overcome this limitation, blending PLA with elastomeric materials such as natural rubber (NR) are commonly reported. In previous, several researches on PLA/NR blend had been reported, with most of them evaluated the mechanical properties. On the other hand, study of degradation behavior is significance of importance, as controlling materials degradation is required in some applications. This research studied the effect of blend composition on mechanical properties, morphology development, and hydrolytic degradation behavior of PLA/NR blends. Various compositions of PLA/NR blends were prepared by melt blending technique. Tensile test and impact test of the blends were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties. Addition of NR improved the elongation at break and impact strength of the blends, but reduced the tensile strength and stiffness of the specimens. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) measurements of the blends displayed two peaks at temperature -70˚C which corresponded to T g of NR and 65˚C which corresponded to T g of PLA. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) micrograph of 70/30 PLA/NR specimen also showed two distinct phases, which lead to indication that PLA/NR blends are immiscible. Hydrolytic degradation behavior was evaluated by measuring the remaining weight of the samples immersed in sodium hydroxide solution for a predetermined times. It was shown that the degradation behavior of PLA/NR blends is affected by composition of the blends, with 100 PLA and 70/30 PLA/NR blend showed the fastest degradation rate and 100 NR displayed the slowest one.

  18. Do laboratory frontal crash test programs predict driver fatality risk? Evidence from within vehicle line variation in test ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, David W; Hoffer, George E

    2007-09-01

    A number of studies have examined whether the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) frontal crash test results reliably indicate the risk of fatality or injury in serious crashes. The conclusions of these studies are mixed. Generally, studies that examine crashes in the circumstances as close as possible to those of the laboratory test find that crash test results do predict real-world risk, but studies of crashes outside those specific circumstances find either no support for the predictive validity of crash test results or limited support with important inconsistencies. We provide a new test of the predictive validity of the crash test results using information from multiple crash tests within vehicle lines, thus controlling for systematic differences in driver behavior across vehicle lines. Among drivers of passenger cars, we find large, statistically significant differences in fatality risk for vehicles with one- to four-star NHTSA ratings versus a five-star rating. We also examine the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's frontal offset crash test, though our sample of vehicle lines tested twice or more is considerably smaller than for NHTSA ratings. Our results also support the predictive validity of the frontal offset crash test results for passenger cars, but not for trucks.

  19. Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-05-02

    This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

  20. Blends of zein and nylon-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blends of zein and nylon-6(55k)were used to produce solution cast films and electrospun fibers. Zein was blended with nylon-6 in formic acid solution. When the amount of nylon-6 was 8% or less a compatible blend formed. The blend was determined to be compatible based on physical property measurement...

  1. The Role of Alternative Testing Strategies in Environmental Risk Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Holden, Patricia; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2017-01-01

    ) workshop in Washington, D.C. and serves as the point of depature for this paper. Here we present the main outcomes by describing and defining the use of ATS for ENMs as well as discussing its future role in environmental risk science. We conclude that diversity in testing should be encouraged to avoid...... chemicals are challenged. Nonetheless, standardized whole organism animal testing is still considered the gold standard for environmental risk assessment. Advancing risk analysis of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) through ATS was discussed in September 2014 at an international Society for Risk Analysis (SRA...... be utilized to skip uncertain environmental extrapolations and give rise to more accurate risk analysis....

  2. Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/polyolefin (PO) blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiwei

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a very important material with high versatility and superior physical properties. Melt blending TPU with metallocene polyolefin (PO) can lower TPU cost and improve polyolefin properties like abrasion resistance, adhesion, and paintability. Since TPU and non-polar PO blends are completely immiscible, efficient compatibilizers become the key issue and remain challenging. My main thesis work is to develop and study compatibilized TPU/PO blends. Although reactive compatibilization is considered the most efficient method, fast interfacial reactions between highly reactive functional groups are necessary to generate compatibilizers within usually short processing time. It is known that the urethane linkage (carbamate -NHCOO-) in TPU can reversibly dissociate to generate highly reactive isocyanates at melt temperatures. To find out the best reactive compatibilization, three approaches were employed on different molecular scales: (1) model urethane compound (dibutyl & dioctyl 4,4'-methylenebis(phenyl carbamate)) and small functional molecule (primary amine, secondary amine, hydroxyl, acid, anhydride, and epoxide) reactions at 200°C monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared to examine the basic chemistry; (2) short, model TPU's with different chemical structures blended with functional polymers including poly(ethylene glycol) and polybutadiene to explore the effect of interface in immiscible mixtures; (3) melt blending of a commercial TPU with polypropylene (PP), further involving more complicated morphology, using different types of functional PP's (note: amine functional PP's were prepared by melt amination) as compatibilizers followed by rheological, morphological, thermal, and mechanical characterizations. Besides the core thesis project on TPU blends, other related work that has been accomplished includes: (1) adhesion between TPU and PP; (2) rheological properties of TPU; (3) block copolymer formation

  3. Prostate-specific antigen testing in inner London general practices: are those at higher risk most likely to get tested?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nderitu, Paul; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Ashworth, Mark; Mathur, Rohini; Hull, Sally; Dudek, Alexandra; Chowdhury, Simon

    2016-07-12

    To investigate the association between factors influencing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing prevalence including prostate cancer risk factors (age, ethnicity, obesity) and non-risk factors (social deprivation and comorbidity). A cross-sectional database of 136 inner London general practices from 1 August 2009 to 31 July 2014. Men aged ≥40 years without prostate cancer were included (n=150 481). Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association between PSA testing and age, ethnicity, social deprivation, body mass index (BMI) and comorbidity while adjusting for age, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostatitis and tamsulosin or finasteride use. PSA testing prevalence was 8.2% (2013-2014), and the mean age was 54 years (SD 11). PSA testing was positively associated with age (OR 70-74 years compared to 40-44 years: 7.34 (95% CI 6.82 to 7.90)), ethnicity (black) (OR compared to white: 1.78 (95% CI 1.71 to 1.85)), increasing BMI and cardiovascular comorbidity. Testing was negatively associated with Chinese ethnicity and with increasing social deprivation. PSA testing among black patients was higher compared to that among white patients, which differs from lower testing rates seen in previous studies. PSA testing was positively associated with prostate cancer risk factors and non-risk factors. Association with non-risk factors may increase the risk of unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Blended Learning: The Student Viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantakumari, N; Sajith, P

    2015-01-01

    Blended learning (BL) is defined as "a way of meeting the challenges of tailoring learning and development to the needs of individuals by integrating the innovative and technological advances offered by online learning with the interaction and participation offered in the best of traditional learning." The Gulf Medical University (GMU), Ajman, UAE, offers a number of courses which incorporate BL with contact classes and online component on an E-learning platform. Insufficient learning satisfaction has been stated as an obstacle to its implementation and efficacy. To determine the students' perceptions toward BL which in turn will determine their satisfaction and the efficacy of the courses offered. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the GMU, Ajman between January and December 2013. Perceptions of BL process, content, and ease of use were collected from 75 students enrolled in the certificate courses offered by the university using a questionnaire. Student perceptions were assessed using Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test on the basis of gender, age, and course enrollment. The median scores of all the questions in the three domains were above three suggesting positive perceptions on BL. The distribution of perceptions was similar between gender and age. However, significant differences were observed in the course enrollment (P = 0.02). Students hold a positive perception of the BL courses being offered in this university. The difference in perceptions among students of different courses suggest that the BL format offered needs modification according to course content to improve its perception.

  5. Methodology to identify risk-significant components for inservice inspection and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.T.; Hartley, R.S.; Jones, J.L. Jr.; Kido, C.; Phillips, J.H.

    1992-08-01

    Periodic inspection and testing of vital system components should be performed to ensure the safe and reliable operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear processing facilities. Probabilistic techniques may be used to help identify and rank components by their relative risk. A risk-based ranking would allow varied DOE sites to implement inspection and testing programs in an effective and cost-efficient manner. This report describes a methodology that can be used to rank components, while addressing multiple risk issues

  6. Polyamide blend-based nanocomposites: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Chow

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymer blend nanocomposites have been considered as a stimulating route for creating a new type of high performance material that combines the advantages of polymer blends and the merits of polymer nanocomposites. In nanocomposites with multiphase matrices, the concept of using nanofillers to improve select properties (e.g., mechanical, thermal, chemical, etc of a polymer blend, as well as to modify and stabilize the blend morphology has received a great deal of interest. This review reports recent advances in the field of polyamide (PA blend-based nanocomposites. Emphasis is placed on the PA-rich blends produced by blending with other thermoplastics in the presence of nanofillers. The processing and properties of PA blend-based nanocomposites with nanofillers are discussed. In addition, the mechanical properties and morphology changes of PA blends with the incorporation of nanofillers are described. The issues of compatibility and toughening of PA blend nanocomposites are discussed, and current challenges are highlighted.

  7. Methods and Models of Market Risk Stress-Testing of the Portfolio of Financial Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Karminsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amid instability of financial markets and macroeconomic situation the necessity of improving bank risk-management instrument arises. New economic reality defines the need for searching for more advanced approaches of estimating banks vulnerability to exceptional, but plausible events. Stress-testing belongs to such instruments. The paper reviews and compares the models of market risk stress-testing of the portfolio of different financial instruments. These days the topic of the paper is highly acute due to the fact that now stress-testing is becoming an integral part of anticrisis risk-management amid macroeconomic instability and appearance of new risks together with close interest to the problem of risk-aggregation. The paper outlines the notion of stress-testing and gives coverage of goals, functions of stress-tests and main criteria for market risk stress-testing classification. The paper also stresses special aspects of scenario analysis. Novelty of the research is explained by elaborating the programme of aggregated complex multifactor stress-testing of the portfolio risk based on scenario analysis. The paper highlights modern Russian and foreign models of stress-testing both on solo-basis and complex. The paper lays emphasis on the results of stress-testing and revaluations of positions for all three complex models: methodology of the Central Bank of stress-testing portfolio risk, model relying on correlations analysis and copula model. The models of stress-testing on solo-basis are different for each financial instrument. Parametric StressVaR model is applicable to shares and options stress-testing;model based on "Grek" indicators is used for options; for euroobligation regional factor model is used. Finally some theoretical recommendations about managing market risk of the portfolio are given.

  8. Cost benefit and risk assessment for selected tank waste process testing alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasper, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program to safely manage wastes currently stored in underground tank at the Hanford Site. A TWRS testing and development strategy was recently developed to define long-range TWRS testing plans. The testing and development strategy considered four alternatives. The primary variable in the alternatives is the level of pilot-scale testing involving actual waste. This study evaluates the cost benefit and risks associated with the four alternatives. Four types of risk were evaluated: programmatic schedule risk, process mishap risk, worker risk, and public health risk. The structure of this report is as follows: Section 1 introduces the report subject; Section 2 describes the test strategy alternative evaluation; Section 3 describes the approach used in this study to assess risk and cost benefit; Section 4 describes the assessment methodologies for costs and risks; Section 5 describes the bases and assumptions used to estimate the costs and risks; Section 6 presents the detailed costs and risks; and Section 7 describes the results of the cost benefit analysis and presents conclusions

  9. The relationship of reported HIV risk and history of HIV testing among emergency department patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C.; Freelove, Sarah M.; Langan, Thomas J.; Clark, Melissa A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Seage, George R.; DeGruttola, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Among a random sample of emergency department (ED) patients, determine the extent to which reported risk for HIV is related to ever having been tested for HIV. Methods A random sample of 18–64-year-old patients at an urban, academic, adult ED were surveyed about their history of ever having been tested for HIV and their reported HIV risk behaviors. A reported HIV risk score was calculated from the survey responses and divided into four levels, based upon quartiles of the risk scores. Pearson’s X2 testing was used to compare HIV testing history and level of reported HIV risk. Logistic regression models were created to investigate the association between level of reported HIV risk and the outcome of ever having been tested for HIV. Results Of the 557 participants, 62.1% were female. A larger proportion of females than males (71.4% versus 60.6%; p<0.01) reported they ever had been tested for HIV. Among the 211 males, 11.4% reported no HIV risk, and among the 346 females, 10.7% reported no HIV risk. The proportion of those who had been tested for HIV was greater among those reporting any risk, compared to those reporting no risk, for females (75.4% vs. 37.8%; p<0.001), but not for males (59.9% vs. 66.7%; p<0.52). However, certain high-risk behaviors, such as a history of injection-drug use, were associated with prior HIV testing for both genders. In the logistic regression analyses, there was no relationship between increasing level of reported HIV risk and a history of ever having been tested for HIV for males. For females, a history of ever having been tested was related to increasing level of reported risk, but not in a linear fashion. Conclusions The relationship between reported HIV risk and history of testing among these ED patients was complex and differed by gender. Among these patients, having greater risk did not necessarily mean a higher likelihood of having ever been tested for HIV. PMID:20107290

  10. Ethnicity and HIV risk behaviour, testing and knowledge in Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Tory M.; Hembling, John; Bertrand, Jane T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To describe levels of risky sexual behaviour, HIV testing and HIV knowledge among men and women in Guatemala by ethnic group and to identify adjusted associations between ethnicity and these outcomes. Design. Data on 16,205 women aged 15?49 and 6822 men aged 15?59 from the 2008?2009 Encuesta Nacional de Salud Materno Infantil were used to describe ethnic group differences in sexual behaviour, HIV knowledge and testing. We then controlled for age, education, wealth and other socio-...

  11. The combustion of coal blends in a fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Dulce; Abelha, Pedro; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Cabrita, Isabel

    1999-07-01

    Combustion studies of five coals of different origin were carried out in a laboratory scale fluidised bed combustor. Five blends prepared by mixing two coals based on their petrological characterisation, in varying amounts, were selected to study the possibility of reduction NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} emissions. The results showed that some blends had the opposite behaviour concerning the release of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} in relation to parent coals, and the emissions were higher than expected. The N{sub 2}O amounts observed were, however, in almost all blends tested, lower than predicted values. With some blends, the mixing levels intended to reduce SO{sub 2} were not always found to correspond to those for simultaneous decrease of Nox. Most of the blends studied showed some evidence of interaction between them. Varying the proportion of the blend components was observed to alter the temperatures at which interactions were stronger.

  12. Blended Learning Versus Traditional Lecture in Introductory Nursing Pathophysiology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blissitt, Andrea Marie

    2016-04-01

    Currently, many undergraduate nursing courses use blended-learning course formats with success; however, little evidence exists that supports the use of blended formats in introductory pathophysiology courses. The purpose of this study was to compare the scores on pre- and posttests and course satisfaction between traditional and blended course formats in an introductory nursing pathophysiology course. This study used a quantitative, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized control group, pretest-posttest design. Analysis of covariance compared pre- and posttest scores, and a t test for independent samples compared students' reported course satisfaction of the traditional and blended course formats. Results indicated that the differences in posttest scores were not statistically significant between groups. Students in the traditional group reported statistically significantly higher satisfaction ratings than students in the blended group. The results of this study support the need for further research of using blended learning in introductory pathophysiology courses in undergraduate baccalaureate nursing programs. Further investigation into how satisfaction is affected by course formats is needed. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Antimisting kerosene: Base fuel effects, blending and quality control techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Ernest, J.; Sarohia, V.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with blending of the AMK additive with Jet A, and the base fuel effects on AMK properties are addressed. The results from the evaluation of some of the quality control techniques for AMK are presented. The principal conclusions of this investigation are: significant compositional differences for base fuel (Jet A) within the ASTM specification DI655; higher aromatic content of the base fuel was found to be beneficial for the polymer dissolution at ambient (20 C) temperature; using static mixer technology, the antimisting additive (FM-9) is in-line blended with Jet A, producing AMK which has adequate fire-protection properties 15 to 20 minutes after blending; degradability of freshly blended and equilibrated AMK indicated that maximum degradability is reached after adequate fire protection is obtained; the results of AMK degradability as measured by filter ratio, confirmed previous RAE data that power requirements to decade freshly blended AMK are significantly higher than equilibrated AMK; blending of the additive by using FM-9 concentrate in Jet A produces equilibrated AMK almost instantly; nephelometry offers a simple continuous monitoring capability and is used as a real time quality control device for AMK; and trajectory (jet thurst) and pressure drop tests are useful laboratory techniques for evaluating AMK quality.

  14. Impact of ternary blends of biodiesel on diesel engine performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Pongamia and waste cooking oils are the main non edible oils for biodiesel production in India. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the fuel properties and investigate the impact on engine performance using Pongamia and waste cooking biodiesel and their ternary blend with diesel. The investigation of the fuel properties shows that Pongamia biodiesel and waste cooking biodiesel have poor cold flow property. This will lead to starting problem in the engine operation. To overcome this problem the ternary blends of diesel, waste cooking biodiesel and Pongamia biodiesel are prepared. The cloud and pour point for ternary blend, (WCB20:PB20:D60 were found to be 7 °C and 6.5 °C which are comparable to cloud and pour point of diesel 6 °C and 5 °C, respectively. The result of the test showed that brake specific fuel consumption for Pongamia biodiesel and waste cooking biodiesel is higher than ternary blend, (WCB20:PB20:D60 due to their lower energy content. The brake thermal efficiency of ternary blend and diesel is comparable while the Pongamia and waste cooking biodiesel have low efficiency. The result of investigation showed that ternary blend can be developed as alternate fuel.

  15. Novel bio-based and biodegradable polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengzhe

    Most plastic materials, including high performance thermoplastics and thermosets are produced entirely from petroleum-based products. The volatility of the natural oil markets and the increasing cost of petroleum have led to a push to reduce the dependence on petroleum products. Together with an increase in environmental awareness, this has promoted the use of alternative, biorenewable, environmentally-friendly products, such as biomass. The growing interest in replacing petroleum-based products by inexpensive, renewable, natural materials is important for sustainable development into the future and will have a significant impact on the polymer industry and the environment. This thesis involved characterization and development of two series of novel bio-based polymer blends, namely polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)/polyamide (PA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/soy protein. Blends with different concentrations and compatible microstructures were prepared using twin-screw extruder. For PHA/PA blends, the poor mechanical properties of PHA improved significantly with an excellent combination of strength, stiffness and toughness by adding PA. Furthermore, the effect of blending on the viscoelastic properties has been investigated using small-amplitude oscillatory shear flow experiments as a function of blend composition and angular frequency. The elastic shear modulus (G‧) and complex viscosity of the blends increased significantly with increasing the concentration of PHA. Blending PLA with soy protein aims at reducing production cost, as well as accelerating the biodegradation rate in soil medium. In this work, the mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of the blends were investigated using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile tests.

  16. Risk-based inservice testing program modifications at Palo Verde nuclear generating station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauf, S.; Lindenlaub, B.; Linthicum, R.

    1996-12-01

    Arizona Public Service Company (APS) is investigating changes to the Palo Verde Inservice Testing (IST) Program that are intended to result in the reduction of the required test frequency for various valves in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI IST program. The analytical techniques employed to select candidate valves and to demonstrate that these frequency reductions are acceptable are risk based. The results of the Palo Verde probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), updated in June 1994, and the risk significant determination performed as part of the implementation efforts for 10 CFR 50.65 (the maintenance rule) were used to select candidate valves for extended test intervals. Additional component level evaluations were conducted by an `expert panel.` The decision to pursue these changes was facilitated by the ASME Risk-Based Inservice Testing Research Task Force for which Palo Verde is participating as a pilot plant. The NRC`s increasing acceptance of cost beneficial licensing actions and risk-based submittals also provided incentive to seek these changes. Arizona Public Service is pursuing the risk-based IST program modification in order to reduce the unnecessary regulatory burden of the IST program through qualitative and quantitative analysis consistent with maintaining a high level of plant safety. The objectives of this project at Palo Verde are as follows: (1) Apply risk-based technologies to IST components to determine their risk significance (i.e., high or low). (2) Apply a combination of deterministic and risk-based methods to determine appropriate testing requirements for IST components including improvement of testing methods and frequency intervals for high-risk significant components. (3) Apply risk-based technologies to high-risk significant components identified by the {open_quotes}expert panel{close_quotes} and outside of the IST program to determine whether additional testing requirements are appropriate.

  17. Design of tailor-made chemical blend using a decomposition-based computer-aided approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza; Gernaey, Krist; Manan, Z.A.

    2011-01-01

    methodology for blended liquid products that identifies a set of feasible chemical blends. The blend design problem is formulated as a Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP) model where the objective is to find the optimal blended gasoline or diesel product subject to types of chemicals...... must be stable liquid mixture). In the second stage, the blend candidates have to satisfy a set of target properties that are ranked according to a specified priority. Finally, a short list of candidates, ordered in terms of specified performance criteria, is produced for final testing and selection....... The application of this systematic and computer-aided approach is illustrated through a case study involving the design of blends of gasoline with oxygenated compounds resulting from degradation and fermentation of biomass for use in internal combustion engines. Emphasis is given here on the concepts used...

  18. Brief report: Validation of a quantitative HIV risk prediction tool using a national HIV testing cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukoos, Jason S; Hopkins, Emily; Bucossi, Meggan M; Lyons, Michael S; Rothman, Richard E; White, Douglas A E; Al-Tayyib, Alia A; Bradley-Springer, Lucy; Campbell, Jonathan D; Sabel, Allison L; Thrun, Mark W

    2015-04-15

    Routine screening is recommended for HIV detection. HIV risk estimation remains important. Our goal was to validate the Denver HIV Risk Score using a national cohort from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patients of 13 years and older were included, 4,830,941 HIV tests were performed, and 0.6% newly diagnosed infections were identified. Of all visits, 9% were very low risk (HIV prevalence = 0.20%), 27% low risk (HIV prevalence = 0.17%), 41% moderate risk (HIV prevalence = 0.39%), 17% high risk (HIV prevalence = 1.19%), and 6% very high risk (HIV prevalence = 3.57%). The Denver HIV Risk Score accurately categorized patients into different HIV risk groups.

  19. Coalescence in PLA-PBAT blends under shear flow: Effects of blend preparation and PLA molecular weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nofar, M. [Center for High Performance Polymer and Composite Systems (CREPEC), Chemical Engineering Department, Polytechnique Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4, Canada and CREPEC, Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Heuzey, M. C.; Carreau, P. J., E-mail: pierre.carreau@polymtl.ca [Center for High Performance Polymer and Composite Systems (CREPEC), Chemical Engineering Department, Polytechnique Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Kamal, M. R. [CREPEC, Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Randall, J. [NatureWorks LLC, 15305 Minnetonka Boulevard, Minnetonka, Minnesota 55345 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Blends containing 75 wt. % of an amorphous polylactide (PLA) with two different molecular weights and 25 wt. % of a poly[(butylene adipate)-co-terephthalate] (PBAT) were prepared using either a Brabender batch mixer or a twin-screw extruder. These compounds were selected because blending PLA with PBAT can overcome various drawbacks of PLA such as its brittleness and processability limitations. In this study, we investigated the effects of varying the molecular weight of the PLA matrix and of two different mixing processes on the blend morphology and, further, on droplet coalescence during shearing. The rheological properties of these blends were investigated and the interfacial properties were analyzed using the Palierne emulsion model. Droplet coalescence was investigated by applying shear flows of 0.05 and 0.20 s{sup −1} at a fixed strain of 60. Subsequently, small amplitude oscillatory shear tests were conducted to investigate changes in the viscoelastic properties. The morphology of the blends was also examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. It was observed that the PBAT droplets were much smaller when twin-screw extrusion was used for the blend preparation. Shearing at 0.05 s{sup −1} induced significant droplet coalescence in all blends, but coalescence and changes in the viscoelastic properties were much more pronounced for the PLA-PBAT blend based on a lower molecular weight PLA. The viscoelastic responses were also somehow affected by the thermal degradation of the PLA matrix during the experiments.

  20. Enhancing the Dyeability of Polypropylene Fibers by Melt Blending with Polyethylene Terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Mirjalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attempts were made to modify polypropylene fibers by melt blending with polyethylene terephthalate in order to enhance the dyeability of the resultant fiber. Five blends of polypropylene/polyethylene terephthalate/compatibilizer were prepared and subsequently spun into fibers. Three disperse dyes were used to dye such modified fibers at boiling and 130°C. The dyeing performance of the blend fibers, as well as the morphological, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, of the corresponding blends was characterized by means of spectrophotometry, polarized optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and tensile testing.

  1. Nutrient composition, functional, and pasting properties of unripe cooking banana, pigeon pea, and sweetpotato flour blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohizua, Ehimen R; Adeola, Abiodun A; Idowu, Micheal A; Sobukola, Olajide P; Afolabi, T Adeniyi; Ishola, Raphael O; Ayansina, Simeon O; Oyekale, Tolulope O; Falomo, Ayorinde

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated some quality attributes of unripe cooking banana (UBF), pigeon pea (PPF), and sweetpotato (SPF) flour blends. Simplex centroid mixture design was used to obtain 17 blends from the flours. The nutrient composition, color, and functional properties of the blends were evaluated using standard methods. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and treatment means were compared using Duncan's multiple range test at 5% probability level. There were significant ( p  pigeon pea-sweetpotato flour blends are desirable for alleviating malnutrition in Nigeria and developing new food formulations.

  2. Enhancing the Dyeability of Polypropylene Fibers by Melt Blending with Polyethylene Terephthalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Siamak; Ameri, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Attempts were made to modify polypropylene fibers by melt blending with polyethylene terephthalate in order to enhance the dyeability of the resultant fiber. Five blends of polypropylene/polyethylene terephthalate/compatibilizer were prepared and subsequently spun into fibers. Three disperse dyes were used to dye such modified fibers at boiling and 130°C. The dyeing performance of the blend fibers, as well as the morphological, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, of the corresponding blends was characterized by means of spectrophotometry, polarized optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile testing. PMID:24288485

  3. Concerns about Genetic Testing for Schizophrenia among Young Adults at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ryan E; Friesen, Phoebe; Brucato, Gary; Girgis, Ragy R; Dixon, Lisa

    Genetic tests for schizophrenia may introduce risks and benefits. Among young adults at clinical high-risk for psychosis, little is known about their concerns and how they assess potential risks. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 young adults at clinical high-risk for psychosis to ask about their concerns. Participants expressed concerns about test reliability, data interpretation, stigma, psychological harm, family planning, and privacy. Participants' responses showed some departure from the ethics literature insofar as participants were primarily interested in reporting their results to people to whom they felt emotionally close, and expressed little consideration of biological closeness. Additionally, if tests showed an increased genetic risk for schizophrenia, four clinical high-risk persons felt obligated to tell an employer and another three would "maybe" tell an employer, even in the absence of clinical symptoms. These findings suggest opportunities for clinicians and genetic counselors to intervene with education and support.

  4. PLA and two components silicon rubber blends aiming for frozen foods packaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utai Meekum

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Designing of PLA and two components silicone rubber blends was studies. Frozen food packaging application is the main ultimate aim. The statistical method using 23 DOE was conducted. The standard testing methods, in particular impact testing at sub-zero temperature, were performed. The preliminary blend formula comprised 1.0 phr of silane and polyester polyols, respectively, was initially resolved. Then, the optimize the silicone portion in the blends was determined. Blending formula using 8.0 phr of silicone with respect to PLA matrix gave rise to the overall satisfactory properties. 3. TETA was used as the silicone curing agent and reactively blended onto the ingredients. TETA at 0.4 phr, with respect to the silicone, enhanced the mechanical properties, especially flexibility and toughness, of the PLA/silicone blend. Exceeding the optimal TETA loading would cause the chain scission and also the dilution effects. Hence, marginal inferior properties of the blends were be experienced. The preliminary biodegradability investigation found that the PLA/silicone blend initially triggered at the second week. Its degradation rate was likely to be faster than neat PLA. Keywords: PLA/silicone blends, Mechanical properties, Sub-zero impact strength

  5. Experimental investigation of CI engine combustion, performance and emissions in DEE–kerosene–diesel blends of high DEE concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, K.R.; Thipse, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First ever study on DEE–kerosene–diesel blends used in CI engine. • DEE–diesel blends have reduced the trade-off between PM and NOx of diesel engine. • Optimum performance blend has been found as DE15D. • Adulteration effects of kerosene with diesel have also been investigated. • Additions of kerosene with DE15D blend have deteriorated the overall engine performance. - Abstract: An experimental investigation had been carried out to evaluate the effects of oxygenated cetane improver diethyl ether (DEE) blends with kerosene and diesel on the combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection diesel engine. Initially, 2%, 5%, 8%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% DEE (by volume) were blended into diesel. The DEE–diesel blends have reduced the trade-off between PM and NOx of diesel engine and the optimum performance blend has been found as DE15D. Similarly, 5%, 10% and 15% kerosene (by volume) were blended into diesel to investigate the adulteration effect. In addition, a study was carried out to evaluate the effects of kerosene adulteration on DE15D by blending with 5%, 10% and 15% kerosene (by volume). The engine tests were carried out at 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of full load for all test fuels. Laboratory fuel tests showed that the DEE is completely miscible with diesel and kerosene in any proportion. It was observed that the density, kinematic viscosity and calorific value of the blends decreases, while the oxygen content and cetane number of the blends increases with the concentration of DEE addition. The experimental test results showed that the DEE–kerosene–diesel blends have low brake thermal efficiency, high brake specific fuel consumption, high smoke at full load, low smoke at part load, overall low NO, almost similar CO, high HC at full load and low HC at part load as compared to DE15D blend

  6. Predicting the risk of a false-positive test for women following a mammography screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Olsen, Anne Helene; Schwartz, Walter

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study was to provide a simple estimate of the cumulative risk of a false-positive test for women participating in mammography screening. To test the method, we used data from two well-established, organized mammography screening programmes offering biennial...... screening to women aged 50-69 years in Copenhagen and Fyn, Denmark. METHODS: We defined the outcome from a screen as being either a false-positive test or not a false-positive test. We then tested whether the outcomes from subsequent screens were independent, and afterwards estimated the risk over 10...

  7. Testing risk-taking behavior in Chinese undergraduate students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang Du

    Full Text Available The DOSPERT, developed by Weber, Blais and Betz, can be used to measure risk behaviors in a variety of domains. We investigated the use of this scale in China. The participants were 1144 undergraduate students. After we removed some items that were not homogeneous, a principal component analysis extracted six components that accounted for 44.48% of the variance, a value similar to that obtained in the analysis conducted by Weber et al. Chinese undergraduates scored higher on the investment subscale compared with the results of Weber's study. The analysis of individual differences indicated that there was a significant gender difference in the ethical, investment and health/safety subscales, where males scored significantly higher than females. The type of home location was also significant on the ethical and health/safety subscales, where undergraduates from the countryside scored lower than undergraduates from cities and towns on the ethical subscale, and undergraduates from towns scored higher than those from other two areas on the health/safety subscale. Male undergraduates from towns scored higher than male undergraduates from other areas on the gambling subscale.

  8. Internal Impingement of the Shoulder: A Risk of False Positive Test Outcomes in External Impingement Tests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Leschinger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. External impingement tests are considered as being particularly reliable for identifying subacromial and coracoid shoulder impingement mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if these tests are likely to provoke an internal shoulder impingement mechanism which, in cases of a pathologic condition, can lead to a positive test result. Method. In 37 subjects, the mechanical contact between the glenoid rim and the rotator cuff (RC was measured quantitatively and qualitatively in external impingement test positions using an open MRI system. Results. Mechanical contact of the supraspinatus with the posterosuperior glenoid was present in 30 subjects in the Neer test. In the Hawkins test, the subscapularis was in contact with the anterosuperior glenoid in 33 subjects and the supraspinatus in 18. In the horizontal impingement test, anterosuperior contact of the supraspinatus with the glenoid was identified in 35 subjects. Conclusion. The Neer, Hawkins, and horizontal impingement tests are likely to provoke the mechanism of an internal shoulder impingement. A posterosuperior internal impingement mechanism is being provoked predominately in the Neer test. The Hawkins test narrows the distance between the insertions of the subscapularis and supraspinatus and the anterosuperior labrum, which leads to an anterosuperior impingement mechanism.

  9. Polystyrene/Hyperbranched Polyester Blends and Reactive Polystyrene/Hyperbranched Polyester Blends

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mulkern, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    .... In this work, the incorporation of HBPs in thermoplastic blends was investigated. Several volume fractions of hydroxyl functionalized hyperbranched polyesters were melt blended with nonreactive polystyrene (PS...

  10. Experiences of high-risk pregnant women who were offered a choice between non-invasive prenatal testing, invasive testing or no follow-up test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schendel, Rachel; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Katia; De Boer, Marjon; Coumans, Audrey; Faas, Brigitte; Van Langen, Irene; Lichtenbelt, Klaske; Van Maarle, Merel; Macville, Merryn; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The TRIDENT study (Trial by Dutch laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing) evaluates the implementation of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in the Dutch healthcare system. Here we report on the preferences and experiences of pregnant women at high risk for fetal

  11. Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2012-12-10

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

  12. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh DK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Devinder KA Singh,1 Sharmila GK Pillai,1 Sin Thien Tan,1 Chu Chiau Tai,1 Suzana Shahar2 1Physiotherapy Programme, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, 2Nutrition and Dietetics Programme, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Physical performance and balance declines with aging and may lead to increased risk of falls. Physical performance tests may be useful for initial fall-risk screening test among community-dwelling older adults. Physiological profile assessment (PPA, a composite falls risk assessment tool is reported to have 75% accuracy to screen for physiological falls risk. PPA correlates with Timed Up and Go (TUG test. However, the association between many other commonly used physical performance tests and PPA is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between physiological falls risk measured using PPA and a battery of physical performance tests.Methods: One hundred and forty older adults from a senior citizens club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (94 females, 46 males, aged 60 years and above (65.77±4.61, participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were screened for falls risk using PPA. A battery of physical performance tests that include ten-step test (TST, short physical performance battery (SPPB, functional reach test (FRT, static balance test (SBT, TUG, dominant hand-grip strength (DHGS, and gait speed test (GST were also performed. Spearman’s rank correlation and binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the significantly associated independent variables (physical performance tests with falls risk (dependent variable.Results: Approximately 13% older adults were at high risk of falls categorized using PPA. Significant differences (P<0.05 were demonstrated for age, TST, SPPB, FRT, SBT, TUG between high and low falls risk group. A significant (P<0.01 weak correlation

  13. Performance of Blended Learning in University Teaching:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Reiss

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning as a combination of classroom teaching and e-learning has become a widely represented standard in employee and management development of companies. The exploratory survey “Blended Learning@University” conducted in 2008 investigated the integration of blended learning in higher education. The results of the survey show that the majority of participating academic teachers use blended learning in single courses, but not as a program of study and thus do not exploit the core performance potential of blended learning. According to the study, the main driver of blended learning performance is its embeddedness in higher education. Integrated blended programs of study deliver the best results. In blended learning, learning infrastructure (in terms of software, culture, skills, funding, content providing, etc. does not play the role of a performance driver but serves as an enabler for blended learning.

  14. Adapting a blended motivational interviewing and problem-solving intervention to address risky substance use amongst South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorsdahl, Katherine; Myers, Bronwyn; Ward, Catherine L; Matzopoulos, Richard; Mtukushe, Bulelwa; Nicol, Andrew; Cuijpers, Pim; Stein, Dan J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acceptability and initial substance use outcomes of a blended motivational interviewing (MI) and problem-solving therapy (PST) intervention, delivered by peer counsellors. Twenty people who scored at risk for substance use according to the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) received a five session blended MI-PST intervention and were assessed at baseline and at three months. An open-ended semi-structured interview, designed to identify possible factors that may hinder or promote the acceptability of the intervention was also conducted. Fifteen participants completed the intervention and the three-month follow-up. According to ASSIST scores, participants significantly reduced their substance use (p > 0.001) at the three-month follow-up. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the effect of this intervention more rigorously.

  15. Non-host volatile blend optimization for forest protection against the European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rikard Unelius

    Full Text Available Conifer feeding bark beetles (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae pose a serious economic threat to forest production. Volatiles released by non-host angiosperm plants (so called non-host volatiles, NHV have been shown to reduce the risk of attack by many bark beetle species, including the European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus. However, the most active blend for I. typographus, containing three green leaf volatiles (GLVs in addition to the key compounds trans-conophthorin (tC and verbenone, has been considered too expensive for use in large-scale management. To lower the cost and improve the applicability of NHV, we aim to simplify the blend without compromising its anti-attractant potency. Since the key compound tC is expensive in pure form, we also tested a crude version: technical grade trans-conophthorin (T-tC. In another attempt to find a more cost effective substitute for tC, we evaluated a more readily synthesized analog: dehydro-conophthorin (DHC. Our results showed that 1-hexanol alone could replace the three-component GLV blend containing 1-hexanol, (3Z-hexen-1-ol, and (2E-hexen-1-ol. Furthermore, the release rate of tC could be reduced from 5 mg/day to 0.5 mg/day in a blend with 1-hexanol and (--verbenone without compromising the anti-attractant activity. We further show that T-tC was comparable with tC, whereas DHC was a less effective anti-attractant. DHC also elicited weaker physiological responses in the tC-responding olfactory receptor neuron class, providing a likely mechanistic explanation for its weaker anti-attractive effect. Our results suggest a blend consisting of (--verbenone, 1-hexanol and technical trans-conophthorin as a cost-efficient anti-attractant for forest protection against I. typographus.

  16. Non-Host Volatile Blend Optimization for Forest Protection against the European Spruce Bark Beetle, Ips typographus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unelius, C. Rikard; Schiebe, Christian; Bohman, Björn; Andersson, Martin N.; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Conifer feeding bark beetles (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) pose a serious economic threat to forest production. Volatiles released by non-host angiosperm plants (so called non-host volatiles, NHV) have been shown to reduce the risk of attack by many bark beetle species, including the European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus. However, the most active blend for I. typographus, containing three green leaf volatiles (GLVs) in addition to the key compounds trans-conophthorin (tC) and verbenone, has been considered too expensive for use in large-scale management. To lower the cost and improve the applicability of NHV, we aim to simplify the blend without compromising its anti-attractant potency. Since the key compound tC is expensive in pure form, we also tested a crude version: technical grade trans-conophthorin (T-tC). In another attempt to find a more cost effective substitute for tC, we evaluated a more readily synthesized analog: dehydro-conophthorin (DHC). Our results showed that 1-hexanol alone could replace the three-component GLV blend containing 1-hexanol, (3Z)-hexen-1-ol, and (2E)-hexen-1-ol. Furthermore, the release rate of tC could be reduced from 5 mg/day to 0.5 mg/day in a blend with 1-hexanol and (–)-verbenone without compromising the anti-attractant activity. We further show that T-tC was comparable with tC, whereas DHC was a less effective anti-attractant. DHC also elicited weaker physiological responses in the tC-responding olfactory receptor neuron class, providing a likely mechanistic explanation for its weaker anti-attractive effect. Our results suggest a blend consisting of (–)-verbenone, 1-hexanol and technical trans-conophthorin as a cost-efficient anti-attractant for forest protection against I. typographus. PMID:24454855

  17. Tensile behaviour of blends of poly(vinylidene fluoride) with poly(methyl methacrylate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Chung, Shirley Y.

    1990-01-01

    Blends of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVF2) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were prepared over a wide concentration range and tested in tension at the same relative temperature below the glass transition. In nearly all blends, under conditions favoring disentanglement, (decrease in strain rate, or increase in test temperature), the yield stress and drawing stress decreased while the breaking strain increased. For materials with about the same degree of crystallinity, those with a higher proportion of amorphous PVF2 exhibited brittle-like behavior as a result of interlamellar tie molecules. In the semicrystalline blends, yield stress remains high as the test temperature approaches Tg, whereas in the amorphous blends the yield stress falls to zero near Tg. Results of physical aging support the role of interlamellar ties which cause semicrystalline blends to exhibit aging at temperatures above Tg.

  18. Application of various techniques for predicting coke CSR from coal blend properties through laboratory scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, P.S.; Guha, M.; Chakraborty, D.; Krishnan, S.H.; Banerjee, P.K. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2005-07-01

    The study is aimed to fulfill the need of a model that will predict the coke properties from coal blend characteristics so that optimisation of coal blends for producing desired quality of stamp charged coke could be done easily, quickly and with lesser number of carbonisation tests in a 7-kg test oven. To achieve the above goal, different coal blends were formulated to realise sufficient change in each of the blend variables and tests were conducted in the laboratory. The input variables, data and output variables coke strength after reaction (CSR) and coke reactivity index (CSRI) data were generated. Regression analyses and artificial neural network models with different number of hidden number of hidden layers and nodes were used to predict the coke CSR from various combinations of 8 input variables. From the results obtained through all these analyses, it can be concluded that coke CSR can be predicted with reasonable accuracy from coal blend characteristics. 7 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Blended E-Learning as a Requirement for Teaching EFL in a Thai Academic Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananuraksakul, Noparat

    2016-01-01

    This paper results from a pilot study in a Thai academic context testing two hypotheses. First, blended e-learning required by an institution can motivate learners extrinsically to learn EFL. Second, blended e-learning can enhance learners' positive attitudes toward learning EFL. The hypotheses were constructed based on an implication that Thai…

  20. Polypropylene-rubber blends:1. the effect of matrix properties on the impact behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, A.; van der Wal, A.; Mulder, J.J.; Oderkerk, J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of matrix properties, i.e. crystallinity and molecular weight, on the impact behaviour of polypropylene–EPDM blends was studied. The blends were made on a twin-screw extruder. The impact strength was determined as a function of temperature, using a notched Izod impact test. The matrix

  1. Experimental investigation on Performance and Emission Characteristics of J20, P20, N20 Biodiesel blends and Sound Characteristics of P20 Biodiesel blend Used in Single Cylinder Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    rajasekar, R.; karthik, N.; Xavier, Goldwin

    2017-05-01

    Present work provides the effect of biodiesel blends and Sound Characteristics of P20 Biodiesel blend compared with Performance and emission Characteristics of diesel. Methods and analysis biodiesel blends was prepared by the Transesterification Process. Experiments were conducted in single cylinder constant speed direct injection diesel engine for various test fuels. Research is mainly focused on pongamia oil. It was observed that a 20% Pongamia oil blends and its properties were similar to diesel. The results showed that 20% Pongamia oil blends gave better performance, less in noise and emission compared with ester of Jatropha and neem oil blends. Hence Pongamia blends can be used in existing diesel engine without compromising the engine performance.

  2. Blending Words Found In Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyatmi Giyatmi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There are many new words from the social media such as Netizen, Trentop, and Delcon. Those words include in blending. Blending is one of word formations combining two clipped words to form a brand new word. The researchers are interested in analyzing blend words used in the social media such as Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and Blackberry Messenger. This research aims at (1 finding blend words used in the social media (2 describing kinds of blend words used in social media (3 describing the process of blend word formation used in the social media. This research uses some theories dealing with definition of blending and kinds of blending. This research belongs to descriptive qualitative research. Data of the research are English blend words used in social media. Data sources of this research are websites consisting of some English words used in social media and some social media users as the informant. Techniques of data collecting in this research are observation and simak catat. Observation is by observing some websites consisting of some English words used in social media. Simak catat is done by taking some notes on the data and encoding in symbols such as No/Blend words/Kinds of Blending. The researchers use source triangulation to check the data from the researchers with the informant and theory triangulation to determine kinds of blending and blend word formation in social media. There are115 data of blend words. Those data consists of 65 data of Instagram, 47 data of Twitter, 1 datum of Facebook, and 2 data of Blackberry Messenger. There are 2 types of blending used in social media;108 data of blending with clipping and 7 data of blending with overlapping. There are 10 ways of blend word formation found in this research.

  3. A novel fortified blended flour, corn-soy blend "plus-plus," is not inferior to lipid-based ready-to-use supplementary foods for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Malawian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrone, Lacey N; Trehan, Indi; Meuli, Gus J; Wang, Richard J; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Maleta, Kenneth; Manary, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) are often treated with fortified blended flours, most commonly a corn-soy blend (CSB). However, recovery rates remain fortified with oil and dry skim milk, "CSB++," has been developed. In this trial we compared CSB++ with 2 RUSF products for the treatment of MAM to test the hypothesis that the recovery rate achieved with CSB++ will not be >5% worse than that achieved with either RUSF. We conducted a prospective, randomized, investigator-blinded, controlled noninferiority trial involving rural Malawian children aged 6-59 mo with MAM. Children received 75 kcal CSB++ · kg(-1) · d(-1), locally produced soy RUSF, or an imported soy/whey RUSF for ≤12 wk. The recovery rate for CSB++ (n = 763 of 888; 85.9%) was similar to that for soy RUSF (795 of 806, 87.7%; risk difference: -1.82%; 95% CI: -4.95%, 1.30%) and soy/whey RUSF (807 of 918, 87.9%; risk difference: -1.99%; 95% CI: -5.10%, 1.13%). On average, children who received CSB++ required 2 d longer to recover, and the rate of weight gain was less than that with either RUSF, although height gain was the same among all 3 foods studied. A novel, locally produced, fortified blended flour (CSB++) was not inferior to a locally produced soy RUSF and an imported soy/whey RUSF in facilitating recovery from MAM. The recovery rate observed for CSB++ was higher than that for any other fortified blended flour tested previously. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00998517.

  4. A novel fortified blended flour, corn-soy blend “plus-plus,” is not inferior to lipid-based ready-to-use supplementary foods for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Malawian children12345

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrone, Lacey N; Trehan, Indi; Meuli, Gus J; Wang, Richard J; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Maleta, Kenneth; Manary, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) are often treated with fortified blended flours, most commonly a corn-soy blend (CSB). However, recovery rates remain fortified with oil and dry skim milk, “CSB++,” has been developed. Objective: In this trial we compared CSB++ with 2 RUSF products for the treatment of MAM to test the hypothesis that the recovery rate achieved with CSB++ will not be >5% worse than that achieved with either RUSF. Design: We conducted a prospective, randomized, investigator-blinded, controlled noninferiority trial involving rural Malawian children aged 6–59 mo with MAM. Children received 75 kcal CSB++ · kg−1 · d−1, locally produced soy RUSF, or an imported soy/whey RUSF for ≤12 wk. Results: The recovery rate for CSB++ (n = 763 of 888; 85.9%) was similar to that for soy RUSF (795 of 806, 87.7%; risk difference: −1.82%; 95% CI: −4.95%, 1.30%) and soy/whey RUSF (807 of 918, 87.9%; risk difference: −1.99%; 95% CI: −5.10%, 1.13%). On average, children who received CSB++ required 2 d longer to recover, and the rate of weight gain was less than that with either RUSF, although height gain was the same among all 3 foods studied. Conclusions: A novel, locally produced, fortified blended flour (CSB++) was not inferior to a locally produced soy RUSF and an imported soy/whey RUSF in facilitating recovery from MAM. The recovery rate observed for CSB++ was higher than that for any other fortified blended flour tested previously. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00998517. PMID:22170366

  5. Test and cull of high risk Coxiella burnetii infected pregnant dairy goats is not feasible due to poor test performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogerwerf, Lenny; Koop, Gerrit; Klinkenberg, Don; Roest, Hendrik I J; Vellema, Piet; Nielen, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    A major human Q fever epidemic occurred in The Netherlands during 2007-2009. In response, all pregnant goats from infected herds were culled before the 2010 kidding season without individual testing. The aim of this study was to assess whether high risk animals from recently infected naive herds can

  6. Testing the Predictive Validity of the Hendrich II Fall Risk Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyesil; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2018-03-01

    Cumulative data on patient fall risk have been compiled in electronic medical records systems, and it is possible to test the validity of fall-risk assessment tools using these data between the times of admission and occurrence of a fall. The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model scores assessed during three time points of hospital stays were extracted and used for testing the predictive validity: (a) upon admission, (b) when the maximum fall-risk score from admission to falling or discharge, and (c) immediately before falling or discharge. Predictive validity was examined using seven predictive indicators. In addition, logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that significantly affect the occurrence of a fall. Among the different time points, the maximum fall-risk score assessed between admission and falling or discharge showed the best predictive performance. Confusion or disorientation and having a poor ability to rise from a sitting position were significant risk factors for a fall.

  7. Electrospun gelatin/polyurethane blended nanofibers for wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Lee, Jung Bok; Kwon, Il Keun [Department of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Ryul; Park, Sang Hyuk [Conservative Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seong Ho, E-mail: kwoni@khu.ac.k [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    In this study, we prepared a blended nanofiber scaffold using synthetic and natural polymers, polyurethane (PU) and gelatin respectively, using the electrospinning method to prepare a material for wound dressing. In order to confirm the properties of this gelatin/PU blended nanofiber scaffold, we performed scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, contact angle, water uptake, mechanical property, recovery, and degradation tests, and cellular response. The results obtained indicate that the mean diameter of these nanofibers was uniformly electrospun and ranged from 0.4 to 2.1{mu}m. According to the results, when the amount of gelatin in the blended solution decreased, the contact angle increased and water uptake of the scaffold decreased concurrently. In the mechanical tests, the blended nanofibrous scaffolds were elastic, and elasticity increased as the total amount of PU increased. Moreover, as the total amount of gelatin increased, the cell proliferation increased with the same amount of culture time. Therefore, this gelatin/PU blended nanofiber scaffold has potential application for use as a wound dressing.

  8. Blended Learning: enabling Higher Education Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Matheos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning research and practice have been areas of growth for two decades in Canada, with over 95% of Canadian higher education institutions involved in some form of blended learning. Despite strong evidence based research and practice blended learning, for the most part, has remained at sidelined in Canadian universities. The article argues the need for blended learning to situate itself within the timely and crucial Higher Education Reform (HER agenda. By aligning the affordances of blended learning with the components of HER, blended learning can clearly serve as an enabler for HER.

  9. Blended Learning: The Student Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantakumari, N; Sajith, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blended learning (BL) is defined as “a way of meeting the challenges of tailoring learning and development to the needs of individuals by integrating the innovative and technological advances offered by online learning with the interaction and participation offered in the best of traditional learning.” The Gulf Medical University (GMU), Ajman, UAE, offers a number of courses which incorporate BL with contact classes and online component on an E-learning platform. Insufficient learning satisfaction has been stated as an obstacle to its implementation and efficacy. Aim: To determine the students’ perceptions toward BL which in turn will determine their satisfaction and the efficacy of the courses offered. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the GMU, Ajman between January and December 2013. Perceptions of BL process, content, and ease of use were collected from 75 students enrolled in the certificate courses offered by the university using a questionnaire. Student perceptions were assessed using Mann–Whitney U-test and Kruskal–Wallis test on the basis of gender, age, and course enrollment. Results: The median scores of all the questions in the three domains were above three suggesting positive perceptions on BL. The distribution of perceptions was similar between gender and age. However, significant differences were observed in the course enrollment (P = 0.02). Conclusion Students hold a positive perception of the BL courses being offered in this university. The difference in perceptions among students of different courses suggest that the BL format offered needs modification according to course content to improve its perception. PMID:26500788

  10. Risks associated with genetic testing: health insurance discrimination or simply business as usual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, K K

    2000-01-01

    Doctors can test patients for mutations that put them at high risk for hereditary forms of such diseases as breast and ovarian cancer. Even though the opportunities for disease prevention using genetic testing will increase with time, the risks of testing, which include insurance loss and employment discrimination, currently make testing problematic. Some have proposed making use of genetic information in health insurance underwriting illegal. But in the current system of risk-based underwriting, it is hard to imagine that insurance companies will willingly forego access to a growing body of information on risk. If the American public chooses to limit the use of genetic information, a reassessment of current laws or methods of paying for health care will be needed.

  11. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation ...

  12. Kinetic and morphological differentiation of ettringites in plain and blended Portland cements with metakaolin and the ASTM C 452-68 test. Part II: Morphological differentiation by SEM and XRD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talero, R.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The same cementitious materials (OPCs, SRPCs and matekaolin, MK, the same blended cements and the same ASTM C 452-68 test than in Part I, were used. Other complementary determinations were: chemical analysis of cementing materials, SEM and XRD analysis of ettringites and specific properties of some cement tested and of their pastes.The experimental results have also demonstrated that when 7.0% SO3, equivalent to 15.05% of gypsum, was added to the M pozzolan-containing Portland cement and tested with the ASTM C 452-68 method, it was not found to behave aggressively but rather as “setting regulator ”, because the increase in mechanical strengths over time and setting times in these mixes were, therefore, similar to the pattern observed in any PC. However, when the gypsum content was raised to triple than that amount (21.0% SO3, it behaved aggressively. In both cases, logically, ettringite from both origins were involved in the resulting beneficial or adverse behavior.En esta Parte II se utilizaron los mismos materiales cementíceos (CPO, CPRS, y metakaolín, MK, los mismos cementos de mezcla y el mismo método de ensayo ASTM C 452-68 que en la Parte I. Otras determinaciones complementarias fueron: análisis químico de los materiales cementíceos, análisis por DRX y SEM de ettringitas y propiedades específicas de algunos cementos ensayados y de sus pastas.Los resultados experimentales obtenidos han demostrado también que, el 7.0% de SO3 presente en los 30 cementos de mezcla con MK, ensayados conforme el método ASTM C 452-68, no se comporta como agresivo sino como ”regulador de fraguado”, porque los tiempos de fraguado y el aumento de resistencias mecánicas fueron como los de cualquier CP. De aquí que algunos de esos cementos de mezcla puedan ser considerados “cementos hidráulicos expansivos”, el resto, no. Sin embargo, cuando la cantidad de yeso aportada fue el triple (21,0% SO3, se comportó como agresivo, motivo por el cual

  13. Risk management in organic coffee supply chains : testing the usefulness of critical risk models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brusselaers, J.F.; Benninga, J.; Hennen, W.H.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the findings of the analysis of the supply chain of organic coffee from Uganda to the Netherlands using a Chain Risk Model (CRM). The CRM considers contamination of organic coffee with chemicals as a threat for the supply chain, and analyses the consequences of contamination in

  14. Characterization of an Experimental Referee Broadened Specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel and ERBS fuel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, G. T.

    1982-01-01

    Characterization data and comparisons of these data are presented for three individual lots of a research test fuel designated as an Experimental Referee Broadened Specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel. This research fuel, which is a blend of kerosene and hydrotreated catalytic gas oil, is a representation of a kerojet fuel with broadened properties. To lower the hydrogen content of the ERBS fuel, a blending stock, composed of xylene bottoms and hydrotreated catalytic gas oil, was developed and employed to produce two different ERBS fuel blends. The ERBS fuel blends and the blending stock were also characterized and the results for the blends are compared to those of the original ERBS fuel. The characterization results indicate that with the exception of the freezing point for ERBS lot 2, which was slightly high, the three lots, produced over a 2 year period, met all general fuel requirements. However, although the properties of the fuels were found to be fairly consistent, there were differences in composition. Similarly, all major requirements for the ERBS fuel blends were met or closely approached, and the properties of the blended fuels were found to generally reflect those expected for the proportions of ERBS fuel and blending stock used in their production.

  15. Nutrition-Related Cancer Prevention Cognitions and Behavioral Intentions: Testing the Risk Perception Attitude Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W.; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Hesse, Bradford W.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether the risk perception attitude framework predicted nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions. Data from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed to assess respondents' reported likelihood of developing cancer (risk) and perceptions of whether they could lower their…

  16. 12 CFR 652.100 - Audit of the risk-based capital stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit of the risk-based capital stress test. 652.100 Section 652.100 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS Risk-Based Capital Requirements § 652.100 Audit of...

  17. BLENDED TECHNOLOGY IN LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Alexandrovna Kameneva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the use of information technologies in the context of a blended technology approach to learning foreign languages in higher education institutions. Distance learning tools can be categorized as being synchronous (webinar, video conferencing, case-technology, chat, ICQ, Skype, interactive whiteboards or asynchronous (blogs, forums, Twitter, video and audio podcasts, wikis, on-line testing. Sociological and psychological aspects of their application in the educational process are also considered.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-8-41

  18. Particulate matter emissions from a heavy duty vehicle fuelled by petroleum diesel and used cooking oil blends

    OpenAIRE

    Dizayi,; Li, HU; Hadavi,; Tomlin, AS

    2015-01-01

    Fuel characteristic and exhaust particulate emissions tests were carried out for a EURO5 compliant Heavy Duty Vehicle operating on both pure petroleum diesel (PD) and used cooking oil (C2G Ultra Biofuel) PD blends under real world driving conditions. Fuel tests showed that fuel temperature, substitution ratio and engine speed play a key role in determining the spray characteristics of the Ultra Biofuel blends. However, under real world operating conditions, the Bioltec fuel blending system wa...

  19. Evaluating a new marker for risk prediction using the test tradeoff: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stuart G; Van Calster, Ben; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2012-03-22

    Most of the methodological literature on evaluating an additional marker for risk prediction involves purely statistical measures of classification performance. A disadvantage of a purely statistical measure is the difficulty in deciding the improvement in the measure that would make inclusion of the additional marker worthwhile. In contrast, a medical decision making approach can weigh the cost or harm of ascertaining an additional marker against the benefit of a higher true positive rate for a given false positive rate that may be associated with risk prediction involving the additional marker. An appealing form of the medical decision making approach involves the risk threshold, which is the risk at which the expected utility of treatment and no treatment is the same. In this framework, a readily interpretable evaluation of the net benefit of an additional marker is the test tradeoff corresponding to the risk threshold. The test tradeoff is the minimum number of tests for a new marker that need to be traded for a true positive to yield an increase in the net benefit of risk prediction with the additional marker. For a sensitivity analysis the test tradeoff is computed over multiple risk thresholds. This article updates the theory and estimation of the test tradeoff. An example is provided.

  20. Cervical Precancer Risk in HIV-Infected Women Who Test Positive for Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Despite a Normal Pap Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Marla J; Burk, Robert D; Massad, L Stewart; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Hessol, Nancy A; Castle, Philip E; Anastos, Kathryn; Xie, Xianhong; Minkoff, Howard; Xue, Xiaonan; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Flowers, Lisa; Levine, Alexandra M; Colie, Christine; Rahangdale, Lisa; Fischl, Margaret A; Palefsky, Joel M; Strickler, Howard D

    2015-11-15

    Determining cervical precancer risk among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women who despite a normal Pap test are positive for oncogenic human papillomavirus (oncHPV) types is important for setting screening practices. A total of 2791 HIV-infected and 975 HIV-uninfected women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study were followed semiannually with Pap tests and colposcopy. Cumulative risks of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater (CIN-2+; threshold used for CIN treatment) and grade 3 or greater (CIN-3+; threshold to set screening practices) were measured in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women with normal Pap tests, stratified by baseline HPV results, and also in HIV-infected women with a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL; benchmark indication for colposcopy). At baseline, 1021 HIV-infected and 518 HIV-uninfected women had normal Pap tests, of whom 154 (15%) and 27 (5%), respectively, tested oncHPV positive. The 5-year CIN-2+ cumulative risk in the HIV-infected oncHPV-positive women was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9%-34%), 12% (95% CI, 0%-22%), and 14% (95% CI, 2%-25%) among those with CD4 counts Pap result who test HPV16 positive have high precancer risk (similar to those with LSIL), possibly warranting immediate colposcopy. Repeat screening in 1 year may be appropriate if non-16 oncHPV is detected. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Effect of Whole Multigrain Blends Addition on Quality Characteristics of Cookies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Păucean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Whole grain cereal products are important components of the daily diet worldwide. A high consumption of these products is associated with a decreased risk of diabetes, myocardial infarctions, and certain cancers. This study aimed to asses the effect of the whole multigrain flour (wheat, rye, barley and oats incorporation at different levels (8%, 10% on the quality characteristics of cookies. Moisture, ash, fat, protein, reducing carbohydrates, alkalinity, water absorption and impregnation index of blends and cookies were determined. The sensory profile was obtained by a 9 points hedonic test. Incorporation of multigrain flour in cookies could be a powerful tool to obtain food with enhanced nutritional characteristics.Whole grain cereal products are important components of the daily diet worldwide. A high consumption of these products is associated with a decreased risk of diabetes, myocardial infarctions, and certain cancers. This study aimed to asses the effect of the whole multigrain flour (wheat, rye, barley and oats incorporation at different levels (8%, 10% on the quality characteristics of cookies. Moisture, ash, fat, protein, reducing carbohydrates, alkalinity, water absorption and impregnation index of blends and cookies were determined. The sensory profile was obtained by a 9 points hedonic test. Incorporation of multigrain flour in cookies could be a powerful tool to obtain food with enhanced nutritional characteristics.

  2. Blending process modeling and control by multivariate curve resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumot, J; Igne, B; Anderson, C A; Drennen, J K; de Juan, A

    2013-12-15

    The application of the Multivariate Curve Resolution by Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) method to model and control blend processes of pharmaceutical formulations is assessed. Within the MCR-ALS framework, different data analysis approaches have been tested depending on the objective of the study, i.e., knowing the effect of different factors in the evolution of the blending process (modeling) or detecting the blend end-point and monitoring the concentration of the different species during and at the end of the process (control). Data analysis has been carried out studying multiple blending runs simultaneously taking advantage of the multiset mode of the MCR-ALS method. During the ALS optimization, natural constraints, such as non-negativity (spectral and concentration directions) have been applied for blend modeling. When blending control is the main purpose, a variant of the MCR-ALS algorithm with correlation constraint in the concentration direction has been additionally used. This constraint incorporates an internal calibration procedure, which relates resolved concentration values (in arbitrary units) with the real reference concentration values in the calibration samples (known references) providing values in real concentration scale in the final MCR-ALS results. Two systems consisting of pharmaceutical mixtures of an active principle (acetaminophen) with two or four excipients have been investigated. In the first case, MCR results allowed the description of the evolution of the individual compounds and the assessment of some physical effects in the blending process. In the second case, MCR analysis allowed the detection of the end-point of the process and the assessment of the effects linked to variations in the concentration level of the compounds. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alternative Testing Strategies for Nanomaterials: State of the Science and Considerations for Risk Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, K J

    2016-08-01

    The rapid growth of the nanotechnology industry has warranted equal progress in the nanotoxicology and risk assessment fields. In vivo models have traditionally been used to determine human and environmental risk for chemicals; however, the use of these tests has limitations, and there are global appeals to develop reliable alternatives to animal testing. Many have investigated the use of alternative (nonanimal) testing methods and strategies have quickly developed and resulted in the generation of large toxicological data sets for numerous nanomaterials (NMs). Due to the novel physicochemical properties of NMs that are related to surface characteristics, the approach toward toxicity test development has distinct considerations from traditional chemicals, bringing new requirements for adapting these approaches for NMs. The methodical development of strategies that combine multiple alternative tests can be useful for predictive NM risk assessment and help screening-level decision making. This article provides an overview of the main developments in alternative methods and strategies for reducing uncertainty in NM risk assessment, including advantages and disadvantages of in vitro, ex vivo, and in silico methods, and examples of existing comprehensive strategies. In addition, knowledge gaps are identified toward improvements for experimental and strategy design, specifically highlighting the need to represent realistic exposure scenarios and to consider NM-specific concerns such as characterization, assay interferences, and standardization. Overall, this article aims to improve the reliability and utility of alternative testing methods and strategies for risk assessment of manufactured NMs. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Performance and emission characteristics of Various Nano Particles with Bio-Diesel blend on Di Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, N.; Goldwin Xavier, X.; Rajasekar, R.; Ganesh Bairavan, P.; Dhanseelan, S.

    2017-05-01

    Present study provides the effect of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) and Cerium Oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles additives on the Performance and emission uniqueness of Jatropha. Jatropha blended fuel is prepared by the emulsification technique with assist of mechanical agitator. Nano particles (Zinc Oxide (ZnO)) and Cerium Oxide (CeO2)) mixed with Jatropha blended fuel in mass fraction (100 ppm) with assist of an ultrasonicator. Experiments were conducted in single cylinder constant speed direct injection diesel engine for various test fuels. Performance results revealed that Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) of Jatropha blended Cerium Oxide (B20CE) is 3% and 11% higher than Jatropha blended zinc oxide (B20ZO) and Jatropha blended fuel (B20) and 4% lower than diesel fuel (D100) at full load conditions. Emission result shows that HC and CO emissions of Jatropha blended Cerium Oxide (B20CE) are (6%, 22%, 11% and 6%, 15%, 12%) less compared with Jatropha blended Zinc Oxide (B20ZO), diesel (D100) and Jatropha blended fuel (B20) at full load conditions. NOx emissions of Jatropha blended Cerium Oxide is 1 % higher than diesel fuel (D100) and 2% and 5% lower than Jatropha blended Zinc Oxide, and jatropha blended fuel.

  5. The Swiss Army physical fitness test battery predicts risk of overuse injuries among recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, T; Von Vigier, R O; Frey, F; Mäder, U

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the discriminative power of physical performance tests to recognize conscripts with enhanced risk of acute and overuse injuries in specific, physically demanding occupational specialties of the Swiss Army. The five performance tests investigated represent the Swiss Army Physical Fitness Test Battery. Physical fitness performances were assessed during recruitment procedures prior to military service, and injury occurrences were assessed during 18 weeks of boot camp. Complete fitness and injury data of 459 volunteers from four military occupational specialties were collected. Discriminative power of volunteers' aerobic endurance capacity, trunk muscle fitness, muscle power of upper and lower extremities, and balance for predicting risk of acute injuries and for predicting risk of overuse injuries was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The presented fitness tests had no discriminative power for predicting the risk of acute injuries. However, the trunk muscle fitness test was discriminative in predicting overuse injuries in all four military occupational specialties, progressive endurance run in three, balance test in two, and standing long jump in one. Only the seated shot put had no significant power for predicting overuse injuries in all four study groups. However, for different occupational specialties, different fitness parameters were discriminative to predict overuse injuries. It is possible to conclude that the fitness tests used allow detection of conscripts with enhanced overuse injury risk in physically demanding occupational specialties and therefore provide an indicator to select suitable personnel for physically demanding jobs in a military organization.

  6. Alternative fuel properties of tall oil fatty acid methyl ester-diesel fuel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altiparmak, D.; Keskin, A.; Koca, A. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Technical Education Faculty; Guru, M. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Engineering and Architectural Faculty

    2007-01-15

    In this experimental work, tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends as alternative fuels for diesel engines were studied. Tall oil methyl ester was produced by reacting tall oil fatty acids with methyl alcohol under optimum conditions. The blends of tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel were tested in a direct injection diesel engine at full load conditions. The effects of the new fuel blends on the engine performance and exhaust emission were tested. It was observed that the engine torque and power output with tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends increased up to 6.1% and 5.9%, respectively. It was also seen that CO emissions decreased to 38.9% and NO{sub x} emissions increased up to 30% with the new fuel blends. The smoke capacity did not vary significantly. (author)

  7. Blended learning in K-12 mathematics and science instruction -- An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason

    Blended learning has developed into a hot topic in education over the past several years. Flipped classrooms, online learning environments, and the use of technology to deliver educational content using rich media continue to garner national attention. While generally well accepted and researched in post-secondary education, not much research has focused on blended learning in elementary, middle, and high schools. This thesis is an exploratory study to begin to determine if students and teachers like blended learning and whether or not it affects the amount of time they spend in math and science. Standardized achievement test data were also analyzed to determine if blended learning had any effect on test scores. Based on student and teacher surveys, this population seems to like blended learning and to work more efficiently in this environment. There is no evidence from this study to support any effect on student achievement.

  8. Alternative fuel properties of tall oil fatty acid methyl ester-diesel fuel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Duran; Keskin, Ali; Koca, Atilla; Gürü, Metin

    2007-01-01

    In this experimental work, tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends as alternative fuels for diesel engines were studied. Tall oil methyl ester was produced by reacting tall oil fatty acids with methyl alcohol under optimum conditions. The blends of tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel were tested in a direct injection diesel engine at full load condition. The effects of the new fuel blends on the engine performance and exhaust emission were tested. It was observed that the engine torque and power output with tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends increased up to 6.1% and 5.9%, respectively. It was also seen that CO emissions decreased to 38.9% and NO(x) emissions increased up to 30% with the new fuel blends. The smoke opacity did not vary significantly.

  9. Radiation effect on PVC/ENR blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantara Thevy Ratnam; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan

    1997-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the physical properties of Polyvinyl Chloride / Epoxidised Natural Rubber Blends (PVC/ENR blends) were investigated. The enhancement in tensile strength, elongation at break, hardness and aging properties of the blends have confirmed the positive effect of irradiation on the blends. It is evident from gel fraction and infra red spectroscopic studies that the blends of PVC and ENR cross-linked upon irradiation. The results also revealed that at any blend composition, the enhancement in properties depend on irradiation dose which controls the degree of radiation induced cross-linking. In an attempt to maximize the constructive effect of irradiation, the influence of various additives such as stabilizers, radiation sensitizers, fillers and processing aids on the blend properties were studied. The changes in blend properties upon irradiation with the presents of above additives were also presented in this paper

  10. Blended Learning as Transformational Institutional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerLinden, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews institutional approaches to blended learning and the ways in which institutions support faculty in the intentional redesign of courses to produce optimal learning. The chapter positions blended learning as a strategic opportunity to engage in organizational learning.

  11. NESDIS Blended Rain Rate (RR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The blended Rain Rate (RR) product is derived from multiple sensors/satellites. The blended products were merged from polar-orbiting and geostationary satellite...

  12. Intrinsically safe moisture blending system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman Jr., Russell L.; Vanatta, Paul D.

    2012-09-11

    A system for providing an adjustable blend of fluids to an application process is disclosed. The system uses a source of a first fluid flowing through at least one tube that is permeable to a second fluid and that is disposed in a source of the second fluid to provide the adjustable blend. The temperature of the second fluid is not regulated, and at least one calibration curve is used to predict the volumetric mixture ratio of the second fluid with the first fluid from the permeable tube. The system typically includes a differential pressure valve and a backpressure control valve to set the flow rate through the system.

  13. Performance of Diesel Engine Using Blended Crude Jatropha Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Kamarul Azhar; Mohd Sazali, Nor Shahida Akma; Mohd Ali, Mas Fauzi; Alimin, Ahmad Jais; Khir, Saffiah Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    Vegetable oil presents a very promising alternative to diesel oil since it is renewable and has similar properties to the diesel. In view of this, crude jatropha oil is selected and its viscosity is reduced by blending it with diesel. Since jatropha oil has properties which are similar to mineral diesel, it can be used in compression ignition engines without any engine modification. This paper presents the results of investigation carried out on a four-cylinder, four strokes and indirect-injection diesel engine. The engine, operated using composition blends of crude jatropha oil and diesel, were compared with mineral diesel. An experimental investigation has been carried out to analyze the performance characteristics of a compression ignition engine from the blended fuel (5%, 10%, 20% and 30%). A naturally aspirated four-stroke indirect injection diesel engine was tested at full load conditions, speeds between 1000 and 3500 rpm with intervals of 500 rpm. Results obtained from the measures of torque, power, specific fuel consumptions, thermal efficiency and brake mean effective pressure are nearly the same between blended and diesel fuel. An overall graph shows that the performance of relevant parameters from blended fuel is most likely similar to the performance produced from diesel. The experimental results proved that the use of crude jatropha oil in compression ignition engines is a viable alternative to diesel.

  14. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-10-01

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the

  15. Documented tuberculin skin testing among infliximab users following a multi-modal risk communication interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatin, Deborah; Rawson, Nigel S B; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Braun, M Miles; Martin, Carolyn K; Moreland, Larry W; Becker, Angela F; Patkar, Nivedita M; Allison, Jeroan J; Saag, Kenneth G

    2006-01-01

    Following its licensure, tuberculosis (TB) was reported as a potential adverse effect of infliximab. Subsequently, the product circular was changed to recommend tuberculin skin testing before patients received infliximab, which was reinforced by several risk communication efforts. The aim of this study was to evaluate patterns and predictors of documented tuberculin skin testing in patients before and after manufacturer, federal, and academic risk communications. Patients administered infliximab were identified from 11 health plans located throughout the United States, and claims data were examined to determine whether the patients had received a tuberculin skin test. Patients were divided into three cohorts depending on the timing of their first infliximab treatment in relation to the risk communication efforts. The overall tuberculin skin testing rate doubled from 15.4% in the first cohort to 30.9% in the last cohort, while the rate of pre-infliximab treatment testing increased from 0 to 27.7% (Chi-squared test for trend, p skin testing rates were significantly higher in women, those with a diagnosis of rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, and those with a rheumatologist as prescriber. After multivariable analysis, only rheumatologist remained significantly associated with tuberculin skin testing. Although the tuberculin skin testing rate was relatively low overall, tuberculin skin testing doubled over 30 months of ongoing risk communication efforts and under ascertainment likely occurred. We also found variation in the tuberculin skin testing rate associated with physician specialty. This study demonstrates a significant change in patient care following risk communication efforts. (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Blending UNH streams of different uranium enrichments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, B.F.

    1958-04-18

    The cost and feasibility of blending UNH streams of different uranium enrichments at HAPO was evaluated on a preliminary basis. Cases studied were blending 37.5% enriched UNH with depleted E metal UNH to yield a 0.947% enriched end product, and blending depleted E metal UNH with the depleted natural uranium to yield 0.7115% enriched end product. A reasonable degree of feasibility is indicated for such a blend program at HAPO.

  17. The Risk of Adverse Impact in Selections Based on a Test with Known Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Corte, Wilfried; Lievens, Filip

    2005-01-01

    The authors derive the exact sampling distribution function of the adverse impact (AI) ratio for single-stage, top-down selections using tests with known effect sizes. Subsequently, it is shown how this distribution function can be used to determine the risk that a future selection decision on the basis of such tests will result in an outcome that…

  18. A simplified caries risk test in stimulated saliva from elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Sergio; Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; García-Peña, Carmen

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate and compare lactobacilli species (LB) and mutans streptococci (MS) caries risk identification by means of a Caries Risk Test Bacteria (CRT Bacteria test), with a conventional laboratory test (CLT), as well as their correlation with the dental caries experience [(decayed-missing-filled teeth (DMFT index)] in subjects 60 years of age and older. Cross-sectional study. Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit, Aging Area. XXI Century National Medical Center; Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). A total of 696 elderly subjects residing in southwestern Mexico City. The DMFT index was determined in 696 subjects and saliva collected by stimulation. This was processed with a CRT Bacteria test and a CLT (the gold standard) test. Subjects with high [> or =10(5) colony forming units (CFU)/ml] and low caries risk (caries experience and the LB and MS caries risk, similar to that present with the CLT test. The CRT Bacteria test shows similar results to those of the CLT test in subjects 60 years of age and over.

  19. Predicting the risk of a false-positive test for women following a mammography screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Olsen, Anne Helene; Schwartz, Walter

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study was to provide a simple estimate of the cumulative risk of a false-positive test for women participating in mammography screening. To test the method, we used data from two well-established, organized mammography screening programmes offering biennial...... be calculated in a simple way relatively early after the start of a mammography screening programme....

  20. Anxiety sensitivity and suicide risk among firefighters: A test of the depression-distress amplification model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Smith, Lia J; Boffa, Joseph W; Tran, Jana K; Schmidt, N Brad; Joiner, Thomas E; Vujanovic, Anka A

    2018-04-07

    Firefighters represent an occupational group at increased suicide risk. How suicidality develops among firefighters is poorly understood. The depression-distress amplification model posits that the effects of depression symptoms on suicide risk will be intensified in the context of anxiety sensitivity (AS) cognitive concerns. The current study tested this model among firefighters. Overall, 831 firefighters participated (mean [SD] age = 38.37 y [8.53 y]; 94.5% male; 75.2% White). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3), and Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R) were utilized to assess for depression symptoms, AS concerns (cognitive, physical, social), and suicide risk, respectively. Linear regression interaction models were tested. The effects of elevated depression symptoms on increased suicide risk were augmented when AS cognitive concerns were also elevated. Unexpectedly, depression symptoms also interacted with AS social concerns; however, consistent with expectations, depression symptoms did not interact with AS physical concerns in the prediction of suicide risk. In the context of elevated depression symptoms, suicide risk is potentiated among firefighters reporting elevated AS cognitive and AS social concerns. Findings support and extend the depression-distress amplification model of suicide risk within a sample of firefighters. Interventions that successfully impact AS concerns may, in turn, mitigate suicide risk among this at-risk population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Blended Identities: Identity Work, Equity and Marginalization in Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikoop, Will

    2013-01-01

    This article is a theoretical study of the self-presentation strategies employed by higher education students online; it examines student identity work via profile information and avatars in a blended learning environment delivered through social networking sites and virtual worlds. It argues that students are faced with difficult choices when…

  2. High-Risk Palliative Care Patients' Knowledge and Attitudes about Hereditary Cancer Testing and DNA Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, John M; Emidio, Oluwabunmi; Ma, Brittany; Bailey, Lauryn; Smith, Thomas J; Kang, In Guk; Yu, Brandon J; Owodunni, Oluwafemi Patrick; Abusamaan, Mohammed; Razzak, Rab; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2017-12-04

    Even at the end of life, testing cancer patients for inherited susceptibility may provide life-saving information to their relatives. Prior research suggests palliative care inpatients have suboptimal understanding of genetic importance, and testing may be underutilized in this clinical setting. These conclusions are based on limited research. This study aimed to estimate genetic testing prevalence among high-risk palliative care patients in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. We also aimed to understand these patients' understanding of, and attitudes toward, hereditary cancer testing and DNA banking. Palliative care in-patients with cancer completed structured interviews, and their medical records were reviewed. Among patients at high risk for hereditary cancer, we assessed history of genetic testing/DNA banking; and related knowledge and attitudes. Among 24 high-risk patients, 14 (58.3%) said they/their relatives had genetic testing or they had been referred for a genetics consultation. Of the remaining 10 patients, seven (70%) said they would "probably" or "definitely" get tested. Patients who had not had testing were least concerned about the impact of future testing on their family relationships; two (20%) said they were "extremely concerned" about privacy related to genetic testing. Of patients without prior testing, five (50%) said they had heard or read "a fair amount" about genetic testing. No high-risk patients had banked DNA. Overall, 23 (95.8%) said they had heard or read "almost nothing" or "relatively little" about DNA banking. Written materials and clinician discussion were most preferred ways to learn about genetic testing and DNA banking. Overall, this study demonstrates underutilization of genetics services at the end of life continues to be problematic, despite high patient interest.

  3. Dispersion-strengthened Aluminium Products Manufactured by Powder Blending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1969-01-01

    Detailed experiments carried out to examine relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of powder-blended aluminum products are reported; their results as well as structural studies by transmission electron microscopy and tensile-and creep- testing, are given; as dispersed phase......, various oxide powders were selected on criterion that during manufacturing no reaction must taken place between metal and oxide phase; strength of powder-blended aluminum products increases and elongation decreases with decreasing particle size of aluminum powder and with increasing concentration of oxide...... phase....

  4. Poly(hydroxybutyrate)/cellulose acetate blend nanofiber scaffolds: Preparation, characterization and cytocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhijiang, Cai, E-mail: caizhijiang@hotmail.com [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); State Key Laboratory of Hollow Fiber Membrane Material and Processes, No 399 BingShuiXi Street, XiQing District, Tianjin, China, 300387 (China); Yi, Xu; Haizheng, Yang; Jia, Jianru; Liu, Yuanpei [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/cellulose acetate (CA) blend nanofiber scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning using the blends of chloroform and DMF as solvent. The blend nanofiber scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, XRD, DSC, contact angle and tensile test. The blend nanofibers exhibited cylindrical, uniform, bead-free and random orientation with the diameter ranged from 80–680 nm. The scaffolds had very well interconnected porous fibrous network structure and large aspect surface areas. It was found that the presence of CA affected the crystallization of PHB due to formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which restricted the preferential orientation of PHB molecules. The DSC result showed that the PHB and CA were miscible in the blend nanofiber. An increase in the glass transition temperature was observed with increasing CA content. Additionally, the mechanical properties of blend nanofiber scaffolds were largely influenced by the weight ratio of PHB/CA. The tensile strength, yield strength and elongation at break of the blend nanofiber scaffolds increased from 3.3 ± 0.35 MPa, 2.8 ± 0.26 MPa, and 8 ± 0.77% to 5.05 ± 0.52 MPa, 4.6 ± 0.82 MPa, and 17.6 ± 1.24% by increasing PHB content from 60% to 90%, respectively. The water contact angle of blend nanofiber scaffolds decreased about 50% from 112 ± 2.1° to 60 ± 0.75°. The biodegradability was evaluated by in vitro degradation test and the results revealed that the blend nanofiber scaffolds showed much higher degradation rates than the neat PHB. The cytocompatibility of the blend nanofiber scaffolds was preliminarily evaluated by cell adhesion studies. The cells incubated with PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffold for 48 h were capable of forming cell adhesion and proliferation. It showed much better biocompatibility than pure PHB film. Thus, the prepared PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffolds are bioactive and may be more suitable for cell proliferation suggesting that these scaffolds can be used for

  5. Testing the Relative Performance of Data Adaptive Prediction Algorithms: A Generalized Test of Conditional Risk Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Polley, Eric C.; Briggs, Farren B. S.; van der Laan, Mark J.; Hubbard, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the relative fit of competing models can be used to address many different scientific questions. In classical statistics one can, if appropriate, use likelihood ratio tests and information based criterion, whereas clinical medicine has tended to rely on comparisons of fit metrics like C-statistics. However, for many data adaptive modelling procedures such approaches are not suitable. In these cases, statisticians have used cross-validation, which can make inference challenging. In t...

  6. PLA and two components silicon rubber blends aiming for frozen foods packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekum, Utai; Khiansanoi, Apichart

    2018-03-01

    Designing of PLA and two components silicone rubber blends was studies. Frozen food packaging application is the main ultimate aim. The statistical method using 23 DOE was conducted. The standard testing methods, in particular impact testing at sub-zero temperature, were performed. The preliminary blend formula comprised 1.0 phr of silane and polyester polyols, respectively, was initially resolved. Then, the optimize the silicone portion in the blends was determined. Blending formula using 8.0 phr of silicone with respect to PLA matrix gave rise to the overall satisfactory properties. 3. TETA was used as the silicone curing agent and reactively blended onto the ingredients. TETA at 0.4 phr, with respect to the silicone, enhanced the mechanical properties, especially flexibility and toughness, of the PLA/silicone blend. Exceeding the optimal TETA loading would cause the chain scission and also the dilution effects. Hence, marginal inferior properties of the blends were be experienced. The preliminary biodegradability investigation found that the PLA/silicone blend initially triggered at the second week. Its degradation rate was likely to be faster than neat PLA.

  7. Pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of coal-MBM blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodras, G; Grammelis, P; Basinas, P

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, thermogravimetric analysis was employed in order to investigate the behaviour of MBM and their blends with Greek brown coal, under pyrolysis and combustion conditions. MBM presented enhanced pyrolysis rates reflecting its high volatile and low ash contents compared to Greek brown coal. Increased conversion rates were observed when MBM was added in the brown coal sample. Significant interactions were detected between the two fuel blend components leading to significant deviations from the expected behaviour. The catalytic effect of mineral matter on the pyrolysis of MBM resulted in reaction rate decrease and DTG curve shift to lower temperatures for the demineralised MBM. Alterations in the combustion process due to the mineral matter were minimal when testing the blends. Interactions maintained during combustion and lower reactivity of MBM was achieved due to the reduced oxygen content.

  8. 7 CFR 989.16 - Blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Blend. 989.16 Section 989.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 989.16 Blend. Blend means to mix or commingle raisins. ...

  9. 40 CFR 80.82 - Butane blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.82 Butane blending. A refiner for any refinery that produces gasoline by blending butane with conventional gasoline or reformulated gasoline or RBOB may meet... paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the refiner may: (i) Blend the butane with conventional gasoline, or...

  10. Factors underlying anxiety in HIV testing: risk perceptions, stigma, and the patient-provider power dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Catherine; Myers, Ted

    2003-05-01

    Client anxiety is often associated with diagnostic testing. In this study, the authors used a grounded theory approach to examine the situational and social factors underlying anxiety associated with HIV testing, analyzing transcripts from semistructured interviews with 39 HIV test recipients in Ontario, Canada (selected based on HIV serostatus, risk experience, geographic region, gender, and number of HIV tests), then integrating emergent themes with existing research literature. Analysis revealed four themes: perceptions of risk and responsibility for health, stigma associated with HIV, the patient-provider power dynamic, and techniques used by test recipients to enhance control in their interactions with providers. Service implications include modifications to information provision during the test session, attention to privacy and anonymity, and sensitivity to patient-provider interactions.

  11. Study on Shape Memory of Poly(vinyl chloride/Thermoplastic Polyester Urethane Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rashidi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, shape memory effect of polycaprolactone based polyurethane/poly(vinyl chloride blends in which the PVC weight percentage are 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 and 80 were studied using DMA apparatus. The compatibility, tension and dynamic-mechanical properties of these blends have been studied by the authors and this paper specifically deals with the tests results of shape memory effect. The results of tension tests in about 20 percent showed that with increasing PVC content in the blends, recovery rate of temporary shape to permanent shape, the degree of recovery, and the fixity in quantity of temporary shape are improved. Therefore, the supplementary shape memory tests were performed on the blend with the highest PVC weight percent (80 percent. In this blend, with increasing tension in thermomechanical cycle, the amount of recovery to earlier shape is decreased due to higher plastic strain. The shape memory tests in consecutive cycles were done on this blend and the behavior of the first cycle was compared with the second and the third cycles. One small tensile handy apparatus was used in order to accomplish shape memory tests in higher tension values and the DMA results were registered. In this research the blend with 80 weight percent of PVC as the best shape memory effect was selected.

  12. Developing ICT Competency for Thai Teachers through Blended Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarawang, Chaiya; Kidrakran, Pachoen; Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study aims to enhance teachers' ICT competency. Three hundred and thirty seven teachers are surveyed through a questionnaire to identify training problems and training needs. Then the blended training model is implemented with teachers. The result showed that it can increase score in cognitive and attitude tests. The post-test…

  13. Biodegradation of biodiesel/diesel blends by Candida viswanathii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biodegradation potential of the inoculum was assessed with the redox indicator 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) test and with respirometric experiment in biometer flasks (250 mL) used to measure the microbial CO2 production. In the latter, the inoculum was added to a contaminated soil with the blends ...

  14. Locomotive emissions measurements for various blends of biodiesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the effects of various blends of biodiesel on locomotive engine exhaust emissions. The : emission tests were conducted on two locomotive models, a Tier 2 EMD SD70ACe and a Tier 1 Plus GE Dash9-44CW, using t...

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of Synthetic Blends of l-(+)-Lactic Acid, Ammonia, and Ketones As Potential Attractants For Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, P M; Sen, A

    2017-12-01

    Attraction of Aedes aegypti to various binary, trinary, and quaternary blends of lactic acid and ketones with or without ammonia was studied using a dual choice olfactometer. A dose dependent attraction was observed in cases of single compounds where cyclopentanone attracted the highest percentage (36.9 ± 1.8%) of Ae. aegypti when tested alone. No significant difference was observed between the attraction levels of trinary and binary blends of lactic acid and acetone or butanone when tested against clear air. However, in competitive bioassays, the trinary blend of lactic acid, acetone, and butanone was significantly preferred over binary blends of individual compounds ( P lactic acid. However, acetylacetone acted as an attraction inhibitor when blended with other compounds. Cyclopentanone was attractive, but enhancement of attraction was not observed when blended with other components. Addition of ammonia to binary or trinary blends of lactic acid, acetone, and/or butanone did not increase the attraction significantly. In competitive bioassays, the blends containing ammonia were significantly preferred over the blends lacking ammonia ( P lactic acid, ammonia, acetone, and butanone was most attractive (65 ± 1.5%) and preferred blend of all other combinations.

  16. Empirical Study of the Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, R. L.; Westbrook, S. R.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a database that supports specific proposals for a stability test and specification for biodiesel and biodiesel blends. B100 samples from 19 biodiesel producers were obtained in December of 2005 and January of 2006 and tested for stability. Eight of these samples were then selected for additional study, including long-term storage tests and blending at 5% and 20% with a number of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels.

  17. Profile of the Pleximmune blood test for transplant rejection risk prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhi, Rakesh; Ashokkumar, Chethan; Higgs, Brandon W; Levy, Samantha; Soltys, Kyle; Bond, Geoffrey; Mazariegos, George; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Zeevi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The Pleximmune? test (Plexision Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, USA) is the first cell-based test approved by the US FDA, which predicts acute cellular rejection in children with liver- or intestine transplantation. The test addresses an unmet need to improve management of immunosuppression, which incurs greater risks of opportunistic infections and Epstein?Barr virus-induced malignancy during childhood. High-dose immunosuppression and recurrent rejection after intestine transplantation also result in ...

  18. Frequency of impaired oral glucose tolerance test in high risk pregnancies for gestational diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naheed, F.; Narijo, S.; Kammeruddin, K.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of impaired oral glucose tolerance test in high risk pregnancies for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM). A total of 50 high risk pregnancies for gestational diabetes mellitus were selected through outpatient department of obstetrics. Data was collected according to certain obstetric and non-obstetric risk factors for GDM as inclusion criteria through a designed proforma i.e. family history of diabetes, macrosomia (i.e, wt > 3.5 kg), abortions, grand multiparity, a sudden increase in weight (>1 kg/wk) during pregnancy, age > 35 years, early neonatal deaths/sudden IUDS, polyhydramnios, urogenital infections (vulvo-vaginal candidiasis and UTI), previous history of GDM, congenital abnormalities (with or without polyhydramnios) and multiple pregnancy. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed and analyzed according to American Diabetic Association criteria, 2004. The most frequent risk factors were family history of diabetes mellitus in 1st degree relative and large for dates babies in 18 patients. Similarly, high risk factors such as history of abortions and grand multiparity were present in 16 and 14 pregnant women respectively. Least common factors, which contributed for GDM, were polyhydramnios in 4 cases and perinatal mortality (due to congenital anomalies of foetus, intrauterine deaths or neonatal deaths) seen only in 5 cases. Overall impaired oral glucose tolerance test was found in 24%. Most patients had one (17%) or two risk factors commonly (23%). Only 2% had shown five or more risk factors. Oral glucose tolerance test is a useful diagnostic tool to detect GDM in high risk pregnancies, depending upon the high frequency of number of risk factors in each individual. (author)

  19. Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF) for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter II, G.W.

    2003-06-18

    The objective of this research is to provide the DoD with a framework based on a systematic, risk-based approach to assess impacts for management of natural resources in an ecosystem context. This risk assessment framework is consistent with, but extends beyond, the EPA's ecological risk assessment framework, and specifically addresses DoD activities and management needs. MERAF is intended to be consistent with existing procedures for environmental assessment and planning with DoD testing and training. The intention is to supplement these procedures rather than creating new procedural requirements. MERAF is suitable for use for training and testing area assessment and management. It does not include human health risks nor does it address specific permitting or compliance requirements, although it may be useful in some of these cases. Use of MERAF fits into the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process by providing a consistent and rigorous way of organizing and conducting the technical analysis for Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) (Sigal 1993; Carpenter 1995; Canter and Sadler 1997). It neither conflicts with, nor replaces, procedural requirements within the NEPA process or document management processes already in place within DoD.

  20. PEO + PVP blended polymer composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Blended polymer films of polyethylene oxide + polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PEO + PVP) containing transition metal (TM) ions like Fe3+, Co2+ and Ni2+ have been synthesized by a solution casting method. For these films, structural, thermal, magnetic and optical properties have been studied. X-ray diffraction results reveal the ...

  1. New Faces of Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Michael B.; Fisher, Julia Freeland

    2017-01-01

    The Clayton Christiansen Institute maintains a database of more than 400 schools across the United States that have implemented some form of blended learning, which combines online learning with brick-and-mortar classrooms. Data the Institute has collected over the past six months suggests three trends as this model continues to evolve and mature.…

  2. Improvement of biodiesel methanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Datta Bharadwaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to improve the performance of biodiesel–methanol blends in a VCR engine by using optimized engine parameters. For optimization of the engine, operational parameters such as compression ratio, fuel blend, and load are taken as factors, whereas performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency (Bth and brake specific fuel consumption (Bsfc and emission parameters such as carbon monoxide (CO, unburnt hydrocarbons (HC, Nitric oxides (NOx and smoke are taken as responses. Experimentation is carried out as per the design of experiments of the response surface methodology. Optimization of engine operational parameters is carried out using Derringers Desirability approach. From the results obtained it is inferred that the VCR engine has maximum performance and minimum emissions at 18 compression ratio, 5% fuel blend and at 9.03 kg of load. At this optimized operating conditions of the engine the responses such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption, carbon monoxide, unburnt hydrocarbons, nitric oxide, and smoke are found to be 31.95%, 0.37 kg/kW h, 0.036%, 5 ppm, 531.23 ppm and 15.35% respectively. It is finally observed from the mathematical models and experimental data that biodiesel methanol blends have maximum efficiency and minimum emissions at optimized engine parameters.

  3. Netbaserede uddannelser og blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Jesper Vedel; Vognsgaard Hjernø, Henriette; Jensen, Michael Peter

    2016-01-01

    Denne håndbog er tænkt som inspiration til uddannelsesfaglige medarbejdere, som er eller skal i gang med at undervise på en netbaseret uddannelse i UCL. Håndbogen giver et teoretisk overblik i forhold til netbaserede uddannelser, online- og blended learning samt en indførsel i hvilke didaktiske...

  4. Utility of the exercise electrocardiogram testing in sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan M; Hotait, Mostafa; Tseng, Zian H

    2014-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) remains a major public health problem. Current established criteria identifying those at risk of sudden arrhythmic death, and likely to benefit from implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are neither sensitive nor specific. Exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) testing was traditionally used for information concerning patients' symptoms, exercise capacity, cardiovascular function, myocardial ischemia detection, and hemodynamic responses during activity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We conducted a systematic review of MEDLINE on the utility of exercise ECG testing in SCD risk stratification. Exercise testing can unmask suspected primary electrical diseases in certain patients (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia or concealed long QT syndrome) and can be effectively utilized to risk stratify patients at an increased (such as early repolarization syndrome and Brugada syndrome) or decreased risk of SCD, such as the loss of preexcitation on exercise testing in asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Exercise ECG testing helps in SCD risk stratification in patients with and without arrhythmogenic hereditary syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, J.I.; Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of 239,24O Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual 239 Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with 239,24O Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10 -6 , 6 x 10 -5 , and 5 x 10 -4 , respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung

  6. Miscibility evolution of polycarbonate/polystyrene blends during compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuai, Chengzhi; Almdal, Kristoffer; Johannsen, Ib

    2002-01-01

    The miscibility evolution of polycarbonate/polystyrene (PC/PS) blends during the compounding process in three blending methods of industrial relevance, namely melt blending, remelt blending in a twin-screw extruder and third melt blending in an injection molding machine, was investigated by measu......The miscibility evolution of polycarbonate/polystyrene (PC/PS) blends during the compounding process in three blending methods of industrial relevance, namely melt blending, remelt blending in a twin-screw extruder and third melt blending in an injection molding machine, was investigated...

  7. FeNO and Exercise Testing in Children at Risk of Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby; Christiansen, Christina Figgé; Stokholm, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise testing is the gold standard for diagnosing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children, but requires considerable cooperation and medical resources. Therefore, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has been proposed as a tool to predict the need for exercise testing....... OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between FeNO, exercise test results, and a history of respiratory symptoms during exercise in children at risk of asthma. METHODS: FeNO measurement, exercise testing, and interview about respiratory symptoms during exercise were...... completed in 224 seven-year-old children from the at-risk Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2000 birth cohort. The associations between FeNO, exercise test results, and reported respiratory symptoms during exercise were analyzed adjusting for gender, respiratory infections, and inhaled...

  8. Application of Panel-Based Tests for Inherited Risk of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Payal D; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2017-08-31

    Next-generation or massively parallel sequencing has transformed the landscape of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility. Panel-based genetic tests evaluate multiple genes simultaneously and rapidly. Because these tests are frequently offered in clinical settings, understanding their clinical validity and utility is critical. When evaluating the inherited risk of breast and ovarian cancers, panel-based tests provide incremental benefit compared with BRCA1/2 genetic testing. For inherited risk of other cancers, such as colon cancer and pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma, the clinical utility and yield of panel-based testing are higher; in fact, simultaneous evaluation of multiple genes has been the historical standard for these diseases. Evaluating inherited risk with panel-based testing has recently entered clinical practice for prostate and pancreatic cancers, with potential therapeutic implications. The resulting variants of uncertain significance and mutations with unclear actionability pose challenges to service providers and patients, underscoring the importance of genetic counseling and data-sharing initiatives. This review explores the evolving merits, challenges, and nuances of panel-based testing for cancer susceptibility.

  9. Effect of Pertalite-Spiritus Blend Fuel on Performance of Single Cylinder Spark Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, H.; Susastriawan, A. A. P.; Andrian, D.

    2018-02-01

    This work aims to experimentally investigate an effect of Spiritus and Pertalite blend on engine’s performance (brake horsepower and torque, specific fuel consumption rate, and exhaust gas emission). The tests are conducted at 3000-7000 rpm for four different fuels, i.e., pertalite, 95%P-5%S, 90%P-10%S, and 85%P-15%S to obtain an optimum ratio of the Pertalite-Spiritus blend. The blend ratios of Pertalite (P) and Spiritus (S) are measured by volume. The result shows that addition of 15% Spiritus (by volume) on Pertalilte can enhance the combustion process of the blend hence increasing engine’s brake horsepower and decreasing specific fuel consumption rate. However, engine’s torque is lower when using the blend 85%P-15%S if compared with using Pertalite.

  10. Using of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Ali [Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33500 Mersin (Turkey); Guerue, Metin [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Gazi University, 06570 Maltepe, Ankara (Turkey); Altiparmak, Duran [Technical Education Faculty, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Aydin, Kadir [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2008-04-15

    In this study, usability of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative fuel for diesel engines were studied. Biodiesel was produced by reacting cotton oil soapstock with methyl alcohol at determined optimum condition. The cotton oil biodiesel-diesel fuel blends were tested in a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Engine performances and smoke value were measured at full load condition. Torque and power output of the engine with cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends decreased by 5.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Specific fuel consumption of engine with cotton oil soapstock-diesel fuel blends increased up to 10.5%. At maximum torque speeds, smoke level of engine with blend fuels decreased up to 46.6%, depending on the amount of biodiesel. These results were compared with diesel fuel values. (author)

  11. Using of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Ali; Guerue, Metin; Altiparmak, Duran; Aydin, Kadir

    2008-01-01

    In this study, usability of cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends as an alternative fuel for diesel engines were studied. Biodiesel was produced by reacting cotton oil soapstock with methyl alcohol at determined optimum condition. The cotton oil biodiesel-diesel fuel blends were tested in a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Engine performances and smoke value were measured at full load condition. Torque and power output of the engine with cotton oil soapstock biodiesel-diesel fuel blends decreased by 5.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Specific fuel consumption of engine with cotton oil soapstock-diesel fuel blends increased up to 10.5%. At maximum torque speeds, smoke level of engine with blend fuels decreased up to 46.6%, depending on the amount of biodiesel. These results were compared with diesel fuel values. (author)

  12. Evaluation of performance and emission features of Jatropha biodiesel -turpentine blend as green fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loganathan Karikalan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted to measure the suitability of jatropha biodiesel-wood turpentine blend as a replacement for diesel fuel in a compression ignition engine. Tests were performed in a 4-stroke, single cylinder, air cooled Diesel engine. The results show that the performance factors for various blends were found to be near to diesel, emission features were improved and combustion characteristics were found to be comparable with diesel. The brake thermal efficiency of the blends establishes 9.2% lower than that of diesel at 75% load. Brake specific fuel consumption increases for blends at part load and remains same at full load. The CO, HC, and smoke emissions were reduced by 75, 64-78, and 33-66%, respectively, compared to diesel at 75% load. Nitric oxides were increased. Jatropha biodiesel-wood turpentine blends offered comparable performance and combustion features, reduced emissions and it is capable of replacing standard diesel in compression ignition engines.

  13. Crystalline structure of polypropylene in blends with thermoplastic elastomers after electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steller, Ryszard; Zuchowska, Danuta; Meissner, Wanda; Paukszta, Dominik; Garbarczyk, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    Isotactic polypropylene (PP) was blended in extruder with 0-50% addition of styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) and styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymers. Granulated blends were irradiated with electron beam (60 kGy) and 1 week later processed with injection molding machine. Properties of samples molded from irradiated and non-irradiated granulates were investigated using DSC, WAXS, MFR, SEM and mechanical and solubility tests. It was found that the SEBS based systems are more resistant to irradiation in comparison to similar blends with SBS copolymer. Such behavior can be explained by the presence of double bonds in elastic SBS block. Irradiation of PP-SBS blends leads to considerable structure changes of crystalline and amorphous PP phases and elastic SBS phase. It indicates creation of new (inter)phase consisting of products of grafting and cross-linking reactions. Irradiated PP-SBS blends show significant improvement of impact strength at low temperatures

  14. Tailor-made Design of Chemical Blends using Decomposition-based Computer-aided Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza; Manan, Zainuddin Abd.; Gernaey, Krist

    Computer aided technique is an efficient approach to solve chemical product design problems such as design of blended liquid products (chemical blending). In chemical blending, one tries to find the best candidate, which satisfies the product targets defined in terms of desired product attributes...... (properties). In this way, first the systematic computer-aided technique establishes the search space, and then narrows it down in subsequent steps until a small number of feasible and promising candidates remain and then experimental work may be conducted to verify if any or all the candidates satisfy...... is decomposed into two stages. The first stage investigates the mixture stability where all unstable mixtures are eliminated and the stable blend candidates are retained for further testing. In the second stage, the blend candidates have to satisfy a set of target properties that are ranked according...

  15. Should patients with risk factors be tested for hypersensitivity to contrast media: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepetam, Fatma Merve; Çiftaslan, Nezihe; Oruç, Özlem; Duman, Dildar; Ağca, Meltem; Bulut, İsmet; Çolakoğlu, Bahattin

    2016-08-01

    Previous hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media (CM), atopy, atopic disease, drug allergy, and age (20-29 or >55) are risk factors for CM hypersensitivity reactions. Our aim was to evaluate whether these risk factors should prompt skin testing for diagnosing CM allergy. The study was conducted among patients referred for allergy testing with CM. Skin tests were performed with non ionic or gadolinium CM, recommended by a radiologist. After completion of tests patients were telephonically queried on their symptoms of reactions. 151 risk patients (53 men, 98 women; mean age 55.2) were included in the study. Only 13 (9 %) had a history of hypersensitivity reaction to CM. Compared with the other patients, atopy was significantly more common in patients with a history of CM hypersensitivity reactions. Female gender and mean age were also higher, but not significant. All of the tests with CMs were negative. Only one patient reported urticaria within 1-2 min after administration of CM (telephonically). Atopy can increase the risk of CM allergy. However, skin tests with CMs may be inefficient, unnecessary, and time-consuming, except in cases with a history of CM allergy. Premedication protocols appear to be beneficial in patients with a history of CM allergy and cannot be recommended for patients with well-controlled asthma, rhinitis, atopic dermatitis or history of drug allergy.

  16. Downside Business Confidence Spillovers in Europe: Evidence from Causality-in-Risk Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Atukeren, Erdal; Cevik, Emrah Ismail; Korkmaz, Turhan

    2015-01-01

    This paper employs Hong et al.’s (2009) extreme risk spillovers test to investigate the bilateral business confidence spillovers between Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, France, and Germany. After controlling for domestic economic developments in each country and common international factors, downside risk spillovers are detected as a causal feedback between Spain and Portugal and unilaterally from Spain to Italy. Extremely low business sentiments in France, Germany, and Greece are mostly due ...

  17. Point-of-care testing to promote cardiovascular disease risk assessment: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Kunal N; Brown, Tiffany; Sanchez, Thomas; Long, Timothy; Persell, Stephen D

    2017-09-01

    Updated cholesterol guidelines emphasize multivariable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk estimation to guide treatment decision-making in primary prevention. This study tested the preliminary feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of point-of-care testing (POCT) and quantitative CVD risk assessment in high-risk adults to increase guideline-recommended statin use in primary prevention. Participants were aged 40-75 years, without CVD or diabetes mellitus, and potentially-eligible for consideration of statins based on estimated 10-year CVD risk from last-measured risk factor levels in the electronic health record. We performed POCT to facilitate quantitative CVD risk assessment with the Pooled Cohort Equations immediately before a scheduled primary care provider (PCP) visit. Outcomes were: physician documentation of a CVD risk discussion and statin prescription on the study date. We also assessed acceptability of the intervention through structured questionnaire. We recruited 18 participants (8 from an academic practice and 10 from a federally-qualified health clinic). After the intervention, 83% of participants discussed CVD risk with their PCP, 47% received a statin recommendation from their PCP, and 29% received a new statin prescription during the PCP visit. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. This study demonstrates that in initial testing pre-visit POCT and quantitative CVD risk assessment appears to be a feasible and acceptable intervention that may promote guideline-recommended statin initiation in primary prevention. Future research with an adequately powered trial is warranted to determine the effectiveness of this approach in clinical practice.

  18. Reuse of plastics recovered from solid wastes; Thermal and morphological studies from HDPE/LDPE blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguna, O.; Collar, E.P.; Taranco, J. (Instituto de Plasticos y Caucho, C/Juan de la Cierva, 3.28006 Madrid (ES))

    1989-08-01

    Observations are made about microstructural aspects from HDPE and LDPE homopolymers and their blends as virgin materials and also from urban plastic wastes. Micrographs were taken by SEM. Micrographs corresponding to the fracture surface from specimens tested in an impact test clearly show different microstructural features due to polymer which is more than 50%. Parts were injection molded. A discussion is given about crystallization behavior of those materials obtained by DSC. For all blends the same results have been found, i.e., two peaks owing to each of the two polymers which are present in the blends.

  19. Testing the Cuckoldry Risk Hypothesis of Partner Sexual Coercion in Community and Forensic Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Camilleri

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary theory has informed the investigation of male sexual coercion but has seldom been applied to the analysis of sexual coercion within established couples. The cuckoldry risk hypothesis, that sexual coercion is a male tactic used to reduce the risk of extrapair paternity, was tested in two studies. In a community sample, indirect cues of infidelity predicted male propensity for sexual coaxing in the relationship, and direct cues predicted propensity for sexual coercion. In the forensic sample, we found that most partner rapists experienced cuckoldry risk prior to committing their offence and experienced more types of cuckoldry risk events than non-sexual partner assaulters. These findings suggest that cuckoldry risk influences male sexual coercion in established sexual relationships.

  20. Experimental investigation on CRDI engine using butanol-biodiesel-diesel blends as fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakar Shetty, A. S.; Dineshkumar, L.; Koundinya, Sandeep; Mane, Swetha K.

    2017-07-01

    In this research work an experimental investigation of butanol-biodisel-diesel blends on combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection (DI) diesel engine is carried out. The blends are prepared at different proportions and fuel properties such as calorific value, viscosity, flash point and fire point, cloud point, pour point of butanol (B), biodiesel (B), diesel (D), biodiesel-diesel (BD) blends and butanol-biodiesel-diesel (BBD) blends are determined. The engine test is conducted at different speed and load. From the results obtained for fuel properties we can observe that the flash, fire and pour point, viscosity and density are decreasing by increasing the percentage of butanol in BBD blends. It is also observed that the performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and exhaust gas temperature increases with increase in the proportion of butanol in BBD blend. However, the brake specific fuel consumption (BFSC) decreases with increase in the proportion of butanol in BBD blend. The increase of butanol in BBD blends also influence to increase on emission characteristic such as carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx).

  1. Preparation and properties of blends of polypropylene and acrylonitril-butadiene-styrene with thermoplastic starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaseem, M.; Deri, F.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work the rheological and mechanical properties of polypropylene / thermoplastic starch (PP/TPS) and acrylo nitril-butadiene-styrene/ thermoplastic starch (ABS/TPS) blends were investigated. Starch was plasticised using glycerol and blends were prepared using a laboratory scale with single screw extruder. Rheological properties of the prepared blends were determined using a capillary rheometer. Mechanical properties were studied in term of tensile tests, stress at break, strain at break and young's modulus were determined. Rheological results showed that the blends are pseudo plastic in manner and the true viscosity of Pp/TPS blend decreases with increasing TPS content in the blend until 10%, and at more than 10% TPS it increases with increasing TPS. In ABS/TPS, the true viscosity decreases with increasing TPS content in the blend. The mechanical results showed that in both systems, the stress at break and strain at break decrease with increasing TPS content in the blend while the young's modulus increases with increasing TPS content. The mechanical results shown that the addition of TPS to each of PP and ABS follows the general trend for filler effects on polymer properties. (author)

  2. Mud Pit Risk-Based Closure Strategy Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brain Hoenes

    2004-08-01

    This report presents the findings of the human and ecological risk assessment for the NTS mud pits. The risk assessment utilizes data from 52 of the 270 NTS mud pits in conjunction with corroborative data from 87 other DOE mud pits associated with nuclear testing (at locations on the NTS, in the western United States, and Alaska) as well as relevant process knowledge. Based on the risk assessment findings, the report provides a strategy for further evaluation, characterization, and closure of all 270 NTS mud pit CASs using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  3. Performance and Combustion Characteristics Analysis of Multi-Cylinder CI Engine Using Essential Oil Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ashrafur Rahman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are derived from not-fatty parts of plants and are mostly used in aromatherapy, as well as cosmetics and perfume production. The essential oils market is growing rapidly due to their claimed health benefits. However, because only therapeutic grade oil is required in the medicinal sector, there is a substantial low-value waste stream of essential oils that can be used in the transportation and agricultural sectors. This study investigated the influence of orange, eucalyptus, and tea tree oil on engine performance and combustion characteristics of a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine. Orange, eucalyptus, and tea tree oil were blended with diesel at 10% by volume. For benchmarking, neat diesel and 10% waste cooking biodiesel-diesel blend were also tested. The selected fuels were used to conduct engine test runs with a constant engine speed (1500 RPM (revolutions per minute at four loads. As the load increased, frictional power losses decreased for all of the fuel samples and thus mechanical efficiency increased. At higher loads (75% and 100%, only orange oil-diesel blends produced comparable power to diesel and waste cooking biodiesel-diesel blends. Fuel consumption (brake and indicated for the essential oil-diesel blends was higher when compared to base diesel and waste cooking biodiesel-diesel blends. Thermal efficiency for the essential oil-diesel blends was comparable to base diesel and waste cooking biodiesel-diesel blends. At higher loads, blow-by was lower for essential oil blends as compared to base diesel and waste cooking biodiesel-diesel blends. At 50% and 100% load, peak pressure was lower for all of the essential oil-diesel blends when compared to base diesel and waste cooking biodiesel-diesel blends. From the heat release rate curve, the essential oil-diesel blends ignition delay times were longer because the oils have lower cetane values. Overall, the low-value streams of these essential oils were found to be

  4. Optimization of performance, emission, friction and wear characteristics of palm and Calophyllum inophyllum biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosarof, M.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.; Alabdulkarem, Abdullah; Ashraful, A.M.; Arslan, A.; Rashedul, H.K.; Monirul, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • All of biodiesel blends were given higher BSFC than diesel fuel, except for CIB10. • Diesel produces higher BP and BTE as compared to PB and CIB blends. • CO and HC emissions of PB blends were reduced more than diesel and CIB blends. • PB blends contained lower metal compositions compared to diesel and CIB blends. • PB20 showed lower worn scar surfaces area compared to diesel and biodiesel blends. - Abstract: A running automobile engine produces more friction and wear between its sliding components than an idle one, and thus requires lubrication to reduce this frictional effect. Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel that is produced from renewable resources. Energy studies conducted over the last two decades focused on solutions to problems of rising fossil fuel price, increasing dependency on foreign energy sources, and worsening environmental concerns. Palm oil biodiesel is mostly used in Malaysia. This study conducted engine performance and emission tests with a single-cylinder diesel engine fueled with palm and Calophyllum inophyllum biodiesel blends (PB10, PB20, PB30, CIB10, CIB20, and CIB30) at a full-load engine speed range of 1000–2400 rpm, and then compared the results with those of diesel fuel. Friction and wear tests were conducted using the four-ball tester with different temperatures at 40 and 80 kg load conditions and a constant speed of 1800 rpm. The average brake specific fuel consumption increased from 7.96% to 10.15% while operating on 10%, 20%, and 30% blends of palm and C. inophyllum biodiesel. The respective average brake powers for PB20 and PB30 were 9.31% and 12.93% lower compared with that for diesel fuel. PB20 produced relatively lower CO and HC emissions than the diesel and biodiesel blends. Diesel produced low amounts of NO X emission, and the CIB blend produced a lower frictional coefficient compared with the diesel and PB blends. PB30 showed high average FTP and low average WSD, both of which enhanced

  5. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  6. An Analysis Of Tensile Test Results to Assess the Innovation Risk for an Additive Manufacturing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamczak Stanisław

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the innovation risk for an additive manufacturing process. The analysis was based on the results of static tensile tests obtained for specimens made of photocured resin. The assessment involved analyzing the measurement uncertainty by applying the FMEA method. The structure of the causes and effects of the discrepancies was illustrated using the Ishikawa diagram. The risk priority numbers were calculated. The uncertainty of the tensile test measurement was determined for three printing orientations. The results suggest that the material used to fabricate the tensile specimens shows clear anisotropy of the properties in relation to the printing direction.

  7. Low-Cost, Class D Testing of Spacecraft Photovoltaic Systems Can Reduce Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgione, Joshua B.; Kojima, Gilbert K.; Hanel, Robert; Mallinson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The end-to-end verification of a spacecraft photovoltaic power generation system requires light! A lowcost, portable, and end-to-end photovoltaic-system test appropriate for NASA's new generation of Class D missions is presented. High risk, low-cost, and quick-turn satellites rarely have the resources to execute the traditional approaches from higher-class (A-C) missions. The Class D approach, as demonstrated on the Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), utilizes a portable, metalhalide, theatre lamp for an end-to-end photovoltaic system test. While not as precise and comprehensive as the traditional Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) test, the LADEE method leverages minimal resources into an ongoing assessment program that can be applied through numerous stages of the mission. The project takes a true Class D approach in assessing the technical value of a costly, highfidelity performance test versus a simpler approach with less programmatic risk. The resources required are a fraction of that for a LAPSS test, and is easy to repeat due to its portability. Further, the test equipment can be handed down to future projects without building an on-site facility. At the vanguard of Class D missions, the LADEE team frequently wrestled with and challenged the status quo. The philosophy of risk avoidance at all cost, typical to Class A-C missions, simply could not be executed. This innovative and simple testing solution is contextualized to NASA Class D programs and a specific risk encountered during development of the LADEE Electrical Power System (EPS). Selection of the appropriate lamp and safety concerns are discussed, with examples of test results. Combined with the vendor's panellevel data and periodic inspection, the method ensures system integrity from Integration and Test (I&T) through launch. Following launch, mission operations tools are utilized to assess system performance based on a scant amount of available data.

  8. A practical approach for implementing risk-based inservice testing of pumps at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, R.S. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maret, D.; Seniuk, P.; Smith, L.

    1996-12-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Center for Research and Technology Development`s (CRTD) Research Task Force on Risk-Based Inservice Testing has developed guidelines for risk-based inservice testing (IST) of pumps and valves. These guidelines are intended to help the ASME Operation and Maintenance (OM) Committee to enhance plant safety while focussing appropriate testing resources on critical components. This paper describes a practical approach for implementing those guidelines for pumps at nuclear power plants. The approach, as described in this paper, relies on input, direction, and assistance from several entities such as the ASME Code Committees, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the National Laboratories, as well as industry groups and personnel with applicable expertise. Key parts of the risk-based IST process that are addressed here include: identification of important failure modes, identification of significant failure causes, assessing the effectiveness of testing and maintenance activities, development of alternative testing and maintenance strategies, and assessing the effectiveness of alternative testing strategies with present ASME Code requirements. Finally, the paper suggests a method of implementing this process into the ASME OM Code for pump testing.

  9. A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Stefan; Sela, Erika; Blaha, Ludek; Braunbeck, Thomas; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; García-Franco, Mauricio; Guinea, Joaquin; Klüver, Nils; Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Tobor-Kapłon, Marysia; Witters, Hilda; Belanger, Scott; Benfenati, Emilio; Creton, Stuart; Cronin, Mark T D; Eggen, Rik I L; Embry, Michelle; Ekman, Drew; Gourmelon, Anne; Halder, Marlies; Hardy, Barry; Hartung, Thomas; Hubesch, Bruno; Jungmann, Dirk; Lampi, Mark A; Lee, Lucy; Léonard, Marc; Küster, Eberhard; Lillicrap, Adam; Luckenbach, Till; Murk, Albertinka J; Navas, José M; Peijnenburg, Willie; Repetto, Guillermo; Salinas, Edward; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Spielmann, Horst; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Whale, Graham; Wheeler, James R; Winter, Matthew J

    2013-12-01

    Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing all of the substances and effluents that require regulatory testing. Hence, there is a strong demand for replacement, reduction and refinement strategies and methods. However, until now alternative approaches have only rarely been used in regulatory settings. This review provides an overview on current regulations of chemicals and the requirements for animal tests in environmental hazard and risk assessment. It aims to highlight the potential areas for alternative approaches in environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Perspectives and limitations of alternative approaches to animal tests using vertebrates in environmental toxicology, i.e. mainly fish and amphibians, are discussed. Free access to existing (proprietary) animal test data, availability of validated alternative methods and a practical implementation of conceptual approaches such as the Adverse Outcome Pathways and Integrated Testing Strategies were identified as major requirements towards the successful development and implementation of alternative approaches. Although this article focusses on European regulations, its considerations and conclusions are of global relevance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chapter 5: assessing risk of bias as a domain of quality in medical test studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, P Lina; Riley, Crystal M; Matchar, David B

    2012-06-01

    Assessing methodological quality is a necessary activity for any systematic review, including those evaluating the evidence for studies of medical test performance. Judging the overall quality of an individual study involves examining the size of the study, the direction and degree of findings, the relevance of the study, and the risk of bias in the form of systematic error, internal validity, and other study limitations. In this chapter of the Methods Guide for Medical Test Reviews, we focus on the evaluation of risk of bias in the form of systematic error in an individual study as a distinctly important component of quality in studies of medical test performance, specifically in the context of estimating test performance (sensitivity and specificity). We make the following recommendations to systematic reviewers: 1) When assessing study limitations that are relevant to the test under evaluation, reviewers should select validated criteria that examine the risk of systematic error, 2) categorizing the risk of bias for individual studies as "low," "medium," or "high" is a useful way to proceed, and 3) methods for determining an overall categorization for the study limitations should be established a priori and documented clearly.

  11. Role of Genetic Testing for Inherited Prostate Cancer Risk: Philadelphia Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Veda N; Knudsen, Karen E; Kelly, William K; Abida, Wassim; Andriole, Gerald L; Bangma, Chris H; Bekelman, Justin E; Benson, Mitchell C; Blanco, Amie; Burnett, Arthur; Catalona, William J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Cooperberg, Matthew; Crawford, David E; Den, Robert B; Dicker, Adam P; Eggener, Scott; Fleshner, Neil; Freedman, Matthew L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Hurwitz, Mark D; Hyatt, Colette; Isaacs, William B; Kane, Christopher J; Kantoff, Philip; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Karsh, Lawrence I; Klein, Eric A; Lin, Daniel W; Loughlin, Kevin R; Lu-Yao, Grace; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Mann, Mark J; Mark, James R; McCue, Peter A; Miner, Martin M; Morgan, Todd; Moul, Judd W; Myers, Ronald E; Nielsen, Sarah M; Obeid, Elias; Pavlovich, Christian P; Peiper, Stephen C; Penson, David F; Petrylak, Daniel; Pettaway, Curtis A; Pilarski, Robert; Pinto, Peter A; Poage, Wendy; Raj, Ganesh V; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Robson, Mark E; Rosenberg, Matt T; Sandler, Howard; Sartor, Oliver; Schaeffer, Edward; Schwartz, Gordon F; Shahin, Mark S; Shore, Neal D; Shuch, Brian; Soule, Howard R; Tomlins, Scott A; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Uzzo, Robert; Vander Griend, Donald J; Walsh, Patrick C; Weil, Carol J; Wender, Richard; Gomella, Leonard G

    2018-02-01

    Purpose Guidelines are limited for genetic testing for prostate cancer (PCA). The goal of this conference was to develop an expert consensus-driven working framework for comprehensive genetic evaluation of inherited PCA in the multigene testing era addressing genetic counseling, testing, and genetically informed management. Methods An expert consensus conference was convened including key stakeholders to address genetic counseling and testing, PCA screening, and management informed by evidence review. Results Consensus was strong that patients should engage in shared decision making for genetic testing. There was strong consensus to test HOXB13 for suspected hereditary PCA, BRCA1/2 for suspected hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, and DNA mismatch repair genes for suspected Lynch syndrome. There was strong consensus to factor BRCA2 mutations into PCA screening discussions. BRCA2 achieved moderate consensus for factoring into early-stage management discussion, with stronger consensus in high-risk/advanced and metastatic setting. Agreement was moderate to test all men with metastatic castration-resistant PCA, regardless of family history, with stronger agreement to test BRCA1/2 and moderate agreement to test ATM to inform prognosis and targeted therapy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive, multidisciplinary consensus statement to address a genetic evaluation framework for inherited PCA in the multigene testing era. Future research should focus on developing a working definition of familial PCA for clinical genetic testing, expanding understanding of genetic contribution to aggressive PCA, exploring clinical use of genetic testing for PCA management, genetic testing of African American males, and addressing the value framework of genetic evaluation and testing men at risk for PCA-a clinically heterogeneous disease.

  12. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Keith [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); West, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Wendy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graves, Ronald [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Orban, John [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Przesmitzki, Steve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Theiss, Timothy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This report (February 2009) is an update of the original version, which was published in October 2008. This report is the result of the U.S. Department of Energy's test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program is to assess the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals in the use of renewable fuels.

  13. Chapter 5: Assessing Risk of Bias as a Domain of Quality in Medical Test Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Santaguida, P. Lina; Riley, Crystal M.; Matchar, David B.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Assessing methodological quality is a necessary activity for any systematic review, including those evaluating the evidence for studies of medical test performance. Judging the overall quality of an individual study involves examining the size of the study, the direction and degree of findings, the relevance of the study, and the risk of bias in the form of systematic error, internal validity, and other study limitations. In this chapter of the Methods Guide for Medical Test Reviews,...

  14. Preoperative hemostatic testing and the risk of postoperative bleeding in coronary artery bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Johansson, Pär I; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-01-01

    enrolled in this prospective observational study. TEG, Multiplate aggregometry, and coagulation tests were sampled on the day before surgery. Excessive bleeding was defined as >1000 mL over 18 hours. RESULTS: Multiplate-adenosine diphosphate (ADP) measurements were significantly lower in patients...... impedance aggregometry identified patients at risk for excessive bleeding after CABG. Low fibrinogen levels were associated with increased bleeding. Neither routine TEG parameters nor conventional coagulation tests were correlated with bleeding....

  15. Low Bone Mineral Density Risk Factors and Testing Patterns in Institutionalized Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mailee; Campagna, Elizabeth J.; Jensen, Kristin M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Adults with intellectual or developmental disability (ID/DD) have multiple risks for low bone mineral density (BMD) without formal guidelines to guide testing. We sought to identify risk factors and patterns of BMD testing among institutionalized adults with ID/DD. Methods: We evaluated risk factors for low BMD (Z-/T-score < -1) and…

  16. Tiered guidance for risk-informed environmental health and safety testing of nanotechnologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Zachary A.; Kennedy, Alan J.; Poda, Aimee R.; Cuddy, Michael F.; Moser, Robert D.; MacCuspie, Robert I.; Harmon, Ashley; Plourde, Kenton; Haines, Christopher D.; Steevens, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Provided the rapid emergence of novel technologies containing engineered nanomaterials, there is a need to better understand the potential environmental, health, and safety effects of nanotechnologies before wide-scale deployment. However, the unique properties of nanomaterials and uncertainty regarding applicable test methods have led to a lack of consensus regarding the collection and evaluation of data related to hazard and exposure potentials. Often, overly conservative approaches to characterization and data collection result in prolonged, unfocused, or irrelevant testing, which increases costs and delays deployment. In this paper, we provide a novel testing guidance framework for determining whether a nanotechnology has the potential to release material with nano-specific parameters that pose a risk to humans or the environment. The framework considers methods to categorize nanotechnologies by their structure and within their relevant-use scenarios to inform testing in a time- and resource-limited reality. Based on the precedent of dredged sediment testing, a five-tiered approach is proposed in which opportunities are presented to conclude testing once sufficient risk-related information has been collected, or that the technology in question does not require nano-specific scrutiny. A series of screening stages are suggested, covering relevant aspects including size, surface area, distribution, unique behaviors, and release potential. The tiered, adaptive guidance approach allows users to concentrate on collecting the most relevant data, thus accelerating technology deployment while minimizing risk

  17. Tiered guidance for risk-informed environmental health and safety testing of nanotechnologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Zachary A.; Kennedy, Alan J.; Poda, Aimee R.; Cuddy, Michael F.; Moser, Robert D.; MacCuspie, Robert I.; Harmon, Ashley; Plourde, Kenton; Haines, Christopher D.; Steevens, Jeffery A.

    2015-03-01

    Provided the rapid emergence of novel technologies containing engineered nanomaterials, there is a need to better understand the potential environmental, health, and safety effects of nanotechnologies before wide-scale deployment. However, the unique properties of nanomaterials and uncertainty regarding applicable test methods have led to a lack of consensus regarding the collection and evaluation of data related to hazard and exposure potentials. Often, overly conservative approaches to characterization and data collection result in prolonged, unfocused, or irrelevant testing, which increases costs and delays deployment. In this paper, we provide a novel testing guidance framework for determining whether a nanotechnology has the potential to release material with nano-specific parameters that pose a risk to humans or the environment. The framework considers methods to categorize nanotechnologies by their structure and within their relevant-use scenarios to inform testing in a time- and resource-limited reality. Based on the precedent of dredged sediment testing, a five-tiered approach is proposed in which opportunities are presented to conclude testing once sufficient risk-related information has been collected, or that the technology in question does not require nano-specific scrutiny. A series of screening stages are suggested, covering relevant aspects including size, surface area, distribution, unique behaviors, and release potential. The tiered, adaptive guidance approach allows users to concentrate on collecting the most relevant data, thus accelerating technology deployment while minimizing risk.

  18. Improving the Compatibility of Natural and Synthetic Polymer Blends by Radiation Treatments for Using in Practical Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-El Fadle, F.I.

    2011-01-01

    Different polymer blends based on the natural polymers carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate as well as the synthetic polymers poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly acrylamide (PAM) were prepared by solution casting in the form of films. The common solvent used was water. The different blends prepared in this study were subjected to gamma radiation. The compatibility and structure-property behaviour of these blends was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile mechanical testing before and after irradiation. In addition, the swelling properties of different polymer blends were studied at different conditions of temperature and ph. The controlled release characters of the different blends of different drugs were investigated. In addition, the different polymer blends were used for the removal of heavy metals and dyes waste.

  19. EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO ON ENERGY AND EMISSION OF VCR DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH DUAL BLENDS OF BIODIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. EKNATH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent 10 years biodiesel fuel was studied extensively as an alternative fuel. Most of researchers reported performance and emission of biodiesel and their blends with constant compression ratio. Also all the research was conducted with use of single biodiesel and its blend. Few reports are observed with the use of variable compression ratio and blends of more than one biodiesel. Main aim of the present study is to analyse the effect of compression ratio on the performance and emission of dual blends of biodiesel. In the present study Blends of Jatropha and Karanja with Diesel fuel was tested on single cylinder VCR DI diesel engine for compression ratio 16 and 18. High density of biodiesel fuel causes longer delay period for Jatropha fuel was observed compare with Karanja fuel. However blending of two biodiesel K20J40D results in to low mean gas temperature which is the main reason for low NOx emission.

  20. Performance of jatropha oil blends in a diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forson, F.K.; Oduro, E.K.; Hammond-Donkoh, E. [Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-06-01

    Results are presented on tests on a single-cylinder direct-injection engine operating on diesel fuel, jatropha oil, and blends of diesel and jatropha oil in proportions of 97.4%/2.6%; 80%120%; and 50%150% by volume. The results covered a range of operating loads on the engine. Values are given for the chemical and physical properties of the fuels, brake specific fuel consumption, brake power, brake thermal efficiency, engine torque, and the concentrations of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen in the exhaust gases. Carbon dioxide emissions were similar for all fuels, the 97.4% diesel/2.6% jatropha fuel blend was observed to be the lower net contributor to the atmospheric level. The trend of carbon monoxide emissions was similar for the fuels but diesel fuel showed slightly lower emissions to the atmosphere. The test showed that jatropha oil could be conveniently used as a diesel substitute in a diesel engine. The test further showed increases in brake thermal efficiency, brake power and reduction of specific fuel consumption for jatropha oil and its blends with diesel generally, but the most significant conclusion from the study is that the 97.4% diesel/2.6% jatropha fuel blend produced maximum values of the brake power and brake thermal efficiency as well as minimum values of the specific fuel consumption. The 97.4%12.6% fuel blend yielded the highest cetane number and even better engine performance than the diesel fuel suggesting that jatropha oil can be used as an ignition- accelerator additive for diesel fuel. (author)

  1. Expressing best practices in (risk) analysis and testing of safety-critical systems using patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzner, Wolfgang; Sieverding, Sven; Kacimi, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The continuing pervasion of our society with safety-critical cyber-physical systems not only demands for adequate (risk) analysis, testing and verification techniques, it also generates growing experience on their use, which can be considered as important as the tools themselves for their efficient...

  2. A Study of Black At-Risk Urban Youth Using Computer Assisted Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signer, Barbara R.

    The objectives of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate the year long project, Microcomputer Adaptive Testing High-Risk Urban Students (MATH-R-US). The project produced diagnostic software to meet the following criteria: (1) help students obtain high school mathematics credit needed for graduation; (2) motivate students to learn…

  3. Enabling More than Moore: Accelerated Reliability Testing and Risk Analysis for Advanced Electronics Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarian, Reza; Evans, John W.

    2014-01-01

    For five decades, the semiconductor industry has distinguished itself by the rapid pace of improvement in miniaturization of electronics products-Moore's Law. Now, scaling hits a brick wall, a paradigm shift. The industry roadmaps recognized the scaling limitation and project that packaging technologies will meet further miniaturization needs or ak.a "More than Moore". This paper presents packaging technology trends and accelerated reliability testing methods currently being practiced. Then, it presents industry status on key advanced electronic packages, factors affecting accelerated solder joint reliability of area array packages, and IPC/JEDEC/Mil specifications for characterizations of assemblies under accelerated thermal and mechanical loading. Finally, it presents an examples demonstrating how Accelerated Testing and Analysis have been effectively employed in the development of complex spacecraft thereby reducing risk. Quantitative assessments necessarily involve the mathematics of probability and statistics. In addition, accelerated tests need to be designed which consider the desired risk posture and schedule for particular project. Such assessments relieve risks without imposing additional costs. and constraints that are not value added for a particular mission. Furthermore, in the course of development of complex systems, variances and defects will inevitably present themselves and require a decision concerning their disposition, necessitating quantitative assessments. In summary, this paper presents a comprehensive view point, from technology to systems, including the benefits and impact of accelerated testing in offsetting risk.

  4. Mode of Action Frameworks in Toxicity Testing and Chemical Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, B.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, legislative mandates worldwide are requiring systematic consideration of much larger numbers of chemicals. This necessitates more efficient and effective toxicity testing, as a basis to be more predictive in a risk assessment context. This in turn requires much more emphasis early in the

  5. Liver function tests and risk prediction of incident type 2 diabetes : evaluation in two independent cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, Ali; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Corpeleijn, Eva; van der A, Daphne L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Peelen, Linda M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Navis, Gerjan; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; Beulens, Joline W. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Liver function tests might predict the risk of type 2 diabetes. An independent study evaluating utility of these markers compared with an existing prediction model is yet lacking. Methods and Findings: We performed a case-cohort study, including random subcohort (6.5%) from 38,379

  6. Animal testing, 3R models and regulatory acceptance : Technology transition in a risk-averse context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, M.J.W.A.

    2016-01-01

    Risk avoidance has resulted in a broad range of regulations to guarantee the safety of products such as pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Many of these regulations rely on animal tests. About 3 million laboratory animals are used annually in Europe to meet such regulatory requirements.Regulatory animal

  7. Determinants of the Use of a Diabetes Risk-Screening Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, Nienke; ter Hoeven, C.L.; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2008-01-01

    A study was designed to investigate why people do or do not make use of a diabetes risk test developed to facilitate the timely diagnosis of diabetes. Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire, which was based on the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Planned Behavior, and the Threatening

  8. Study The Properties and Weight Loss Degradation of The Blend LDPE/Cellulose in Soil Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair Jabbar Abdul Ameer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wider applications of polyethylene (PE in packaging and agriculture have raised serious issue of waste disposal and pollution. Therefore, it is necessary to raise its biodegradability by additives.In this study, we will add cellulose to low density polyethylene to prepare polymer blend have ability to degradation in soil environment.The samples were prepared by using twin screw extruder.LDPE and CELL have been mixing with different weight proportions, and studied their properties in order to determine its compliance with the required specifications to be able to be used biodegradable polymers. To improve the viability of decomposition PEG has been added to the resulting blend. Several tests were applied to identify those properties such as tensile,hardness, density and creep test. FTIR, digital microscope and SEM test acheved in order to determine the miscibility and blend morphology befor and after degradation.The results show that,the blend weight loss increase with increasing CELL percent.

  9. Genetic Testing for Sports Performance, Responses to Training and Injury Risk: Practical and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alun G; Wackerhage, Henning; Day, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses practical and ethical considerations regarding genetic tests to predict performance and/or risk of exercise-related injury or illness. Various people might wish to conduct sport-related genetic tests for a variety of reasons. For example, an individual might seek personal genetic information to help guide their own sport participation. A sports coach might wish to test young athletes to aid team selection or individualize training. A physician might want to predict the risk of injury or illness in athletes and advise regarding selection or preventative measures. An insurance company might seek to estimate the risk of career-threatening injury for athletes based partly on genetic information. Whilst this information is, in part, encoded in our DNA sequence, the available tests allow generally only a poor prediction of the aforementioned variables. In other words, the current genetic tests and analysis methods are not powerful enough to inform important decisions in sport to a substantial degree. It is particularly disappointing that more than half of the commercially available genetic tests related to exercise and sport do not appear to identify publicly the genetic variants they assess, making scrutiny by academic scholars and consumers (or their representatives) impossible. There are also challenging ethical issues to consider. For example, the imposition of genetic tests on individuals (especially young people) by third parties is potentially susceptible to abuse. Scientists and practitioners should understand the limitations of the tests currently available, the ethical concerns and the importance of counselling before and after testing so that they are only used in a responsible manner. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Calibration sampling paradox in near infrared spectroscopy: a case study of multi-component powder blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, A D; Liew, C V; Heng, P W S

    2010-08-16

    The objective of this study was to illustrate the sampling paradox resulting from the different strategies of spectral acquisition while preparing and implementing the calibration models for prediction of blend components in multi-component cohesive blends. A D-optimal mixture design was used to create 24 blending runs of the formulation consisting of chlorpheniramine maleate, lactose, microcrystalline cellulose and magnesium stearate. Three strategies: (a) laboratory mixing and static spectral acquisition, (b) IBC mixing and static spectral acquisition and (c) IBC mixing and dynamic spectral acquisition were investigated for obtaining the most relevant and representative calibration samples. An optical head comprising a sapphire window mounted on the lid of the IBC was used for static and dynamic NIR spectral acquisition of the powder blends. For laboratory mixed samples, powders were blended for fixed period of 30 min and later on scanned for NIR spectra. For IBC mixed blends, the spectral acquisition was carried out in-line for 2 min and stopped for static spectral acquisition. The same cycle was repeated for the next 28 min. Partial least square (PLS) calibration models for each component were built and ranked according to their calibration statistics. Optimal calibration models were selected from each strategy for each component and used for in-line prediction of blend components of three independent test runs. Although excellent statistics were obtained for the PLS models from the three strategies, significant discrepancies were observed during prediction of the independent blends in real time. Models built using IBC mixed blends and dynamic spectral acquisition resulted in the most accurate predictions for all the blend components, whereas models prepared using static spectral acquisition (laboratory mixed and IBC) showed erroneous prediction results. The prediction performance differences between the models obtained using the different strategies could be

  11. Physicochemical properties and potential food applications of Moringa oleifera seed oil blended with other vegetable oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollah, Sarafhana; Abdulkarim, Sabo Muhammad; Ahmad, Siti Hajar; Khoramnia, Anahita; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Blends (30:70, 50:50 and 70:30 w/w) of Moringa oleifera seed oil (MoO) with palm olein (PO), palm stearin (PS), palm kernel oil (PKO) and virgin coconut oil (VCO) were prepared. To determine the physicochemical properties of the blends, the iodine value (IV), saponication value (SV), fatty acid (FA) composition, triacylglycerol (TAG) composition, thermal behaviour (DSC) and solid fat content (SFC) tests were analysed. The incorporation of high oleic acid (81.73%) MoO into the blends resulted in the reduction of palmitic acid content of PO and PS from 36.38% to 17.17% and 54.66% to 14.39% and lauric acid content of PKO and VCO from 50.63% to 17.70% and 51.26% to 26.05% respectively while oleic acid and degree of unsaturation were increased in all blends. Changes in the FA composition and TAG profile have significantly affected the thermal behavior and solid fat content of the oil blends. In MoO/PO blends the melting temperature of MoO decreased while, in MoO/PS, MoO/PKO and MoO/VCO blends, it increased indicating produce of zero-trans harder oil blends without use of partial hydrogenation. The spreadability of PS, PKO and VCO in low temperatures was also increased due to incorporation of MoO. The melting point of PS significantly decreased in MoO/PS blends which proved to be suitable for high oleic bakery shortening and confectionary shortening formulation. The finding appears that blending of MoO with other vegetable oils would enable the initial properties of the oils to be modified or altered and provide functional and nutritional attributes for usage in various food applications, increasing the possibilities for the commercial use of these oils.

  12. An experimental study of injection and spray characteristics of diesel and gasoline blends on a common rail injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dong; Wang, Chunhai; Duan, Yaozong; Tian, Zhisong; Huang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    The injection and spray characteristics of diesel and gasoline blends are investigated on a common rail injection system. The injection rate, fuel spray evolution process (tip penetration distance, spray cone angle, projected spray area and relative brightness intensity contour) and microscopic droplet features are analyzed. The results show that diesel and gasoline blends have higher volumetric injection rates, earlier starts of injection and shorter injection delays, but little variances are observed in the mass injection rates for different test fuels. Increased gasoline proportion in the test blends causes slightly decreased spray tip penetration distance but increased spray cone angle. Also, more smaller-size droplets are observed in the fuel jet of the diesel and gasoline blends, indicating that the spray breakup and atomization processes are promoted. - Highlights: • Injection rate and spray characteristics of diesel and gasoline blends are studied. • Diesel and gasoline blends have higher volumetric injection rates. • Earlier starts of injection are found when using diesel and gasoline blends. • Diesel and gasoline blends produce shorter spray penetration but higher cone angle. • The number of small droplets increases in the spray of diesel and gasoline blends

  13. Teaching Shakespeare through blended learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Hawkes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and discusses experimentation with the use of blended learning in teaching Shakespeare. Previous iterations of the subject in a traditional lecture and tutorial format had seen a decline in student attendance and a fall in student achievement at the higher grade levels. A further complicating issue was the range of expectations from the cohort, which comprised students from Creative Writing, Drama, and Education, a factor which also highlights the cross-disciplinary nature of teaching Shakespeare. A blended learning and lectorial format was employed to facilitate small group discussion of the plays in conjunction with a wider social and historical overview. Student feedback indicated that the changes to the delivery method were received positively, although some questions do remain concerning levels of student engagement and the specific disciplinary needs of student cohorts. The findings of the teaching of this subject will translate usefully to other fields and disciplines, especially as more and more subjects take up blended learning. The findings indicate that it is not enough to take up new technologies in the teaching of a unit. The learning environment must also be rethought and reconceptualised.

  14. PENGARUH BLENDED LEARNING TERHADAP PENGUASAAN KONSEP DAN PENALARAN FISIKA PESERTA DIDIK KELAS X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermawanto -

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan 1 Mengetahui pengaruh blended learning terhadap penguasaan konsep fisika 2 Mengetahui pengaruh blended learning terhadap penalaran fisika. Rancangan yang digunakan adalah Randomized Posttest only Control Group Design. Populasinya adalah peserta didik kelas X SMA Negeri 1 Batu. Sampelnya yaitu kelas X-6 dan X-10 sebagai kelas eksperimen, kelas X-11 dan X-12 sebagai kelas kontrol. Hasil uji t penguasan konsep didapat thitung = 6,64 > = ttabel =1,66, menunjukkan ada perbedaan, sedangkan untuk uji lanjut yaitu uji Tuckey menunjukkan Qhitung = 7,55 > Q tabel = 2,85, menunjukan bahwa penguasaan konsep peserta didik yang menggunakan blended learning lebih tinggi dari pada konvensional. Berkaitan dengan penalaran, hasil uji t menunjukkan thitung = 2,65 > ttabel = 1,66, menunjukkan ada perbedaan. Sedangkan untuk uji lanjut yaitu uji Tuckey menunjukkan Qhitung = 3,19 > Qtabel = 2,85, menunjukkan bahwa penalaran peserta didik yang menggunakan blended learning lebih tinggi dari pada konvensional. Simpulan penelitian ini adalah 1 Ada pengaruh blended learning terhadap penguasaan konsep fisika, 2 Ada pengaruh blended learning terhadap penalaran fisika. Pembelajaran blended learning dapat meningkatkan penguasaan konsep dan penalaran fisika serta melatih peserta didik untuk mandiri dan aktif. TThe aims of this research are 1 knowing the influence of blended learning study toward concept physics achievement and 2 knowing the influence of blended learning toward physics reasoning. This research used Randomized Posttest only Control Group Design and conducted in odd semester 2012-2013 academic year. The research population were students of grade X in senior high school 1 Batu. The research samples were four classes: X-6 and X-10 as the experiment classes and X-11 and X-12 as the control classes. The instrument is test of physics concept achievement and physics reasoning in multiple choice form. The results showed that there was no

  15. Testing the reliability of the Fall Risk Screening Tool in an elderly ambulatory population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Susan J; McKay, Michael; Hyrkas, Kristiina

    2013-11-01

    To identify and test the reliability of a fall risk screening tool in an ambulatory outpatient clinic. The Fall Risk Screening Tool (Albert Lea Medical Center, MN, USA) was scripted for an interview format. Two interviewers separately screened a convenience sample of 111 patients (age ≥ 65 years) in an ambulatory outpatient clinic in a northeastern US city. The interviewers' scoring of fall risk categories was similar. There was good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.834-0.889) and inter-rater reliability [intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) = 0.824-0.881] for total, Risk Factor and Client's Health Status subscales. The Physical Environment scores indicated acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.742) and adequate reliability (ICC = 0.688). Two Physical Environment items (furniture and medical equipment condition) had low reliabilities [Kappa (K) = 0.323, P = 0.08; K = -0.078, P = 0.648), respectively. The scripted Fall Risk Screening Tool demonstrated good reliability in this sample. Rewording two Physical Environment items will be considered. A reliable instrument such as the scripted Fall Risk Screening Tool provides a standardised assessment for identifying high fall risk patients. This tool is especially useful because it assesses personal, behavioural and environmental factors specific to community-dwelling patients; the interview format also facilitates patient-provider interaction. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of a blended learning course for teaching oral radiology to undergraduate dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavadella, A; Tsiklakis, K; Vougiouklakis, G; Lionarakis, A

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement a blended course (a combined face-to-face and online instruction) on undergraduate oral radiology and evaluate it by comparing its educational effectiveness (derived from students' performance and answers to questionnaires) to a conventional course's. Students' attitudes concerning the blended methodology were also registered. An original course was developed and implemented, and its electronic version was uploaded to an e-learning educational platform. The course was attended by two groups of final-year students, who were taught by either the conventional face-to-face methodology or the blended learning methodology. Students answered a series of questionnaires, before and after following the course, regarding their perceptions, attitudes and evaluation of the course. Additionally, they completed knowledge assessment tests and their grades (before and after the course) were compared. Educational effectiveness of the course was determined by analysing the results of the questionnaires and the tests. Students in the blended group performed significantly better than their colleagues of the conventional group in the post-course knowledge test, and female students of the blended group performed better than male students. Students evaluated high the course content, organisation, educational material, and the blended group students additionally appreciated the course design and clarity of instructions. Students' attitudes towards elements of blended learning (effectiveness, motivation and active engagement) were very positive. Most of the blended group students, who attended the face-to-face meeting (approx. 91%), evaluated it as helpful for summarising the subject and clarifying difficult issues. Blended learning is effective and well evaluated by dental students and can be implemented in undergraduate curriculum for teaching oral radiology. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Acid resistance of palm oil fuel ash and metakaolin ternary blend cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamilu Usman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of blend of Palm Oil fuel ash (POFA and Metakaolin (MK on the resistance of cement mortar to sulphuric acid (H2SO4 attack. Tests were conducted on POFA and MK ternary blended cement mortar immersed in a 3% H2SO4 solution for up 180 d. Binaries of POFA/cement and MK/cement as well as plain ordinary Portland cement (OPC mortar was also tested for comparison. The parameters measured include residual compressive strength and residual mass. Additionally, the microstructures of the specimens were analysed using the X-ray diffraction and Fourier transformed infrared techniques. The residual compressive strengths of the mortar specimens for plain OPC, binary blend of POFA and cement, binary blend of MK and cement, and ternary blend of POFA, MK and cement after 180 d of immersion in the acid solution were 25, 30, 33, and 32%, respectively. Moreover, the corresponding residual masses of the specimens were 39, 52, 58, and 54%. Accordingly, the ternary blended mortar performed better in resisting H2SO4 attack than the plain OPC and binary blend of POFA/cement mortars.

  18. Evaluation of Anti-Knock Quality of Dicyclopentadiene-Gasoline Blends

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khodaier, Mohannad

    2017-03-28

    Increasing the anti-knock quality of gasoline fuels can enable higher efficiency in spark ignition engines. In this study, the blending anti-knock quality of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD), a by-product of ethylene production from naphtha cracking, with various gasoline fuels is explored. The blends were tested in an ignition quality tester (IQT) and a modified cooperative fuel research (CFR) engine operating under homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and knock limited spark advance (KLSA) conditions. Due to current fuel regulations, ethanol is widely used as a gasoline blending component in many markets. In addition, ethanol is widely used as a fuel and literature verifying its performance. Moreover, because ethanol exhibits synergistic effects, the test results of DCPD-gasoline blends were compared to those of ethanol-gasoline blends. The experiments conducted in this work enabled the screening of DCPD auto-ignition characteristics across a range of combustion modes. The synergistic blending nature of DCPD was apparent and appeared to be greater than that of ethanol. The data presented suggests that DCPD has the potential to be a high octane blending component in gasoline; one which can substitute alkylates, isomerates, reformates, and oxygenates.

  19. Evaluating a novel approach to enhancing dysphagia management: workplace-based, blended e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilott, Irene; Bennett, Bev; Gerrish, Kate; Pownall, Sue; Jones, Amanda; Garth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the learning effect and resource use cost of workplace-based, blended e-learning about dysphagia for stroke rehabilitation nurses. Dysphagia is a potentially life-threatening problem that compromises quality of life. In many countries, nurses play a crucial role in supporting the management of patients with swallowing problems, yet the literature reports a need for training. A single-group, pre- and post-study with mixed methods. Each blended e-learning session comprised a needs analysis, e-learning programmes, practical skills about modifying fluids and action planning to transfer learning into practice. Participants were the population of registered nurses (n = 22) and healthcare assistants (n = 10) on a stroke rehabilitation ward in a large, teaching hospital in England between August 2010-March 2011. Data collection comprised observation (34 hours), questionnaires administered at four time points to examine change in attitude, knowledge and practice, and estimating the resource use cost for the service. Nonparametric tests and content analysis were used to analyse the data. All participants achieved a nationally recognised level of competence. The learning effect was evident on the post- and follow-up measures, with some items of dysphagia knowledge and attitude achieving significance at the p ≤ 0·05 level. The most common self-reported changes in practice related to medicines management, thickening fluids and oral hygiene. The resource use cost was estimated at £2688 for 108 hours training. Workplace-based, blended e-learning was an acceptable, cost effective way of delivering essential clinical knowledge and skills about dysphagia. Dysphagia should be viewed as a patient safety issue because of the risks of malnutrition, dehydration and aspiration pneumonia. As such, it is pertinent to many members of the interdisciplinary team. Consideration should be given to including dysphagia management in initial education and continuing professional

  20. Advanced age, cardiovascular risk burden, and timed up and go test performance in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Vikas; Albin, Roger L; Müller, Martijn L T M; Koeppe, Robert A; Studenski, Stephanie; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular comorbidities are a known risk factor for impaired mobility in elderly individuals. Motor impairments in Parkinson disease are conventionally ascribed to nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation although progressive gait and balance impairments become more common with aging and often show limited response to dopaminergic replacement therapies. We explored the association between elevated cardiovascular risk factors and performance on the Timed Up and Go test in cross-sectional of Parkinson disease subjects (n = 83). Cardiovascular risk factor status was estimated using the Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease risk-scoring algorithm in order to dichotomize the cohort into those with and without elevated modifiable cardiovascular risk compared with normative scores for age and gender. All subjects underwent clinical and neuroimaging evaluations including a 3-m Timed Up and Go test, [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine positron emission tomography imaging to estimate nigrostriatal dopamine terminal loss, and an magnetic resonance imaging assessment of leukoaraiosis. A similar analysis was performed in 49 healthy controls. After adjusting for disease duration, leukoaraiosis, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, Parkinson disease subjects with elevated Framingham risk scores (n = 61) displayed slower Timed Up and Go test performance (β = 1.86, t = 2.41, p = .018) compared with subjects with normal range Framingham risk scores (n = 22). When age ≥65 was added to the model in a post hoc analysis, the strength of effect seen with older age (β = 1.51, t = 2.44, p = .017) was similar to that of elevated Framingham risk scoring (β = 1.87, t = 2.51, p = .014). In a multivariable regression model studying the healthy control population, advanced age (t = 2.15, p = .037) was a significant predictor of Timed Up and Go speed though striatal [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine (t = -1.30, p = .19) and elevated Framingham risk scores (t = 1.32, p = .19) were not

  1. Game innovation through conceptual blending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möring, Sebastian Martin

    In  this  paper  I  wish  to  apply implications of  the  Conceptual  Blending  Theory  to  computer  games.  I  will  analyze  chosen  examples  and  discuss  them  as  a  result  of  video  game  innovation  made  possible  through  "conceptual  blending."  Conceptual  blending  links  at  least......  integration  network  consisting  of  at  least  two  input  spaces,  a  generic  space  and  a  blended  space  as  well  as  its  governing  principles  consisting  of  composition,  completion,  and  elaboration.  With  the  help  of  these  instruments  I  analyze computer  games like  Tuper  Tario  Tros.......,  Hell.  The  purpose  of  my  approach  is  not  so  much  to  validate  the  ideas  of  conceptual  blending  theory  through  another  field  of  examples  (computer  games)  but  to  name  and analyze characteristics of the mentioned games with the  help of a given method....

  2. Correspondence Theory and Phonological Blending in French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Scott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Though less productive than rival word-formation processes like compounding and affixation, blending is still a rich source of neologisms in French. Despite this productivity, however, blends are often seen by scholars as unpredictable, uninteresting, or both. This analysis picks up where recent studies of blending have left off, using Correspondence Theory and a bundle of segmental constraints to deal with this phenomenon as it pertains to French. More specifically, it shows that blending is the result of a single output standing in correspondence with two or more other outputs, and that we do not need to refer to prosodic information, which is crucial in accounts of blending in languages with lexical stress like English, to account for the process in French. The analysis also differs from previous studies in that it locates blending exclusively within the phonology, leaving its morphological and semantic characteristics to be handled by other processes in the grammar.

  3. Statistical methods for assessment of blend homogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Camilla

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis the use of various statistical methods to address some of the problems related to assessment of the homogeneity of powder blends in tablet production is discussed. It is not straight forward to assess the homogeneity of a powder blend. The reason is partly that in bulk materials...... as powder blends there is no natural unit or amount to define a sample from the blend, and partly that current technology does not provide a method of universally collecting small representative samples from large static powder beds. In the thesis a number of methods to assess (in)homogeneity are presented....... Some methods have a focus on exploratory analysis where the aim is to investigate the spatial distribution of drug content in the batch. Other methods presented focus on describing the overall (total) (in)homogeneity of the blend. The overall (in)homogeneity of the blend is relevant as it is closely...

  4. Impact of imperfect test sensitivity on determining risk factors: the case of bovine tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmaragd, Camille; Green, Laura E; Medley, Graham F; Browne, William J

    2012-01-01

    Imperfect diagnostic testing reduces the power to detect significant predictors in classical cross-sectional studies. Assuming that the misclassification in diagnosis is random this can be dealt with by increasing the sample size of a study. However, the effects of imperfect tests in longitudinal data analyses are not as straightforward to anticipate, especially if the outcome of the test influences behaviour. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of imperfect test sensitivity on the determination of predictor variables in a longitudinal study. To deal with imperfect test sensitivity affecting the response variable, we transformed the observed response variable into a set of possible temporal patterns of true disease status, whose prior probability was a function of the test sensitivity. We fitted a Bayesian discrete time survival model using an MCMC algorithm that treats the true response patterns as unknown parameters in the model. We applied our approach to epidemiological data of bovine tuberculosis outbreaks in England and investigated the effect of reduced test sensitivity in the determination of risk factors for the disease. We found that reduced test sensitivity led to changes to the collection of risk factors associated with the probability of an outbreak that were chosen in the 'best' model and to an increase in the uncertainty surrounding the parameter estimates for a model with a fixed set of risk factors that were associated with the response variable. We propose a novel algorithm to fit discrete survival models for longitudinal data where values of the response variable are uncertain. When analysing longitudinal data, uncertainty surrounding the response variable will affect the significance of the predictors and should therefore be accounted for either at the design stage by increasing the sample size or at the post analysis stage by conducting appropriate sensitivity analyses.

  5. Impact of imperfect test sensitivity on determining risk factors: the case of bovine tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Szmaragd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Imperfect diagnostic testing reduces the power to detect significant predictors in classical cross-sectional studies. Assuming that the misclassification in diagnosis is random this can be dealt with by increasing the sample size of a study. However, the effects of imperfect tests in longitudinal data analyses are not as straightforward to anticipate, especially if the outcome of the test influences behaviour. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of imperfect test sensitivity on the determination of predictor variables in a longitudinal study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To deal with imperfect test sensitivity affecting the response variable, we transformed the observed response variable into a set of possible temporal patterns of true disease status, whose prior probability was a function of the test sensitivity. We fitted a Bayesian discrete time survival model using an MCMC algorithm that treats the true response patterns as unknown parameters in the model. We applied our approach to epidemiological data of bovine tuberculosis outbreaks in England and investigated the effect of reduced test sensitivity in the determination of risk factors for the disease. We found that reduced test sensitivity led to changes to the collection of risk factors associated with the probability of an outbreak that were chosen in the 'best' model and to an increase in the uncertainty surrounding the parameter estimates for a model with a fixed set of risk factors that were associated with the response variable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a novel algorithm to fit discrete survival models for longitudinal data where values of the response variable are uncertain. When analysing longitudinal data, uncertainty surrounding the response variable will affect the significance of the predictors and should therefore be accounted for either at the design stage by increasing the sample size or at the post analysis stage by conducting

  6. Provider Discussions of Genetic Tests With U.S. Women at Risk for a BRCA Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Leland E; Haas, Jennifer S; Simon, Steven R

    2018-02-01

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that primary care providers screen unaffected women with a family history of BRCA mutation-associated cancers, but without a personal history of BRCA-related cancer, for referral to genetic counseling and potential genetic testing. The 2015 National Health Interview Survey was analyzed in January 2017 to determine the rates at which unaffected adult women with a positive family history of BRCA-related cancers, assessed using the Family History Screen-7, reported discussing genetic testing with a provider, using genetic counseling services, and having genetic testing for increased cancer risk. Clinical correlates associated with these outcomes were assessed using multivariable logistic regression (AOR with 95% CI). Among unaffected Family History Screen-7 screen-positive women, 9.5% reported discussing genetic testing with a provider, 5.1% reported genetic counseling, and 2.7% reported uptake of genetic testing. Younger women (aged 18-39 and 40-49 years) were more likely to discuss genetic testing than women aged ≥60 years (AOR=1.50, 95% CI=1.09, 2.06 and AOR=1.64, 95% CI=1.15, 2.33, respectively). Women of black race (AOR=1.50, 95% CI=1.09, 2.07) and women with greater than a high school education (AOR=1.85, 95% CI=1.41, 2.43) were more likely to discuss genetic testing than women of white race and women with a high school education or less, respectively. Among a higher risk subgroup with an even stronger family history of BRCA-associated cancers, 18.5% of women reported discussions. Despite a decade-old U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation, few unaffected women at risk for BRCA-associated cancer report discussing genetic testing with a provider. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Study of the properties and biodegradability of polyester/starch blends submitted to microbial attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhas, Gloria M.; Almeida, Yeda M.B. de; Lima, Maria Alice Gomes de Andrade; Santos, Livia Almeida

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the biodegradation of blends of poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate)/starch and poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate-cohydroxyvalerate)/ starch. The blends were obtained by evaporation of the solvent in the mixture of the polymers in chloroform. Tests were carried out in presence of micro-organisms which acted as biodegradation agents. The blends were consumed as carbon substrate and the production of CO 2 was evaluated in the process. In addition, the polyesters' mechanical properties were reduced by the incorporation of starch in its structure. ( 1 H) NMR and infrared spectroscopy detected some characteristic polyester degradation groups in the polyesters' chemical structure, thus confirming the alteration suffered by it. (author)

  8. Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Mechanical Properties of LDPE/Cassava Starch Blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemvichian, Kasinee; Suwanmala, Phiriyatorn; Kangsumrith, Wararat

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Low density polyethylene (LDPE) was blended with cassava starch. The starch content was varied from 10, 20 to 30%. The blends were compression molded to form plastic sheets. The sheets were cut into dog bone-shaped specimens. The samples were gamma irradiated in air with the total dose of 10, 20, 50 and 100 kGy. The mechanical properties of both the unirradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using a Universal Testing Machine. The results demonstrated that tensile strength of the LDPE/Starch blends increased with dose, while it simultaneously decreased with starch content

  9. A laboratory-scale study of sulfur dioxide emission from combustion of pulverized coal blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyaraj, S.P.; Gollahalli, S.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the emission of sulfur dioxide in pulverized coal flames is studied as a function of coal blending parameters. This laboratory-scale study was performed to qualitatively determine the effect of blending different coals on the sulfur-dioxide emission of their flames. Coals of three ranks (anthracite, bituminous, and lignite), and of the same rank but of different origin (Oklahoma and Wyoming mines) were tested. The amount of sulfur dioxide emitted per MJ of heat release (emission index) was determined by integrating the radial concentration profiles of sulfur dioxide. The correlations of the emission index and the peak concentration with blend parameters at 95% confidence level are presented

  10. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. (ed.)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  11. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  12. Developing scales to measure perceived HIV risk and vulnerability among Ethiopian women testing for HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Heather; Tsui, Amy; Hindin, Michelle; Kidanu, Aklilu; Gillespie, Duff

    2011-08-01

    HIV prevention services are increasingly being used by individuals in developing countries, but we know very little about how self-assessed HIV risk determines health-seeking behavior. People may feel they are at risk of HIV infection for many reasons, including both risky behavior and anxiety associated with heightened HIV awareness. In order to improve the measurement of perceived HIV risk, we developed scales measuring two constructs. Perceived risk is one's self-assessed likelihood of becoming HIV-infected based on HIV knowledge and behavior. Perceived vulnerability is felt susceptibility to HIV infection even in the absence of risk behavior. Items measuring these constructs were included in a voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) client survey, conducted in mid-2008 with 2027 women attending eight Ethiopian VCT facilities. We also conducted in-depth interviews with 22 women in two of the facilities and added items to the scales based on findings from these interviews. All items were validated in a post-enumeration survey. Factor structures of both constructs were examined using exploratory factor analysis. We also calculated Pearson's correlations between the scales and comparable constructs and behaviors. Cronbach's alpha for the perceived risk scale was 0.87 in the initial survey and 0.89 in the validation survey. For the perceived vulnerability scale, Cronbach's alpha was only 0.66 in the initial survey but increased to 0.74 after adding items indicated by the in-depth interviews. The scales are moderately correlated, indicated by a Pearson's correlation of 0.65. Both scales have high construct validity. Perceived risk has a higher correlation with HIV status than does perceived vulnerability, at 39% vs 28%. Conversely, perceived vulnerability is more highly correlated with HIV salience than is perceived risk, at 39% compared to 25%. These findings suggest perceived HIV risk and perceived HIV vulnerability should be measured separately. More

  13. AIDS-related stigma, HIV testing, and transmission risk among patrons of informal drinking places in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C; Eaton, Lisa A; Cain, Demetria; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Skinner, Donald; Watt, Melissa H; Pieterse, Desiree

    2012-06-01

    AIDS-related stigma as a barrier to HIV testing has not been examined within the context of high at risk environments such as drinking venues. Of particular importance is whether AIDS-related stigma is associated with HIV transmission risks among people who have never been tested for HIV. We examined: (1) AIDS-related stigma as a barrier to testing, controlling for other potential barriers, and (2) whether stigma is associated with HIV risks among HIV-untested individuals. We surveyed 2,572 individuals attending informal drinking establishments in Cape Town, South Africa to assess HIV testing status, AIDS-related stigma endorsement, and HIV transmission sexual risk behavior. Endorsement of AIDS-related stigma was negatively associated with HIV lifetime testing. In addition, stigma endorsement was associated with higher HIV transmission risks. AIDS-related stigma must be addressed in HIV prevention campaigns across South Africa. Antistigma messages should be integrated with risk reduction counseling and testing.

  14. At-risk high school seniors: Science remediation for Georgia's High School Graduation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Carolyn M.

    State departments of education have created a system of accountability for the academic achievement of students under the mandate of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The Georgia Department of Education established the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) as their method of evaluating the academic achievement of high school students. The GHSGT consist of five sections and students must pass all five sections before students they are eligible to receive a diploma. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of teacher-lead and computer based remediation for a group of high school seniors who have been unsuccessful in passing the science portion of the GHSGT. The objectives of this study include (a) Identify the most effective method of remediation for at-risk students on the science section of the GHSGT, and (b) evaluate the methods of remediation for at-risk students on the science section of GHSGT available to high school students. The participants of this study were at-risk seniors enrolled in one high school during the 2007-2008 school year. The findings of this research study indicated that at-risk students who participated in both types of remediation, teacher-led and computer-based, scored significantly higher than the computer-based remediation group alone. There was no significant relationship between the test scores and the number of times the students were tested.

  15. Risk Factors for Injury Among Japanese Collegiate Players of American Football Based on Performance Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Junta; Watanabe, Yuya; Kimura, Misaka; Fujisawa, Yoshihiko; Hojo, Tatsuya; Yuasa, Yasuhiro; Higashi, Shinsuke; Kuzuhara, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Iguchi, J, Watanabe, Y, Kimura, M, Fujisawa, Y, Hojo, T, Yuasa, Y, Higashi, S, and Kuzuhara, K. Risk factors for injury among Japanese collegiate players of American football based on performance test results. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3405-3411, 2016-The purpose of this study was to identify how risk factors for injury during American football are related to players' physical strength as determined using typical performance tests. One hundred 53 Japanese collegiate players of American football were recruited for this study. Eight potential risk factors were evaluated: position (skill vs. lineman), body mass index, back squat one-repetition maximum, vertical jump height, power, height, body weight, and previous injury. Using multivariate Cox regression, we examined how these factors were associated with knee sprain, ankle sprain, and hamstring strain. We recorded 63 injuries (17 knee sprains, 23 ankle sprains, and 23 hamstring strains). Players with higher power were at significantly greater risk for knee sprains (p = 0.04), those with low power had a significantly higher incidence of ankle sprain (p = 0.01), and vertical jump height was a significant predictor of hamstring strain (p = 0.02). We identified several independent predictors of injuries associated with American football. Our findings may contribute to the development of effective screening tests and prevention exercises.

  16. Guidelineness of the parameters using integrated test in down syndrome risk prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Won; Go, Sung Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study was an evaluation of the significance of each parameter through aimed at pregnant women subjected to screening test(integrated test) in predicting risk of Down syndrome. We retrospectively analysed the correlation of risk of Down's syndrome with Nuchal Translucency(NT) images measured by ultrasound, Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein A(PAPP-A), alpha-fetoprotein(AFP), unconjugated estriol(uE3), human chorionic gonadotrophin(hCG) and Inhibin A by maternal serum. As a result, a significant correlation with NT, uE3, hCG, Inhibin A is revealed with Down's syndrome risk(P<.001). In ROC analysis, AUC of Inhibin A is analysed as the biggest predictor of Down's syndrome(0.859). And the criterion for cut-off was inhibin A 1.4 MoM(sensitivity 81.8%, specificity 75.9%). In conclusion, Inhibin A was the most useful in parameters to predict Down's syndrome in the integrated test. If we make up for the weakness based on the cut-off value of parameters they will be able to be used as an independent indicator in the risk of Down's syndrome screening

  17. Guidelineness of the parameters using integrated test in down syndrome risk prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Won [Graduate School of Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Go, Sung Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Dept. Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study was an evaluation of the significance of each parameter through aimed at pregnant women subjected to screening test(integrated test) in predicting risk of Down syndrome. We retrospectively analysed the correlation of risk of Down's syndrome with Nuchal Translucency(NT) images measured by ultrasound, Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein A(PAPP-A), alpha-fetoprotein(AFP), unconjugated estriol(uE3), human chorionic gonadotrophin(hCG) and Inhibin A by maternal serum. As a result, a significant correlation with NT, uE3, hCG, Inhibin A is revealed with Down's syndrome risk(P<.001). In ROC analysis, AUC of Inhibin A is analysed as the biggest predictor of Down's syndrome(0.859). And the criterion for cut-off was inhibin A 1.4 MoM(sensitivity 81.8%, specificity 75.9%). In conclusion, Inhibin A was the most useful in parameters to predict Down's syndrome in the integrated test. If we make up for the weakness based on the cut-off value of parameters they will be able to be used as an independent indicator in the risk of Down's syndrome screening.

  18. Low-Cost, Class D Testing of Spacecraft Photovoltaic Systems Can Reduce Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgione, Joshua B.; Kojima, Gilbert K.; Hanel, Robert; Mallinson, Mark V.

    2014-01-01

    The end-to-end verification of a spacecraft photovoltaic power generation system requires light! Specifically, the standard practice for doing so is the Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulation (LAPSS). A LAPSS test can characterize a photovoltaic system's efficiency via its response to rapidly applied impulses of simulated sunlight. However, a Class D program on a constrained budget and schedule may not have the resources to ship an entire satellite for a LAPSS test alone. Such was the case with the Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) program, which was also averse to the risk of hardware damage during shipment. When the Electrical Power System (EPS) team was denied a spacecraft-level LAPSS test, the lack of an end-to-end power generation test elevated to a project-level technical risk. The team pulled together very limited resources to not only eliminate the risk, but build a process to monitor the health of the system through mission operations. We discuss a process for performing a low-cost, end-to-end test of the LADEE photovoltaic system. The approach combines system-level functional test, panel-level performance results, and periodic inspection (and repair) up until launch. Following launch, mission operations tools are utilized to assess system performance based on a scant amount of data. The process starts in manufacturing at the subcontractor. The panel manufacturer provides functional test and LAPSS data on each individual panel. We apply an initial assumption that the per-panel performance is sufficient to meet the power generation requirements. The manufacturer's data is also carried as the performance allocation for each panel during EPS system modeling and initial mission operations. During integration and test, a high-power, professional theater lamp system provides simulated sunlight to each panel on the spacecraft, thereby permitting a true end-to-end system test. A passing test results in a step response to nearly full-rated current

  19. Blended particle filters for large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Qi, Di; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in contemporary data science is the development of statistically accurate particle filters to capture non-Gaussian features in large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems. Blended particle filters that capture non-Gaussian features in an adaptively evolving low-dimensional subspace through particles interacting with evolving Gaussian statistics on the remaining portion of phase space are introduced here. These blended particle filters are constructed in this paper through a mathematical formalism involving conditional Gaussian mixtures combined with statistically nonlinear forecast models compatible with this structure developed recently with high skill for uncertainty quantification. Stringent test cases for filtering involving the 40-dimensional Lorenz 96 model with a 5-dimensional adaptive subspace for nonlinear blended filtering in various turbulent regimes with at least nine positive Lyapunov exponents are used here. These cases demonstrate the high skill of the blended particle filter algorithms in capturing both highly non-Gaussian dynamical features as well as crucial nonlinear statistics for accurate filtering in extreme filtering regimes with sparse infrequent high-quality observations. The formalism developed here is also useful for multiscale filtering of turbulent systems and a simple application is sketched below. PMID:24825886

  20. Evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Katsuhiro; Hiramatsu, Muneyuki; Hino, Tomonori; Otake, Takuma; Okamoto, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroki; Honma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Norimichi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the molar mass of gasoline. • We proposed an evaporation model assuming a 2-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE. • We predicted the change in the vapor pressure of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation. • The vapor pressures were measured and compared as a means of verifying the model. • We presented the method for predicting flash points of the ETBE-blended gasoline. - Abstract: To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, production of gasoline blended with ethyl tert-buthyl ether (ETBE) is increasing annually. The flash point of ETBE is higher than that of gasoline, and blending ETBE into gasoline will change the flash point and the vapor pressure. Therefore, it is expected that the fire hazard caused by ETBE-blended gasoline would differ from that caused by normal gasoline. The aim of this study was to acquire the knowledge required for estimating the fire hazard of ETBE-blended gasoline. Supposing that ETBE-blended gasoline was a two-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE, we developed a prediction model that describes the vapor pressure and flash point of ETBE-blended gasoline in an arbitrary ETBE blending ratio. We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the relation between molar mass of gasoline and mass loss fraction. We measured the changes in the vapor pressure and flash point of gasoline by blending ETBE and evaporation, and compared the predicted values with the measured values in order to verify the prediction model. The calculated values of vapor pressures and flash points corresponded well to the measured values. Thus, we confirmed that the change in the evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation could be predicted by the proposed model. Furthermore, the vapor pressure constants of ETBE-blended gasoline were obtained by the model, and then the distillation curves were

  1. Structuring of Interface-Modified Polymer Blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The paper treats the case where blends of polystyrene (PS), poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and a diblock copolymer of PS and PDMS are used as model materials. This modelsystem is predicted to be "stable" in discrete blends in simple shear flow. Stable in the sence that the block copolymer can...... predicted by theory is outside the observed IPS interval for one of the investigated blend pairs....

  2. Constructivism based blended learning in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Huneidi, Ahmad; Schreurs, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper explains how to apply Constructivism and Conversation theories in Blended Learning environment in order to increase learning outcomes and quality. Some scenarios of Constructivism based blended learning activities are presented in this paper. In addition, a Constructivism Based Blended Learning model for “ICT Management” course, a compulsory course in Master of Management Information Systems program at Hasselt University, is proposed. The proposed model applies and combines Cons...

  3. Evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Katsuhiro, E-mail: okamoto@nrips.go.jp [National Research Institute of Police Science, 6-3-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0882 (Japan); Hiramatsu, Muneyuki [Yamanashi Prefectural Police H.Q., 312-4 Kubonakajima, Isawa-cho, Usui, Yamanashi 406-0036 (Japan); Hino, Tomonori; Otake, Takuma [Metropolitan Police Department, 2-1-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8929 (Japan); Okamoto, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroki; Honma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Norimichi [National Research Institute of Police Science, 6-3-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0882 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the molar mass of gasoline. • We proposed an evaporation model assuming a 2-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE. • We predicted the change in the vapor pressure of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation. • The vapor pressures were measured and compared as a means of verifying the model. • We presented the method for predicting flash points of the ETBE-blended gasoline. - Abstract: To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, production of gasoline blended with ethyl tert-buthyl ether (ETBE) is increasing annually. The flash point of ETBE is higher than that of gasoline, and blending ETBE into gasoline will change the flash point and the vapor pressure. Therefore, it is expected that the fire hazard caused by ETBE-blended gasoline would differ from that caused by normal gasoline. The aim of this study was to acquire the knowledge required for estimating the fire hazard of ETBE-blended gasoline. Supposing that ETBE-blended gasoline was a two-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE, we developed a prediction model that describes the vapor pressure and flash point of ETBE-blended gasoline in an arbitrary ETBE blending ratio. We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the relation between molar mass of gasoline and mass loss fraction. We measured the changes in the vapor pressure and flash point of gasoline by blending ETBE and evaporation, and compared the predicted values with the measured values in order to verify the prediction model. The calculated values of vapor pressures and flash points corresponded well to the measured values. Thus, we confirmed that the change in the evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation could be predicted by the proposed model. Furthermore, the vapor pressure constants of ETBE-blended gasoline were obtained by the model, and then the distillation curves were

  4. Blended Learning vs. Traditional Instruction as a Predictor of Student Achievement in New York City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the differences in student achievement on New York State standardized tests between blended learning and traditional instructional methodologies. Specifically, the study compared student achievement in iLearnNYC schools, to their peer schools that deliver instruction in a traditional manner. iLearnNYC is a blended learning…

  5. Direct-to-consumer personal genome testing and cancer risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellcross, Cecelia A; Page, Patricia Z; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The last several years has witnessed an explosion in genomics, with the advent of genome-wide association studies revealing hundreds of DNA variants significantly associated with most common diseases, including cancer. On the heels of these scientific advances came the direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing industry. Genome-wide scans for disease have been marketed and sold directly to the public, without the involvement of a health care provider. Unlike genetic testing for mutations in known hereditary cancer susceptibility genes such as BRCA1/2, these genomic profiles examine DNA variants, which typically have a minimal risk impact, and account for only a fraction of the heritable component of cancer. Furthermore, risk information provided to consumers does not account for family history or other known risk factors. The clinical validity and utility of personal genome scans for disease risk prediction remain for the most part unestablished, although some argue lack of evidence of harm and the possibility that positive impacts on health behaviors or genetic awareness may result from consumer use. The DTC genetic testing industry has sparked significant controversy not only among the scientific community, but also among professional societies and government agencies.In this review, we present some of the history and methodological considerations of DTC genomic profiling, with a focus on cancer risk prediction. The literature regarding consumer awareness and utilization is explored, including understanding, expectations, and behavioral and psychological responses to DTC genomic risk prediction. Primary care provider and genetic professional knowledge and perceptions of DTC genomic profiling are also addressed. Ethical and scientific controversy surrounding the DTC genetic testing industry is presented, along with policy recommendations, regulatory actions, and the changing landscape of the DTC genetic testing market in response. Although our understanding of the

  6. Housekeeping health care workers have the highest risk for tuberculin skin test conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, H A; Karakis, I; Heimer, D; Arzt, M; Goldstein, W; Bouhnik, L; Maimon, M N

    2011-08-01

    Not all health care workers (HCWs) are at the same risk for tuberculin skin test (TST) conversion, indicating latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. To identify risk factors for TST conversion among HCWs. A retrospective cohort study conducted at a tertiary university medical centre included every HCW who had had a negative two-step TST at work entry and at least one consecutive TST in the period 2005-2009 (mean follow-up period 55 months). Binomic logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for TST conversion. Potential risk factors such as age, health care profession, patient exposure profile, workplace division and history of bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination were entered in the model. A total of 450 subjects met the inclusion criteria, of whom 93 had TST conversion. The highest annual rates of TST conversion occurred in workers who worked as housekeeping staff (6.9%). Older age, a work environment with high patient turnover and employment in maintenance departments were significant risk factors (adjusted odds ratios 2.05, 5.2 and 8.4 respectively). Housekeeping staff, older age workers and health care professionals working in an environment of high patient turnover are at increased risk for latent TB infection.

  7. Improving Education in Medical Statistics: Implementing a Blended Learning Model in the Existing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Natasa M; Trajkovic, Goran Z; Bukumiric, Zoran M; Cirkovic, Andja; Nikolic, Ivan M; Milin, Jelena S; Milic, Nikola V; Savic, Marko D; Corac, Aleksandar M; Marinkovic, Jelena M; Stanisavljevic, Dejana M

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies report on the benefits of blended learning in improving medical student education, there is still no empirical evidence on the relative effectiveness of blended over traditional learning approaches in medical statistics. We implemented blended along with on-site (i.e. face-to-face) learning to further assess the potential value of web-based learning in medical statistics. This was a prospective study conducted with third year medical undergraduate students attending the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, who passed (440 of 545) the final exam of the obligatory introductory statistics course during 2013-14. Student statistics achievements were stratified based on the two methods of education delivery: blended learning and on-site learning. Blended learning included a combination of face-to-face and distance learning methodologies integrated into a single course. Mean exam scores for the blended learning student group were higher than for the on-site student group for both final statistics score (89.36±6.60 vs. 86.06±8.48; p = 0.001) and knowledge test score (7.88±1.30 vs. 7.51±1.36; p = 0.023) with a medium effect size. There were no differences in sex or study duration between the groups. Current grade point average (GPA) was higher in the blended group. In a multivariable regression model, current GPA and knowledge test scores were associated with the final statistics score after adjusting for study duration and learning modality (plearning environments for teaching medical statistics to undergraduate medical students. Blended and on-site training formats led to similar knowledge acquisition; however, students with higher GPA preferred the technology assisted learning format. Implementation of blended learning approaches can be considered an attractive, cost-effective, and efficient alternative to traditional classroom training in medical statistics.

  8. Improving Education in Medical Statistics: Implementing a Blended Learning Model in the Existing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Natasa M.; Trajkovic, Goran Z.; Bukumiric, Zoran M.; Cirkovic, Andja; Nikolic, Ivan M.; Milin, Jelena S.; Milic, Nikola V.; Savic, Marko D.; Corac, Aleksandar M.; Marinkovic, Jelena M.; Stanisavljevic, Dejana M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although recent studies report on the benefits of blended learning in improving medical student education, there is still no empirical evidence on the relative effectiveness of blended over traditional learning approaches in medical statistics. We implemented blended along with on-site (i.e. face-to-face) learning to further assess the potential value of web-based learning in medical statistics. Methods This was a prospective study conducted with third year medical undergraduate students attending the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, who passed (440 of 545) the final exam of the obligatory introductory statistics course during 2013–14. Student statistics achievements were stratified based on the two methods of education delivery: blended learning and on-site learning. Blended learning included a combination of face-to-face and distance learning methodologies integrated into a single course. Results Mean exam scores for the blended learning student group were higher than for the on-site student group for both final statistics score (89.36±6.60 vs. 86.06±8.48; p = 0.001) and knowledge test score (7.88±1.30 vs. 7.51±1.36; p = 0.023) with a medium effect size. There were no differences in sex or study duration between the groups. Current grade point average (GPA) was higher in the blended group. In a multivariable regression model, current GPA and knowledge test scores were associated with the final statistics score after adjusting for study duration and learning modality (plearning environments for teaching medical statistics to undergraduate medical students. Blended and on-site training formats led to similar knowledge acquisition; however, students with higher GPA preferred the technology assisted learning format. Implementation of blended learning approaches can be considered an attractive, cost-effective, and efficient alternative to traditional classroom training in medical statistics. PMID:26859832

  9. The Careful Puppet Master: Reducing risk and fortifying acceptance testing with Jenkins CI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason A.; Richman, Gabriel; DeStefano, John; Pryor, James; Rao, Tejas; Strecker-Kellogg, William; Wong, Tony

    2015-12-01

    Centralized configuration management, including the use of automation tools such as Puppet, can greatly increase provisioning speed and efficiency when configuring new systems or making changes to existing systems, reduce duplication of work, and improve automated processes. However, centralized management also brings with it a level of inherent risk: a single change in just one file can quickly be pushed out to thousands of computers and, if that change is not properly and thoroughly tested and contains an error, could result in catastrophic damage to many services, potentially bringing an entire computer facility offline. Change management procedures can—and should—be formalized in order to prevent such accidents. However, like the configuration management process itself, if such procedures are not automated, they can be difficult to enforce strictly. Therefore, to reduce the risk of merging potentially harmful changes into our production Puppet environment, we have created an automated testing system, which includes the Jenkins CI tool, to manage our Puppet testing process. This system includes the proposed changes and runs Puppet on a pool of dozens of RedHat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) virtual machines (VMs) that replicate most of our important production services for the purpose of testing. This paper describes our automated test system and how it hooks into our production approval process for automatic acceptance testing. All pending changes that have been pushed to production must pass this validation process before they can be approved and merged into production.

  10. Does the Strategy of Risk Group Testing for Hepatitis C Hit the Target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana R. Jovanovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the European Union, it is estimated that there are 5.5 million individuals with chronic infection of hepatitis C. Intravenous drug abuse is undoubtedly the key source of the hepatitis C epidemic in Europe and the most efficient mode of transmission of HCV infections (primarily due to short incubation time, but also because the virus is introduced directly into the blood stream with the infected needle. Potentially high-risk and vulnerable populations in Europe (and the world include immigrants, prisoners, sex workers, men having sex with men, individuals infected with HIV, psychoactive substance users etc. Since there is a lack of direct evidence of clinical benefits of HCV testing, decisions related to testing are made based on indirect evidence. Clinical practice has shown that HCV antibody tests are mostly adequate for identification of HCV infection, but the problem is that this testing strategy does not hit the target. As a result of this health care system strategy, a large number of infected patients remain undetected or they are diagnosed late. There is only a vague link between screening and treatment outcomes since there is a lack of evidence on transmission risks, multiple causes, risk behavior, ways of reaching screening decisions, treatment efficiency, etc. According to results of limited number of studies it can be concluded that there is a need to develop targeted programmes for detection of HCV and other infections, but there also a need to decrease potential harms.

  11. Design Principles for the Blend in Blended Learning: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming; Lam, Kwok Man; Lim, Cher Ping

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a collective case study of three blended courses taught by different instructors in a higher education institution, with the purpose of identifying the different types of blend and how the blend supports student learning. Based on the instructors' and students' interviews, and document analysis of course outlines, two major…

  12. Blended education for systems architecting evaluation of the initial blended course version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, G.; Aker, J. van den; Postema, H.

    2016-01-01

    Blended education, the combination of traditional face-To-face education with online possibilities, is seen as the way for the future in education. Challenge for course providers is to learn how to offer blended education and to make the transition toward blended education. In this paper, we

  13. Performance and Emission of VCR-CI Engine with palm kernel and eucalyptus blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas kommana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at complete replacement of conventional diesel fuel by biodiesel. In order to achieve that, palm kernel oil and eucalyptus oil blend has been chosen. Eucalyptus oil was blended with methyl ester of palm kernel oil in 5%, 10% and 15% by volume. Tests were conducted with diesel fuel and blends on a 4 stroke VCR diesel engine for comparative analysis with 220 bar injection pressure and 19:1 compression ratio. All the test fuels were used in computerized 4 stroke single cylinder variable compression ratio engine at five different loads (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 N m. Present investigation depicts the improved combustion and reduced emissions for the PKO85% + EuO15% blend when compared to diesel at full load conditions.

  14. This is not only a test. The hidden risks of antibody screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, P

    1986-05-27

    Interviews with several gay rights activists and public health workers raise serious questions about the blood test to detect antibodies to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A New York gay activist has described the test as "the 80's equivalent of the yellow star," which stigmatizes people and singles them out for discrimination. Public opinion tends not to make any distinction between a positive test result and full-blown AIDS, and government promotion of the test has not added clarity. Several states require the names and addresses of antibody carriers, while others keep lists of the sexual partners of those who test positive. Concern has been expressed that this trend will have 2 practical effects: people will be reluctant to take the test, and record keeping will lead to other uses. Since identification requirements were instituted in Colorado, voluntary testing at gay health clinics dropped from 600 to 100/month. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has allocated US$20 million for special AIDS antibody screening sites, and the states are spending thousands of dollars to collect statistics on individuals at risk. There is increasing concern, however, that funds that could be used for AIDS education are being diverted to antibody screening programs. In states where AIDS is still relatively new, refusal to fund community-based education efforts is considered especially destructive, since there may be time to stop the virus from infecting large numbers of people. A former government official, who disagrees with the CDC approach, has noted that there are no data to support the contention that testing people makes them change their behavior, while AIDS education has been proven to be an effective means to reduce high risk activities. Finally, there is evidence that a positive antibody test has a profound psychological impact, including anxiety, depression, and withdrawal from social relations.

  15. Preparation and Effect of Gamma Radiation on The Properties and Biodegradability of Poly(Styrene/Starch) Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H. E.; Abdel Ghaffar, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable blends based on Poly(styrene/starch) Poly(Sty/Starch) were prepared by the casting method using different contents of starch in the range of 0-20 wt% aiming at preparing disposable packaging materials. The prepared bio-blends were Characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), swelling behavior, mechanical properties, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the swelling behavior slightly increased with increasing starch content and not exceeding 7.5%. The results showed that by increasing irradiation dose up to 5 kGy, the mechanical properties of the prepared PSty/10 wt% Starch blend film modified than other blend films, and hence it is selected. Also the water resistant increased, by irradiation of the selected PSty/10 wt% Starch blend film. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between Starch and PSty of the PSty/10 wt% Starch blend film promote a more homogenous blend film as shown in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared Poly(Sty/Starch) blends with different compositions and the selected irradiated PSty/10 wt% Starch blend were subjected to biodegradation in soil burial tests for 6 months using two different types of soils; agricultural and desert soils, then analyzed gravimetrically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results suggested that there is a possibility of using irradiated PSty/10 wt% Starch at a dose of 5 kGy as a potential candidate for packaging material.

  16. Investigating Miscibility of Polymers and Its Impact on the Morphology, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of Polymer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwat, Zafarullah Khan; Baloch, Musa Kaleem

    2015-11-01

    The miscibility of polystyrene (PS)/poly(styrene- co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) blend films, prepared by the solution casting technique using tetrahydrofuran as a common solvent, was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and tensile testing. Morphological observations revealed partial miscibility of the blend. FTIR measurements also ascertained partial miscibility of the blend as slight variations in the spectra for various blend compositions were observed. DSC studies also confirmed the semicompatible nature of the examined blend by displaying a single Tg for the composition, 25/75, and two Tg's for compositions, 50/50 and 75/25. The enhancement in thermal stability and mechanical properties which were quite pronounced for the composition, 25/75, also favored partial miscibility of the blend. The partial miscibility of the PS/PSAN blend may be attributed to the intramolecular repulsive effect, characteristic of a homopolymer/copolymer blend system, and the Pi-Pi stacking of phenyl rings of the blend components due to some structural similarities.

  17. IMPLEMENTATION OF DIOXANE AND DIESEL FUEL BLENDS TO REDUCE EMISSION AND TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF THE COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SENDILVELAN S.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance of a compression ignition engine fuelled with 1, 4 Dioxane- diesel blends is evaluated. A single-cylinder, air-cooled, direct injection diesel engine developing a power output of 5.2 kW at 1500 rev/min is used. Base data is generated with standard diesel fuel subsequently; five fuel blends namely 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 percentages by volume of diesel and dioxane were prepared and tested in the diesel engine. Engine performance and emission data were used to optimize the blends for reducing emission and improving performance. Results show improved performance with B10 blends compared to neat fuel for all conditions of the engine. Other blends recorded marginal decrease in brake thermal efficiency. The maximum efficiency for B30, B50 blends at peak load are 26.3%, 25.2% respectively against 29.1% for sole fuel. NOx emissions were found to be high or the blends. Peak pressure and rate of pressure rise are increased with increase in dioxane ratio due to improved combustion rate. Heat release pattern shows higher premixed combustion rate with the blends. Higher ignition delay and lower combustion duration are found with all blends than neat diesel fuel.

  18. FeNO and Exercise Testing in Children at Risk of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby; Christiansen, Christina Figgé; Stokholm, Jakob; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Chawes, Bo Lund

    2017-11-10

    Exercise testing is the gold standard for diagnosing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children, but requires considerable cooperation and medical resources. Therefore, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has been proposed as a tool to predict the need for exercise testing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between FeNO, exercise test results, and a history of respiratory symptoms during exercise in children at risk of asthma. FeNO measurement, exercise testing, and interview about respiratory symptoms during exercise were completed in 224 seven-year-old children from the at-risk Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2000 birth cohort. The associations between FeNO, exercise test results, and reported respiratory symptoms during exercise were analyzed adjusting for gender, respiratory infections, and inhaled corticosteroid treatment. The associations were also analyzed stratified by asthma and atopic status. Of the 224 children, 28 (13%) had an established asthma diagnosis and 58 (26%) had a positive exercise test (≥15% drop in forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV 1 ] from baseline). FeNO and bronchial obstruction after exercise were linearly associated with a doubling of FeNO corresponding to a 2.4% drop in FEV 1 (95% confidence interval, 0.8-4.1; P exercise test outcome among children who reported respiratory symptoms during exercise was 17 ppb, which only had 74% negative predictive value. There was no association between FeNO and reported respiratory symptoms during exercise (odds ratio = 1.3 [0.8-1.9]; P = .29) or reported symptoms during exercise and exercise test results (odds ratio = 1.0 [1.0-1.1]; P = .12). A history of respiratory symptoms during exercise was not associated with either elevated FeNO or a positive exercise test in children at risk of asthma. FeNO and exercise test results were linearly associated traits, but FeNO could not reliably be used dichotomized to predict the need

  19. Microstructure of an immiscible polymer blend and its stabilization effect on amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziyi; Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica; Craig, Duncan; Qi, Sheng

    2013-07-01

    This study proposes use of the phase separation of immiscible polymer blends as a formulation approach to improve the stabilization and solubilization of amorphous molecular dispersions of poorly soluble drugs. This approach uses the phase separation and different drug solubilization properties of the two immiscible polymers in the blend to optimize drug loading and stabilization. The model system tested in this study is a EUDRAGIT E PO-PVP-VA 50/50 (w/w) blend loaded with felodipine via hot melt extrusion. The phase separation behavior of the polymer blend and drug loaded polymer blend formulations were characterized using a range of thermal (MTDSC), spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR), and imaging (AFM and thermal transition mapping) techniques. The polymer blend formulations demonstrated superior performance in drug release as well as stabilization against stressed temperature, stressed humidity, and mechanical milling in comparison to the drug-polymer binary systems. This is attributed to the configuration of the phase separated microstructure of the polymer blend formulations where the hydrophilic polymer domains host high concentrations of molecularly dispersed drug which are protected from moisture induced recrystallization on aging by the hydrophobic polymer domains. Additionally drug incorporation as a molecular dispersion in different polymer phases reduces the drug recrystallization tendency on aging under high temperatures and during milling.

  20. Isothermal microcalorimetry as a quality by design tool to determine optimal blending sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hallak, M H D Kamal; Azarmi, Shirzad; Xu, Zhenghe; Maham, Yadollah; Löbenberg, Raimar

    2010-09-01

    This study was designed to assess the value of isothermal microcalorimetry (ITMC) as a quality by design (QbD) tool to optimize blending conditions during tablet preparation. Powder mixtures that contain microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and prednisone were prepared as 1:1:1 ratios using different blending sequences. ITMC was used to monitor the thermal activity of the powder mixtures before and after each blending process. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were performed on all final powder mixtures. Final powder mixtures were used to prepare tablets with 10 mg prednisone content, and dissolution tests were performed on all tablet formulations. Using ITMC, it was observed that the powder mixtures had different thermal activity depending on the blending sequences of the ingredients. All mixtures prepared by mixing prednisone with DCPD in the first stage were associated with relatively fast and significant heat exchange. In contrast, mixing prednisone with MCC in the first step resulted in slower heat exchange. Powder mixture with high thermal activity showed extra DSC peaks, and their dissolution was generally slower compared to the other tablets. Blending is considered as a critical parameter in tablet preparation. This study showed that ITMC is a simple and efficient tool to monitor solid-state reactions between excipients and prednisone depending on blending sequences. ITMC has the potential to be used in QbD approaches to optimize blending parameters for prednisone tablets.

  1. Predicting the Composition of Red Wine Blends Using an Array of Multicomponent Peptide-Based Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Ghanem

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Differential sensing using synthetic receptors as mimics of the mammalian senses of taste and smell is a powerful approach for the analysis of complex mixtures. Herein, we report on the effectiveness of a cross-reactive, supramolecular, peptide-based sensing array in differentiating and predicting the composition of red wine blends. Fifteen blends of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc, in addition to the mono varietals, were used in this investigation. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA showed a clear differentiation of blends based on tannin concentration and composition where certain mono varietals like Cabernet Sauvignon seemed to contribute less to the overall characteristics of the blend. Partial Least Squares (PLS Regression and cross validation were used to build a predictive model for the responses of the receptors to eleven binary blends and the three mono varietals. The optimized model was later used to predict the percentage of each mono varietal in an independent test set composted of four tri-blends with a 15% average error. A partial least square regression model using the mouth-feel and taste descriptive sensory attributes of the wine blends revealed a strong correlation of the receptors to perceived astringency, which is indicative of selective binding to polyphenols in wine.

  2. Blending Octane Number of Ethanol in HCCI, SI and CI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad

    2016-10-17

    The effect of ethanol blended with three FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, I, J and A corresponding to RON 70.3, 71.8 and 83.5, respectively, were compared to PRF70 and PRF84 with the same ethanol concentrations, these being 2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% by volume. A Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was used to understand the blending effect of ethanol with FACE gasolines and PRFs in spark-ignited and homogeneous charge compression ignited mode. Blending octane numbers (BON) were obtained for both the modes. All the fuels were also tested in an ignition quality tester to obtain Blending Derived Cetane numbers (BDCN). It is shown that fuel composition and octane number are important characteristics of all the base fuels that have a significant impact on octane increase with ethanol. The dependency of octane number for the base fuel on the blending octane number depended on the combustion mode operated. The aromatic composition in the base fuel, effects blending octane number of the mixture, for fuels with higher aromatic content lower blending octane numbers were observed for ethanol concentration.

  3. Experimental investigations on mixing of two biodiesels blended with diesel as alternative fuel for diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Srithar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The world faces the crises of energy demand, rising petroleum prices and depletion of fossil fuel resources. Biodiesel has obtained from vegetable oils that have been considered as a promising alternate fuel. The researches regarding blend of diesel and single biodiesel have been done already. Very few works have been done with the combination of two different biodiesel blends with diesel and left a lot of scope in this area. The present study brings out an experiment of two biodiesels from pongamia pinnata oil and mustard oil and they are blended with diesel at various mixing ratios. The effects of dual biodiesel works in engine and exhaust emissions were examined in a single cylinder, direct injection, air cooled and high speed diesel engine at various engine loads with constant engine speed of 3000 rpm. The influences of blends on CO, CO2, HC, NOx and smoke opacity were investigated by emission tests. The brake thermal efficiency of blend A was found higher than diesel. The emissions of smoke, hydro carbon and nitrogen oxides of dual biodiesel blends were higher than that of diesel. But the exhaust gas temperature for dual biodiesel blends was lower than diesel.

  4. Application of risk-based methods to inservice testing of check valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Closky, N.B.; Balkey, K.R.; McAllister, W.J. [and others

    1996-12-01

    Research efforts have been underway in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and industry to define appropriate methods for the application of risk-based technology in the development of inservice testing (IST) programs for pumps and valves in nuclear steam supply systems. This paper discusses a pilot application of these methods to the inservice testing of check valves in the emergency core cooling system of Georgia Power`s Vogtle nuclear power station. The results of the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) are used to divide the check valves into risk-significant and less-risk-significant groups. This information is reviewed by a plant expert panel along with the consideration of appropriate deterministic insights to finally categorize the check valves into more safety-significant and less safety-significant component groups. All of the more safety-significant check valves are further evaluated in detail using a failure modes and causes analysis (FMCA) to assist in defining effective IST strategies. A template has been designed to evaluate how effective current and emerging tests for check valves are in detecting failures or in finding significant conditions that are precursors to failure for the likely failure causes. This information is then used to design and evaluate appropriate IST strategies that consider both the test method and frequency. A few of the less safety-significant check valves are also evaluated using this process since differences exist in check valve design, function, and operating conditions. Appropriate test strategies are selected for each check valve that has been evaluated based on safety and cost considerations. Test strategies are inferred from this information for the other check valves based on similar check valve conditions. Sensitivity studies are performed using the PSA model to arrive at an overall IST program that maintains or enhances safety at the lowest achievable cost.

  5. Doctor, what does my positive test mean? From Bayesian textbook tasks to personalized risk communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka eNavarrete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the research on Bayesian reasoning aims to answer theoretical questions about the extent to which people are able to update their beliefs according to the Bayes Theorem (Baratgin & Politzer, 2006; Barbey & Sloman, 2007; Gigerenzer & Hoffrage, 1995 about the evolutionary nature of Bayesian inference (Brase, 2002, 2007; Gigerenzer & Hoffrage, 1995, or about the role of cognitive abilities in Bayesian inference (Johnson & Tubau, 2013; Lesage, Navarrete, & De Neys, 2013; Sirota, Juanchich, & Hagmayer, 2014. Few studies aim to answer practical, mainly health-related questions, such as, questions such as ‘What does it mean to have a positive test in a context of cancer screening?’ or ‘What is the best way to communicate a medical test result so a patient will understand it?. This type of research aims to translate the empirical finding into effective ways of providing risk information. In addition, the applied research often adopts the paradigms and methods of the theoretically-motivated research. But sometimes it works the other way around, and the theoretical research borrows the importance of the practical question in the medical context. The study of Bayesian reasoning is relevant to risk communication in that,, to be as useful as possible, applied research should employ specifically tailored methods and contexts specific to the recipients of the risk information. In this paper, we concentrate on the communication of the result of medical tests and outline the epidemiological and test parameters that affect the predictive power of a test – whether it is correct or not. Building on this, we draw up recommendations for better practice to convey the results of medical tests that could inform health policy makers (e.g. what are the drawbacks of mass screenings?, be used by health practitioners and, in turn, help patients to make better and more informed decisions.

  6. Evaluating the fall risk among elderly population by choice step reaction test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang D

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Donghai Wang,1 Jian Zhang,1 Yuliang Sun,2 Wenfei Zhu,2 Shiliu Tian,1 Yu Liu1 1Key Laboratory of Exercise and Health Sciences of the Ministry of Education, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Physical Education, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Falls during daily activities are often associated with injuries and physical disabilities, thereby affecting quality of life among elder adults. Balance control, which is crucial in avoiding falls, is composed of two elements: muscle strength and central nervous system (CNS control. A number of studies have reported that reduced muscle strength raises the risk of falling. However, to date there has been only limited research focused on the relationship between fall risk and the CNS. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between CNS and risk of falling among the elderly. A total of 140 elderly people (92 females and 48 males were divided into faller and nonfaller groups based on questionnaire responses concerning falls in their daily life. Participants undertook a choice step reaction test in which they were required to respond to random visual stimuli using foot movements as fast as possible in the left or right directions. Response time was quantified as premotor time (PMT and motor time (MT. In addition, the participants’ electromyography data were recorded during the choice step reaction test. A maximal isokinetic torque test was also performed. PMT was greater in the fallers than in the nonfallers group. There was a significant difference between fall status and direction on PMT. PMT of the left limb in nonfallers was faster than the right, but in fallers there was no difference between left and right limbs. A similar phenomenon was also observed for MT. There were significant differences between fallers and nonfallers in maximum isokinetic torque at knee and ankle joints. The correct rate of PMT was

  7. EM algorithm for one-shot device testing with competing risks under exponential distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, N.; So, H.Y.; Ling, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an extension of the work of Balakrishnan and Ling [1] by introducing a competing risks model into a one-shot device testing analysis under an accelerated life test setting. An Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm is then developed for the estimation of the model parameters. An extensive Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to assess the performance of the EM algorithm and then compare the obtained results with the initial estimates obtained by the Inequality Constrained Least Squares (ICLS) method of estimation. Finally, we apply the EM algorithm to a clinical data, ED01, to illustrate the method of inference developed here. - Highlights: • ALT data analysis for one-shot devices with competing risks is considered. • EM algorithm is developed for the determination of the MLEs. • The estimations of lifetime under normal operating conditions are presented. • The EM algorithm improves the convergence rate

  8. THERMAL properties and morphology of Polypropylene/Polycarbonate/Polypropylene-Graft-Maleic anhydride blends

    OpenAIRE

    Mat-Shayuti M. S.; Abdullah M. Z.; Megat-Yusoff P. S. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of blending polycarbonate (PC) into polypropylene (PP) matrix polymer on thermal properties and morphology. The blends, containing 5% to 35% of polycarbonate and 5% compatibilizer, were compounded using twin-screw extruder and fabricated into standard tests samples using injection or compression molding. The compatibilizer used was polypropylene-graft-maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed improved thermal degradation temperature ...

  9. Blended learning pedagogy designed for communication module among undergraduate nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Devi, M Kamala; Chen, Hui-Chen; Soong, Swee Kit Alan; Ang, Emily

    2018-02-01

    Effective communication is important for nurse and patient outcomes. Nursing students often feel unprepared to communicate effectively with patients and other healthcare workers within the clinical environment. Blended learning pedagogy-based communication skills training can provide an alternative to traditional methods of teaching to enhance students' satisfaction and self-efficacy levels in communicating with others. To examine the effectiveness of blended learning pedagogy in a redesigned communication module among nursing undergraduates in enhancing their satisfaction levels and attitudes towards learning communication module as well as self-efficacy in communication. A single group pre-test and post-test quasi-experimental design was adopted. Data were collected from August 2016 to November 2016 from 124 nursing undergraduates from a leading nursing school. Blended learning pedagogy was adopted to redesign a communication module that offered a wide array of learning opportunities via face-to-face classroom and online sessions. Validated and reliable instruments were used to measure satisfaction levels with blended learning pedagogy, attitudes towards learning communication, and communication self-efficacy. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Participants had enhanced satisfaction levels with blended learning pedagogy, better attitudes in learning communication skills, and improved communication self-efficacies at posttest (week 13 of the semester) when compared with their pre-test scores (week one of the semester). Participants scored higher in the Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale, the Communication Skills Attitude Scale, and the communication skills subscale of the Nursing Students Self-Efficacy Scale. Blended learning pedagogy can be effectively used in facilitating communication modules and enhancing student outcomes among nursing undergraduates. The long-term effectiveness of using blended learning pedagogy in

  10. Risk Factors for Inadequate Defibrillation Safety Margins Vary With the Underlying Cardiac Disease: Implications for Selective Testing Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnes, J.L.; Westra, S.W.; Bouwels, L.H.; Boer, M.J. de; Brouwer, M.A.; Smeets, J.L.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In view of the shift from routine toward no or selective defibrillation testing, optimization of the current risk stratification for inadequate defibrillation safety margins (DSMs) could improve individualized testing decisions. Given the pathophysiological differences in myocardial

  11. Risk-Reducing Salpingo-oophorectomy and Ovarian Cancer Screening in 1077 Women After BRCA Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannis, Gabriel N.; Fehniger, Julia E.; Creasman, Jennifer S.; Jacoby, Vanessa L.; Beattie, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Background For women at potentially increased risk for ovarian cancer, data regarding screening and risk reduction are limited. Previous studies have reported on the behaviors of BRCA mutation carriers, but less is known about the behaviors of non-BRCA carriers. We surveyed a large cohort of women after BRCA testing to identify the prevalence and posttest predictors of risk-reducing and screening interventions. Methods A median of 3.7 years after BRCA testing, 1447 women who received genetic counseling and BRCA testing at 2 hospital sites were surveyed, with a 77.6% response rate. We analyzed data from 1077 survey respondents. We performed univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify predictors of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), screening transvaginal ultrasonography (TVUS), and screening serum cancer antigen 125 (CA-125). Results Among the respondents, 201 women (18.7%) received positive test results for a deleterious mutation, 103 women (9.6%) received true-negative results, and 773 women (71.8%) received uninformative results. Overall, 19.1% of eligible women underwent RRSO and 39.6% used screening procedures. A positive BRCA result predicted RRSO (odds ratio [OR], 28.1; 95% CI, 16.2-48.6), TVUS (9.5 [4.3-21.0]), and serum CA-125 (13.0 [5.5-29.0]). Similarly, a true-negative BRCA result reduced the OR for RRSO (0.1 [0.0-0.6]), TVUS (0.2 [0.1-0.5]), and serum CA-125 (0.3 [0.1-0.7]). Of the 71.8% of women who received uninformative results after BRCA testing, 12.3% subsequently underwent RRSO, 33.8% reported ever having undergone screening serum CA-125 since BRCA testing, and 37.3% reported ever having undergone screening TVUS since BRCA testing. Conclusions Results of BRCA testing strongly predict RRSO and ovarian cancer screening. Use of RRSO and ovarian screening was reported in a sizable percentage of non-BRCA carriers despite insufficient data to determine the effectiveness of these interventions. PMID:23247828

  12. Influence of muscle fitness test performance on metabolic risk factors among adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota Jorge

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the association between muscular fitness (MF, assessed by 2 components of Fitnessgram test battery, the Curl-Up and Push-Ups tests and the metabolic risk score among adolescent girls. Methods A total of 229 girls (aged 12-15 years old comprised the sample of this study. Anthropometric data (height, body mass, waist circumference were collected. Body mass index (BMI was also calculated. Muscular strength was assessed taking into account the tests that comprised the FITNESSGRAM test battery, i.e. the curl-up and the push-up. Participants were then categorized in one of 3 categories according the number of tests in which they accomplished the scores that allow them to be classified in health or above health zone. The blood pressure [BP], fasting total cholesterol [TC], low density lipoprotein-cholesterol [LDL-C], high density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides [TG], glucose, and a metabolic risk score (MRS were also examined. Physical Activity Index (PAI was obtained by questionnaire. Results Higher compliance with health-zone criteria (good in the 2 tests, adjusted for age and maturation, were positive and significantly (p ≤ 0.05 associated with height (r = 0.19 and PAI (r = 0.21, while a significant but negative association was found for BMI (r = -0.12; WC (r = -0.19; TC (r = -0.16; TG (r = -0.16; LDL (r = -0.16 and MRS (r = -0.16. Logistic regression showed that who were assigned to MF fittest group were less likely (OR = 0.27; p = 0.003 to be classified overweight/obese and less likely (OR = 0.26; p = 0.03 to be classified as having MRS. This last association was also found for those whom only performed 1 test under the health zone (OR = 0.23; p = 0.02. Conclusions Our data showed that low strength test performance was associated with increased risk for obesity and metabolic risk in adolescent girls even after adjustment for age and maturation.

  13. Genetic Testing and Neuroimaging: Trading off Benefit and Risk for Youth with Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Grace; Mizgalewicz, Ania; Borgelt, Emily; Illes, Judy

    According to the World Health Organization, mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. The first onset of mental illness usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Neuroimaging and genetic testing have been invaluable in research on behavioral and intentional disorders, particularly with their potential to lead to improved diagnostic and predictive capabilities and to decrease the associated burdens of disease. The present study focused specifically the perspectives of mental health providers on the role of neuroimaging and genetic testing in clinical practice with children and adolescents. We interviewed 38 psychiatrists, psychologists, and allied mental health professionals who work primarily with youth about their receptivity towards either the use of neuroimaging or genetic testing. Interviews probed the role they foresee for these modalities for prediction, diagnosis, and treatment planning, and the benefits and risks they anticipate. Practitioners anticipated three major benefits associated with clinical introduction of imaging and genetic testing in the mental health care for youth: (1) improved understanding of illness, (2) more accurate diagnosis than available through conventional clinical examination, and (3) validation of treatment plans. They also perceived three major risks: (1) potential adverse impacts on employment and insurance as adolescents reach adulthood, (2) misuse or misinterpretation of the imaging or genetic data, and (3) infringements on self-esteem or self-motivation. Movement of brain imaging and genetic testing into clinical care will require a delicate balance of biology and respect for autonomy in the still-evolving cognitive and affective world of young individuals.

  14. Animal Testing in the Risk Society and Violation of the Principle of Equal Consideration of Interests

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Rafael Speck de

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to analyze the practice of animal testing under the paradigm of the Risk Society, Animal Rights, and in which point such research hurts the principle of equal consideration of like interests advocated by Peter Singer and other moral philosophers. On the one hand, this paper calls into question the attempt to transfer the results of an experiment with animals to reactions in humans, and the security criteria (or insecurity) adopted by science. On the other hand, an evaluation ...

  15. [Prognostic value of exercise testing in risk stratification of patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara Vargas, Jorge; Ilarraza-Lomelí, Hermes; García Saldivia, Marianna; Bueno Ayala, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    To compare the predictive power of conventional exercise testing (CVET) vs cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). A cohort study of 1,474 patients with heart failure was analyzed. We assessed variables of CVET and CPET. We used Schiller CS200 equipment with modified Balke protocol ramp. The comparison between groups was performed by correlation and contingency tables. It was considered stochastic significance when P<.05. 80% of the patients were male with an average age of 53±15 years. The most prevalent causes of heart failure were 65% for ischemic heart disease and 27% for dilated cardiomyopathy. Left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was 34±10%, the workload were 6.3±2 (87%) METs and VO2 peak was 21±7mlO2/kg/min. CPET qualified 9% more patients at high risk compared to the 78% CVET, P<.001. The variables with more percentage at high risk were: 60% chronotropic incompetence and 49% VO2 recovery. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy CVET for detecting high-risk subjects, compared to the CPET was 90%, 100% and 91% respectively. Weighted kappa between two tests was 0.7 (P<.001). The CVET has adequate sensitivity and specificity to detect patients with heart failure at high risk relative to the CPET. The degree of agreement is significant, but not enough to consider it as a surrogated test. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Testing the impact on natural risks' awareness of visual communication through an exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The need to communicate about natural disasters in order to improve the awareness of communities at risk is not a matter for debate anymore. However, communication can be implemented using different media and tools, and their effectiveness may be difficult to grasp. Current research on the topic is usually focused on assessing whether communication practices meet users' needs, whereas impact assessment is mostly left out. It can be explained by difficulties arising from (1) the definition of the impact to measure, i.e. awareness, and the appropriate indicators to measure it and its variations, and (2) the implementation of a research design that allows assessing these impacts without bias. This research aims at both developing a methodology to measure risk awareness and to use it for testing the effectiveness of visual communication. The testing was conducted in the Ubaye Valley in France, an alpine area affected by multiple hazards, from December 2013 to mid-February 2014. The setting consisted of an exhibition in the public library of the main town, Barcelonnette. The main natural hazards of the study case (i.e. landslides, avalanches, flooding, debris flows and earthquakes), as well as structural and non-structural measures were presented to the general public using local examples of hazards events and mitigation. Various visualization tools were used: videos, Google earth map, interactive timeline, objects, mock-ups, technical devices as well as posters with pictures, drawings and graphs. In order to assess the effects of the exhibition on risk awareness, several groups of children and adults were submitted to a research design, consisting of 1) a pre-test, 2) the visit of the exhibition and 3) a post-test similar to the pre-test. Close-ended questions addressed the awareness indicators according to the literature, i.e. worry level, previous experiences with natural hazards events, exposure to awareness raising, ability to mitigate/respond/prepare, attitude to

  17. Mosquito attractant blends to trap host seeking Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Nisha; Ayyanar, Elango; Shanmugavelu, Sabesan; Muthuswamy, Kalyanasundaram

    2013-03-01

    Aedes aegypti is the key vector of three important arboviral diseases -dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya. To identify volatile chemicals which could be used in odour based traps for Aedes mosquito surveillance, a few synthetic compounds and compound blends have been evaluated in an indigenously designed olfactometer. A total of 24 compounds and seven compound blends were screened against unfed adult female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes for attraction and compared with control group. The attractancy or repellency index of the test material to mosquitoes was calculated and rated them as class-1, class-2 and class-3 with rating values ranging 1-15, 16-33 and 34-100 respectively. Out of the 24 compounds tested, six were showing significant attractancy (P attractancy with a rating value of 57.81. Sixteen compounds showed significant repellency (P attractancy (P attractancy.

  18. Adolescents in The Netherlands underestimate risk for sexually transmitted infections and deny the need for sexually transmitted infection testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfers, Mireille; de Zwart, Onno; Kok, Gerjo

    2011-05-01

    Worldwide, adolescents are at risk for sexually transmitted infections (STI). In The Netherlands, test rates among young heterosexual people are low and knowledge on the behavioral determinants of testing is scarce. In this study, we investigated STI testing in more detail with two independent samples of 16-25 year old vocational school students (n = 756/n = 1302). The aim of this study was to examine risk perceptions in relation to STI testing among lower educated adolescents in order to inform the development of an intervention promoting STI testing. We compared multiple measures of risk perception, fear of testing, self-efficacy for testing, and risk knowledge between groups of adolescents engaging and not engaging in risk behavior. The results show that at least half of the participating students with sexual experience underestimated their susceptibility for STI and showed an optimistic bias. Students with sexual experience also considered STI very severe but lacked self-efficacy for testing. This combination can yield a defensive reaction to the threat of STI that, in turn, results in the underestimation of personal risks. However, self-efficacy did not mediate the relationship between intention to test and perceived relative risk. In conclusion, our findings show underestimation of personal risks by vocational school students, a high perceived severity of STI and low self-efficacy for testing. A low level of knowledge regarding sexual risks and symptoms of STI might have contributed to low risk perceptions. Self-efficacy did not change the relation of intention-to-test to perceived risk.

  19. HIV testing and risk perceptions: a qualitative analysis of secondary school students in Kampala, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Aluzimbi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of self-reported HIV testing and risk behavior among sexually active adolescents and youth in secondary schools in Kampala Uganda. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted between June and October 2010 among secondary school students in Kampala, Uganda. Forty eight (48 students across the 54 schools were purposively selected for the qualitative sub-study based on their responses to particular questions. We thematically analyzed 28 interviews for our qualitative study using Nvivo software. Drug and alcohol use coupled with peers pressure impaired students’ perceptions towards HIV risk and therefore increased their susceptibility to HIV risk behaviors. Of the 28 scripts analyzed, 82% (23/28 had ever had sexual partners, 79% (22/28 were currently sexually active, and 57% (16/28 had ever been tested for HIV. In conclusion, most adolescents interviewed did not perceive HIV testing to be important to HIV prevention and reported low perception of susceptibility to HIV infection. Development of an adolescent HIV prevention model is important in improving uptake of HIV services.

  20. HIV Testing and Risk Perceptions: A Qualitative Analysis of Secondary School Students in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluzimbi, George; Lubwama, George; Muyonga, Michael; Hladik, Wolfgang

    2017-06-23

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of self-reported HIV testing and risk behavior among sexually active adolescents and youth in secondary schools in Kampala Uganda. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted between June and October 2010 among secondary school students in Kampala, Uganda. Forty eight (48) students across the 54 schools were purposively selected for the qualitative sub-study based on their responses to particular questions. We thematically analyzed 28 interviews for our qualitative study using Nvivo software. Drug and alcohol use coupled with peers pressure impaired students' perceptions towards HIV risk and therefore increased their susceptibility to HIV risk behaviors. Of the 28 scripts analyzed, 82% (23/28) had ever had sexual partners, 79% (22/28) were currently sexually active, and 57% (16/28) had ever been tested for HIV. In conclusion, most adolescents interviewed did not perceive HIV testing to be important to HIV prevention and reported low perception of susceptibility to HIV infection. Development of an adolescent HIV prevention model is important in improving uptake of HIV services.

  1. Risk-Based Allowed Outage Time and Surveillance Test Interval Extensions for Angra 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Orlando Gibelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA is used to evaluate Allowed Outage Times (AOT and Surveillance Test Intervals (STI extensions for three Angra 1 nuclear power plant safety systems. The interest in such an analysis lies on the fact that PSA comprises a risk-based tool for safety evaluation and has been increasingly applied to support both the regulatory and the operational decision-making processes. Regarding Angra 1, among other applications, PSA is meant to be an additional method that can be used by the utility to justify Technical Specification relaxation to the Brazilian regulatory body. The risk measure used in this work is the Core Damage Frequency, obtained from the Angra 1 Level 1 PSA study. AOT and STI extensions are evaluated for the Safety Injection, Service Water and Auxiliary Feedwater Systems using the SAPHIRE code. In order to compensate for the risk increase caused by the extensions, compensatory measures as (1 test of redundant train prior to entering maintenance and (2 staggered test strategy are proposed. Results have shown that the proposed AOT extensions are acceptable for two of the systems with the implementation of compensatory measures whereas STI extensions are acceptable for all three systems.

  2. The influence of blend ratio on the morphology, mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties of PP/LDPE blends

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mofokeng, TG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on how the blend ratio and morphology influence the mechanical, thermal, thermomechanical, and rheological properties of poly(propylene) (PP)/low density polyethylene (LDPE) blends. The blend morphology is composed of the major...

  3. Experimental study on the performance and emissions of a compression ignition engine fuelled with butanol diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Duraid F.; Prabhakaran, P.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the application of the blends of butanol with diesel to a direct injection diesel engine was carried out. Experimental tests were carried out to study the performance and emissions of the engine fuelled with the blends compared with those fuelled by diesel. The test results show that it is feasible and applicable for the blends with butanol to replace conventional diesel as the fuel for diesel engine; the fuel consumption, brake efficiency, exhaust temperature, and volumetric efficiency of the engine fuelled by the blends were comparable with that fuelled by diesel. The characteristics of the emissions were also studied. CO, CO 2 , HC and NO X are measured and compared with the base fuel case when the conventional diesel is used alone. The results were different for different speeds, loads and blends. (author)

  4. Mechanical and water barrier properties of agar/κ-carrageenan/konjac glucomannan ternary blend biohydrogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jong-Whan; Wang, Long-Feng

    2013-07-01

    Multicomponent hydrogel films composed of agar, κ-carrageenan, konjac glucomannan powder, and nanoclay (Cloisite(®) 30B) were prepared and their mechanical and water barrier properties such as water vapor permeability (WVP), water contact angle (CA), water solubility (WS), water uptake ratio (WUR), water vapor uptake ratio (WVUR) were determined. Mechanical, water vapor barrier, and water resistance properties of the ternary blend film exhibited middle range of individual component films, however, they increased significantly after formation of nanocomposite with the clay. Especially, the water holding capacity of the ternary blend biopolymer films increased tremendously, from 800% to 1681% of WUR for agar and κ-carrageenan films up to 5118% and 5488% of WUR for the ternary blend and ternary blend nanocomposite films, respectively. Water vapor adsorption behavior of films was also tested by water vapor adsorption kinetics and water vapor adsorption isotherms test. Preliminary test result for fresh spinach packaging revealed that the ternary blend biohydrogel films had a high potential for the use as an antifogging film for packaging highly respiring agricultural produce. In addition, the ternary blend nanocomposite film showed an antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Listeria monocytogenes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Doctor, what does my positive test mean? From Bayesian textbook tasks to personalized risk communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Gorka; Correia, Rut; Sirota, Miroslav; Juanchich, Marie; Huepe, David

    2015-01-01

    Most of the research on Bayesian reasoning aims to answer theoretical questions about the extent to which people are able to update their beliefs according to Bayes' Theorem, about the evolutionary nature of Bayesian inference, or about the role of cognitive abilities in Bayesian inference. Few studies aim to answer practical, mainly health-related questions, such as, “What does it mean to have a positive test in a context of cancer screening?” or “What is the best way to communicate a medical test result so a patient will understand it?”. This type of research aims to translate empirical findings into effective ways of providing risk information. In addition, the applied research often adopts the paradigms and methods of the theoretically-motivated research. But sometimes it works the other way around, and the theoretical research borrows the importance of the practical question in the medical context. The study of Bayesian reasoning is relevant to risk communication in that, to be as useful as possible, applied research should employ specifically tailored methods and contexts specific to the recipients of the risk information. In this paper, we concentrate on the communication of the result of medical tests and outline the epidemiological and test parameters that affect the predictive power of a test—whether it is correct or not. Building on this, we draw up recommendations for better practice to convey the results of medical tests that could inform health policy makers (What are the drawbacks of mass screenings?), be used by health practitioners and, in turn, help patients to make better and more informed decisions. PMID:26441711

  6. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntanoo, K., E-mail: thip-kk@hotmail.com [Graduate School of Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 Thailand (Thailand); Promkotra, S., E-mail: sarunya@kku.ac.th [Department of Geotechnology, Faculty of Technology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 Thailand (Thailand); Kaewkannetra, P., E-mail: paknar@kku.ac.th [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Technology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 Thailand (Thailand)

    2015-03-30

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (T{sub m}) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  7. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-01

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (Tm) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  8. Students' Perceptions of Blended Learning and its Effectiveness As a Part of Second Year Dental Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varthis, Spyridon

    The field of dental medical education is one of the most rapidly evolving fields in education. Newer teaching methods are being evaluated and incorporated in dental institutions. One of the promising new methods is the blended learning approach that may involve a "flipped" instructional sequencing, where online instruction precedes the group meeting, allowing for more sophisticated learning through discussion and critical thinking. The author conducted a mixed method, experimental study that focused on second year dental students' perceptions of blended learning and its effectiveness. A sample size of 40 dental students in their second year from a Northeastern Regional Dental School were invited to participate in this study to evaluate a blended learning approach in comparison to a more traditional lecture format. Students who participated in the study, participated in group problem-solving, responded to Likert-type surveys, completed content exams, and were interviewed individually. Based on Likert survey data and interview responses, the participants in the blended learning treatment reported very positive opinions including positive perceptions of the organization, support of meaningful learning and potential merits for use in dental education. There also was evidence that the blended learning group achieved at least as well as the traditional lecture group, and excelled on certain content test items. The results of this study support the conclusion that blended instruction promotes active, in-depth and self-regulated learning. During blended learning, students set standards or goals regarding their learning, evaluate their progress toward these goals, and then adapt and regulate their cognition, motivation, and behavior in order to accomplish their goals. Overall, the results of this research on blended learning, including the use of problem-based learning in group discussions, supports the merits of incorporating blended earning in dental education curricula.

  9. Student Outcomes in a Blended Preschool Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesbury, Sybil A.

    2015-01-01

    This case study examined the effect of quality preschool programming on child outcomes in a blended inclusive preschool program implemented in an urban school system in the piedmont of North Carolina. The blended inclusive preschool program was a newly initiated program in this district and had been in place for only 1 school year. The purpose of…

  10. Learning Management Systems on Blended Learning Courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuran, Mehmet Şükrü; Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Elsner, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of Learning Management System (LMS) features based on observations on a blended learning course under the Erasmus+ project COLIBRI. We explain the main features of LMSes under two main categories: accessibility content-related and underline the capabilities of four......, interactive content support, and content access restriction is of paramount importance for blended learning courses....

  11. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  12. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending

  13. Structuring of Interface-Modified Polymer Blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The paper treats the case where blends of polystyrene (PS), poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and a diblock copolymer of PS and PDMS are used as model materials. This modelsystem is predicted to be "stable" in discrete blends in simple shear flow. Stable in the sence that the block copolymer can not...

  14. Improving Curriculum through Blended Learning Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darojat, Ojat

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a study of blended learning pedagogy in open and distance learning (ODL), involving two universities in Southeast Asia, STOU Thailand and UT Indonesia. The purpose of this study is to understand the issues related to the implementation of blended-learning pedagogy. Qualitative case study was employed to optimize my understanding of…

  15. Preparing Teachers for Emerging Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kevin M.; Stallings, Dallas T.

    2014-01-01

    Blended learning environments that merge learning strategies, resources, and modes have been implemented in higher education settings for nearly two decades, and research has identified many positive effects. More recently, K-12 traditional and charter schools have begun to experiment with blended learning, but to date, research on the effects of…

  16. Enhancing Students' Language Skills through Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banditvilai, Choosri

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of using blended learning to enhance students' language skills and learner autonomy in an Asian university environment. Blended learning represents an educational environment for much of the world where computers and the Internet are readily available. It combines self-study with valuable face-to-face interaction…

  17. Transport through track etched polymeric blend membrane

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymer blends of polycarbonate (PC) and polysulphone (PSF) having thickness, 27 m, are prepared by solution cast method. The transport properties of pores in a blend membrane are examined. The pores were produced in this membrane by a track etching technique. For this purpose, a thin polymer membrane was ...

  18. Meeting Diverse Learner Needs with Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a 40-week Computer, Research Skills, and Projects (CRSP) blended learning course designed and implemented at Dubai Men's College. The learning employed a design using socio-constructivist principles in the blended approach to cater to the learning preferences of students. (Contains 2 figures and 1 footnote.)

  19. The Household Risk Perception instrument and the Self-Efficacy in Environmental Risk Reduction instrument: psychometric testing using principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneal, Gail; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Postma, Julie; Hill, Wade; Butterfield, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    To report the psychometric testing of the Household Risk Perception and Self-Efficacy in Environmental Risk Reduction instruments using principal components analysis. There are limited instruments available to test household risk perception and self-efficacy related to environmental health behaviours. The Household Risk Perception instrument was developed to measure personal perceptions of household environmental health risks. The Self-Efficacy in Environmental Risk Reduction instrument was designed to measure caregivers' confidence in taking steps to reduce household risks. An exploratory analysis of previous data was undertaken. Baseline data from 235 caregivers enrolled in a randomized clinical trial testing a healthy housing intervention were collected between 2006-2009. Principal components analysis was used to determine principal components from measured responses to each instrument. Components were explored and compared to constructs used to design the original instruments. A five-component structure showed the simplest solution and explained 65% of variance in the Household Risk Perception analysis. Cronbach's alpha values indicated satisfactory internal consistency for four of five identified components. Risk perception varied according to available sensory input of the specific risk. A four-component structure explained 64% of the variance in the Self-Efficacy in Environmental Risk Reduction analysis. Cronbach's alpha values were satisfactory. Items mapped to steps in an action-oriented process vs. agent-specific actions. Results from both analyses suggest that environmental tobacco smoke is perceived differently than other household risks. Previously, both instruments relied on item reliability and content validity testing. This study provides a basis for further instrument revision and theoretical testing. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Is low IQ related to risk of death by homicide? Testing an hypothesis using data from a longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, George David; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Gale, Catharine R

    2008-01-01

    Lower IQ test scores are related to an increased risk of violent assault. We tested the relation between IQ and death by homicide. In a prospective cohort study of 14,537 men (21 homicides), the association between lower IQ and an increased risk of homicide was lost after multiple adjustment....

  1. Information-seeking and sharing behavior following genomic testing for diabetes risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Rachel; Powell, Jill; Barry, William; Haga, Susanne B

    2015-02-01

    As the practice of medicine has become more patient-driven, patients are increasingly seeking health information within and outside of their doctor's office. Patients looking for information and support are often turning to the Internet as well as family and friends. As part of a study to understand the impact of delivery method of genomic testing for type 2 diabetes risk on comprehension and health-related behaviors, we assessed participants' information-seeking and sharing behaviors after receiving their results in-person with a genetic counselor or online through the testing company's website. We found that 32.6 % of participants sought information after receiving the genomic test results for T2DM; 80.8 % of those that did seek information turned to the Internet. Eighty-eight percent of participants reported that they shared their T2DM risk results, primarily with their spouse/partner (65 %) and other family members (57 %) and children (19 %); 14 % reported sharing results with their health provider. Sharing was significantly increased in those who received results in-person from the genetic counselor (p = 0.0001). Understanding patients' interests and needs for additional information after genomic testing and with whom they share details of their health is important as more information and clinical services are available and accessed outside the clinician's office. Genetic counselors' expertise and experience in creating educational materials and promoting sharing of genetic information can facilitate patient engagement and education.

  2. Risk factors for tuberculin skin test conversion among HIV-infected patients in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Saumil; Chen, Tina Fang; Zapata, Josue; Holzman, Robert S.; Zapata, Luis C.; Aberg, Judith A.; Sivapalasingam, Sumathi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We assessed the incidence of and risk factors for tuberculin skin test (TST) conversion among HIV-infected adults at a New York City clinic. Methods All adult HIV-infected patients were eligible for inclusion if they had a negative baseline TST result and at least one subsequent documented TST test result. Results A total of 414 HIV-infected patients had a negative baseline TST result; 288 (69.6%) were male. Among 348 patients who had a place of birth documented, 50% were born outside of mainland USA. Twenty-two (5.3%) of 414 patients had documented TST conversions, giving a crude incidence rate of 1.77 per 100 person-years. Being a foreign-born Asian individual (p = 0.02), having lived in a shelter (p = 0.004), and having an increase in CD4 cell count (p = 0.02) while under care were independent risk factors for TST conversion. Conclusions We found a high TST conversion rate among HIV-infected patients attending an urban clinic. Annual TST testing is particularly important for patients who are foreign-born from high-endemic countries, those with a history of homelessness, and those with an increase in CD4 cell count since the baseline negative TST test. PMID:22542005

  3. Virtual Reality Training Versus Blended Learning of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Felix; Brzoska, Julia A.; Gondan, Matthias; Rangnick, Henriette M.; Chu, Jackson; Kenngott, Hannes G.; Linke, Georg R.; Kadmon, Martina; Fischer, Lars; Müller-Stich, Beat P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study compared virtual reality (VR) training with low cost-blended learning (BL) in a structured training program. Training of laparoscopic skills outside the operating room is mandatory to reduce operative times and risks. Laparoscopy-naïve medical students were randomized in 2 groups stratified for sex. The BL group (n = 42) used E-learning for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and practiced basic skills with box trainers. The VR group (n = 42) trained basic skills and LC on the LAP Mentor II (Simbionix, Cleveland, OH). Each group trained 3 × 4 hours followed by a knowledge test concerning LC. Blinded raters assessed the operative performance of cadaveric porcine LC using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). The LC was discontinued when it was not completed within 80 min. Students evaluated their training modality with questionnaires. The VR group completed the LC significantly faster and more often within 80 min than BL (45% v 21%, P = .02). The BL group scored higher than the VR group in the knowledge test (13.3 ± 1.3 vs 11.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.001). Both groups showed equal operative performance of LC in the OSATS score (49.4 ± 10.5 vs 49.7 ± 12.0, P = 0.90). Students generally liked training and felt well prepared for assisting in laparoscopic surgery. The efficiency of the training was judged higher by the VR group than by the BL group. VR and BL can both be applied for training the basics of LC. Multimodality training programs should be developed that combine the advantages of both approaches. PMID:25997044

  4. Effect of chain extension on rheology and tensile properties of PHB and PHB-PLA blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousfield, Glenn

    blend continued to degrade, and the PLLA did not in these cases significantly increase complex viscosity. By contrast, the 25/75 PHB/PLLA blend had a complex viscosity equal to the neat PLLA blend, and both of the blends remained stable. All five blends were also produced with 1% Joncryl to observe the effect of Joncryl on the blends. In the 50/50 blend and the blends in which PLLA was the major component, complex viscosity increased by at least an order of magnitude, while in the 75/25 PHB/PLLA blend and the neat PHB blend, the effect of Joncryl was to increase complex viscosity only by a factor of 2. The effect of blending and of Joncryl on PHB-PLA blends was further investigated through uniaxial tensile stress testing of compression moulded samples of the blends, neat and with 1% Joncryl. The results showed an increase in tensile stress at yield and tensile strain at break for blends with the addition of Joncryl, although Young's modulus was somewhat diminished for these blends. In conclusion, chain extenders were not effective in reversing the effect of thermomechanical degradation, possibly because they do not change the resistance to bond rotation in PHB chains, or because they are not reactive with acrylates, although the exact cause has not been determined.

  5. Risk evaluation for motor operated valves in an Inservice Testing Program at a PWR nuclear power plant in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.C.; Chen, K.T.; Su, Y.L.; Ting, K.; Chien, F.T.; Li, G.D.; Huang, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Safety related valves such as Motor Operated Valves (MOV), Air Operated Valves (AOV) or Check Valves (CV) play an important role in nuclear power plant. Functioning of these valves mainly aim at emergency reactivity control, post-accident residue heat removal, post-accident radioactivity removal and containment isolation when a design basis accident occurred. In order to maintain these valves under operable conditions, an Inservice Testing Program (IST) is defined for routine testing tasks based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code section XI code requirements. Risk based Inservice Testing Programs have been studied and developed extensively in the nuclear energy industry since the 1990s. Risk Based evaluations of IST can bring positive advantages to the licensee such as identifying the vulnerability of the system, reducing unnecessary testing burden, concentrating testing resources on the critical pass oriented valves and saving plant’s personnel dose exposure. This risk evaluation is incorporated with quantitative and qualitative analyses to the Motor Operated Valves under current Inservice Testing Program for PWR nuclear power plant in Taiwan. With the outcome of the risk classifications for the safety related MOVs through numerical or deterministic analyses, a risk based testing frequency relief is suggested to demonstrate the benefits received from the risk based Inservice Testing Program. The goal made of this study, it could be as a reference and cornerstone for the licensee to perform overall scope Risk-Informed Inservice Testing Program (RI-IST) evaluation by referring relevant methodologies established in this study.

  6. Evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Katsuhiro; Hiramatsu, Muneyuki; Hino, Tomonori; Otake, Takuma; Okamoto, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroki; Honma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Norimichi

    2015-04-28

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, production of gasoline blended with ethyl tert-buthyl ether (ETBE) is increasing annually. The flash point of ETBE is higher than that of gasoline, and blending ETBE into gasoline will change the flash point and the vapor pressure. Therefore, it is expected that the fire hazard caused by ETBE-blended gasoline would differ from that caused by normal gasoline. The aim of this study was to acquire the knowledge required for estimating the fire hazard of ETBE-blended gasoline. Supposing that ETBE-blended gasoline was a two-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE, we developed a prediction model that describes the vapor pressure and flash point of ETBE-blended gasoline in an arbitrary ETBE blending ratio. We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the relation between molar mass of gasoline and mass loss fraction. We measured the changes in the vapor pressure and flash point of gasoline by blending ETBE and evaporation, and compared the predicted values with the measured values in order to verify the prediction model. The calculated values of vapor pressures and flash points corresponded well to the measured values. Thus, we confirmed that the change in the evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation could be predicted by the proposed model. Furthermore, the vapor pressure constants of ETBE-blended gasoline were obtained by the model, and then the distillation curves were developed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk-based testing of imported animals: A case study for bovine tuberculosis in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Clazien J; van der Goot, Jeanet A; van Zijderveld, Fred G; Swanenburg, Manon; Elbers, Armin R W

    2015-09-01

    In intra-EU trade, the health status of animals is warranted by issuing a health certificate after clinical inspection in the exporting country. This certificate cannot provide guarantee of absence of infection, especially not for diseases with a long incubation period and no overt clinical signs such as bovine tuberculosis (bTB). The Netherlands are officially free from bTB since 1999. However, frequent reintroductions occurred in the past 15 years through importation of infected cattle. Additional testing (AT) of imported cattle could enhance the probability of detecting an imported bTB infection in an early stage. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of risk-based AT for bTB in cattle imported into The Netherlands. A generic stochastic import risk model was developed that simulates introduction of infection into an importing country through importation of live animals. Main output parameters are the number of infected animals that is imported (Ninf), the number of infected animals that is detected by testing (Ndet), and the economic losses incurred by importing infected animals (loss). The model was parameterized for bTB. Model calculations were optimized to either maximize Ndet or to minimize loss. Model results indicate that the risk of bTB introduction into The Netherlands is very high. For the current situation in which Dutch health checks on imported cattle are limited to a clinical inspection of a random sample of 5-10% of imported animals, the calculated annual Ninf=99 (median value). Random AT of 8% of all imported cattle results in Ndet=7 (median value), while the median Ndet=75 if the sampling strategy for AT is optimized to maximize Ndet. However, in the latter scenario, loss is more than twice as large as in the current situation, because only calves are tested for which cost of detection is higher than the expected gain of preventing a possible outbreak. When optimizing the sampling strategy for AT to minimize loss, only breeding

  8. Characterization of the microfibrillated cellulose from water hyacinth pulp after alkali treatment and wet blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrofi, M.; Abral, H.; Kasim, A.; Pratoto, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the effect of mechanical treatment on the characterization of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) from water hyacinth pulp was carried out. Chemical and mechanical treatments were used in this experiments. Chemical treatment such as cooking fibers into the high-pressure reactor. While, the mechanical treatment that provides shear stress on the fibers by means of the wet blending process. The experiments were conducted at the time of wet blending namely 15, 20, and 25 min respectively. The final products were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and tensile test. SEM observation was carried out on the surface of the film. XRD shows that the crystallinity index of MFC with wet blending 15, 20, and 25 min are 56.24, 78.41, and 85.97% respectively. The maximum value of tensile strength was 23.21 MPa at 25 min of wet blending.

  9. Polyethersulfone – barium chloride blend ultrafiltration membranes for dye removal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambabu, K.; Srivatsan, N.; Gurumoorthy, Anand V. P.

    2017-11-01

    A series of Polyethersulfone (PES) – barium chloride (BaCl2) blend ultra filtration membrane was developed by varying the BaCl2 concentration in the dope solution. Prepared membranes were subjected to membrane characterization and their performance was studied through dye rejection tests. Morphological studies through SEM and AFM showed that the composite membranes exhibited differences in morphologies, porosities and properties due to the BaCl2 addition as compared with pristine PES membrane. Addition of the inorganic modifier enhanced the hydrophilicity and water permeability of the blend membrane system. Polymer enhanced ultrafiltration of dye solutions showed that the proposed blend system had better performance in terms of flux and rejection efficiency than the pure polymer membrane. The performance of the 2 wt% BaCl2 blend membrane was more promising for application to real time dye wastewater studies.

  10. Preparation and Properties of the Chitosan/PVA Blend for Heavy Metals Chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair Jabbar Abdul Ameer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Current research based on the use of extracted chitosan mixed with Polyvinyl alcohol to manufacture blend that can been used in water purification from heavy metals such as copper, this due to chitosan properties and its ability to chelation these metals because of the presence of the functional groups in their structure. The blend has been treated with borax to increase the viscosity, and then high density polyethylene granulated coated with polymer solution to increase the surface area for chelation. The ultraviolet test showed the efficiency of blend to chelation of copper ions through lower the copper ions absorbance peak after each stage where the solution of copper ions pass on the polymer blend containing chitosan.

  11. Information Behavior and HIV Testing Intentions Among Young Men at Risk for HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadowbrooke, Chrysta C.; Veinot, Tiffany C.; Loveluck, Jimena; Hickok, Andrew; Bauermeister, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Health research shows that knowing about health risks may not translate into behavior change. However, such research typically operationalizes health information acquisition with knowledge tests. Information scientists who investigate socially embedded information behaviors could help improve understanding of potential associations between information behavior—as opposed to knowledge—and health behavior formation, thus providing new opportunities to investigate the effects of health information. We examine the associations between information behavior and HIV testing intentions among young men who have sex with men (YMSM), a group with high rates of unrecognized HIV infection. We used the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict intentions to seek HIV testing in an online sample of 163 YMSM. Multiple regression and recursive path analysis were used to test two models: (a) the basic TPB model and (b) an adapted model that added the direct effects of three information behaviors (information exposure, use of information to make HIV-testing decisions, prior experience obtaining an HIV test) plus self-rated HIV knowledge. As hypothesized, our adapted model improved predictions, explaining more than twice as much variance as the original TPB model. The results suggest that information behaviors may be more important predictors of health behavior intentions than previously acknowledged. PMID:25346934

  12. Risks of Using Bedside Tests to Verify Nasogastric Tube Position in Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Ni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasogastric (NG tubes are commonly used for enteral feeding. Complications of feeding tube misplacement include malnutrition, pulmonary aspiration, and even death. We built a Bayesian network (BN to analyse the risks associated with available bedside tests to verify tube position. Evidence on test validity (sensitivity and specificity was retrieved from a systematic review. Likelihood ratios were used to select the best tests for detecting tubes misplaced in the lung or oesophagus. Five bedside tests were analysed including magnetic guidance, aspirate pH, auscultation, aspirate appearance, and capnography/colourimetry. Among these, auscultation and appearance are non-diagnostic towards lung or oesophagus placements. Capnography/ colourimetry can confirm but cannot rule out lung placement. Magnetic guidance can rule out both lung and oesophageal placement. However, as a relatively new technology, further validation studies are needed. The pH test with a cut-off at 5.5 or lower can rule out lung intubation. Lowering the cut-off to 4 not only minimises oesophageal intubation but also provides extra safety as the sensitivity of pH measurement is reduced by feeding, antacid medication, or the use of less accurate pH paper. BN is an effective tool for representing and analysing multi-layered uncertainties in test validity and reliability for the verification of NG tube position. Aspirate pH with a cut-off of 4 is the safest bedside method to minimise lung and oesophageal misplacement.

  13. people who inject drugs, HIV risk, and HIV testing uptake in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Alice K; Hahn, Judith A; Couture, Marie-Claude; Maher, Kelsey; Page, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Dramatic rises in injection drug use (IDU) in sub-Saharan Africa account for increasingly more infections in a region already overwhelmed by the HIV epidemic. There is no known estimate of the number of people who inject drugs (PWID) in the region, or the associated HIV prevalence in PWID. We reviewed literature with the goal of describing high-risk practices and exposures in PWID in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as current HIV prevention activities aimed at drug use. The literature search looked for articles related to HIV risk, injection drug users, stigma, and HIV testing in sub-Saharan Africa. This review found evidence demonstrating high rates of HIV in IDU populations in sub-Saharan Africa, high-risk behaviors of the populations, lack of knowledge regarding HIV, and low HIV testing uptake. There is an urgent need for action to address IDU in order to maintain recent decreases in the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Copyright © 2013 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Avian diversity and West Nile virus: testing associations between biodiversity and infectious disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, V.O.; Godsey, M.S.; King, R.J.; Guptill, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of several high profile infectious diseases in recent years has focused attention on our need to understand the ecological factors contributing to the spread of infectious diseases. West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease that was first detected in the United States in 1999. The factors accounting for variation in the prevalence of WNV are poorly understood, but recentideas suggesting links between high biodiversity and reduced vector-borne disease risk may help account for distribution patterns of this disease. Since wild birds are the primary reservoir hosts for WNV, we tested associations between passerine (Passeriform) bird diversity, non-passerine (all other orders) bird diversity and virus infection rates in mosquitoes and humans to examine the extent to which bird diversity is associated with WNV infection risk. We found t h at non-passerine species richness (number of non-passerine species) was significantly negatively correlated with both mosquito and human infection rates, whereas there was no significant association between passerine species richness and any measure of infection risk. Our findings suggest that non-passerine diversity may play a role in dampening WNV amplification rates in mosquitoes, minimizing human disease risk.

  15. Physicochemical properties of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid film modified via blending with poly(butyl acrylate-co-methyl methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoquan Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA/poly(butyl acrylate-co-methyl methacrylate (P(BA-co-MMA blend films with different P(BA-co-MMA mole contents were prepared by casting the polymer blend solution in chloroform. Surface morphologies of the PLGAP(BA-co-MMA blend films were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties of PLGAP(BA-co-MMA blend films were investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, tensile tests, and surface contact angle tests. The introduction of P(BA-co-MMA could modify the properties of PLGA films.

  16. Reduction of Perceived Social Distance as an Explanation for Media's Influence on Personal Risk Perceptions: A Test of the Risk Convergence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jiyeon; Nabi, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The risk convergence model proposes reduction of perceived social distance to a mediated personality as a mechanism through which the mass media can influence audiences' personal risk perceptions. As an initial test of the model, this study examined whether 5 audience variables known to facilitate media effects on personal risk…

  17. Kickback risk of portable chainsaws while cutting wood of different properties: laboratory tests and deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Portable chainsaws are associated with substantial risk and can cause serious injury to operators, especially during kickback. This paper presents new results from research and analyses conducted regarding the impact between the different properties of wood on this occurrence. In an open area, such differences may include: wood species, humidity, temperature and the facing angle of the wood fibres in relation to the kerf and shape of the wood surface that comes in contact with the tip of the guide bar. This paper investigates chainsaw kickback including the research results on kickback and wood-cutting energy, saw chain speed and the efficiency of the chainsaw engine. It also presents conclusions drawn from the tests that can be useful for chainsaw users, showing the dependencies between the different properties of wood and the risk of injury.

  18. Prenatal nutrition, epigenetics and schizophrenia risk: can we test causal effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride, James B; Susser, Ezra; Kundakovic, Marija; Kresovich, Jacob K; Davey Smith, George; Relton, Caroline L

    2012-06-01

    We posit that maternal prenatal nutrition can influence offspring schizophrenia risk via epigenetic effects. In this article, we consider evidence that prenatal nutrition is linked to epigenetic outcomes in offspring and schizophrenia in offspring, and that schizophrenia is associated with epigenetic changes. We focus upon one-carbon metabolism as a mediator of the pathway between perturbed prenatal nutrition and the subsequent risk of schizophrenia. Although post-mortem human studies demonstrate DNA methylation changes in brains of people with schizophrenia, such studies cannot establish causality. We suggest a testable hypothesis that utilizes a novel two-step Mendelian randomization approach, to test the component parts of the proposed causal pathway leading from prenatal nutritional exposure to schizophrenia. Applied here to a specific example, such an approach is applicable for wider use to strengthen causal inference of the mediating role of epigenetic factors linking exposures to health outcomes in population-based studies.

  19. Procedure to select test organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified crops in aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbeck, Angelika; Bundschuh, Rebecca; Bundschuh, Mirco; Hofmann, Frieder; Oehen, Bernadette; Otto, Mathias; Schulz, Ralf; Trtikova, Miluse

    2017-11-01

    For a long time, the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified (GM) crops focused mainly on terrestrial ecosystems. This changed when it was scientifically established that aquatic ecosystems are exposed to GM crop residues that may negatively affect aquatic species. To assist the risk assessment process, we present a tool to identify ecologically relevant species usable in tiered testing prior to authorization or for biological monitoring in the field. The tool is derived from a selection procedure for terrestrial ecosystems with substantial but necessary changes to adequately consider the differences in the type of ecosystems. By using available information from the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC), the procedure can draw upon existing biological data on aquatic systems. The proposed procedure for aquatic ecosystems was tested for the first time during an expert workshop in 2013, using the cultivation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize as the GM crop and 1 stream type as the receiving environment in the model system. During this workshop, species executing important ecological functions in aquatic environments were identified in a stepwise procedure according to predefined ecological criteria. By doing so, we demonstrated that the procedure is practicable with regard to its goal: From the initial long list of 141 potentially exposed aquatic species, 7 species and 1 genus were identified as the most suitable candidates for nontarget testing programs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:974-979. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  20. Quantitative falls risk assessment using the timed up and go test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Barry R; O'Donovan, Alan; Romero-Ortuno, Roman; Cogan, Lisa; Scanaill, Cliodhna Ni; Kenny, Rose A

    2010-12-01

    Falls are a major problem in older adults worldwide with an estimated 30% of elderly adults over 65 years of age falling each year. The direct and indirect societal costs associated with falls are enormous. A system that could provide an accurate automated assessment of falls risk prior to falling would allow timely intervention and ease the burden on overstretched healthcare systems worldwide. An objective method for assessing falls risk using body-worn kinematic sensors is reported. The gait and balance of 349 community-dwelling elderly adults was assessed using body-worn sensors while each patient performed the "timed up and go" (TUG) test. Patients were also evaluated using the Berg balance scale (BBS). Of the 44 reported parameters derived from body-worn kinematic sensors, 29 provided significant discrimination between patients with a history of falls and those without. Cross-validated estimates of retrospective falls prediction performance using logistic regression models yielded a mean sensitivity of 77.3% and a mean specificity of 75.9%. This compares favorably to the cross-validated performance of logistic regression models based on the time taken to complete the TUG test (manually timed TUG) and the Berg balance score. These models yielded mean sensitivities of 58.0% and 57.8%, respectively, and mean specificities of 64.8% and 64.2%, respectively. Results suggest that this method offers an improvement over two standard falls risk assessments (TUG and BBS) and may have potential for use in supervised assessment of falls risk as part of a longitudinal monitoring protocol.

  1. Evaluation of safety, performance and emissions of synthetic fuel blends in a Cessna Citation II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, T.A.; Melkert, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Prior to being used in aviation, alternative fuels have to be tested thoroughly to ensure safe operation. At Delft University of Technology, a test programme was performed to evaluate the safety, performance and emissions of synthetic fuel blends. During test preparations, compatibility of the

  2. Hair Testing for Drugs of Abuse and New Psychoactive Substances in a High-Risk Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Alberto; Palamar, Joseph J; Gerace, Enrico; Di Corcia, Daniele; Vincenti, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Hundreds of new psychoactive substances (NPS) have emerged in the drug market over the last decade. Few drug surveys in the USA, however, ask about use of NPS, so prevalence and correlates of use are largely unknown. A large portion of NPS use is unintentional or unknown as NPS are common adulterants in drugs like ecstasy/Molly, and most NPS are rapidly eliminated from the body, limiting efficacy of urine, blood and saliva testing. We utilized a novel method of examining prevalence of NPS use in a high-risk population utilizing hair-testing. Hair samples from high-risk nightclub and dance music attendees were tested for 82 drugs and metabolites (including NPS) using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Eighty samples collected from different parts of the body were analyzed, 57 of which detected positive for at least one substance-either a traditional or new drug. Among these, 26 samples tested positive for at least one NPS-the most common being butylone (25 samples). Other new drugs detected include methylone, methoxetamine, 5/6-APB, α-PVP and 4-FA. Hair analysis proved a powerful tool to gain objective biological drug-prevalence information, free from possible biases of unintentional or unknown intake and untruthful reporting of use. Such testing can be used actively or retrospectively to validate survey responses and inform research on consumption patterns, including intentional and unknown use, polydrug-use, occasional NPS intake and frequent or heavy use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Orthostatic blood pressure test for risk stratification in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Münch

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD in young adults, mainly ascribed to ventricular tachycardia (VT. Assuming that VT is the major cause of (pre- syncope in HCM patients, its occurrence is essential for SCD risk stratification and primarily preventive ICD-implantation. However, evidence of VT during syncope is often missing. As the differentiation of potential lethal causes for syncope such as VT from more harmless reasons is crucial, HCM patients were screened for orthostatic dysregulation by using a simple orthostatic blood pressure test.Over 15 months (IQR [9;20] 100 HCM patients (55.8±16.2 yrs, 61% male were evaluated for (pre-syncope and VT (24h-ECGs, device-memories within the last five years. Eighty patients underwent an orthostatic blood pressure test. Logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis.In older patients (>40 yrs a positive orthostatic test result increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 63 (95%-CI [8.8; 447.9], p<0.001; 93% sensitivity, 95%-CI [76; 99]; 74% specificity, 95%-CI [58; 86]. No correlation with VT was shown. A prolonged QTc interval also increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 6.6 (95%-CI [2.0; 21.7]; p=0.002.The orthostatic blood pressure test is highly valuable for evaluation of syncope and presyncope especially in older HCM patients, suggesting that orthostatic syncope might be more relevant than previously assumed. Considering the high complication rates due to ICD therapies, this test may provide useful information for the evaluation of syncope in individual risk stratification and may help to prevent unnecessary device implantations, especially in older HCM patients.

  4. Experimental investigation into effects of addition of zinc oxide on performance, combustion and emission characteristics of diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blends in CI engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Prabakaran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is to investigate the effect of zinc oxide nano particle addition to diesel-biodiesel-ethanol blends. Solubility tests were done for the fuels at three different temperatures. Out of eighteen blends, six blends were stable at 5 °C, 15 °C and above 25 °C. Out of the six blends, two blends were checked for properties as per ASTM standards. One of them was chosen for testing the performance, combustion and emission characteristics in a diesel engine. In the same blend, zinc oxide was added in the amount of 250 ppm. Property testing of the blended fuel indicated that there was an increase in calorific value due to addition of nano particle. The performance tests were conducted on a single cylinder four stroke direct injection diesel engine at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. For the blend containing zinc oxide, there was an increase in BSFC, HRR and cylinder pressure. Also, there was a decrease in BTE, NOx and smoke, as compared to diesel. The addition of zinc oxide nano particles increased the BTE and decreased the BSFC as compared with the biodiesel diesel ethanol blend at full load. This study gives a direction to utilize the renewable fuel to reduce the consumption of fossil fuel.

  5. Preparation of Azidated Polybutadiene(Az-PBD)/Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Copolymer(EVA) Blends for the Application of Energetic Thermoplastic Elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Won; Choi, Myung Chan; Chang, Young-Wook; Noh, Si-Tae [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Kil [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    A new energetic thermoplastic elastomer based on the azidated polybutadiene(Az-PBD)/ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) blends was prepared, and structure and properties of the blends were investigated by SEM, DSC, DMA, tensile testing and combustion test. The Az-PBD was synthesized via a two-step process involving the addition reaction of commercially available 1,2-PBD with Br{sub 2} and subsequent nucleophilic substitution reaction of the brominated PBD with NaN{sub 3}. EVA/Az-PBD with 90/10, 80/20, 70/30 (wt/wt) was prepared by a solution blending. SEM, DSC, and DMA results revealed that the blends are partially compatible and Az-PBD is dispersed in continuous EVA matrix. Tensile test showed that modulus and tension set increased while elongation-at-break of the blends decreased with increasing Az-PBD content in the blends, but all the blends showed a elongation at break as high as 700% and a tension set of less than 5%, indicating that the blends are typically elastomeric. Combustion test showed that, with increasing Az-PBD content in the blend, higher energy can be released.

  6. Radiation resistant polypropylene blended with mobilizer, antioxidants and nucleating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamshad, A.; Basfar, A.A. E-mail: abasfar@kacst.edu.sa

    2000-03-01

    Post-irradiation storage of medical disposables prepared from isotactic polypropylene renders them brittle due to degradation. To avoid this, isotactic polypropylene [(is)PP] was blended with a mobilizer, dioctyl pthallate (DOP), three antioxidants (hindered amines and a secondary antioxidant) and benzoic acid to obtain radiation-resistant, thermally-stable and transparent material. Different formulations prepared were subjected to gamma radiation to doses of 25 and 50 kGy. Tests of breakage on bending after ageing in an oven at 70 deg. C up to 12 months have shown that the addition of DOP and the antioxidants imparts improved radiation and thermal stability as compared to (is)PP alone or its blend with DOP. All the formulations irradiated or otherwise demonstrated excellent colour stability even after accelerated ageing at 70 deg. C for prolonged periods. (author)

  7. Radiation resistant polypropylene blended with mobilizer,. antioxidants and nucleating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshad, A.; Basfar, A. A.

    2000-03-01

    Post-irradiation storage of medical disposables prepared from isotactic polypropylene renders them brittle due to degradation. To avoid this, isotactic polypropylene [(is)PP] was blended with a mobilizer, dioctyl pthallate (DOP), three antioxidants (hindered amines and a secondary antioxidant) and benzoic acid to obtain radiation-resistant, thermally-stable and transparent material. Different formulations prepared were subjected to gamma radiation to doses of 25 and 50 kGy. Tests of breakage on bending after ageing in an oven at 70°C up to 12 months have shown that the addition of DOP and the antioxidants imparts improved radiation and thermal stability as compared to (is)PP alone or its blend with DOP. All the formulations irradiated or otherwise demonstrated excellent colour stability even after accelerated ageing at 70°C for prolonged periods.

  8. Instant blend from cassava derivatives produced by extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Rossi Moretti Trombini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The current research aimed to evaluate the effects of extrusion parameters on the physical characteristics of extruded blends of cassava leaf flour and starch. A factorial central composite design with four independent variables and the response surface methodology were used to evaluate the results of color parameters (L*, a*, b*, water absorption index, water solubility index and paste properties, according to the variations in the leaf flour percentage (1.5 to 7.5%, extrusion temperature (60 to 100ºC, screw speed (175 to 231rpm and moisture (20 to 30%. Extrusion conditions affect color, water absorption and water solubility indexes and paste properties of blends. The intermediate tested conditions of variable parameters lead to obtain extruded products with higher cold viscosity and water absorption index and light color, desirable qualities for rapid preparation products.

  9. EXPLORING THE POTENTIAL OF FACEBOOK FOR BLENDED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrisius Istiarto Djiwandono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports a small-scale exploratory research into the potential of Facebook for blended learning. It sets out to find answers to two research objectives: (1 identify the learners' opinions about the use of Facebook as a means of learning reading and job interview in English, and (2 determine the effect', of blended learning on the learners' mastery of new vocabulary. Twenty-five freshmen students of class 2008 who were taking English class at Ma Chung University were taken as the respondents. After a pre-test was administered to them to identity their initial vocabulary mastery, an online task was assigned to them. The task required them to learn interview techniques, upload their own interview session, and read texts. A face to face interaction followed to deal with difficulties and clarify some issues. A post-test measuring their vocabulary growth and questionnaires to identify their opinions were then given at the end of the experiment. The result shows that while gaining significantly higher mastery of new words, the learners expressed different opinions on the use of Facebook as a means of blended learning. The majority felt that face-to-face interaction still needs to accompany the online session to clear up some difficulties and misunderstanding during the online session, while a few others opted for exclusively online session because of its efficiency and higher participation rate by passive learners.

  10. IIHS side crash test ratings and occupant death risk in real-world crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Eric R; Lund, Adrian K

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate how well the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) side crash test ratings predict real-world occupant death risk in side-impact crashes. The IIHS has been evaluating passenger vehicle side crashworthiness since 2003. In the IIHS side crash test, a vehicle is impacted perpendicularly on the driver's side by a moving deformable barrier simulating a typical sport utility vehicle (SUV) or pickup. Injury ratings are computed for the head/neck, torso, and pelvis/leg, and vehicles are rated based on their ability to protect occupants' heads and resist occupant compartment intrusion. Component ratings are combined into an overall rating of good, acceptable, marginal, or poor. A driver-only rating was recalculated by omitting rear passenger dummy data. Data were extracted from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and National Automotive Sampling System/General Estimates System (NASS/GES) for the years 2000-2009. Analyses were restricted to vehicles with driver side air bags with head and torso protection as standard features. The risk of driver death was computed as the number of drivers killed (FARS) divided by the number involved (NASS/GES) in left-side impacts and was modeled using logistic regression to control for the effects of driver age and gender and vehicle type and curb weight. Death rates per million registered vehicle years were computed for all outboard occupants and compared by overall rating. Based on the driver-only rating, drivers of vehicles rated good were 70 percent less likely to die when involved in left-side crashes than drivers of vehicles rated poor, after controlling for driver and vehicle factors. Compared with vehicles rated poor, driver death risk was 64 percent lower for vehicles rated acceptable and 49 percent lower for vehicles rated marginal. All 3 results were statistically significant. Among components, vehicle structure rating exhibited the strongest relationship with driver death risk. The vehicle

  11. Analysis of Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid/Poly(Isoprene Polymeric Blend for application as biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ramos Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of renewable raw materials encourages research in the biopolymers area. The Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid/Poly(Isoprene (PLGA/IR blend combines biocompatibility for application in the health field with excellent mechanical properties. The blend was obtained by solubilization of polymers in organic solvents. To investigate the polymer thermochemical properties, FTIR and DSC were applied. To investigate the composition's influence over polymer mechanical properties, tensile and hardness test were applied. To analyze the blends response in the cell environment, a stent was produced by injection molding process, and Cell Viability Test and Previous Implantability were used. The Infrared spectra show that chemical composition is related only with polymers proportion in the blend. The calorimetry shows a partial miscibility in the blend. The tensile test shows that adding Poly(Isoprene to Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid induced a relevant reduction in the Young modulus, tensile stress and tenacity of the material, which was altered from the fragile raw PLGA to a ductile material. The composition did not affect the blend hardness. The cell viability test shows that the blend has potential application as biomaterial, while the first results of implantability indicate that the polymeric stent kept its original position and caused low fibrosis.

  12. One size does not fit all: HIV testing preferences differ among high-risk groups in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Jan; Njau, Bernard; Mtuy, Tara; Brown, Derek S; Mühlbacher, Axel; Thielman, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In order to maximize the effectiveness of "Seek, Test, and Treat" strategies for curbing the HIV epidemic, new approaches are needed to increase the uptake of HIV testing services, particularly among high-risk groups. Low HIV testing rates among such groups suggest that current testing services may not align well with the testing preferences of these populations. Female bar workers and male mountain porters have been identified as two important high-risk groups in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. We used conventional survey methods and a discrete choice experiment (DCE), a preference elicitation method increasingly applied by economists and policy-makers to inform health policy and services, to analyze trade-offs made by individuals and quantify preferences for HIV testing services. Bivariate descriptive statistics were used to analyze differences in survey responses across groups. Compared to 486 randomly selected community members, 162 female bar workers and 194 male Kilimanjaro porters reported 2-3 times as many lifetime sexual partners (p porters preferred testing in venues where antiretroviral therapy was readily available. Both high-risk groups were less averse to traveling longer distances to test compared to their community counterparts. These results expose systematic differences in HIV testing preferences across high-risk populations compared to their community peers. Tailoring testing options to the preferences of high-risk populations should be evaluated as a means of improving uptake of testing in these populations.

  13. Risk-Taking Tendencies and Radon Messages: A Field Experiment Testing an Information Processing Model for Risk Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. A.; Valenti, JoAnn Myer

    Using radon (a naturally-occurring radioactive gas linked to lung cancer) as the health risk factor, a study examined which risk-taking tendencies interact with different health-risk message strategies. A phone survey pretested 837 randomly selected homeowners from three Florida counties with the highest levels of radon in the state (706 agreed to…

  14. Profile of the Pleximmune blood test for transplant rejection risk prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhi, Rakesh; Ashokkumar, Chethan; Higgs, Brandon W; Levy, Samantha; Soltys, Kyle; Bond, Geoffrey; Mazariegos, George; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Zeevi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Pleximmune™ test (Plexision Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, USA) is the first cell-based test approved by the US FDA, which predicts acute cellular rejection in children with liver- or intestine transplantation. The test addresses an unmet need to improve management of immunosuppression, which incurs greater risks of opportunistic infections and Epstein–Barr virus-induced malignancy during childhood. High-dose immunosuppression and recurrent rejection after intestine transplantation also result in a 5-year graft loss rate of up to 50%. Such outcomes seem increasingly unacceptable because children can experience rejection-free survival with reduced immunosuppression. Pleximmune test sensitivity and specificity for predicting acute cellular rejection is 84% and 81% respectively in training set–validation set testing of 214 children. Among existing gold standards, the biopsy detects but cannot predict rejection. Anti-donor antibodies, which presage antibody-mediated injury, reflect late-stage allosensitization as a downstream effect of engagement between recipient and donor cells. Therefore, durable graft and patient outcomes also require an accurate management of cellular immune responses in clinical practice. PMID:26760313

  15. [Drug using risks screening in primary care patients using the ASSIST test: Cross sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Juan A; Rigabert, Alina; Gómez Llano, M Nieves; Rubio, Gabriel

    2018-03-15

    The aim of this study is to estimate risky-drug use patterns of consumption of primary care patients. Multicentric descriptive cross-sectional study. five primary health care centers of the South of Madrid. all patients between 16-100 year-old consulting with their family physician. Spanish-validated World Health Organization ASSIST test was use to screen risky drug use in primary care. Total points scored at the test were obtained. A sum of 441 screening test were collected. Mean age was 51,3 years and 51.6% of patients presented a moderate-severe risky drug use out of the nine drugs tested. The more frequent drug use screened were tobacco (41.7%) followed by alcohol (15.4%), hypnotics (13.7%) and cannabis (5.7%). Differences were found between genders in the patterns: men had higher risky drug uses compared to women regarding alcohol and cannabis. Women had higher sedatives/hypnotics consumption prevalence. A 16% of patients presented with polyconsumption drug use patterns. There is risk derived from drug misuse in primary care for tobacco, alcohol, hypnotics and cannabis as detected by the ASSIST test. There is a higher rate of hypnotics than expected. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Qualitative risk assessment during polymer mortar test specimens preparation - methods comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F; Sousa, S P B; Ribeiro, M C S; Arezes, P; Swuste, P; Baptista, J S

    2015-01-01

    Polymer binder modification with inorganic nanomaterials (NM) could be a potential and efficient solution to control matrix flammability of polymer concrete (PC) materials without sacrificing other important properties. Occupational exposures can occur all along the life cycle of a NM and “nanoproducts” from research through scale-up, product development, manufacturing, and end of life. The main objective of the present study is to analyse and compare different qualitative risk assessment methods during the production of polymer mortars (PM) with NM. The laboratory scale production process was divided in 3 main phases (pre-production, production and post-production), which allow testing the assessment methods in different situations. The risk assessment involved in the manufacturing process of PM was made by using the qualitative analyses based on: French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety method (ANSES); Control Banding Nanotool (CB Nanotool); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne method (EPFL); Guidance working safely with nanomaterials and nanoproducts (GWSNN); Istituto Superiore per la Prevenzione e la Sicurezza del Lavoro, Italy method (ISPESL); Precautionary Matrix for Synthetic Nanomaterials (PMSN); and Stoffenmanager Nano. It was verified that the different methods applied also produce different final results. In phases 1 and 3 the risk assessment tends to be classified as medium-high risk, while for phase 2 the more common result is medium level. It is necessary to improve the use of qualitative methods by defining narrow criteria for the methods selection for each assessed situation, bearing in mind that the uncertainties are also a relevant factor when dealing with the risk related to nanotechnologies field. (paper)

  17. Qualitative risk assessment during polymer mortar test specimens preparation - methods comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F.; Sousa, S. P. B.; Arezes, P.; Swuste, P.; Ribeiro, M. C. S.; Baptista, J. S.

    2015-05-01

    Polymer binder modification with inorganic nanomaterials (NM) could be a potential and efficient solution to control matrix flammability of polymer concrete (PC) materials without sacrificing other important properties. Occupational exposures can occur all along the life cycle of a NM and “nanoproducts” from research through scale-up, product development, manufacturing, and end of life. The main objective of the present study is to analyse and compare different qualitative risk assessment methods during the production of polymer mortars (PM) with NM. The laboratory scale production process was divided in 3 main phases (pre-production, production and post-production), which allow testing the assessment methods in different situations. The risk assessment involved in the manufacturing process of PM was made by using the qualitative analyses based on: French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety method (ANSES); Control Banding Nanotool (CB Nanotool); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne method (EPFL); Guidance working safely with nanomaterials and nanoproducts (GWSNN); Istituto Superiore per la Prevenzione e la Sicurezza del Lavoro, Italy method (ISPESL); Precautionary Matrix for Synthetic Nanomaterials (PMSN); and Stoffenmanager Nano. It was verified that the different methods applied also produce different final results. In phases 1 and 3 the risk assessment tends to be classified as medium-high risk, while for phase 2 the more common result is medium level. It is necessary to improve the use of qualitative methods by defining narrow criteria for the methods selection for each assessed situation, bearing in mind that the uncertainties are also a relevant factor when dealing with the risk related to nanotechnologies field.

  18. Studies on the preparation of multi-monomer grafted PP by one-step extrusion and the blends with PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, a novel grafted polypropylene (PP was prepared by one step free-radical melt grafting way in a single-screw extruder. The results were shown that the addition of St to the melt-grafting system as a comonomer could significantly enhance MMA grafting degree onto PP and reduce the degradation of PP matrix by means of FTIR and MFR test, respectively. Then, the extruded multi-monomer grafted PP, as a component, directly blend with poly (vinyl chloride (PVC, named as gPP/PVC. The corresponding improved compatibility was examined. Comparison with pure PP/PVC blends, due to the addition of gPP, the tensile strengths of gPP/PVC blends increased significantly and the impact strengths were unchanged as those of pure PP/PVC blends. The DSC results also suggested that the compatibility of PP/PVC blends were improved largely.

  19. The process and risk of the CPR1000 cold function test in the cold area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tinghao; Zhang Jian; Ji Dapeng; Shi Quanjian; Tian Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Hong yanhe nuclear power station is the first CPR1000 reactor which is under construction in the cold area of north China. It is also the first time to carry out the cold functional test (CFT) in the winter of north China. The preparation and process of CFT are described in the paper. According to the experience feedback of CFT of Unit 1, the risk and solution which are significance for the CFT of the other NPS in the cold area are analysed. (authors)

  20. Fall Risk Based on Timed Up and Go Test in Elderly at Nursing Home in West Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiruchelvam Selvadurai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Mobility assessment is important in preventing falls in elderly. This study was conducted to determine the level of fall risk in elderly people at Karitas Cimahi Nursing Home, West Java, Indonesia by using ‘timed up and go test’(TUG. Methods:This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at Karitas Cimahi Nursing Home from June–November 2013. The risk of falls was categorized into two; high and low risk of falls. High risk of falls indicated when the participants complete the TUG test with time taken >10 seconds, and low risk of falls indicated when the time taken is 10 seconds. Conclusions: The level of fall risk in elderly people at Karitas Cimahi Nursing Home based on the test showed that all participants, both male and female, regardless of using assistive device have high level risk of falls.

  1. Blending formal and informal learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Gro

    Defence College (RDDC) revealed that resistance to online courses with collaborative activities is common. Through learning theory, motivational theory and practical examples, this paper will explore how we can succeed in tapping into the existing culture of collaboration. A deeper understanding......The aim of this paper is to explore the possibilities collaboration offers in the virtual learning environments of the armed forces. I will argue that for reasons of culture and structure in the armed forces, the opportunities created by collaborative learning activities in e-learning and blended...... learning are especially fruitful here. Collaboration is a pervasive, foundational form of activity in our armies, air forces and navies. It expresses itself in cultural traits such as never leaving a soldier behind, taking your share and being someone you can count on, to name a few. Moreover, most armed...

  2. Blending formal and informal learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Gro

    The aim of this paper is to explore the possibilities collaboration offers in the virtual learning environments of the armed forces. I will argue that for reasons of culture and structure in the armed forces, the opportunities created by collaborative learning activities in e-learning and blended...... learning are especially fruitful here. Collaboration is a pervasive, foundational form of activity in our armies, air forces and navies. It expresses itself in cultural traits such as never leaving a soldier behind, taking your share and being someone you can count on, to name a few. Moreover, most armed...... forces activities are structured forms of collaboration; staff work, tactical planning, active duty and so forth are all day-to-day examples. Collaborative activities in virtual learning spaces tap into that culture. However, and perhaps confusingly, a study I conducted last year at the Royal Danish...

  3. Blending traditional and digital marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Dania TODOR

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is a matter of fact that we are in the digital era and internet marketing and social media have a significant impact on the way consumers behave, companies do business and it is a must for companies to adapt to the new reality. Due to the fast evolution of the technology, the continuous increase in demand and supply, the supply chain elongation and the big amount of date, the only solution to face the major changes is the automation of all the processes. But even though the new era of communication is here, specialist suggest that companies should not ignore traditional methods, and to try to blend digital marketing with traditional campaigns in order to achieve their goals.

  4. Effect of Die Head Temperature at Compounding Stage on the Degradation of Linear Low Density Polyethylene/Plastic Film Waste Blends after Accelerated Weathering

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Al-Salem; N. M. Al-Dousari; G. Joseph Abraham; M. Aromin D’Souza; O. A. Al-Qabandi; W. Al-Zakri

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated weathering test was performed on blends of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and plastic film waste constituting the following percentages of polyolefin polymers (wt.%): LLDPE (46%), low density polyethylene (LDPE, 51%), high density polyethylene (HDPE, 1%), and polypropylene (PP, 2%). Compounded blends were evaluated for their mechanical and physical (optical) properties. The impact of photodegradation on the formulated blends was studied, and loss of mechanical integrity w...

  5. Blended Working: For whom it may (not) work.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, Nico W.; Rietzschel, Eric F.; De Jonge, Kiki M.M.

    Similarly to related developments such as blended learning and blended care, blended working is a pervasive and booming trend in modern societies. Blended working combines on-site and off-site working in an optimal way to improve workers’ and organizations’ outcomes. In this paper, we examine the

  6. Blended Learning in Action: A Practical Guide toward Sustainable Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Catlin R.; Wycoff, Tiffany; Green, Jason T.

    2017-01-01

    Blended learning has the power to reinvent education, but transitioning to a blended model is challenging. Blended learning requires a fundamentally new approach to learning as well as a new skillset for both teachers and school leaders. Loaded with research, examples, and resources, "Blended Learning in Action" demonstrates the…

  7. Segmentation and Representation of Consonant Blends in Kindergarten Children's Spellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the growth of children's segmentation and representation of consonant blends in the kindergarten year and to evaluate the extent to which linguistic features influence segmentation and representation of consonant blends. Specifically, the roles of word position (initial blends, final blends),…

  8. Fighting Testing ACAT/FRRP: Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology/Fighter Risk Reduction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Flight testing Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology/Fighter Risk Reduction Project (ACAT/FRRP). The goal of this project is to develop common modular architecture for all aircraft, and to enable the transition of technology from research to production as soon as possible to begin to reduce the rate of mishaps. The automated Ground Collision Avoidance System (GCAS) system is designed to prevent collision with the ground, by avionics that project the future trajectory over digital terrain, and request an evasion maneuver at the last instance. The flight controls are capable of automatically performing a recovery. The collision avoidance is described in the presentation. Also included in the presentation is a description of the flight test.

  9. Novel sulfonated poly (ether ether keton)/polyetherimide acid-base blend membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuai; Wang, Lihua; Ding, Yue; Liu, Biqian; Han, Xutong; Song, Yanlin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • SPEEK/PEI acid-base blend membranes are prepared for VRB applications. • The acid-base blend membranes have much lower vanadium ion permeability. • The energy efficiency of SPEEK/PEI maintain around 86.9% after 50 cycles. - Abstract: Novel acid-base blend membranes composed of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyetherimide (PEI) were prepared for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). The blend membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The ion exchange capacity (IEC), proton conductivity, water uptake, vanadium ion permeability and mechanical properties were measured. As a result, the acid-base blend membranes exhibit higher water uptake, IEC and lower vanadium ion permeability compared to Nafion117 membranes and all these properties decrease with the increase of PEI. In VRB single cell test, the VRB with blend membranes shows lower charge capacity loss, higher coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) than Nafion117 membrane. Furthermore, the acid-base blend membranes present stable performance up to 50 cycles with no significant decline in CE and EE. All experimental results indicate that the SPEEK/PEI (S/P) acid-base blend membranes show promising prospects for VRB

  10. BioBlend.objects: metacomputing with Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Simone; Pireddu, Luca; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Lianas, Luca; Soranzo, Nicola; Afgan, Enis; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2014-10-01

    BioBlend.objects is a new component of the BioBlend package, adding an object-oriented interface for the Galaxy REST-based application programming interface. It improves support for metacomputing on Galaxy entities by providing higher-level functionality and allowing users to more easily create programs to explore, query and create Galaxy datasets and workflows. BioBlend.objects is available online at https://github.com/afgane/bioblend. The new object-oriented API is implemented by the galaxy/objects subpackage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Blended Chitosan Paste for Infection Prevention: Preliminary and Preclinical Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Joel M; Jennings, Jessica A; Courtney, Harry S; Beenken, Karen E; Smeltzer, Mark S; Haggard, Warren O

    2017-07-01

    Local drug delivery devices offer a promising method for delivering vancomycin and amikacin for musculoskeletal wounds. However, current local delivery devices such as beads and sponges do not necessarily allow for full coverage of a wound surface with eluted antibiotics and do not address the need for reducing the antibiotic diffusion distance to help prevent contamination by bacteria or other microorganisms. We blended chitosan/polyethylene glycol (PEG) pastes/sponges to increase biocompatibility and improve antibiotic coverage within the wound. (1) Are blended chitosan/PEG pastes biodegradable? (2) Are the blended pastes biocompatible? (3) How much force does paste require for placement by injection? (4) Will the pastes elute active antibiotics to inhibit bacteria in vitro? (5) Can the pastes prevent infection in a preclinical model with hardware? Our blended paste/sponge formulations (0.5% acidic, 1% acidic, and acidic/neutral) along with a control neutral 1% chitosan sponge were tested in vitro for degradability, cytocompatibility, injectability tested by determining the amount of force needed to inject the pastes, elution of antibiotics, and activity tested using zone of inhibition studies. Along with these studies, in vivo models for biocompatibility and infection prevention were tested using a rodent model and an infected mouse model with hardware, respectively. By evaluating these characteristics, an improved local drug delivery device can be determined. All three of the paste formulations evaluated were almost fully degraded and with 6 days of degradation, the percent remaining being was less than that of the control sponge (percent remaining: control 99.251% ± 1.0%; 0.5% acidic 1.6% ± 2.1%, p = 0.002; 1% acidic 1.7% ± 1.6%, p = 0.002; acidic/neutral 2.3% ± 1.7%, p = 0.010). There was good biocompatibility because cell viability in vitro was high (control 100.0 ± 14.3; 0.5% acidic formulation at 79.4 ± 12.6, p blended chitosan/PEG pastes with

  12. Optimization of periodic testing frequency of a reactor protection system based on a risk-cost model and public risk perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalaquzzaman, M.; Kang, Hyun Gook; Kim, Man Cheol; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Risk, cost, and public risk perception are incorporated to optimize test frequency. → Protection system unavailability decreases with an increasing test frequency. → CDF and spurious trip rate increase with human errors. → Shorter interval tests are notably beneficial when the human error level is very low. → Test error, moderator temperature coefficient, trip cost are key factors. - Abstract: Techniques for optimizing the frequency of periodic surveillance testing of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety systems have been receiving increased attention and growing importance because of the need to reduce system unavailability and maintenance cost. Economic losses from maintenance human errors should be included in estimating periodic testing and maintenance costs because the losses increase with maintenance human errors. This paper proposes a method for optimizing periodic testing intervals of a digital reactor protection system by balancing risk and cost of periodic surveillance tests, in which maintenance human error and public risk perception have been reflected. The risk and costs were estimated from both plant operator and socio-economic standpoints. This model determines the optimal testing frequency for the minimum value of an objective function that consists of all costs, including the monetary values of the consequence of maintenance human errors and reactor core damage. We present a case study using our model for the OPR1000 plant. The study results show the significance of reducing human errors in periodic testing and maintenance. The proposed method is expected to be useful to NPP operators as well as regulators for evaluating the optimal periodic testing frequency of a nuclear reactor protection system and for obtaining information needed in decision making processes.

  13. Relations between blended learning possibilities and teachers' approaches to blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenalt, Maria Hvid; Nielsen, Tobias Alsted; Bager-Elsborg, Anna

    : • Optain locally-embedded knowledge about blended learning • Develop opportunities for law students to receive (more) feedback • Comply with strategic aims The results so far suggest that teachers provide a disciplinary perspective on the key dimensions of blended learning, which influences......Higher Education has embraced blended learning as a way of enhancing quality in teaching and helping students to learn. This presentation addresses relations between blended learning possiblities presented to teachers in a teacher training project and teachers’ approaches to blended learning. We...... suggest that in order to identify the level of impact of integrating technologies in teaching and learning, we need to understand the factors influencing approaches to design of courses for blended contexts. Participants in the teacher training project come from the Department of Law at Aarhus University...

  14. Identification and Quantification of Processes Affecting the Fate of Ethanol-Blended Fuel in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, J. M.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    At present, the oil and gas industry distributes gasoline with an ethanol content of up to 10% (E10) to the consumer. However, ethanol advocates are promoting gasoline blends with higher ethanol content to be introduced into the market (e.g., E20, corresponding to an ethanol content of 20%). The likelihood of unintended fuel releases with elevated ethanol concentrations through surficial spills or from underground storage systems will therefore increase. A particular concern is the increased rate of CH4 and CO2 production as the spill biodegrades, which is believed to be associated with the increased ethanol content in the fuel. Consequently, high gas generation rates associated with ethanol-blended fuels may amplify the risk of vapor intrusion of CH4 and BTEX into basements or other subsurface structures that may be nearby. A comprehensive and comparative study on the fate of higher concentration ethanol-blended fuels in the subsurface has not been conducted to date. The present study focuses on determining the fate of ethanol blended fuels in the subsurface through a series of controlled and instrumented laboratory column experiments. The experiments compare the behavior of pure gasoline with that of ethanol-blended fuels for different soil types (sand and silt) in columns 2 meters tall and 30cm in diameter. The column experiments focus on the quantification of gas generation by volatilization and biodegradation and 1-D vertical fate and transport of CO2, CH4, benzene and toluene through the vadose zone. The fuel blends have been injected into the lower third of the columns and gas composition and fluxes within the column are being monitored over time. The goal of this study is to contribute to the scientific foundation that will allow gauging the level of risk and the need for remediation at fuel spill sites with higher ethanol blends.

  15. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 195 - Risk-Based Alternative to Pressure Testing Older Hazardous Liquid and Carbon Dioxide Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pressure tested, based on the inherent risk of a given pipeline segment. The first step is to determine the... test requirements depending on the inherent risk of a given pipeline segment. The overall risk... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Risk-Based Alternative to Pressure Testing Older...

  16. Assessment of poly(ε-caprolactone)/poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) blends processed by solvent casting and electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Gaudio, Costantino; Ercolani, Enrico; Nanni, Francesca; Bianco, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → PHBV, PCL and blends were processed in form of solvent cast films and e-spun mats. → A clear phase separation was observed for cast films when blended in equal amount. → E-spun blends were comprised of uniform and defect-free randomly arranged fibers. → DSC and XRD analyses demonstrated the immiscibility of PHBV and PCL. → Rearrangement of e-spun fibers and neckings, after axial test, were observed. - Abstract: Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) were blended in different ratio, e.g. 30/70, 50/50 and 70/30 (w/w), by means of solvent casting or electrospinning. Microstructure, thermal and mechanical properties of cast films and non-woven mats were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and uniaxial tensile test. The microstructure of PHBV/PCL solvent cast films (thickness 65-100 μm) was strictly dependent on the composition of the blend, a clean phase separation was observed for the 50/50 (w/w) sample. All electrospun PHBV/PCL blends (thickness 350-800 μm) were characterised by uniform and homogenous fibers, the average size was about 3 μm. Both techniques led to polymeric blends comprised of separate crystalline domains associated to an amorphous interdisperse phase. It has also been demonstrated that electrospun PHBV/PCL blends showed a lower segregation degree among the crystalline domains. Solvent cast blends were characterised by superior mechanical properties in terms of tensile modulus and tensile strength compared to electrospun ones. Fractured electrospun blends showed an overall fiber rearrangement in the direction of the applied load, eventually highlighting multiple necking regions along the fibers.

  17. Test of the depression distress amplification model in young adults with elevated risk of current suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capron, Daniel W; Lamis, Dorian A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2014-11-30

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among young adults and the rate of suicide has been increasing for decades. A depression distress amplification model posits that young adults with comorbid depression and anxiety have elevated suicide rates due to the intensification of their depressive symptoms by anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns. The current study tested the effects of anxiety sensitivity subfactors as well as the depression distress amplification model in a very large sample of college students with elevated suicide risk. Participants were 721 college students who were at elevated risk of suicidality (scored>0 on the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation). Consistent with prior work, anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns, but not physical or social concerns, were associated with suicidal ideation. Consistent with the depression distress amplification model, in individuals high in depression, anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns predicted elevated suicidal ideation but not among those with low depression. The results of this study corroborate the role of anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns and the depression distress amplification model in suicidal ideation among a large potentially high-risk group of college students. The depression distress amplification model suggests a specific mechanism, anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns, that may be responsible for increased suicide rates among those with comorbid anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Morphological studies of DBSA-doped polyaniline/PVC blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Asma Binat; Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Ahmad, Maqsood

    2010-01-01

    Solution blending technique has been used to synthesize dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA)-doped polyaniline (PAND)/poly-vinyl chloride (PVC) blends by two methods, namely redoping method (PANDR/PVC blends) and aqueous polymerization method (PANDA/PVC blends). PANDR/PVC blends show improved mechanical properties as compared to PANDA/PVC blends, which show brittle nature of the films. However, by increasing concentration of PANDR in the PVC matrix, PANDR/PVC blend films are becoming more rigid due to increases in the modulus of elasticity. Irradiation of blend samples by electron beam used during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses has changed the morphology of PANDA/PVC blend films due to dehydrochlorination of free PVC, whereas PANDR/PVC blends remain unaffected during irradiation by electron beam.

  19. The discourse around usefulness, morality, risk and trust: a focus group study on prenatal genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetti, Monica; Montali, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Giorgia

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the underlying values and beliefs that guide women's reasoning on prenatal genetic test (PGT) uptake, as framed by their own words, during a group discussion, in a Catholic country such as Italy. Women's reasoning was explored by means of five focus group consisting of seven pregnant women and 13 new mothers. The focus group material content was analysed using the Nudist software. The discourse around PGT was rooted into four frames of reference: The usefulness dimension was used to express the positions in favour of PGT, whereas morality, risk and trust were used to express negative evaluations on such a technology. Participants advocated for themselves the choice of being tested, besides giving some credit to the partner's opinion. Moreover, participants reported little knowledge on PGT. The research shed some light on the frames of reference used by participants to build their positions on PGT uptake, confirming the public's ability to translate scientific accounts into personally meaningful information. A more complete understanding of the reasons for decisions to test would help counsellors to better communicate with women and couples, and to better assist them to make a better informed testing decision. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Identification of Elderly Falling Risk by Balance Tests Under Dual Tasks Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Aslankhani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to identify elderly fallers and non-fallers by balance test under dual tasks conditions. Methods & Materials: This study was an analyze-comparative study. Subjects were from three park of Tehran. Subjects were 20 older adults with outhistory of falls (aged 75.95±6.28 years and 21 older adults with a history of 2 or more falls in the previous one year (aged 72.50±7.31 Years . All subjects performed Timed Up & Go test under 3 conditions (TimedUp & Go, Timed Up & Go with numbers counter randomly [TUG cognitive], and Timed Up & Go while carrying a full cup of water [TUG manual]. A multivariate analysis of variance and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: The results showed significant difference between elderly fallers and non fallers in fall risk composed dependent variable (P=0.0005, as the non fallers had greater score than the elderly fallers. Also, results showed that TUG cognitive has prediction capacity of elderly fall (P=0.013. Conclusion: Consequently, balance under cognitive dual task conditions could be useful method in identification of risk of falling and planning dual task exercise program and physiotherapy to preventfalls.

  1. Caries risk assessment in school children using a reduced Cariogram model without saliva tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twetman Svante

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the caries predictive ability of a reduced Cariogram model without salivary tests in schoolchildren. Methods The study group consisted of 392 school children, 10-11 years of age, who volunteered after informed consent. A caries risk assessment was made at baseline with aid of the computer-based Cariogram model and expressed as "the chance of avoiding caries" and the children were divided into five risk groups. The caries increment (ΔDMFS was extracted from the dental records and bitewing radiographs after 2 years. The reduced Cariogram was processed by omitting the variables "salivary mutans streptococci", "secretion rate" and "buffer capacity" one by one and finally all three. Differences between the total and reduced models were expressed as area under the ROC-curve. Results The baseline caries prevalence in the study population was 40% (mean DMFS 0.87 ± 1.35 and the mean 2-year caries increment was 0.51 ± 1.06. Both Cariogram models displayed a statistically relationship with caries development (p Conclusions The accuracy of caries prediction in school children was significantly impaired when the Cariogram model was applied without enumeration of salivary tests.

  2. Gold nanoparticle-enabled blood test for early stage cancer detection and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianyu; Pierre-Pierre, Nickisha; Yan, Xin; Huo, Qun; Almodovar, Alvin J O; Valerio, Felipe; Rivera-Ramirez, Inoel; Griffith, Elizabeth; Decker, David D; Chen, Sixue; Zhu, Ning

    2015-04-01

    When citrate ligands-capped gold nanoparticles are mixed with blood sera, a protein corona is formed on the nanoparticle surface due to the adsorption of various proteins in the blood to the nanoparticles. Using a two-step gold nanoparticle-enabled dynamic light scattering assay, we discovered that the amount of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the gold nanoparticle protein corona is increased in prostate cancer patients compared to noncancer controls. Two pilot studies conducted on blood serum samples collected at Florida Hospital and obtained from Prostate Cancer Biorespository Network (PCBN) revealed that the test has a 90-95% specificity and 50% sensitivity in detecting early stage prostate cancer, representing a significant improvement over the current PSA test. The increased amount of human IgG found in the protein corona is believed to be associated with the autoantibodies produced in cancer patients as part of the immunodefense against tumor. Proteomic analysis of the nanoparticle protein corona revealed molecular profile differences between cancer and noncancer serum samples. Autoantibodies and natural antibodies produced in cancer patients in response to tumorigenesis have been found and detected in the blood of many cancer types. The test may be applicable for early detection and risk assessment of a broad spectrum of cancer. This new blood test is simple, low cost, requires only a few drops of blood sample, and the results are obtained within minutes. The test is well suited for screening purpose. More extensive studies are being conducted to further evaluate and validate the clinical potential of the new test.

  3. Preparation and characterization of poly (L-lactic acid and poly(ethylene oxide blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoppi R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA and poly(ethylene oxide (PEO blends were prepared by mechanical mixture and fusion of homopolymers. Samples were submitted to in vitro degradation tests (immersion in a phosphate buffer solution with pH = 7.4 at 37 °C. Independently of the blend composition, PEO was dissolved after 14 days of immersion. As expected, after immersion, scanning electron microscopy showed that the blends were porous, contrary to the samples, which were not immersed in the buffer solution. Phase separation was not evident. Using differential scanning calorimetry, the melting points (Tm of both PLLA and PEO crystalline fractions were observed and remained practically constant, indicating no miscibility. Thermogravimetry showed that the temperature where the main mass loss stage starts (Tonset, depended on the blend composition and period of immersion in the buffer. The blends and the PLLA homopolymer were implanted in defects produced in the tibias of rats. The blends were as biocompatible as the PLLA.

  4. Heat release and engine performance effects of soybean oil ethyl ester blending into diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Andre Valente; Velasquez, Jose Antonio; Milanez, Luiz Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The engine performance impact of soybean oil ethyl ester blending into diesel fuel was analyzed employing heat release analysis, in-cylinder exergy balances and dynamometric tests. Blends with concentrations of up to 30% of soybean oil ethyl ester in volume were used in steady-state experiments conducted in a high speed turbocharged direct injection engine. Modifications in fuel heat value, fuel-air equivalence ratio and combustion temperature were found to govern the impact resulting from the addition of biodiesel on engine performance. For the analyzed fuels, the 20% biodiesel blend presented the best results of brake thermal efficiency, while the 10% biodiesel blend presented the best results of brake power and sfc (specific fuel consumption). In relation to mineral diesel and in full load conditions, an average increase of 4.16% was observed in brake thermal efficiency with B20 blend. In the same conditions, an average gain of 1.15% in brake power and a reduction of 1.73% in sfc was observed with B10 blend.

  5. Performance of blend sign in predicting hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Jun; Guo, Rui; Ma, Lu; Li, Mou; Wang, Xiaoze; Lin, Sen; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-12-01

    Hematoma expansion is independently associated with poor outcome in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Blend sign is a simple predictor for hematoma expansion on non-contrast computed tomography. However, its accuracy for predicting hematoma expansion is inconsistent in previous studies. This meta-analysis is aimed to systematically assess the performance of blend sign in predicting hematoma expansion in ICH. A systematic literature search was conducted. Original studies about predictive accuracy of blend sign for hematoma expansion in ICH were included. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated. Summary receiver operating characteristics curve was constructed. Publication bias was assessed by Deeks' funnel plot asymmetry test. A total of 5 studies with 2248 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios of blend sign for predicting hematoma expansion were 0.28, 0.92, 3.4 and 0.78, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.85. No significant publication bias was found. This meta-analysis demonstrates that blend sign is a useful predictor with high specificity for hematoma expansion in ICH. Further studies with larger sample size are still necessary to verify the accuracy of blend sign for predicting hematoma expansion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Physicochemical and FTIR Study of Diesel-Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad Khan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Iqbal; Lal, Bhajan; Idris, Al-Amin; Albeirutty, Muhammad H.; Ayoub, Muhammad; Sufian, Suriati binti

    2018-04-01

    Physicochemical properties of combustion fuels play a key role in determining the qualitative and quantitative characteristics, reliability and health effects associated with emissions. This paper reports the preparation of polysaccharide (PS) based emulsifier for stable blending of petroleum diesel-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and investigated the influence of H2O2 as diesel fuel blends on the physicochemical properties and characteristics. The quantity of PS-emulsifier was kept at 5 volume % (vol. %) and the volume ratio of H2O2 were varied 5-15 vol. % to reference diesel (RD), respectively. The blended diesel/H2O2 fuel were prepared under inert oxygen (O2) gas closed heating system; afterthought, physiochemical properties of diesel/H2O2 blend were evaluated at standard ASTM D-975 testing method. The kinetic properties show the interaction of RD and H2O2 blend at presence of PS emulsifier which exhibit the phenomenon to diminish the interfacial tension among the two different phases to form a homogenized stable solution. Results revealed that H2O2 is capable of enhancing the diesel fuel properties and showed that the addition of H2O2 in a diesel fuel blend are lied within the ranges of standard ASTM D-975. Due to further oxygen atom present in H2O2, it can facilitate the combustion process which ultimately effect on exhaust emission.

  7. Enzymatic degradation behavior of nanoclay reinforced biodegradable PLA/PBSA blend composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malwela, Thomas; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Films of a biodegradable PLA/PBSA blend and blend-composites containing 2wt% of C20A, C30B and MEE were prepared by solvent casting and spin coating. The films were incubated in vials containing Tris-HCl buffer with Proteinase K, and their weight losses were measured after enzymatic degradation. The surface morphology before and after degradation tests was studied by SEM and in situ AFM. The results showed that neat PLA had a lower percentage weight loss than neat PBSA, whereas blending them resulted in an increased weight loss. The incorporation of C20A into the as-prepared blend accelerated the degradation rate, whereas C30B and MEE decelerated the degradation rate. Annealing at 70°C reduced the degradation rate of the blend, and the presence of nanoclays further reduced the degradation rates. Annealing at 120°C dramatically decelerated the degradation of the blend, whereas the incorporation of nanoclays accelerated the degradations rates. The enhancement of the degradation rates in the presence of nanoclays indicated that the degradation rates were mainly controlled by the PLA matrix. Thin films were also cast onto a silicon substrate using a spin coater, and enzymatic degradation on the completely crystalline surfaces revealed that enzymatic attack occurred by pitting and surface erosion of the thin films. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Swelling and tribological properties of melt-mixed fluoroelastomer/nitrile rubber blends under crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagelsir, Yasin; Li, San-Xi; Lv, Xiaoren; Wang, Shijie; Wang, Song; Osman, Zeinab

    2018-01-01

    The melt-mixed fluoroelastomer (FKM)/ nitrile rubber (NBR) blends of (90/10, 80/20, 70/30, 60/40 and 50/50) ratios with same hardness were prepared, and their swelling and tribological properties under crude oil were investigated for the purpose of developing high performance cost-effective elastomers meeting requirement of oil extraction progressive cavity pump stator. Differential scanning calorimetry confirmed compatible blend system for all blends. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed co-continuous morphology of 200–400 nm phase size for all blends, expect FKM/NBR (90/10) which exhibited partially continuous phase morphology of 100–250 nm phase size. The results of swelling and linear wear tests under crude oil indicated that swelling percentage, coefficient of friction and specific wear rate of FKM/NBR blends were much better than NBR, with FKM/NBR (90/10 and 80/20) showing swelling percentage and specific wear rate very close to FKM. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy disclosed that fracture of macromolecular chains was the main mechanochemical effect of unswollen and swollen worn surfaces, in addition to oxygenated degradation detected with increasing NBR ratio in the blends. The fracture of macromolecular chains resulted in slight fatigue wear mechanism, which was also confirmed by FE-SEM of the worn surfaces.

  9. Effects of moisture and coal blending on Hardgrove Grindability Index of Western Australian coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B.; Zhang, D.K.; Yan, H.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box 1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Brooke, R.J. [Wesfarmers Premier Coal Limited, P.O. Box 21, Premier Road, Collie, Western Australia 6225 (Australia)

    2003-04-15

    Investigations into the effects of moisture and coal blending on Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI) were carried out on Collie coal of Western Australia. Experiments were conducted in a standard Hardgrove apparatus on four individual Premier seam coals (namely P2, P3, P4 and Hebe) and several blends (namely Hebe/P2, Hebe/P3, Hebe/P4, Hebe/P2/P4) prepared at various blending ratios. The experiments comprised of 5 days of air-drying followed by oven drying. Among the coal seams tested, Hebe showed the highest HGI (58) whereas P4 was the lowest (47). HGI was found to correlate well with residual moisture, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.5 to 0.9 depending on the type of coal seam or blend. In contrast, moisture measurements on the samples loaded into the HGI apparatus (size 0.600 to 1.180 mm), referred to as the 'coarse fraction' showed erratic trends with HGI. The experimental results suggest that no relationship exist between the coarse fraction moisture and HGI. Measured HGI values of binary and ternary blends were found to correspond well with the weighted average values of HGI within {+-}2 HGI units. This effect was confirmed by a further investigation with a range of 11 binary (P3/Hebe) blends of various proportions.

  10. Treeing phenomenon of thermoplastic polyethylene blends for recyclable cable insulation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunzhi Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its good recyclability and low processing energy consumption, non-crosslinked polyethylene blends (e.g. LLDPE-HDPE blends are considered as one of potential environmental-friendly substitutions for crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE as cable insulation material. Although extensive work has been performed for measuring the basic dielectric properties, there is a lack of the investigations on the aging properties for such a material system, which hinders the evaluation of reliability and lifetime of the material for cable insulation. In this paper, we study the electric aging phenomenon of 0.7LLDPE-0.3HDPE blending material by investigating the treeing behavior, and its comparison with XLPE and LLDPE. Treeing tests show that the 0.7LLDPE-0.3HDPE blends have lower probability for treeing as well as smaller treeing dimensions. Further thermal analysis and microstructure study results suggest that the blends exhibit larger proportion of thick lamellae and higher crystallinity with homogeneously-distributed amorphous region, which is responsible for good anti-treeing performance. Our finding provides the evidence that the 0.7LLDPE-0.3HDPE blends exhibits better electric-aging-retardance properties than XLPE, which may result in a potential application for cable insulation.

  11. Tuberculin skin test result and risk of death among persons with active TB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C Auld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the tuberculin skin test (TST is frequently used to aid in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB disease and to identify persons with latent TB infection, it is an imperfect test and approximately 10-25% of persons with microbiologically confirmed TB disease have a negative TST. Previous studies have suggested that persons with a negative TST are more likely to present with severe TB disease and have an increased rate of TB-related death. METHODS: We analyzed culture-confirmed TB cases captured in US TB surveillance data from 1993 to 2008 and performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine the association between TST result and death. RESULTS: Of 284,866 cases of TB reported in the US, 58,180 persons were eligible for inclusion in the analysis and 3,270 of those persons died after initiating TB treatment. Persons with a negative TST accounted for only 14% of the eligible cases but accounted for 42% of the deaths. Persons with a TST≥15 mm had 67% lower odds of death than persons with a negative TST (adjusted odds ratio 0.33, 95% confidence interval 0.30-0.36. CONCLUSIONS: A negative TST is associated with an increased risk of death among persons with culture-confirmed TB disease, even after adjustment for HIV status, site of TB disease, sputum smear AFB status, drug susceptibility, age, sex, and origin of birth. In addition to indicating risk of developing disease, the TST may also be a marker for increased risk of death.

  12. Higher alcohol–biodiesel–diesel blends: An approach for improving the performance, emission, and combustion of a light-duty diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imdadul, H.K.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Zulkifli, N.W.M.; Alabdulkarem, Abdullah; Rashed, M.M.; Teoh, Y.H.; How, H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The fuel properties of higher alcohol blended biodiesel were improved. • Higher alcohol shows remarkable increase in the BP, BTE and decrease the BSFC. • Alcohols mixed with biodiesel diminishes HC, CO and smoke significantly. • CO 2 emissions of pentanol blended fuel decreases at maximum speed. • Higher alcohol blended biodiesel showed improved combustion. - Abstract: Pentanol is a long-chain alcohol with five carbons in its molecular structure and is produced from renewable feedstock, which may help to improve the challenging problems of energy security and environmental issues. In this investigation, the performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of a single-cylinder, four-stroke, water-cooled, direct-injection diesel engine were evaluated by using 10%, 15%, and 20% pentanol and Calophyllum inophyllum (CI) biodiesel blends in diesel under different speed conditions. The fuel properties of the blended fuels were measured and compared. Combustion attributes, such as cylinder pressure and heat-release rate, were also analyzed. Results indicated that increasing the proportion of pentanol in biodiesel blends improved the fuel properties compared with 20% blend of CI biodiesel (CI 20). The modified blends of pentanol showed reduced brake-specific fuel consumption with higher brake thermal efficiency and brake power than CI 20. Although the modified test blends showed a slightly higher nitric oxide emission, the carbon monoxide emission and unburned hydrocarbon emission for 15% and 20% blends of pentanol showed even better reduction than CI 20. Smoke emission was also reduced significantly. The carbon dioxide emission of the test blends were reduced at the maximum speed condition compared to CI 20. In terms of combustion, the modified test fuels exhibited a significant improvement, thus indicating better performance and emission. This study concluded that the 15% and 20% blends of biodiesel, diesel, and pentanol can optimize engine

  13. [Sexual risk behaviours and PAP testing in university women vaccinated against human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Feito, Ana; Antón-Fernández, Raquel; Paz-Zulueta, María

    2017-08-31

    To estimate the association between the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and sexual risk behaviour, as well as the participation in the Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP). Cross-sectional study. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Law, and School of Economics and Business (University of Oviedo). Female university students. Information was collected about contraceptive methods, sexual behaviours, HPV knowledge, and participation in the CCSP. Furthermore, proportions and odds ratio (OR) were estimated with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Approximately two-thirds (67.7%) of the sample was vaccinated against HPV, and 216 women (65.3%) were sexually active. Barrier contraceptive methods were used by 67.6% during their current intimate relationships, being less frequent in non-vaccinated women (54.9% vs. 75.4% in vaccinated female students) (P=.002). The risk of having at least one sexual risk behaviour was higher in non-vaccinated women: OR2.29 (95%CI: 1.29-4.07). In addition, the probability of having a PAP test within the CCSP was higher in non-vaccinated women: OR2.18 (95%CI: 1.07-4.47). The prevalence of sexual risk behaviours in non-vaccinated women is elevated, and it is related to the lack of use of barrier contraceptive methods. The vaccination against HPV could affect sexual behaviours and the participation in the CCSP. Therefore, the information received by young people about contraceptive methods, sexually transmitted diseases, and cancer prevention should be reinforced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Pilot Test of a Culturally Appropriate Diabetes Prevention Intervention for At-Risk Latina Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurley, Jessica L; Fortmann, Addie L; Gutierrez, Angela P; Gonzalez, Patricia; Euyoque, Johanna; Clark, Taylor; Preciado, Jessica; Ahmad, Aakif; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Gallo, Linda C

    2017-12-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to test the preliminary effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of a peer-led, culturally appropriate, Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)-based lifestyle intervention for Latina women at high-risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Participants (N = 61) were overweight/obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥25) Latina women with no diabetes, at elevated risk either due to midlife age (45-65 years; n = 37) or history of gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 24). The study used a 1-group pretest-posttest design and offered 12 weeks of peer-led education sessions in a community setting. The intervention targeted physical activity and dietary behaviors to facilitate weight reduction and included culturally appropriate content, age-specific health information, and stress/emotion management strategies. Clinical and self-report assessments were conducted at baseline, month 3, and month 6. Results Mean participant age was 47.8 years (SD = 10.8). Most (91.2%) were born in Mexico, and 43.3% had a ninth-grade education or less. At month 6, participants achieved a mean reduction of 4.1% body weight (7 lb [3.2 kg]). Statistically significant improvements were observed for dietary behaviors, stress, and depression symptoms. Attrition was low, 5% (3 women). Focus groups indicated that intervention content increased knowledge, was applicable, highly valued, culturally relevant, and would be recommended to others. Conclusions This culturally tailored DPP adaptation was feasible and acceptable for 2 groups of Latina women at high-risk for T2DM and showed preliminary effectiveness in reducing weight and modifying self-reported dietary behaviors, stress, and depression symptoms. Further research is needed to identify ways to enhance weight loss and diabetes prevention in this at-risk, underserved population.

  15. Environmental risk assessment of selected organic chemicals based on TOC test and QSAR estimation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yulang; Zhang, Huanteng; Huang, Qiansheng; Lin, Yi; Ye, Guozhu; Zhu, Huimin; Dong, Sijun

    2018-02-01

    Environmental risks of organic chemicals have been greatly determined by their persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity (PBT) and physicochemical properties. Major regulations in different countries and regions identify chemicals according to their bioconcentration factor (BCF) and octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow), which frequently displays a substantial correlation with the sediment sorption coefficient (Koc). Half-life or degradability is crucial for the persistence evaluation of chemicals. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) estimation models are indispensable for predicting environmental fate and health effects in the absence of field- or laboratory-based data. In this study, 39 chemicals of high concern were chosen for half-life testing based on total organic carbon (TOC) degradation, and two widely accepted and highly used QSAR estimation models (i.e., EPI Suite and PBT Profiler) were adopted for environmental risk evaluation. The experimental results and estimated data, as well as the two model-based results were compared, based on the water solubility, Kow, Koc, BCF and half-life. Environmental risk assessment of the selected compounds was achieved by combining experimental data and estimation models. It was concluded that both EPI Suite and PBT Profiler were fairly accurate in measuring the physicochemical properties and degradation half-lives for water, soil, and sediment. However, the half-lives between the experimental and the estimated results were still not absolutely consistent. This suggests deficiencies of the prediction models in some ways, and the necessity to combine the experimental data and predicted results for the evaluation of environmental fate and risks of pollutants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effect of blend ratio of PP/kapok blend nonwoven fabrics on oil sorption capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Do-Hyung; Shin, Min-Seung; Jung, Young-Jin; Lee, Dong-Jin; Kim, Han-Do

    2013-01-01

    More research and development on novel oil sorbent materials is needed to protect the environmental pollution. New nonwoven fabrics (pads) of polypropylene (PP)/kapok blends (blend ratio: 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75 and 10/90) were prepared by needle punching process at a fixed (optimized) condition (punch density: 50 punches/cm2 and depth: 4mm). This study focused on the effect of blend ratio of PP/kapok nonwoven fabrics on oil sorption capacities to find the best blend ratio having the highest synergy effect. The PP/kapok blend (50/50) sample has the lowest bulk density and showed the best oil absorption capacity. The oil sorption capacity of PP/kapok blend (50/50) nonwoven fabric for kerosene/soybean oil [21.09/27.01 (g oil/g sorbent)] was 1.5-2 times higher than those of commercial PP pad oil sorbents. The highest synergy effect of PP/kapok blend (50/50) was ascribed to the lowest bulk density of PP/kapok blend (50/50), which might be due to the highest morphologically incompatibility between PP fibre and kapok. These results suggest that the PP/kapok blend (50/50) having the highest synergy effect has a high potential as a new high-performance oil sorbent material.

  17. A blending rule for octane numbers of PRFs and TPRFs with ethanol

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2016-04-12

    Ethanol is widely used as an octane booster in commercial gasoline fuels. Its oxygenated nature aids in reducing harmful emissions such as nitric oxides (NOx), soot and unburned hydrocarbons (HC). However, the non-linear octane response of ethanol blending with gasoline fuels is not completely understood because of the unknown intermolecular interactions in such blends. In general, when ethanol is blended with gasoline, the Research Octane Number (RON) and the Motor Octane Number (MON) non-linearly increase (synergistic) or decrease (antagonistic), and the non-linearity depends on the composition of the base gasoline. The complexity of commercial gasoline, comprising of hundreds of different components, makes it challenging to understand ethanol-gasoline synergistic/antagonistic blending effects. Understanding ethanol blending effects with simpler gasoline surrogates blends may enable a better understanding of ethanol blending with complex multi-component gasoline fuels. This study presents a blending rule to predict the octane numbers (ON) of ethanol/primary reference fuel (PRF; mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane) and ethanol/toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF; mixtures of toluene, iso-octane and n-heptane) mixtures using the data available in literature and new data. The ON of ethanol blends with PRF-40, -50, and -60 were measured and compared with those from literature. Additional experimental data were collected to validate the developed model for ethanol blends of three different TPRFs having the same RON but different MON (i.e., different toluene contents). The three tested TPRF mixtures have octane ratings of RON 60.0/MON 58.0 (toluene 10.2 vol%), RON 60.0/MON 56.3 (toluene 19.8 vol%), and RON 60.0/MON 53.2 (toluene 40.2 vol%). The octane prediction model consists of linear and non-linear by mole regions. The transition point between the linear and non-linear regions is a function of the RON and MON of the base PRF and TPRF mixture. The non-linear by

  18. Investigation of Lubrication Properties of Petroleum Fuel and Biohydrocarbon Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawron Bartosz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers issues regarding lubricity of petroleum fuels used in piston and turbine engines, containing hydrocarbon biocomponents. Basing on available literature it can be said that the most prospective fuel components are biohydrocarbons. The paper describes effect of biohydrocarbons included in aviation fuel and diesel fuel on lubricity of such blends. The analysis covers two processes for obtaining biohydrocarbons, the HVO and the Fischer-Tropsch process. Due to problems with actual products acquiring, biohydrocarbons models representing chemically the actual ones from specific process. Lubricity testing was carried out according to standard test methods.

  19. Hyperspectral imaging of polymer/fullerene blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Tinti, Francesca; Savoini, Alberto; Melchiorre, Michele; Po, Riccardo; Camaioni, Nadia

    2014-10-01

    The effectiveness of a hyperspectral imaging system integrated on an enhanced dark-field microscope for probing the microscale morphology of model poly(3- hexylthiopene): [6,6]-phenyl-C61- butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) blends is demonstrated. This non-contact technique provides both spectral and spatial information in one measurement, providing an effective mapping of the presence and location of the component materials in the investigated P3HT:PCBM blends spincoated over different substrates (zinc oxide, poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate). The hyperspectral analysis accounts for the micro-scale morphology of P3HT:PCBM blends, even in case of high film roughness, and the quantitative determination of blend components reveals a preferential accumulation of the lowenergy material (P3HT) at the interface with air, confirming the findings reported with other mapping techniques

  20. Constructivism Based Blended Learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mhammad Al-Huneidi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explain how to apply Constructivism and Conversation theories in Blended Learning environment in order to increase learning outcomes and quality. Some scenarios of Constructivism based blended learning activities are presented in this paper. In addition, a Constructivism Based Blended Learning model for “ICT Management” course, a compulsory course in Master of Management Information Systems program at Hasselt University, is proposed. The proposed model applies and combines Constructivism and Conversation theories in Blended Learning environment, in which the student is an active maker of knowledge. In the proposed model a variety of learning activities and scenarios, differentiated for working students and regular students are applied, supported by innovative ICT tools, which facilitate applying Constructivism and Conversation theories and increase the level of communication and interaction between students, as a result, learning quality, experience and outcomes are increased effectively.