WorldWideScience

Sample records for testing activity

  1. Active damper wind tunnel test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Active damper wind tunnel test in support of the development of Constellation/Ares. Testing of the 1% and .548% models for active damper and wall interference assessment in support of the Ares/CLV integrated vehicle. This test occurred at the 11 foot wind tunnel at the Ames Research Center, California. This image is extracted from high definition video file and is the highest resolution available.

  2. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  3. Standardization Activities in TMF Test Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, M. J.; Castelli, M. G.; Bressers, J.; Oehmke, R. L. T.

    1996-01-01

    No standard test practice currently exists for strain-controlled thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) testing. This paper discusses recent activities which lay the foundation for standardization of TMF test methods. Specifically, the paper documents the results of two interlaboratory TMF test programs, identifies key TMF symposia and workshops, and discusses efforts toward drafting a TMF standard test practice.

  4. Basophil-activation tests in hymenoptera allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Anthony E. J.; van der Heide, Sicco

    The measurement of basophil-activation markers may be useful in detecting IgIE-mediated sensitization but the relevance for application of the basophil-activation test in prediction of clinical reactivity in Hymenoptera allergy is very limited. For this reason, this test currently has no established

  5. Electrolysis activities at FCH Test Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn Nielsen, Eva; Nygaard, Frederik Berg

    FCH Test Center for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies was established in 2010 at Risø DTU in Denmark. Today, the test center is part of DTU Energy Conversion. The center gives industry access to advanced testing and demonstration of components and systems. A number of national projects and EU p...... projects regarding water electrolysis involve FCH Test Center as a partner. This presentation gives an overview of the activities....

  6. Development and Testing of Active Groundwater Samplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Bertel; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Andersen, Lars Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Active groundwater sampling techniques are methods where the aquifer is flushed by pumping. The methods developed and tested represent non-dedicated methods for use in existing water wells. This paper describes two different sampling techniques: the Separation Pumping Technique (SP) and the Packer...... on numerical modelling and controlled laboratory experiments. Active groundwater sampling techniques can be used for remedial pumping optimization and in obtaining hydraulic data and represent a fast operational and reliable sampling tool, also under heterogeneous and low permeability conditions....

  7. Future testing of active safety systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, F.M.; Pelders, H.A.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Active safety systems are increasingly becoming available in trucks and passenger vehicles. Developments in the field of active safety are shifting from increasing driver comfort towards increasing occupant safety. Furthermore, this shift is seen within active safety systems: safety functions are

  8. 26 CFR 1.141-2 - Private activity bond tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... test and private security or payment test of section 141(b) or the private loan financing test of section 141(c). The private business use and private security or payment tests are described in §§ 1.141-3... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Private activity bond tests. 1.141-2 Section 1...

  9. Active fault diagnosis based on stochastic tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on stochastic change detection applied in connection with active fault diagnosis (AFD). An auxiliary input signal is applied in AFD. This signal injection in the system will in general allow us to obtain a fast change detection/isolation by considering the output...

  10. Severe Accident Test Station Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing safety margins in light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents is currently the focus of a number of international R&D programs. The current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system is particularly susceptible since the Zr-based cladding experiences rapid oxidation kinetics in steam at elevated temperatures. Therefore, alternative cladding materials that offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012. This report summarizes the capabilities of the SATS and provides an overview of the oxidation kinetics of several candidate cladding materials. A suggested baseline for evaluating ATF candidates is a two order of magnitude reduction in the steam oxidation resistance above 1000ºC compared to Zr-based alloys. The ATF candidates are categorized based on the protective external oxide or scale that forms during exposure to steam at high temperature: chromia, alumina, and silica. Comparisons are made to literature and SATS data for Zr-based alloys and other less-protective materials.

  11. Junction temperature estimation for an advanced active power cycling test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jørgensen, S.

    2015-01-01

    estimation method using on-state VCE for an advanced active power cycling test is proposed. The concept of the advanced power cycling test is explained first. Afterwards the junction temperature estimation method using on-state VCE and current is presented. Further, the method to improve the accuracy...

  12. Effects of Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity on Mathematics Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David S.; Hannon, James C.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of physical activity on academic performance in school-based settings is under researched. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between a single, vigorous (70-85%) bout of physical activity completed during physical education on standardized mathematics test performance among 72, eighth grade students…

  13. Activities preceding a decline in the paratuberculosis test prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils

    . A challenge in evaluation of activities in a national programme it is essentially a sample size of one without a control group. Therefore, the apparent effect of activities on programme level can only be descriptive. Our objective was to describe the decline in the test-prevalence along with the activities...... for a “continuous” flow of diagnostic test information four times annually in each herd. This information can be used for detection and management of infectious animals and for prevalence monitoring....... preceding this decline. The cohort of herds enrolled in 2006-2007 had an average estimated within-herd test-prevalence of 10% at start. By January 2014 this had declined to 2%. The test-prevalence in the cohort of herds enrolled in 2008-2010 started at approximately 6% and by January 2014 was reduced...

  14. The test-retest reliability of habitual incidental physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Gavin; Giles-Corti, Billie; Milligan, Rex

    2003-01-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability of items measuring habitual incidental physical activity, incidental physical activity behaviour and sedentary behaviours. Eighty-four subjects aged 18-65 years were interviewed from randomly selected households within metropolitan and rural Western Australia. Subjects were administered the interview on two separate occasions 10 days apart. Subjects were asked about habitual incidental physical activity (i.e. bouts performed for 10 minutes or less) performed during the week and on weekends. Intraclass correlations performed for items measuring incidental physical activity were generally found to be low to moderate. The frequency of incidental physical activity was more reliably recalled than the average duration spent on short trips (ICC 0.582 to 0.872 compared with 273 to 0.551). Kappa coefficients for habitual incidental physical activity behaviour items were observed to have moderate-to-high (0.478 to 0.939) agreement between administrations. Sedentary behaviours overall showed high test-retest reliability (ICC 0.646 to 0.925). These findings demonstrate that adults can reliably recall the frequency, but not the duration, of habitual incidental physical activity. Thus, the frequency measured by these items could be used to determine the effectiveness of current Australian physical activity guidelines and possibly identify shifts in incidental physical activity behaviour over time. Measurement of physical activity in all domains including incidental physical activity is required to determine the effectiveness of current guidelines and implemented health promotion interventions.

  15. Active control rotor model testing at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description of the model helicopter rotor tests currently in progress at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory is presented. The tests are designed to provide data for rotor dynamic modeling for use with active control system design. The model rotor to be used incoporates the capability for Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control through the use of a standard swashplate on a three bladed hub. Sample results from the first series of tests are presented, along with the methodology used for state and parameter identification. Finally, pending experiments and possible research directions using this model and test facility are outlined.

  16. Test-Takers' Background, Literacy Activities, and Views of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Klinger, Don A.; Cheng, Liying; Fox, Janna; Doe, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among students' background information and their in-school and after-school literacy activities, as well as the relationships between students' background and their views of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). The results showed that students' literacy activities could be grouped into three…

  17. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 6: Water ejector plume tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcginnis, F. K.; Summerhays, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Results are given of vacuum testing of nozzles designed to eject water vapor away from the space shuttle to prevent contamination of the spacecraft surfaces and payload. The water vapor is generated by an active cooling system which evaporates excess fuel cell water to supplement a modular radiator system (MRS). The complete heat rejection system including the MRS, flash evaporator or sublimator and nozzle were first tested to demonstrate the system operational characteristics. The plume tests were performed in two phases and the objectives of this test series were: (1) to determine the effectiveness of a supersonic nozzle and a plugged nozzle in minimizing impingement upon the spacecraft of water vapor exhausted by an active device (flash evaporator or sublimator); and (2) to obtain basic data on the flow fields of exhaust plumes generated by these active devices, both with and without nozzles installed.

  18. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 4BMS-X Design and Test Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Warren T.; Knox, James C.

    2017-01-01

    In support of the NASA goals to reduce power, volume and mass requirements on future CO2 (Carbon Dioxide) removal systems for exploration missions, a 4BMS (Four Bed Molecular Sieve) test bed was fabricated and activated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The 4BMS-X (Four Bed Molecular Sieve-Exploration) test bed used components similar in size, spacing, and function to those on the flight ISS flight CDRA system, but were assembled in an open framework. This open framework allows for quick integration of changes to components, beds and material systems. The test stand is highly instrumented to provide data necessary to anchor predictive modeling efforts occurring in parallel to testing. System architecture and test data collected on the initial configurations will be presented.

  20. Determinants of HIV Testing Among Sexually Active Young People ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study used data from the 2013 Zambia Demographic Health Survey (ZDHS) based on a nationally representative sample carried out by Central Statistical Office of Zambia. This paper analyzed a special module designed to collect information on the extent of the uptake of HIV testing by sexually active young people in ...

  1. Test-to-test variability in motor activity during the suggested immobilization test in restless legs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba-Rubio, José; Sforza, Emilia

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the test-to-test variability of the suggested immobilization test (SIT) in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Twenty patients with primary RLS (12 men and eight women; age: 53.3+/-11.3 years) were selected for the study. We compared the results of two SITs performed on two consecutive evenings prior to polysomnographic recordings. Overall, the periodic leg movement index during the SIT (SIT PLM) and the SIT PLM index associated with sensory manifestations (SIT PLM+) were not significantly different between tests. The number of PLM sequences per SIT, the mean PLM duration and the PLM interval did not significantly change between the two consecutive tests. The pattern of temporal evolution of motor activity across the SIT was very reproducible, SIT PLM showing a clear tendency to a progressive increase across the test, with the SIT PLM+ index decreasing in the second half of the test. Despite good reproducibility, there were marked intra-individual differences. Considering the proposed cut-off value of 12 for the SIT PLM index to confirm RLS, 11 patients were positive at the first test and four additional patients became positive at the second test. SIT PLM index changes did not correlate with age, severity of disease and polysomnographic measures. Quantitative analysis of motor activity during two consecutive SITs in RLS patients showed a significant inter-test intra-individual variability unrelated to demographic, clinical or polysomnographic parameters. SIT PLM index variability suggests that a single test would not be sensitive enough for diagnostic purposes in unclear cases and that new criteria need to be applied to increase its specificity and sensitivity.

  2. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F. [Informatics Corp., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scripsick, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  3. Oratest: A new concept to test caries activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saxena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Caries activity tests are based on the concept of a specific odontogenic infection, the principle causative organism being streptococci mutans. Their predominance is attributed to its acidogenic and aciduric nature after a selective growth advantages over the other non- acid tolerant organisms. Many studies on caries activity are aimed at finding relevant microorganisms. Till date, the ideal method to evaluate in terms of sensitivity, specialization and reliability has not been found. Many of these caries activity tests require extensive work up time and additional equipment. Rosenberg et al. in 1989 developed Oratest, a simple, economical, non- invasive and less time-consuming test for estimating the oral microbial level. The test is simple and consists of rinsing the mouth with 10 ml of sterile milk, 3 ml of which is mixed with 0.12 ml of 0.1% methylene blue dye and observed for colour change. The present study sample consists of twenty five children with dental caries and twenty five controls, free of caries, gingivitis and other oral ailments. This study is being conducted in the department of Oral Pathology & Microbiology and is in the preliminary phase so further results are awaited.

  4. Test-re-test reproducibility of activity capacity measures for children with an acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baque, Emmah; Barber, Lee; Sakzewski, Leanne; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2016-01-01

    To determine test-re-test reproducibility of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, 30-second repetition maximum (repmax) of functional exercises, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and High-level Mobility Assessment Tool (HiMAT) in children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). Secondarily, to assess the accuracy between hand-timed and video-timed scores for the TUG test and HiMAT. Thirty children at least 1 year post-ABI (mean age at assessment = 11 years 11 months, SD = 2 years 4 months; 14 males; Gross Motor Function Classification Scale I = 17, II = 13) were assessed twice. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of measurement and minimum detectable change (MDC) were determined. The Bland-Altman method and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were used to assess the agreement between hand and video-timed TUG test and HiMAT scores. Test-re-test reproducibility was acceptable for the TUG test (ICC = 0.92; MDC = 1.2s); repmax of functional exercises (ICC = 0.84-0.98; MDC = 4-8 reps); 6MWT (ICC = 0.90; MDC = 69.38 m) and HiMAT (ICC = 0.98; MDC = 6). Comparison of hand and video scores for the TUG test and HiMAT demonstrated a mean difference of 0.23 (LOA = -0.3-0.7) and -0.07 (LOA = -1.99-1.85), respectively. Conclusions Test-re-test reproducibility of lower limb activity capacity measures in children with ABI are acceptable. The MDC scores provide a useful reference to interpret treatment effectiveness. Video timing was more accurate than hand-timing for the TUG test.

  5. The basophil activation test in immediate-type drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Oliver V; Gentinetta, Thomas; Bridts, Chris H; Ebo, Didier G

    2009-08-01

    Diagnosis of drug allergy involves first the recognition of sometimes unusual symptoms as drug allergy and, second, the identification of the eliciting drug. This is an often difficult task, as the clinical picture and underlying pathomechanisms are heterogeneous. In clinical routine, physicians frequently have to rely upon a suggestive history and eventual provocation tests, both having their specific limitations. For this reason both in vivo (skin tests) and in vitro tests are investigated intensively as tools to identify the disease-eliciting drug. One of the tests evaluated in drug allergy is the basophil activation test (BAT). Basophils with their high-affinity IgE receptors are easily accessible and therefore can be used as indicator cells for IgE-mediated reactions. Upon allergen challenge and cross-linking of membrane-bound IgE antibodies (via Fc-epsilon-RI) basophils up-regulate certain activation markers on their surface such as CD63 and CD203c, as well as intracellular markers (eg, phosphorylated p38MAPK). In BAT, these alterations can be detected rapidly on a single-cell basis by multicolor flow cytometry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Combining this technique with in vitro passive sensitization of donor basophils with patients' serum, one can prove the IgE dependence of a drug reaction. This article summarizes the authors' current experience with the BAT in the diagnostic management of immediate-type drug allergy mediated by drug-specific IgE antibodies.

  6. On-sky Testing of the Active Phasing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonté, Frédéric; Araujo, Constanza; Bourtembourg, Reynald; Brast, Roland; Derie, Frédéric; Duhoux, Philippe; Dupuy, Christophe; Frank, Christophe; Karban, Robert; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Noethe, Lothar; Sedghi, Babak; Surdej, Isabelle; Yaitskova, Natalia; Luong, Bruno; Chueca, Sergio; Reyes, Marcos; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Quiros Pacheco, Fernando; Dohlen, Kjetil; Vigan, Arthur

    2009-06-01

    The Active Phasing Experiment (APE) has been used by ESO to gain experience in controlling segmented primary mirrors in preparation for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The experiment tested various phasing techniques and explored their advantages and limitations. Four optical phasing sensors were developed using different techniques — a curvature sensor, a pyramid sensor, a Shack-Hartmann sensor and a sensor based on a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The design of the APE instrument is described. APE was installed at the VLT visitor focus for on-sky testing and a brief summary of the results of the experiment is given.

  7. The Activity of Antimicrobial Surfaces Varies by Testing Protocol Utilized.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias D Campos

    Full Text Available Contaminated hospital surfaces are an important source of nosocomial infections. A major obstacle in marketing antimicrobial surfaces is a lack of efficacy data based on standardized testing protocols.We compared the efficacy of multiple testing protocols against several "antimicrobial" film surfaces.Four clinical isolates were used: one Escherichia coli, one Klebsiella pneumoniae, and two Staphylococcus aureus strains. Two industry methods (modified ISO 22196 and ASTM E2149, a "dried droplet", and a "transfer" method were tested against two commercially available antimicrobial films, one film in development, an untreated control, and a positive (silver control film. At 2 (only ISO and 24 hours following inoculation, bacteria were collected from film surfaces and enumerated.Compared to untreated films in all protocols, there were no significant differences in recovery on either commercial brand at 2 or 24 hours after inoculation. The silver surface demonstrated significant microbicidal activity (mean loss 4.9 Log10 CFU/ml in all methods and time points with the exception of 2 hours in the ISO protocol and the transfer method. Using our novel droplet method, no differences between placebo and active surfaces were detected. The surface in development demonstrated variable activity depending on method, organism, and time point. The ISO demonstrated minimal activity at 2 hours but significant activity at 24 hours (mean 4.5 Log10 CFU/ml difference versus placebo. The ASTEM protocol exhibited significant differences in recovery of staphylococci (mean 5 Log10 CFU/ml but not Gram-negative isolates (10 fold decrease. Minimal activity was observed with this film in the transfer method.Varying results between protocols suggested that efficacy of antimicrobial surfaces cannot be easily and reproducibly compared. Clinical use should be considered and further development of representative methods is needed.

  8. Adaptive and robust active vibration control methodology and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Ioan Doré; Castellanos-Silva, Abraham; Constantinescu, Aurelian

    2017-01-01

    This book approaches the design of active vibration control systems from the perspective of today’s ideas of computer control. It formulates the various design problems encountered in the active management of vibration as control problems and searches for the most appropriate tools to solve them. The experimental validation of the solutions proposed on relevant tests benches is also addressed. To promote the widespread acceptance of these techniques, the presentation eliminates unnecessary theoretical developments (which can be found elsewhere) and focuses on algorithms and their use. The solutions proposed cannot be fully understood and creatively exploited without a clear understanding of the basic concepts and methods, so these are considered in depth. The focus is on enhancing motivations, algorithm presentation and experimental evaluation. MATLAB®routines, Simulink® diagrams and bench-test data are available for download and encourage easy assimilation of the experimental and exemplary material. Thre...

  9. Design and Calibration Tests of an Active Sound Intensity Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kletschkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an active sound intensity probe that can be used for sound source localization in standing wave fields. The probe consists of a sound hard tube that is terminated by a loudspeaker and an integrated pair of microphones. The microphones are used to decompose the standing wave field inside the tube into its incident and reflected part. The latter is cancelled by an adaptive controller that calculates proper driving signals for the loudspeaker. If the open end of the actively controlled tube is placed close to a vibrating surface, the radiated sound intensity can be determined by measuring the cross spectral density between the two microphones. A one-dimensional free field can be realized effectively, as first experiments performed on a simplified test bed have shown. Further tests proved that a prototype of the novel sound intensity probe can be calibrated.

  10. Wind Tunnel Test of the SMART Active Flap Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Anand, Vaidyanthan R.; Birchette, Terrence S.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Boeing and a team from Air Force, NASA, Army, DARPA, MIT, UCLA, and U. of Maryland have successfully completed a wind-tunnel test of the smart material actuated rotor technology (SMART) rotor in the 40- by 80-foot wind-tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. The Boeing SMART rotor is a full-scale, five-bladed bearingless MD 900 helicopter rotor modified with a piezoelectric-actuated trailing edge flap on each blade. The eleven-week test program evaluated the forward flight characteristics of the active-flap rotor at speeds up to 155 knots, gathered data to validate state-of-the-art codes for rotor aero-acoustic analysis, and quantified the effects of open and closed loop active flap control on rotor loads, noise, and performance. The test demonstrated on-blade smart material control of flaps on a full-scale rotor for the first time in a wind tunnel. The effectiveness of the active flap control on noise and vibration was conclusively demonstrated. Results showed significant reductions up to 6dB in blade-vortex-interaction and in-plane noise, as well as reductions in vibratory hub loads up to 80%. Trailing-edge flap deflections were controlled within 0.1 degrees of the commanded value. The impact of the active flap on control power, rotor smoothing, and performance was also demonstrated. Finally, the reliability of the flap actuation system was successfully proven in more than 60 hours of wind-tunnel testing.

  11. Versatile equipment for mechanical testing of active materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, Johannes; Heimgartner, Peter

    2005-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) 3 different project groups presently perform aging research on active materials. The research fields are fusion, high neutron flux targets and LWR relevant components. Up to now mechanical testing has been performed with small, low dose rate samples behind local shielding, not appropriate for highly activated material. To overcome this situation, a cell concept for active mechanical testing was elaborated and has been erected in PSI's Hotlab. It consists of 4 shielded cells. 3 connected cells are versatile and independently operable for highly beta/gamma active samples. One cell is an alpha/beta/gamma-box which will be realized in a second phase. This paper presents the versatility especially of the beta/gamma-cells: The different user groups perform experiments in these cells, whereas different machines can be placed into the cells. As consequence of the need of heavily shielded cell doors, a special strengthening and levelling of the floor has been required. In all cells the relevant media are installed. Besides the performance of the cells, the project progress as the difficulties and their solutions are described. (Author)

  12. Design and preliminary testing of an active intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letechipia, Jorge; Alessi, Aldo; Rodríguez, Gerardo; Asbun, Juan

    2014-07-01

    To enhance bone healing through controlled interfragmentary movements, numerous experiments have been conducted in animal models employing external fixation devices to apply mechanical stimulation to the fracture site. However, the efficacy of these fixators has been questioned. On the other hand, intramedullary nailing is a widely established clinical practice for reducing closed tibial fractures. In an effort to enhance bone healing, to overcome the disadvantages of external fixators (i.e., non-uniform linear movement), and to enhance the advantages of intramedullary nailing (i.e., reduced risk of infection), an active intramedullary nail has been designed and fabricated. Active nail will provide controlled in-situ stimulation (simultaneously axial and shear) from a selectable acceleration (0.35 to 8.17g - axial and 0.44g to 10.46 g - shear), associated to a discreet set of high-frequency values (29.82 - 172.05 Hz - axial and 29.68 to 172.13 - shear). Five active intramedullary nails were fabricated, capable of producing average acceleration between 0.35 and 10.4 g. Acceleration is applied simultaneously by all three axes (x, y, and z), resulting in axial and shear stimulation. For each acceleration level, there are a limited number of frequencies that can be selected. For each frequency, there are a limited number of acceleration levels that can be delivered. Bone morphology produces different levels of acceleration in each axe. Acceleration levels are controlled externally only by the variable power source (1.5VDC to 6VDC). Accelerated in-vitro testing showed that the life of the device exceeded the required active period. Mechanical test showed that in case of failure of the active component, the active intramedullary nail will act as a standard nail, allowing bone healing to continue its normal course. Ex vivo experiments were conducted inserting one active intramedullary nail in two intact adult sheep tibia. Results indicate that the strain induced by the

  13. Factorial Structure of Cognitive Activity Using a Neuropsychological Test Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A general neuropsychological test battery was assembled and individually given to a 98-subject sample, aged 11–12 years old. The battery included some basic and common tests routinely used in the evaluation of language, memory, spatial abilities, concept formation, and praxic abilities. Twenty-five different scores were calculated. A factor analysis with varimax rotation disclosed nine different factors, accounting for about 70% of the variance. Factor I was measured by a Sequential Verbal Memory test and Verbal Fluency subtests (“verbal factor”. Factor II was measured by the Wechsler Memory Scale Visual Memory subtests (immediate and delayed reproduction, and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (copy and immediate reproduction (“non-verbal memory and constructional factor”. Factor III was measured by the WMS Logical Memory subtests (immediate and delayed; “verbal memory factor”. Factor IV was associated with fine movements (tapping subtests, right and left hand; “fine movements factor”. Factor V was specially measured by the Information subtest of the WMS and the Boston Naming Test (“verbal knowledge”. Factor VI represented a “praxic ability factor” (ideomotor praxis tests. Delayed Associative Learning subtest measured Factor VII; and Digits measured Factor VIII. Factor IX was a “mental control factor” (Mental Control subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale. The implications of these results to theories relating to the structure of cognitive activity are discussed.

  14. Comparative activity of carbapenem testing (the COMPACT study) in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, the most common of which are Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Acinetobacter baumannii, are frequent causes of hospital-acquired infections. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro activity of doripenem and comparator carbapenem antibiotics against Gram-negative clinical isolates collected from COMParative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT) study centres in Turkey. Methods Ten centres in Turkey were invited to submit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, and other Gram-negative isolates from intensive care unit (ICU)/non-ICU patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections, bloodstream infections, or nosocomial pneumonia, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, between May and October 2008. Susceptibility was determined by each centre using E-test. A central laboratory performed species confirmation as well as limited susceptibility and quality-control testing. Results Five hundred and ninety six isolates were collected. MIC90 values for doripenem, meropenem, and imipenem, respectively, were 32, ≥ 64, and ≥ 64 mg/L against Pseudomonas spp.; 0.12, 0.12, and 0.5 mg/L against Enterobacteriaceae; and ≥ 64 mg/L for each against other Gram-negative isolates. In determining the susceptibility of hospital isolates of selected Gram-negative pathogens to doripenem, imipenem, and meropenem, we found that against all pathogens combined, the MIC90 for ICU compared with non-ICU isolates was higher. Conclusions Doripenem showed similar or slightly better activity than meropenem and better activity than imipenem against the Gram-negative pathogens collected in Turkey. PMID:22340940

  15. Comparative activity of carbapenem testing (the COMPACT study in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leblebicioglu Hakan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence indicates that Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, the most common of which are Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Acinetobacter baumannii, are frequent causes of hospital-acquired infections. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro activity of doripenem and comparator carbapenem antibiotics against Gram-negative clinical isolates collected from COMParative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT study centres in Turkey. Methods Ten centres in Turkey were invited to submit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, and other Gram-negative isolates from intensive care unit (ICU/non-ICU patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections, bloodstream infections, or nosocomial pneumonia, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, between May and October 2008. Susceptibility was determined by each centre using E-test. A central laboratory performed species confirmation as well as limited susceptibility and quality-control testing. Results Five hundred and ninety six isolates were collected. MIC90 values for doripenem, meropenem, and imipenem, respectively, were 32, ≥ 64, and ≥ 64 mg/L against Pseudomonas spp.; 0.12, 0.12, and 0.5 mg/L against Enterobacteriaceae; and ≥ 64 mg/L for each against other Gram-negative isolates. In determining the susceptibility of hospital isolates of selected Gram-negative pathogens to doripenem, imipenem, and meropenem, we found that against all pathogens combined, the MIC90 for ICU compared with non-ICU isolates was higher. Conclusions Doripenem showed similar or slightly better activity than meropenem and better activity than imipenem against the Gram-negative pathogens collected in Turkey.

  16. Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) Environmental Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, George A.

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  17. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Models And Initial Active Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-04-23

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNPX model simulations and initial testing of the active mode variation of the Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was previously reported.

  18. Market risk stress testing for internationally active financial institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Petar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper develops a comprehensive framework for market risk stress testing in internationally active financial institutions. We begin by defining the scope and type of the stress test and explaining how to select risk factors and the stress time horizon. We then address challenges related to data gathering, followed by in-depth discussion of techniques for developing realistic shock scenarios. Next the process of shock application to a particular portfolio is described, followed by determination of portfolio profit and loss. We conclude by briefly discussing the issue of assigning probability to stress scenarios. We illustrate the framework by considering the development of a ‘worst case’ scenario using global financial market data from Thomson Reuters Datastream.

  19. Utilisation of Wearable Computing for Space Programmes Test Activities Optimasation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, V.; Lazzari, D.; Alemanni, M.

    2004-08-01

    New technologies are assuming a relevant importance in the Space business domain also in the Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) activities allowing process optimization and capability that were unthinkable only few years ago. This paper has the aim to describe Alenia Spazio (ALS) gained experience on the remote interaction techniques as a results of collaborations established both on European Communities (EC) initiatives, with Alenia Aeronautica (ALA) and Politecnico of Torino (POLITO). The H/W and S/W components performances increase and costs reduction due to the home computing massive utilization (especially demanded by the games business) together with the network technology possibility (offered by the web as well as the hi-speed links and the wireless communications) allow today to re-think the traditional AIT process activities in the light of the multimedia data exchange: graphical, voice video and by sure more in the future. Aerospace business confirm its innovation vocation which in the year '80 represents the cradle of the CAD systems and today is oriented to the 3D data visualization/ interaction technologies and remote visualisation/ interaction in collaborative way on a much more user friendly bases (i.e. not for specialists). Fig. 1 collects AIT extended scenario studied and adopted by ALS in these years. ALS experimented two possibilities of remote visualization/interaction: Portable [e.g. Fig.2 Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), Wearable] and walls (e.g.VR-Lab) screens as both 2D/3D visualisation and interaction devices which could support many types of traditional (mainly based on EGSE and PDM/CAD utilisation/reports) company internal AIT applications: 1. design review support 2. facility management 3. storage management 4. personnel training 5. integration sequences definition 6. assembly and test operations follow up 7. documentation review and external access to AIT activities for remote operations (e.g. tele-testing) EGSE Portable Clean room

  20. Specific methanogenic activity test for anaerobic degradation of influents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Athar; Dubey, Shashi Kant

    2017-05-01

    Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) determines the methane-producing capability of the sludge for a specific substrate. Methanogenic activity test can be used to delineate the operating conditions for anaerobic systems and a parameter to assess the system performance by giving a better perceptive of the system and its stability. At the beginning of the start-up period of a new digester, the SMA is of great importance for the determination of proper initial organic loading rate. In different phases, a regular determination of SMA also ascertains the development stages of the sludge. Also, a change in SMA indicates an inhibition or an accumulation of slow degradable or even non-biodegradable organic matter from the influents. This paper reviews the SMA of anaerobic sludge under different operating conditions using different substrates.

  1. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active againstStaphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at 90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  2. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De

    2002-01-01

    on detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de......Bond strength and hermeticity of plasma activated bonded (PAB) Si-Si interfaces are reported. Bonding of 100 mm Si(1 0 0) wafers was performed. An average bond strength of 9.0+/-3.9 MPa was achieved without performing any annealing steps. Cavities bonded in vacuum were found to be hermetic based...

  3. Inflammatory aetiology of human myometrial activation tested using directed graphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available THERE ARE THREE MAIN HYPOTHESES FOR THE ACTIVATION OF THE HUMAN UTERUS AT LABOUR: functional progesterone withdrawal, inflammatory stimulation, and oxytocin receptor activation. To test these alternatives we have taken information and data from the literature to develop causal pathway models for the activation of human myometrium. The data provided quantitative RT-PCR results on key genes from samples taken before and during labour. Principal component analysis showed that pre-labour samples form a homogenous group compared to those during labour. We therefore modelled the alternative causal pathways in non-labouring samples using directed graphs and statistically compared the likelihood of the different models using structural equations and D-separation approaches. Using the computer program LISREL, inflammatory activation as a primary event was highly consistent with the data (p = 0.925, progesterone withdrawal, as a primary event, is plausible (p = 0.499, yet comparatively unlikely, oxytocin receptor mediated initiation is less compatible with the data (p = 0.091. DGraph, a software program that creates directed graphs, produced similar results (p= 0.684, p= 0.280, and p = 0.04, respectively. This outcome supports an inflammatory aetiology for human labour. Our results demonstrate the value of directed graphs in determining the likelihood of causal relationships in biology in situations where experiments are not possible.

  4. Laboratory Testing of Active and Passive UHF RFID Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarovszki Peter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with research of laboratory testing by active and passive UHF tags and therefore mutual coexistence of active and passive RFID technology, which is a part of automatic identification and data capture. In this article we would like to describe an identification of transport unit based on passive technology and also by active technology. We would like to specify, how this technologies can work together and in which application focuses on postal and logistics. All results are verified by measurement in our AIDC laboratory, which is located at the University of Žilina. Our research contains different types of measurements in order to point out the possible influence of these two technologies. The results of our research bring the new point of view and indicate the ways using of UHF RFID technology in postal and logistics applications. At the end of this article is characterized the utilization of the RFID technology in postal logistics chain by using both passive and active technologies.

  5. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  6. Vision-based Ground Test for Active Debris Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Min Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the continuous space development by mankind, the number of space objects including space debris in orbits around the Earth has increased, and accordingly, difficulties of space development and activities are expected in the near future. In this study, among the stages for space debris removal, the implementation of a vision-based approach technique for approaching space debris from a far-range rendezvous state to a proximity state, and the ground test performance results were described. For the vision-based object tracking, the CAM-shift algorithm with high speed and strong performance, and the Kalman filter were combined and utilized. For measuring the distance to a tracking object, a stereo camera was used. For the construction of a low-cost space environment simulation test bed, a sun simulator was used, and in the case of the platform for approaching, a two-dimensional mobile robot was used. The tracking status was examined while changing the position of the sun simulator, and the results indicated that the CAM-shift showed a tracking rate of about 87% and the relative distance could be measured down to 0.9 m. In addition, considerations for future space environment simulation tests were proposed.

  7. German National Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) Testing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habrich, Heinz; Söhne, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The European Global Navigation System (GNSS) Galileo is going to be established in the near future. Currently, four satellites are in place forming the In-Orbit-Testing (IOT) phase. Within the next years, the constellation will be filled. Full Operational Capability (FOC) will be reached 2019. Beside the Open Service (OS) which is comparable to other OS of existing GNSS, e.g., GPS C/A, there is a so-called Public Regulated Service (PRS) included in the IOT satellites already. The PRS will have improved robustness, i.e. robust signals which will be resistant against involuntary interferences, jamming and spoofing. The PRS signal is encrypted and there will be a restricted access to authorized users, e.g. safety and emergency services, authorities with security task, critical infrastructure organizations etc. The access to the PRS which will be controlled through a special key management will be managed and supervised within the European Union (EU) Member States (MS) by national authorities, the Competent PRS Authority (CPA). But a set of Common Minimum Standards (CMS) will define the minimum requirements applicable to each PRS participant. Nevertheless, each MS is responsible for its national key management. This presentation will inform about the testing activities for Galileo PRS in Germany. The coarse concept for the testing is explained, the schedule is outlined. Finally, the paper will formulate some expectations to the Galileo PRS, e.g. for international cooperation.

  8. Positive affect and physical activity: Testing effects on goal setting, activation, prioritisation, and attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David S; Bertenshaw, Emma J; Sheeran, Paschal

    2017-04-23

    The present research tested whether incidental positive affect promotes pursuit of physical activity goals. Four key features of goal pursuit were examined - setting physical activity goals (Study 1), goal activation (Study 2), and goal prioritization and goal attainment (Study 3). Participants (Ns = 80, 81, and 59, in Studies 1-3, respectively) were randomized to positive affect (joy, hope) or neutral affect (control) conditions in each study. Questionnaire measures of goal level, goal commitment, and means selection (Study 1); a lexical decision task indexed goal activation (Study 2), a choice task captured goal prioritization and MET minutes quantified goal attainment (Study 3). Study 1 showed that positive affect led to a greater number of intended physical activities, and that joy engendered greater willingness to try activities. In Study 2, a positive affect induction led to heightened activation of the physical activity goal compared to the control condition. The joy induction in Study 3 led to greater physical activity, and a trend towards greater goal prioritization. These findings suggest that positive affect enhances the pursuit of physical activity goals. Implications for health behavior theories and interventions are outlined.

  9. Mycobactericidal activity of selected disinfectants using a quantitative suspension test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, P A; Babb, J R; Fraise, A P

    1999-02-01

    In this study, a quantitative suspension test carried out under both clean and dirty conditions was used to assess the activity of various instrument and environmental disinfectants against the type strain NCTC 946 and an endoscope washer disinfector isolate of Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium fortuitum NCTC 10,394, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv NCTC 7416 and a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The disinfectants tested were; a chlorine releasing agent, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) at 1000 ppm and 10,000 ppm av Cl; chlorine dioxide at 1100 ppm av ClO2 (Tristel, MediChem International Limited); 70% industrial methylated spirits (IMS); 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde (Asep, Galan); 10% succinedialdehyde and formaldehyde mixture (Gigasept, Schulke & Mayr); 0.35% peracetic acid (NuCidex, Johnson & Johnson); and a peroxygen compound at 1% and 3% (Virkon, Antec International). Results showed that the clinical isolate of MAI was much more resistant than M. tuberculosis to all the disinfectants, while the type strains of M. chelonae and M. fortuitum were far more sensitive. The washer disinfector isolate of M. chelonae was extremely resistant to 2% alkaline activated glutaraldehyde and appeared to be slightly more resistant than the type strain to Nu-Cidex, Gigasept, Virkon and the lower concentration of NaDCC. This study has shown peracetic acid (Nu-Cidex), chlorine dioxide (Tristel), alcohol (IMS) and high concentrations of a chlorine releasing agent (NaDCC) are rapidly mycobactericidal. Glutaraldehyde, although effective, is a slow mycobactericide. Gigasept and Virkon are poor mycobactericidal agents and are not therefore recommended for instruments or spillage if mycobacteria are likely to be present.

  10. Comparative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT) study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Giuseppe; Seifert, Harald; Decker-Burgard, Sabine; Laeuffer, Joerg; Morrissey, Ian; Mutters, Reinier

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the current susceptibility of hospital isolates of contemporary Gram-negative pathogens to the carbapenems doripenem, imipenem and meropenem. Between May and October 2008, seven centres in Germany were invited to collect and submit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae and other Gram-negative bacterial Intensive Care Unit (ICU)/non-ICU isolates from patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs), bloodstream infections (BSIs) or nosocomial pneumonia (NP). Susceptibility was determined at each centre by Etest. A central laboratory performed species confirmation as well as limited susceptibility and quality control testing. In total, 363 isolates were collected, comprising 46.0% Enterobacteriaceae, 45.2% P. aeruginosa, 4.7% Acinetobacter spp. and 4.1% other Gram-negatives. Most isolates (47.9%) were collected from NP, 32.8% were from cIAIs and 19.3% from BSIs; 57.3% were obtained from ICU patients. The MIC(90) values (minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of the isolates) for doripenem, meropenem and imipenem were, respectively, 4, 16 and 32 mg/L against P. aeruginosa, 0.06, 0.06 and 0.5mg/L against Enterobacteriaceae and ≥ 64 mg/L for each carbapenem against other Gram-negative isolates. Using European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints, 81.1%, 75.6% and 79.3% of P. aeruginosa were susceptible to doripenem, imipenem and meropenem, respectively. Against all pathogens combined, MIC(90) values for ICU versus non-ICU isolates, respectively, were 4 mg/L vs. 1mg/L for doripenem, 8 mg/L vs. 1mg/L for meropenem and ≥ 64 mg/L vs. 8 mg/L for imipenem. Doripenem showed comparable activity against P. aeruginosa from patients with BSIs, cIAIs or NP. Similar findings were observed for Enterobacteriaceae and other Gram-negatives, including Acinetobacter spp. Doripenem generally showed similar or slightly better activity than meropenem and better activity than imipenem against Gram

  11. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active against Staphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at ≤1 mg/L and all isolates at ≤2 mg/L (MIC5090, 0.25/2 mg/L. National MRSA rates ranged from a low of 28.8% in Colombia to a high of 68.1% in Chile. All Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae were susceptible to ceftaroline (MIC50/90 values were at ≤0.015/≤0.015 mg/L for both. All Streptococcus pneumoniae were susceptible to ceftaroline, linezolid, tigecycline and vancomycin. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone was at 88.4% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 73.9% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for all S. pneumoniae. Ceftriaxone susceptibility was only at 33.3% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 0.0% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for penicillin-intermediate (penicillin MIC, 4 mg/L strains. All Haemophilus influenzae (29.4% β-lactamase-positive isolates were susceptible to ceftaroline, amoxicillin–clavulanate, ceftriaxone, and levofloxacin. For the Latin American region, the ESBL-phenotype rate was 37.6% for Escherichia coli and 53.3% for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Ceftaroline was not active against ESBL-phenotype strains but was active against >90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  12. Active Thermal Control Experiments for LISA Ground Verification Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Sei; DeBra, Daniel B.

    2006-11-01

    The primary mission goal of LISA is detecting gravitational waves. LISA uses laser metrology to measure the distance between proof masses in three identical spacecrafts. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 × 10-15 m/s2√Hz . Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below 40 pm/√Hz over 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz. Thermal variations due to, for example, solar radiation or temperature gradients across the proof mass housing will distort the spacecraft causing changes in the mass attraction and sensor location. We have developed a thermal control system developed for the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability better than 1 mK/√Hz to f control for the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiation. Thermally stable environment is very demanded for LISA performance verification. In a lab environment specifications can be met with considerable amount of insulation and thermal mass. For spacecraft, the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements simultaneously in the presence of long time delay. A simple proportional plus integral control law presently provides approximately 1 mK/√Hz of thermal stability for over 80 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feed-forward algorithm will extend performance to below 1 mK/√Hz at f < 1 mHz and lower.

  13. LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

    2014-04-03

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although

  14. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Lise, Kristensen,; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics......Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting time tests is a device, used to monitor heparin therapy for the treatment of venous thrombosis or...

  16. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  17. Improving active Mealy machine learning for protocol conformance testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, F.; Kuppens, H.; Tretmans, J.; Vaandrager, F.; Verwer, S.

    2014-01-01

    Using a well-known industrial case study from the verification literature, the bounded retransmission protocol, we show how active learning can be used to establish the correctness of protocol implementation I relative to a given reference implementation R. Using active learning, we learn a model M

  18. Plutonium recycle test reactor characterization activities and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1997-05-01

    Report contains results of PRTR core and associated structures characterization performed in January and February of 1997. Radiation survey data are presented, along with recommendations for stabilization activities before transitioning to a decontamination and decommissioning function. Recommendations are also made about handling the waste generated by the stabilization activities, and actions suggested by the Decontamination and Decommissioning organization.

  19. Modeling motive activation in the Operant Motives Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, J. Malte; Lang, Jonas W. B.; Engeser, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    measures (Lang, 2014) and reports the first analysis of which we are aware that applies this model to OMT data (N = 633) and studies dynamic motive activation in the OMT. Results of this analysis yielded evidence for dynamic motive activation in the OMT and showed that simulated IRT reliabilities based...

  20. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  1. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsang, Chin-Fu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kneafsey, Timothy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borglin, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Piceno, Yvette [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andersen, Gary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nakagawa, Seiji [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nihei, Kurt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Doughty, Christine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition’s (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  2. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-12-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety.

  3. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs

  4. Wind Tunnel Testing of Active Control System for Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper describes preparation of wind tunnel testing of the principle of using flaps to control the motion of suspension bridges. The experiment will take place at the Instituto Superior Technico Lisbon, Portugal. The bridge section model is constructed of foam with an aluminium frame. The flaps...

  5. Activities preceding a decline in the paratuberculosis test prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils

    A voluntary control programme on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was initiated in Denmark in 2006 and has since 2007 included 25-28% of the dairy herds and 35-40% of the dairy cows. The programme was complemented with activities aimed to reduce the MAP infection prevalence...

  6. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Step Activity and 6-Minute Walk Test Outcomes When Wearing Low-Activity or High-Activity Prosthetic Feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdeman, Shane R; Schmid, Kendra K; Myers, Sara A; Jacobsen, Adam L; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    To determine changes in average daily step count (ADSC) and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) due to use of low-activity feet (LA) and high-activity energy-storage-and-return (ESAR) feet, and examine the sensitivity of these measures to properly classify different prosthetic feet. Individuals with transtibial amputations (n = 28) participated in a 6-week, randomized crossover study. During separate 3-week periods, participants wore either a LA foot (eg, solid-ankle-cushioned-heel) or an ESAR foot. Differences in 6MWT and ADSC at the end of the 3-week period were recorded. Subjects performed similarly in the 6MWT with the LA and ESAR foot (P = 0.871) and ADSC (P = 0.076). The correct classification of ESAR is only 51.9% and 61.5% with 6MWT and ADSC, respectively. For the LA foot, correct classification is less than 50% for both tests. Neither ADSC or 6MWT are responsive to changes in prosthetic feet. The pitfalls and shortcomings of these instruments with regard to their ability to detect differences in prosthetic feet are outlined. Based on these results, it is not recommended that the 6MWT and ADSC are used as a means to assess outcomes for different prosthetic feet.

  8. Active Match Load Circuit Intended for Testing Piezoelectric Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Rødgaard, Martin Schøler; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    An adjustable high voltage active load circuit for voltage amplitudes above 100 volts, especially intended for resistive matching the output impedance of a piezoelectric transformer (PT) is proposed in this paper. PTs have been around for over 50 years, were C. A. Rosen is common known for his...... famous Rosen type design back in the 1950s. After the discovered of new piezoelectric materials and new PT designs have been invented, the PT based power converters are in the area where they can outperform tradition electromagnetic based converters in certain applications. The performance of PTs can...

  9. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Cold Weather On-road Testing of the Chevrolet Volt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report details cold weather on-road testing of a Chevrolet Volt. It quantifies changes in efficiency and electric range as ambient temperature changes. It will be published to INL's AVTA website as an INL technical report and will be accessible to the general public.

  10. Pilot Testing of the Pathway Active Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Christopher M.; Murphy, Sytil K.; Zollman, Dean A.; Christel, Michael; Stevens, Scott

    2010-10-01

    We present an initial analysis of data taken to test the technical functionality and student usability of an interactive synthetic tutoring system administered online. The system allows students to ask questions and receive prerecorded video responses from knowledgeable tutors in real-time. It logs student interactions with a timestamp and username to generate a time-resolved picture of students' use of the system. The tutoring interaction is structured by lessons covering Newton's laws. Time on-task estimates indicate that students spent about 2.5 hours working through our materials, about as much as intended. Data show students' reluctance to query the tutor or that their focus is on other aspects of the system. This suggests modifications to the system that may encourage students to take advantage of its interactive capabilities. The system combines lessons, images, and video technology designed to emulate conversation to produce a supplemental teaching tool that may be useful for studying multimedia effects on learning.

  11. Synchronous droplets as a test bed for pulsatory active fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsikis, Georgios; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Collective behavior in many-body systems has been studied extensively focusing on a wide range of interacting entities including: flocking animals, sedimenting particles and microfluidic droplets among others. Here, we propose an experimental platform to explore an oscillatory active fluid with synchronous ferrofluid droplets immersed in an immiscible carrier fluid in a Hele-Shaw configuration. The droplets are organized and actuated on a 2-D uniform grid through application of a precessive magnetic field. The state of our system is dependent on three parameters: the grid occupancy with fluid droplets, the grid geometry and the magnetic field. We study the long range orientational order of our system over a range of those parameters by tracking the motion of the droplets and analyzing the PIV data of the carrier fluid flow. Numerical simulations are juxtaposed with experimental data for prediction of the system's behavior.

  12. Development and Test of Robotically Assisted Extravehicular Activity Gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jonathan M.; Peters, Benjamin J.; Laske, Evan A.; McBryan, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two years, the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) project under NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) funded an effort to develop an electromechanically-assisted space suit glove. The project was a collaboration between the Johnson Space Center's Software, Robotics, and Simulation Division and the Crew and Thermal Systems division. The project sought to combine finger actuator technology developed for Robonaut 2 with the softgoods from the ILC Phase VI EVA glove. The Space Suit RoboGlove (SSRG) uses a system of three linear actuators to pull synthetic tendons attached to the glove's fingers to augment flexion of the user's fingers. To detect the user's inputs, the system utilizes a combination of string potentiometers along the back of the fingers and force sensitive resistors integrated into the fingertips of the glove cover layer. This paper discusses the development process from initial concepts through two major phases of prototypes, and the results of initial human testing. Initial work on the project focused on creating a functioning proof of concept, designing the softgoods integration, and demonstrating augmented grip strength with the actuators. The second year of the project focused on upgrading the actuators, sensors, and software with the overall goal of creating a system that moves with the user's fingers in order to reduce fatigue associated with the operation of a pressurized glove system. This paper also discusses considerations for a flight system based on this prototype development and address where further work is required to mature the technology.

  13. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  14. Relationships between meaningful activity, basic psychological needs, and meaning in life: test of the meaningful activity and life meaning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakman, Aaron M

    2013-01-01

    The author of this study proposed and examined a theoretical model in which meaningful activity fulfills basic psychological needs and contributes to meaning in life. Hypotheses derived from the Meaningful Activity and Life Meaning model and tested within this study included: (1) meaningful activity will be associated with meaning in life, (2) meaningful activity will be associated with basic psychological needs, and (3) basic psychological needs will partially mediate the relationship between meaningful activity and meaning in life. Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to test the study hypotheses. A total of 591 undergraduate and graduate students completed the Engagement in Meaningful Activities Survey, the Basic Psychological Needs Scales (i.e., autonomy, competence, and relatedness), and the Presence subscale of the Meaning in Life Questionnaire. Results from the study were in full support of each hypothesis and indicate the important role meaningful activity may serve in fostering meaning in life. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Activity-Guided Isolation of Bioactive Constituents with Antinociceptive Activity from Muntingia calabura L. Leaves Using the Formalin Test

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Yusof, Mohd. Izwan; Salleh, Mohd. Zaki; Lay Kek, Teh; Ahmat, Norizan; Nik Azmin, Nik Fatini; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the antinociceptive potential of methanol extract of Muntingia calabura L. (MEMC) and to isolate and identify the bioactive compound(s) responsible for the observed antinociceptive activity. The MEMC and its partitions (petroleum ether (PEP), ethyl acetate (EAP), and aqueous (AQP) partitions), in the dose range of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, were tested using the formalin-induced nociceptive test. The PEP, which exerted the most effective activity in...

  16. Diagnostic value of the basophil activation test in evaluating Hymenoptera venom sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternelj, Andreja; Silar, Mira; Bajrovic, Nissera; Adamic, Katja; Music, Ema; Kosnik, Mitja; Korosec, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis of allergy to Hymenoptera venom is usually confirmed with skin testing and measurement of specific serum IgE antibody, tests which are sometimes inconclusive. In these cases, additional in vitro tests are necessary. The aim of this study was to show the applicability of the basophil activation test in detecting sensitization to Hymenoptera venom and to compare the test sensitivity and clinical positive-predictive value with skin prick tests and measurement of allergen-specific serum IgE. This prospective study was conducted between June 2004 and December 2007 and included a large group of 204 patients. All patients had a history of at least one systemic allergic reaction of Müller grades II-IV after a Hymenoptera sting. We compared results of the basophil activation test, specific serum IgE and skin prick tests with patients' clinical history and data on culprit insects. The overall clinical sensitivities of the basophil activation test, specific serum IgE and skin prick tests were 90%, 76% and 64%, respectively; the clinical positive-predictive values of the three tests were 79%, 73% and 78% for bee venom, 86%, 59% and 43% for wasp venom; and 84%, 77% and 22% for both venoms. Our results revealed a higher clinical sensitivity and comparable or better clinical positive-predictive value of basophil activation tests than skin prick tests and allergen-specific serum IgE in the detection of allergy to Hymenoptera venom.

  17. Is Free Recall Active: The Testing Effect through the ICAP Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchok, Christiana; Mar, Christopher; Craig, Scotty D.

    2017-01-01

    Amidst evidence in favor of "active learning," online instruction widely implements passive design and tests learners' retrieval performance as opposed to learners' understanding. Literature reporting the testing effect promotes recall as a learning tool. The Interactive>Constructive>Active>Passive taxonomy would place quizzing…

  18. 78 FR 7939 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... 430 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode); Proposed Rule #0... Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode) AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... mode energy use for microwave ovens, including both microwave-only ovens and convection microwave ovens...

  19. Current Limitations and Recommendations to Improve Testing for the Environmental Assessment of Endocrine Active Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coady, Katherine K; Biever, Ronald C; Denslow, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    In this paper existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine-active chemicals are described, and associated challenges discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically...... evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect...... apical data to detect possible adverse effects. These test systems are currently designed to robustly assess endocrine activity and/or adverse effects in the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone signaling pathways; however, there are some limitations of current test systems for evaluating endocrine...

  20. Current Limitations and Recommendations to Improve Testing for the Environmental Assessment of Endocrine Active Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coady, Katherine K; Biever, Ronald C; Denslow, Nancy D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine-active chemicals are described, and associated challenges discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically...... evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect...... apical data to detect possible adverse effects. These test systems are currently designed to robustly assess endocrine activity and/or adverse effects in the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone signaling pathways; however, there are some limitations of current test systems for evaluating endocrine...

  1. Electromyography Activation Levels of the 3 Gluteus Medius Subdivisions During Manual Strength Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otten, Roald; Tol, Johannes L; Holmich, Per

    2015-01-01

    deficits and guide specific rehabilitation programs. However, the optimal positions for assessing the strength and activation of these subdivisions are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The first aim was to establish which strength-testing positions produce the highest surface electromyography (sEMG) activation levels...... of the individual GM subdivisions. The second aim was to evaluate differences in sEMG activation levels between the tested and contralateral (stabilizing) leg. METHOD: Twenty healthy physically active male subjects participated in this study. Muscle activity using sEMG was recorded for the GM subdivisions in 8...... different strength-testing positions and analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: Significant differences between testing positions for all 3 GM subdivisions were found. There were significant differences between the tested and the contralateral anterior and middle GM subdivisions (P...

  2. Fitness Testing in Physical Education--A Misdirected Effort in Promoting Healthy Lifestyles and Physical Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cale, Lorraine; Harris, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Physical fitness testing is commonplace within schools and the physical education (PE) curriculum, with advocates claiming one of the key purposes of testing to be the promotion of healthy lifestyles and physical activity. Despite this, much controversy has surrounded the fitness testing of young people. Purpose: This paper draws on…

  3. Relation between subjective and objective scores on the active straight leg raising test.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Mens, Jan M A; Beekmans, RE; Tijhuis, MT

    2010-01-01

    DESIGN: Cross sectional. OBJECTIVE: To fill a gap in the validation of the active straight leg raising (ASLR) test concerning the relation between a patient's subjective score on the ASLR test and the objective measured force. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The ASLR test is used to classify patients

  4. 30 CFR 251.7 - Test drilling activities under a permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... opportunity to participate in the test drilling through a signed agreement on a cost-sharing basis. You may... original share cost. (3) Providing opportunity for participation in a shallow test drilling project. When... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test drilling activities under a permit. 251.7...

  5. Effects of early postmyocardial infarction exercise testing on self-perception and subsequent physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, C K; Taylor, C B; Reese, L B; DeBusk, R F

    1983-04-01

    The effects of exercise testing 3 weeks after clinically uncomplicated myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent physical activity were evaluated in 40 consecutive men with a mean age of 52 +/- 9 years. Patients' confidence in their ability to perform various physical activities was evaluated with self-efficacy scales which patients completed before and after a symptom-limited treadmill exercise test. Increases in confidence (self-efficacy) for activities similar to treadmill exercise (walking, stair climbing, and running) were greatest after treadmill exercise, whereas increases for dissimilar activities (sexual intercourse and lifting) were greatest after test results were explained by a physician and nurse. The intensity and duration of subsequent physical activity at home were more highly correlated with self-efficacy after treadmill exercise than with peak treadmill heart rate. Of the 8 patients whose treadmill tests were limited by angina pectoris, 7 had self-efficacy scores which remained low after treadmill testing or which decreased from initially high values after treadmill testing. These patients had lower peak heart rates and work loads than patients whose self-efficacy increased or remained high after treadmill testing. After MI, patients' perception of their capacity for physical activity and their actual patterns of subsequent physical activity are influenced by early treadmill testing in a manner which is congruent with these patients' treadmill performance.

  6. Evaluation of mutagenic activities of endosulfan phosalone, malathion, and permethrin, before and after metabolic activation, in the Ames Salmonella test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pednekar, M.D.; Gandhi, S.R.; Netrawali, M.S.

    1987-06-01

    The work reported here evaluates the mutagenic activities of commonly used insecticides - endosulfan (organochlorine), phosalone and malathion (organophosphorus) and permethrin (pyrethroid), before and after activation with cecal microbial extract or with liver post-mitochondrial fraction (S9-fraction) of rat, in Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA 97a, TA 98 and TA 100. As far as we are aware, no study has yet addressed whether the insecticides mentioned above can be mutagenic following their activation by mammalian cecal microorganisms.

  7. Basophil activation testing in diagnosis and monitoring of allergic disease - An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberlein, Bernadette; Santos, Alexandra F.; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Nopp, Anna; Ferrer, Marta; Rouzaire, Paul; Ebo, Didier; Sabato, Vito; Sanz, Maria L.; Pecaric-Petkovic, Tatjana; Patil, Sarita U.; Hausmann, Oliver V.; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Korosec, Peter; Knol, Edward F.; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The nature of basophil activation as an ex vivo challenge makes it a multifaceted and promising tool for the allergist. Through the development of flow cytometry, discovery of activation markers such as CD63 and markers identifying basophil granulocytes, the basophil activation test (BAT) has become

  8. Activity-Guided Isolation of Bioactive Constituents with Antinociceptive Activity from Muntingia calabura L. Leaves Using the Formalin Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Izwan Mohamad Yusof

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the antinociceptive potential of methanol extract of Muntingia calabura L. (MEMC and to isolate and identify the bioactive compound(s responsible for the observed antinociceptive activity. The MEMC and its partitions (petroleum ether (PEP, ethyl acetate (EAP, and aqueous (AQP partitions, in the dose range of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, were tested using the formalin-induced nociceptive test. The PEP, which exerted the most effective activity in the respective early and late phase, was further subjected to the fractionation procedures and yielded seven fractions (labelled A to G. These fractions were tested, at the dose of 300 mg/kg, together with distilled water or 10% DMSO (negative controls; morphine and aspirin (positive controls for potential antinociceptive activity. Of all fractions, Fraction D showed the most significant antinociceptive activity, which is considered as equieffective to morphine or aspirin in the early or late phase, respectively. Further isolation and identification processes on fraction D led to the identification of three known and one new compounds, namely, 5-hydroxy-3,7,8-trimethoxyflavone (1, 3,7-dimethoxy-5-hydroyflavone (2, 2′,4′-dihydroxy-3′-methoxychalcone (3, and calaburone (4. At the dose of 50 mg/kg, compound 3 exhibited the highest percentage of antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of MEMC involved, partly, the synergistic activation of the flavonoid types of compounds.

  9. Activity-Guided Isolation of Bioactive Constituents with Antinociceptive Activity from Muntingia calabura L. Leaves Using the Formalin Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Yusof, Mohd Izwan; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Lay Kek, Teh; Ahmat, Norizan; Nik Azmin, Nik Fatini; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the antinociceptive potential of methanol extract of Muntingia calabura L. (MEMC) and to isolate and identify the bioactive compound(s) responsible for the observed antinociceptive activity. The MEMC and its partitions (petroleum ether (PEP), ethyl acetate (EAP), and aqueous (AQP) partitions), in the dose range of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, were tested using the formalin-induced nociceptive test. The PEP, which exerted the most effective activity in the respective early and late phase, was further subjected to the fractionation procedures and yielded seven fractions (labelled A to G). These fractions were tested, at the dose of 300 mg/kg, together with distilled water or 10% DMSO (negative controls); morphine and aspirin (positive controls) for potential antinociceptive activity. Of all fractions, Fraction D showed the most significant antinociceptive activity, which is considered as equieffective to morphine or aspirin in the early or late phase, respectively. Further isolation and identification processes on fraction D led to the identification of three known and one new compounds, namely, 5-hydroxy-3,7,8-trimethoxyflavone (1), 3,7-dimethoxy-5-hydroyflavone (2), 2',4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxychalcone (3), and calaburone (4). At the dose of 50 mg/kg, compound 3 exhibited the highest percentage of antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of MEMC involved, partly, the synergistic activation of the flavonoid types of compounds.

  10. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  11. Current Limitations and Recommendations to Improve Testing for the Environmental Assessment of Endocrine Active Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coady, Katherine K; Biever, Ronald C; Denslow, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    existing test methods are resource intensive in regard to time, cost, and use of animals. However, based on recent experiences, there are opportunities to improve approaches to, and guidance for existing test methods, and reduce uncertainty. For example, in vitro high throughput screening could be used......In this paper existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine-active chemicals are described, and associated challenges discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically...... evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect...

  12. Testing of actively cooled mock-ups in several high heat flux facilities-An International Round Robin Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.roedig@fz-juelich.de; Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, Porte Magenta, BP181, 71205 Le Creusot Cedex (France); Cox, S. [JET, UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Escourbiac, F. [CEA-DRFC, Cadarache, 13115 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Gervash, A. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Kapoustina, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuehnlein, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuznetsov, V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nygren, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States); Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States)

    2005-11-15

    Several electron beam and ion beam facilities are involved in high heat flux testing of plasma-facing components for next step fusion devices. Up to a certain degree, these machines are comparable, but differences concern, e.g. beam generation, beam sweeping, calibration techniques and diagnostics. In order to get an information if tests in the different facilities are really comparable, a set of actively cooled CFC monoblocks has been heated in four electron beam and one ion beam facility at comparable power densities. The temperature response during these loadings has been registered and used as a criteria for assessment.

  13. Antidepressant-like activity of liposomal formulation containing nimodipine treatment in the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lina Clara Gayoso E Almendra Ibiapina; Rolim, Hercília Maria Lins; Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction may be an etiological factor in affective illness. Nimodipine (NMD) is a Ca(2+) channel blocker that has been extensively investigated for therapy of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In this work, we have evaluated the antidepressant-like activity of nimodipine encapsulated into liposomes (NMD-Lipo) in mice through tail suspension and forced swim assays, as well as MAOB activity. During the tail suspension test, the administration of NMD-Lipo at 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg was able to promote a reduction in the immobility time of animals greater than the positive control (imipramine). In the forced swim test, the immobility time of mice treated with NMD-Lipo was reduced. This reduction was significantly greater than that found in the animals treated with imipramine and paroxetine. This may suggest that NMD-Lipo provides more antidepressant-like activity than in positive controls. The groups that received a combination of liposomal NMD and antidepressant drugs showed lower immobility time than the groups, which were treated only with imipramine or paroxetine. The mice treated with the combination of NMD-Lipo and reserpine presented an increase in the time of immobility compared with animals treated only with NMD-Lipo. There was a significant decrease in MAOB activity in animals treated with NMD-Lipo compared with untreated animals. The results of the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity suggested that the antidepressant activity of NMD-Lipo may be related to an increase in the cerebral monoamine concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Are students' impressions of improved learning through active learning methods reflected by improved test scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, Marcee C

    2013-02-01

    To report the transformation from lecture to more active learning methods in a maternity nursing course and to evaluate whether student perception of improved learning through active-learning methods is supported by improved test scores. The process of transforming a course into an active-learning model of teaching is described. A voluntary mid-semester survey for student acceptance of the new teaching method was conducted. Course examination results, from both a standardized exam and a cumulative final exam, among students who received lecture in the classroom and students who had active learning activities in the classroom were compared. Active learning activities were very acceptable to students. The majority of students reported learning more from having active-learning activities in the classroom rather than lecture-only and this belief was supported by improved test scores. Students who had active learning activities in the classroom scored significantly higher on a standardized assessment test than students who received lecture only. The findings support the use of student reflection to evaluate the effectiveness of active-learning methods and help validate the use of student reflection of improved learning in other research projects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Which is preferable for orthostatic hypotension diagnosis in older adults: active standing test or head-up tilt table test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ali Ekrem; Soysal, Pinar; Isik, Ahmet Turan

    2017-01-01

    Correct evaluation of orthostatic hypotension (OH) is crucial in geriatric practice, since OH is associated with mortality and morbidity. The study aimed to determine the most appropriate method for measuring blood pressure in transition from supine to upright position in order to diagnose OH in older adults. Active standing test (AST) and head-up tilt table (HUT) test as well as comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA), including mini-mental state examination or the cognitive state test, mini-nutritional assessment, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, and Tinetti performance-oriented mobility assessment indexes, were performed in 290 geriatric patients. The prevalence of OH during HUT and AST was 19% and 37%, respectively. In patients with OH during HUT, the frequency of dementia and recurrent falls were higher (P0.05). Comparison of the groups according to CGA measurements revealed significant differences in terms of cognition, nutritional status, activities of daily life, and balance function in patients with OH only during HUT (P0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of AST were 49.0%, 65.5%, 25.0%, and 84.6% respectively, according to HUT. The results suggest that orthostatic blood pressure changes determined by HUT might be of higher clinical significance than that by AST in older adults. It might be important that the evaluation of OH by HUT should be included in daily geriatric practice.

  16. [Mutagenic Activity of Four Aminoazo Compounds with Different Carcinogenicity for Rat Liver in the Ames Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, T S; Sinitsyna, O I; Kaledin, V I

    2015-01-01

    In this paper in the bacterial Ames test we compared the mutagenicity of four aminoazo compounds, previously studied by other researchers and used for activation of rat liver enzymes, with the carcinogenicity in the rat liver. It was found that in the Ames test they have mutagenic activity, however, this activity does not correlate quantitatively with rat sensitivity to their hepatocarcinogenic action. Thus, the most active carcinogen 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene causes mutations almost 2.5 times less than weakly carcinogenic ortho-aminoazotoluene, and exactly the same number of mutations as non-carcinogenic N,N-diethyl-4-aminoazobenzene.

  17. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient’s bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization.

  18. eTEST: Developing a Smart Home HIV Testing Kit that Enables Active, Real-Time Follow-Up and Referral After Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Tyler; Chan, Philip A; Simpanen, Erik; Operario, Don

    2017-05-08

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are the group at highest risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States, but many do not test as frequently as recommended. Home-based self-testing (HBST) for HIV holds promise for promoting regular testing among these individuals, but currently available HBSTs have limited follow-up options, providing only a 1-800 number that participants can call. Failure to actively conduct follow-up counseling and referrals after HBST use could result in delays in seeking confirmatory testing and care among users receiving reactive (preliminary positive) test results. HBST also fails to connect users who test negative with other prevention services that can reduce their future risk for HIV. The aim of our study was to use qualitative research methods with high-risk MSM to inform development of a "smart" HBST kit. The kit utilizes existing Internet-of-Things (IoT) technologies to monitor HBST use in real-time and enable delivery of timely, active follow-up counseling and referrals over the phone. In phase 1, individual interviews (n=10) explored how participants might use HBST and their views and preferences for conducting counseling and referral after HBST. Based on these perspectives, we developed a smartphone app (iOS, Android) that uses data from light sensors on Bluetooth low energy (BLE) beacons to monitor when HBST kits are opened, facilitating timely follow-up phone contact with users. In phase 2, a usability study conducted among high-risk MSM (n=10) examined the acceptability and feasibility of this system and provided user perspectives after using the system along with HBST. Phase 1 themes suggested that MSM preferred HBST, that most thought active follow-up after HBST would be valuable, and that doing so over the phone within 24 h after testing was preferable. Phase 2 results showed that the eTEST system successfully detected HBST use in nearly all cases. Participant perspectives also suggested that the

  19. Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine by two different tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassone, Luciana M; Fidel, Rivail Antonio Sergio; Murad, Cristiana Francescutti; Fidel, Sandra Rivera; Hirata, Rafael

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial capacity of sodium hypochlorite (1% and 5%) and chlorhexidine (0.12%, 0.5% and 1%) with or without the addition of organic material (bovine serum albumin, BSA) against some bacterial samples (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum) using two activity tests (contact and diffusion agar tests). In the contact test (first model), bacterial samples were kept in contact with each irrigating solution for different time intervals: immediately (t(0)), 5 min (t(5)), 15 min (t(15)) and 30 min (t(30)). The agar diffusion test was the second model used. In half the specimens, 0.5% BSA was added to simulate organic tissue present in the root canal. Bacterial growth was evaluated for each microorganism and activity test. Each test was repeated 10 times. In the contact test, 0.12% chlorhexidine solution (CHX) did not eliminate E. faecalis at any tested time. CHX at 0.5% eliminated all strains except E. faecalis after immediate contact. All strains were eliminated by 1% CHX, 1% NaOCl and 5% NaOCl. BSA did not interfere with the antimicrobial activity of the irrigating solutions. In the agar diffusion test, all solutions exhibited zones of antimicrobial activity; however, BSA interfered with the antimicrobial activity of NaOCl and CHX. Under the condition of the contact test, the 0.12% CHX was ineffective in eliminating E. faecalis, while 0.5% CHX, 1% CHX, 1% NaOCl and 5% NaOCl showed antibacterial effectiveness against all the tested bacterial strains. The addition of an organic load interfered with the accuracy of the agar diffusion test.

  20. An experimental test of density‐dependent selection on temperament traits of activity, boldness and sociability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le Galliard, J.‐F; Paquet, M; Mugabo, M

    2015-01-01

    .... We tested this prediction by examining density‐dependent selection in juvenile common lizards Zootoca vivipara scored for activity, boldness and sociability at birth and at the age of 1 year...

  1. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  2. A study of the relation between sports activity and sports test in NNCT male Students

    OpenAIRE

    内山, 了治; 塚田, 修三; 加藤, 俊也

    1996-01-01

    Purposes of this study were to clarify the relation between sports activity and sports test (physical fitness and motor performance) in N National College of Technology (NNCT) male students. Their sports activity were gathered information by questionnaires developed by Taisyuukann-tairyokukagakukennkyukai. Physical fitness and motor performance were measured by a sports test developed by Ministry of Education. The main results were as follows: 1) All year students; Average of physical fitness...

  3. Electromyographic study of rotator cuff muscle activity during full and empty can tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Kai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The empty can (EC and full can (FC tests are used as diagnostic tools for patients with rotator cuff disease. However, recently concerns have been raised that these tests do not selectively activate the muscle. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the rotator cuff muscle activation levels during the EC and FC tests in various positions using electromyography. Twelve healthy, right-handed men without shoulder complaints (mean age: 26.1 years, range: 23–35 years were included. The tests were performed isometrically with the shoulder elevated at 45° and 90° in the sagittal, scapular, and coronal planes, either in the thumb-up (FC test or thumb-down (EC test positions. During these positions, the electromyographic signal was recorded simultaneously from the four shoulder muscles using a combination of surface and intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. The average activation of the supraspinatus and subscapularis was greater during the EC test than during the FC test and in the scapular and coronal planes than in the sagittal plane at 90°. For the infraspinatus, there were no significant differences in any positions between the two tests. Thus, the rotator cuff muscles are influenced by arm position and the elevation plane during the EC and FC tests.

  4. Activity profiling of ectomycorrhiza communities in two forest soils using multiple enzymatic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Pritsch, Karin; Schloter, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Garbaye, Jean

    2005-07-01

    Data on the diversity and distribution of enzyme activities in native ectomycorrhizal (ECM) communities are inadequate. A microplate multiple enzymatic test was developed which makes it possible to measure eight enzyme activities on 14 individual, excised ECM root tips. Hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes are involved in the decomposition of lignocellulose, chitin and phosphorus-containing organic compounds. This test system was used to describe the functional diversity of ECM communities in two forest sites. This set of tests proved to be accurate and sensitive enough to reveal a high diversity of activity profiles, depending on the fungal symbiont and the soil horizon. Ectomycorrhizas can be classified into specialists and generalists, and appear to complement each other in the same horizon to collectively perform all eight activities studied. By including a higher number of different assays for more detailed analyses, ECM activity profiling will provide a valuable tool for studying the functional diversity of ECM communities.

  5. 78 FR 30899 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test Studies... Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test Studies System. OMB Control Number: 1850-0803. Type of Review: An extension... with levels of incentives for various types of survey operations, focus groups, cognitive laboratory...

  6. Antioxidant Activity in the Blood and Testes of the Mottled Brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IJAAAR

    Corresponding author: eoewuola@gmail.com; GSM: +234(8)060862361. Abstract. This study was carried out to assess the antioxidant activity in the blood and testes of mottled brown male. Japanese quails at ... induction of oxidative stress in the testes.

  7. An overview of Test Techniques for Characterizing Active Phased Array Antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, W.P.M.N.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a review will be given of the microwave testing of active phased anay antennas. It will be shown that due to the application of Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules in such antennas considerable more tests have to be performed to characterise completely their microwave performance than for

  8. Active Learning and Threshold Concepts in Multiple Testing That Can Further Develop Student Critical Statistical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Desley

    2015-01-01

    Two practical activities are described, which aim to support critical thinking about statistics as they concern multiple outcomes testing. Formulae are presented in Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, which are used to calculate the inflation of error associated with the quantity of tests performed. This is followed by a decision-making exercise, where…

  9. The Active Straight Leg Raise test in lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, Jan M A; Huis in 't Veld, EMJ; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Although many properties of the Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) test as a diagnostic test in lumbopelvic pain (LPP) are well documented, various elements are lacking. A cross-sectional study was performed to compute sensitivity and specificity, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of various

  10. An improved monocyte activation test using cryopreserved pooled human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solati, Shabnam; Aarden, Lucien; Zeerleder, Sacha; Wouters, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The monocyte activation test (MAT) is a promising replacement of the currently used rabbit pyrogen test to detect the presence of pyrogens in injectable drugs. In the MAT, drugs are incubated with a source of human monocytes and production of pyrogenic cytokines used as readout. The best results are

  11. Detailed measurements and modelling of thermo active components using a room size test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    measurements in an office sized test facility with thermo active ceiling and floor as well as modelling of similar conditions in a computer program designed for analysis of building integrated heating and cooling systems. A method for characterizing the cooling capacity of thermo active components is described...

  12. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Bridge Model with Active Vibration Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Mendes, P. A.

    The application of active control systems to reduce wind vibrations in bridges is a new area of research. This paper presents the results that were obtained on a set of wind tunnel tests of a bridge model equipped with active movable flaps. Based on the monitored position and motion of the deck...

  13. Pilot-Testing CATCH Early Childhood: A Preschool-Based Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shreela; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Hedberg, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background: The literature on theoretically-based programs targeting healthy nutrition and physical activity in preschools is scarce. Purpose: To pilot test CATCH Early Childhood (CEC), a preschool-based nutrition and physical activity program among children ages three to five in Head Start. Methods: The study was conducted in two Head Start…

  14. Activity of two strobilurin fungicides against three species of decay fungi in agar plate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliet D. Tang; Tina Ciaramitaro; Maria Tomaso-Peterson; Susan V. Diehl

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity of strobilurin fungicides against wood decay fungi in order to assess their potential to act as a co-biocide for copper-based wood protection. Two strobilurin fungicides, Heritage (50% azoxystrobin active ingredient) and Insignia (20% pyraclostrobin active ingredients), and copper sulfate pentahydrate were tested...

  15. Tests of biological activity of metabolites from Penicillium expansum (Link Thom various isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Borecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aqrobacterium tumefaciens and cucumber, mustard and linseeds were compared as test organisms for evaluation of the biological activity of patulin. It was found that the reaction of cucumber seeds and linseed to the patulin concentrations was more pronounced than that of mustard and Aqrobacterium tumefaciens. The activity of metabolites produced by Penicillium expansum was investigated with the use of cucumber seeds. As measure of activity served the percentage of radicule growth inhibition was compared with the growth in control seeds. The biological activity of the metabolites was specific for the isolates, those from apples being more active. Thirty two isolates from pears and 34 from apples were examined.

  16. Ground tests with active neutron instrumentation for the planetary science missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvak, M.L., E-mail: litvak@mx.iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Mitrofanov, I.G.; Sanin, A.B. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Jun, I. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kozyrev, A.S. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Krylov, A.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Timoshenko, G.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Starr, R. [Catholic University of America, Washington DC (United States); Zontikov, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-11

    We present results of experimental work performed with a spare flight model of the DAN/MSL instrument in a newly built ground test facility at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. This instrument was selected for the tests as a flight prototype of an active neutron spectrometer applicable for future landed missions to various solid solar system bodies. In our experiment we have fabricated simplified samples of planetary material and tested the capability of neutron activation methods to detect thin layers of water/water ice lying on top of planetary dry regolith or buried within a dry regolith at different depths.

  17. AN INVESTIGATION OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SOME 9- SUBSTITUEDPHENANTHRENE DERIVATIVES WITH AMES / SALMONELLA / MICROSOME TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap KUTLU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three different 9-Substituted phenantrene derivatives that were synthesized to be used as basic matter for drugs were tested for their mutagenic potency in strains TA 98 and TA 100 ofSalmonella typhimurium by using Ames test. Therefore, both strains were tested in the absence or presence of S9 metabolic activation, for five different doses of each test substances in two paralel independent experiments. In the absence of metabolic activation, while only one of the compounds were causing frame-shift mutations, two of them were determined to induce base pair substitution mutations. In the presence of metabolic activation, while two of the compounds were mutagenic for TA 98, base pair substitution mutations were not detected for any of the substances. Each of the compoundstested were found to be mutagenic for at least one strain in the presence or absence of S9.

  18. Which is preferable for orthostatic hypotension diagnosis in older adults: active standing test or head-up tilt table test?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin AE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ali Ekrem Aydin,1 Pinar Soysal,2 Ahmet Turan Isik1 1Center for Aging Brain and Dementia, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey; 2Kayseri Education and Research Hospital, Geriatric Center, Kayseri, Turkey Background: Correct evaluation of orthostatic hypotension (OH is crucial in geriatric practice, since OH is associated with mortality and morbidity. The study aimed to determine the most appropriate method for measuring blood pressure in transition from supine to upright position in order to diagnose OH in older adults.Methods: Active standing test (AST and head-up tilt table (HUT test as well as comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA, including mini-mental state examination or the cognitive state test, mini-nutritional assessment, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, and Tinetti performance-oriented mobility assessment indexes, were performed in 290 geriatric patients.Results: The prevalence of OH during HUT and AST was 19% and 37%, respectively. In patients with OH during HUT, the frequency of dementia and recurrent falls were higher (P<0.05; on the other hand, the levels of serum vitamin D and albumin and estimated glomerular filtration rate were lower (P<0.05. However, all these parameters for OH during AST were not significant (P>0.05. Comparison of the groups according to CGA measurements revealed significant differences in terms of cognition, nutritional status, activities of daily life, and balance function in patients with OH only during HUT (P<0.05, but not during AST (P>0.05. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of AST were 49.0%, 65.5%, 25.0%, and 84.6% respectively, according to HUT.Conclusion: The results suggest that orthostatic blood pressure changes determined by HUT might be of higher clinical significance than that by AST in older adults. It might be important that the evaluation of OH by HUT should be

  19. Structural and preliminary thermal performance testing of a pressure activated contact heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. Y.; Christian, E. L.; Wohlwend, J. W.; Parish, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    A contact heat exchanger concept is being developed for use onboard Space Station as an interface device between external thermal bus and pressurized modules. The concept relies on mechanical contact activated by the fluid pressure inside thin-walled tubes. Structural testings were carried out to confirm the technology feasibility of using such thin-walled tubes. The test results also verified the linear elastic stress analysis which was used to predict the tube mechanical behaviors. A preliminary thermal testing was also performed with liquid Freon-11 flowing inside tubes and heat being supplied by electrical heating from the bottom of the contact heat exchanger baseplate. The test results showed excellent agreement of test data with analytical prediction for all thermal resistances except for the two-phase flow characteristics. Testing with two-phase flow inside tubes will, however, be performed on the NASA-JSC test bed.

  20. Improved reclassification of mortality risk by assessment of physical activity in patients referred for exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jonathan; Nead, Kevin T; Chang, Peter; Abella, Joshua; Kokkinos, Peter; Leeper, Nicholas J

    2015-04-01

    Inability to meet minimal guidelines on physical activity is associated with poor health outcomes, but quantifying activity can be complex. We studied whether a simple question regarding participation in regular activity improves risk classification for all-cause mortality. Maximal exercise testing was performed in 6962 patients (mean age, 58.9 ± 11 years) for clinical reasons. Subjects also were assessed for participation in regular activity using a simple yes/no response to meeting minimal recommendations on activity. The incremental value of adding a simple physical activity assessment to clinical, demographic, and exercise test information to predict mortality was determined using Cox proportional hazards models, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination index during a mean follow-up of 9.7 ± 4 years. Subjects who did not meet the minimal guidelines on activity had a lower exercise capacity (7.4 ± 4.3 vs 9.1 ± 3.6 metabolic equivalents, P mortality rate (2.42% vs 1.71%, P mortality (hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.51, P test variables, fitness had the highest C-index for predicting mortality (0.72, P mortality among patients who are referred for exercise testing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Active vibration control testing of the SPICES program: final demonstration article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, James P.; Jacobs, Jack H.

    1996-05-01

    The Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures (SPICES) Program is a partnership program sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The mission of the program is to develop cost effective material processing and synthesis technologies to enable new products employing active vibration suppression and control devices to be brought to market. The two year program came to fruition in 1995 through the fabrication of the final smart components and testing of an active plate combined with two trapezoidal rails, forming an active mount. Testing of the SPICES combined active mount took place at McDonnell Douglas facilities in St. Louis, MO, in October-December 1995. Approximately 15 dB reduction in overall response of a motor mounted on the active structure was achieved. Further details and results of the SPICES combined active mount demonstration testing are outlined. Results of numerous damping and control strategies that were developed and employed in the testing are presented, as well as aspects of the design and fabrication of the SPICES active mount components.

  2. Current limitations and recommendations to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Katherine K.; Biever, Ronald C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D.; Holbech, Henrik; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Krueger, Hank; Levine, Steven L.; Maack, Gerd; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine active chemicals are described, and associated challenges are discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or to the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro, and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect apical data to detect possible adverse effects. These test systems are currently designed to robustly assess endocrine activity and/or adverse effects in the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone signaling pathways; however, there are some limitations of current test systems for evaluating endocrine hazard and risk. These limitations include a lack of certainty regarding: 1) adequately sensitive species and life stages; 2) mechanistic endpoints that are diagnostic for endocrine pathways of concern; and 3) the linkage between mechanistic responses and apical, adverse outcomes. Furthermore, some existing test methods are resource intensive with regard to time, cost, and use of animals. However, based on recent experiences, there are opportunities to improve approaches to and guidance for existing test methods and to reduce uncertainty. For example, in vitro high-throughput screening could be used to prioritize chemicals for testing and provide insights as to the most appropriate assays for characterizing hazard and risk. Other recommendations include adding endpoints for elucidating connections between mechanistic effects and adverse outcomes, identifying potentially sensitive taxa for which test methods currently do not exist, and addressing key endocrine pathways of possible concern in addition to those associated with estrogen, androgen, and thyroid

  3. Do collaborative practical tests encourage student-centered active learning of gross anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rodney A; Cates, Tanya; White, Lloyd; Farchione, Davide

    2016-05-06

    Benefits of collaborative testing have been identified in many disciplines. This study sought to determine whether collaborative practical tests encouraged active learning of anatomy. A gross anatomy course included a collaborative component in four practical tests. Two hundred and seven students initially completed the test as individuals and then worked as a team to complete the same test again immediately afterwards. The relationship between mean individual, team, and difference (between team and individual) test scores to overall performance on the final examination (representing overall learning in the course) was examined using regression analysis. The overall mark in the course increased by 9% with a decreased failure rate. There was a strong relationship between individual score and final examination mark (P learning occurring during the collaborative testing and that weaker students gained the benefit from team marks without significant active learning taking place. This negative outcome may be due to insufficient encouragement of the active learning strategies that were expected to occur during the collaborative testing process. An improved understanding of the efficacy of collaborative assessment could be achieved through the inclusion of questionnaire based data to allow a better interpretation of learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 9: 231-237. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. Round-robin testing of a reference glass for low-activity waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L.; Wolf, S. F.

    1999-12-06

    A round robin test program was conducted with a glass that was developed for use as a standard test material for acceptance testing of low-activity waste glasses made with Hanford tank wastes. The glass is referred to as the low-activity test reference material (LRM). The program was conducted to measure the interlaboratory reproducibility of composition analysis and durability test results. Participants were allowed to select the methods used to analyze the glass composition. The durability tests closely followed the Product Consistency Test (PCT) Method A, except that tests were conducted at both 40 and 90 C and that parallel tests with a reference glass were not required. Samples of LRM glass that had been crushed, sieved, and washed to remove fines were provided to participants for tests and analyses. The reproducibility of both the composition and PCT results compare favorably with the results of interlaboratory studies conducted with other glasses. From the perspective of reproducibility of analysis results, this glass is acceptable for use as a composition standard for nonradioactive components of low-activity waste forms present at >0.1 elemental mass % and as a test standard for PCTS at 40 and 90 C. For PCT with LRM glass, the expected test results at the 95% confidence level are as follows: (1) at 40 C: pH = 9.86 {+-} 0.96; [B] = 2.30 {+-} 1.25 mg/L; [Na] = 19.7 {+-} 7.3 mg/L; [Si] = 13.7 {+-} 4.2 mg/L; and (2) at 90 C: pH = 10.92 {+-} 0.43; [B] = 26.7 {+-} 7.2 mg/L; [Na] = 160 {+-} 13 mg/L; [Si] = 82.0 {+-} 12.7 mg/L. These ranges can be used to evaluate the accuracy of PCTS conducted at other laboratories.

  5. In vitro genotoxicity of neutral red after photo-activation and metabolic activation in the Ames test, the micronucleus test and the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérard, Melanie; Zeller, Andreas; Singer, Thomas; Gocke, Elmar

    2012-07-04

    Neutral red (Nr) is relatively non-toxic and is widely used as indicator dye in many biological test systems. It absorbs visible light and is known to act as a photosensitizer, involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (type-I reaction) and singlet oxygen (type-II reaction). The mutagenicity of Nr was determined in the Ames test (with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535, TA97, TA98, TA98NR, TA100, and TA102) with and without metabolic activation, and with and without photo-activation on agar plates. Similarly to the situation following metabolic activation, photo-mutagenicity of Nr was seen with all Salmonella strains tested, albeit with different effects between these strains. To our knowledge, Nr is the only photo-mutagen showing such a broad action. Since the effects are also observed in strains not known to be responsive to ROS, this indicates that ROS production is not the sole mode of action that leads to photo-genotoxicity. The reactive species produced by irradiation are short-lived as pre-irradiation of an Nr solution did not produce mutagenic effects when added to the bacteria. In addition, mutagenicity in TA98 following irradiation was stronger than in the nitroreductase-deficient strain TA98NR, indicating that nitro derivatives that are transformed by bacterial nitroreductase to hydroxylamines appear to play a role in the photo-mutagenicity of Nr. Photo-genotoxicity of Nr was further investigated in the comet assay and micronucleus test in L5178Y cells. Concentration-dependent increases in primary DNA damage and in the frequency of micronuclei were observed after irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The accomplishments of lithium target and test facility validation activities in the IFMIF/EVEDA phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeiter, Frederik; Baluc, Nadine; Favuzza, Paolo; Gröschel, Friedrich; Heidinger, Roland; Ibarra, Angel; Knaster, Juan; Kanemura, Takuji; Kondo, Hiroo; Massaut, Vincent; Saverio Nitti, Francesco; Miccichè, Gioacchino; O’hira, Shigeru; Rapisarda, David; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Wakai, Eiichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2018-01-01

    As part of the engineering validation and engineering design activities (EVEDA) phase for the international fusion materials irradiation facility IFMIF, major elements of a lithium target facility and the test facility were designed, prototyped and validated. For the lithium target facility, the EVEDA lithium test loop was built at JAEA and used to test the stability (waves and long term) of the lithium flow in the target, work out the startup procedures, and test lithium purification and analysis. It was confirmed by experiments in the Lifus 6 plant at ENEA that lithium corrosion on ferritic martensitic steels is acceptably low. Furthermore, complex remote handling procedures for the remote maintenance of the target in the test cell environment were successfully practiced. For the test facility, two variants of a high flux test module were prototyped and tested in helium loops, demonstrating their good capabilities of maintaining the material specimens at the desired temperature with a low temperature spread. Irradiation tests were performed for heated specimen capsules and irradiation instrumentation in the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The small specimen test technique, essential for obtaining material test results with limited irradiation volume, was advanced by evaluating specimen shape and test technique influences.

  7. Load release balance test under unstable conditions effectively discriminates between physically active and sedentary young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemková, E; Štefániková, G; Muyor, J M

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates test-retest reliability and diagnostic accuracy of the load release balance test under four varied conditions. Young, early and late middle-aged physically active and sedentary subjects performed the test over 2 testing sessions spaced 1week apart while standing on either (1) a stable or (2) an unstable surface with (3) eyes open (EO) and (4) eyes closed (EC), respectively. Results identified that test-retest reliability of parameters of the load release balance test was good to excellent, with high values of ICC (0.78-0.92) and low SEM (7.1%-10.7%). The peak and the time to peak posterior center of pressure (CoP) displacement were significantly lower in physically active as compared to sedentary young adults (21.6% and 21.0%) and early middle-aged adults (22.0% and 20.9%) while standing on a foam surface with EO, and in late middle-aged adults on both unstable (25.6% and 24.5%) and stable support surfaces with EO (20.4% and 20.0%). The area under the ROC curve >0.80 for these variables indicates good discriminatory accuracy. Thus, these variables of the load release balance test measured under unstable conditions have the ability to differentiate between groups of physically active and sedentary adults as early as from 19years of age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a multi-biomarker disease activity test for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centola, Michael; Cavet, Guy; Shen, Yijing; Ramanujan, Saroja; Knowlton, Nicholas; Swan, Kathryn A; Turner, Mary; Sutton, Chris; Smith, Dustin R; Haney, Douglas J; Chernoff, David; Hesterberg, Lyndal K; Carulli, John P; Taylor, Peter C; Shadick, Nancy A; Weinblatt, Michael E; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity measurement is a key component of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management. Biomarkers that capture the complex and heterogeneous biology of RA have the potential to complement clinical disease activity assessment. To develop a multi-biomarker disease activity (MBDA) test for rheumatoid arthritis. Candidate serum protein biomarkers were selected from extensive literature screens, bioinformatics databases, mRNA expression and protein microarray data. Quantitative assays were identified and optimized for measuring candidate biomarkers in RA patient sera. Biomarkers with qualifying assays were prioritized in a series of studies based on their correlations to RA clinical disease activity (e.g. the Disease Activity Score 28-C-Reactive Protein [DAS28-CRP], a validated metric commonly used in clinical trials) and their contributions to multivariate models. Prioritized biomarkers were used to train an algorithm to measure disease activity, assessed by correlation to DAS and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for classification of low vs. moderate/high disease activity. The effect of comorbidities on the MBDA score was evaluated using linear models with adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing. 130 candidate biomarkers were tested in feasibility studies and 25 were selected for algorithm training. Multi-biomarker statistical models outperformed individual biomarkers at estimating disease activity. Biomarker-based scores were significantly correlated with DAS28-CRP and could discriminate patients with low vs. moderate/high clinical disease activity. Such scores were also able to track changes in DAS28-CRP and were significantly associated with both joint inflammation measured by ultrasound and damage progression measured by radiography. The final MBDA algorithm uses 12 biomarkers to generate an MBDA score between 1 and 100. No significant effects on the MBDA score were found for common comorbidities. We followed a stepwise approach to

  9. Development of a multi-biomarker disease activity test for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Centola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disease activity measurement is a key component of rheumatoid arthritis (RA management. Biomarkers that capture the complex and heterogeneous biology of RA have the potential to complement clinical disease activity assessment. OBJECTIVES: To develop a multi-biomarker disease activity (MBDA test for rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: Candidate serum protein biomarkers were selected from extensive literature screens, bioinformatics databases, mRNA expression and protein microarray data. Quantitative assays were identified and optimized for measuring candidate biomarkers in RA patient sera. Biomarkers with qualifying assays were prioritized in a series of studies based on their correlations to RA clinical disease activity (e.g. the Disease Activity Score 28-C-Reactive Protein [DAS28-CRP], a validated metric commonly used in clinical trials and their contributions to multivariate models. Prioritized biomarkers were used to train an algorithm to measure disease activity, assessed by correlation to DAS and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for classification of low vs. moderate/high disease activity. The effect of comorbidities on the MBDA score was evaluated using linear models with adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing. RESULTS: 130 candidate biomarkers were tested in feasibility studies and 25 were selected for algorithm training. Multi-biomarker statistical models outperformed individual biomarkers at estimating disease activity. Biomarker-based scores were significantly correlated with DAS28-CRP and could discriminate patients with low vs. moderate/high clinical disease activity. Such scores were also able to track changes in DAS28-CRP and were significantly associated with both joint inflammation measured by ultrasound and damage progression measured by radiography. The final MBDA algorithm uses 12 biomarkers to generate an MBDA score between 1 and 100. No significant effects on the MBDA score were found for

  10. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  11. Advanced Nanoindentation Testing for Studying Strain-Rate Sensitivity and Activation Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier-Kiener, Verena; Durst, Karsten

    2017-11-01

    Nanoindentation became a versatile tool for testing local mechanical properties beyond hardness and modulus. By adapting standard nanoindentation test methods, simple protocols capable of probing thermally activated deformation processes can be accomplished. Abrupt strain-rate changes within one indentation allow determining the strain-rate dependency of hardness at various indentation depths. For probing lower strain-rates and excluding thermal drift influences, long-term creep experiments can be performed by using the dynamic contact stiffness for determining the true contact area. From both procedures hardness and strain-rate, and consequently strain-rate sensitivity and activation volume can be reliably deducted within one indentation, permitting information on the locally acting thermally activated deformation mechanism. This review will first discuss various testing protocols including possible challenges and improvements. Second, it will focus on different examples showing the direct influence of crystal structure and/or microstructure on the underlying deformation behavior in pure and highly alloyed material systems.

  12. The antioxidant activity test by using DPPH method from the white tea using different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmajana, Doddy A.; Hadiansyah, Firman; Desnilasari, Dewi

    2017-11-01

    The solvents used in this study are: aquades, ethanol and glacial acetic acid. The raw material as the source of antioxidants is white tea. Pure Quercetin is used as a comparing antioxidant. The treatment design was the solvent type for extraction, while the antioxidant activity was tested using DPPH method, with IC50 as the reference of antioxidant activity value. The results of antioxidant activity tests with three different solvent types are IC50 of 22,499 µg/mL for aquades, IC50 of 13,317 µg/mL for Ethanol and IC50 of 60,555 µg/mL for Glacial Acetic Acid. As a control of the standard antioxidant activity value of Quercetin is 4,313 µg/mL.

  13. TEST CONTROL OF CALCULATED TASKS EXECUTION AT THE ALGORITHMIC LEVEL OF EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr O. Petkov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the question of the open calculated tasks test control. These materials are focused on basic algorithmic level of educational activity. A method for estimating the control results based on the implementation of the minimum number of open computational tasks is proposed. The technique allows the possibility of refutation mark, exposed by a computer program. It also describes, the characteristics of the controlling program, realizing the method. There are presented the results of calculated tasks execution using the developed program. Information of the article can be used for control tests developing at any algorithmic level of educational activities and for researching of complexity of open calculated tasks.

  14. Test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activity during memory-encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Brandt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying hemispheric specialization of memory are not completely understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI can be used to develop and test models of hemispheric specialization. In particular for memory tasks however, the interpretation of fMRI results is often hampered by the low reliability of the data. In the present study we therefore analyzed the test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation related to an implicit memory encoding task, with a particular focus on brain activity of the medial temporal lobe (MTL. Fifteen healthy subjects were scanned with fMRI on two sessions (average retest interval 35 days using a commonly applied novelty encoding paradigm contrasting known and unknown stimuli. To assess brain lateralization, we used three different stimuli classes that differed in their verbalizability (words, scenes, fractals. Test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation was assessed by an intraclass-correlation coefficient (ICC, describing the stability of inter-individual differences in the brain activation magnitude over time. We found as expected a left-lateralized brain activation network for the words paradigm, a bilateral network for the scenes paradigm, and predominantly right-hemispheric brain activation for the fractals paradigm. Although these networks were consistently activated in both sessions on the group level, across-subject reliabilities were only poor to fair (ICCs ≤ 0.45. Overall, the highest ICC values were obtained for the scenes paradigm, but only in strongly activated brain regions. In particular the reliability of brain activity of the MTL was poor for all paradigms. In conclusion, for novelty encoding paradigms the interpretation of fMRI results on a single subject level is hampered by its low reliability. More studies are needed to optimize the retest reliability of fMRI activation for memory tasks.

  15. Statistical testing of the association between annual turnover and marketing activities in SMEs using χ2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, Liana; Miclea, Şerban; Izvercian, Monica

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers the impact of SMEs' annual turnover upon its marketing activities (in terms of marketing responsibility, strategic planning and budgeting). Empirical results and literature reviews unveil that SMEs managers incline to partake in planned and profitable marketing activities, depending on their turnover's level. Thus, using the collected data form 131 Romanian SMEs managers, we have applied the Chi-Square Test in order to validate or invalidate three research assumptions (hypotheses), created starting from the empirical and literature findings.

  16. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  17. A comparison of hamstring muscle activity during different screening tests for non-contact ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Rasmus S; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars L; Myklebust, Grethe; Kallemose, Thomas; Lauridsen, Hanne B; Hölmich, Per; Aagaard, Per; Zebis, Mette K

    2016-06-01

    Reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscles during a sports-specific sidecutting movement has been found to be a potential risk factor for non-contact ACL injury. However, whether a reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscle is a general neuromuscular phenomenon and thereby observable independently of the type of clinical screening tests used is not known. This cross sectional study investigated the rank correlation of knee joint neuromuscular activity between three different ACL injury risk screening tests. Sixty-two adolescent female elite football and handball players (16.7±1.3years) participated in the study. Using surface electromyography (EMG) assessment, the neuromuscular activity of medial hamstring muscle (semitendinosus, ST), lateral hamstring muscle (biceps femoris, BF) and quadriceps muscle (vastus lateralis, VL) were monitored during three standardized screening tests - i.e. one-legged horizontal hop (OLH), drop vertical jump (DJ) and sidecutting (SC). Neuromuscular pre-activity was measured in the time interval 10ms prior to initial contact on a force plate. For neuromuscular hamstring muscle pre-activity, correlation analysis (Spearman correlation coefficient) showed low-to-moderate correlations between SC and 1) DJ (rs=0.34-0.36, Pinjury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Anaphylaxis caused by cloxacillin: diagnosis with seriated analysis by way of basophil activation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Trabado, Ana; Cámara Hijón, Carmen; Porcel Carreño, Sergio Luis; Rodríguez Martín, Elena; Fletes Peral, Carmen; Pereira Navarro, Gemma; Jiménez Timón, Soledad; Hernández Arbeiza, Francisco Javier; Fernández Pereira, Luis

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by cloxacillin in a 13-year-old patient. The basophil activation test, performed 25 days after the anaphylactic reaction, was positive to cloxacillin, amoxicillin, and penicillin G and negative to ibuprofen, tolerated by the patient. The analysis was performed 17 days after the reaction was not conclusive because 74% of the basophil population was activated in basal conditions. The abnormally high activation was similar to that found in an analysis before the reaction, exactly 4 days after finishing a well-tolerated treatment with amoxicillin. This first analysis was available because a patient's sample was taken from the emergency laboratory as a blind control for a study to assess the basophil activation test reliability in diagnosis of hypersensitivity to NSAIDs. The high number of activated basophils in basal conditions after treatment with amoxicillin and before the anaphylactic reaction to cloxacillin probably reflects the beginning of the sensitization. Until now, no cases of hypersensitivity to cloxacillin have been diagnosed by means of the basophil activation test.

  19. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to the NTP Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been recognized as an enabling technology for missions to Mars and beyond. However, one of the key challenges of developing a nuclear thermal rocket is conducting verification and development tests on the ground. A number of ground test options are presented, with the Sub-surface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) method identified as a preferred path forward for the NTP program. The SAFE concept utilizes the natural soil characteristics present at the Nevada National Security Site to provide a natural filter for nuclear rocket exhaust during ground testing. A validation method of the SAFE concept is presented, utilizing a non-nuclear sub-scale hydrogen/oxygen rocket seeded with detectible radioisotopes. Additionally, some alternative ground test concepts, based upon the SAFE concept, are presented. Finally, an overview of the ongoing discussions of developing a ground test campaign are presented.

  20. Can vaccinia virus be replaced by MVA virus for testing virucidal activity of chemical disinfectants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp Ingrid

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus strain Lister Elstree (VACV is a test virus in the DVV/RKI guidelines as representative of the stable enveloped viruses. Since the potential risk of laboratory-acquired infections with VACV persists and since the adverse effects of vaccination with VACV are described, the replacement of VACV by the modified vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA was studied by testing the activity of different chemical biocides in three German laboratories. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides (peracetic acid, aldehydes and alcohols were tested in a quantitative suspension test according to the DVV/RKI guideline. All tests were performed with a protein load of 10% fetal calf serum with both viruses in parallel using different concentrations and contact times. Residual virus was determined by endpoint dilution method. Results The chemical biocides exhibited similar virucidal activity against VACV and MVA. In three cases intra-laboratory differences were determined between VACV and MVA - 40% (v/v ethanol and 30% (v/v isopropanol are more active against MVA, whereas MVA seems more stable than VACV when testing with 0.05% glutardialdehyde. Test accuracy across the three participating laboratories was high. Remarkably inter-laboratory differences in the reduction factor were only observed in two cases. Conclusions Our data provide valuable information for the replacement of VACV by MVA for testing chemical biocides and disinfectants. Because MVA does not replicate in humans this would eliminate the potential risk of inadvertent inoculation with vaccinia virus and disease in non-vaccinated laboratory workers.

  1. Exploration of the benefits of an activity-specific test of temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimova, Irina N

    2009-10-01

    The Structure of Temperament Questionnaire (STQ) was proposed by Rusalov in 1989 and subsequently tested in five languages. The questionnaire assesses four temperamental traits (Ergonicity, Plasticity, Tempo, and Emotionality) in three separate areas of activity: physical, verbal-social, and intellectual. The scales are all activity-specific. In 775 Canadian subjects, two temperament tests were compared, both developed on the basis of Pavlovian studies of the nervous system: the activity-specific approach (STQ) and the nonspecific Pavlovian Temperamental Survey (PTS). More significant sex differences were found on activity-specific scales of the STQ than on the nonspecific PTS scales. The pattern of correlations between the STQ scales and the time taken on an experimental task requiring a prolonged and intense word-assessment activity showed stronger correlations with the specific scales of the STQ measuring the dynamic aspects of social-verbal activity, and not with the PTS Strength of Excitation scale, which is based on a "general arousal" concept. The results supported the separation of temperament traits related to three different types of activities and opposed to "general arousal" theories of temperament.

  2. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of bioflavonoids and structural analogues in the Ames/Salmonella test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn GR; Van der Stel JJ; Stavenuiter JFC; Hamzink MRJ; Kreijl CF; LEO; LBO

    1996-01-01

    The mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of bioflavonoids were determined in the bacterial mutagenicity test of Ames, using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. The decreasing order of mutagenic activity found in both strains was quercetin>myricetin-kaempferol>morin hydrate. The

  3. Electromyographic Activity of the Upper Limb in Three Hand Function Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Sanches Silva

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The results suggested the existence of differences in the muscle activation pattern during the performance of hand function evaluations. Occupational therapists should be aware of unique muscle requirements and its impact on the results of dexterity tests during hand function evaluation.

  4. Wind tunnel testing of a full scale helicopter blade section with an upstream active Gurney flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, Richard; Freire Gomez, J.; Booker, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed on an aerofoil section comparable to that of a full scale helicopter blade section with an upstream active Gurney flap in the framework of the European project CleanSky ITD Green RotorCraft. A modified NACA0012 profile was used, with 23 Kulite pressure transducers

  5. A comparison of hamstring muscle activity during different screening tests for non-contact ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus S; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2016-01-01

    during three standardized screening tests - i.e. one-legged horizontal hop (OLH), drop vertical jump (DJ) and sidecutting (SC). Neuromuscular pre-activity was measured in the time interval 10ms prior to initial contact on a force plate. RESULTS: For neuromuscular hamstring muscle pre...

  6. Exciting New Take on a Classic: Crash Test Activity Puts the Egg in the Driver's Seat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Keith

    2011-01-01

    An excellent common activity in technology and engineering classes involves dropping an egg from a significant height in a protective device designed and built by students. This article describes how the author uses the classic "egg drop" as an inspiration to have students modify a small crash test vehicle that speeds down a track and crashes into…

  7. Exciting New Take on a Classic: Crash Testing Activity Puts the Egg in the Driver's Seat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Keith

    2011-01-01

    An excellent common activity in technology and engineering classes involves dropping an egg from a significant height in a protective device designed and built by students. This article describes how the author uses the classic "egg drop" as an inspiration to have students modify a small crash test vehicle that speeds down a track and crashes into…

  8. Thyroid in a jar: towards an integrated in vitro testing strategy for thyroid-active compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jomaa, B.

    2015-01-01

      Jomaa, B. (2015). Thyroid in a Jar: Towards an Integrated In Vitro Testing Strategy for Thyroid-Active Compounds. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands Abstract The aim of this thesis was to find in vitro and toxicogenomics-based alternatives to

  9. Screening of Plant Extracts for Antioxidant Activity: a Comparative Study on Three Testing Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, I.; Beek, van T.A.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Groot, de Æ.; Evstatieva, L.N.

    2002-01-01

    Three methods widely employed in the evaluation of antioxidant activity, namely 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method, static headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) and -carotene bleaching test (BCBT), have been compared with regard to their application in the screening of

  10. Acceptance test of an activity meter to be used as reference in a calibration methodology establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Eduardo L.; Kuahara, Lilian T.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: educorrea1905@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The nuclear medicine is a medical physics area in which radiopharmaceuticals are used in diagnostic procedures. These radioactive elements are administered in the patient and the radiation emitted is detected by an equipment, that makes the body scan, connected to a computer software, and the image is constructed. In order to operate the nuclear medicine service must have calibrated radiation detectors. Thought, it does not exist, in Brazil, an activity meter calibration methodology, which causes many measurement uncertainties. The goal of this study is to present the acceptance test results of an activity meter to be used as reference in a new calibration methodology establishment. It was checked an activity meter Capintec, CRC-25R model, using three control sources ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba). The tests were based on the CNEN-NN 3.05 standard, the manufacturer manual, the TRS-454 and the TECDOC 602 and include: physical inspection, chamber voltage, zero adjustment, background response, data check and repeatability. The linearity and geometry tests could not be made, because the laboratory where the activity meter is located is not authorized to receive non-sealed radioactive sources. The equipment has presented a good behavior. All the results are in the range presented by national and international standards and the equipment is now being used in the laboratory and periodically passes through the quality control tests. (author)

  11. The sensitivity of tests to detect in vivo platelet activation induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative sensitivities for the various in vivo and in vitro tests for platelet activation are unknown. This was studied in a baboon model where limited and more substantial injury to the vascular endothelum was inflicted. The endothelium of a segment of the right carotid artery was removed with a balloon catheter on day ...

  12. Impact of a maximal exercise test on symptoms and activity in chronic fatigue syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazelmans, E.; Bleijenberg, G.; Voeten, M.J.M.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the effects of exercise on symptoms and activity in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). METHODS: Twenty CFS patients and 20 neighborhood controls performed an incremental exercise test until exhaustion. Fatigue, muscle pain, minutes spent resting, and the level of physical

  13. Partnering with School Nutrition Professionals to Promote Fruit and Vegetable Intake through Taste-Testing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirignano, Sherri M.; Hughes, Luanne J.; Wu-Jung, Corey J.; Morgan, Kathleen; Grenci, Alexandra; Savoca, LeeAnne

    2013-01-01

    The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) of 2010 sets new nutrition standards for schools, requiring them to serve a greater variety and quantity of fruits and vegetables. Extension educators in New Jersey partnered with school nutrition professionals to implement a school wellness initiative that included taste-testing activities to support…

  14. Improving Instruction through the Management of Testing and Evaluation Activities: A Guidebook for School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard C.; Bank, Adrianne

    This guidebook shows how school district personnel from many areas--curriculum, instruction, supervision, staff development--can coordinate their activities to focus on instructional improvement. It reveals how data derived from tests, when properly used, can be useful in helping district personnel work with school and community people to assess…

  15. Relationships between spatial activities and scores on the mental rotation test as a function of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Sheryl R; Pickens, Stefanie J

    2005-06-01

    Previous results suggested that female college students' scores on the Mental Rotations Test might be related to their prior experience with spatial tasks. For example, women who played video games scored better on the test than their non-game-playing peers, whereas playing video games was not related to men's scores. The present study examined whether participation in different types of spatial activities would be related to women's performance on the Mental Rotations Test. 31 men and 59 women enrolled at a small, private church-affiliated university and majoring in art or music as well as students who participated in intercollegiate athletics completed the Mental Rotations Test. Women's scores on the Mental Rotations Test benefitted from experience with spatial activities; the more types of experience the women had, the better their scores. Thus women who were athletes, musicians, or artists scored better than those women who had no experience with these activities. The opposite results were found for the men. Efforts are currently underway to assess how length of experience and which types of experience are related to scores.

  16. Estrogenic and mutagenic activities of Crotalaria pallida measured by recombinant yeast assay and Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Paula; Resende, Flávia; Höhne, Ana; de Camargo, Mariana; Espanha, Lívia; Nogueira, Catarine; Melo, Maria; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana

    2013-09-04

    Crotalaria pallida Ailton is a plant belonging to the Fabaceae family, popularly known as "rattle or rattlesnake" and used in traditional medicine to treat swelling of the joints and as a vermifuge. Previous pharmacological studies have also reported anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifungal activities. Nevertheless, scientific information regarding this species is scarce, and there are no reports related to its possible estrogenic and mutagenic effects. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the estrogenic potential of C. pallida leaves by means of the Recombinant Yeast Assay (RYA), seeking an alternative for estrogen replacement therapy during menopause; and to reflect on the safe use of natural products to assess the mutagenic activity of the crude extract from C. pallida leaves, the dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol by means of the Ames test. The recombinant yeast assay with the strain BY4741 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was performed with the ethanolic extract, dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol isolated from the leaves of C. pallida. Mutagenic activity was evaluated by the Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test), using the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA100, TA98, TA97 and TA102, with (+S9) and without (-S9) metabolization, by the preincubation method. All samples showed estrogenic activity, mainly stigmasterol. The ethanolic extract from C. pallida leaves showed mutagenic activity in the TA98 strain (-S9), whereas dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol were found devoid of activity. Considering the excellent estrogenic activity performed by stigmasterol in the RYA associated with the absence of mutagenic activity when evaluated by the Ames test, stigmasterol becomes a strong candidate to be used in hormone replacement therapy during menopause.

  17. Test-retest reliability of a questionnaire to assess physical environmental factors pertaining to physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGinn Aileen P

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the documented benefits of physical activity, many adults do not obtain the recommended amounts. Barriers to physical activity occur at multiple levels, including at the individual, interpersonal, and environmental levels. Only until more recently has there been a concerted focus on how the physical environment might affect physical activity behavior. With this new area of study, self-report measures should be psychometrically tested before use in research studies. Therefore the objective of this study was to document the test-retest reliability of a questionnaire designed to assess physical environmental factors that might be associated with physical activity in a diverse adult population. Methods Test and retest surveys were conducted over the telephone with 106 African American and White women and men living in either Forsyth County, North Carolina or Jackson, Mississippi. Reliability of self-reported environmental factors across four domains (e.g., access to facilities and destinations, functionality and safety, aesthetics, natural environment was determined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC overall and separately by gender and race. Results Generally items displayed moderate and sometimes substantial reliability (ICC between 0.4 to 0.8, with a few differences by gender or race, across each of the domains. Conclusion This study provides some psychometric evidence for the use of many of these questions in studies examining the effect of self-reported physical environmental measures on physical activity behaviors, among African American and White women and men.

  18. Identification of prefrontal cortex (BA10) activation while performing Stroop test using diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Sabin; Chityala, Srujan R.; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2011-03-01

    Stroop test is commonly used as a behavior-testing tool for psychological examinations that are related to attention and cognitive control of the human brain. Studies have shown activations in Broadmann area 10 (BA10) of prefrontal cortex (PFC) during attention and cognitive process. The use of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for human brain mapping is becoming more prevalent. In this study we expect to find neural correlates between the performed cognitive tasks and hemodynamic signals detected by a DOT system. Our initial observation showed activation of oxy-hemoglobin concentration in BA 10, which is consistent with some results seen by positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our study demonstrates the possibility of combining DOT with Stroop test to quantitatively investigate cognitive functions of the human brain at the prefrontal cortex.

  19. Design and Test of Semi-Active Vibration-Reducing System for Lathe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Hu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, its theory design, analysis and test system of semi-active vibration controlling system used for precision machine have been done. Firstly, lathe bed and spindle entity were modeled by using UG software; Then modes of the machine bed and the key components of spindle were obtained by using ANSYS software; Finally, harmonic response analysis of lathe spindle under complex load was acquired, which provided a basis of MR damper’s structure optimization design for a certain type of precision machine. In order to prove its effectives, a prototype semi-active vibration controlling lathe with MR damper was developed. Tests have been done, and comparison results between passive vibration isolation equipment and semi-active vibration controlling equipment proved its good performances of MR damper.

  20. Biological shielding test of hot cells with high active source 60Co (300 TBq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švrčula, P.; Zoul, D.; Zimina, M.; Petříčková, A.; Adamíková, T.; Schulc, M.; Srba, O.

    2017-11-01

    This article describes a method for testing of the efficiency of the biological shielding of the hot cell facility, which were constructed as a part of the project SUSEN. Ten hot cells and one semi-hot cell are present in the facility Radiochemistry II. The shielding is made from steel plates. In order to demonstrate sufficient efficiency of the biological shielding of the hot cells and a correspondence between measured and contractual values at selected points. The test was done using sealed high activity 60Co sources. The results are also used as a proof of the optimization of radiation protection for the workplace of this type. The results confirm significant optimization of radiation protection at the workplace. The dose received by a staff do not exceed one tens of annual limit during active service. Obtained results fulfill general requirements of radiation protection and will be used for further active service of hot cells facility.

  1. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis of Test Endpoints for Detecting the Effects of Endocrine Active Substances in Fish Full Life Cycle Tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crane, M.; Gross, M.; Matthiessen, P.; Ankley, G.T.; Axford, S.; Bjerregaard, P.; Brown, R.; Chapman, P.; Dorgeloh, M.; Galay-Burgos, M.; Green, J.; Hazlerigg, C.; Janssen, J.; Lorenzen, K.; Parrott, J.; Rufli, H.; Scha, C.; Seki, M.; Stolzenberg, H.C.; van der Hoeven, N.; Vethaak, A.D.; Winfield, J.; Zok, S.; Wheeler, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fish full life cycle (FFLC) tests are increasingly required in the ecotoxicological assessment of endocrine active substances. However, FFLC tests have not been internationally standardized or validated, and it is currently unclear how such tests should best be designed to provide statistically

  2. [Basophil activation test--a practical approach to diagnosis of common respiratory allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniak, Małgorzata; Dyga, Wojciech; Porębski, Grzegorz; Czarnobilska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of immediate allergy is based on clinical data, skin prick tests (SPT), and measurements of allergen-specific IgE (sIgE). Basophil activation test (BAT) can supplement these methods and obviate their disadvantages, and possibly replace allergen challenge tests, such as a nasal provocative test (NPT). In this study, we assessed the influence of different storage times on BAT results. Futhermore, we compared the results of SPT, sIgE and NPT against BAT for common aeroallergens. BAT was performed in twelve patients with allergic rhinitis sensitized to birch pollen or mites 1, 4 and 24 hours after blood sampling. CD63 was used as an activation marker. Three serial 10-fold dilutions (1:1, 1:10, 100) of allergen extract were employed. The further 10 individuals allergic to mites undergone complete diagnostic evaluation including SPT, sIgE measurements, NPT and BAT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the diagnostic techniques and tests conditions. Basophil activation expressed as stimulation index did not decline significantly up to 24h. Exposure to causal allergens resulted in a dose-dependent increase in expression of CD63 on peripheral blood basophils in tested individuals. We did not observed substantial differences in results of the investigated diagnostic methods determined by a ROC analysis. Flow-assisted diagnosis of common respiratory allergy relies upon allergen-induced activation of blood basophils can be a useful approach to determine the clinically relevant allergen in sensitized individuals. BAT with inhaled allergens can be performed within 24 hours after blood collecting into a tube with EDTA. Allergen suitable for NPT in appropriate dilutions is a good reagent for use in BAT.

  3. Development, validation and applications of the monocyte activation test for pyrogens based on human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Stefanie; von Aulock, Sonja; Daneshian, Mardas; Hartung, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms such as Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria, viruses and fungi contain components that activate the innate immune system. These components, called pyrogens (Greek: pyros=fire), can occur independently of viable microorganisms and are a major safety concern in parenterally administered drugs, since they can cause severe reactions such as fever, organ failure, and shock in the recipient. So far these drugs have been tested by injecting them intravenously into rabbits and measuring their fever reaction or, alternatively, by the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL) test, employing the coagulation of the hemolymph lysate of Limulus polyphemus. Both tests have inherent limitations. A new in vitro monocyte activation test (MAT) based on human whole blood, capable of measuring all pyrogens relevant to the human patient, introduced in this journal in 1995, was validated and recently accepted by European Pharmacopoeia and US FDA. This review describes its principle, development, validation and the wide spectrum of applications, such as for testing of medical devices, blood products, toxic or immunomodulatory drugs, dialysis liquids, lipidic parenterals, and air quality. This alternative method promises to replace the rabbit pyrogen test fully and to overcome several limitations of the LAL assay.

  4. Responsiveness of the active wrist joint position sense test after distal radius fracture intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannopoulos, Christos; Sitler, Michael; Michlovitz, Susan; Tucker, Carole; Tierney, Ryan

    Prospective cohort study. The active wrist joint position sense (JPS) test has been determined to be a clinically useful test for assessing wrist sensorimotor (SM) status after distal radius fracture (DRF). Its responsiveness is yet to be determined. Primary study aim was to determine the active wrist JPS test responsiveness to detect change in wrist SM status at 8 and 12 weeks after DRF treatment intervention. Secondary aims were to compare group (nonsurgical, surgical, high, and low pain) test responsiveness; compare pain-level group participants test scores; determine the relationship between test minimal clinically important difference (MCID) value and function; compare functional outcomes across assessment times; and determine the Patient Global Impression of Change Scale intrarater reliability. A total of 33 male and female participants were tested at baseline, 8, and 12 weeks after nonsurgical (n = 13) and surgical (n = 20) DRF treatment interventions. Distribution-based analysis encompassed both group- (ie, effect size, standardized response mean) and individual-based (ie, minimum detectable change) statistical indices. Anchor-based analysis determined the MCID value by linking test scores to the Patient Global Impression of Change Scale. The active wrist JPS test is highly responsive based on effect size (8 weeks = 1.53 and 12 weeks = 2.36) and standardized response mean (8 weeks = 1.57 and 12 weeks = 2.14). Statistically significant minimum detectable change values were 4.28° and 4.94° at 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Clinically meaningful MCID values were 5.00° and 7.09° at 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Between treatment type and pain-level group responsiveness levels were not significantly different. High-pain participants demonstrated significantly greater JPS deficit. Test MCID values and function were significantly associated. This is the first study to determine the active wrist JPS test responsiveness as reflected by its group- and

  5. Antidepressant-like activity of turmerone in behavioral despair tests in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jung-Chun; Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Liu, Chia-Yu; Huang, Hui-Chi; Wu, Lung-Yuan; Peng, Wen-Huang

    2013-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-depressive activity of turmerone after one-week administration by using a mouse forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Animals were divided into four groups (n = 10 /group): control (0.9% saline), the three doses of turmerone (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg) for one-week treatment. To assess the effect of turmerone on locomotor activity, mice were evaluated in the open-field paradigm. Forced swimming test (FST) and Tail suspension test (TST) were used to take as a measure of antidepressant activity. The probable mechanisms of action of the anti-depressive effect of turmerone was also investigated by measuring the activity of monoamine oxidase-A and corticosterone levels in the blood and the levels of monoamines in the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus of the mice. Turmerone (2.5, 5.0 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced the immobility time of mice in both the FST and TST, but it did not significantly affect the ambulatory and total movements of mice. However, hyperactivity might explain the results. In addition, turmerone decreased the corticosterone level in the blood while it increased the levels of 5-HT in cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, the level of NE in striatum and hippocampus, the levels of MHPG and DOPAC in hypothalamus, the level of 5-HIAA in striatum, and the level of DA in striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. Turmerone (2.5, 5.0 mg/kg) decreased the activity of MAO-A in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of mouse brain. After one-week administration, turmerone produced antidepressant-like effects. The mechanisms of action of anti-depressive effect of turmerone seemed to involve an increase of the monoamines level decreasing the MAO-A activity and the stress of mice.

  6. Basophil activation test for the diagnosis of hymenoptera venom allergy in childhood: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, H; Tenbrock, K; Baron, J; Merk, H; Lehmann, S

    2011-01-01

    Cellular in vitro tests such as the CD63-based basophil activation test (BAT) have been successfully used to diagnose hymenoptera venom sensitization in adult patients while this has not been investigated in children so far. 15 children (9 male, 6 female; 12.7±3.5 years) with suspected allergy to vespula (VE) or honey bee (HB) venom entered this study. Besides serum tryptase (ST) levels, sensitisation against VE and HB was assessed by titrated skin testing and determination of venom-specific serum IgE (sIgE) in all patients. After stimulation with 50 ng of insect venom, CD63-expression of activated basophils was measured by flow cytometry. Skin testing permitted identification of the culprit insect in 7 patients, 3 cases were diagnosed by additional sIgE measurements. In addition, BAT identified mono-sensitization in 3 further patients with double sensitization upon skin and sIgE testing. Test sensitivity was lower for the BAT (67-75%) than for skin testing (89-100%) and sIgE determination (100%). Neither basophil activation nor sIgE serum levels were identified as reliable predictors of sting reaction severity. In all patients, ST measurements yielded values below the upper reference value. The current pilot study suggests a possible clinical benefit of BAT analysis in the diagnostic workup of pediatric insect venom allergy. However, further large-scale trials are required to investigate whether the BAT reliably contributes to the correct identification of the culprit insect venom. Due to its comparatively low sensitivity, the BAT should currently not be used in isolation from, but only in combination with established diagnostic instruments. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Closeout Report for the Refractory Metal Accelerated Heat Pipe Life Test Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; Reid, R.; Stewart, E.; Hickman, R.; Mireles, O.

    2013-01-01

    With the selection of a gas-cooled reactor, this heat pipe accelerated life test activity was closed out and its resources redirected. The scope of this project was to establish the long-term aging effects on Mo-44.5%Re sodium heat pipes when subjected to space reactor temperature and mass fluences. To date, investigators have demonstrated heat pipe life tests of alkali metal systems up to .50,000 hours. Unfortunately, resources have not been available to examine the effect of temperature, mass fluence, or impurity level on corrosion or to conduct post-test forensic examination of heat pipes. The key objective of this effort was to establish a cost/time effective method to systematically test alkali metal heat pipes with both practical and theoretical benefits. During execution of the project, a heat pipe design was established, a majority of the laboratory test equipment systems specified, and operating and test procedures developed. Procurements for the heat pipe units and all major test components were underway at the time the stop work order was issued. An extremely important outcome was the successful fabrication of an annular wick from Mo-5%Re screen (the single, most difficult component to manufacture) using a hot isostatic pressing technique. This Technical Publication (TP) includes specifics regarding the heat pipe calorimeter water-cooling system, vendor design for the radio frequency heating system, possible alternative calorimeter designs, and progress on the vanadium equilibration technique. The methods provided in this TP and preceding project documentation would serve as a good starting point to rapidly implement an accelerated life test. Relevant test data can become available within months, not years, and destructive examination of the first life test heat pipe might begin within 6 months of test initiation. Final conclusions could be drawn in less than a quarter of the mission duration for a long-lived, fission-powered, deep space probe.

  8. Development and whirl tower test of the SMART active flap rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Kennedy, Dennis K.; Stemple, Alan D.; Anand, V. R.; Birchette, Terry S.

    2004-07-01

    A full scale Smart Material Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) system with piezoelectric actuated blade flaps was developed and whirl tower tested. The development effort included design, fabrication, and component testing of rotor blades, trailing edge flaps, piezoelectric actuators, switching power amplifiers, and the data/power system. Simulations and model scale wind tunnel tests have shown that this system can provide 80% vibration reduction, 10dB noise reduction for a helicopter passing overhead, and substantial aerodynamic performance gains. Whirl tower testing of the 34-foot diameter rotor demonstrated the functionality, robustness, and required authority of the active flap system. The program involved extensive development work and risk reduction tests which resulted in a robust, high performance actuator and a tightly integrated actuator, flap, and blade system. The actuator demonstrated excellent performance during bench testing and has accumulated over 60 million cycles under a spectrum of loading conditions. The flight worthy active flap rotor blades were based on a modified design of the FAA certified MD900 Explorer production rotor blade. Whirl tower testing was conducted with full rotor instrumentation and a 5-component balance. The rotor was tested for 13 hours under a range of conditions, including 7 hours of flap operation. Flap inputs included open loop static and dynamic commands. The flaps showed excellent authority with oscillatory thrust greater than 10% of the steady baseline thrust. Various flap actuation frequency sweeps were run to investigate the dynamics of the rotor and the flap system. Limited closed loop tests used hub accelerations and hub loads for feedback. Proving the integration, robust operation, and authority of the flap system were the key objectives met by the whirl tower test. This success depended on tailoring the piezoelectric materials and actuator to the application and meeting actuator/blade integration requirements

  9. Analysis of α-glucosidase enzyme activity used in a rapid test for steam sterilization assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, B; Korza, G; Setlow, P

    2016-05-01

    This study was to determine the sources, location and identity of α-glucosidases in dormant/germinating/outgrowing spores and growing cells of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953, an enzymatic activity in spores used in rapid tests of steam sterilization. α-Glucosidase activity in spores and cells was determined measuring methylumbelliferyl-α-d-glucoside (α-MUG) or α-MUG-6-phosphate hydrolysis fluorometrically. While α-MUG-6-phosphate was not hydrolysed by cell or spore extracts, assays with α-MUG showed that: (1) the α-glucosidase activity was inside and outside spores, and the activity outside spores was largely removed by buffer washes or heat activation, whereas α-glucosidase activity was only inside vegetative cells; (2) most α-glucosidase activity in cells and spores was soluble; (3) Western blots and enzyme inhibition using an anti-α-glucosidase antiserum identified ≥2 α-glucosidases in spores and growing cells; (4) α-glucosidase-specific activities were similar in dormant, germinated and outgrowing spore and growing cell extracts; and (5) significant α-glucosidase was synthesized during spore germination and outgrowth and cell growth, this synthesis was not repressed by glucose nor induced by α-MUG, but glucose inhibited α-MUG uptake. α-MUG hydrolysis by G. stearothermophilus is by α-MUG uptake and hydrolysis by ≥2 α-glucosidases associated with dormant spores and synthesized by germinating and outgrowing spores. The enzyme activity observed by sterilization assurance assays appears likely to come from heat-stable enzyme in the spore core and enzyme(s) synthesized in spore outgrowth. The results of this work provide new insight into the science behind a rapid test for steam sterilization assurance. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Wing Torsional Stiffness Tests of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) F/A-18 airplane has been ground-load-tested to quantify its torsional stiffness. The test has been performed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in November 1996, and again in April 2001 after a wing skin modification was performed. The primary objectives of these tests were to characterize the wing behavior before the first flight, and provide a before-and-after measurement of the torsional stiffness. Two streamwise load couples have been applied. The wing skin modification is shown to have more torsional flexibility than the original configuration has. Additionally, structural hysteresis is shown to be reduced by the skin modification. Data comparisons show good repeatability between the tests.

  11. Activity Limitation in Glaucoma: Objective Assessment by the Cambridge Glaucoma Visual Function Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalicky, Simon E; McAlinden, Colm; Khatib, Tasneem; Anthony, Louise May; Sim, Sing Yue; Martin, Keith R; Goldberg, Ivan; McCluskey, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We design and evaluate a computer-based objective simulation of activity limitation related to glaucoma. A cross-sectional study was performed involving 70 glaucoma patients and 14 controls. Mean age was 69.0 ± 10.2 years; 49 (58.3%) were male. The Cambridge Glaucoma Visual Function Test (CGVFT) was administered to all participants. Rasch analysis and criterion, convergent, and divergent validity tests assessed the psychometric properties of the CGVFT. Regression modeling was used to determine factors predictive of CGVFT person measures. Sociodemographic information, better and worse eye visual field parameters, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and the Rasch-analyzed Glaucoma Activity Limitation-9 (GAL-9) and Visual Function Questionnaire Utility Index (VFQUI) questionnaire responses were recorded. From 139 pilot CGVFT items, 59 had acceptable fit to the Rasch model, with acceptable precision (person separation index, 2.13) and targeting. Cambridge Glaucoma Visual Function Test person measure (logit) scores increased between controls (-0.20 ± 0.08) and patients with mild (-0.15 ± 0.08), moderate (-0.13 ± 0.10), and severe (-0.05 ± 0.10) glaucoma (P test administered to a cohort of glaucoma patients. It may benefit glaucoma patients, careers, health care providers, and policy makers, providing increased awareness of activity limitation due to glaucoma.

  12. Motivation towards extracurricular activities and motivation at school: A test of the generalization effect hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denault, Anne-Sophie; Guay, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is a promising avenue for enhancing students' school motivation. Using self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), the goal of this study was to test a serial multiple mediator model. In this model, students' perceptions of autonomy support from their extracurricular activity leader predicted their activity-based intrinsic and identified regulations. In turn, these regulations predicted their school-based intrinsic and identified regulations during the same school year. Finally, these regulations predicted their school-based intrinsic and identified regulations one year later. A total of 276 youths (54% girls) from disadvantaged neighborhoods were surveyed over two waves of data collection. The proposed mediation model was supported for both types of regulation. These results highlight the generalization effects of motivation from the extracurricular activity context to the school context. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mucolytic Activity Test of Shallot Extract (Allium Ascalonicum L) by in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswati, D. A.; Dhina, M. A.; Mubaroq, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to explain the results of research on the mucolytic activity of shallot extract is proportional to 0.2% N-Acetylcysteine. Shallot (Allium ascalonicum L.) is efficacious for treating cough. This research was conducted by examining the mucolytic activity of shallot extract made with various dose concentration 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. The mucolytic activity test was performed in vitro based on the decrease in the viscosity of the egg whites by using the Brookfield viscometer. The results showed that shallot extract with dose concentration of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% had mucolytic activity by decreasing the viscosity of egg white solution. The effective concentration almost equal to 0.2% N-Acetylcysteine is at 25% concentration.

  14. F-106B airplane active control landing gear drop test performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, William E.; Mcgehee, John R.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Vogler, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads and vibrations resulting from landing impact and from runway and taxiway unevenness are recognized as significant factors in causing fatigue damage, dynamic stress on the airframe, crew and passenger discomfort, and reduction of the pilot's ability to control the aircraft during ground operations. One potential method for improving operational characteristics of aircraft on the ground is the application of active control technology to the landing gears to reduce ground loads applied to the airframe. An experimental investigation was conducted on series-hydraulic active control nose gear. The experiments involved testing the gear in both passive and active control modes. Results of this investigation show that a series-hydraulic active control gear is feasible and that such a gear is effective in reducing the loads transmitted by the gear to the airframe during ground operations.

  15. The Status of Psychological Testing in Clinical Psychology: Relationships Between Test Use and Professional Activities and Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Terry C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The occupational specializations and therapeutic orientations of clinical psychologists were related to their use and opinion of testing. The two tests clinicians considered most important to clinical practice were the Rorschach and the Thematic Apperception Test. Among the 10 most frequently recommended test, projective measures were listed 30…

  16. Negativization rates of IgE radioimmunoassay and basophil activation test in immediate reactions to penicillins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, T D; Torres, M J; Blanca-López, N; Rodríguez-Bada, J L; Gomez, E; Canto, G; Mayorga, C; Blanca, M

    2009-02-01

    Skin test sensitivity in patients with immediate allergy to penicillins tends to decrease over time, but no information is available concerning in vitro tests. We analysed the negativization rates of two in vitro methods that determine specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies, the basophil activation test using flow cytometry (BAT) and the radioallergosorbent test (RAST), in immediate allergic reactions to penicillins. Forty-one patients with immediate allergic reactions to amoxicillin were followed up over a 4-year period. BAT and RAST were performed at 6-month intervals. Patients were randomized into groups: Group I, skin tests carried out at regular intervals; Group II, skin tests made only at the beginning of the study. Differences were observed between RAST and BAT (P RAST. Levels of specific IgE antibodies tended to decrease over time in patients with immediate allergic reactions to amoxicillin. Conversion to negative took longer for the RAST assay, although the differences were only detected with the amoxicillin hapten. Skin testing influenced the rate of negativization of the RAST assay, contributing to maintenance of in vitro sensitivity. Because of the loss of sensitivity over time, the determination of specific IgE antibodies to penicillins in patients with immediate allergic reactions must be done as soon as possible after the reaction.

  17. Flight Test of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, David

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of flight tests performed on the F/A active aeroelastic wing airplane is shown. The topics include: 1) F/A-18 AAW Airplane; 2) F/A-18 AAW Control Surfaces; 3) Flight Test Background; 4) Roll Control Effectiveness Regions; 5) AAW Design Test Points; 6) AAW Phase I Test Maneuvers; 7) OBES Pitch Doublets; 8) OBES Roll Doublets; 9) AAW Aileron Flexibility; 10) Phase I - Lessons Learned; 11) Control Law Development and Verification & Validation Testing; 12) AAW Phase II RFCS Envelopes; 13) AAW 1-g Phase II Flight Test; 14) Region I - Subsonic 1-g Rolls; 15) Region I - Subsonic 1-g 360 Roll; 16) Region II - Supersonic 1-g Rolls; 17) Region II - Supersonic 1-g 360 Roll; 18) Region III - Subsonic 1-g Rolls; 19) Roll Axis HOS/LOS Comparison Region II - Supersonic (open-loop); 20) Roll Axis HOS/LOS Comparison Region II - Supersonic (closed-loop); 21) AAW Phase II Elevated-g Flight Test; 22) Region I - Subsonic 4-g RPO; and 23) Phase II - Lessons Learned

  18. Lead Testing in Soil Contaminated with Pesticides and Reducing its Effects by the Activity of Activated Charcoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Chand Thakur

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead poisoning is classically defined as exposure to high levels of lead typically associated with severe health effects, but being a heavy metal which is potentially toxic, if present at even minor concentrations, it is of great concern to environmentalists and medical professionals alike. Activated charcoal has been known to adsorb heavy metals and thus, was used in this study as well. Aim: The main aim of this study was to decrease the lead content of agricultural soil which is attributed to the use of pesticides containing lead by using activated charcoal. Material and Methods: The lead contamination in agricultural soil and plant dry mass samples which increases due to the effect of pesticides was detected by using Field Portable X-Ray Fluroscence (FP-XRF spectrophotometer. Soil was taken in plastic trays and the plants were grown and watered daily. The collected ground water was also tested. For the estimation of lead in water samples, Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (GFAAS was employed. Results: This study suggested the remediation of soil lead content by using activated charcoal. The study also revealed that activated charcoal not only adsorbs lead but also inhibits the accumulation of lead in ground water. Conclusion: This study promotes a cost effective process to treat agricultural lands polluted with leaded pesticides. Water purifiers, refrigerator etc. contain varying amounts of activated charcoal, after usage of these appliances it can be recycled and used as a source of activated charcoal. This can be applied in pesticide contaminated fields either in the form of slurry or by spraying.

  19. Final payload test results for the RemoveDebris active debris removal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forshaw, Jason L.; Aglietti, Guglielmo S.; Salmon, Thierry; Retat, Ingo; Roe, Mark; Burgess, Christopher; Chabot, Thomas; Pisseloup, Aurélien; Phipps, Andy; Bernal, Cesar; Chaumette, François; Pollini, Alexandre; Steyn, Willem H.

    2017-09-01

    Since the beginning of the space era, a significant amount of debris has progressively been generated in space. Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions have been suggested as a way of limiting and controlling future growth in orbital space debris by actively deploying vehicles to remove debris. The European Commission FP7-sponsored RemoveDebris mission, which started in 2013, draws on the expertise of some of Europe's most prominent space institutions in order to demonstrate key ADR technologies in a cost effective ambitious manner: net capture, harpoon capture, vision-based navigation, dragsail de-orbiting. This paper provides an overview of some of the final payload test results before launch. A comprehensive test campaign is underway on both payloads and platform. The tests aim to demonstrate both functional success of the experiments and that the experiments can survive the space environment. Space environmental tests (EVT) include vibration, thermal, vacuum or thermal-vacuum (TVAC) and in some cases EMC and shock. The test flow differs for each payload and depends on the heritage of the constituent payload parts. The paper will also provide an update to the launch, expected in 2017 from the International Space Station (ISS), and test philosophy that has been influenced from the launch and prerequisite NASA safety review for the mission. The RemoveDebris mission aims to be one of the world's first in-orbit demonstrations of key technologies for active debris removal and is a vital prerequisite to achieving the ultimate goal of a cleaner Earth orbital environment.

  20. Comparative investigations of genotoxic activity of five nitriles in the comet assay and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jong-C; Hseu, You C; Chen, Chin-H; Wang, Shu-H; Chen, Ssu C

    2009-09-30

    Two short-term assays, the modified Ames test and the comet assay, were carried out to evaluate the genotoxicity of five nitriles (acetonitrile, propionitrile, methacrylonitrile, butyronitrile, and benzonitrile). With the comet assay, all the nitriles studied were found to induce the genotoxicity in human lymphocytes and Hep G2 cells. Except for butyronitrile, the genotoxic potency in lymphocytes was more pronounced than that in Hep G2 cells, and the rank order of genotoxicity induced by these five nitriles in lymphocytes was different from that in Hep G2 cells, indicating that the pathways leading to genotoxicity in both types of cells were different. In the modified Ames test, no tested nitriles showed mutagenic activity on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98 and TA 100 with and without metabolic activation. Comparing the results obtained from both tests in this study, the comet assay seems to be more sensitive than the modified Ames test. Thus, the comet assay can be used to detect the genotoxicity of all nitriles.

  1. Pre-irradiation testing of actively cooled Be-Cu divertor modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Kuehnlein, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A set of neutron irradiation tests is prepared on different plasma facing materials (PFM) candidates and miniaturized components for ITER. Beside beryllium the irradiation program which will be performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, includes different carbon fiber composites (CFQ) and tungsten alloys. The target values for the neutron irradiation will be 0.5 dpa at temperatures of 350{degrees}C and 700{degrees}C, resp.. The post irradiation examination (PIE) will cover a wide range of mechanical tests; in addition the degradation of thermal conductivity will be investigated. To determine the high heat flux (HHF) performance of actively cooled divertor modules, electron beam tests which simulate the expected heat loads during the operation of ITER, are scheduled in the hot cell electron beam facility JUDITH. These tests on a selection of different actively cooled beryllium-copper and CFC-copper divertor modules are performed before and after neutron irradiation; the pre-irradiation testing is an essential part of the program to quantify the zero-fluence high heat flux performance and to detect defects in the modules, in particular in the brazed joints.

  2. Active tower damping and pitch balancing - design, simulation and field test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckwitz, Daniel; Shan, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The tower is one of the major components in wind turbines with a contribution to the cost of energy of 8 to 12% [1]. In this overview the load situation of the tower will be described in terms of sources of loads, load components and fatigue contribution. Then two load reduction control schemes are described along with simulation and field test results. Pitch Balancing is described as a method to reduce aerodynamic asymmetry and the resulting fatigue loads. Active Tower Damping is reducing the tower oscillations by applying appropiate pitch angle changes. A field test was conducted on an Areva M5000 wind turbine.

  3. Integral test on activation cross section of tag gas nuclides using fast neutron spectrum fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    Activation cross sections of tag gas nuclides, which will be used for the failed fuel detection and location in FBR plants, were evaluated by the irradiation tests in the fast neutron spectrum fields in JOYO and YAYOI. The comparison of their measured radioactivities and the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 cross section set showed that the C/E values ranged from 0.8 to 2.8 for the calibration tests in YAYOI and that the present accuracies of these cross sections were confirmed. (author)

  4. A review of the TAEA proficiency test on natural and anthropogenic radionuclides activities in black tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeltepe, E; Şahin, N K; Aslan, N; Hult, M; Özçayan, G; Wershofen, H; Yücel, Ü

    2017-10-07

    A proficiency test amongst 15 Turkish laboratories with participation of 5 non-Turkish laboratories was organized to determine the 137 Cs, 40 K and 90 Sr massic activities in black tea powder samples. The bulk material, consisting of tea produced in 2014, was mixed with contaminated tea that was withdrawn from the market after the Chernobyl accident. Nineteen laboratories reported 41 results. The evaluation of the results was based on the accuracy and precision criteria adopted by the IAEA Proficiency Testing Group and resulted in 49% acceptable results, 19% acceptable with warning and 32% were found to be not acceptable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 3D shoulder kinematics for static vs dynamic and passive vs active testing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Lachaine, Xavier; Allard, Paul; Godbout, Véronique; Begon, Mickael

    2015-09-18

    Shoulder motion analysis provides clinicians with references of normal joint rotations. Shoulder joints orientations assessment is often based on series of static positions, while clinicians perform either passive or active tests and exercises mostly in dynamic. These conditions of motion could modify joint coordination and lead to discrepancies with the established references. Hence, the objective was to evaluate the influence of static vs dynamic and passive vs active testing conditions on shoulder joints orientations. Twenty asymptomatic subjects setup with 45 markers on the upper limb and trunk were tracked by an optoelectronic system. Static positions (30°, 60°, 90° and 120° of thoracohumeral elevation) and dynamic motion both in active condition and passively mobilised by an examiner were executed. Three-dimensional sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, scapulothoracic and glenohumeral joint angles (12 in total) representing the distal segment orientation relative to the proximal segment orientation were estimated using a shoulder kinematical chain model. Separate four-way repeated measures ANOVA were applied on the 12 joint angles with factors of static vs dynamic, passive vs active, thoracohumeral elevation angle (30°, 60°, 90° and 120°) and plane of elevation (frontal and sagittal). Scapulothoracic lateral rotation progressed more during arm elevation in static than in dynamic gaining 4.2° more, and also in passive than in active by 6.6°. Glenohumeral elevation increased more during arm elevation in active than in passive by 4.4°. Shoulder joints orientations are affected by the testing conditions, which should be taken into consideration for data acquisition, inter-study comparison or clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Passive characterization and active testing of epoxy bonded regenerators for room temperature magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Tian; Navickaité, Kristina; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    -layer AMR based on spherical particles is tested actively in a small reciprocating magnetic refrigerator, achieving a no-load temperature span of 16.8 °C using about 143 g of epoxy-bonded La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hy materials. Simulations based on a one-dimensional (1D) AMR model are also implemented to validate......Epoxy bonded regenerators of both spherical and irregular La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hy particles have been developed aiming at increasing the mechanical strength of active magnetic regenerators (AMR) loaded with brittle magnetocaloric materials and improving the flexibility of shaping the regenerator geometry...

  7. Aerobic exercise and cold pressor test induce hypoalgesia in active and inactive men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Jørgensen, Maria N.

    2015-01-01

    . It was hypothesized that active subjects had more efficient pain inhibition compared with inactive subjects. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover study with 2 days of data collection. METHODS: Fifty-six (28 females) subjects participated in this study. Subjects were subgrouped into active (n = 30) and inactive (n = 26......). Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was assessed by cold pressor testing. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) was assessed after 15 minutes bicycling at a heart rate corresponding to 75% VO2max. A control session of 15 minutes quiet rest was also included. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded...

  8. Evaluation of diagnostic tests for cytomegalovirus active infection in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fontanive Franco

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is a main viral infection after kidney transplantation. The diagnostic methods currently employed are pp65 antigenemia and nucleic acid amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and aim at detecting viral replication. Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate and compare by both methods the incidence of CMV active infection in kidney transplant patients and to establishthe best clinical-laboratory correlation. Methods: Thirty sequential kidney transplant recipients were enrolled in a single center prospective cohort study. Peripheral blood samples were drawn from day 15 until the 6th month after transplantation and tested for CMV replication by pp65 antigenemia and quantitative PCR assays (qPCR. Results: Two hundred forty samples were analyzed and the incidence of active infection was similar by both methods. Time elapsed to the first positive test was almost identical but more samples tested positive by qPCR than by antigenemia in a behavior that was almost evenly distributed overtime. Agreement between tests was observed in 217 samples (90.4%; kappa = 0.529; p < 0.001 and in 25 patients the tests were concordant (83.3%; kappa = 0.667; p < 0.001. The evaluation of the diagnostic parameters for CMV replication revealed higher sensitivity for the qPCR test (82.1% against antigenemia (59.0%. Quantitative PCR was also slightly more accurate than antigenemia. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that both methods are suitable and have almost equivalent accuracy for the detection of post-transplant cytomegalovirus replication. The choice for either test must take in consideration the demand, execution capability and cost-effectiveness at each institution.

  9. Relationships Among Two Repeated Activity Tests and Aerobic Fitness of Volleyball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Yoav; May-Rom, Moran; Ekshtien, Aya; Eisenstein, Tamir; Nemet, Dan; Eliakim, Alon

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine performance indices of a repeated sprint test (RST) and to examine their relationships with performance indices of a repeated jump test (RJT) and with aerobic fitness among trained volleyball players. Sixteen male volleyball players performed RST (6 × 30 m sprints), RJT (6 sets of 6 consecutive jumps), and an aerobic power test (20-m Shuttle Run Test). Performance indices for the RST and the RJT were (a) the ideal 30-m run time (IS), the total run time (TS) of the 6 sprints, and the performance decrement (PD) during the test and (b) the ideal jump height (IJ), the total jump height (TJ) of all the jumps, and the PD during the test, respectively. No significant correlations were found between performance indices of the RST and RJT. Significant correlations were found between PD, IS, and TS in the RST protocol and predicted peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (r = -0.60, -0.75, -0.77, respectively). No significant correlations were found between performance indices of the RJT (IJ, TJ, and PD) and peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2. The findings suggest that a selection of repeated activity test protocols should acknowledge the specific technique used in the sport, and that a distinct RJT, rather than the classic RST, is more appropriate for assessing the anaerobic capabilities of volleyball players. The findings also suggest that aerobic fitness plays only a minor role in performance maintenance throughout characteristic repeated jumping activity of a volleyball game.

  10. PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION, AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY TEST OF Ni-Mo/NATURAL ZEOLITE ON PYRIDINE HYDRODENITROGENATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Kadarwati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation, characterization, and catalytic activity test of Ni-Mo/natural zeolite on pyridine hydrodenitrogenation were carried out. Preparation of catalyst was conducted by impregnation method using nickel nitrate hexahydrate and ammonium heptamolibdate precursor as Ni and Mo source respectively. Characterization of catalyst was conducted by using gravimetry, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and X-ray diffraction method. Catalytic activity test on pyridine hydrodenitrogenation was carried out by using flow system reactor with hydrogen flow rate variable. The research results showed that the catalyst's total acidity and crystallinity are increased with level of impregnation success of 96.71% and 90.08% respectively. Ni-Mo/natural zeolites able to increase the catalytic conversion up to 71.78% at 350 °C and hydrogen flow rate of 10 mL/min with more highly varied product distribution. Assuming that the pyridine hydrodenitrogenation follows the pseudo first order kinetics.

  11. F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test results viewed from an active controls perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalai, K. J.; Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test program are presented, along with the implications for active controls applications. The closed loop performance of the digital control system agreed well with the sampled-data system design predictions. The digital fly-by-wire mechanization also met pilot flying qualities requirements. The advantages of mechanizing the control laws in software became apparent during the flight program and were realized without sacrificing overall system reliability. This required strict software management. The F-8 flight test results are shown to be encouraging in light of the requirements that must be met by control systems for flight-critical active controls applications.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of NaOCl and chlorhexidine using a contact test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassone Luciana Moura

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the in vitro antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (1% and 5% and chlorhexidine (0.12%, 0.5% and 1%. Bacterial samples (ATCC of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were submitted to a contact test. Solutions were evaluated at different time intervals: immediately, 5 min, 15 min, and 30 min after contact and repeated 10 times. The results of the contact test showed that 0.12% chlorhexidine did not eliminate E. faecalis at any time interval, while 0.5% and 1% chlorhexidine and 1% and 5% sodium hypochlorite did. These results permit us to conclude that to obtain better antimicrobial activity, chlorhexidine in a concentration greater than 0.12% should be used.

  13. Testing methods for antimicrobial activity of TiO2 photocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markov Siniša L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a lot of commercial TiO2 photocatalyst products have been developed and extensively studied for prospective and safe antimicrobial application in daily life, medicine, laboratories, food and pharmaceutical industry, waste water treatments and in development of new self-cleaning and antimicrobial materials, surfaces and paints. This paper reviews the studies published worldwide on killing microorganisms, methods for testing the antimicrobial activity, light sources and intensities, as well as calculation methods usually used when evaluating the antimicrobial properties of the TiO2-based products. Additionally, some strengths and weaknesses of the available methods for testing the antimicrobial activity of TiO2 photocatalyst products have been pointed out.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45008

  14. Usability testing of a monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weegen S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sanne van der Weegen,1 Renée Verwey,1,2 Huibert J Tange,3 Marieke D Spreeuwenberg,1 Luc P de Witte1,2 1Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, the Netherlands; 2Research Centre Technology in Care, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands; 3Department of General Practice, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, the Netherlands Introduction: A monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity, consisting of an activity sensor, smartphone application (app, and website for patients and their practice nurses, has been developed: the 'It's LiFe!' tool. In this study the usability of the tool was evaluated by technology experts and end users (people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type 2 diabetes, with ages from 40–70 years, to improve the user interfaces and content of the tool. Patients and methods: The study had four phases: 1 a heuristic evaluation with six technology experts; 2 a usability test in a laboratory by five patients; 3 a pilot in real life wherein 20 patients used the tool for 3 months; and 4 a final lab test by five patients. In both lab tests (phases 2 and 4 qualitative data were collected through a thinking-aloud procedure and video recordings, and quantitative data through questions about task complexity, text comprehensiveness, and readability. In addition, the post-study system usability questionnaire (PSSUQ was completed for the app and the website. In the pilot test (phase 3, all patients were interviewed three times and the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI was completed. Results: After each phase, improvements were made, mainly to the layout and text. The main improvement was a refresh button for active data synchronization between activity sensor, app, and server

  15. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A., E-mail: ronzhin@fnal.gov [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Los, S.; Ramberg, E. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kim, H. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. The time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  16. Development, validation and applications of the monocyte activation test for pyrogens based on human whole blood

    OpenAIRE

    Schindler, Stefanie; Aulock, Sonja von; Daneshian, Mardas; Hartung, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms such as Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria, viruses and fungi contain components that activate the innate immune system. These components, called pyrogens (Greek: pyros=fire), can occur independently of viable microorganisms and are a major safety concern in parenterally administered drugs, since they can cause severe reactions such as fever, organ failure, and shock in the recipient. So far these drugs have been tested by injecting them intravenously into rabbits and meas...

  17. Underground Test Area Activity Communication/Interface Plan, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Rehfeldt, Kenneth [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this plan is to provide guidelines for effective communication and interfacing between Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity participants, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) and its contractors. This plan specifically establishes the following: • UGTA mission, vision, and core values • Roles and responsibilities for key personnel • Communication with stakeholders • Guidance in key interface areas • Communication matrix

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 and activity impairment assessment in acute bacterial sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Nuz; Lloyd, Andrew; Keating, Karen N; Nafees, Beenish; Piccirillo, Jay; Wild, Diane

    2013-07-01

    To validate the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 and Activity Impairment Assessment in patients with acute bacterial sinusitis. Data were used from a phase III clinical trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily for 5 consecutive days in the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis. The psychometric properties and factor structure of the 2 measures were assessed. Participants were given the measures to self-complete using either a telephone voice response system or a paper-and-pencil format. Three hundred seventy-four patients with acute bacterial sinusitis were used in the analysis. Patients received either a placebo or 400 mg moxifloxacin once daily. Patients were then reviewed at test of cure and follow-up. All analyses were conducted on a combined sample of placebo and active treatment patients. The Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 was associated with minimal missing data at baseline but a higher proportion by test of cure. There was no evidence of floor or ceiling effects and no significant skew. The Activity Impairment Assessment also had low missing data at baseline and no obvious floor or ceiling effects, but the data were not normally distributed. Both measures had good internal consistency. Convergent and divergent validity as well as sensitivity and the minimally important difference are also reported. The measures both have good psychometric properties and are suitable for use with patients with acute bacterial sinusitis. Both instruments are sensitive. The minimal important difference estimates for the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 are quite high but are similar to estimates reported previously.

  19. Development and usability testing of an internet intervention to increase physical activity in overweight adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riiser, Kirsti; Løndal, Knut; Ommundsen, Yngvar; Sundar, Turid; Helseth, Sølvi

    2013-01-28

    Internet interventions may provide opportunities for low threshold counseling using feedback to guide and support health behavior, including increased physical activity. Research shows that overweight and obese adolescents are less physically active than their peers of normal weight. There are good reasons to believe that Internet-based interventions may be particularly suitable for motivating adolescents to increase physical activity, but we need to gain further knowledge of what features are effective and how to design such interventions. To describe the process of development and evaluation of usability of a Web-based program for increasing physical activity in overweight adolescents. Informed by the self-determination theory, motivational interviewing, and perspectives on self-regulation, this intervention was developed in a stepwise process by an interdisciplinary team of researchers, designers, developers, and representatives from the target group. An iterative qualitative usability testing approach (observation, survey, and interview) was applied in 2 sequences, first in the lab and second in the field, to assess how adolescents (aged 12-16 years) used and experienced the program and to make adjustments to the program based on evaluation of their response. The following components were included in the program: self-monitoring through planning and registration of physical activity and graphical response on progress, autonomy supportive individual Web-based counseling, forum for social support, and relevant age-adjusted information about physical activity. The first usability test resulted in adjustments related mainly to making the content and aim of the different features more visible and explicit. The second test evaluated the program with adjustments from the first test, revealing that the program was well accepted by the participants and only small aesthetic adjustments had to be made to complete the final version of the Internet program, Young & Active

  20. Assessment of Dentally Related Function in Individuals with Cognitive Impairment: The Dental Activities Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Potter, Guy G; Sloane, Philip D; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David

    2017-03-01

    To develop and validate the Dental Activities Test (DAT), a clinical tool for measuring dentally related function in cognitively impaired older adults. Cross-sectional study design. Three assisted living residences in North Carolina. Assisted living residents with normal to impaired cognition aged 50 and older; not blind, deaf, or severely physically disabled; and English speaking (N = 90). Items for the DAT were developed based on focus group discussions, literature review, and clinical relevance. Cronbach alpha, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability were examined, and construct validity was assessed in relation to correlations with cognitive and functional assessments. Correlations between the DAT and oral health measures were also analyzed to evaluate the concurrent validity of the DAT. The DAT has excellent internal consistency reliability (Cronbach alpha 0.90), test-retest reliability (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.84), and interrater reliability (r = 0.90). In terms of construct validity, higher DAT scores were significantly associated with better cognitive function, as well as better activity of daily living and instrumental activity of daily living function. Finally, the DAT was significantly associated with oral hygiene and gingival health. The DAT is a reliable and valid instrument to measure dentally-related function in older adults with cognitive impairment. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Active Skin Antenna with 3D Printing Array Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhu Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An active skin antenna with structural load-bearing and electromagnetic functions is usually installed in the structural surface of mobile vehicles such as aircrafts, warships, and high-speed train. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and testing of a novel active skin antenna which consists of an encapsulation shell, antenna skin, and RF and beam control circuits. The antenna skin which consists of the facesheet, honeycomb, array framework, and microstrip antenna elements was designed by using Bayesian optimization, in order to improve the design efficiency. An active skin antenna prototype with 32 microstrip antenna elements was fabricated by using a hybrid manufacturing method. In this method, 3D printing technology was applied to fabricate the array framework, and the different layers were bonded to form the final antenna skin by using traditional composite process. Some experimental testing was conducted, and the testing results validate the feasibility the proposed antenna skin structure. The proposed design and fabrication technique is suitable for the development of conformal load-bearing antenna or smart skin antenna installed in the structural surface of aircraft, warships, and armored vehicles.

  2. Activation of electrical machinery. Supplement 1. [Preliminary evaluation; not applicable to ground tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolen, J.R.

    1963-11-15

    The following analysis of the induced radioactivity in SNAP-50/SPUR electrical machinery having a high cobalt content is submitted. Induced radioactivity in the flight vehicle will contribute negligibly to allowable radiation levels. This is especially so due to the low neutron to gamma ratio of assumed radiation damage tolerances to semiconductors. A calculation to estimate the order of magnitude of induced radioactivity in cobalt is attached. The calculation is based on a best guess of the neutron spectrum directly behind a lithium hydride shield. The resulting low cobalt activity and associated dose rate of about 1 mr/hr at 10 ft from a generator or a motor is insignificant. Although the evaluation indicates insignificant levels of induced radioactivity, this conclusion is not applicable to a ground test. Neutron moderation and scattering from a containment vessel and biological shield would greatly perturb the neutron environment behind the flight shield. Posttest handling of all components within the vacuum test chamber will undoubtedly be a problem. Notwithstanding the importance of limiting induced radioactivity, other considerations such as economy, cooling and vacuum requirements will largely dictate the final facility design. In summary, an activation analysis involves the overall facility design and will not be readily resolved. For a 10,000 hr. test the Co/sup 60/ activity may range from 100 curies per lb of cobalt where no shielding is provided to 10/sup -3/ curies per lb of cobalt where the equivalent of a flight shield is provided.

  3. Activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in a dual neuropsychological screening test: An fMRI approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tachibana Atsumichi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kana Pick-out Test (KPT, which uses Kana or Japanese symbols that represent syllables, requires parallel processing of discrete (pick-out and continuous (reading dual tasks. As a dual task, the KPT is thought to test working memory and executive function, particularly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, and is widely used in Japan as a clinical screen for dementia. Nevertheless, there has been little neurological investigation into PFC activity during this test. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to evaluate changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD signal in young healthy adults during performance of a computerized KPT dual task (comprised of reading comprehension and picking out vowels and compared it to its single task components (reading or vowel pick-out alone. Results Behavioral performance of the KPT degraded compared to its single task components. Performance of the KPT markedly increased BOLD signal intensity in the PFC, and also activated sensorimotor, parietal association, and visual cortex areas. In conjunction analyses, bilateral BOLD signal in the dorsolateral PFC (Brodmann's areas 45, 46 was present only in the KPT. Conclusions Our results support the central bottleneck theory and suggest that the dorsolateral PFC is an important mediator of neural activity for both short-term storage and executive processes. Quantitative evaluation of the KPT with fMRI in healthy adults is the first step towards understanding the effects of aging or cognitive impairment on KPT performance.

  4. The effects of bicycle frame geometry on muscle activation and power during a wingate anaerobic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Mark D; Hills-Meyer, Patrick; Miller, Michael G; Michael, Timothy J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of bicycle seat tube angles (STA) of (72° and 82°) on power production and EMG of the vastus laeralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), semimembranous (SM), biceps femoris (BF) during a Wingate test (WAT). Twelve experienced cyclists performed a WAT at each STA. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to identify differences in muscular activation by STA. EMG variables were normalized to isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Paired t-tests were used to test the effects of STA on: peak power, average power, minimum power and percent power drop. Results indicated BF activation was significantly lower at STA 82° (482.9 ± 166.6 %MVC·s) compared to STA 72° (712.6 ± 265.6 %MVC·s). There were no differences in the power variables between STAs. The primary finding was that increasing the STA from 72° to 82° enabled triathletes' to maintain power production, while significantly reducing the muscular activation of the biceps femoris muscle. Key PointsRoad cyclists claim that bicycle seat tube angles between 72° and 76° are most effective for optimal performance in racing.Triathletes typically use seat tube angles greater than 76°. It is thought that a seat tube angle greater than 76° facilitates a smoother bike to run transition in the triathlon.Increasing the seat tube angle from 72 to 82 enabled triathletes' to maintain power production, while significantly reducing the muscular activation of the biceps femoris muscle.Reduced hamstring muscular activation in the triathlon frame (82 seat tube angle) may serve to reduce hamstring tightness following the bike phase of the triathlon, allowing the runner to use a longer stride length.

  5. Active recall to increase HIV and STI testing: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Monica; Woodhall, Sarah C; Nardone, Anthony; Burns, Fiona; Mercey, Danielle; Gilson, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Active recall can improve reattendance rates and could increase retesting rates and detection of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but the best strategy remains uncertain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of active recall for HIV and/or STI testing. We searched six electronic databases using terms for HIV, STIs, tests and active recall (defined as a reminder to retest for HIV/STIs) for randomised, non-randomised and observational English-language studies published between 1983 and 2013. Outcomes included reattendance/retesting rate and STI diagnosis at follow-up. Of 5634 papers identified, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Of the 14 comparative studies, all but one demonstrated higher reattendance/retesting rates in the intervention group, but the range was wide (17.5-89%). Meta-analysis of nine RCTs found reattendance/retesting rates were significantly higher in the intervention versus control groups (pooled OR 2.42 (95% CI 1.84 to 3.19)). In a subgroup analysis, home sampling increased retesting compared with clinic testing (pooled OR 2.20 (95% CI 1.65 to 2.94)). In observational studies SMS reminders increased retesting compared with standard clinic care (pooled OR 2.19 (95% CI 1.46 to 3.29)), but study estimates were highly heterogeneous (I(2)=94%, pActive recall interventions are associated with higher reattendance/retesting rates for HIV/STI. Although home sampling and SMS reminders were associated with higher reattendance/retesting rates in most studies, evidence is limited by the heterogeneity of interventions and control groups and the quality of studies. Further work is needed to explore which active recall modality is clinically cost-effective and acceptable for HIV/STI screening. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Pilot Study on the Genetic Background of an Active Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Test in Finnish Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Raivisto, Teija; Kettunen, Kaisa; Kovanen, Leena; Haukka, Jari; Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Elg, Jessica; Gieselmann, Dirk-Rolf; Rathnayake, Nilminie; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Tervahartiala, Taina; Sorsa, Timo

    2017-05-01

    In periodontitis, genetics and smoking play important roles in host immune system response. The aim of this study is to determine whether the genetic background of initial periodontitis and caries could be detected using an active matrix metalloproteinase (aMMP)-8 chairside test in Finnish adolescents. Forty-seven participants gave approval for analysis of both oral fluid collection and DNA. An aMMP-8 chairside test was performed on participants (adolescents aged 15 to 17 years), and full-mouth clinical parameters of oral health were assessed including periodontal, oral mucosal, and caries status in Eastern Finland from 2014 to 2015. DNA was extracted from oral fluid samples and genotyped for 71 polymorphisms in 29 candidate genes for periodontitis. Results were analyzed using a logistic regression model. P values were corrected for multiple testing using false discovery rate (background.

  7. An overview on GSF activities at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semioshkina, Natalia; Voigt, Gabrielle

    2006-02-01

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS) in Kazakhstan was one of the major sites used by the former USSR for testing nuclear weapons for more than 40 years. Since the early 1990s, agricultural activities have been re-established there by neighbouring collective and private farms. Therefore, it has become important to evaluate the radiological situation and the current and future risk to people living on and using the contaminated area. During the last eight years, GSF has participated in many international projects performed on the STS to evaluate the radiological situation. A large number of soil, vegetation and food samples has been collected and analysed. Internal dose is one of the main components of the total dose when deriving risk factors for a population living within the test site. Internal doses, based on food monitoring and whole body measurements, were calculated for adults and were in the range of 13-500 microSv/y due to radiocaesium and radiostrontium.

  8. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  9. Effects of neuroleptics displaying antidepressant activity on behavior of rats in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górka, Z; Janus, K

    1985-08-01

    Levomepromazine, thioridazine and cis-chlorprothixene, neuroleptics with antidepressant activity, trans-chlorprothixene, the therapeutically inactive isomer of chlorprothixene, clozapine, an atypical neuroleptic, and imipramine, a classical antidepressant, were studied in the forced swimming test in rats after single or chronic administration. Levomepromazine (1.5 mg/kg), clozapine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) and imipramine (10 mg/kg) after single administration, 1 hr before the test, shortened the period of the immobility. After chronic administration only imipramine (10 mg/kg orally, twice daily, for 10 days) diminished the immobility. Levomepromazine, thioridazine, cis-chlorprothixene and trans-chlorprothixene (1.5 mg, orally, twice daily, for 10 days), 15-18 hr after the last dose did not influence the immobility, although the behavioral parameters in the open field test were not depressed. It is concluded that the forced swimming test is not a suitable pharmacological model for revealing antidepressant activities of certain neuroleptics that are useful in treating certain forms of human depression.

  10. Activation calculation and radiation analysis for China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhi, E-mail: zchen@ustc.edu.cn; Qiao, Shiji; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, X. George

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Activation calculation was performed using FLUKA for the main components of CFETR. • Radionuclides and radioactive wastes were assessed for CFETR. • The Waste Disposal Ratings (WDR) were assessed for CFETR. - Abstract: The activation calculation and analysis for the China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) will play an important role in its system design, maintenance, inspection and assessment of nuclear waste. Using the multi-particle transport code FLUKA and its associated data library, we calculated the radioactivity, specific activity, waste disposal rating from activation products, nuclides in the tritium breeding blanket, shielding layer, vacuum vessel and toroidal field coil (TFC) of CFETR. This paper presents the calculation results including neutron flux, activation products and waste disposal rating after one-year full operation of the CFETR. The findings show that, under the assumption of one-year operation at the 200 MW fusion power, the total radioactivity inventory will be 1.05 × 10{sup 19} Bq at shutdown and 1.03 × 10{sup 17} Bq after ten years. The primary residual nuclide is found to be {sup 55}Fe in ten years after the shutdown. The waste disposal rating (WDR) values are very low (<<1), according to Class C limits, CFETR materials are qualified for shallow land burial. It is shown that CFETR has no serious activation safety issue.

  11. Activation of blood coagulation in plasma from chronic urticaria patients with negative autologous plasma skin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asero, R; Cugno, M; Tedeschi, A

    2011-02-01

    Skin reactivity to the intradermal injection of autologous serum (autologous serum skin test - ASST) and/or plasma (autologous plasma skin test - APST) is thought to identify chronic urticaria (CU) patients with an autoimmune/autoreactive disease. Immune-mediated inflammation and coagulation are strictly linked, and coagulation activation has been described in CU patients as shown by the elevation of plasma prothrombin fragment F1+2 and, in severe cases, of d-dimer as well. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the coagulation cascade is activated in APST-negative CU patients as it has been described in CU patients with an autoreactive disease. A total of 43 adults with CU (M/F 15/28; mean age 43.5 years; 16 APST-negative patients and 27 APST-positive) and 30 healthy subjects were studied. Prothrombin fragment F1+2, d-dimer and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels were measured by ELISA. Prothrombin fragment F1+2 and d-dimer were elevated in seven of 16 APST-negative CU patients. The activation of the coagulation cascade was associated with disease severity. Men were more prevalent in idiopathic than in autoreactive CU patients (M/F: 10/6 vs. 5/22; Pcoagulation cascade is activated although with a lower intensity than in patients with autoreactive disease. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Feasibility study of a neutron activation system for EU test blanket systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Kuo, E-mail: kuo.tian@kit.edu [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Calderoni, Pattrick [Fusion for Energy(F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Klix, Axel [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • This paper summarizes the technical baseline and preliminary design of EU TBM Neutron Activation System, briefly describes the key components, and outlines the major integration challenges. - Abstract: The Neutron Activation System (NAS) for the EU Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) and Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) is an instrument that is proposed to determine the absolute neutron fluence and absolute neutron flux with information on the neutron spectrum in selected positions of the corresponding Test Blanket Modules (TBMs). In the NAS activation probes are exposed to the ITER neutron flux for periods ranging from several tens of seconds up to a full plasma pulse length, and the induced gamma activities are subsequently measured. The NAS is composed of a pneumatic transfer system and a counting station. The pneumatic transfer system includes irradiation ends in TBMs, transfer pipes, return gas pipes, a transfer station with a distributor (carousel), and a pressurized gas driving system, while the counting station consists of gamma ray detectors, signal processing electronic devices, and data analyzing software for neutron source strength evaluation. In this paper, a brief description on the proposed TBM NAS as well as the key components is presented, and the integration challenges of TBM NAS are outlined.

  13. Test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test for the shoulder and hip joints by unskilled examiners using a manual goniometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Gil; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test using a manual goniometer by unskilled examiners. [Subjects and Methods] Active range of motion was measured in 30 students attending U university (4 males, 26 females). Range of motion during flexion and extension of the shoulder and hip joints were measured using a manual goniometer. [Results] Flexion and extension of the shoulder joint (ICC=0.906 and ICC=0.808) and (ICC=0.946 and ICC=0. 955) of the hip joint showed excellent reliabilities. [Conclusion] The active range of motion test using a manual goniometer showed very high test-retest reliability in unskilled examiners. When examiners are aware of the method of the test, an objective assessment can be conducted.

  14. Mirroring activity in the brain and movement determinant in the Rorschach test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Piero; Giromini, Luciano; Parolin, Laura; Pineda, Jaime A; Viglione, Donald J

    2013-01-01

    Human movement (M) responses to the Rorschach are related to cognitive sophistication, creativity, and empathy. Recent studies also link Ms to EEG-mu suppression, an index of mirroring activity in the brain. In this article, we further investigate the link between Ms and mu suppression by testing some clinical interpretative distinctions. Previously collected EEG data recorded during the administration of the Rorschach were reanalyzed. We hypothesized that (a) among several responses investigated, only M would be associated with mu suppression, and (b) Ms with active movement, ordinary form quality, or whole human figures would be most strongly associated with mu suppression. Hypothesis 1 was fully confirmed, thus supporting that the traditional interpretation of M has a neurobiological foundation. Hypothesis 2 was partially confirmed; that is, active Ms were associated with mu suppression more strongly than passive Ms (p < .05), but no other significant differences emerged. Clinical implications are discussed.

  15. Reliability and validity testing of the Self-Efficacy for Functional Activities Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, B

    1999-01-01

    Self-efficacy expectations for functional activities were defined operationally by having individuals rate their perceived judgment or confidence in their ability to perform each specific activity of daily living (ADL) (bathing, dressing, transferring, ambulating, and stair climbing) at a given point in time. The Self-Efficacy for Functional Activities (SEFA) scale initially included 27 items focusing on efficacy expectations related to performance of each ADL independently, with adaptive equipment, and with the help of another person. After initial pilaf testing the scale was revised to include 9 items which focused on efficacy expectations related to performance of each ADL independently, or with the help of another person. Two additional studies were done and provided some evidence for the reliability and validity of the SEFA when used with older adults.

  16. Wind Tunnel Testing of Microtabs and Microjets for Active Load Control of Wind Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, Aubryn Murray

    Increases in wind turbine size have made controlling loads on the blades an important consideration for future turbine designs. One approach that could reduce extreme loads and minimize load variation is to incorporate active control devices into the blades that are able to change the aerodynamic forces acting on the turbine. A wind tunnel model has been constructed to allow testing of different active aerodynamic load control devices. Two such devices have been tested in the UC Davis Aeronautical Wind Tunnel: microtabs and microjets. Microtabs are small surfaces oriented perpendicular to an airfoil surface that can be deployed and retracted to alter the lift coefficient of the airfoil. Microjets produce similar effects using air blown perpendicular to the airfoil surface. Results are presented here for both static and dynamic performance of the two devices. Microtabs, located at 95% chord on the lower surface and 90% chord on the upper surface, with a height of 1% chord, produce a change in the lift coefficient of 0.18, increasing lift when deployed on the lower surface and decreasing lift when deployed on the upper surface. Microjets with a momentum coefficient of 0.006 at the same locations produce a change in the lift coefficient of 0.19. The activation time for both devices is less than 0.3 s, which is rapid compared to typical gust rise times. The potential of active device to mitigate changes in loads was tested using simulated gusts. The gusts were produced in the wind tunnel by accelerating the test section air speed at rates of up to 7 ft/s 2. Open-loop control of microtabs was tested in two modes: simultaneous and sequential tab deployment. Activating all tabs along the model span simultaneously was found to produce a change in the loads that occurred more rapidly than a gust. Sequential tab deployment more closely matched the rates of change due to gusts and tab deployment. A closed-loop control system was developed for the microtabs using a simple

  17. A new dye uptake assay to test the activity of antibiotics against intracellular Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutera, Vivien; Caspar, Yvan; Boisset, Sandrine; Maurin, Max

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the aetiological agent of tularaemia. Antibiotic treatment of this zoonosis is based on the administration of a fluoroquinolone or a tetracycline for cases with mild to moderate severity, whereas an aminoglycoside (streptomycin or gentamicin) is advocated for severe cases. However, treatment failures and relapses remain frequent, especially in patients suffering from chronic lymph node suppuration. Therefore, new treatment alternatives are needed. We have developed a dye uptake assay for determination of minimal inhibitory extracellular concentrations (MIECs) of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis, and validated the method by comparing the results obtained using a CFU-enumerating method. We also compared MIECs with MICs of the same compounds determined using a CLSI broth microdilution method. We tested the activity of 11 antibiotics against two clinical strains of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolated in France. Both strains displayed low MICs (≤1 μg/mL) to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin), gentamicin, doxycycline and rifampicin. Higher MICs (≥8 μg/mL) were found for carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem), daptomycin and linezolid. Erythromycin MICs were 4.0 and 16.0 μg/mL, respectively, for the two clinical strains. MIECs were almost the same with the two methods used. They were concordant with MICs, except for erythromycin and linezolid (respectively, four and eight times more active against intracellular F. tularensis) and gentamicin (four to eight times less active against intracellular F. tularensis). This study validated the dye uptake assay as a new tool for determination of the activity of a large panel of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis. This test confirmed the intracellular activity of first-line antibiotics used for tularaemia treatment, but also revealed significant activity of linezolid against intracellular F. tularensis.

  18. Is it better to select or to receive? Learning via active and passive hypothesis testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markant, Douglas B; Gureckis, Todd M

    2014-02-01

    People can test hypotheses through either selection or reception. In a selection task, the learner actively chooses observations to test his or her beliefs, whereas in reception tasks data are passively encountered. People routinely use both forms of testing in everyday life, but the critical psychological differences between selection and reception learning remain poorly understood. One hypothesis is that selection learning improves learning performance by enhancing generic cognitive processes related to motivation, attention, and engagement. Alternatively, we suggest that differences between these 2 learning modes derives from a hypothesis-dependent sampling bias that is introduced when a person collects data to test his or her own individual hypothesis. Drawing on influential models of sequential hypothesis-testing behavior, we show that such a bias (a) can lead to the collection of data that facilitates learning compared with reception learning and (b) can be more effective than observing the selections of another person. We then report a novel experiment based on a popular category learning paradigm that compares reception and selection learning. We additionally compare selection learners to a set of "yoked" participants who viewed the exact same sequence of observations under reception conditions. The results revealed systematic differences in performance that depended on the learner's role in collecting information and the abstract structure of the problem.

  19. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Testing Activity, Frio Formation, Texas and Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to provide the environmental input into the Division of Geothermal Energy's decisions to expand the geothermal well testing activities to include sites in the Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana. It is proposed that drilling rigs be leased before they are removed from sites in the formation where drilling for gas or oil exploration has been unsuccessful and that the rigs be used to complete the drilling into the geopressured zone for resource exploration. This EA addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environment, and the possible impacts in a broad sense as they apply to the Gulf Coast well testing activity of the Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram of the Department of Energy. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay, Atlas) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. in the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource.

  20. Perceived characteristics of the environment associated with active travel: development and testing of a new scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutrie Nanette

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental characteristics may be associated with patterns of physical activity. However, the development of instruments to measure perceived characteristics of the local environment is still at a comparatively early stage, and published instruments are not necessarily suitable for application in all settings. We therefore developed and established the test-retest reliability of a new scale for use in a study of the correlates of active travel and overall physical activity in deprived urban neighbourhoods in Glasgow, Scotland. Methods We developed and piloted a 14-item scale based on seven constructs identified from the literature (aesthetics, green space, access to amenities, convenience of routes, traffic, road safety and personal safety. We administered the scale to all participants in a random postal survey (n = 1322 and readministered the scale to a subset of original respondents (n = 125 six months later. We used principal components analysis and Varimax rotation to identify three principal components (factors and derived summary scores for subscales based on these factors. We examined the internal consistency of these subscales using Cronbach's alpha and examined the test-retest reliability of the individual items, the subscale summary scores and an overall summary neighbourhood score using a combination of correlation coefficients and Cohen's kappa with and without weighting. Results Public transport and proximity to shops were the items most likely to be rated positively, whereas traffic volume, traffic noise and road safety for cyclists were most likely to be rated negatively. Three principal components – 'safe and pleasant surroundings', 'low traffic' and 'convenience for walking' – together explained 45% of the total variance. The test-retest reliability of individual items was comparable with that of items in other published scales (intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs 0.34–0.70; weighted Cohen

  1. Purification and activity testing of the full-length YycFGHI proteins of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Türck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The YycFG two-component regulatory system (TCS of Staphylococcus aureus represents the only essential TCS that is almost ubiquitously distributed in gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C-content. YycG (WalK/VicK is a sensor histidine-kinase and YycF (WalR/VicR is the cognate response regulator. Both proteins play an important role in the biosynthesis of the cell envelope and mutations in these proteins have been involved in development of vancomycin and daptomycin resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present high yield expression and purification of the full-length YycG and YycF proteins as well as of the auxiliary proteins YycH and YycI of Staphylococcus aureus. Activity tests of the YycG kinase and a mutated version, that harbours an Y306N exchange in its cytoplasmic PAS domain, in a detergent-micelle-model and a phosholipid-liposome-model showed kinase activity (autophosphorylation and phosphoryl group transfer to YycF only in the presence of elevated concentrations of alkali salts. A direct comparison of the activity of the kinases in the liposome-model indicated a higher activity of the mutated YycG kinase. Further experiments indicated that YycG responds to fluidity changes in its microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The combination of high yield expression, purification and activity testing of membrane and membrane-associated proteins provides an excellent experimental basis for further protein-protein interaction studies and for identification of all signals received by the YycFGHI system.

  2. An experimental test of the fluctuation relation in an active camphor boat system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paroor, H. M.; Nambiar, N.; Bandi, M. M.

    The Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation (FR) posits a specific symmetry between positive and negative fluctuations in entropy production, or a related quantity (e.g power) for systems in non-equilibrium stationary state. Successful tests in a variety of systems suggest the FR may be more generally applicable than the conditions under which it was originally derived. Systems where the FR fails are therefore valuable for the insight they provide into the FR's general success. It has recently been suggested that ``active matter'' should not satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem or FR. We experimentally test this possibility in a system of active camphor boats, self-propelled by surface tension gradients at air-water interfaces. The boats interact via short-range capillary attraction which competes with long-range surface tension mediated repulsion. Tuning interaction strength with number density, we test the FR through the statistics of power as one goes from a free non-interacting camphor boat, through a few weakly interacting boats to several, strongly interacting boats. We present preliminary results of our experiments and data analysis.

  3. Antibacterial activity of chemically defined chitosans: influence of molecular weight, degree of acetylation and test organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellegård, H; Strand, S P; Christensen, B E; Granum, P E; Hardy, S P

    2011-07-15

    Chitosans, polysaccharides obtained from the exoskeleton of crustaceans, have been shown to exert antibacterial activity in vitro and their use as a food preservative is of growing interest. However, beyond a consensus that chitosan appears to disrupt the bacterial cell membrane, published data are inconsistent on the chemical characteristics that confer the antibacterial activity of chitosan. While most authors agree that the net charge density of the polymer (reflected in the fraction of positively charged amino groups at the C-2 position of the glucosamine unit) is an important factor in antibacterial activity, conflicting data have been reported on the effect of molecular weight and on the susceptibility among different bacterial species to chitosan. Therefore, we prepared batches of water-soluble hydrochloride salts of chitosans with weight average molecular weights (M(w)) of 2-224kDa and degree of acetylation of 0.16 and 0.48. Their antibacterial activity was evaluated using tube inhibition assays and membrane integrity assays (N-Phenyl-1-naphthylamine fluorescence and potassium release) against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and three lipopolysaccharide mutants of E. coli and S. Typhimurium. Chitosans with lower degree of acetylation (F(A)=0.16) were more active than the more acetylated chitosans (F(A)=0.48). No trends in antibacterial action related to increasing or decreasing M(w) were observed although one of the chitosans (M(w) 28.4kDa, F(A)=0.16) was more active than the other chitosans, inhibiting growth and permeabilizing the membrane of all the test strains included. The test strains varied in their susceptibility to the different chitosans with wild type S. Typhimurium more resistant than the wild type E. coli. Salmonellae lipopolysaccharide mutants were more susceptible than the matched wild type strain. Our results show that the chitosan preparation details are critically important in identifying the antibacterial

  4. Comparison of denitrification activity measurements in groundwater using cores and natural-gradient tracer tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Garabedian, S.P.; Brooks, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of many solutes in groundwater is dependent upon the relative rates of physical flow and microbial metabolism. Quantifying rates of microbial processes under subsurface conditions is difficult and is most commonly approximated using laboratory studies with aquifer materials. In this study, we measured in situ rates of denitrification in a nitrate- contaminated aquifer using small-scale, natural-gradient tracer tests and compared the results with rates obtained from laboratory incubations with aquifer core material. Activity was measured using the acetylene block technique. For the tracer tests, co-injection of acetylene and bromide into the aquifer produced a 30 ??M increase in nitrous oxide after 10 m of transport (23-30 days). An advection-dispersion transport model was modified to include an acetylene-dependent nitrous oxide production term and used to simulate the tracer breakthrough curves. The model required a 4-day lag period and a relatively low sensitivity to acetylene to match the narrow nitrous oxide breakthrough curves. Estimates of in situ denitrification rates were 0.60 and 1.51 nmol of N2O produced cm-3 aquifer day-1 for two successive tests. Aquifer core material collected from the tracer test site and incubated as mixed slurries in flasks and as intact cores yielded rates that were 1.2-26 times higher than the tracer test rate estimates. Results with the coring-dependent techniques were variable and subject to the small- scale heterogeneity within the aquifer, while the tracer tests integrated the heterogeneity along a flow path, giving a rate estimate that is more applicable to transport at the scale of the aquifer.

  5. Transformation of benzoxazinones and derivatives and microbial activity in the test environment of soil ecotoxicological tests on Poecilus cupreus and Folsomia candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomsgaard, Inge S; Mortensen, Anne G; Idinger, Jacqueline; Coja, Tamara; Blümel, Sylvia

    2006-02-22

    Benzoxazinones, such as 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA) and 2,4-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIBOA), and benzoxazolinones, such as 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (MBOA) and 2-benzoxazolinone (BOA), are biologically active secondary metabolites found in cereals. Because these compounds could be exploited as part of a strategy for reducing the use of synthetic pesticides, ecotoxicological tests were performed recently. In this paper, the transformation of the compounds in the test environment of the ecotoxicological tests was studied. DIMBOA was degraded and partly transformed to MBOA during the period of ecotoxicological testing of the compounds. During testing of MBOA on Poecilus cupreus test media the analysis showed that at the initial concentrations of 2 and 10 mg kg(-1) no MBOA was left after 45 days of testing, but the metabolite 2-amino-phenoxazin-3-one (AMPO) was formed. During testing of BOA on both Folsomia candida and Poecilus cupreus the more biologically active compound 2-amino-phenoxazin-3-one (APO) was formed. Thus, the ecotoxicological test results on MBOA and BOA were partly due to the microbial transformation of the compounds during the time of testing.

  6. Integration and test activities for the SUMIRE prime focus spectrograph at LAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madec, F.; Jaquet, Marc; Pascal, Sandrine; Bozier, A.; Le Mignant, David; Vives, S.; Ferrand, D.; Pegot-Ogier, T.; Arthaud, G.; Golebiowski, M.; Sugai, H.; Tamura, N.; Gunn, J.; Smee, S.; Oliveira, L.

    2014-07-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project for Subaru telescope consists in four identical spectrographs feed by 600 fibers each. Each spectrograph is composed by an optical entrance unit that creates a collimated beam and distributes the light to three channels, two visible and one near infrared. We present here the integration process of the first spectrograph channel. The verification requirements, the specific integration requirements and the product tree are the main drivers from the top plan for the Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) development process. We then present the AIT flow-down, the details for the AIT processes as well as opto-mechanical alignment procedures and tests setup. In parallel, we are developing and validating dedicated tools to secure and facilitate the AIT activities, as we have to assemble eight visible cameras, integrate and align four fiber slits, integrate and align the components of four spectrographs.

  7. ASTM and VAMAS activities in titanium matrix composites test methods development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.; Harmon, D. M.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Russ, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are being considered for a number of aerospace applications ranging from high performance engine components to airframe structures in areas that require high stiffness to weight ratios at temperatures up to 400 C. TMC's exhibit unique mechanical behavior due to fiber-matrix interface failures, matrix cracks bridged by fibers, thermo-viscoplastic behavior of the matrix at elevated temperatures, and the development of significant thermal residual stresses in the composite due to fabrication. Standard testing methodology must be developed to reflect the uniqueness of this type of material systems. The purpose of this paper is to review the current activities in ASTM and Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) that are directed toward the development of standard test methodology for titanium matrix composites.

  8. [A clinical case of occupational allergy to piperacilline. A novel diagnostic method: basophil activation test (BAT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, P; Digiesi, G; Pignatti, Patrizia; Bordini, L; Previdi, M

    2013-01-01

    Piperacillin, unlike other antibiotics, rarely causes immediate allergic reactions. Only two cases related to occupational exposure are reported in the literature. Adoption of new methods for diagnosis of occupational allergy to drugs. An atopic nurse, aged 30 years, was referred to our hospital for an allergic work-related reaction to piperacillin. The patient had suffered two successive episodes with immediate cutaneous reaction, angioedema and dyspnoea after preparing piperacillin. Almost four years previously she had suffered from similar symptoms after taking amoxicillin. She was submitted to a clinical examination and a routine allergic test, performing also specific IgE (Phadia Pharmacia ImmunoCap) and BAT (Basophil Activation Test) for Beta-lactam antibiotics. A positive response to piperacillin was observed in our case using BAT a new non-invasive and safe method, that proved useful for diagnosis of allergy. Moreover, we observed a change from an allergic reaction for therapeutic use of amoxicillin to a work-related adverse reaction to another beta-lactam, piperacillin. In previous clinical cases cutaneous and specific challenge tests were performed for diagnosis. At present, availability of an in vitro test, such as BAT may provide new diagnostic opportunities, and a useful tool for studying clinical cases other than, in perspective, monitoring exposed workers. Preventive measures were taken in the workplace to lower the risk of sensitization and allergic response. The nurse was transferred to a well controlled job.

  9. Trypanocidal activity of the essential oils in their conventional and nanoemulsion forms: in vitro tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Oliveira, Camila B; Zimmermann, Carine E P; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Santos, Roberto C V; Rech, Virginia C; Tonin, Alexandre A; Giongo, Janice L; Mattos, Cristiane B; Koester, Letícia; Santurio, Janio M; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility in vitro of Trypanosoma evansi to the essential oils of andiroba (Carapa guaianensis) and aroeira (Schinus molle), in their conventional and nanostructured forms. For that, pure oils at concentrations of 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% were used. A negative control (untreated) and a positive control (diminazene aceturate 0.5%) were used as comparative parameters. Later, the same tests were performed, using nanoemulsions oils at concentrations of 0.5% and 1.0%. The tests were carried out in triplicates and the numbers of parasites were quantified on 1, 3 and 6 h from onset of the study. A dose-dependent reduction in the number of parasites to the forms of two oils tested was observed after 1 h. The concentration of parasites was significantly reduced at low concentrations after 3 h, as well as at 6 h no alive parasites were observed for the essential oils tested. Ours findings indicate, for the first time, that oils of andiroba and aroeira (in their conventional and nanoemulsion forms) have high activity against T. evansi in vitro, leading to the suggestion that these oils may be applied as an alternative treatment for this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of a novel multibiomarker test to assess rheumatoid arthritis disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H; Knevel, Rachel; Huizinga, Tom W; Haney, Douglas J; Shen, Yijing; Ramanujan, Saroja; Cavet, Guy; Centola, Michael; Hesterberg, Lyndal K; Chernoff, David; Ford, Kerri; Shadick, Nancy A; Hamburger, Max; Fleischmann, Roy; Keystone, Edward; Weinblatt, Michael E

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is important for patient management, and additional objective information may aid rheumatologists in clinical decision making. We validated a recently developed multibiomarker disease activity (MBDA) test relative to clinical disease activity in diverse RA cohorts. Serum samples were obtained from the Index for Rheumatoid Arthritis Measurement, Brigham and Women's Hospital Rheumatoid Arthritis Sequential Study, and Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic cohorts. Levels of 12 biomarkers were measured and combined according to a prespecified algorithm to generate the composite MBDA score. The relationship of the MBDA score to clinical disease activity was characterized separately in seropositive and seronegative patients using Pearson's correlations and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) to discriminate between patients with low and moderate/high disease activity. Associations between changes in MBDA score and clinical responses 6-12 weeks after initiation of anti-tumor necrosis factor or methotrexate treatment were evaluated by the AUROC. The MBDA score was significantly associated with the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the C-reactive protein level (DAS28-CRP) in both seropositive (AUROC 0.77, P < 0.001) and seronegative (AUROC 0.70, P < 0.001) patients. In subgroups based on age, sex, body mass index, and treatment, the MBDA score was associated with the DAS28-CRP (P < 0.05) in all seropositive and most seronegative subgroups. Changes in the MBDA score at 6-12 weeks could discriminate both American College of Rheumatology criteria for 50% improvement responses (P = 0.03) and DAS28-CRP improvement (P = 0.002). Changes in the MBDA score at 2 weeks were also associated with subsequent DAS28-CRP response (P = 0.02). Our findings establish the criterion and discriminant validity of a novel multibiomarker test as an objective measure of RA disease activity to aid

  11. Testing a user-driven approach in health promotion activities targeting users of psychiatric services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann Hempler, Nana; Saurbrey Pals, Regitze; Oest, Lone

    2017-01-01

    on two health education models and seven visual dialogue tools developed in co-creation with users. Fifty-four professionals received training in the approach on a three-day course. The course included theoretical introduction and practical training of the tools through role play and group work...... with course participants and users. Professionals had to test at least one tool in a health promoting activity such as health checks, exercise etc. Data were collected through observations of health promoting activities (n=15) and questionnaires (n=54). Data were analysed using systematic text condensation...... the approach. Some professionals lacked support and only 27.7% professionals had discussed implementation with their manager. The subsequent intervention will be implemented with a strong focus on dialogue with managers. 1Health Promotion, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen 2 Research Center of Health Promotion...

  12. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apresyan, A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Los, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Pena, C.; Presutti, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Ronzhin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-08-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  13. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  14. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized.

  15. Inhibitory effects of veterinary antibiotics on anammox activity: short- and long-term tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sguanci, S; Lotti, T; Caretti, C; Caffaz, S; Dockhorn, T; Lubello, C

    2017-11-01

    The suitability of the anammox process for the treatment of swine digester liquor was assessed through the evaluation of the short- and long-term inhibitory effect of three veterinary antibiotics commonly administered to Italian swine livestock. The toxicity of doxycycline, tiamulin and enrofloxacin was evaluated through batch tests designed to estimate specific anammox activity. Moreover, the short-term toxicity of combined concentrations of doxycycline and enrofloxacin was evaluated so as to verify whether a synergistic effect could be established. According to the inhibition recorded in the presence of the maximum antibiotics concentrations predicted for digester liquor, target compounds do not seem to represent a real hazard for anammox bacteria because at those concentration levels, the activity was just slightly reduced. Moreover, in granular systems, inhibition could be easily counterbalanced by increasing the biomass concentration in the reactor, thus assuring the design treatment capacity for antibiotic-rich wastewaters.

  16. How to learn effectively in medical school: test yourself, learn actively, and repeat in intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Students in medical school often feel overwhelmed by the excessive amount of factual knowledge they are obliged to learn. Although a large body of research on effective learning methods is published, scientifically based learning strategies are not a standard part of the curriculum in medical school. Students are largely unaware of how to learn successfully and improve memory. This review outlines three fundamental methods that benefit learning: the testing effect, active recall, and spaced repetition. The review summarizes practical learning strategies to learn effectively and optimize long-term retention of factual knowledge.

  17. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  18. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cancer: Rationale and Insight for Future Therapeutic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placencio, Veronica R; DeClerck, Yves A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its function as an inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator (PA), PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a paradoxical protumorigenic role in cancer, promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell survival. In this review, we summarize preclinical evidence in support of the protumorigenic function of PAI-1 that has led to the testing of small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitors, initially developed as antithrombotic agents, in animal models of cancer. The review discusses the challenges and the opportunities that lay ahead to the development of efficacious and nontoxic PAI-1 inhibitors as anticancer agents. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Active and realistic passive marijuana exposure tested by three immunoassays and GC/MS in urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mule, S.J.; Lomax, P.; Gross, S.J.

    1988-05-01

    Human urine samples obtained before and after active and passive exposure to marijuana were analyzed by immune kits (Roche, Amersham, and Syva) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven of eight subjects were positive for the entire five-day test period with one immune kit. The latter correlated with GC/MS in 98% of the samples. Passive inhalation experiments under conditions likely to reflect realistic exposure resulted consistently in less than 10 ng/mL of cannabinoids. The 10-100-ng/mL cannabinoid concentration range essential for detection of occasional and moderate marijuana users is thus unaffected by realistic passive inhalation.

  20. Matrix Effects in Proficiency Testing Materials Influence the Accurate Measurement of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Wang, Jianbing; Huang, Xianzhang; Zeng, Ruili; Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Lin, Haibiao; Han, Liqiao; Ke, Peifeng; Zhuang, Junhua

    2016-10-01

    A consensus on an accurate method to measure γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity for clinical purposes has not been achieved among practicing clinical laboratories. To improve analytical trueness, we evaluated the influences of matrix effects in proficiency testing (PT) materials on the measurement of GGT activity in human serum samples. Five fresh frozen human samples (FFS1-5) and five lyophilized proficiency testing materials (Lyo1-5) were distributed to 23 participating clinical laboratories for the measurement of GGT activity. Target GGT activity values for the samples were obtained by using previously approved reference methods. The results obtained by the Beckman Coulter Unicel DxC 800 Synchron analyzer were compared to the target values assigned by two reference laboratories, and the commutability of the lyophilized materials was evaluated according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guideline EP14-A2. The relative bias between the results obtained by the Beckman Coulter analyzer and the reference target values ranged from -27.2% to -18.0% for FFS1-5 and from 9.1% to 2.5% for Lyo1-5. Non-commutability of all lyophilized samples falling outside of the 95% prediction interval was observed. The results obtained for the lyophilized PT materials were deemed acceptable within the total allowable errors, suggesting that matrix effects may impart a false sense of confidence that clinical analytical systems are performing very well. A primary reference measurement procedure on fresh frozen serum provides a valuable method for evaluating the trueness of results measured by PT.

  1. In vitro antimicrobial activity of natural toxins and animal venoms tested against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Vincent TK

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei are the causative agent of melioidosis. Increasing resistance of the disease to antibiotics is a severe problem in treatment regime and has led to intensification of the search for new drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are the most ubiquitous in nature as part of the innate immune system and host defense mechanism. Methods Here, we investigated a group of venoms (snakes, scorpions and honey bee venoms for antimicrobial properties against two strains of Gram-negative bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei by using disc-diffusion assay for in vitro susceptibility testing. The antibacterial activities of the venoms were compared with that of the isolated L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO and phospholipase A2 (PLA2s enzymes. MICs were determined using broth dilution method. Bacterial growth was assessed by measurement of optical density at the lowest dilutions (MIC 0.25 mg/ml. The cell viability was measured using tetrazolium salts (XTT based cytotoxic assay. Results The studied venoms showed high antimicrobial activity. The venoms of C. adamanteus, Daboia russelli russelli, A. halys, P. australis, B. candidus and P. guttata were equally as effective as Chloramphenicol and Ceftazidime (30 μg/disc. Among those tested, phospholipase A2 enzymes (crotoxin B and daboiatoxin showed the most potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (TES bacteria. Naturally occurring venom peptides and phospholipase A2 proved to possess highly potent antimicrobial activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei. The XTT-assay results showed that the cell survival decreased with increasing concentrations (0.05–10 mg/mL of Crotalus adamanteus venom, with no effect on the cell viability evident at 0.5 mg/mL. Conclusion This antibacterial profile of snake venoms reported herein will be useful in the search for potential antibacterial agents against drug resistant microorganisms like B. pseudomallei.

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of natural toxins and animal venoms tested against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, R; Pachiappan, A; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Thwin, Maung M; Hian, Yap E; Chow, Vincent TK; Bow, Ho; Weng, Joseph T

    2006-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei are the causative agent of melioidosis. Increasing resistance of the disease to antibiotics is a severe problem in treatment regime and has led to intensification of the search for new drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are the most ubiquitous in nature as part of the innate immune system and host defense mechanism. Methods Here, we investigated a group of venoms (snakes, scorpions and honey bee venoms) for antimicrobial properties against two strains of Gram-negative bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei by using disc-diffusion assay for in vitro susceptibility testing. The antibacterial activities of the venoms were compared with that of the isolated L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2s) enzymes. MICs were determined using broth dilution method. Bacterial growth was assessed by measurement of optical density at the lowest dilutions (MIC 0.25 mg/ml). The cell viability was measured using tetrazolium salts (XTT) based cytotoxic assay. Results The studied venoms showed high antimicrobial activity. The venoms of C. adamanteus, Daboia russelli russelli, A. halys, P. australis, B. candidus and P. guttata were equally as effective as Chloramphenicol and Ceftazidime (30 μg/disc). Among those tested, phospholipase A2 enzymes (crotoxin B and daboiatoxin) showed the most potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (TES) bacteria. Naturally occurring venom peptides and phospholipase A2 proved to possess highly potent antimicrobial activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei. The XTT-assay results showed that the cell survival decreased with increasing concentrations (0.05–10 mg/mL) of Crotalus adamanteus venom, with no effect on the cell viability evident at 0.5 mg/mL. Conclusion This antibacterial profile of snake venoms reported herein will be useful in the search for potential antibacterial agents against drug resistant microorganisms like B. pseudomallei. PMID:16784542

  3. Development and preliminary testing of a computerized Animated Activity Questionnaire (AAQ) in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peter, Wf; Loos, M; de Vet, Hcw

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop an Animated Activity Questionnaire (AAQ), based on video animations, for assessing activity limitations in patients with hip/knee osteoarthritis (OA), which combines the advantages of self-reported questionnaires and performance-based tests, without many of their limitations...... correlations with performance-based tests (Stair Climbing Test , Timed Up and Go test, 30 second Chair Stand Test ) were calculated. Results 17 basic daily activities were chosen for the AAQ. Video animations were made showing a person performing each activity with 3 to 5 different levels of difficulty......, and to preliminary assess its reliability and validity. We hypothesize that the AAQ correlates highly with performance-based tests, and moderately with self-reports. Methods Item selection was based on 1) the pilot AAQ; 2) pre-specified conditions; 3) the International Classification of Functioning core set for OA...

  4. Examining students' after-school literacy activities and their literacy performance on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Liying; Klinger, Don A; Zheng, Ying

    2009-01-01

    ... reading and writing activities. Key words: after-school reading, after-school writing, literacy testing, test performance, secondary students, Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test, ESL/ELD students, second language learners Cet article analyse les activites de litteratie parascolaires des eleves et les resultats qu'ils ont obtenus lors d...

  5. A pilot test of the Latin active hip hop intervention to increase physical activity among low-income Mexican-American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Andrea J

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of the current study was to develop, implement, and evaluate a hip hop dance intervention, Latin Active, among low-income Mexican-American adolescents. Mexican-descent adolescents tend to have disproportionate rates of low physical activity, overweight status, and obesity. A 5-week intervention design with pretest and post-test self-report measures. Charter middle school (grades 6-9) health/science classes in a low-income neighborhood were the setting for the Latin Active intervention. Overall, 81 participants were recruited; 73 (n  =  41, female; n  =  32, male) provided active parental consent to complete pretest/post-test surveys. Intervention . The Latin Active program included 10 interactive 50-minute lessons that were delivered twice a week during science/health classes. The curriculum was created on the basis of Social Cognitive Theory, Critical Hip Hop Pedagogy, and feedback from key stakeholders. The lessons focused on increasing physical activity as well as neighborhood barriers. The self-report pretest (n  =  73) and post-test (n  =  56) surveys included measures for frequency of vigorous physical activity, self-efficacy, and neighborhood barriers. Analysis . Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to assess mean differences from pretest to post-test results for intervention outcomes by gender. The Latin Active program (with 77% retention at post-test) significantly increased vigorous physical activity and dance (p hip hop physical activity program, Latin Active demonstrated preliminary efficacy to increase girl's vigorous physical activity and boy's perception of neighborhood barriers to physical activity. Future research will need to use a randomized, controlled design and investigate the effect of the program on measures of body mass index.

  6. Reproducibility and criterion-related validity of the sit and reach test and toe touch test for estimating hamstring flexibility in recreationally active young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, F; Sainz de Baranda, P; De Ste Croix, M; Santonja, F

    2012-11-01

    1) to examine the test-retest reproducibility and criterion-related validity of the sit and reach test (SRT) and the toe touch test (TT) for estimating hamstring flexibility measured through the passive straight leg raise test (PSLR); and 2) to determine whether the SRT cut-off scores may be used for the TT test to identify participants in this sample of young healthy adults as having short hamstring flexibility. Test-retest design. Controlled laboratory environment. 243 active recreationally young adults. Participants performed the SRT, the TT test and PSLR twice in a randomized order with a 4-week interval between trials. Reproducibility was examined using typical percentage error (coefficient of variation [CV]) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) as well as their respective confidence limits. Regression and Kappa correlation statistical analyses were performed to study the association of the SRT and TT test with the PSLR test and the 95% limits of agreement (LoA) between SRT and TT test were calculated to explore differences in the mean differences between these measurements. The finding showed acceptable reproducibility measures for SRT (8.74% CV; 0.92 ICC), TT test (9.86% CV; 0.89 ICC) and PSLR (5.46% CV; 0.85 ICC). The SRT (R² = 0.63) and TT test (R² = 0.49) were significantly associated with PSLR. The 95% LoA between SRT and TT test reported systematic bias (2.84 cm) and wide 95% random error (±9.72 cm). Reproducibility of SRT, TT test and PSLR is acceptable and the criterion-related validity of SRT and TT test is moderate. Furthermore, the SRT cut-off scores should not be used for TT test for the detection of short hamstring muscles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mutagenicity and chemopreventive activities of Astronium species assessed by Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Flávia Aparecida; Campos, Debora Leite; da Silva, Viviane Cândida; De Grandis, Rone Aparecido; Souza, Leonardo Perez; Leonardo Junior, Carlos Sérgio; da Rocha, Cláudia Quintino; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2015-08-01

    In the neotropical savannah, Astronium species are used in popular medicine to treat allergies, inflammation, diarrhea and ulcers. Given that natural products are promising starting points for the discovery of novel potentially therapeutic agents, the aim of the present study was to investigate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of hydroalcoholic extracts of Astronium spp. The mutagenicity was determined by the Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100 and TA102. The antimutagenicity was tested against the direct-acting and indirect-acting mutagens. The results showed that none of the extracts induce any increase in the number of revertants, demonstrating the absence of mutagenic activity. On the other hand, the results on the antimutagenic potential showed a moderate inhibitory effect against NPD and a strong protective effect against B[a]P and AFB1. This study highlights the importance of screening species of Astronium for new medicinal compounds. The promising results obtained open up new avenues for further study and provide a better understanding the mechanisms by which these species act in protecting DNA from damage. However, further pharmacological and toxicological investigations of crude extracts of Astronium spp., as well as of its secondary metabolites, are necessary to determine the mechanism(s) of action to guarantee their safer and more effective application to human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure-activity relationships for chloro- and nitrophenol toxicity in the pollen tube growth test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueuermann, G. [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Ecotoxicology; Somashekar, R.K. [Bangalore Univ. (India). Dept. of Botany; Kristen, U. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik

    1996-10-01

    Acute toxicity of 10 chlorophenols and 10 nitrophenols with identical substitution patterns is analyzed with the pollen tube growth (PTG) test. Concentration values of 50% growth inhibition (IC50) between 0.1 and 300 mg/L indicate that the absolute sensitivity of this alternative biotest is comparable to conventional aquatic test systems. Analysis of quantitative structure-activity relationships using lipophilicity (log K{sub ow}), acidity (pK{sub a}), and quantum chemical parameters to model intrinsic acidity, solvation interactions, and nucleophilicity reveals substantial differences between the intraseries trends of log IC50. With chlorophenols, a narcotic-type relationship is derived, which, however, shows marked differences in slope and intercept when compared to reference regression equations for polar narcosis. Regression analysis of nitrophenol toxicity suggests interpretation in terms of two modes of action: oxidative uncoupling activity is associated with a pK{sub a} window from 3.8 to 8.5, and more acidic congeners with diortho-substitution show a transition from uncoupling to a narcotic mode of action with decreasing pK{sub a} and log K{sub ow}. Model calculations for phenol nucleophilicity suggest that differences in the phenol readiness for glucuronic acid conjugation as a major phase-II detoxication pathway have no direct influence on acute PTG toxicity of the compounds.

  9. Verification of cardiac mechanics software: benchmark problems and solutions for testing active and passive material behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Sander; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Arens, Sander; Augustin, Christoph M; Baron, Lukas; Blake, Robert; Bradley, Chris; Castro, Sebastian; Crozier, Andrew; Favino, Marco; Fastl, Thomas E; Fritz, Thomas; Gao, Hao; Gizzi, Alessio; Griffith, Boyce E; Hurtado, Daniel E; Krause, Rolf; Luo, Xiaoyu; Nash, Martyn P; Pezzuto, Simone; Plank, Gernot; Rossi, Simone; Ruprecht, Daniel; Seemann, Gunnar; Smith, Nicolas P; Sundnes, Joakim; Rice, J Jeremy; Trayanova, Natalia; Wang, Dafang; Jenny Wang, Zhinuo; Niederer, Steven A

    2015-12-08

    Models of cardiac mechanics are increasingly used to investigate cardiac physiology. These models are characterized by a high level of complexity, including the particular anisotropic material properties of biological tissue and the actively contracting material. A large number of independent simulation codes have been developed, but a consistent way of verifying the accuracy and replicability of simulations is lacking. To aid in the verification of current and future cardiac mechanics solvers, this study provides three benchmark problems for cardiac mechanics. These benchmark problems test the ability to accurately simulate pressure-type forces that depend on the deformed objects geometry, anisotropic and spatially varying material properties similar to those seen in the left ventricle and active contractile forces. The benchmark was solved by 11 different groups to generate consensus solutions, with typical differences in higher-resolution solutions at approximately 0.5%, and consistent results between linear, quadratic and cubic finite elements as well as different approaches to simulating incompressible materials. Online tools and solutions are made available to allow these tests to be effectively used in verification of future cardiac mechanics software.

  10. Survey of active and inactive mines for possible use as in situ test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    A survey of active and inactive mines which might be useful for radioactive waste storage in situ test experiments was conducted. It was performed for Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Office of Waste Isolation. The report covers available information gathered from literature, U.S. Bureau of Mines, the Mining Enforcement and Safety Agency, and a limited number of personal contacts with constructors or operators of facilities. This survey is preliminary in nature and the objective is to develop potential candidate facilities for in situ experiments which warrant further investigation. Included are descriptions of 244 facilities, with all the data about each one which was available within the time restraint of the study. These facility descriptions are additionally indexed by depth of mine, nature of the country rock, mineral mined, and type of entry. A total of 14 inactive mines and 34 active mines has been selected as those most worthy of further investigation for possible service as nuclear waste isolation test facilities. This investigation, being preliminary and having been performed in a very short time period, must be qualified, and the description of the qualification is presented in the body of this report. Qualifications deal primarily with the hazard of having omitted facilities and having incomplete data in some instances. Results indicate sedimentary rock mines of minerals of evaporite origin as a first ranking of preference for in situ testing, followed by other sedimentary rocks and then by mines producing minerals from any type rock where the mine is above the local water table. These are general rules and of course there can be exceptions to them.

  11. The diagnostic interpretation of basophil activation test in immediate allergic reactions to betalactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M J; Padial, A; Mayorga, C; Fernández, T; Sanchez-Sabate, E; Cornejo-García, J A; Antúnez, C; Blanca, M

    2004-11-01

    Basophil activation by allergens, including drugs, has been used to determine sensitivity and to study IgE recognition and cross-reactivity. We sought to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a basophil activation test (Basotest) in patients with immediate allergic reactions to betalactams, with a later comparison between patients who were selective (those recognizing the culprit drug excluding benzylpenicillin (BP)) and cross-reactors (those recognizing several penicillin determinants including BP). Basotest to different haptens was performed in 70 patients with immediate allergic reactions to betalactams, classified into three groups: (A) skin test positive independently of CAP/RAST immunoassay value, (B) skin test negative and CAP/RAST positive, and (C) skin test and CAP/RAST negative but drug provocation test positive. Basotest was carried out by flow cytometry following the manufacturer's instructions using different betalactam determinants and results expressed as a stimulation index. Of the 70 patients, 34 (48.6%) were positive to Basotest (sensitivity: 48.6%), 31 (44.3%) to CAP/RAST and 46 (65.7%) to either one or the other. Considering the different groups, Basotest was positive in 50.9% of patients in Group A, 60% in Group B and 14.3% in Group C. The specificity was 91.3%. Positivity to the haptens was 28.6% to amoxicillin (AX), 21.7% to BP, 20% to benzylpenicilloyl-poly-l-lysine, 12.5% to ampicillin and 2.2% to minor determinant mixture. In patients with cephalosporin reactions, Basotest to the culprit cephalosporin was positive in 77.7%. There were differences between the two reactor groups in the sensitivity of Basotest (selective to AX=50%, cross-reactors=28.6%; chi(2)=10.809, P=0.004) and in the CAP/RAST (selective to AX=28.6%, cross-reactors=61.9%; chi(2)=8.944, P=0.011). The sensitivity of Basotest is similar to immunoassays (CAP/RAST). Sensitivity is improved when used in combination. Although further studies are required, Basotest results

  12. A Six-DOF Buoyancy Tank Microgravity Test Bed with Active Drag Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Jianping; Zhu, Zhanxia

    2017-10-01

    Ground experiment under microgravity is very essential because it can verify the space enabling technologies before applied in space missions. In this paper, a novel ground experiment system that can provide long duration, large scale and high microgravity level for the six degree of freedom (DOF) spacecraft trajectory tracking is presented. In which, the most gravity of the test body is balanced by the buoyancy, and the small residual gravity is offset by the electromagnetic force. Because the electromagnetic force on the test body can be adjusted in the electromagnetic system, it can significantly simplify the balancing process using the proposed microgravity test bed compared to the neutral buoyance system. Besides, a novel compensation control system based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is developed to estimate and compensate the water resistance online, in order to improve the fidelity of the ground experiment. A six-DOF trajectory tracking in the microgravity system is applied to testify the efficiency of the proposed compensation controller, and the experimental simulation results are compared to that obtained using the classic proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method. The simulation results demonstrated that, for the six-DOF motion ground experiment, the microgravity level can reach to 5 × 10-4 g. And, because the water resistance has been estimated and compensated, the performance of the presented controller is much better than the PID controller. The presented ground microgravity system can be applied in on-orbit service and other related technologies in future.

  13. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  14. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  15. APPLICATION OF RESPIROMETRIC TESTS FOR ASSESSMENT OF METHANOGENIC BACTERIA ACTIVITY IN WASTEWATER SLUDGE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cimochowicz-Rybicka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Production of a methane-rich gas (‘biogas’ is contemporary popular sludges processing technology which allows to generate thermal and/or electric energy. Formal requirements issued by the European Union to promote so called renewable energy resources made these process more attractive leading to its application in WWTPs which were designed based on different sludge handling processes. Authors (as active design engineers noted that dimensioning sludge digestion chamber is usually based on SRT assessment without any emphasis on sludge characteristics. Bio-mass characteristics and the estimation of its activity with respect to methane production are of great importance, from both scientific and practical points of view, as anaerobic digestion appears to be one of crucial processes in municipal wastewater handling and disposal. The authors propose respirometric tests to estimate a biomass potential to produce ‘a biogas’ and several years’ laboratory and full scale experience proved its usefulness and reliability both as a measurement and a design tool applicable in sludge handling. Dimensioning method proposed by authors, allows to construct and optimize operation of digestion chambers based on a methanogenic activity.

  16. Tetrazolium/Formazan Test as an Efficient Method to Determine Fungal Chitosan Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaaban H. Moussa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal chitosan was extracted from Aspergillus niger mycelia. The produced chitosan was characterized with deacetylation degree of 89.2%, a molecular weight of 2.4 × 104 Da, and 96.0% solubility in 1% acetic acid solution. The antibacterial activity of fungal chitosan was evaluated against two foodborne pathogens, that is, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus, using the established antibacterial assays, for example, zone of growth inhibition and agar plat count tests, and using 2,3,5,-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC as chromogenic marker for qualitative and quantitative determining of antibacterial potentiality. The TTC (0.5% w/v was added, at concentration of 10%, to cultured broth, containing chitosan with different concentrations then the formed formazan was separated. The formation of red formazan could be considered as a qualitative indication for antibacterial activity, whereas the measurement of color intensity for the resuspended red formazan, using spectrophotometer at 480 nm, provided a quantitative evidence for the strength of the used antibacterial agent. Regarding the rapidity, technical simplicity, and cost-effectiveness, TTC assay could be recommended as an efficient alternative method for qualitative and quantitative determination of chitosan antibacterial activity and could be suggested for general evaluation of antibacterial agents.

  17. Design of a New Integrated Structure of the Active Suspension System and Emergency Lane Change Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-bo; Liu, Hai-mei; Zhang, Lan-chun; Bei, Shao-yi

    2017-09-01

    An integrated structure of the active suspension system was proposed in order to solve the problem of the individual control of the height of the body or the adjustable damping of the active suspension system of the electric vehicle, which improve the vibration reduction performance of the vehicle. The air bag was used to replace the traditional spiral spring, and the traditional shock absorber was replaced by the damping adjustable shock absorber, and the control module received the body acceleration sensor and the horizontal height sensor signal. The system controlled adjustable damping coefficient of shock absorber through the height of the car body the output of the air pump relay and the height control valve and the output of the electromagnetic valve of the adjustable damping shock absorber, and the emergency lane change test was carried out under different modes of speed of 60km/h. The experimental results indicated that the damping value was greater, average roll angle, yaw angle and average vehicle lateral acceleration were small when vehicle body was in the state of emergency lane change, which verified the feasibility of the integrated control strategy and structure design of the active suspension system. The research has important theoretical research value and engineering application prospect for designing and controlling strategy of vehicle chassis integrated control system.

  18. Translation and pilot testing of a measure to assess hypertension self-care activities among Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Findlow, Jan; Coffman, Maren J; Karp, Celia A

    2017-01-17

    Hispanics in the US have high rates of uncontrolled hypertension in comparison to non-Hispanic whites. This pilot study reports on the translation of a validated measure, the Hypertension Self-Care Activity Level Effects (H-SCALE), for use with Spanish speakers. The H-SCALE assesses Hispanics' adherence to lifestyle activities that contribute to primary and secondary risk reduction of high blood pressure. Cross-sectional data were collected from Hispanic primary care patients attending a free health clinic in Charlotte, NC. We performed basic psychometric tests and calculated descriptive statistics to assess adherence rates to recommended hypertension self-care behaviors. Participants were primarily female, under age 50 and had a high-school education or less; 48% were from Mexico. Internal consistency of all H-SCALE subscales was acceptable to good. Most participants were non-smokers (80%) and alcohol abstainers (85%). Participants had low adherence to weight management practices, physical activity and healthy eating habits. One-third of those with hypertension were adherent to medication regimens. The Spanish version of the H-SCALE is a reliable and useful tool for clinicians working with Hispanic adults. Based on these findings, all adult Hispanics need lifestyle behavior counseling for primary and secondary prevention of hypertension and other chronic diseases. The H-SCALE can provide valuable information to clinical and public health practitioners focused on chronic disease prevention and management.

  19. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and fabrication technologies for Indian test blanket module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Baldev; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-10-01

    For the development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel (RAFMS), for the Indian Test Blanket Module for ITER, a 3-phase programme has been adopted. The first phase consists of melting and detailed characterization of a laboratory scale heat conforming to Eurofer 97 composition, to demonstrate the capability of the Indian industry for producing fusion grade steel. In the second phase which is currently in progress, the chemical composition will be optimized with respect to tungsten and tantalum for better combination of mechanical properties. Characterization of the optimized commercial scale India-specific RAFM steel will be carried out in the third phase. The first phase of the programme has been successfully completed and the tensile, impact and creep properties are comparable with Eurofer 97. Laser and electron beam welding parameters have been optimized and welding consumables were developed for Narrow Gap - Gas Tungsten Arc welding and for laser-hybrid welding.

  20. Floating light-activated microelectrical stimulators tested in the rat spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, Ammar; Sahin, Mesut; Freedman, David S.; Cevik, Elif; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Unlu, M. Selim

    2011-10-01

    Microelectrodes of neural stimulation utilize fine wires for electrical connections to driving electronics. Breakage of these wires and the neural tissue response due to their tethering forces are major problems encountered with long-term implantation of microelectrodes. The lifetime of an implant for neural stimulation can be substantially improved if the wire interconnects are eliminated. Thus, we proposed a floating light-activated microelectrical stimulator (FLAMES) for wireless neural stimulation. In this paradigm, a laser beam at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths will be used as a means of energy transfer to the device. In this study, microstimulators of various sizes were fabricated, with two cascaded GaAs p-i-n photodiodes, and tested in the rat spinal cord. A train of NIR pulses (0.2 ms, 50 Hz) was sent through the tissue to wirelessly activate the devices and generate the stimulus current. The forces elicited by intraspinal stimulation were measured from the ipsilateral forelimb with a force transducer. The largest forces were around 1.08 N, a significant level of force for the rat forelimb motor function. These in vivo tests suggest that the FLAMES can be used for intraspinal microstimulation even for the deepest implant locations in the rat spinal cord. The power required to generate a threshold arm movement was investigated as the laser source was moved away from the microstimulator. The results indicate that the photon density does not decrease substantially for horizontal displacements of the source that are in the same order as the beam radius. This gives confidence that the stimulation threshold may not be very sensitive to small displacement of the spinal cord relative to the spine-mounted optical power source.

  1. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  2. Crucible of Creativity: Testing Public Outreach Activities at the Phoenix Comicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Phoenix Comicon (PCC) is a growing four-day pop culture event that features guests, costuming, exhibits, and discussion panels for popular sci-fi, fantasy, horror, and anime franchises. The 2014 and 2015 shows (which drew 75,000+ unique attendees each) featured a science programming track coordinated and organized by Horodyskyj. The track consisted of discussion panels, mixers, shows, interactive displays, and signature events (over 30 hours of programming each year). Topics ranged from planetary sciences to biotechnology to artificial intelligence and event staff were recruited from all levels of experience in academia, industry, and STEM outreach. The PCC science programming track for both 2014 and 2015 received very positive feedback from the audience, PCC management, and even scientists who participated in the event. Panelists and staff received frequent unsolicited praise about the content and events, and surveys showed requests for more science content in future years. Demand for good science programming, especially the kind that links the audience to local scientists, is high. The unique organizational structure of PCC, which draws heavily on the fan community rather than industry professionals, provides a rich test bed for public outreach activities generated by scientists themselves. In 2014, we tested science-based game shows, such as the bloody Exoplanet Survivor. In 2015, we ran a science interactivity booth and an interactive stage show about forensics based on the BBC series Sherlock. I will detail some of the successes and failures of these various events and what we're planning for 2016.

  3. Interspecific metabolic diversity of root-colonizing endophytic fungi revealed by enzyme activity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Dániel G; Kovács, Gábor M

    2016-12-01

    Although dark septate endophytes (DSE) represent a worldwide dispersed form group of root-colonizing endophytic fungi, our knowledge on their role in ecosystem functioning is far limited. In this study, we aimed to test if functional diversity exists among DSE fungi representing different lineages of root endophytic fungal community of semiarid sandy grasslands. To address this question and to gain general information on function of DSE fungi, we adopted api-ZYM and BioLog FF assays to study those non-sporulating filamentous fungi and characterized the metabolic activity of 15 different DSE species. Although there were striking differences among the species, all of the substrates tested were utilized by the DSE fungi. When endophytes characteristic to grasses and non-grass host plants were separately considered, we found that the whole substrate repertoire was used by both groups. This might illustrate the complementary functional diversity of the communities root endophytic plant-associated fungi. The broad spectra of substrates utilized by these root endophytes illustrate the functional importance of their diversity, which can play role not only in nutrient mobilization and uptake of plants from with nutrient poor soils, but also in general plant performance and ecosystem functioning. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. High Lift Common Research Model for Wind Tunnel Testing: An Active Flow Control Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John C.; Melton, Latunia P.; Viken, Sally A.; Andino, Marlyn Y.; Koklu, Mehti; Hannon, Judith A.; Vatsa, Veer N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a research and development effort sponsored by the NASA Advanced Air Transport Technology Project to achieve the required high-lift performance using active flow control (AFC) on simple hinged flaps while reducing the cruise drag associated with the external mechanisms on slotted flaps of a generic modern transport aircraft. The removal of the external fairings for the Fowler flap mechanism could help to reduce drag by 3.3 counts. The main challenge is to develop an AFC system that can provide the necessary lift recovery on a simple hinged flap high-lift system while using the limited pneumatic power available on the aircraft. Innovative low-power AFC concepts will be investigated in the flap shoulder region. The AFC concepts being explored include steady blowing and unsteady blowing operating in the spatial and/or temporal domain. Both conventional and AFC-enabled high-lift configurations were designed for the current effort. The high-lift configurations share the cruise geometry that is based on the NASA Common Research Model, and therefore, are also open geometries. A 10%-scale High Lift Common Research Model (HL-CRM) is being designed for testing at the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel during fiscal year 2018. The overall project plan, status, HL-CRM configurations, and AFC objectives for the wind tunnel test are described.

  5. Assessment of a Newly Developed, Active Pneumatic-Driven, Sensorimotor Test and Training Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Haslinger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The sensorimotor system (SMS plays an important role in sports and in every day movement. Several tools for assessment and training have been designed. Many of them are directed to specific populations, and have major shortcomings due to the training effect or safety. The aim of the present study was to design and assess a dynamic sensorimotor test and training device that can be adjusted for all levels of performance. The novel pneumatic-driven mechatronic device can guide the trainee, allow independent movements or disrupt the individual with unpredicted perturbations while standing on a platform. The test-reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Subjects were required to balance their center of pressure (COP in a target circle (TITC. The time in TITC and the COP error (COPe were recorded for analysis. The results of 22 males and 14 females (23.7 ± 2.6 years showed good to excellent test–retest reliability. The newly designed Active Balance System (ABS was then compared with the Biodex Balance System SD® (BBS. The results of 15 females, 14 males (23.4 ± 1.6 years showed modest correlation in static and acceptable correlation in dynamic conditions, suggesting that ABS could be a reliable and comparable tool for dynamic balance assessments.

  6. Core-shell column Tanaka characterization and additional tests using active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, Jufang Wu; Karlsson, Anders; Kjellberg, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, core-shell particles have gained more and more attention in fast liquid chromatography separations due to their comparable performance with fully porous sub-2 μm particles and their significantly lower back pressure. Core-shell particles are made of a solid core surrounded by a shell of classic fully porous material. To embrace the developed core-shell column market and use these columns in pharmaceutical analytical applications, 17 core-shell C18 columns purchased from various vendors with various dimensions (50 mm × 2.1 mm to 100 mm × 3 mm) and particle sizes (1.6-2.7 μm) were characterized using Tanaka test protocols. Furthermore, four selected active pharmaceutical ingredients were chosen as test probes to investigate the batch to batch reproducibility for core-shell columns of particle size 2.6-2.7 μm, with dimension of 100 × 3 mm and columns of particle size 1.6 μm, with dimension 100 × 2.1 mm under isocratic elution. Columns of particle size 2.6-2.7 μm were also tested under gradient elution conditions. To confirm the claimed comparable efficiency of 2.6 μm core-shell particles as sub-2 μm fully porous particles, column performances of the selected core-shell columns were compared with BEH C18 , 1.7 μm, a fully porous column material as well. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Differences in cortical and pituitary activity in response to hypoglycaemia and cognitive testing in healthy men with different basal activity of the renin-angiotensin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie-Olsen, Lise G; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Kjaer, Troels W

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: High renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity has been associated with a high risk of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and with cognitive deterioration during experimental hypoglycaemia in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to describe possible differences...... in cerebral activity during hypoglycaemia and cognitive testing in two groups of healthy men with different basal RAS activity. METHODS: Ten healthy men with high RAS activity and 10 with low activity underwent six oxygen-15-labelled water positron emission tomography scans: twice during normoglycaemia, twice...... during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and twice during post-hypoglycaemia. During the scans, the subjects performed a computer-based reaction time test. RESULTS: Occipital areas were consistently more activated in the low RAS group than in the high RAS group throughout all three conditions. During...

  8. Does increased superficial neck flexor activity in the craniocervical flexion test reflect reduced deep flexor activity in people with neck pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Gwendolen; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    The craniocervical flexion test assesses the deep cervical flexor muscles (longus capitis, longus colli). Ideally, electromyography (EMG) studies measure activity in both deep and superficial (sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene) flexors during the test, but most studies confine recordings to superficial muscle activity as the technique to record the deep muscles is invasive. Higher activity of the superficial flexors has been interpreted as an indicator of reduced deep flexor activity in people with neck pain but how close the inverse relationship is during this test is unknown. EMG was recorded from the sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene and deep cervical flexor muscles to quantify their relationship during the craniocervical flexion test, from 32 women (age: 38.0 ± 11.6 yrs) with a history of chronic non-specific neck pain. The range of craniocervical flexion at each of the five test stages was also measured. A moderate negative correlation was identified (r = -0.45; P flexion test. There was a moderate although weaker and non-significant negative correlation between deep cervical flexors and anterior scalene activity (r = -0.34; P = 0.053). The results affirm the interpretation that higher levels of activity of the superficial flexor muscles are an indicator of reduced deep cervical flexor activity in the craniocervical flexion test. Further studies of neuromuscular and movement strategies used by people with neck pain to compensate for poorer activation of the deep cervical flexors will inform best clinical assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Basophil activation test for inhalant allergens in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogulur, Ismail; Kiykim, Ayca; Baris, Safa; Ozen, Ahmet; Yuce, Ezgi Gizem; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif

    2017-06-01

    Flow cytometric quantification of in vitro basophil activation can be quite performant and reliable tool to measure IgE-dependent allergen-specific responses in allergic patients. Current study aimed to evaluate the clinical relevance of basophil activation test (BAT) for the diagnosis of pediatric grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) allergies. Forty-seven patients suffering from allergic rhinitis with HDM and grass pollen co-sensitization with clinical history of allergic rhinitis and/or asthma and 15 non-allergic healthy subjects were enrolled. BAT was determined by flow cytometry upon double staining with anti-IgE/anti-CD63 mAb. Regarding HDM with cut-off point greater than 12.5% for CD63 + basophils sensitivity and specificity of the BAT were 90% and 73%, with positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) as 0.70 and 0.91, respectively. The analysis of concordance of being either allergic or healthy in comparison to BAT results for HDM revealed a substantial concordance (κ index = 0.61, p allergic or healthy in comparison to BAT results for grass pollen revealed an almost perfect concordance (κ index = 0.87, p allergic children was found to be remarkably higher in our cohort compared to other studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

  11. Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

  12. TTC- Based Test as an Efficient Method to Determine Antibiofilm Activity of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojniak Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Among metal nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles are a widely used in various life sectors such as in biomedical applications, air and water purification, food production, cosmetics, garments and in various household products. There are several methods for production of silver nanoparticles. Generally, silver nanoparticles can be prepared by chemical methods such as chemical reduction and electrochemical techniques, physical methods, and biological methods such as the use of microorganisms. The biological route of synthesis provides a great diversity in choice for its raw materials such as bacteria, algae, fungi and plants. The aim of the study was to evaluate the tetrazolium/formazan test as a method to determine antibiofilm activity of biological synthetized silver nanoparticles. In this study Bacillus subtilis grown on brewery effluent and produced biosurfactant was used for silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs synthesis. The culture supernatants were used in synthesis of Ag-NPs. The formation of nanoparticles accompanied by colour changes of the used reaction system was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy. The bacteria isolated from the biofilm of water supply system were used in the evaluation of the antibiofilm activity of biologically synthetized Ag-NPs. To compare the results the commonly used crystal violet assay (CV for biofilm analysis was applied.

  13. Sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test does not increase the muscle force generation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2011-06-01

    A positive inotropic action by the sympathetic nervous system on skeletal muscles has been observed and investigated in animal and in vitro studies. This action provided a theoretical basis for the putative ergogenic action of catecholamines and adrenergic agonists, although there is no clear evidence of this effect in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of inotropic effects associated to physiological sympathetic activation in healthy subjects. The muscle force capacity was investigated in the tibialis anterior (n = 9 subjects) and in the soleus (n = 9) muscles electrically stimulated with single pulses and double pulses with variable interspike interval (4-1,000 ms) and short pulse trains (frequency: 5-14 Hz) before, during, and after sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test (CPT). CPT significantly decreased by 10.4 ± 7.2 and 10.6 ± 4.4% the force produced by single and double pulse stimulation, respectively, and produced smaller decreases in the force obtained by train stimulation in the tibialis anterior, while no significant changes were observed in either type of contraction in the soleus muscle. CPT failed to induce any increase in the force capacity of the investigated muscles. The prevalent decrease in force evidenced in this study supports the concept that the weakening sympathetic action on type I fiber, already shown to occur in humans, prevails over the putative potentiating action.

  14. Muscle activity influence on the kinematics of the cervical spine in frontal tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehner, Christoph; Schick, Sylvia; Kraus, Michael; Scola, Alexander; Hell, Wolfram; Kramer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The question of muscle activity influence on the cervical spine kinematics during rear-end and frontal crash events has been discussed. Less data are available concerning frontal collisions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the ventral and dorsal neck muscles on the cervical spine kinematics during simulated frontal sled collisions. A frontal collision with a velocity change (delta V) of 10.2 km/h was simulated in a sled test with 10 healthy subjects (7 female; 3 male). A high-speed camera and accelerometers recorded the motion and acceleration data. The activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles was recorded with surface electrodes. To avoid cross-talk, an intramuscular recording of the semispinalis capitis muscles was performed with fine-wire electrodes. The sequence of both muscle activities was reproducible in all subjects. The maximal force of the sternocleidomastoid muscle was observed after a median of 152 ms, with 0 defining the time of the trigger signal. With earlier onset of muscle force, maximal dorsal horizontal acceleration of the head (r = -0.600) was reached later and the ventral translation (r = -0.733) and flexion movement (r = -0.755) set in earlier. The maximal force of the semispinalis capitis muscle was observed after a median of 160 ms. If the duration of muscle force was longer, the maximal head flexion (r = 0.685) and the maximal ventral head translation (r = 0.738) were reached later. The sternocleidomastoid muscle force is mainly associated with the horizontal head acceleration and influences the onset of the flexion and translation motion. To summarize, these temporal correlations allow the conclusion that the semispinalis capitis muscle force is mainly associated with the angular head acceleration and influences the duration of the flexion and translation motion.

  15. Molecular characterization and antiviral activity test of common drugs against echovirus 18 isolated in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park KwiSung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic diversity and antiviral activity for five common antiviral drugs of echovirus (ECV 5 isolated in Korea have been described. The present study extended these tests to a Korean ECV 18 isolate. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis caused by the ECV 18 isolate was reported in Korea in 2005, marking the first time this virus had been identified in the country since enterovirus surveillance began in 1993. Using a sample isolated from stool specimen of a 5-year-old male patient with aseptic meningitis, the complete genome sequence was obtained and was compared it with the Metcalf prototype strain. Unlike the ECV5 isolate, the 3' untranslated region had the highest identity value (94.2% at the nucleotide level, while, at the amino acid level, the P2 region displayed the highest identity value (96.9%. These two strains shared all cleavage sites, with the exception of the 2B/2C site, which was RQ/NN in the Metcalf strain but RQ/NS in the Korean ECV 18 isolate. In Vero cells infected with the Korean ECV 18 isolate, no cytotoxicity was observed in the presence of azidothymidine, acyclovir, amantadine, lamivudine, or ribavirin, when the drugs were administered at a CC50 value >100 μg/mL. Of the five drugs, only amantadine (IC50: 4.97 ± 0.77 μg/mL, TI: 20.12 and ribavirin (IC50: 7.63 ± 0.87 μg/mL, TI: 13.11 had any antiviral activity against the Korean ECV 18 isolate in the five antiviral drugs. These antiviral activity effects were similar with results of the Korean ECV5 isolate.

  16. In vitro antimicrobial activity of linezolid tested against vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated in Brazilian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Adriana O.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE has been described recently in Brazil. This is in contrast to the USA and Europe, where the VRE appeared in the late 1980s. The progressive increase in VRE isolation poses important problems in the antimicrobial therapy of nosocomial infections. Treatment options and effective antimicrobial agents for VRE are often limited and the possibility of transfer of vancomycin genes to other Gram-positive microorganisms continues. In the search for antimicrobial agents for multiresistant Gram-positive cocci, compounds such as linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin have been evaluated. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro activity of the oxazolidinone linezolid and 10 other antimicrobial agents, including quinupristin-dalfopristin, against multiresistant enterococci isolated in Brazilian hospitals. Thirty-three vancomycin resistant isolates (17 Enterococcus faecium and 16 E. faecalis, were analyzed. Strains were isolated from patients at São Paulo Hospital, Oswaldo Cruz Hospital, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, Santa Marcelina Hospital, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, and Hospital de Clínicas do Paraná. The samples were tested by a broth microdilution method following the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS recommendations. All isolates were molecular typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Linezolid was the most active compound against these multiresistant enterococci, showing 100% inhibition at the susceptible breakpoints. Quinupristin/dalfopristin and teicoplanin showed poor activity against both species. The molecular typing results suggest that there has been interhospital spread of vancomycin resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis among Brazilian hospitals. The results of this study indicate that linezolid is an appropriate therapeutic option for the treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococci infections in Brazil.

  17. Early postoperative erythromycin breath test correlates with hepatic cytochrome P4503A activity in liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L E; Olsen, A K; Stentoft, K

    2001-01-01

    , but the method has never been directly validated. The aim of the study was to investigate whether an early postoperative erythromycin breath test correlated with the hepatic CYP3A protein level and catalytic activity in liver transplant recipients. METHODS: In 18 liver transplant recipients, the erythromycin...... breath test was performed within 2 hours after transplantation. A graft biopsy was obtained during surgery and analyzed for the CYP3A protein level by Western blotting and for CYP3A activity with erythromycin demethylation and testosterone 6beta- hydroxylation assays. RESULTS: The erythromycin breath......). CONCLUSION: Our data support the erythromycin breath test as a specific in vivo assay of CYP3A activity in humans. The test is applicable in liver transplant recipients in the early postoperative phase. Future studies should evaluate the clinical usefulness of an early postoperative erythromycin breath test...

  18. Effect of testing conditions on the propsychotic action of MK-801 on prepulse inhibition, social behaviour and locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Anand; Taylor, David Alan; Malone, Daniel Thomas

    2010-01-12

    The present paper reports on two investigations designed with the aim of refining existing animal models representing several aspects of psychosis, used to evaluate antipsychotic potential of novel compounds. The aim of the first investigation was to determine the effect of habituating rats to the injection procedure on three behavioural testing paradigms, social interaction, locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response. Results showed that while there was no effect on social behaviour or locomotor activity, the habituating to injection procedure decreased startle magnitude. For the second study, the aim was to determine whether the order in which the tests were conducted would affect sensitivity to the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801), a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist known to induce social withdrawal, increase locomotor activity and disrupt PPI. Either social interaction or locomotor activity tests were carried out 3 days prior to PPI tests (protocol 1), or PPI tests were carried out 3 days prior to social interaction and locomotor activity tests (protocol 2). Results showed that protocol 2 rats were more sensitive to the social withdrawal-inducing, hyperlocomotive- and PPI-disruptive effects of MK-801. Based on these results, the testing conditions appear to have a significant influence on the outcome of experiments aimed at observing the propsychotic action of MK-801.

  19. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  20. Development and Testing of a Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist for EFNEP and FSNE Adult Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Traliece; Serrano, Elena L.; Cox, Ruby H.; Lambur, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess reliability and validity of the Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist to measure nutrition, food safety, and physical activity practices among adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and Food Stamp Nutrition Education program (FSNE) participants. Methods: Test-retest…

  1. TESTING DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z > 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Konidaris, Nicholas P. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kocevski, Dale D.; Yan, Renbin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Juneau, Stephanie [Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); McLean, Ian S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Villar, Victor [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-20

    We present some of the first science data with the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument to test the effectiveness of different AGN/SF diagnostics at z {approx} 1.5. MOSFIRE spectra were obtained in three H-band multi-slit masks in the GOODS-S field, resulting in 2 hr exposures of 36 emission-line galaxies. We compare X-ray data with the traditional emission-line ratio diagnostics and the alternative mass-excitation and color-excitation diagrams, combining new MOSFIRE infrared data with previous HST/WFC3 infrared spectra (from the 3D-HST survey) and multiwavelength photometry. We demonstrate that a high [O III]/H{beta} ratio is insufficient as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) indicator at z > 1. For the four X-ray-detected galaxies, the classic diagnostics ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) remain consistent with X-ray AGN/SF classification. The X-ray data also suggest that 'composite' galaxies (with intermediate AGN/SF classification) host bona fide AGNs. Nearly {approx}2/3 of the z {approx} 1.5 emission-line galaxies have nuclear activity detected by either X-rays or the classic diagnostics. Compared to the X-ray and line ratio classifications, the mass-excitation method remains effective at z > 1, but we show that the color-excitation method requires a new calibration to successfully identify AGNs at these redshifts.

  2. Differences of prefrontal cortex activity between picture-based personality tests: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Haida, Munetaka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Hayakawa, Noriyoshi; Inomata, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on brain activity induced by picture-based personality tests. Near-infrared spectroscopy is a newly developed, noninvasive technology in neuroimaging that can measure brain activity through blood volume changes. We measure the prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 10 [BA10]) activities of adolescents during the Rorschach (1921), the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study (PFS; Hayashi, 1964), and Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943). BA10 showed that the PFS was left-hemisphere dominant and significantly different from the Rorschach and TAT, which showed a tendency to be right-hemisphere dominant. We believe that this tendency reflects emotion and sociality.

  3. Iodine adsorption on ion-exchange resins and activated carbons: batch testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-09-30

    Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows. The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine

  4. A data base and a standard material for use in acceptance testing of low-activity waste products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, S.F.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Strachan, D.M.

    1998-04-01

    The authors have conducted replicate dissolution tests following the product consistency test (PCT) procedure to measure the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si at various combinations of temperature, duration, and glass/water mass ratio. Tests were conducted with a glass formulated to be compositionally similar to low-activity waste products anticipated for Hanford to evaluate the adequacy of test methods that have been designated in privatization contracts for use in product acceptance. An important finding from this set of tests is that the solution concentrations generated in tests at 20 C will likely be too low to measure the dissolution rates of waste products reliably. Based on these results, the authors recommend that the acceptance test be conducted at 40 C. Tests at 40 C generated higher solution concentrations, were more easily conducted, and the measured rates were easily related to those at 20 C. Replicate measurements of other glass properties were made to evaluate the possible use of LRM-1 as a standard material. These include its composition, homogeneity, density, compressive strength, the Na leachability index with the ANSI/ANS 16.1 leach test, and if the glass is characteristically hazardous with the toxicity characteristic leach procedure. The values of these properties were within the acceptable limits identified for Hanford low-activity waste products. The reproducibility of replicate tests and analyses indicates that the glass would be a suitable standard material.

  5. Development and preliminary testing of a computerized animated activity questionnaire in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, W F; Loos, M; de Vet, H C W; Boers, M; Harlaar, J; Roorda, L D; Poolman, R W; Scholtes, V A B; Boogaard, J; Buitelaar, H; Steultjens, M; Roos, E M; Guillemin, F; Rat, A C; Benedetti, M G; Escobar, A; Østerås, N; Terwee, C B

    2015-01-01

    To develop an Animated Activity Questionnaire (AAQ) based on video animations for assessing activity limitations in patients with hip/knee osteoarthritis (OA) that combines the advantages of self-reported questionnaires and performance-based tests without many of their limitations and to preliminarily assess its reliability and validity. We hypothesized that the AAQ would correlate highly with performance-based tests and moderately with self-reported questionnaires. Item selection was based on the pilot AAQ, prespecified conditions, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health core set for OA, existing measurement instruments, and focus groups of patients. Test-retest reliability was assessed in 30 of 110 patients. In 110 patients, correlations were calculated between the AAQ and the self-reported Hip Disability/Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score activities of daily living subscale (H/KOOS). In 45 of 110 patients, correlations with performance-based tests (stair climbing test, timed up and go test, and 30-second chair stand test) were calculated. In total, 17 basic daily activities were chosen for the AAQ. Video animations were made showing a person performing each activity with 3-5 different levels of difficulty. Patients were asked to select the level that best matched their own performance. Reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.97 [95% confidence interval 0.93-0.98]); the AAQ correlated highly with performance-based tests (0.62), but higher with the H/KOOS (0.76) than expected. A computerized AAQ for assessing activity limitations was developed. Content validity was considered good. Preliminary validation results showed high reliability, but construct validity needs further study with a larger sample size. Continuing research will focus on construct validity and crosscultural validity. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. [Cerebral activation during Stroop's test in a case of early focal brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Pineda, P; Román, F; Sánchez-Navarro, J P; López-Hernández, F; Bargalló, N; Falcón, C; Ramírez-Ruiz, B; Caldú-Ferrús, X; Martínez-Lage, J

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers an important advantage over other functional neuroimaging techniques used with children because of its harmlessness. Previous studies conducted with adults with alexia suggested two ways the brain can reorganise reading after a brain injury affecting the left hemisphere, one contralateral and the other ipsilateral. We describe a study carried out using fMRI of a 10 year old girl with an injury to the left hemisphere caused by a fishing harpoon when she was 6 years old. As a result of the accident the girl presented a right hemiparesia. The girl s parents and teachers also reported difficulties in the acquisition of reading writing and arithmetic, as well as a certain degree of attentional deficit. An fMRI exploration was performed while the girl was doing the Stroop test. The structural MR images showed left hemisphere cortical lesions in the orbital and angular gyrus regions, in addition to the caudate and putamen nuclei, and in the inferior longitudinal bundle. The fRMI revealed a strong overactivation of the right dorsolateral frontal cortex, in the evaluation of interference, and activations of the right angular and bilateral supramarginal gyri, in the evaluation of word reading. The functional study suggests the existence of a reorganisation of reading that is both intra and inter hemispheric.

  7. Benchmark of the SixTrack-Fluka Active Coupling Against the SPS Scrapers Burst Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Mereghetti, A; Cerutti, F

    2014-01-01

    The SPS scrapers are a key ingredient for the clean injection into the LHC: they cut off halo particles quite close to the beam core (e.g.~3.5 sigma) just before extraction, to minimise the risk for quenches. The improved beam parameters as envisaged by the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) Project required a revision of the present system, to assess its suitability and robustness. In particular, a burst (i.e. endurance) test of the scraper blades has been carried out, with the whole bunch train being scraped at the centre (worst working conditions). In order to take into account the effect of betatron and longitudinal beam dynamics on energy deposition patterns, and nuclear and Coulomb scattering in the absorbing medium onto loss patterns, the SixTrack and Fluka codes have been coupled, profiting from the best of the refined physical models they respectively embed. The coupling envisages an active exchange of tracked particles between the two codes at each turn, and an on-line aperture check in SixTrack, in order ...

  8. Characterisation of aroma profiles of commercial soy sauce by odour activity value and omission test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yunzi; Su, Guowan; Zhao, Haifeng; Cai, Yu; Cui, Chun; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhao, Mouming

    2015-01-15

    Twenty-seven commercial soy sauces produced through three different fermentation processes (high-salt liquid-state fermentation soy sauce, HLFSS; low-salt solid-state fermentation soy sauce, LSFSS; Koikuchi soy sauce, KSS) were examined to identify the aroma compounds and the effect of fermentation process on the flavour of the soy sauce was investigated. Results showed that 129 volatiles were identified, of which 41 aroma-active components were quantified. The types of odorants occurring in the three soy sauce groups were similar, although their intensities significantly differed. Many esters and phenols were found at relatively high intensities in KSS, whereas some volatile acids only occurred in LSFSS. Furthermore, 23 aroma compounds had average OAVs>1, among which 3-methylbutanal, ethyl acetate, 4-hydroxy-2-ethyl-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone, 2-methylbutanal and 3-(methylthio)propanal exhibited the highest average OAVs (>100). In addition, omission tests verified the important contribution of the products resulting from amino acid catabolism to the characteristic aroma of soy sauce. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Krenzien, Susan [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). NNSA/NSO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  10. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenzien, Susan [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1D, Change 1, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2013a); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). If a participant’s requirement document differs from this QAP, the stricter requirement will take precedence. NNSA/NFO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  11. Underground Test Area Activity Preemptive Review Guidance Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Rehfeldt, Kenneth [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Preemptive reviews (PERs) of Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity corrective action unit (CAU) studies are an important and long-maintained quality improvement process. The CAU-specific PER committees provide internal technical review of ongoing work throughout the CAU lifecycle. The reviews, identified in the UGTA Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) (Sections 1.3.5.1 and 3.2), assure work is comprehensive, accurate, in keeping with the state of the art, and consistent with CAU goals. PER committees review various products, including data, documents, software/codes, analyses, and models. PER committees may also review technical briefings including Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO)-required presentations to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and presentations supporting key technical decisions (e.g., investigation plans and approaches). PER committees provide technical recommendations to support regulatory decisions that are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) and NDEP.

  12. Design and testing of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Deptuch, G; Claus, G; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Gornushkin, Y; Husson, D; Riester, J L; Winter, M

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking based on a novel detector structure has been proposed, simulated, fabricated and tested. This detector is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low- resistivity silicon wafer standard for a CMOS process. The individual pixel is comprised of only three MOS transistors and a photodiode collecting the charge created in the thin undepleted epitaxial layer. This approach provides a low cost, high resolution and thin device with the whole detector area sensitive to radiation (100% fill factor). Detailed device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out in order to study the charge. collection mechanism and to validate the proposed idea. In order to demonstrate viability of the technique, two prototype chips were successively fabricated using 0.6 mu m and 0.35 mu m CMOS processes. Both chips have been fully characterized. The pixel conversion gain has been calibrated using a /sup...

  13. Coalbed natural gas exploration, drilling activities, and geologic test results, 2007-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur C.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the North Slope Borough, and the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation conducted a four-year study designed to identify, define, and delineate a shallow coalbed natural gas (CBNG) resource with the potential to provide locally produced, affordable power to the community of Wainwright, Alaska. From 2007 through 2010, drilling and testing activities conducted at three sites in or near Wainwright, identified and evaluated an approximately 7.5-ft-thick, laterally continuous coalbed that contained significant quantities of CBNG. This coalbed, subsequently named the Wainwright coalbed, was penetrated at depths ranging from 1,167 ft to 1,300 ft below land surface. Core samples were collected from the Wainwright coalbed at all three drill locations and desorbed-gas measurements were taken from seventeen 1-ft-thick sections of the core. These measurements indicate that the Wainwright coalbed contains enough CBNG to serve as a long-term energy supply for the community. Although attempts to produce viable quantities of CBNG from the Wainwright coalbed proved unsuccessful, it seems likely that with proper well-field design and by utilizing currently available drilling and reservoir stimulation techniques, this CBNG resource could be developed as a long-term economically viable energy source for Wainwright.

  14. Promoting Physical Activity in Low-Active Adolescents via Facebook: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial to Test Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicki, Thomas R; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana; Hillman, Charles H; Huhman, Marian; McAuley, Edward

    2014-10-30

    The World Wide Web is an effective method for delivering health behavior programs, yet major limitations remain (eg, cost of development, time and resource requirements, limited interactivity). Social media, however, has the potential to deliver highly customizable and socially interactive behavioral interventions with fewer constraints. Thus, the evaluation of social media as a means to influence health behaviors is warranted. The objective of this trial was to examine and demonstrate the feasibility of using an established social networking platform (ie, Facebook) to deliver an 8 week physical activity intervention to a sample of low-active adolescents (N=21; estimated marginal mean age 13.48 years). Participants were randomized to either an experimental (ie, Behavioral) or attentional control (ie, Informational) condition. Both conditions received access to a restricted-access, study-specific Facebook group where the group's administrator made two daily wall posts containing youth-based physical activity information and resources. Primary outcomes included physical activity as assessed by accelerometry and self-report. Interactions and main effects were examined, as well as mean differences in effect sizes. Analyses revealed significant improvements over time on subjectively reported weekly leisure-time physical activity (F1,18=8.426, P=.009, η2 = .319). However, there was no interaction between time and condition (F1,18=0.002, P=.968, η2 = .000). There were no significant time or interaction effects among the objectively measured physical activity variables. Examination of effect sizes revealed moderate-to-large changes in physical activity outcomes. Results provide initial support for the feasibility of delivery of a physical activity intervention to low-active adolescents via social media. Whether by employing behavioral interventions via social media can result in statistically meaningful changes in health-related behaviors and outcomes remains to be

  15. Multi-criteria decision analysis of test endpoints for detecting the effects of endocrine active substances in fish full life cycle tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Mark; Gross, Melanie; Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T; Axford, Stephen; Bjerregaard, Poul; Brown, Ross; Chapman, Peter; Dorgeloh, Michael; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; Green, John; Hazlerigg, Charles; Janssen, John; Lorenzen, Kai; Parrott, Joanne; Rufli, Hans; Schäfers, Christoph; Seki, Masanori; Stolzenberg, Hans-Christian; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Vethaak, Dick; Winfield, Ian J; Zok, Sabine; Wheeler, James

    2010-07-01

    Fish full life cycle (FFLC) tests are increasingly required in the ecotoxicological assessment of endocrine active substances. However, FFLC tests have not been internationally standardized or validated, and it is currently unclear how such tests should best be designed to provide statistically sound and ecologically relevant results. This study describes how the technique of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) was used to elicit the views of fish ecologists, aquatic ecotoxicologists and statisticians on optimal experimental designs for assessing the effects of endocrine active chemicals on fish. In MCDA qualitative criteria (that can be valued, but not quantified) and quantitative criteria can be used in a structured decision-making process. The aim of the present application of MCDA is to present a logical means of collating both data and expert opinions on the best way to focus FFLC tests on endocrine active substances. The analyses are presented to demonstrate how MCDA can be used in this context. Each of 3 workgroups focused on 1 of 3 species: fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), and zebrafish (Danio rerio). Test endpoints (e.g., fecundity, growth, gonadal histopathology) were scored for each species for various desirable features such as statistical power and ecological relevance, with the importance of these features determined by assigning weights to them, using a swing weighting procedure. The endpoint F1 fertilization success consistently emerged as a preferred option for all species. In addition, some endpoints scored highly in particular species, such as development of secondary sexual characteristics (fathead minnow) and sex ratio (zebrafish). Other endpoints such as hatching success ranked relatively highly and should be considered as useful endpoints to measure in tests with any of the fish species. MCDA also indicated relatively less preferred endpoints in fish life cycle tests. For example, intensive

  16. Rapid activated sludge respiration inhibition test performed by CO2 producing rate using a carbon dioxide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Noboru; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Shoji, Ryo

    2005-01-01

    The rapid activated sludge inhibition test (rapid ASRI) is one of the promising bioassays to evaluate environmental risk to the ecosystem caused by various pollutants. To improve the sensitivity and stability of ASRI, the CO2 producing rate (CPR) using a carbon dioxide gas sensor was employed to examine the respiration activity of activated sludge and to compare it to that by the conventional activated sludge respiration inhibition test using oxygen uptake rate (OUR) by EC50 values derived from dose response curve. Detection of respiratory activity based on CPR has higher reliability and sensitivity than that of OUR. It should be noted that the sensitivity of CPR for evaluating toxicity is sufficiently high in terms of derived dose response curve of some model environmental pollutants and the resultant EC50 values.

  17. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, E. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Herman, C. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, C. F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, N. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, J. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valenta, M. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, G. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, D. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Robbins, R. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, L. E. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  18. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lindberg, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heasler, Patrick G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mercier, Theresa M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cozzi, Alex [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, William E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Eibling, Russell E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Reigel, Marissa M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  19. Spring-mass behavior and electromyographic activity evolution during a cycle-run test to exhaustion in triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Meur, Y; Dorel, S; Rabita, G; Bernard, T; Brisswalter, J; Hausswirth, C

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate spring-mass (SM) behavior and associated electromyographic (EMG) activity during a run to exhaustion following a cycle exercise in trained triathletes. Ten triathletes completed four tests: a cycling test to determine V˙O(2max); a running test to determine the lactate threshold (LT); a 5 min control run at LT (C-Run) followed after a total recovery period by a cycle-to-run session to exhaustion [30 min of cycling at ∼80% V˙O(2max) followed by a run until exhaustion at LT (T-Run)]. SM behavior and EMG signals in nine lower limb muscles were recorded throughout the running sessions. Immediately after cycling, leg stiffness was 12.1% higher than its C-Run value and a concomitant increase of EMG activity of knee extensors was observed during pre-contact. Throughout T-Run, leg stiffness decreased by 7.3%, while knee extensors and ankle flexors activities decreased during pre-contact and braking phases. No significant variations in SM parameters and no significant increase of muscle activity were reported between C-Run and the end of T-Run. SM behavior during the cycle-run test was consistent with EMG activity changes. Cessation of exercise was not associated with significant alterations of stiffness values and EMG activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Circulating antigen tests and urine reagent strips for diagnosis of active schistosomiasis in endemic areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochodo, Eleanor A; Gopalakrishna, Gowri; Spek, Bea; Reitsma, Johannes B; van Lieshout, Lisette; Polman, Katja; Lamberton, Poppy; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Leeflang, Mariska M G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care (POC) tests for diagnosing schistosomiasis include tests based on circulating antigen detection and urine reagent strip tests. If they had sufficient diagnostic accuracy they could replace conventional microscopy as they provide a quicker answer and are easier to use.

  1. Comparison of bioenergetics of walking during a multistage incremental shuttle walk test and a 6-min walk test in active older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Mario; Duvergé, Sébastien; Kalinova, Émilia; Bui, Hung Tien; Comtois, Alain S

    2017-04-01

    The goal of the present research was to compare the bioenergetics variability of walking, during the 6-min walk test (6-MWT) and a multistage incremental shuttle walk test (MISWT) in an active older population. Twenty-two healthy physically active older adults with a group mean age of 70.4 ± 5.8 years completed the 6-MWT and the MISWT. Heart rate (HR), walking speed and walking [Formula: see text]O 2 were measured throughout each test with a portable metabolic cart. Strong correlations were found for the [Formula: see text]O 2 peak and the walking speed (r = 0.91 and r = 0.89 respectively for 6-MWT and MISWT). Differences in [Formula: see text]O 2 peak values were analysed with a paired Student's t test. Repeated measures ANOVA were conducted to detect differences between tests. The Bland and Altman plot indicates that the average difference between both tests was 2.5 ml kg -1  min -1 . MISWT [Formula: see text]O 2 peak means were significantly greater than the 6-MWT [Formula: see text]O 2 peak mean values (21.6 ± 5.3 vs. 18.9 ± 4.5 ml kg -1  min -1 ) which indicate bioenergetics differences between the two walking tests. Thus, the MISWT and 6-MWT elicited different walking [Formula: see text]O 2 peak and HR suggesting that the MISWT field test challenge the participants to a higher level of cardiovascular and respiratory stress. The walking [Formula: see text]O 2 peak recorded for the MISWT was significantly greater than the 6-MWT. Consequently, both tests seem to measure different facets of the aerobic capacity. MISWT seems to be a better indicator of maximal aerobic power whereas the 6-MWT provides more relevant information regarding aerobic endurance in aging population.

  2. Effect of generalised sympathetic activation by cold pressor test on cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Micieli, G; Bosone, D; Losano, G; Bini, R; Cavallini, A; Passatore, M

    1998-07-15

    There is no general agreement regarding several aspects of the role of the sympathetic system on cerebral haemodynamics such as extent of effectiveness, operational range and site of action. This study was planned to identify the effect of a generalised sympathetic activation on the cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans before it is masked by secondary corrections, metabolic or myogenic in nature. A total of 35 healthy volunteers aged 20-35 underwent a 5 min lasting cold pressor test (CPT) performed on their left hand. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in the middle cerebral arteries and arterial blood pressure were recorded with transcranial Doppler sonography and with a non-invasive finger-cuff method, respectively. The ratio of arterial blood pressure to mean blood velocity (ABP/Vm) and Pulsatility Index (PI) were calculated throughout each trial. CPT induced an increase in mean ABP (range 2-54 mmHg depending on the subject) and only a slight, though significant, increase in blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (+2.4 and +4.4% on ipsi- and contralateral side, respectively). During CPT, the ratio ABP/Vm increased and PI decreased in all subjects on both sides. These changes began simultaneously with the increase in blood pressure. The increase in ABP/Vm ratio is attributed to an increase in the cerebrovascular resistance, while the concomitant reduction in PI is interpreted as due to the reduction in the compliance of the middle cerebral artery. The results suggest that generalised increases in the sympathetic discharge, causing increases in ABP, can prevent concomitant increases in CBF by acting on both small resistance and large compliant vessels. This effect is also present when a slight increase in blood pressure occurs, which suggests a moderate increase in the sympathetic discharge, i.e. when ABP remains far below the upper limit of CBF autoregulation.

  3. Reproducibility of incremental maximal cycle ergometer tests in healthy recreationally active subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Kasper; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Testing of the ventilatory threshold (VT) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) is relevant for the evaluation of a range of training studies, clinical trials and cross-sectional studies. Due to a possible learning effect, a familiarization test is often performed to increase test......-averaging intervals (60, 30, 15, 10 and 5 s) for the determination of VO2 peak to compare test results and reproducibility. METHODS: Thirteen recreational triathletes completed three identical incremental maximal cycle ergometer tests. The initial workload was 75 and 100 watt (W) for women and men, respectively...

  4. Activity of the European high heat flux test facility: FE200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, FE200, Porte Magenta BP181, 71200 Le Creusot Cedex (France) and EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: isabelle.bobinvastra@framatome-anp.com; Escourbiac, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)]. E-mail: escourbi@drfc.cad.cea.fr; Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: mario.merola@tech.efda.org; Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: lorenzp@tech.efda.org

    2005-11-15

    FE200 is an electron beam (EB) 200 kW test facility resulting since 1991 from partnership between Framatome Technical Centre in Le Creusot (France) and Tore Supra team in CEA Cadarache (France). It is dedicated to high heat flux testing of small and medium-sized plasma facing components. The performed tests are thermal fatigue tests (100,000 since 1992), critical heat fluxes, disruptions, glancing incidence tests on materials such as Cu-Al25 and CuCrZr alloys, carbon fibre composite (CFC) or tungsten (W). The thermal fatigue behaviour of some primary first wall (PFW), hypervapotron and divertor components is described.

  5. Testing a self-determination theory model of children’s physical activity motivation: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding children’s physical activity motivation, its antecedents and associations with behavior is important and can be advanced by using self-determination theory. However, research among youth is largely restricted to adolescents and studies of motivation within certain contexts (e.g., physical education). There are no measures of self-determination theory constructs (physical activity motivation or psychological need satisfaction) for use among children and no previous studies have tested a self-determination theory-based model of children’s physical activity motivation. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of scores derived from scales adapted to measure self-determination theory constructs among children and test a motivational model predicting accelerometer-derived physical activity. Methods Cross-sectional data from 462 children aged 7 to 11 years from 20 primary schools in Bristol, UK were analysed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of adapted behavioral regulation and psychological need satisfaction scales. Structural equation modelling was used to test cross-sectional associations between psychological need satisfaction, motivation types and physical activity assessed by accelerometer. Results The construct validity and reliability of the motivation and psychological need satisfaction measures were supported. Structural equation modelling provided evidence for a motivational model in which psychological need satisfaction was positively associated with intrinsic and identified motivation types and intrinsic motivation was positively associated with children’s minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions The study provides evidence for the psychometric properties of measures of motivation aligned with self-determination theory among children. Children’s motivation that is based on enjoyment and inherent satisfaction of physical activity is

  6. Testing a self-determination theory model of children's physical activity motivation: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J; Jago, Russell; Fox, Kenneth R; Edwards, Mark J; Thompson, Janice L

    2013-09-26

    Understanding children's physical activity motivation, its antecedents and associations with behavior is important and can be advanced by using self-determination theory. However, research among youth is largely restricted to adolescents and studies of motivation within certain contexts (e.g., physical education). There are no measures of self-determination theory constructs (physical activity motivation or psychological need satisfaction) for use among children and no previous studies have tested a self-determination theory-based model of children's physical activity motivation. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of scores derived from scales adapted to measure self-determination theory constructs among children and test a motivational model predicting accelerometer-derived physical activity. Cross-sectional data from 462 children aged 7 to 11 years from 20 primary schools in Bristol, UK were analysed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of adapted behavioral regulation and psychological need satisfaction scales. Structural equation modelling was used to test cross-sectional associations between psychological need satisfaction, motivation types and physical activity assessed by accelerometer. The construct validity and reliability of the motivation and psychological need satisfaction measures were supported. Structural equation modelling provided evidence for a motivational model in which psychological need satisfaction was positively associated with intrinsic and identified motivation types and intrinsic motivation was positively associated with children's minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The study provides evidence for the psychometric properties of measures of motivation aligned with self-determination theory among children. Children's motivation that is based on enjoyment and inherent satisfaction of physical activity is associated with their objectively-assessed physical

  7. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  8. Comparison of two in vivo and two ex vivo tests to assess the antibacterial activity of several antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messager, S; Goddard, P A; Dettmar, P W; Maillard, J-Y

    2004-10-01

    An ex vivo test was adapted to mimic the in vivo conditions of testing antiseptic activity on human forearms and in the European Standard Hygienic Handwash Test (BSEN 1499). The study was to validate the ex vivo protocols using 4.8% (w/v) para-chloro-meta-xylenol (PCMX, neat Dettol), 0.5% (w/v) triclosan in 70% (v/v) isopropanol, and 2% (v/v) povidone-iodine against a high bacterial inoculum (>10(8) cfu/mL) of Escherichia coli NCTC 10538. Two ex vivo tests using human skin samples, including one introducing a mechanical rubbing effect, were compared with two corresponding in vivo tests (the forearm test and the BSEN handwashing test). All antiseptics assessed in vivo (forearm and handwash tests) produced reductions in bacterial counts that were significantly greater than those for the non-medicated soft soap control. When assessed ex vivo without rubbing, only PCMX and povidone-iodine achieved reductions significantly greater than soft soap. When assessed ex vivo with mechanical rubbing, only PCMX and triclosan achieved reductions significantly greater than soft soap. Overall, the antiseptics at the concentrations tested were more active when tested in vivo than ex vivo. The addition of a mechanical effect, either in vivo by the volunteers washing their hands or ex vivo by a drill rubbing two skin samples against each other, produced a significantly greater reduction in bacterial concentrations. The ex vivo tests were easily adapted to mimic in vivo protocols. The value of such tests, particularly the one that includes a rubbing effect, may be significant as they avoid the need for human volunteers.

  9. Dynamics of changes in the activation of blood coagulation tests at different variants of thromboprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Миколаївна Клигуненко

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study an influence of the different variants of thromboprophylaxis on activation of blood coagulation test on the background of surgical aggression. D-dimer concentration in serum is in direct proportion to fibrinolysis activity and to an amount of lysed fibrin. At the same time fibrinolysis activation is followed with an increase of formation of products of fibrin degradation (PFD that interact with fibrin-monomers and increase the number of SFMC.Materials and methods: After informed consent 200 patients were prospectively divided into groups depending on preparation and regimen of thromboprophylaxis. 1 group (n=30 – ungraded heparin (UGH (5000 ОD for 2 hours before surgery 2 times during 7 days after it. 2 group(n=30 nadraparin calcium 9500 anti-Ха МO (0,3 ml for 2 hours before surgery 2500 МО 1 time for a day 7 days after surgery; 3 group(n=48 – endoxaparin sodium(0,2 ml for 2 hours before surgery 1 time a day 7 days; 4 group(n=29 endoxaparin sodium(0,2ml for 8 hours before surgery, 0,2 ml 1 time a day 7 days; 5 group(n=34 – bemiparin sodium(0,2 ml for 2 hours before surgery 0,2 ml 1 time a day 7 days; 6 group(n=29 bemiparin sodium(0,2ml in 6 hours after surgery 1 time a day 7 days. Patients were comparable on sex, concomitant pathology, class АSA (1-2 and type of surgical intervention. There were studied the number of thrombocytes, prothrombin time (PT, INR AFTT, fibrinogen, Х-а factor activity, antithrombin, 111 (AT111, protein C, SFMC, d-dimer before surgery, on 1,5 and 7 day after it.Results and discussions: On the 1 day of postsurgical period the most influence on D-dimer level had presurgical thromboprophylaxis (TPP with UGH and nadroparin calcium. So the D-dimer level exceeded norm respectively by 67 % (р=0,017 and 65,9 % (р<0,05. In patients of 3 and 4 groups D-dimer level was the lowest that formed deficiency by 56 % (р<0,05 and 52,7 % (р<0,05 from the norm respectively. At the same time an analysis of

  10. Evaluation of the β-CARBA™ test, a colorimetric test for the rapid detection of carbapenemase activity in Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, Sandrine; Dortet, Laurent; Naas, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    There is an urgent need for accurate and fast diagnostic tests to identify carbapenemase-producing bacteria. Here, we have evaluated a novel colorimetric test (the β-CARBA™ test; Bio-Rad) to detect carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli from cultured colonies. The performance of the β-CARBA™ test was compared with that of the Carba NP test (or the CarbAcineto NP test) and RAPIDEC ® CARBA NP (bioMérieux) using a collection of 290 isolates with characterized β-lactamase content. This collection included 199 carbapenemase producers (121 Enterobacteriaceae, 36 Pseudomonas and 42 Acinetobacter baumannii ) and 91 non-carbapenemase producers (55 Enterobacteriaceae, 20 Pseudomonas and 16 A. baumannii ). The β-CARBA™ test correctly detected 84.9% of the carbapenemase producers, including all KPC and IMP, 96.4% of VIM, 85.3% of NDM, 80.5% of OXA-48-like and 91.2% of A. baumannii -related OXA carbapenemases (OXA-23, OXA-40, OXA-58, OXA-143 and overexpressed OXA-51). All rare metallo-β-lactamases (SPM, AIM, GIM, DIM and SIM) were detected. Importantly, all non-KPC Ambler class A carbapenemases were not detected, including GES variants with carbapenemase activity ( n  = 6), IMI ( n  = 3), NMC-A ( n  = 1), SME ( n  = 2), FRI-1 ( n  = 1) and BIC-1 ( n  = 1). All non-carbapenemase producers gave a negative result except with OXA-163-, OXA-405- and one TEM-3-producing Citrobacter freundii . The overall sensitivity and specificity of the β-CARBA™ test were 84.9% and 95.6%, respectively. This test is easy to perform and to interpret by non-specialized staff members. Despite lack of specificity towards non-KPC Ambler class A and OXA-48-like carbapenemases, the β-CARBA™ test could complete the existing panel of tests available for the confirmation of carbapenemases in Gram-negatives.

  11. Electromyographic activity after latissimus dorsi transfer: testing of coactivation as a simple tool to assess latissimus dorsi motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Johannes E; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Beitzel, Knut; Minzlaff, Philipp; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Imhoff, Andreas B; Buchmann, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate coactivation (CoA) testing as a clinical tool to monitor motor learning after latissimus dorsi tendon transfer. We evaluated 20 patients clinically with the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) outcomes scores, visual analog scale, active external rotation (aER), and isometric strength testing in abduction and external rotation. Measurements of aER were performed while the latissimus dorsi was activated in its new function of external rotation with concomitant activation (coactivation) of its native functions (adduction and extension). Bilateral surface electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded during aER measurements and the strength testing procedure (EMG activity ratio: with/without CoA). Patients were divided into two groups (excellent/good vs fair/poor) according to the results of the ASES and UCLA scores. The mean follow-up was 57.8 ± 25.2 months. Subdivided by clinical scores, the superior outcome group lost aER with CoA, whereas the inferior outcome group gained aER (UCLA score: -2.2° ± 7.4° vs +4.3° ± 4.1°; P = .031). Patients with inferior outcomes in the ASES score showed higher latissimus dorsi EMG activity ratios (P = .027), suggesting an inadequate motor learning process. Isometric strength testing revealed that the latissimus dorsi transfer had significantly greater activity compared with the contralateral side (external rotation, P = .008; abduction, P = .006) but did not have comparable strength (external rotation, P = .017; abduction, P = .009). Patients with inferior clinical results were more likely to be dependent on CoA to gain external rotation. Therefore, CoA testing may be used as a tool to evaluate the status of postoperative motor learning after latissimus dorsi transfer. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and testing of a nutrition, food safety, and physical activity checklist for EFNEP and FSNE adult programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Traliece; Serrano, Elena L; Cox, Ruby H; Lambur, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To develop and assess reliability and validity of the Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist to measure nutrition, food safety, and physical activity practices among adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and Food Stamp Nutrition Education program (FSNE) participants. Test-retest reliability (Cronbach alpha), internal consistency (Pearson Correlation), criterion-related validity (Spearman Correlation Coefficients), and sensitivity-to-change, were calculated for dietary quality, food safety, and physical activity, based on data collected from 73 EFNEP and FSNE participants. Nutrition and physical activity domains achieved reliability coefficients of 0.70. The instrument scored Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.20 for nutrition, 0.34 for food safety, and 0.28 for physical activity. The instrument consistently measured dietary and physical activity practices, but not food safety. All domains obtained low correlation coefficients, although consistent with other studies' validity results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Using the EZ-Diffusion Model to Score a Single-Category Implicit Association Test of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Amanda L; Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E

    2015-03-01

    The Single-Category Implicit Association Test (SC-IAT) has been used as a method for assessing automatic evaluations of physical activity, but measurement artifact or consciously-held attitudes could be confounding the outcome scores of these measures. The objective of these two studies was to address these measurement concerns by testing the validity of a novel SC-IAT scoring technique. Study 1 was a cross-sectional study, and study 2 was a prospective study. In study 1, undergraduate students (N = 104) completed SC-IATs for physical activity, flowers, and sedentary behavior. In study 2, undergraduate students (N = 91) completed a SC-IAT for physical activity, self-reported affective and instrumental attitudes toward physical activity, physical activity intentions, and wore an accelerometer for two weeks. The EZ-diffusion model was used to decompose the SC-IAT into three process component scores including the information processing efficiency score. In study 1, a series of structural equation model comparisons revealed that the information processing score did not share variability across distinct SC-IATs, suggesting it does not represent systematic measurement artifact. In study 2, the information processing efficiency score was shown to be unrelated to self-reported affective and instrumental attitudes toward physical activity, and positively related to physical activity behavior, above and beyond the traditional D-score of the SC-IAT. The information processing efficiency score is a valid measure of automatic evaluations of physical activity.

  14. ACT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content View Sources Ask Us Also Known As ACT Activated Coagulation Time Formal Name Activated Clotting Time ... What is being tested? The activated clotting time (ACT) is a test that is used primarily to ...

  15. Antimutagenic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Activities of Silybum Marianum [L.] Gaertn Assessed by the Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay (Ames Test) and the Micronucleus Test in Mice Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Flávio Fernandes Veloso; Silva, Carolina Ribeiroe; Véras, Jefferson Hollanda; Cardoso, Clever Gomes; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Chen, Lee Chen

    2016-07-01

    Silymarin (SM), a standardized extract from Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn., is composed mainly of flavonolignans, and silibinin (SB) is its major active constituent. The present study aimed to evaluate the antimutagenic activities of SM and SB using the Ames mutagenicity test in Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as their anticytotoxic and antigenotoxic activities using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. To assess antimutagenicity, Salmonella Typhimurium strains were treated with different concentrations of SM or SB and the appropriate positive control for each strain. To assess antigenotoxicity and anticytotoxicity, Swiss mice were treated with different concentrations of SM or SB and mitomycin C (MMC). The results showed that SM was not significantly effective in reducing the number of frameshift mutations in strain TA98, while SB demonstrated significant protection at higher doses (P < 0.05). Regarding strain TA 100, SM and SB significantly decreased mutagenicity (point mutations) (P < 0.05). The results of the antigenotoxic evaluation demonstrated that SM and SB significantly reduced the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) (P < 0.05). The results also indicated that SM and SB significantly attenuated MMC-induced cytotoxicity (P < 0.05). Based on these results, both SM and SB presented antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic actions.

  16. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Test to Extract Soil Properties Using the Seismic HammerTM Active Seismic Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Rebekah F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abbott, Robert E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Geologic material properties are necessary parameters for ground motion modeling and are difficult and expensive to obtain via traditional methods. Alternative methods to estimate soil properties require a measurement of the ground's response to a force. A possible method of obtaining these measurements is active-source seismic surveys, but measurements of the ground response at the source must also be available. The potential of seismic sources to obtain soil properties is limited, however, by the repeatability of the source. Explosives, and hammer surveys are not repeatable because of variable ground coupling or swing strength. On the other hand, the Seismic Hammer TM (SH) is consistent in the amount of energy it inputs into the ground. In addition, it leaves large physical depressions as a result of ground compaction. The volume of ground compaction varies by location. Here, we hypothesize that physical depressions left in the earth by the SH correlate to energy recorded by nearby geophones, and therefore are a measurement of soil physical properties. Using measurements of the volume of shot holes, we compare the spatial distribution of the volume of ground compacted between the different shot locations. We then examine energy recorded by the nearest 50 geophones and compare the change in amplitude across hits at the same location. Finally, we use the percent difference between the energy recorded by the first and later hits at a location to test for a correlation to the volume of the shot depressions. We find that: * Ground compaction at the shot-depression does cluster geographically, but does not correlate to known surface features. * Energy recorded by nearby geophones reflects ground refusal after several hits. * There is no correlation to shot volume and changes in energy at particular shot locations. Deeper material properties (i.e. below the depth of surface compaction) may be contributing to the changes in energy propagation. * Without further

  18. Feed-forward active contour analysis for improved brachial artery reactivity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Daniel N; Sehgal, Chandra M; Sultan, Laith R; Reamer, Courtney B; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-08-01

    The object of this study was to utilize a novel feed-forward active contour (FFAC) algorithm to find a reproducible technique for analysis of brachial artery reactivity. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is an important marker of vascular endothelial function but has not been adopted for widespread clinical use given its technical limitations, including inter-observer variability and differences in technique across clinical sites. We developed a novel FFAC algorithm with the goal of validating a more reliable standard. Forty-six healthy volunteers underwent FMD measurement according to the standard technique. Ultrasound videos lasting 5-10 seconds each were obtained pre-cuff inflation and at minutes 1 through 5 post-cuff deflation in longitudinal and transverse views. Automated segmentation using the FFAC algorithm with initial boundary definition from three different observers was used to analyze the images to measure diameter/cross-sectional area over the cardiac cycle. The %FMD was calculated for average, minimum, and maximum diameters/areas. Using the FFAC algorithm, the population-specific coefficient of variation (CV) at end-diastole was 3.24% for transverse compared to 9.96% for longitudinal measurements; the subject-specific CV was 15.03% compared to 57.41%, respectively. For longitudinal measurements made via the conventional method, the population-specific CV was 4.77% and subject-specific CV was 117.79%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for transverse measurements was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.98) compared to 0.90 (95% CI: 0.84-0.94) for longitudinal measurements with FFAC and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.51-0.84) for conventional measurements. In conclusion, transverse views using the novel FFAC method provide less inter-observer variability than traditional longitudinal views. Improved reproducibility may allow adoption of FMD testing in a clinical setting. The FFAC algorithm is a robust technique that should be evaluated further for its ability to replace the

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Different Plant Extracts and Phenolic Phytochemicals Tested on Paenibacillus Larvae Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Mărghitaş

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus larvae, a Gram-positive and spore-forming bacterium is responsible for American foulbrood disease inbees. The antimicrobial activity of different plant extracts and phenolic phytochemical was evaluated onPaenibacillus larvae bacteria. In addition possible correlation with antioxidant activity of the same plant extracts wasstudied. Extracts of the following plants were utilized: Achillea millefolium (yarrow, Ocimum basilicum (basil,Thymus vulgaris (thyme and Urtica dioica (nettle. The extracts that showed antimicrobial activity were later testedto determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. Although nettle present the lowest polyphenolic contentcompared with the other plant extracts, exhibit the highest antimicrobial activity, measured as the inhibition zoneusing Mueller-Hinton agar plates. Basil presented both polyphenolic content and antimicrobial activity at higherlevels, while thyme had the lowest antimicrobial activity, even it present high amount of polyphenols.

  20. Current limitations and a path forward to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coady, Katherine K.; Biever, Ronald C.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    practices developed through recent experiences conducting EAC screening/testing. Additionally, the collective assessment of EAC screening and testing data (e.g. compilation of historical control data) can be leveraged to refine test designs and performance criteria to maximize the power and utility of EAC......To assess the hazards and risks of possible endocrine active chemicals (EACs) there is a need for robust, validated test methods that detect perturbation of endocrine pathways of concern and provide insights reliable information as to assess to potential adverse effects on apical endpoints. One......, there is the opportunity for strategic use of HTP data and/or early screening level information to help guide the selection of existing assays that can further evaluate a given EAC modality. Further challenges for EAC screening and testing involve guidance and optimization in several areas, such as concentration setting...

  1. Towards a Smart Semi-Active Prosthetic Leg: Preliminary Assessment and Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Awad, MI; Abouhossein, A; Dehghani-Sanij, AA; Richardson, R.; Moser, D.; Zahedi, S; Bradley, D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a development of a semi-active prosthetic knee, which can work in both active and passive modes based on the energy required during the gait cycle of various activities of daily livings (ADLs). The prosthetic limb is equipped with various sensors to measure the kinematic and kinetic parameters of both prosthetic limbs. This prosthetic knee is designed to be back-drivable in passive mode to provide a potential use in energy regeneration when there negative energy across the...

  2. A new protocol test for physical activity research in obese children (etiobe project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixeres, Jaime; Zaragozá, Irene; Alcañiz, Mariano; Gomis-Tena, Julio; Cebolla, Ausiàs

    2009-01-01

    A new protocol is presented to validate TIPS (portable physiological monitoring device designed by I3BH that can get respiration, ecg and activity of the patient) for physical habits detection. Physiological and activity parameters and data from questionnaires have been acquired from a group of obese & non-obese children (n=20). Children completed activities from sedentary level to vigorous level. Preliminary results show variability on the response of children's effort and feasibility of TIPS platform as an ambulatory tool.

  3. Clinimetric properties of the Tinetti Mobility Test, Four Square Step Test, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and spatiotemporal gait measures in individuals with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, Anne D; Fritz, Nora E; Kostyk, Sandra K; Young, Gregory S; Kegelmeyer, Deb A

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with Huntington's disease (HD) experience balance and gait problems that lead to falls. Clinicians currently have very little information about the reliability and validity of outcome measures to determine the efficacy of interventions that aim to reduce balance and gait impairments in HD. This study examined the reliability and concurrent validity of spatiotemporal gait measures, the Tinetti Mobility Test (TMT), Four Square Step Test (FSST), and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale in individuals with HD. Participants with HD [n = 20; mean age ± SD=50.9 ± 13.7; 7 male] were tested on spatiotemporal gait measures and the TMT, FSST, and ABC Scale before and after a six week period to determine test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) values. Linear relationships between gait and clinical measures were estimated using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Spatiotemporal gait measures, the TMT total and the FSST showed good to excellent test-retest reliability (ICC > 0.75). MDC values were 0.30 m/s and 0.17 m/s for velocity in forward and backward walking respectively, four points for the TMT, and 3s for the FSST. The TMT and FSST were highly correlated with most spatiotemporal measures. The ABC Scale demonstrated lower reliability and less concurrent validity than other measures. The high test-retest reliability over a six week period and concurrent validity between the TMT, FSST, and spatiotemporal gait measures suggest that the TMT and FSST may be useful outcome measures for future intervention studies in ambulatory individuals with HD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Energy shift estimation of demand response activation on domestic refrigerators – A field test study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Gudmand-Høyer, Kristian; Marinelli, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method to estimate the amount of energy that can be shifted during demand response (DR) activation on domestic refrigerator. Though there are many methods for DR activation like load reduction, load shifting and onsite generation, the method under study is load shifting....... Electric heating and cooling equipment like refrigerators, water heaters and space heaters and coolers are preferred for such DR activation because of their energy storing capacity. Accurate estimation of available regulating power and energy shift is important to understand the value of DR activation...

  5. Small-scale and large-scale testing of photo-electrochemically activated leaching technology in Aprelkovo and Delmachik Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekisov, AG; Lavrov, AYu; Rubtsov, YuI

    2017-02-01

    The paper gives a description of tests and trials of the technology of heap gold leaching from rebellious ore in Aprelkovo and Delmachik Mines. Efficiency of leaching flowsheets with the stage-wise use of activated solutions of different reagents, including active forms of oxygen, is evaluated. Carbonate-peroxide solutions are used at the first stage of leaching to oxidize sulfide and sulfide-arsenide ore minerals to recover iron and copper from them. The second stage leaching uses active cyanide solutions to leach encapsulated and disperse gold and silver.

  6. The Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities : test-retest reliability and comparison with an accelerometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Streppel, Kitty R M; van der Beek, Allard J; van der Woude, Luc H V; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam; van Mechelen, Willem; van der Woude, Lucas

    BACKGROUND: The objective was to determine the test-retest reliability and criterion validity of the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD). METHODS: Forty-five non-wheelchair dependent subjects were recruited from three Dutch rehabilitation centers. Subjects'

  7. Crosslanguage Lexical Activation: A Test of the Revised Hierarchical and Morphological Decomposition Models in Arabic-English Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem, Mousa; Foote, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the predictions of the revised hierarchical (RHM) and morphological decomposition (MDM) models with Arabic-English bilinguals. The RHM (Kroll & Stewart, 1994) predicts that the amount of activation of first language translation equivalents is negatively correlated with second language (L2) proficiency. The MDM (Frost, Forster, &…

  8. Application of the Copenhagen Soccer Test in high-level women players - locomotor activities, physiological response and sprint performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendiksen, Mads; Pettersen, Svein Arne; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the physiological response, sprint performance and technical ability in various phases of the Copenhagen Soccer Test for Women (CSTw) and investigated whether the locomotor activities of the CSTw were comparable to competitive match-play (CM). Physiological measurements and physical/...

  9. Performance of a novel test to quantify activated protein C resistance in women with a history of pre-eclampsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, A.W.; Hamulyak, K.; Oerle, R. van; Pampus, L.C. van; Spaanderman, M.E.A.; Damoiseaux, J.; Rosing, J.; Peeters, L.L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We determined the performance of a functional test for activated protein C (APC) resistance in formerly pre-eclamptic women and matched controls. STUDY DESIGN: In our university medical center, we assessed the response to APC in plasma in 118 formerly pre-eclamptic women and in 57 healthy

  10. Factors Predicting the Physical Activity Behavior of Female Adolescents: A Test of the Health Promotion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Mohamadian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesPhysical activity behavior begins to decline during adolescence and continues to decrease throughout young adulthood. This study aims to explain factors that influence physical activity behavior in a sample of female adolescents using a health promotion model framework.MethodsThis cross-sectional survey was used to explore physical activity behavior among a sample of female adolescents. Participants completed measures of physical activity, perceived self-efficacy, self-esteem, social support, perceived barriers, and perceived affect. Interactions among the variables were examined using path analysis within a covariance modeling framework.ResultsThe final model accounted for an R2 value of 0.52 for physical activity and offered a good model-data fit. The results indicated that physical activity was predicted by self-esteem (β=0.46, p<0.001, perceived self-efficacy (β=0.40, p<0.001, social support (β=0.24, p<0.001, perceived barriers (β=-0.19, p<0.001, and perceived affect (β=0.17, p<0.001.ConclusionsThe findings of this study showed that the health promotion model was useful to predict physical activity behavior among the Iranian female adolescents. Information related to the predictors of physical activity behavior will help researchers plan more tailored culturally relevant health promotion interventions for this population.

  11. Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Activities are outlined to introduce students to information on solar energy while performing ordinary classroom work. In this teaching manual solar energy is integrated with the humanities. The activities include such things as stories, newspapers, writing assignments, and art and musical presentations all filled with energy related terms. An energy glossary is provided. (BCS)

  12. Design and test of a novel magnetic lead screw for active suspension system in a vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Nick Ilsø; Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2014-01-01

    . Furthermore the Magnetic Lead Screw is introduced and its benefits when used with an active suspension system are discussed. Based on a model of a quarter car, the design specifications for the MLS active suspension system are found, which leads to a design study. The design study investigates the relation...

  13. TCR-Vß8 as alternative to animal testing for quantifying active SEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a result of ingestion of Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. SEs cause gastroenteritis and also cause activation of T cells and massive cytokine release. A current method for the detection of active SEs relies on its eme...

  14. The Distribution of Liver Steatosis, Fibrosis, Steatohepatitis and Inflammation Activity in Alcoholics According to FibroMax Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska, Monika; Wojtowicz, Ewa; Cylwik, Bogdan; Gruszewska, Ewa; Chrostek, Lech

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of alcoholic liver diseases is based on the history of alcohol abuse, clinical evidence of liver disease and laboratory abnormalities. The new non-invasive biomarkers have higher sensitivity to quantify and predict steatosis and fibrosis than ultrasonography. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of liver diseases in alcoholics by means of FibroMax. A total of 142 consecutive alcoholics were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of liver diseases was assayed by means of non-invasive biomarkers: fibrosis by FibroTest, steatosis by SteatoTest, steatohapatitis by AshTest (alcoholic origin) and NashTest (non-alcoholic origin) and necroinflammatory activity by ActiTest. 38.7% of alcoholics do not have fibrosis, 38%--steatosis, 94.1%--alcoholic steatohepatitis, 56.6%--non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and 33.6%--necroinflammatory activity. The insignificant fibrosis (Falcoholic steatohepatitis (H1) exists in 5.2% patients, moderate (H2) in none of the patient and severe (H3) in only one patient (0.7%). The distribution of NashTest scores is as following: N0--56.6%, N1--38.2% and N2--5.1%. Insignificant inflammatory activity (Aalcoholic patients but significant (A≥2) in 25.5%. The frequency of severe steatosis (F3) and necroinflammatory activity (A3) in patients with cirrhosis (F4) is 50% for each of them. The prevalence of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis evaluated by means of FibroMax in alcoholics is higher than in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and lower than in mixed, alcoholic and non-alcoholic ones. This may indicate the presence of non-alcoholic liver disease in alcoholics.

  15. The status of the CABRI test program: Recent results and future activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, F.; Gonnier, Ch.; Papin, J. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    1997-01-01

    The first five CABRI experiments of the REP-Na series, all with UO2 fuel and up to a maximum local burnup of 64 GWd/t, have been examined and analyzed and are now reasonably well understood. In March 1996, the first MOX test with a 3 cycle irradiated fuel at 47 GWd/t radially averaged, local maximum burnup has been successfully performed. The rod did not fail and detailed examinations are being obtained and still in progress presently. The available results and findings are presented in this paper. Three experiments of the REP-Na test matrix are still to be performed, REP-Na7, a 4 cycle MOX test, is scheduled in November 1996. The last two experiments, REP-Na 8 the key experiment of the UO2 matrix, and REP-Na 9, a 2 cycle MOX fuel test, will be performed during the first half of 1997. The CABRI tests made with sodium cooling have a good representativity of reactor conditions during some tens of milliseconds. For better simulation on a longer time range, a project study has been undertaken in view of the implementation of a pressurized-water loop into the CABRI reactor. The design of this loop and the performance parameters of the upgraded driver core of CABRI is presented. Finally, the planning of the CABRI transformation and the outlines of the future test matrix is given. The most optimistic estimation allows to predict that the first tests under prototypical test conditions could be performed before the end of 1999.

  16. Adaptation, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the Physical Activity Neighborhood Environment Scale in Nigeria (PANES-N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, Adewale L; Sallis, James F; Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje Y; Amin, Mariam M; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2013-11-01

    This study adapted the Physical Activity Neighborhood Environment Scale (PANES) to the Nigerian context and assessed the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Nigerian version (PANESN). A multidisciplinary panel of experts adapted the original PANES to reflect the built and social environment of Nigeria. The adapted PANES was subjected to cognitive testing and test retest reliability in a diverse sample of Nigerian adults (N = 132) from different neighborhood types. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) was used to assess test-retest reliability, and construct validity was investigated with Analysis of Covariance for differences in environmental attributes between neighborhoods. Four of the 17 items on the original PANES were significantly modified, 3 were removed and 2 new items were incorporated into the final version of adapted PANES-N. Test-retest reliability was substantial to almost perfect (ICC = 0.62-1.00) for all items on the PANES-N, and residents of neighborhoods in the inner city reported higher residential density, land use mix and safety, but lower pedestrian facilities and aesthetics than did residents of government reserved area/new layout neighborhoods. The PANES-N appears promising for assessing environmental perceptions related to physical activity in Nigeria, but further testing is required to assess its applicability across Africa.

  17. Comparison of EUCAST and CLSI broth microdilution methods for the susceptibility testing of 10 systemically active antifungal agents when tested against Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Castanheira, Mariana; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-06-01

    The antifungal broth microdilution (BMD) method of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) was compared with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) BMD method M27-A3 for amphotericin B, flucytosine, anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, isavuconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole susceptibility testing of 357 isolates of Candida. The isolates were selected from global surveillance collections to represent both wild-type (WT) and non-WT MIC results for the azoles (12% of fluconazole and voriconazole results were non-WT) and the echinocandins (6% of anidulafungin and micafungin results were non-WT). The study collection included 114 isolates of Candida albicans, 73 of C. glabrata, 76 of C. parapsilosis, 60 of C. tropicalis, and 34 of C. krusei. The overall essential agreement (EA) between EUCAST and CLSI results ranged from 78.9% (posaconazole) to 99.6% (flucytosine). The categorical agreement (CA) between methods and species of Candida was assessed using previously determined CLSI epidemiological cutoff values. The overall CA between methods was 95.0% with 2.5% very major (VM) and major (M) discrepancies. The CA was >93% for all antifungal agents with the exception of caspofungin (84.6%), where 10% of the results were categorized as non-WT by the EUCAST method and WT by the CLSI method. Problem areas with low EA or CA include testing of amphotericin B, anidulafungin, and isavuconazole against C. glabrata, itraconazole, and posaconazole against most species, and caspofungin against C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We confirm high level EA and CA (>90%) between the 2 methods for testing fluconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin against all 5 species. The results indicate that the EUCAST and CLSI methods produce comparable results for testing the systemically active antifungal agents against the 5 most common species of Candida; however, there are several areas where additional

  18. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachan, Rosemary R C; Lawton, Rebecca J; Jackson, Cath; Conner, Mark; Meads, David M; West, Robert M

    2011-04-11

    Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations) were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form) and health outcomes were assessed. Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ) at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B=-1.79 mm/Hg) and resting heart rate (B=-2.08 beats) and significantly increased body mass index (B=.18 units) compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. © 2011 McEachan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Cath

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. Methods A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form and health outcomes were assessed. Results and discussion Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B = -1.79 mm/Hg and resting heart rate (B = -2.08 beats and significantly increased body mass index (B = .18 units compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. Conclusions The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08807396

  20. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and mixture toxicity of organic chemicals in Photobacterium phosphoreum: the Microtox test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermens, J.; Busser, F.; Leeuwangh, P.; Musch, A.

    1985-02-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships were calculated for the inhibition of bioluminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum by 22 nonreactive organic chemicals. The inhibition was measured using the Microtox test and correlated with the partition coefficient between n-octanol and water (Poct), molar refractivity (MR), and molar volume (MW/d). At log Poct less than 1 and greater than 3, deviations from linearity were observed. Introduction of MR and MW/d improved the quality of the relationships. The influences of MR or MW/d may be related with an interaction of the tested chemicals to the enzyme system which produces the light emission. The sensitivity of the Microtox test to the 22 tested compounds is comparable to a 14-day acute mortality test with guppies for chemicals with log Poct less than 4. The inhibition of bioluminescence by a mixture of the tested compounds was slightly less than was expected in case of concentration addition. The Microtox test can give a good estimate of the total aspecific minimum toxicity of polluted waters. When rather lipophilic compounds or pollutants with more specific modes of action are present, this test will underestimate the toxicity to other aquatic life.

  1. A new digitized method of the compulsive gnawing test revealed dopaminergic activity of salvinorin A in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Stephen M; Butterweck, Veronika

    2010-09-01

    The compulsive gnawing (CG) test has been used for numerous years as an assay to determine the dopaminergic activity of various compounds. We developed a new method of quantification via a digitization step which allowed a more precise measurement of the gnawing activity. It was the aim of the present study to explore possible dopaminergic effects of salvinorin A (SA), the major active compound of Salvia divinorum, using the new digitized CG test. A group of experiments using male C57BL/6 mice were performed to validate the new method of quantification showing only significant increases of gnawing when the dopamine reuptake inhibitors buproprion (20 mg/kg, p.0.) and nomifensine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) were given concomitantly with apomorphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Different concentrations of the SA (1.0, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested with positive dopaminergic activity when administered with apomorphine which differed from the semisynthetic counterpart U-69593. Furthermore, the activity observed with SA was unsuccessfully antagonized by the κ-opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (NorBNI; 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.), while the dopamine antagonist haloperidol did successfully block (0.06 mg/kg, i.p.) the gnawing activity seen with SA. Our data further strengthen the argument that salvinorin A is not a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist and is the first in vivo study that veers from salvinorin A acting solely like its synthetic counterparts. Furthermore, the digitized CG test system used in this study provides a new computational method to accurately detect behavior associated with dopaminergic neurotransmission. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  2. Learning and memory in the forced swimming test: effects of antidepressants having varying degrees of anticholinergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enginar, Nurhan; Yamantürk-Çelik, Pınar; Nurten, Asiye; Güney, Dilvin Berrak

    2016-07-01

    The antidepressant-induced reduction in immobility time in the forced swimming test may depend on memory impairment due to the drug's anticholinergic efficacy. Therefore, the present study evaluated learning and memory of the immobility response in rats after the pretest and test administrations of antidepressants having potent, comparatively lower, and no anticholinergic activities. Immobility was measured in the test session performed 24 h after the pretest session. Scopolamine and MK-801, which are agents that have memory impairing effects, were used as reference drugs for a better evaluation of the memory processes in the test. The pretest administrations of imipramine (15 and 30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (7.5 and 15 mg/kg), trazodone (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg), and moclobemide (10 and 20 mg/kg) were ineffective, whereas the pretest administrations of scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time suggesting impaired "learning to be immobile" in the animals. The test administrations of imipramine (30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (15 mg/kg), moclobemide (10 mg/kg), scopolamine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time, which suggested that the drugs exerted antidepressant activity or the animals did not recall that attempting to escape was futile. The test administrations of trazodone (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) produced no effect on immobility time. Even though the false-negative and positive responses made it somewhat difficult to interpret the findings, this study demonstrated that when given before the pretest antidepressants with or without anticholinergic activity seemed to be devoid of impairing the learning process in the test.

  3. Outcomes and costs of incorporating a multibiomarker disease activity test in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Kaleb; Strand, Vibeke; Shadick, Nancy A; Degtiar, Irina; Ford, Kerri; Michalopoulos, Steven N; Hornberger, John

    2015-09-01

    The multibiomarker disease activity (MBDA) blood test has been clinically validated as a measure of disease activity in patients with RA. We aimed to estimate the effect of the MBDA test on physical function for patients with RA (based on HAQ), quality-adjusted life years and costs over 10 years. A decision analysis was conducted to quantify the effect of using the MBDA test on RA-related outcomes and costs to private payers and employers. Results of a clinical management study reporting changes to anti-rheumatic drug recommendations after use of the MBDA test informed clinical utility. The effect of treatment changes on HAQ was derived from 5 tight-control and 13 treatment-switch trials. Baseline HAQ scores and the HAQ score relationship with medical costs and quality of life were derived from published National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases data. Use of the MBDA test is projected to improve HAQ scores by 0.09 units in year 1, declining to 0.02 units after 10 years. Over the 10 year time horizon, quality-adjusted life years increased by 0.08 years and costs decreased by US$457 (cost savings in disability-related medical costs, US$659; in productivity costs, US$2137). The most influential variable in the analysis was the effect of the MBDA test on clinician treatment recommendations and subsequent HAQ changes. The MBDA test aids in the assessment of disease activity in patients with RA by changing treatment decisions, improving the functional status of patients and cost savings. Further validation is ongoing and future longitudinal studies are warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  4. Test-retest reliability of fMRI experiments during robot-assisted active and passive stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Lukas; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Wolf, Peter; Riener, Robert; Kollias, Spyros; Michels, Lars

    2015-11-17

    Brain activity has been shown to undergo cortical and sub-cortical functional reorganisation over the course of gait rehabilitation in patients suffering from a spinal cord injury or a stroke. These changes however, have not been completely elucidated by neuroimaging to date, mainly due to the scarcity of long-term, follow-up investigations. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible stepper MARCOS was specifically developed to enable the investigation of the supraspinal adaptations in paretic patients undergoing gait-rehabilitation in a controlled and repeatable manner. In view of future clinical research, the present study aims at examining the test-retest reliability of functional MRI (fMRI) experiments using MARCOS. The effect of repeated active and passive stepping movements on brain activity was investigated in 16 healthy participants from fMRI data collected in two separate imaging sessions six weeks apart. Root mean square errors (RMSE) were calculated for the metrics of motor performance. Regional overlap of brain activation between sessions, as well as an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was computed from the single-subject and group activation maps for five regions of interest (ROI). Data from eight participants had to be excluded due to excessive head motion. Reliability of motor performance was higher during passive than active movements, as seen in 4.5- to 13-fold lower RMSE for passive movements. In contrast, ICC ranged from 0.48 to 0.72 during passive movements and from 0.77 to 0.85 during active movements. Regional overlap of activations was also higher during active than during passive movements. These findings imply that an increased variability of motor performance during active movements of healthy participants may be associated with a stable neuronal activation pattern across repeated measurements. In contrast, a stable motor performance during passive movements may be accompanied by a confined reliability of brain activation

  5. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of bioflavonoids and structural analogues in the Ames/Salmonella test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn GR; Stel JJ van der; Stavenuiter JFC; Hamzink MRJ; Kreijl CF; LEO; LBO

    1996-01-01

    De mutagene en antimutagene eigenschappen van bioflavonoiden werden in de bacteriele mutageniteitstest van Ames met Salmonella typhimurium stammen TA98 en TA100 onderzocht. De volgorde van mutagene activiteit voor beide stammen in aanwezigheid van metabole activering was

  6. Promoting physical activity: development and testing of self-determination theory-based interventions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fortier, Michelle S; Duda, Joan L; Guerin, Eva; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2012-01-01

    .... In this review, we aim to highlight how researchers and practitioners can draw from the SDT framework to develop, implement, and evaluate intervention efforts centered on increasing physical activity...

  7. TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY OF TETRAX® STATIC POSTUROGRAPHY SYSTEM IN YOUNG ADULTS WITH LOW PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Nuray; Doğanlar, Nur; Çelik, Emine; Aysşe, Sümeyra Engin; Akkaya, Semih; Güngör, Harun R; Şahin, Füsun

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of postural sway with force plates can be affected by type of measurement and various clinical parameters such as age and activity level of the individual person. For this reason, variability is detected in postural reactions of healthy subjects without balance impairment. Test-retest reliability of postural sway in adolescent athletes has been measured using a force plate and additional test-retest studies have been suggested for subjects of different age groups with different activity levels. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to assess test-retest reliability of Tetrax® Static Posturography in young adults with low physical activity level, and examine the relationship between posturography results and low activity level. Young adults older than 18 years of age were included in the study. Demographic characteristics of the cases were recorded including age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and dominant extremity. Number of falls in the previous six months, lower body endurance (sit to stand test) and single-leg eyes closed stance test were recorded. Activity level of participants was determined according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Posturographic evaluation of all volunteers was completed using the Tetrax® Interactive Postural Balance System (Sunlight Medical Ltd, Israel). Fall risk and general stability index (SI) calculated by the Tetrax® were recorded. Following the first test, measurements were repeated 24 to 48 hours later for reliability purposes. Sixty-five subjects (28 male, 37 female; mean age 22.2 ± 1.1 years, mean BMI 22.6 ± 3.3 kg/m(2)) were evaluated. All participants were classified as minimally active according to mean IPAQ score (1042.1 ± 517.7 [231 - 2826] MET- minutes per week). ICC scores between the first and second tests for fall index and total stability index were excellent (ICC2,1=0.858, 0.850, respectively). Fall risk determined by using the Tetrax

  8. Prothrombin Time and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time Testing: A Comparative Effectiveness Study in a Million-Patient Sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu N Capoor

    Full Text Available A substantial fraction of all American healthcare expenditures are potentially wasted, and practices that are not evidence-based could contribute to such waste. We sought to characterize whether Prothrombin Time (PT and activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT tests of preoperative patients are used in a way unsupported by evidence and potentially wasteful.We evaluated prospectively-collected patient data from 19 major teaching hospitals and 8 hospital-affiliated surgical centers in 7 states (Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia. A total of 1,053,472 consecutive patients represented every patient admitted for elective surgery from 2009 to 2012 at all 27 settings. A subset of 682,049 patients (64.7% had one or both tests done and history and physical (H&P records available for analysis. Unnecessary tests for bleeding risk were defined as: PT tests done on patients with no history of abnormal bleeding, warfarin therapy, vitamin K-dependent clotting factor deficiency, or liver disease; or aPTT tests done on patients with no history of heparin treatment, hemophilia, lupus anticoagulant antibodies, or von Willebrand disease. We assessed the proportion of patients who received PT or aPTT tests who lacked evidence-based reasons for testing.This study sought to bring the availability of big data together with applied comparative effectiveness research. Among preoperative patients, 26.2% received PT tests, and 94.3% of tests were unnecessary, given the absence of findings on H&P. Similarly, 23.3% of preoperative patients received aPTT tests, of which 99.9% were unnecessary. Among patients with no H&P findings suggestive of bleeding risk, 6.6% of PT tests and 7.1% of aPTT tests were either a false positive or a true positive (i.e. indicative of a previously-undiagnosed potential bleeding risk. Both PT and aPTT, designed as diagnostic tests, are apparently used as screening tests

  9. Functional Brain Activation in Response to a Clinical Vestibular Test Correlates with Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; DeDios, Yiri; Kofman, Igor S; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain fMRI activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: Skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either a vestibulo-spinal reflex [saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)], or an ocular muscle response [utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)]. Research suggests that the skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for subjects than the high decibel tones required to elicit VEMPs. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of brain activity. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that pneumatically powered skull taps would elicit a similar pattern of brain activity as shown in previous studies. Our results provide the first evidence of using pneumatically powered skull taps to elicit vestibular activity inside the MRI scanner. A conjunction analysis revealed that skull taps elicit overlapping activation with auditory tone bursts in the canonical vestibular cortical regions. Further, our postural control assessments revealed that greater amplitude of brain activation in response to vestibular stimulation was associated with better balance control for both techniques. Additionally, we found that skull taps elicit more robust vestibular activity compared to auditory tone bursts, with less reported aversive effects, highlighting the utility of this approach for future clinical and basic science research.

  10. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Mixing and In Situ Stabilization of PCBs in Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The good correlation between the two passive samplers (SPMDs and PEDs) provides mutual validation, and confirms the effectiveness of AC-amendment by...Phoxocephalid Amphipods from Central California. Journal of Crustacean Biology 1984, 4, 233-247. (48) Lawrie, S. M.; Raffaelli, D. G., Activity and mobility of...concentrations and PCB bioaccumulation (clams, polychaetes, and crustaceans ) occurred in Hunters Point sediment treated with activated carbon (AC

  11. A Mobile Application for Easy Design and Testing of Algorithms to Monitor Physical Activity in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Spinsante

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses approaches to Human Activity Recognition (HAR with the aim of monitoring the physical activity of people in the workplace, by means of a smartphone application exploiting the available on-board accelerometer sensor. In fact, HAR via a smartphone or wearable sensor can provide important information regarding the level of daily physical activity, especially in situations where a sedentary behavior usually occurs, like in modern workplace environments. Increased sitting time is significantly associated with severe health diseases, and the workplace is an appropriate intervention setting, due to the sedentary behavior typical of modern jobs. Within this paper, the state-of-the-art components of HAR are analyzed, in order to identify and select the most effective signal filtering and windowing solutions for physical activity monitoring. The classifier development process is based upon three phases; a feature extraction phase, a feature selection phase, and a training phase. In the training phase, a publicly available dataset is used to test among different classifier types and learning methods. A user-friendly Android-based smartphone application with low computational requirements has been developed to run field tests, which allows to easily change the classifier under test, and to collect new datasets ready for use with machine learning APIs. The newly created datasets may include additional information, like the smartphone position, its orientation, and the user’s physical characteristics. Using the mobile tool, a classifier based on a decision tree is finally set up and enriched with the introduction of some robustness improvements. The developed approach is capable of classifying six activities, and to distinguish between not active (sitting and active states, with an accuracy near to 99%. The mobile tool, which is going to be further extended and enriched, will allow for rapid and easy benchmarking of new algorithms based

  12. US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota

    2012-01-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

  13. Critical tests for determination of microbiological quality and biological activity in commercial vermicompost samples of different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantina-Ievina, Lelde; Andersone, Una; Berkolde-Pīre, Dace; Nikolajeva, Vizma; Ievinsh, Gederts

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present paper was to show that differences in biological activity among commercially produced vermicompost samples can be found by using a relatively simple test system consisting of microorganism tests on six microbiological media and soilless seedling growth tests with four vegetable crop species. Significant differences in biological properties among analyzed samples were evident both at the level of microbial load as well as plant growth-affecting activity. These differences were mostly manufacturer- and feedstock-associated, but also resulted from storage conditions of vermicompost samples. A mature vermicompost sample that was produced from sewage sludge still contained considerable number of Escherichia coli. Samples from all producers contained several potentially pathogenic fungal species such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudallescheria boidii, Pseudallescheria fimeti, Pseudallescheria minutispora, Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium prolificans, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Stachybotrys chartarum, Geotrichum spp., Aphanoascus terreus, and Doratomyces columnaris. In addition, samples from all producers contained plant growth-promoting fungi from the genera Trichoderma and Mortierella. The described system can be useful both for functional studies aiming at understanding of factors affecting quality characteristics of vermicompost preparations and for routine testing of microbiological quality and biological activity of organic waste-derived composts and vermicomposts.

  14. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Roldán-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Sit-to-stand (STS tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG, biceps femoris (BF, vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM, the abdominal rectus (AR, erector spinae (ES, rectus femoris (RF, soleus (SO and the tibialis anterior (TA. Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects.

  15. Testing promotes long-term learning via stabilizing activation patterns in a large network of brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keresztes, Attila; Kaiser, Daniel; Kovács, Gyula; Racsmány, Mihály

    2014-11-01

    The testing effect refers to the phenomenon that repeated retrieval of memories promotes better long-term retention than repeated study. To investigate the neural correlates of the testing effect, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging methods while participants performed a cued recall task. Prior to the neuroimaging experiment, participants learned Swahili-German word pairs, then half of the word pairs were repeatedly studied, whereas the other half were repeatedly tested. For half of the participants, the neuroimaging experiment was performed immediately after the learning phase; a 1-week retention interval was inserted for the other half of the participants. We found that a large network of areas identified in a separate 2-back functional localizer scan were active during the final recall of the word pair associations. Importantly, the learning strategy (retest or restudy) of the word pairs determined the manner in which the retention interval affected the activations within this network. Recall of previously restudied memories was accompanied by reduced activation within this network at long retention intervals, but no reduction was observed for previously retested memories. We suggest that retrieval promotes learning via stabilizing cue-related activation patterns in a network of areas usually associated with cognitive and attentional control functions. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects.

  17. Platelet Activation Test in Unprocessed Blood (Pac-t-UB) to Monitor Platelet Concentrates and Whole Blood of Thrombocytopenic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Mark; van Holten, Thijs C; Fleurke, Ger-Jan; Remijn, Jasper A

    2013-04-01

    Platelet concentrate transfusion is the standard treatment for hemato-oncology patients to compensate for thrombocytopenia. We have developed a novel platelet activation test in anticoagulated unprocessed blood (pac-t-UB) to determine platelet function in platelet concentrates and in blood of thrombocytopenic patients. We have measured platelet activity in a platelet concentrate and in anticoagulated unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion thrombocytopenic patient. Our data show time-dependent platelet activation by GPVI agonist (collagen related peptide; CRP), PAR-1 agonist (SFLLRN), P2Y12 agonist (ADP), and thromboxane receptor agonist (U46619) in a platelet concentrate. Furthermore, pac-t-UB showed time-dependent platelet activation in unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion patient with thrombocytopenia. Testing platelet function by different agonists in relation to storage show that 3-day-old platelet concentrates are still reactive to the studied agonists. This reactivity rapidly drops for each agonists during longer storage. Pac-t-UB is a novel tool to estimate platelet function by different agonists in platelet concentrates and in unprocessed blood of thrombocytopenic patients. In the near future, we will validate whether pac-t-UB is an adequate test to monitor the quality of platelet concentrates and whether pac-t-UB predicts the bleeding risk of transfused thrombocytopenic patients.

  18. Extracurricular activities: Investigating the affects of participation-nonparticipation on the Georgia High School Science Graduation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Ray A.

    Student achievement research suggests that participation in extracurricular activities has a positive impact on the academic and developmental outcomes for adolescents. Specifically, several studies reported that adolescents who participate in extra-curricular activities are more likely to experience increases in academic achievement, self-esteem, high school graduation rates, and pro-social behaviors. On the other hand, there is research suggesting that participation in extracurricular activities may distract students from their academic pursuits. The state of Georgia requires all eleventh grade students to participate in the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT). The GHSGT consists of five separate tests that include (a) English/language arts, (b) math, (c) writing, (d) social studies, and (e) science. Each comprehensive exam is worth 600 points. A high school diploma will be awarded if the student scores at least 500 points on each individual exam. Further, review of student outcomes on the GHSGT revealed that first-time test takers were failing the science portion of the test at a greater percentage than any other subject on the GHSGT. Specifically, the Governor's Office of Student Achievement (GOSA) reported that from 2002 through 2004, a total of 70,451 students or 30.3% of students that were first-time test takers failed the science portion of the GHSGT. As a result, investigating factors that potentially could increase student achievement in science became the impetus for this study. In particular, this study examined the relationships between the levels of student participation in school sponsored extracurricular activities in relation to the level of student achievement in the area of science.

  19. Development of a versatile readout and test system and characterization of a capacitively coupled active pixel sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, Jens; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    With the availability of high voltage and high resistivity CMOS processes, active pixel sensors are becoming increasingly interesting for radiation detection in high energy physics experiments. Although the pixel signal-to-noise ratio and the sensor radiation tolerance were improved, active pixel sensors cannot yet compete with state-of-the-art hybrid pixel detector in a high radiation environment. Hence, active pixel sensors are possible candidates for the outer tracking detector in HEP experiments where production cost plays a role. The investigation of numerous prototyping steps and different technologies is still ongoing and requires a versatile test and readout system, which will be presented in this talk. A capacitively coupled active pixel sensor fabricated in AMS 180 nm high voltage CMOS process is investigated. The sensor is designed to be glued to existing front-end pixel readout chips. Results from the characterization are presented in this talk.

  20. Antioxidant activity test on ambonese banana stem sap (Musa parasidiaca var. sapientum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Setia Budi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polymorphonuclear cells (PMN release oxygen free radicals or reactive oxygen species (ROS during inflammation. As a result, ROS level is higher than antioxidant level in our body during oxidative stress leading to prolong inflammation or continuous tissue damage. Indonesia, on the other hand, is a country with various herbal medicines. For instance, ambonese banana (Musa parasidiaca var. sapientum is often used as herbal medicine. Ambonese banana, moreover, has flavonoid, polyphenol, tannin, and saponin as antioxidants to reduce free radicals by transferring their hydrogen atom. Medicine used to reduce the impact of free radicals is known as antioxidant. Antioxidant is proved to accelerate wound healing. Purpose: This research aims to analyze the effects of the antioxidant activity of Ambonese banana stem sap extract. Method: Antioxidant activities in this research were examined with 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hidrazyl (DPPH method by reacting with stable radical compounds. Spectrophotometry with a wavelength of 517 nm was used to measure absorption results shown in purple. The absorption results then were calculated by IC50 reduction activity. Result: There were significant differences of Ambonese banana stem sap antioxidant activity (p50%. Conclusion: Ambonese banana stem sap extract has antioxidant activities.

  1. The ACTH4–9 analog ORG 2766 ‘normalizes’ the changes in motor activities of rats elicited by housing and test conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, G.; Ree, J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    Motor activities of rats were decreased by short-term (7 days) social isolation as well as by intense light test conditions. The ACTH4-9 analog ORG 2766, s.c. administered 50 min before testing, dose-dependently decreased the high motor activities of group-housed housed rats tested under low light

  2. Prediction of VO2max in Children and Adolescents Using Exercise Testing and Physical Activity Questionnaire Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Nate E; Vehrs, Pat R; Fellingham, Gilbert W; George, James D; Hager, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a treadmill walk-jog-run exercise test previously validated in adults and physical activity questionnaire data to estimate maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) in boys (n = 62) and girls (n = 66) aged 12 to 17 years old. Data were collected from Physical Activity Rating (PA-R) and Perceived Functional Ability (PFA) questionnaires, a walk-jog-run submaximal treadmill exercise test, and a maximal graded exercise test. Regression analysis resulted in the development of 2 models to predict VO2max. Submaximal exercise test data were used to build the following model (R2 = .73; SEE = 4.59 mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)): VO2max (mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)) = 26.890+(5.877 × Gender; 0 = female; 1 = male) - (0.782 × Body Mass Index [BMI])+(0.438 × PFA Score) +(2.712 × Treadmill Speed; mph) +(0.746 × Age) +(0.449 × PA-R Score). Maximal exercise test data were used to build the following model (R2 = .83; SEE = 3.63 mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)): VO2max (mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)) = 10.716+(1.334 × Maximal Treadmill Grade) +(5.203 × Treadmill Speed; mph) +(3.494 × Gender; 0 = female; 1 = male) - (0.413 × BMI) +(0.249 × PFA). The results of this study demonstrate, for the first time, that regression equations that use both exercise data and physical activity questionnaire data can accurately predict VO2max in youth. The submaximal and maximal exercise tests that use self-selected treadmill speeds can be used to assess cardiorespiratory fitness of youth with a wide range of fitness levels.

  3. Clinical value of rapid urine trypsinogen-2 test strip, urinary trypsinogen activation peptide, and serum and urinary activation peptide of carboxypeptidase B in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Jesús; Martínez, Juan; Trigo, Celia; Sánchez-Payá, José; Compañy, Luis; Laveda, Raquel; Griñó, Pilar; García, Cristina; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel

    2005-12-14

    To assess the usefulness of urinary trypsinogen-2 test strip, urinary trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP), and serum and urine concentrations of the activation peptide of carboxypeptidase B (CAPAP) in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute abdominal pain and hospitalized within 24 h after the onset of symptoms were prospectively studied. Urinary trypsinogen-2 was considered positive when a clear blue line was observed (detection limit 50 microg/L). Urinary TAP was measured using a quantitative solid-phase ELISA, and serum and urinary CAPAP by a radioimmunoassay method. Acute abdominal pain was due to acute pancreatitis in 50 patients and turned out to be extrapancreatic in origin in 22 patients. Patients with acute pancreatitis showed significantly higher median levels of serum and urinary CAPAP levels, as well as amylase and lipase than extrapancreatic controls. Median TAP levels were similar in both groups. The urinary trypsinogen-2 test strip was positive in 68% of patients with acute pancreatitis and 13.6% in extrapancreatic controls (Pabdominal pain, hospitalized within 24 h of symptom onset, CAPAP in serum and urine was a reliable diagnostic marker of acute pancreatitis. Urinary trypsinogen-2 test strip showed a clinical value similar to amylase and lipase. Urinary TAP was not a useful screening test for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.

  4. Impact of Diabetes Type 1 in Children on Autonomic Modulation at Rest and in Response to the Active Orthostatic Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacon, Thais Roque; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1), of which one of the first subclinical manifestations is changes in heart rate variability (HRV). Thus, analysis of HRV associated with the autonomic active orthostatic test is important in this population. To analyze the autonomic modulation responses induced by the implementation of the active orthostatic test, in children with DM1, and study the autonomic modulation by means of HRV indices. Data of 35 children were analyzed, of both sexes, aged between 7 and 15 years, who were divided into two groups: Diabetic (n = 16) and Control (n = 19). The following variables were collected initially: weight, height, body fat percentage, heart rate, blood pressure and casual blood glucose. Subsequently, for analysis of autonomic modulation, the beat-to-beat heart rate was captured by a heart rate monitor in the supine position for 30 minutes and after 10 minutes standing during performance of the active orthostatic test. HRV indices were calculated in the time and frequency domains. For data analysis, covariance analysis was used to compare groups and ANOVA for repeated measures to compare the effects of the active orthostatic test. These data were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, body fat percentage and casual blood glucose, with a 5% significance level. The results suggested that diabetic children at rest present a decrease in SDNN (50.4 vs. 75.2), rMSSD (38.7 vs 57.6) and LF [ms2] (693.6 vs 1874.6). During the active orthostatic test the children in both groups demonstrated a reduction in SDNN, RMSSD and LF [ms2] compared to the resting position, and this response was less pronounced in the diabetic group. We conclude that regardless of age, sex, ethnicity, body fat percentage and casual blood glucose, performing the active orthostatic test promoted increased sympathetic modulation and reduced parasympathetic modulation in both groups, and this response was less

  5. Impact of Diabetes Type 1 in Children on Autonomic Modulation at Rest and in Response to the Active Orthostatic Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Roque Giacon

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1, of which one of the first subclinical manifestations is changes in heart rate variability (HRV. Thus, analysis of HRV associated with the autonomic active orthostatic test is important in this population.To analyze the autonomic modulation responses induced by the implementation of the active orthostatic test, in children with DM1, and study the autonomic modulation by means of HRV indices.Data of 35 children were analyzed, of both sexes, aged between 7 and 15 years, who were divided into two groups: Diabetic (n = 16 and Control (n = 19. The following variables were collected initially: weight, height, body fat percentage, heart rate, blood pressure and casual blood glucose. Subsequently, for analysis of autonomic modulation, the beat-to-beat heart rate was captured by a heart rate monitor in the supine position for 30 minutes and after 10 minutes standing during performance of the active orthostatic test. HRV indices were calculated in the time and frequency domains. For data analysis, covariance analysis was used to compare groups and ANOVA for repeated measures to compare the effects of the active orthostatic test. These data were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, body fat percentage and casual blood glucose, with a 5% significance level.The results suggested that diabetic children at rest present a decrease in SDNN (50.4 vs. 75.2, rMSSD (38.7 vs 57.6 and LF [ms2] (693.6 vs 1874.6. During the active orthostatic test the children in both groups demonstrated a reduction in SDNN, RMSSD and LF [ms2] compared to the resting position, and this response was less pronounced in the diabetic group.We conclude that regardless of age, sex, ethnicity, body fat percentage and casual blood glucose, performing the active orthostatic test promoted increased sympathetic modulation and reduced parasympathetic modulation in both groups, and this response

  6. Pubertal development, spare time activities, and adolescent delinquency: testing the contextual amplification hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Tina; Oliver, Bonamy R; Maughan, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    Extensive evidence supports associations between early pubertal timing and adolescent externalizing behavior, but how and under which conditions they are linked is not fully understood. In addition, pubertal development is also characterized by variations in the relative speed at which individuals mature, but studies linking pubertal 'tempo' and outcomes are scarce. This study examined the mediating and moderating roles of spare time activities in associations between pubertal development and later delinquency, using data from a large (4,327 girls, 4,250 boys) longitudinal UK cohort (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children). Self-reports of Tanner stage were available from ages 9 to 14, spare time activities at age 12 and delinquency at age 15. Pubertal development was examined using latent growth models. Spare time activities were categorized using factor analyses, yielding four types (hanging out at home, hanging out outside, consumerist behavior, and sports/games), which were examined as mediators and moderators. Earlier and faster maturation predicted delinquency in boys and girls. Spare time activities partially mediated these links such that early maturing girls more often engaged in hanging out outside, which placed them at greater risk for delinquency. In addition, compared to their later and slower maturing counterparts, boys who matured earlier and faster were less likely to engage in sports/games, a spare time activity type that is linked to lower delinquency risk. No moderation effects were found. The findings extend previous research on outcomes of early maturation and show how spare time activities act as proxies between pubertal development and delinquency.

  7. Phytochemical isolation of compounds from Sceletium tortuosum and activity testing against Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itumeleng I. Setshedi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major health care problem in tropical regions due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against widely available antimalarial drugs. Traditional societies relied on medicinal plants to treat parasitic infections. As a result, drugs like quinine and artemisinin were isolated from herbs and barks (Varughese et al. 2010. Sceletium tortuosum has been used as medicine for social and spiritual purposes by San hunter gatherers and Khoi pastoralists. Sceletium tortuosum is rich in alkaloids, one of the important classes of natural product producing treatment for parasitic infections (Kayser et al. 2002. Laboratory preparation of extracts of fresh S. tortuosum plant material was conducted mimicking traditional methods of preparation using organic solvents. Mesembrine was isolated from a methanol extract using conventional column chromatography. Sixteen extracts and mesembrine were evaluated for antiplasmodium activity using a plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase culture sensitivity assay with chloroquine as reference drug.Of the sixteen extracts, four showed activity against P. falciparum with IC50 ranging between 1.47 µg/mL and 7.32 µg/mL. Extracts prepared from stored material at -20 °C showed no antiplasmodium activity. The four originally active extracts were re-screened six months later, but the antimalarial activity could not be reproduced. To determine discrepancy in biological results, chemical profiling of the extracts was done using high performance liquid chromatography technique. Differences were observed in the profiles of the active extracts when compared to those of stored plant material.The instability of plant constituents observed could be a result of plant storage suggesting that the plant is best used when fresh.

  8. 75 FR 51271 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... products intended for use in animals. This information will be used to explore concepts of interest and... techniques, when appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Testing Communications on the Food... Response Responses Response Total Hours Individual indepth interviews 360 1 360 .75 270 General public...

  9. In vitro susceptibility testing of fluoroquinolone activity against Salmonella: recent changes to CLSI standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humphries, R. M.; Fang, F. C.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2012-01-01

    significance, and data supporting the revised ciprofloxacin break points. We encourage clinical laboratories to adopt the revised CLSI ciprofloxacin break points for all Salmonella isolates in which susceptibility testing is indicated and discuss the technical issues for laboratories using commercial...... antimicrobial susceptibility systems. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved....

  10. Effectiveness of a Classroom Mindfulness Coloring Activity for Test Anxiety in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsley, Dana; Heath, Nancy L.; Fajnerova, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based structured versus unstructured coloring on test anxiety, 52 participants (53.8% female; M[subscript age] = 10.92 years, SD = 0.82) were randomly assigned to either a structured mandala (n = 26) or free coloring condition (n = 26), and completed a standardized anxiety measure to assess anxiety…

  11. Problem-Solving Test: Catalytic Activities of a Human Nuclear Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: ion exchange chromatography, polynucleotides, oligonucleotides, radioactive labeling, template, primer, DNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase, helicase, nucleoside triphosphates, nucleoside diphosphates, nucleoside monophosphates, nucleosides, 5'-end and 3'-end, bacteriophage,…

  12. 78 FR 67218 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ....gov/tools-forms/forms/bank-operations/stress-test-reporting.html ). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The OCC... internal assessments of capital adequacy and overall capital planning. The OCC recognizes that many covered... trading shock. Securities Available-for-Sale (AFS) Market Shock Worksheet Consistent with the redefinition...

  13. Protease activity measurement in milk as a diagnostic test for clinical mastitis in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Werven, van T.; Roffel, S.; Hogeveen, H.; Nazmi, K.; Bikker, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing use of automated milking systems, automated detection of clinical mastitis is becoming more important. Various in- or on-line diagnostic tests are in use, but generally suffer from false mastitis alerts. In this study, we explored a new diagnostic approach based on

  14. 78 FR 40156 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Copy Testing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... burden of tobacco. The campaigns will feature televised advertisements along with complementary ads on... campaign advertisements prior to launch. This information will be collected through copy testing as part of...

  15. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  16. 77 FR 49412 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Research, Development, Test and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... communication is critical for successful mother/calf interactions could have more serious impacts. Also... at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC), in the Tongue of the Ocean near Andros... moved in a well oriented direction away from the source towards the deep water exit from the Tongue of...

  17. Construct validity of a revised Physical Activity Scale and testing by cognitive interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lise G; Groenvold, Mogens; Jørgensen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To validate the construct validity of a new version of a Physical Activity Scale (PAS 2) for measuring average weekly physical activity of sleep, work, and leisure time to determine whether a further criterion validation is justified. METHODS: The validity of responses to the questionnaire...... participants with a PAS 1 24-h MET-score hours. Among participants with a PAS 1 24-h MET-score =45 MET-hours, the weekly-based scale, PAS 2, systematically estimated fewer MET-hours compared to the 24-h based scale, PAS 1. The difference increased proportionally with the average of the two MET...

  18. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Augmented Formulation Matrix Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hansen, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Roberts, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-20

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in Washington State. The HLW will be vitrified in the HLW facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. A portion (~35%) of the LAW will be vitrified in the LAW vitrification facility for disposal onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize all of the wastes destined for those facilities. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. Cast Stone, a cementitious waste form, is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW. A statistically designed test matrix was used to evaluate the effects of key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. For the processing properties, the water-to-dry-blend mix ratio was the most significant parameter in affecting the range of values observed for each property. The single shell tank (SST) Blend simulant also showed differences in measured properties compared to the other three simulants tested. A review of the testing matrix and results indicated that an additional set of tests would be beneficial to improve the understanding of the impacts noted in the Screening

  19. The C-13/H-2-glucose test for determination of small intestinal lactase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Stellaard, F; Priebe, MG; Koetse, HA; Hagedoorn, RE; de Bruijn, S; Elzinga, H; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, [No Value; Antoine, JM

    Background To diagnose hypolactasia, determination of lactase enzyme activity in small intestinal biopsy material is considered to be the golden standard. Because of its strongly invasive character and the sampling problems, alternative methods have been looked for. Design We analysed the

  20. Explaining prosocial intentions : Testing causal relationships in the norm activation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, Linda; de Groot, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines factors influencing prosocial intentions. On the basis of the norm activation model (NAM), we propose that four variables influence prosocial intentions or behaviours: ( I) personal norms (PN), reflecting feelings of moral obligation to engage in prosocial behaviour, (2)

  1. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  2. Design and experimental tests of a rotary active magnetic regenerator prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Dan; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A rotary active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype with efficiency and compact design as focus points has been designed and built. The main objective is to demonstrate improved efficiency for rotary devices by reducing heat leaks from the environment and parasitic mechanical work losses while...

  3. Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) White-Painted Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) Radome Survivability Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Kwack, Eug; Stegman, Matthew; Dawson, Douglas; Hoffman, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    NASA's SMAP Mission launched in January 2015 into a 685 km near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and radiometer which share a common feedhorn and mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 rpm, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within three days. The radiometer and its associated electronics have tight thermal stability requirements in order to meet the required surface emittance measurement precision from space. Maintaining the thermal stabilities is quite challenging because the radiometer is located on a spinning platform that can either be in full sunlight or eclipse, and thus exposed to a highly transient environment. Stability requirements were met by integrating a light-weight Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) radome into the design to prevent solar illumination of the feed horn interior. The radome was painted white since the thermo-optical properties of bare sunlit EPS degrade rapidly over the three-year mission. Milling of the EPS and solvent within the white paint created cavities on the EPS surface which may introduce localized hot spots possibly violating the EPS glass transition temperature of 96degC and leading to structural integrity concerns. A three-day thermal test was conducted in a vacuum chamber to verify survivability of the radome during a simulated non-spin fault condition at end of mission. A portable solar simulator illuminated the test article and the beam irradiance was kept nearly constant during the entire 50 hour test, except during the first hour which simulated the expected 79degC on-orbit surface temperature of the radome. The test article survived based on the established pass criteria for three separate metrics: dimensional, optical property, and color. If any hot spots exist locally, they did not cause any observable permanent deformation when compared to pre- and

  4. Educational Added Value Unit: Development and Testing of a Measure for Educational Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiot, Amy B; Kirkendall, Eric S; Gosdin, Craig H; Shah, Samir S; DeBlasio, Dominick J; Meier, Katie A; O'Toole, Jennifer K

    2017-11-01

    University-based hospitalists educate health care professionals as an expectation, often lacking time and support for these activities. The purpose of this study was to (1) develop a tracking tool to record educational activities, (2) demonstrate its applicability and ease of completion for faculty members in different divisions, and (3) compare educational efforts of individuals from different professional pathways and divisions by using the educational added value unit (EAVU). Educational activities were selected and ranked according to preparation effort, presentation time, and impact to calculate the EAVU. Faculty participants from 5 divisions at 1 institution (hospital medicine, general and community pediatrics, emergency medicine, behavior medicine and clinical psychology, and biostatistics and epidemiology) completed the retrospective, self-report tracking tool. A total of 62% (74 of 119) of invited faculty members participated. All faculty earned some EAVUs; however, there was a wide distribution range. The median EAVU varied by division (hospital medicine [21.7], general and community pediatrics [20.6], emergency medicine [26.1], behavior medicine and clinical psychology [18.3], and biostatistics and epidemiology [8.2]). Faculty on the educator pathway had a higher median EAVU compared with clinical or research pathways. The EAVU tracking tool holds promise as a mechanism to track educational activities of different faculty pathways. EAVU collection could be of particular benefit to hospitalists, who often perform unsupported teaching activities. Additional studies are needed to determine how to apply a similar process in different institutions and to determine how EAVUs could be used for additional support for teaching, curriculum development, and educational scholarship. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. INL Active Interrogation Testing In Support of the GNEP Safeguards Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester

    2008-04-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. Work at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the area of active interrogation, using neutron and photon sources, has been under way for many years to develop methods for detecting and quantifying nuclear material for national and homeland security research areas. This research knowledge base is now being extended to address nuclear safeguards and process monitoring issues related to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). As a first step in this area preliminary scoping studies have been performed to investigate the usefulness of using active neutron interrogation, with a low-power electronic neutron generator, to assay Department of Transportation 6M shipping drums containing uranium oxide fuel rodlets from INL’s zero power physics reactor. Using the paired-counting technique during the die-away time period of interrogation, a lower detection limit of approximately 4.2 grams of enriched uranium (40% 235U) was calculated for a 40 minute measurement using a field portable 2.5 MeV neutron source and an array of 16 moderated helium-3 neutron tubes. Future work in this area, including the use of a more powerful neutron source and a better tailored detector array, would likely improve this limit to a much lower level. Further development work at INL will explore the applicability of active interrogation in association with the nuclear safeguards and process monitoring needs of the advanced GNEP facilities under consideration. This work, which will include both analyses and field demonstrations, will be performed in collaboration with colleagues at INL and elsewhere that have expertise in nuclear fuel reprocessing as well as active interrogation and its use for nuclear material analyses.

  6. Identification and antioxidant activity test of bioactive compound produced from ethanol extract of temukunci (Boesenbergia rotunda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atun, Sri; Handayani, Sri; Frindryani, Luthfi Fitri

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this study are to identify and to analyze antioxidant activity of bioactive compounds in ethanol extract of temukunci (Boesenbergia rotunda) rhizome. This research method was carried out by maceration of 3 kg dryed powder of B. rotunda in ethanol. The extract was concentrated using a vacuum evaporator. White crystals obtained from ethanol extract further recrystallized to produce as much as 80 mg of pure compound. Identification of pure compound was obtained using UV-Vis, IR, and 1H-NMR. The antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts, pure compounds, and ascorbic acid (positive control) were obtained using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method. The UV-Vis spectra showed λmax 287.40 and 214.20 nm, the IR spectra showed absorption C=C aromatic group at 1571.66 cm-1, C=O carbonyl at 1639.37 cm-1 and CO at 1153.35 cm-1. 1H-NMR spectra showed a group monosubtituted benzene, benzene tetrasubstituted, proton of hydroxyl group, proton of methoxyl group, one proton oxyalkyl, and two protons alkyl. The spectroscopic data showed the compound is pinostrobin (5-hydroxy-7-metoxyiflavanone). The antioxidant activity (IC50) of the ethanol extracts from B. rotunda rhizome, pinostrobin, and ascorbic acid (positive control) were 92.6; 62.84; and 3.7 µg/mL repectively. The study showed that the ethanol extract of B. rotunda rhizome and bioactive compounds have high antioxidant activity, but their activity lower than ascorbic acid.

  7. Ground tests with prototype of CeBr{sub 3} active gamma ray spectrometer proposed for future venus surface missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvak, M.L., E-mail: litvak@mx.iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Sanin, A.B.; Golovin, D.V. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Jun, I. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Mitrofanov, I.G. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Shvetsov, V.N.; Timoshenko, G.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Vostrukhin, A.A. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-11

    The results of a series of ground tests with a prototype of an active gamma-ray spectrometer based on a new generation of scintillation crystal (CeBr{sub 3}) are presented together with a consideration to its applicability to future Venus landing missions. We evaluated the instrument's capability to distinguish the subsurface elemental composition of primary rock forming elements such as O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K and Fe. Our study uses heritage from previous ground and field tests and applies to the analysis of gamma lines from activation reaction products generated by a pulsed neutron generator. We have estimated that the expected accuracies achieved in this approach could be as high as 1–10% for the particular chemical element being studied.

  8. Theoretical and Numerical Experiences on a Test Rig for Active Vibration Control of Mechanical Systems with Moving Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rinchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Active control of vibrations in mechanical systems has recently benefited of the remarkable development of robust control techniques. These control techniques are able to guarantee performances in spite of unavoidable modeling errors. They have been successfully codified and implemented for vibrating structures whose uncertain parameters could be assumed to be time-invariant. Unfortunately a wide class of mechanical systems, such as machine tools with carriage motion realized by a ball-screw, are characterized by time varying modal parameters. The focus of this paper is on modeling and controlling the vibrations of such systems. A test rig for active vibration control is presented. An analytical model of the test rig is synthesized starting by design data. Through experimental modal analysis, parametric identification and updating procedures, the model has been refined and a control system has been synthesized.

  9. 3D Active Edge Silicon Detector Tests With 120 GeV Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Da Via, Cinzia; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Christopher; Kok, Angela; Parker, Sherwood; Watts, Stephen; Anelli, Giovanni; Avati, Valentina; Bassetti, Valerio; Boccone, Vittorio; Bozzo, Marco; Eggert, Karsten; Ferro, Fabrizio; Inyakin, Alexandre; Kaplon, Jan; Lozano Bahilo, Julio; Morelli, Aldo; Niewiadomski, Hubert; Noschis, Elias; Oljemark, Fredrik; Oriunno, Marco; Österberg, Kenneth; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Snoeys, Walter; Tapprogge, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    3D detectors with electrodes penetrating through the silicon wafer and covering the edges were tested in the SPS beam line X5 at CERN in autumn 2003. Detector parameters including efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, and edge sensitivity were measured using a silicon telescope as a reference system. The measured sensitive width and the known silicon width were equal within less than 10 mum.

  10. 3D Active Edge Silicon Detector Tests With 120 GeV Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da ViÀ, Cinzia; Deile, Mario; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Christopher; Kok, Angela; Parker, Sherwood; Watts, Stephen; Anelli, Giovanni; Avati, Valentina; Bassetti, Valerio; Boccone, Vittorio; Bozzo, Marco; Eggert, Karsten; Ferro, Fabrizio; Inyakin, Alexandre; Kaplon, Jan; Lozano Bahilo, Julio; Morelli, Aldo; Niewiadomski, Hubert; Noschis, Elias; Oljemark, Fredrik; Oriunno, Marco; Osterberg, Kenneth; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Snoeys, Walter; Tapprogge, Stefan

    2009-04-01

    3D detectors with electrodes penetrating through the silicon wafer and covering the edges were tested in the SPS beam line X5 at CERN in autumn 2003. Detector parameters including efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, and edge sensitivity were measured using a silicon telescope as a reference system. The measured sensitive width and the known silicon width were equal within less than 10 mum.

  11. Electrocorticographic activation within human auditory cortex during dialogue-based language and cognitive testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Vadimovich Nourski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Current models of cortical speech and language processing include multiple regions within the temporal lobe of both hemispheres. Human communication, by necessity, involves complex interactions between regions subserving speech and language processing with those involved in more general cognitive functions. To assess these interactions, we utilized an ecologically salient conversation-based approach. This approach mandates that we first clarify activity patterns at the earliest stages of cortical speech processing. Therefore, we examined high gamma (70-150 Hz responses within the electrocorticogram (ECoG recorded simultaneously from Heschl’s gyrus (HG and lateral surface of the superior temporal gyrus (STG. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing evaluation for treatment of medically intractable epilepsy. They performed an expanded version of the Mini-mental state examination (MMSE, which included additional spelling, naming, and memory-based tasks. ECoG was recorded from HG and the STG using multicontact depth and subdural electrode arrays, respectively. Differences in high gamma activity during listening to the interviewer and the subject's self-generated verbal responses were quantified for each recording site and across sites within HG and STG. The expanded MMSE produced widespread activation in auditory cortex of both hemispheres. No significant difference was found between activity during listening to the interviewer's questions and the subject's answers in posteromedial HG (auditory core cortex. A different pattern was observed throughout anterolateral HG and posterior and middle portions of lateral STG (non-core auditory cortical areas, where activity was significantly greater during listening compared to speaking. No systematic task-specific differences in the degree of suppression during speaking relative to listening were found in posterior and middle STG. Individual sites could, however, exhibit task-related variability in

  12. Predictive performance for human skin sensitizing potential of the human cell line activation test (h-CLAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukada, Yuko; Ashikaga, Takao; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Sono, Sakiko; Mugita, Nanae; Hirota, Morihiko; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Sasa, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent changes in regulatory restrictions and social opposition to animal toxicology experiments have driven the need for reliable in vitro tests for predicting the skin sensitizing potentials of a wide variety of industrial chemicals. Previously, we developed the human cell line activation test (h-CLAT) as a cell-based assay to predict the skin sensitizing potential of chemicals, and showed the correspondence between the h-CLAT and the murine local lymph node assay results. This study was conducted to investigate the predictive performance of the h-CLAT for human skin sensitizing potential. We selected a total of 66 test chemicals with known human sensitizing potential, and tested all chemicals with the h-CLAT. We then evaluated the performance of the h-CLAT in predicting human sensitizing potential. Forty-five of 51 tested sensitizers were positive in the h-CLAT, indicating relatively high sensitivity. Also, 10 of 15 non-sensitizers were correctly detected as negative. The overall agreement between human data and h-CLAT outcome was 83%. Furthermore, the h-CLAT could accurately predict the human sensitizing potential of 23 tested chemicals that were amines, heterocyclic compounds, or sulfur compounds. Our data indicate the utility of the h-CLAT for predicting the human skin sensitizing potential of a variety of chemicals. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Tests of an alternate mobile transporter and extravehicular activity assembly procedure for the Space Station Freedom truss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Lake, Mark S.; Bush, Harold G.; Jensen, J. Kermit; Wallsom, Richard E.; Phelps, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a ground test program of an alternate mobile transporter (MT) concept and extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly procedure for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) truss keel. A three-bay orthogonal tetrahedral truss beam consisting of 44 2-in-diameter struts and 16 nodes was assembled repeatedly in neutral buoyancy by pairs of pressure-suited test subjects working from astronaut positioning devices (APD's) on the MT. The truss bays were cubic with edges 15 ft long. All the truss joint hardware was found to be EVA compatible. The average unit assembly time for a single pair of experienced test subjects was 27.6 sec/strut, which is about half the time derived from other SSF truss assembly tests. A concept for integration of utility trays during truss assembly is introduced and demonstrated in the assembly tests. The concept, which requires minimal EVA handling of the trays, is shown to have little impact on overall assembly time. The results of these tests indicate that by using an MT equipped with APD's, rapid EVA assembly of a space station-size truss structure can be expected.

  14. Synthesis Methyl Nitrophenyl Acrylate and Cytotoxic Activity Test against P388 Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teni Ernawati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of methyl nitrophenyl acrylate via modification of methyl trans-cinnamate had been done to improve its biological activity. The reaction of methyl trans-cinnamate with nitrating agent gave methyl 3-(2-nitrophenylacrylate and methyl 3-(4-nitrophenylacrylate with an ortho/para ratio of 1:8. Its structure was confirmed with 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FTIR, GC-MS. Biological activity of methyl 3-(4-nitrophenylacrylate and methyl 3-(2-nitrophenylacrylate assays was performed on Cancer cells against P388 Murine Leukemia with IC50= 7.98 μg/mL, IC50 = 27.78 μg/mL.

  15. Caffeine as a marker substrate for testing cytochrome P450 activity in human and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Marta; Daniel, Władysława A

    2008-01-01

    The current knowledge on the involvement of cytochrome P450 (P450, CYP) isoforms in the metabolism of caffeine in rat and human liver is reviewed. Attention is also paid to species- and concentration-dependent metabolism of caffeine. Finally, we discuss the P450-mediated metabolism of caffeine in relation to coffee addiction and drug interactions. Due to its safety, favorable pharmacokinetic properties, and P450 isoform-selective metabolism, caffeine has great potential as a metabolic marker substance in both humans and rats, and as a more universal metabolic tool in the latter species. However, the qualitative and relative quantitative contribution of P450 isoforms to the metabolism of caffeine is species- and concentration-dependent. While 3-N-demethylation is quantitatively the main oxidation pathway in human, 8-hydroxylation is the dominant metabolic pathway in rat. Both of these main reactions in the two species are specifically catalyzed by CYP1A2. Caffeine may be applied as a marker substance for assessing the activity of CYP1A2 in human and rat liver, but by using different reactions: 3-N-demethylation in humans and C-8-hydroxylation in rats. In addition, caffeine can be used to preliminarily and simultaneously estimate CYP2C activity in rat liver using 7-N-demethylation as a marker reaction. On the other hand, CYP3A4-catalyzed 8-hydroxylation in humans is not sufficiently isoform-specific to mark the activity of CYP3A4. Caffeine pharmacokinetics may be changed by drugs affecting the activity of CYP1A2 (human and rat) or CYP2C (rat), e.g. via autoinduction or by treatment with certain antidepressants or neuroleptics. Therefore, patients taking caffeine-containing medicine or coffee drinkers taking drugs that interact with CYP1A2 may require proper dosage adjustments upon caffeine ingestion and cessation.

  16. Modeling and experimental testing activity of the Voltage Optimization Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchino, Antonio; Hu, Junjie; Marinelli, Mattia

    could include two aspects: 1) investigate the OLTC’s application in an active distribution network characterized by several subfeeders, where higher penetration of different distributed generations is present; and 2) combine the   OLTC control with smart-metering technology, where the measurements from...... the smart meters can be used as inputs for the control actions of the OLTC transformer. ...

  17. Introduction of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and preparatory activities for its entry into force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Mutsu Establishment, Mutsu, Aomori (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is a very important treaty, not only for Japan but also for the world, because it prohibits any nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion anywhere in the world. The treaty however will not enter into force until it has been signed and ratified by all the 44 states listed in Annex 2 to the treaty. Many efforts to facilitate the treaty's early entry into force are being done by many countries and many international organizations. As one of result of these efforts, a Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization had be established at a meeting of State Signatories on 19 November 1996, and the Commission started activities to establish global verification regime of the treaty and to prepare for its entry into force. Under the CTBT activities, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is expected to play an important role as supporter for the Japanese Government, especially in a field of an International Monitoring System (IMS). However, there is no appropriate guide book on the CTBT for JAERI staff at present. This report provides some introduction of the CTBT regime and preparatory activities for its entry into force. Only open source information is used for making the report. If anyone need more detail information, it should be asked to contact competent authorities. (author)

  18. Seasonal Changes in Testes Vascularisation in the Domestic Cat (Felis domesticus: Evaluation of Microvasculature, Angiogenic Activity, and Endothelial Cell Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Alexandre-Pires

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some male seasonal breeders undergo testicular growth and regression throughout the year. The objective of this study was to understand the effect of seasonality on: (i microvasculature of cat testes; (ii angiogenic activity in testicular tissue in vitro; and (iii testicular endothelial cells expression throughout the year. Testicular vascular areas increased in March and April, June and July, being the highest in November and December. Testes tissue differently stimulated in vitro angiogenic activity, according to seasonality, being more evident in February, and November and December. Even though CD143 expression was higher in December, smaller peaks were present in April and July. As changes in angiogenesis may play a role on testes vascular growth and regression during the breeding and non-breeding seasons, data suggest that testicular vascularisation in cats is increased in three photoperiod windows of time, November/December, March/April and June/July. This increase in testicular vascularisation might be related to higher seasonal sexual activity in cats, which is in agreement with the fact that most queens give birth at the beginning of the year, between May and July, and in September.

  19. Humoral immunity in tuberculin skin test anergy and its role in high-risk persons exposed to active tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encinales, Liliana; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Maria; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Granados, Julio; Almeciga, Ingrid; Clavijo, Olga; Awad, Carlos; Collazos, Vilma; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Bañales-Mendez, José Luis; Vazquez-Castañeda, Lilia; Stern, Joel N.; Romero, Viviana; Frindkis-Hareli, Masha; Terreros, Daniel; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2009-01-01

    The most common test to identify latent tuberculosis is the Tuberculin skin test that detects T cell responses of delayed type hypersensitivity type IV. Since it produces false negative reactions in active tuberculosis or in high-risk persons exposed to tuberculosis patients as shown in this report, we studied antibody profiles to explain the anergy of such responses in high-risk individuals without active infection. Our results showed that humoral immunity against Tuberculin, regardless of the result of the Tuberculin skin test is important for protection from active tuberculosis and that the presence of high antibody titers is a more reliable indicator of infection latency suggesting that latency can be based on the levels of antibodies together with in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of the purified protein derivative. Importantly, anti-Tuberculin IgG antibody levels mediate the anergy described herein, which could also prevent reactivation of disease in high-risk individuals with high antibody titers. Such IgG Tuberculin antibodies were also found associated with blocking and/or stimulation of in vitro cultures of PBMC with Tuberculin. In this regard, future studies need to establish if immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can generate a broad spectrum of reactions either toward Th1 responses favoring stimulation by cytokines or by antibodies and those toward diminished responses by Th2 cytokines or blocking by antibodies; possibly involving mechanisms of antibody dependent protection from Mtb by different subclasses of IgG. PMID:20004475

  20. Comparison of the Results from Microscopic Tests Concerning the Quality of Activated Sludge and Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sowinska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical studies on wastewater quality and microscopic analyses of activated sludge are necessary to properly evaluate the condition of activated sludge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the sludge biotic index to determine when a change in treatment quality is short-lived, caused by, e.g., a change in influent quality or quantity, and when it indicates adverse changes in the biocenosis of activated sludge, which would very likely result in the lower efficiency of wastewater treatment in the near future. The objects of the study were two identical parallel running small wastewater treatment plants. The following indicators of contamination were analyzed: the chemical oxygen demand (COD, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, and total suspended solids (TSS. The authors additionally carried out a microscopic analysis. The study confirmed a correlation between the sludge biotic index and the removal efficiency of COD and BOD5; however, no correlation was found between the sludge biotic index and the removal efficiency of total suspended solids. The presence of metazoan microorganisms coincided in time with a good effluent treatment efficiency. When their quantity declined, a decrease in the efficiency of wastewater treatment was also observed.

  1. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials: Test methods and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauter, Paula [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tucker, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tezak, Matthew S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boucher, Raymond [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  2. Fractionation of an anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract and in vitro antioxidative activity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juadjur, A; Mohn, C; Schantz, M; Baum, M; Winterhalter, P; Richling, E

    2015-01-15

    The incidence of chronic diseases increases with advancing age of the population. A commonly discussed cause of chronic diseases is oxidative stress, which occurs in the body when there is an imbalance between the formation and inactivation of so-called reactive oxygen species (ROS). Epidemiological data suggest that a 'healthy diet', with a high content of flavonoids indicates preventive properties and correlates with an inverse effect with respect to the risk of chronic diseases. Berries (especially bilberries, Vaccinium myrtillus L.) are an important source of these flavonoids. In this study, we investigated, in vitro, the antioxidative properties of fractions obtained from a commercially available anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract (BE). As markers for antioxidative activity, the intracellularly generated ROS levels, oxidative DNA damage, and total glutathione (tGSH) levels were determined in the human colon cell lines Caco-2 and HT-29. In Caco-2 cells, the ROS levels and, in both cell lines, the oxidative DNA damage, were significantly reduced in the presence of the original BE and phenolcarbonic acid-rich fraction. Total GSH levels were slightly increased after pretreatment with BE, phenolcarbonic acid and the polymeric fractions, but not with the anthocyanin fraction. In summary, the BE and the therefrom-isolated phenolcarbonic acid-rich fraction, showed the most potent antioxidative activity whereas the polymeric and anthocyanin-rich fraction, in total, were less active. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  4. Formulation of antiacne serum based on lime peel essential oil and in vitro antibacterial activity test against Propionibacterium acnes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Noor; Fatimah, Ifat; Chabib, Lutfi; Fajarwati, Febi Indah

    2017-03-01

    Propionibacterium acnes are a normal bacterium in human skin but it can become primary pathogens that can cause inflammation on the skin. Research about new antibacterial compounds is important because resistance of bacteria acne to antibiotics. Some of Essential oils have antibacterial properties. Lime peel essential oil and patchouli essential oil have some terpenoids that act as antibacterial compounds such as Linalool and Seychellene. The purpose of this research was to formulate anti acne serum based on lime peel essential oil and patchouli oil and to determine the zone of inhibition against of Propionibacterium acnes. This study made 21 variations of formulation of anti acne serum, consisted of lime peel essential oil, patchouli oil and olive oil. Anti acne serum was evaluated i.e. in vitro antibacterial activity test against Propionibacterium acnes for 5 days, organoleptic, stability test, pH test, viscosity test and GC-MS analysis. Nine serum formulations had been selected, which based on their most favorite order. Those favorite serums had antibacterial inhibitory against Propionibacterium acnes between 20.80 - 26.12 mm, whereas control positive only 12.47 mm and control negative 5.78 mm. The most favorite serum with the best antibacterial activity was serum formula A. The composition of serum A consist of lime peel essential oil: patchouli oil: olive oil (11:1:18).

  5. Mouse testing methods in psychoneuroimmunology: an overview of how to measure sickness, depressive/anxietal, cognitive, and physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Jason M; Blevins, Neil A; Baynard, Tracy; Freund, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    The field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) aims to uncover the processes and consequences of nervous, immune, and endocrine system relationships. Behavior is a consequence of such interactions and manifests from a complex interweave of factors including immune-to-neural and neural-to-immune communication. Often the signaling molecules involved during a particular episode of neuroimmune activation are not known but behavioral response provides evidence that bioactives such as neurotransmitters and cytokines are perturbed. Immunobehavioral phenotyping is a first-line approach when examining the neuroimmune system and its reaction to immune stimulation or suppression. Behavioral response is significantly more sensitive than direct measurement of a single specific bioactive and can quickly and efficiently rule in or out relevance of a particular immune challenge or therapeutic to neuroimmunity. Classically, immunobehavioral research was focused on sickness symptoms related to bacterial infection but neuroimmune activation is now a recognized complication of diseases and disorders ranging from cancer to diabesity. Immunobehaviors include lethargy, loss of appetite, and disinterest in social activity and the surrounding environment. In addition, neuroimmune activation can precipitate feelings of depression and anxiety while negatively impacting cognitive function and physical activity. Provided is a detailed overview of behavioral tests frequently used to examine neuroimmune activation in mice with a special emphasis on preexperimental conditions that can confound or prevent successful immunobehavioral experimentation.

  6. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Shane N; Fortier, Michelle S; Strachan, Shaelyn M; Blanchard, Chris M; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-13

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.'s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, Pself-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible.

  7. Determination of the In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of Compounds Tested Against Punta Toro Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-29

    cells were grown in minimum essential medium (MEM; GIBCO Labs, Grand Island, NY) containing 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS; HyClone Labs, Logan, UT) and 0.1... bovine serum (FBS, HyClone Labs, Logan, UT) and 0.1% NaHCO3 without antibiotics. All were determined to be mycoplasma-free. Test Compounds: All...influenza, parainfluenza , rhino, vesicular stomatitis, bluetongue, reo and rota viruses (3-6). The compound was only slightly effective vs PTV in vitro (VR

  8. Translating, Reliability Testing, and Validating a Norwegian Questionnaire to Assess Adolescents’ Intentions to be Physically Active After High School Graduation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Burchard Erdvik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to test the reliability and validity of a Norwegian measure of adolescents’ intentions to be physically active after graduation (the Intention to be Physically Active After Graduation [IPAG] Questionnaire. The development of IPAG involved a translation and back-translation procedure and a test–retest study, performed on 105 adolescents (M age = 17.1, SD = 0.6 from three different high schools in Kristiansand, Norway. The four IPAG items loaded on one single factor, demonstrating acceptable factor loadings (.68-.90 and acceptable Cronbach’s alpha values (.84 and .84 in both the test and retest assessment. IPAG correlated positively with a measure of attitudes toward physical activity (.61-.71 and a measure of participants’ intentions to be physically active next month (.77-.82, supporting both construct validity and criterion-related validity of the IPAG-Questionnaire. Acceptable reliability and validity of IPAG was found, which supports the use of this instrument in future research.

  9. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, A P; Huppert, T J; Beluk, N H; Elbin, R J; Henry, L C; French, J; Dakan, S M; Collins, M W

    2014-12-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18-45 years with a recent (15-45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X's and O's) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion.

  10. IDENTIFICATION AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY TEST OF SOME COMPOUNDS FROM METHANOL EXTRACT PEEL OF BANANA (Musa paradisiaca Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Atun

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of these research was measured activity as antioxidant some compounds in methanol extracts of peel of banana (Musa paradisiaca Linn., isolated some compounds which had activities as antioxidant, and determined this structure. Method of this study was extracted powdered peel of banana with methanol at room temperature. Extract was concentrated in vaccuo and then successively was partitioned with n-hexane, chloroform, etyl acetate, and buthanol. Antioxidant test from each fractions was measured by hydroxyl radical scavenger test with Fenton reaction method. The result of this study showed activity each fractions as  hydroxyl radical scavenger activity of chloroform, etyl acetate, and buthanol fraction were IC50 693.15; 2347.40; and 1071.14 mg/mL respectively. The isolation of secondary metabolite compounds from chloroform fraction obtained two isolate compounds. Identification by spectroscopy IR,  MS, 1H and 13C NMR one and two dimension showed that the compounds are 5,6,7,4'-tetrahidroxy-3,4-flavan-diol and a new compound cyclohexenon derivative (2-cyclohexene-1-on-2,4,4-trimethyl-3-O-2'-hydroxypropyl ether.   Keywords: antioxidant, peel of banana, Musa paradisiaca, hydroxyl radical scavenger

  11. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, T. J.; Beluk, N. H.; Elbin, R. J.; Henry, L. C.; French, J.; Dakan, S. M.; Collins, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/ patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18–45 years with a recent (15–45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X’s and O’s) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion. PMID:24477579

  12. Update of lomefloxacin in vitro activity and spectrum. A multicenter trial testing contemporary pathogens following Food and Drug Administration validation guidelines. Lomefloxacin Activity Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R N; Sader, H S; Erwin, M E

    1994-10-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently recommended that the antimicrobial product package insert (PPI) subsection on microbiology be annually validated with regard to the compound's spectrum and potency. To address this request, a nine-laboratory trial was organized to test (two methods) lomefloxacin, a newer fluoroquinolone, and nine comparison drugs against PPI-listed pathogens (1934 strains). A broad geographic sampling (nine medical centers) was achieved, and lomefloxacin was determined to be active [minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), or = 90% of strains] for all PPI-listed species except Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, and Providencia rettgeri (42%-87% inhibited). Comparison fluoroquinolones also had a similarly compromised spectrum of activity against these species. Additional organism species, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, Salmonella enteriditis, and Shigella species, should be added to the lomefloxacin PPI (MIC90s, 0.03-0.25 microgram/ml) following data generated in this study. These in vitro results indicate that lomefloxacin remains active against the vast majority of clinically "indicated" species, and that it has a spectrum compatible with other marketed fluoroquinolones for these tested pathogens, monitored in 1994.

  13. SYNTHESIS AND ANTIPLASMODIAL ACTIVITY TESTING OF (1-N-(4-METHOXYBENZYL-1,10-PHENANTHROLINIUM BROMIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslin Hadanu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of (1-N-(4-methoxybenzyl-1,10-phenanthroline bromide from 1,10-phenanthroline monohydrate and 4-methoxybenzaldehyde as starting material and evaluation of its antiplasmodial activities have been carried out. The 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol was prepared from 4-methoxy-benzaldehyde using sodium borohydride (NaBH4 reagent and ethanol absolute solution. The mixture was refluxed for 3 h. To yield colorless dilution compound with 90.41 % in efficiency. Furthermore, bromination of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol with phosphorus bromide (PBr3 was conducted by refluxing for 3 h. The product of this reaction was yellow liquid of 4-methoxybenzyl bromide, 79.03% yield and 95.34 % purity. The final step of reaction was benzylation of 1,10-phenanthroline monohydrate with 4-methoxybenzyl bromide reagent. It was conducted by refluxing in aceton for 8 h at 55 oC. The yield of the reaction was (1-N-(4-methoxybenzyl-1,10-phenanthroline bromide (77.63%. It is pink solid form, and its melting point is 192-193 oC. Identification of the product was carried out by means of GC-MS, IR and 1H-NMR spectrometers. The in vitro antiplasmodial activity on chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum FCR-3 strain and chloroquine sensitive P. falciparum D10 strain for (1-N-(4-methoxybenzyl-1,10-phenanthroline bromide were determined by microscopic method. The result showed that after 72 h incubation, it has IC50 0.93±0.02 µM and 1.21±0.09 µM, respectively.   Keywords: 1,10-phenanthroline,  (1-N-(4-methoxybenzyl-1,10-phenanthroline bromide, 4 methoxybenzaldehyde, antiplasmodial activities

  14. Cognitive testing of physical activity and acculturation questions in recent and long-term Latino immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrigan David

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We ascertained the degree to which language (English versus Spanish, and residence time in the US influence responses to survey questions concerning two topics: self-reported acculturation status, and recent physical activity (PA. This topic is likely to be of general interest because of growing numbers of immigrants in countries worldwide. Methods We carried out qualitative (cognitive interviews of survey items on acculturation and physical activity on 27 Latino subjects from three groups: (a In Spanish, of those of low residence time (less than five years living in the U.S. (n = 9; (b In Spanish, of those of high residence time (15 or more years in the U.S (n = 9; and (c in English, of those of high residence time (n = 9. Results There were very few language translation problems; general question design defects and socio-cultural challenges to survey responses were more common. Problems were found for both acculturation and PA questions, with distinct problem types for the two question areas. Residence time/language group was weakly associated with overall frequency of problems observed: low residence time/Spanish (86%, high residence time/Spanish (67%, and English speaking groups (62%. Conclusions Standardized survey questions related to acculturation and physical activity present somewhat different cognitive challenges. For PA related questions, problems with such questions were similar regardless of subject residence time or language preference. For acculturation related questions, residence time/language or education level influenced responses to such questions. These observations should help in the interpretation of survey results for culturally diverse populations.

  15. Modeling Learning and Memory Using Verbal Learning Tests: Results From ACTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alden L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of memory training on initial recall and learning. Method. The Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study of community-dwelling adults older than age 65 (n = 1,401). We decomposed trial-level recall in the Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) into initial recall and learning across trials using latent growth models. Results. Trial-level increases in words recalled in the AVLT and HVLT at each follow-up visit followed an approximately logarithmic shape. Over the 5-year study period, memory training was associated with slower decline in Trial 1 AVLT recall (Cohen’s d = 0.35, p = .03) and steep pre- and posttraining acceleration in learning (d = 1.56, p learning, d = 3.10, p memory-trained group had a higher level of recall than the control group through the end of the 5-year study period despite faster decline in learning. Discussion. This study contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms by which training benefits memory and expands current knowledge by reporting long-term changes in initial recall and learning, as measured from growth models and by characterization of the impact of memory training on these components. Results reveal that memory training delays the worsening of memory span and boosts learning. PMID:22929389

  16. Modeling learning and memory using verbal learning tests: results from ACTIVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Brandt, Jason; Tommet, Doug; Marsiske, Michael; Jones, Richard N

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the influence of memory training on initial recall and learning. The Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study of community-dwelling adults older than age 65 (n = 1,401). We decomposed trial-level recall in the Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) into initial recall and learning across trials using latent growth models. Trial-level increases in words recalled in the AVLT and HVLT at each follow-up visit followed an approximately logarithmic shape. Over the 5-year study period, memory training was associated with slower decline in Trial 1 AVLT recall (Cohen's d = 0.35, p = .03) and steep pre- and posttraining acceleration in learning (d = 1.56, p memory-trained group had a higher level of recall than the control group through the end of the 5-year study period despite faster decline in learning. This study contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms by which training benefits memory and expands current knowledge by reporting long-term changes in initial recall and learning, as measured from growth models and by characterization of the impact of memory training on these components. Results reveal that memory training delays the worsening of memory span and boosts learning.

  17. Serological testing versus other strategies for diagnosis of active tuberculosis in India: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Dowdy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Undiagnosed and misdiagnosed tuberculosis (TB drives the epidemic in India. Serological (antibody detection TB tests are not recommended by any agency, but widely used in many countries, including the Indian private sector. The cost and impact of using serology compared with other diagnostic techniques is unknown.Taking a patient cohort conservatively equal to the annual number of serological tests done in India (1.5 million adults suspected of having active TB, we used decision analysis to estimate costs and effectiveness of sputum smear microscopy (US$3.62 for two smears, microscopy plus automated liquid culture (mycobacterium growth indicator tube [MGIT], US$20/test, and serological testing (anda-tb ELISA, US$20/test. Data on test accuracy and costs were obtained from published literature. We adopted the perspective of the Indian TB control sector and an analysis frame of 1 year. Our primary outcome was the incremental cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY averted. We performed one-way sensitivity analysis on all model parameters, with multiway sensitivity analysis on variables to which the model was most sensitive. If used instead of sputum microscopy, serology generated an estimated 14,000 more TB diagnoses, but also 121,000 more false-positive diagnoses, 102,000 fewer DALYs averted, and 32,000 more secondary TB cases than microscopy, at approximately four times the incremental cost (US$47.5 million versus US$11.9 million. When added to high-quality sputum smears, MGIT culture was estimated to avert 130,000 incremental DALYs at an incremental cost of US$213 per DALY averted. Serology was dominated by (i.e., more costly and less effective than MGIT culture and remained less economically favorable than sputum smear or TB culture in one-way and multiway sensitivity analyses.In India, sputum smear microscopy remains the most cost-effective diagnostic test available for active TB; efforts to increase access to quality-assured microscopy

  18. Evaluation of immunomodulatory activity of two potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains by in vivo tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dayong; Li, Chang; Qin, Yanqing; Yin, Ronglan; Du, Shouwen; Liu, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yanfang; Wang, Cuiyan; Rong, Fengjun; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-10-01

    Here we evaluate the immunomodulatory function of two potential probiotic strains, Lactobacillus salivarius CICC 23174 and Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 1.557. Mice were fed with each Lactobacillus strain at different doses for several consecutive days. The effects of the two probiotic strains on immune organs, immune cells and immune molecules were investigated on days 10 and 20. Both Lactobacillus strains increased the spleen index, improved the spleen lymphocyte transformation rate, enhanced sIgA production and improved the number of CD11c(+) CD80(+) double-positive cells. L. plantarum CGMCC 1.557 was the more active strain in enhancing the phagocytic activity of macrophages, while, L. salivarius CICC 23174 was the more effective strain at maintaining the Th1/Th2 balance. This study suggests that these two Lactobacillus strains have beneficial effects on regulation of immune responses, which has promising implications for the development of ecological agents and functional foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Test-beam activities and results for the ATLAS ITk pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bisanz, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will result in an increase of the instantaneous luminosity up to about 5×1034 cm−2s−1. To cope with the challenges the current Inner Detector will be replaced by an all-silicon Inner Tracker (ITk) system. The Pixel Detector will have to deal with occupancies of about 300~hits/FE/s as well as a fluence of 2×1016neqcm−2. Various sensor layouts are under development, aiming at providing a high performance, cost effective pixel instrumentation to cover an active area of about 10~m2. These range from thin planar silicon, over 3D silicon, to active CMOS sensors. After extensive characterization of the sensors in the lab, their charge collection properties and hit efficiency are measured in common testbeam campaigns, which provide valuable feedback for improvements of the layout. Testbeam measurements of the final prototypes will be used for the decision of which sensor types will be installed in ITk. The setups used in the ITk Pixel testbeam campaigns will be presented, inclu...

  20. Test-beam activities and results for the ATLAS ITk pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bisanz, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will result in an increase of the instantaneous luminosity up to about $5\\times10^{34}~\\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$. To cope with the resulting challenges the current Inner Detector will be replaced by an all-silicon Inner Tracker (ITk) system. The Pixel Detector will have to deal with occupancies of about 300~hits/FE/s as well as a fluence of $2\\times10^{16}~\\text{n}_\\text{eq}\\text{cm}^{-2}$. Various sensor layouts are under development, aiming at providing a high performance, cost effective pixel instrumentation to cover an active area of about $10~\\text{m}^2$. These range from thin planar silicon, over 3D silicon, to active CMOS sensors.\\par After extensive characterization of the sensors in the lab, their charge collection properties and hit efficiency are measured in common testbeam campaigns, which provide valuable feedback for improvements of the layout. Testbeam measurements of the final prototypes will be used for the decision of which sensor types will be installed in...

  1. Test-beam activities and results for the ATLAS ITk pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisanz, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the LHC aims at an increase of the instantaneous luminosity up to about 5×1034 cm‑2 s‑1. To cope with the resulting challenges the current Inner Detector will be replaced by an all-silicon Inner Tracker (ITk) system. The Pixel Detector will have to deal with occupancies of about 300 hits/FE/s as well as a fluence of around 2×1016 neq cm‑2. Various sensor layouts are under development, aiming at providing a high performance, cost effective pixel instrumentation to cover an active area of about 10 m2. These range from thin planar silicon, 3D silicon, to active CMOS sensors. After extensive characterization of the sensors in the lab, their charge collection properties and hit efficiency are measured in common testbeam campaigns, which provide valuable feedback for improvements of the layout. Testbeam measurements of the final prototypes will be used for the decision of which sensor types will be installed in ITk. The setups used in the ITk Pixel testbeam campaigns will be presented, including the common track reconstruction and analysis software. Results from the latest measurements will be shown, highlighting some of the developments and challenges for the ITk Pixel sensors.

  2. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Mahmoodi, Pooya; Pinto, Fulvio; Meo, Michele

    2018-02-16

    Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters' primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites.

  3. Social and environmental determinants of physical activity in urban parks: Testing a neighborhood disorder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jason A; Briones, Maya D; Bauer, Eliane Z; Trujillo, Melissa; Lopez, Melissa; Subica, Andrew M

    2018-01-31

    The current study examined the nexus of neighborhood disorder-in the form of physical disorder (e.g., broken glass and vandalism) and social disorder (e.g., public drinking and lewd conduct)-and physical activity (PA) in urban public parks to inform public policy addressing chronic disease in at-risk populations. Five hundred and twenty-two unique observations were conducted in 22 public parks from March to September 2016. The study utilized the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to document age, gender, ethnicity, and PA level of park users. The Physical Activity Resource Assessment (PARA) was used to document observed physical and social disorder incivilities in public parks included in the current study. Males, adults, and Latina/os accounted for the largest number of park users, respectively. Significant PA differences were observed across gender, age, and ethnicity. Multiple linear regression controlling for gender, age, and ethnicity found physical disorder, but not social disorder, generally predicted PA reductions. While it has been demonstrated that physical disorder predicts PA reductions in low-income communities of color, this is the first study to reveal that physical disorder may lead to decreased PA in urban public parks. Thus, remediation of public park incivilities characterized by physical disorder, paired with community outreach, may lead to increased PA in at-risk communities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymyxins: Antibacterial Activity, Susceptibility Testing, and Resistance Mechanisms Encoded by Plasmids or Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirel, Laurent; Jayol, Aurélie; Nordmann, Patrice

    2017-04-01

    SUMMARYPolymyxins are well-established antibiotics that have recently regained significant interest as a consequence of the increasing incidence of infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Colistin and polymyxin B are being seriously reconsidered as last-resort antibiotics in many areas where multidrug resistance is observed in clinical medicine. In parallel, the heavy use of polymyxins in veterinary medicine is currently being reconsidered due to increased reports of polymyxin-resistant bacteria. Susceptibility testing is challenging with polymyxins, and currently available techniques are presented here. Genotypic and phenotypic methods that provide relevant information for diagnostic laboratories are presented. This review also presents recent works in relation to recently identified mechanisms of polymyxin resistance, including chromosomally encoded resistance traits as well as the recently identified plasmid-encoded polymyxin resistance determinant MCR-1. Epidemiological features summarizing the current knowledge in that field are presented. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Artificial Neural Networks for Reducing Computational Effort in Active Truncated Model Testing of Mooring Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Voie, Per Erlend Torbergsen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2015-01-01

    simultaneously, this method is very demanding in terms of numerical efficiency and computational power. Therefore, this method has not yet proved to be feasible. It has recently been shown how a hybrid method combining classical numerical models and artificial neural networks (ANN) can provide a dramatic...... model. Hence, in principal it is possible to achieve reliable experimental data for much larger water depths than what the actual depth of the test basin would suggest. However, since the computations must be faster than real time, as the numerical simulations and the physical experiment run...... reduction in computational effort when performing time domain simulation of mooring lines. The hybrid method uses a classical numerical model to generate simulation data, which are then subsequently used to train the ANN. After successful training the ANN is able to take over the simulation at a speed two...

  6. Test beam results of a depleted monolithic active pixel sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obermann, Theresa; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Bonn Univ. (Germany); Schwenker, Benjamin [Goettingen Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS Pixel-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    New monolithic detector concepts are currently being explored for future particle physics experiments, in particular for the upgrade of the ATLAS detector. Common to monolithic pixel detectors is the integration of the front-end circuitry and the sensor on the same silicon substrate. The DMAPS concept makes use of high resistive silicon as substrate. It enables the application of a high bias voltage to create a drift field for the charge collection in the sensor part as well as the full usage of CMOS logic in the same piece of silicon. DMAPS prototypes from several foundries are available since three years and have been extensively characterized in the lab. In this talk, results of test beam campaigns, with neutron irradiated prototypes implemented in the ESPROS process, are presented.

  7. A test to assess the mechanical power sustainable during everyday activities in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodaglio, Edda Maria; Saibene, Franco

    2003-01-01

    to define with a simple test the power sustainable by older people during everyday occupations. nine healthy subjects (65-71 years) performed two series of 5-6 trials on bicycle and arm ergometers at constant power. Throughout the exercise they reported their evaluation of the effort, referred either to perceived whole body exertion or to the working muscles, using Borg's category-ratio, CR10, scale. The exercise was interrupted when CR7 was attained. From a linear regression of the individual data of the work done from the start of each trial to the transition from CR4 to CR5, corresponding to 'somewhat heavy' and 'heavy', and the corresponding duration it was possible to calculate the slope of the work/time relationship. This was considered as the value of power sustainable for leg or arm muscles. on average the sustainable power for the work done on the bicycle ergometer represented 55% of the maximal mechanical power. During the control trial on the bicycle ergometer at a power corresponding to their sustainable power the subjects were able to exercise for 30 min without symptoms of fatigue or discomfort, with an average CR of 3. The average heart rate was 114 bpm and the blood lactate concentration at the end of the exercise was always lower than 4 mmol/l. Sustainable power calculated for the arm muscles was about one quarter that of the leg muscles, but all subjects reported the evaluation of the effort as more difficult. the determination of power sustainable for the leg muscles with this simple test appears reliable and accurate.

  8. Tuberculin skin test result and risk of death among persons with active TB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C Auld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the tuberculin skin test (TST is frequently used to aid in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB disease and to identify persons with latent TB infection, it is an imperfect test and approximately 10-25% of persons with microbiologically confirmed TB disease have a negative TST. Previous studies have suggested that persons with a negative TST are more likely to present with severe TB disease and have an increased rate of TB-related death. METHODS: We analyzed culture-confirmed TB cases captured in US TB surveillance data from 1993 to 2008 and performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine the association between TST result and death. RESULTS: Of 284,866 cases of TB reported in the US, 58,180 persons were eligible for inclusion in the analysis and 3,270 of those persons died after initiating TB treatment. Persons with a negative TST accounted for only 14% of the eligible cases but accounted for 42% of the deaths. Persons with a TST≥15 mm had 67% lower odds of death than persons with a negative TST (adjusted odds ratio 0.33, 95% confidence interval 0.30-0.36. CONCLUSIONS: A negative TST is associated with an increased risk of death among persons with culture-confirmed TB disease, even after adjustment for HIV status, site of TB disease, sputum smear AFB status, drug susceptibility, age, sex, and origin of birth. In addition to indicating risk of developing disease, the TST may also be a marker for increased risk of death.

  9. Clinically Meaningful Change Estimates for the Six-Minute Walk Test and Daily Activity in Individuals With Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Michael J.; Curtis, Amy B.; Vangsnes, Eric; Dickinson, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present pilot study was to provide a preliminary estimate of the minimum detectable difference (MDD) and minimum clinically important difference (MCID) of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and daily activity in outpatients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods A convenience sample of 22 adults with stable New York Heart Association Functional Class II and III CHF performed two baseline 6MWTs separated by 30 minutes of rest. Subjects then wore a triaxial accelerometer for 7 days to monitor daily activity. After 7 weeks of usual care, subjects again wore the accelerometer for 7 days and then returned to the clinic to complete the Global Rating of Change Scale (GRS) with regard to their heart disease and perform another set of 6MWTs. For the 6MWT, the MDD was calculated using the two baseline 6MWT distances. For daily activity, the MDD was calculated using two methods: (1) day-to-day test-retest reliability during baseline monitoring, and (2) baseline to follow-up test-retest reliability in those who reported no change on the GRS. The MCID for the 6MWT and daily activity was calculated using the mean and 95% confidence interval (CI95%) for those subjects who reported ‘improvement’ on the GRS. Results The MDD at the CI95% for the 6MWT was 32.4 meters. The MCID for the 6MWT was 30.1 (CI95% 20.8, 39.4) meters. The MDD for daily activity was 5,909 vector magnitude units (VMU·hr.−1) The MCID for daily activity was 1,337 VMU·hr.−1 There was good alignment of the MDD and MCID for the 6MWT, suggesting that clinically meaningful change is approximately 32 meters. However, the calculated MCID was substantially less than measurement error as represented by the MDD, indicating that the MCID was underestimated in this sample or that daily activity may be robust to change in overall disease status. PMID:23997688

  10. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Wild, Vivienne [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during

  11. Assessment of hepatic detoxification activity: proposal of an improved variant of the (13c-methacetin breath test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann-Georg Holzhütter

    Full Text Available Breath tests based on the administration of a (13C-labeled drug and subsequent monitoring of (13CO2 in the breath (quantified as DOB - delta over baseline liberated from the drug during hepatic CPY-dependent detoxification are important tools in liver function diagnostics. The capability of such breath tests to reliably indicate hepatic CYP performance is limited by the fact that (13CO2 is not exclusively exhaled but also exchanged with other compartments of the body. In order to assess this bias caused by variations of individual systemic CO2 kinetics we administered intravenously the test drug (13C-methacetin to 25 clinically liver-healthy individuals and monitored progress curves of DOB and the plasma concentration of (13C-methacetin. Applying compartment modelling we estimated for each individual a set of kinetic parameters characterizing the time-dependent exchange of the drug and of CO2 with the liver and non-hepatic body compartments. This analysis revealed that individual variations in the kinetics of CO2 may account for up to 30% deviation of DOB curve parameters from their mean at otherwise identical (13C-methacetin metabolization rates. In order to correct for this bias we introduced a novel detoxification score which ideally should be assessed from the DOB curve of a 2-step test ("2DOB" which is initialized with the injection of a standard dose of (13C-labeled bicarbonate (in order to provide information on the actual CO2 status of the individual followed by injection of the (13C-labeled test drug (the common procedure. Computer simulations suggest that the predictive power of the proposed 2DOB breath test to reliably quantity the CYP-specific hepatic detoxification activity should be significantly higher compared to the conventional breath test.

  12. Field test of a thermal active building system (tabs) in an office building in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondo, Daniela; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Corgnati, Stefano P.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing attention has been addressed in the last years to the assessment, at the same time, of energy performances and indoor environmental quality in buildings. Focusing on thermal comfort recent international standards as ISOEN7730 and EN15251 introduce criteria for using categories...... an experimental study in an office building in Denmark where cooling in summer is provided by thermally activated building systems (TABS). Indoor climate quality evaluation, cooling system performance and energy consumption for a specific room were analyzed with different levels of internal gains. The experiments...... in the indoor environmental assessment of a building. At the same time, also use of low temperature heating and high temperature cooling systems in non-residential buildings has increased, due to the energy efficiency and the economical cooling and heating performance of tins kind of plants. This paper presents...

  13. A Model System in S2 Cells to Test the Functional Activities of Drosophila Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, M; Gasanov, N B; Georgiev, P; Maksimenko, O

    2015-01-01

    Insulators are a special class of regulatory elements that can regulate interactions between enhancers and promoters in the genome of high eukaryotes. To date, the mechanisms of insulator action remain unknown, which is primarily related to the lack of convenient model systems. We suggested studying a model system which is based on transient expression of a plasmid with an enhancer of the copia transposable element, in Drosophila embryonic cell lines. We demonstrated that during transient transfection of circle plasmids with a well-known Drosophila insulator from the gypsy retrotransposon, the insulator exhibits in an enhancer-blocking assay the same properties as in Drosophila stable transgenic lines. Therefore, the Drosophila cell line is suitable for studying the main activities of insulators, which provides additional opportunities for investigating the functional role of certain insulator proteins.

  14. [Evaluation of the activity of cytokine genes--a new diagnostic test in immunology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriianova, O A; Mordvinov, V A; Ivanova, I P; Krugleeva, O L; Tananko, E M; Braga, E A; Nosikov, V V; Kozlov, V A; Lozovoĭ, V P

    1991-01-01

    The increased level of IL-1 mRNA was discovered in neutrophils of patients suffering from pollinosis for a long time and responding poorly to specific immunotherapy. Moreover, neutrophils from patients with exacerbation of pollinosis responded to stimuli less than cells from healthy donors. In remission, the activated neutrophils from pollinosis patients and healthy donors had the same levels of IL-1b mRNA. Tumor necrosis factor alpha expression was unchanged in neutrophils of pollinosis patients. Changes in the status of cells from patients were detected with a simple procedure of dot hybridization. Peripheral blood cells were used as available material. This allows one to hope that the approach can be used for analyzing the patients' immune status in choosing the treatment course as well as for controlling the treatment effect.

  15. Plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with oral necrobacillosis (lumpy jaw disease) using an automated handheld testing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotohira, Yukari; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Haruka; Sano, Tadashi; Tsuchiya, Masakazu; Suzuki, Yohko; Shimamori, Toshio; Tsukano, Kenji; Sato, Ayano; Yokota, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and effectiveness of directly determining endotoxin activity in plasma samples from kangaroos with lumpy jaw disease (LJD, n=15) and healthy controls (n=12). Prior to the present study, the ability of the commercially available automated handheld portable test system (PTS(TM)) to detect endotoxin activity in kangaroo plasma was compared with that of the traditional LAL-kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Plasma samples, which were obtained from endotoxin-challenged cattle, were diluted 1:20 in endotoxin-free water and heated to 80°C for 10 min. The performance of the PTS(TM) was not significantly different from that of the traditional LAL-based assay. The data obtained using PTS(TM) correlated with those using KT (r(2)=0.963, Pkangaroos with systemic inflammation caused by oral necrobacillosis and identified plasma endotoxin activity as a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation in kangaroos with LJD. Based on ROC curves, we proposed a diagnostic cut-off point for endotoxin activity of >0.22 EU/ml for the identification of LJD. Our results indicate that the assessment of plasma endotoxin activity is a promising diagnostic tool for determining the outcome of LJD in captive macropods.

  16. Extravehicular Activity Testing in Analog Environments: Evaluating the Effects of Center of Gravity and Environment on Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, M.L.; Chappell, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) Project is performing tests in different analog environments to understand human performance during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with the aim of developing more safe and efficient systems for lunar exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The project is characterizing human EVA performance in studies using several test beds, including the underwater NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) and Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) facilities, JSC fs Partial Gravity Simulator (POGO), and the NASA Reduced Gravity Office (RGO) parabolic flight aircraft. Using these varied testing environments, NASA can gain a more complete understanding of human performance issues related to EVA and the limitations of each testing environment. Tests are focused on identifying and understanding the EVA system factors that affect human performance such as center of gravity (CG), inertial mass, ground reaction forces (GRF), suit weight, and suit pressure. The test results will lead to the development of lunar EVA systems operations concepts and design requirements that optimize human performance and exploration capabilities. METHODS: Tests were conducted in the NBL and during NEEMO missions in the NOAA Aquarius Habitat. A reconfigurable back pack with repositionable mass was used to simulate Perfect, Low, Forward, High, Aft and NASA Baseline CG locations. Subjects performed simulated exploration tasks that included ambulation, kneel and recovery, rock pick-up, and shoveling. Testing using POGO, that simulates partial gravity via pneumatic weight offload system and a similar reconfigurable rig, is underway for a subset of the same tasks. Additionally, test trials are being performed on the RGO parabolic flight aircraft. Subject performance was assessed using a modified Cooper-Harper scale to assess operator compensation required to achieve desired performance. All CG locations are based on the assumption of a

  17. A New Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Test Cases for CFD: Summary of AVT WG-003 Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Calavera, Luis P.; Bennett, Robert; Fox, John H.; Galbraith, Robert W.; Geurts, Evert; Henshaw, Micahel J. deC.; Huang, XingZhong; Kaynes, Ian W.; Loeser, Thomas; Naudin, Pierre; hide

    1999-01-01

    With the continuous progress in hardware and numerical schemes, Computational Unsteady Aerodynamics (CUA), that is, the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to unsteady flowfields, is slowly finding its way as a useful and reliable tool (turbulence and transition modeling permitting) in the aircraft, helicopter, engine and missile design and development process. Before a specific code may be used with confidence it is essential to validate its capability to describe the physics of the flow correctly, or at least to the level of approximation required, for which purpose a comparison with accurate experimental data is needed. Unsteady wind tunnel testing is difficult and expensive; two factors which dramatically limit the number of organizations with the capability and/or resources to perform it. Thus, unsteady experimental data is scarce, often classified and scattered in diverse documents. Additionally, access to the reports does not necessarily assure access to the data itself. The collaborative effort described in this paper was conceived with the aim of collecting into a single easily accessible document as much quality data as possible. The idea is not new. In the early 80's NATO's AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Structures and Material Panel (SMP) produced AGARD Report No. 702 "Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Measurements", which has found and continues to find extensive use within the CUA Community. In 1995 AGARD's Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) decided to update and expand the former database with new geometries and physical phenomena, and launched Working Group WG-22 on "Validation Data for Computational Unsteady Aerodynamic Codes". Shortly afterwards AGARD was reorganized as the RTO (Research and Technology Organization) and the WG was renamed as AVT (Applied Vehicle Technolology) WG-003. Contributions were received from AEDC, BAe, DLR, DERA, Glasgow University, IAR, NAL, NASA, NLR, and ONERA. The final publication

  18. APE: the Active Phasing Experiment to test new control system and phasing technology for a European Extremely Large Optical Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Constanza, A.; Brast, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Esteves, R.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Koenig, E.; Kolb, J.; Nylund, M.; Noethe, L.; Surdej, I.; Courteville, A.; Wilhelm, R.; Montoya, L.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Langlois, M.

    2005-08-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope will be composed of one or two giant segmented mirrors (up to 100 m of diameter) and of several large monolithic mirrors (up to 8 m in diameter). To limit the aberrations due to misalignments and defective surface quality it is necessary to have a proper active optics system. This active optics system must include a phasing system to limit the degradation of the PSF due to misphasing of the segmented mirrors. We will present the lastest design and development of the Active Phasing Experiment that will be tested in laboratory and on-sky connected to a VLT at Paranal in Chile. It includes an active segmented mirror, a static piston plate to simulate a secondary segmented mirror and of four phasing wavefront sensors to measure the piston, tip and tilt of the segments and the aberrations of the VLT. The four phasing sensors are the Diffraction Image Phase Sensing Instrument developed by Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Pyramid Phasing Sensor developed by Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, the Shack-Hartmann Phasing Sensor developed by the European Southern Observatory and the Zernike Unit for Segment phasing developed by Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. A reference measurement of the segmented mirror is made by an internal metrology developed by Fogale Nanotech. The control system of Active Phasing Experiment will perform the phasing of the segments, the guiding of the VLT and the active optics of the VLT. These activities are included in the Framework Programme 6 of the European Union.

  19. Optimal Control Allocation with Load Sensor Feedback for Active Load Suppression, Flight-Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Goodrick, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. The aircraft structure and the control architecture must be designed to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to utilize high structural margins, restrict control surface commands to a limited set of analyzed combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage. An optimal control technique has been explored and shown to achieve desirable vehicle control performance while limiting sensed structural loads to specified values. This technique has been implemented and flown on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed aircraft. The flight tests illustrate that the approach achieves the desired performance and show promising potential benefits. The flights also uncovered some important issues that will need to be addressed for production application.

  20. First tests of a novel radiation hard CMOS sensor process for Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernegger, H.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Dalla, M.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Kugathasan, T.; Maneuski, D.; Musa, L.; Riedler, P.; Riegel, C.; Sbarra, C.; Schaefer, D.; Schioppa, E. J.; Snoeys, W.

    2017-06-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS [1] tracking detector for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires novel radiation hard silicon sensor technologies. Significant effort has been put into the development of monolithic CMOS sensors but it has been a challenge to combine a low capacitance of the sensing node with full depletion of the sensitive layer. Low capacitance brings low analog power. Depletion of the sensitive layer causes the signal charge to be collected by drift sufficiently fast to separate hits from consecutive bunch crossings (25 ns at the LHC) and to avoid losing the charge by trapping. This paper focuses on the characterization of charge collection properties and detection efficiency of prototype sensors originally designed in the framework of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade [2]. The prototypes are fabricated both in the standard TowerJazz 180nm CMOS imager process [3] and in an innovative modification of this process developed in collaboration with the foundry, aimed to fully deplete the sensitive epitaxial layer and enhance the tolerance to non-ionizing energy loss. Sensors fabricated in standard and modified process variants were characterized using radioactive sources, focused X-ray beam and test beams before and after irradiation. Contrary to sensors manufactured in the standard process, sensors from the modified process remain fully functional even after a dose of 1015neq/cm2, which is the the expected NIEL radiation fluence for the outer pixel layers in the future ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) [4].

  1. Feedback-related brain activity predicts learning from feedback in multiple-choice testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Different event-related potentials (ERPs) have been shown to correlate with learning from feedback in decision-making tasks and with learning in explicit memory tasks. In the present study, we investigated which ERPs predict learning from corrective feedback in a multiple-choice test, which combines elements from both paradigms. Participants worked through sets of multiple-choice items of a Swahili-German vocabulary task. Whereas the initial presentation of an item required the participants to guess the answer, corrective feedback could be used to learn the correct response. Initial analyses revealed that corrective feedback elicited components related to reinforcement learning (FRN), as well as to explicit memory processing (P300) and attention (early frontal positivity). However, only the P300 and early frontal positivity were positively correlated with successful learning from corrective feedback, whereas the FRN was even larger when learning failed. These results suggest that learning from corrective feedback crucially relies on explicit memory processing and attentional orienting to corrective feedback, rather than on reinforcement learning.

  2. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for ``data frac`` stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  3. Operation Test of the Supercritical CO{sub 2} Compressor Supported with Active Magnetic Bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jae Eun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jeong IK [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, the operation test status of the SCIEL sCO{sub 2} AMB Compressor is briefly described. The Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle Integral Experiment Loop (SCIEL) has been installed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to develop the element technologies for the sCO{sub 2} cycle power generation system. The operation of the SCIEL has mainly focused on sCO{sub 2} compressor development and establishing sCO{sub 2} system control logic. The installation of the SCIEL low compression loop was finished in December 2014 and research team succeeded in generating electric power on the supercritical state of the CO{sub 2} in May 2015. The SCIEL has been built in KAERI to develop the element technologies and the system control logics for the sCO{sub 2} cycle power conversion unit of the next generation reactor. For the stable operation of the sCO{sub 2} compressor under high rotational speed, the AMB sCO{sub 2} compressor was developed and achieved the maximum 40,000 rpm.

  4. Benchmark Test of Differential Emission Measure Codes and Multi-thermal Energies in Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, Paul; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry

    2015-10-01

    We compare the ability of 11 differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting and inversion methods to constrain the properties of active regions and solar flares by simulating synthetic data using the instrumental response functions of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) and EUV Variability Experiment (SDO/EVE), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite/ X-ray Sensor (GOES/XRS). The codes include the single-Gaussian DEM, a bi-Gaussian DEM, a fixed-Gaussian DEM, a linear spline DEM, the spatial-synthesis DEM, the Monte-Carlo Markov Chain DEM, the regularized DEM inversion, the Hinode/ X-Ray Telescope (XRT) method, a polynomial spline DEM, an EVE+GOES, and an EVE+RHESSI method. Averaging the results from all 11 DEM methods, we find the following accuracies in the inversion of physical parameters: the EM-weighted temperature Tw^{fit}/Tw^{sim}=0.9±0.1, the peak emission measure EMp^{fit}/EMp^{sim}=0.6±0.2, the total emission measure EMt^{fit}/EMt^{sim}=0.8±0.3, and the multi-thermal energies E_{th}^{fit}/EM_{th}^{approx}=1.2±0.4. We find that the AIA spatial-synthesis, the EVE+GOES, and the EVE+RHESSI method yield the most accurate results.

  5. Telavancin activity when tested by a revised susceptibility testing method against uncommonly isolated Gram-positive pathogens responsible for documented infections in hospitals worldwide (2011-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Flamm, Robert K; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2015-03-01

    The broth microdilution method for telavancin susceptibility testing was revised and now utilises DMSO as solvent for stock solution preparation and diluent for stock solution dilution, following CLSI guidelines for water-insoluble agents. The revised method also incorporates polysorbate 80 in the test medium to mitigate drug binding to plastics. This revised methodology provides more accurate and reproducible MIC determinations, which results in values lower than the previously established method. This study was conducted to re-establish telavancin potencies and susceptibility profiles (using updated interpretive criteria) against a collection of uncommon clinical pathogens (3821 isolates). Telavancin showed MIC50 values of 0.06mg/L against tested staphylococcal species (MIC50/90, 0.03/0.06mg/L; 98.1-100.0% susceptible), with lower results for Staphylococcus hominis (MIC50, ≤0.015mg/L), Staphylococcus lugdunensis (MIC50, ≤0.015mg/L) and Staphylococcus simulans (MIC50, 0.03mg/L). Vancomycin (MIC50, 1mg/L), daptomycin (MIC50, 0.12-1mg/L) and linezolid (MIC50, 0.25-1mg/L) had MIC50 results at least four-fold higher than telavancin against CoNS. Streptococci (99.2-100.0% susceptible) displayed telavancin MIC50 values of ≤0.015-0.03mg/L. Vancomycin (MIC50, 0.25-0.5mg/L) and linezolid (MIC50, 0.5-1mg/L) had higher MIC50 results against streptococci, whilst daptomycin MIC50 values varied from ≤0.06mg/L to 0.5mg/L. Micrococcus, Listeria and Corynebacterium spp. were inhibited by telavancin at ≤0.015, ≤0.03 and ≤0.06mg/L, respectively. Telavancin exhibited potent in vitro activity against this collection, greater than comparators (daptomycin, linezolid, vancomycin). This study provides new baseline MIC results for telavancin and confirms the spectrum and potency of telavancin against less commonly encountered Gram-positive species. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. What Has Experience Got to Do with It? An Exploration of L1 and L2 Test Takers' Perceptions of Test Performance and Alignment to Classroom Literacy Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Christine; Cheng, Liying; Fox, Janna; Klinger, Don; Zheng, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The importance of first language (L1) and second language (L2) test takers' experience with large-scale literacy testing has been well documented in educational research. Our study focused on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT), a cross-curricular literacy test that is one of the graduation requirements for Ontario high school…

  7. Validez, fiabilidad y reproducibilidad de un test incremental en rampa en personas físicamente activas. Validity and reliability of an incremental ramp test for active persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Peinado, Pedro José

    2005-10-01

    validez alcanzada es de contenido y queda justificada por su inclusión habitual en la determinación de los umbrales en ejercicio en la bibliografía (Yamamoto y col., 1991, Ribas y col., 1994, Chicharro y col., 1995, Lucia y col., 1999.AbstractThe continuous apparition of new gas analysis equipment makes necessary and accurate calibration at the start of any new research. At the start of this study the validity of the Oxicon Pro ® analyser had already been proved (Carter et al. 1999:49, Koskolou y Geladas, 2002, Rietjens et al., 2001, but not the reproducibility of it with the protocol here proposed. With this aim test-retest trials were carried out with a group of subjects’ physically active (Sport Science students from the INEF of Madrid. Ten subjects participate (5 males and 5 females physically active (table I sows the characteristics of the subjects did two effort tests in cicloergometer. The ramp protocol increased 5 Watts every 12 seconds (25 watts•min-1, with a 3 minute worm up and lasting when the normal criteria of maximal effort were shown.The results (Table IV to VIII show the high correlation between the variables of the two tests carried out (from r=0.60 and 0.99 and a determination coefficient for VO2, VCO2 and Load of r2=0.95, 0.94 and 0.97 respectively. Only two variables showed differences between test 1 and 2, the maximal production of VCO2 and the aerobic threshold expressed in hart rate. These differences could be done to the increased load of the second test even thought no significant differences were observed on that parameter. No correlations were observed between performance variables like VO2 max, VO2/kg, Load and Load/kg and the recuperation variables.In conclusion, the studied variables support the validity of the protocol and the analyser used on our future researches.

  8. Effect of In-Flight Exercise and Extravehicular Activity on Postflight Stand Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice; Greenisen, Michael; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Foster, Philip P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crewmembers during short-duration spaceflights (9-16 days) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 hr of landing. Thirty crewmembers performed self-selected in-flight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. A 10min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10- 15 d before launch (PRE) and within four hours of landing (POST). Based upon their in-flight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% ,HRMax, = 20 min/session, n = 11), medium (MEDex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% HRmax, = 20 min/session, n = 10), or low (LOex: = 3x/week, HR and duration variable, n = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, or analysis of variance, P PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared to PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36+/-5 bpm) compared to HIex or MEDex groups (25+/-1bpm; 22+/-2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after spaceflight in the MEDex and HIex groups, but was significantly less in the LOex group (PRE: -9+/- 3, POST: -19+/- 4 mmHg). Thus, moderate to high levels of in-flight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after spaceflight compared.

  9. Performance test results of noninvasive characterization of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act surrogate waste by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Streier, G.G.

    1997-03-01

    During FY-96, a performance test was carried out with funding from the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the noninvasive elemental assay capabilities of commercial companies for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals present in 8-gal drums containing surrogate waste. Commercial companies were required to be experienced in the use of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) techniques and to have a prototype assay system with which to conduct the test assays. Potential participants were identified through responses to a call for proposals advertised in the Commerce Business Daily and through personal contacts. Six companies were originally identified. Two of these six were willing and able to participate in the performance test, as described in the test plan, with some subsidizing from the DOE MWFA. The tests were conducted with surrogate sludge waste because (1) a large volume of this type of waste awaits final disposition and (2) sludge tends to be somewhat homogeneous. The surrogate concentrations of the above RCRA metals ranged from {approximately} 300 ppm to {approximately} 20,000 ppm. The lower limit was chosen as an estimate of the expected sensitivity of detection required by noninvasive, pretreatment elemental assay systems to be of value for operational and compliance purposes and to still be achievable with state-of-the-art methods of analysis. The upper limit of {approximately} 20,000 ppm was chosen because it is the opinion of the author that assay above this concentration level is within current state-of-the-art methods for most RCRA constituents. This report is organized into three parts: Part 1, Test Plan to Evaluate the Technical Status of Noninvasive Elemental Assay Techniques for Hazardous Waste; Part 2, Participants` Results; and Part 3, Evaluation of and Comments on Participants` Results.

  10. Kappa-opioid receptors mediate the antidepressant-like activity of hesperidin in the mouse forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Carlos B; Del Fabbro, Lucian; de Gomes, Marcelo G; Goes, André T R; Souza, Leandro C; Boeira, Silvana P; Jesse, Cristiano R

    2013-01-05

    The opioid system has been implicated as a contributing factor for major depression and is thought to play a role in the mechanism of action of antidepressants. This study investigated the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in the mouse forced swimming test. Our results demonstrate that hesperidin (0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test without affecting locomotor activity in the open field test. The antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin (0.3 mg/kg) in the forced swimming test was prevented by pretreating mice with naloxone (1 mg/kg, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist) and 2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-Nmethyl-N-[(1S)-1-(3-isothiocyanatophenyl)-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl] acetamide (DIPPA (1 mg/kg), a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist), but not with naloxone methiodide (1 mg/kg, a peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist), naltrindole (3 mg/kg, a selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist), clocinnamox (1 mg/kg, a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist) or caffeine (3 mg/kg, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist). In addition, a sub-effective dose of hesperidin (0.01 mg/kg) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test when combined with a sub-effective dose of morphine (1 mg/kg). The antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in the forced swimming test on mice was dependent on its interaction with the κ-opioid receptor, but not with the δ-opioid, μ-opioid or adenosinergic receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that hesperidin possesses antidepressant-like properties and may be of interest as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of depressive disorders. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Evaluation of (antigenotoxic activities of Phyllanthus niruri L. in rat bone marrow using the micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Márlisson de Queiroz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phyllanthus niruri L. (Euphorbiaceae, known as "quebra-pedra" (Portuguese for "stonebreaker", is an herb used for kidney disorders. In light of its frequent use by the population, the present study aimed to investigate the genotoxic, antigenotoxic and cytotoxic activities of a standardized P. niruri extract in bone marrow rats. Three groups of 12 animals were treated daily by gavage over a period of 30 days, with 50, 150 or 250 mg/kg of P. niruri extract aqueous solution. The control group (n = 12 received tap water. At the end of treatment (day 31, groups were divided into two minor subgroups (n=6/group and received cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg, i.p. or saline 0.9% (i.p.. After 24 hours, we evaluated the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes for each animal (MNPCE at 1000 PCE. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with the PCE/NCE ratio (NEC = normochromatic erythrocytes. General toxicity was assessed during treatment using the parameters of body weight gain, ration and water consumption. The dry extract did not provoke changes in body weight, weight gain, ration and water intake or changes in the frequency of MNPCE or cytotoxicity in bone marrow. We propose that the P. niruri extract used here showed no genotoxic, antigenotoxic and cytotoxic activities under the experimental conditions.Phyllanthus niruri L. (Euphorbiaceae, conhecida como "quebra-pedra", é uma planta medicinal utilizada frequentemente pela população no tratamento de problemas renais. Foram avaliadas as atividades genotóxicas, antigenotóxicas e citotóxicas de um extrato padronizado dessa espécie em ratos. Três grupos de doze animais foram tratados durante trinta dias, por gavagem, com 50, 150 ou 250 mg/kg/dia de solução aquosa do extrato de P. niruri e um grupo controle (n=12 recebeu água destilada pela mesma via. No final do tratamento os grupos foram divididos em dois subgrupos (6 animais/grupo e receberam uma dose única de ciclofosfamida (50 mg/kg, i.p. ou de

  12. Effects of activated carbon amended sediment on biological responses in Chironomus riparius multi-generation testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nybom, Inna, E-mail: inna.nybom@uef.fi; Abel, Sebastian; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • AC induced secondary effects were dependent on the occurrence of ingestible AC particles. • Morphological changes were seen in TEM figures in Chironomus riparius larvae gut wall. • Retarded growth and development of the Chironomus riparius larvae was observed. • With the smallest particle size AC degreased survival was seen (dosages ≥1% sediment dw). - Abstract: The biological effects of activated carbon (AC) amendments in sediments were studied with the midge Chironomus riparius. The effects on larvae growth were studied using three different AC particles sizes (PAC: 90% <63 μm, MAC: ø 63–200 μm and GAC: ø 420–1700 μm). The long- term effects of MAC were studied in an emergence experiment over two generations (P, F1), together with larvae growth experiment over three generations (P, F1, F2). Retarded growth and development of the larvae were observed in the two smallest particle sizes (PAC and MAC), as well as morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer studied from transmission electron micrographs. In addition, at high AC treatments the larvae reaching fourth instar stage were of a smaller size compared to the controls. With PAC treatment AC amendment dosages higher than 1% of sediment dry weight induced mortality. In the emergence experiment there was an indication of a delay in F1 generation emergence. Male dry weight (dw) in P generation was significantly reduced in the 2.5% MAC treatment. The effects of AC amendments were more obvious in the C. riparius larvae compared to the effects seen in emerging adults exposed to AC-amended sediment during the larval stage.

  13. Which platelet function test best reflects the in vivo plasma concentrations of ticagrelor and its active metabolite? The HARMONIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziński, Marek; Ostrowska, Małgorzata; Adamski, Piotr; Sikora, Joanna; Sikora, Adam; Karczmarska-Wódzka, Aleksandra; Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Boinska, Joanna; Laskowska, Ewa; Obońska, Ewa; Fabiszak, Tomasz; Kubica, Jacek

    2016-11-30

    Aim of this study was assessment of the relationship between concentrations of ticagrelor and its active metabolite (AR-C124910XX) and results of selected platelet function tests. In a single-centre, cohort study, patients with myocardial infarction underwent blood sampling following a 180 mg ticagrelor loading dose intake (predose, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 24 hours postdose) to perform pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessments. Platelet reactivity was evaluated using the VASP-assay, the VerifyNow device and the Multiplate analyzer. Analysis of 36 patients revealed high negative correlations between ticagrelor concentrations and platelet reactivity evaluated with all three platelet function tests (the VASP-assay: RS=-0.722; pticagrelor and AR-C124910XX concentrations.

  14. The effects of hemolysis on plasma prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests using photo-optical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernaningsih, Yetti; Akualing, Jeine Stela

    2017-09-01

    Hemolysis is the most common reason why coagulation test samples are rejected. However, the effects of hemolysis on plasma prothrombin time (PPT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) are rarely investigated and the results are controversial. This research aims to analyze the effects of hemolysis on PPT and APPT using the photo-optical method.Nonhemolyzed citrate blood samples (n = 30) with normal PPT and APTT underwent 2-step mechanical lysis and then hemoglobin level measurement was carried out at each step. The first lysis was mild to moderate resulting in a hemoglobin level of sensitivity and 87.9% specificity), while the value for APTT was 0.95 g/dL (75% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity).Not all hemolyzed samples should be rejected for PPT and APTT tests using photo-optical methods.

  15. A comparative study on basophil activation test, histamine release assay, and passive sensitization histamine release assay in the diagnosis of peanut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, L. F.; Juel-Berg, N.; Hansen, K. S.; Clare Mills, E. N.; van Ree, R.; Poulsen, L. K.; Jensen, B. M.

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundAllergy can be diagnosed using basophil tests. Several methods measuring basophil activation are available. This study aimed at comparing basophil activation test (BAT), histamine release assay (HR), and passive sensitization histamine release assay (passive HR) in the diagnosis of peanut

  16. Analysis and testing of an integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Jiang, Peng; Pan, Hui; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-04-01

    An integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control is analyzed and tested in this paper. The seat suspension consists of a switching mechanism transforming both longitudinal and vertical motions into a rotary motion and a real-time damping-controllable system-a rotary magnetorheological (MR) damper working in pure shear mode and its corresponding control system. The switching mechanism employs the parallelogram frames as a motion guide which keeps the seat moving longitudinally and vertically. At the same time, both longitudinal and vertical motions are transformed into a reciprocating rotary motion that is transmitted to the rotary MR damper after an amplification by a gear mechanism. Both the longitudinal and vertical vibrations can be attenuated in real time through controlling the damping force (or torque) of the rotary MR damper. The mathematical model of the seat suspension system is established, simulated, and analyzed. The experimental test based on the test rig in Hefei University of Technology is implemented, and the results of simulation and experimental test are compared and analyzed.

  17. Study on measurement accuracy of active optics null test systems based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator and laser interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijie; Xu, Longbo; Ma, Xiao; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhou, You; Lu, Qi; Bai, Yunbo; Shao, Jianda

    2017-06-01

    A common way to test high-quality aspherical lenses is to use a measurement system based on a set of null corrector and a laser interferometer. The null corrector can either be a combination of spherical lenses or be a computer generated hologram (CGH), which compensates the aspheric wave-front being tested. However, the null optics can't be repeatedly used once the shape of tested optics changes. Alternative active null correctors have been proposed based on dynamic phase modulator devices. A typical dynamic phase modulator is liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM), which can spatially change the refractive index of the liquid crystal and thus modify the phase of the input wave-front. Even though the measurement method based on LCSLM and laser interferometer has been proposed and demonstrated for optical testing several years ago, it still can't be used in the high quality measurement process due to its limited accuracy. In this paper, we systematically study the factors such as LCSLM structure parameters, encoding error and laser interferometer performance, which significantly affect the measurement accuracy. Some solutions will be proposed in order to improve the measurement accuracy based on LCSLM and laser interferometer.

  18. Active noise reduction audiometry: a prospective analysis of a new approach to noise management in audiometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromwich, Matthew A; Parsa, Vijay; Lanthier, Nicole; Yoo, John; Parnes, Lorne S

    2008-01-01

    To develop a new method of screening audiometry that reduces the adverse effects of low frequency background noise by using active noise reduction (ANR) headphone technology. Prospective testing within an anechoic chamber evaluated the physical properties of ANR headphones. A prospective clinical crossover study compared standard audiometry with ANR headphone audiometry. Bose Aviation X circum-aural ANR headphones were tested for both active and passive attenuation properties in a hemi-anechoic chamber using a head and torso simulator. Thirty-seven otology clinic patients then underwent standard audiometry and ANR audiometry, which was performed in a 30- and/or 40-dB sound field. Objective ANR headphone attenuation levels of up to 12 dB were achieved at frequencies below 2,000 Hz. In standard audiometric testing, 40 dB of narrow-band background noise decreased patient pure tone thresholds by 24 dB at 250 Hz. The use of ANR technology provided 12 dB of additional attenuation. This resulted in a significant improvement in test results despite the 40 dB of background noise (P = resulted in a significant improvement in results (P = results were identical to those obtained in a quiet sound booth. Despite a 30-dB sound field, ANR audiometry can produce an audiogram identical to that obtained in a double-walled sound booth. ANR headphone audiometry improves the sensitivity of audiometric screening for mild low-frequency hearing loss. This technology may have important applications for screening in schools, industry, and community practices.

  19. In vitro and in vivo antifungal activity, liver profile test, and mutagenic activity of five plants used in traditional Mexican medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Cornejo-Garrido

    Full Text Available Berberis hartwegii Benth., Berberidaceae, Hamelia patens Jacq., Rubiaceae, Dendropanax arboreus (L. Decne & Planch., Araliaceae, Erythrina herbacea L., Fabaceae, and Zanthoxylum caribaeum Lam., Rutaceae, acetone extracts were selected on the basis of their use in traditional Mexican medicine to treat scabies or skin diseases. Anti-dermatophyte activity in vitro was evaluated using the agar dilution assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of B. hartwegii and Z. caribaeum were tested against experimental tinea pedis. The infected animals were treated intragastrically daily for seven days with 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of acetone extracts. The acetone extract of H. patens exhibited 100% growth inhibition against T. mentagrophytes and E. floccosum at 100.0 and 50.0 µg/ml, respectively, and B. hartwegii inhibited growth of M. canis and T. mentagrophytes at 100.0 µg/ml. Effective treatments with 2.5 mg/kg of Z. caribaeum and B. hartwegii extract were comparable with 1 mg/kg of clotrimazole in mice. Liver profile tests and histological analyses did not exhibit any signs of toxicity and the Ames test indicated that both extracts were safe when evaluated in strains TA98, TA100 and TA102. Our results suggest the potential for the future development of new antifungal drugs from B. hartwegii or Z. caribaeum.

  20. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SODIUM SOAP FROM NYAMPLUNG SEED OIL (Calophyllum inophyllum L. AND TEST ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST Staphilococus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Chasani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This research was used nyamplung seed oil as antibacterial soap material. The soap from nyamplung seed oil was performed by saponification reactions, characterization of soap based on SNI 06-3632-1994. The antibacterial activity was tested against bacteria Staphylococus aureus. The result of this research showed that soap had yellow color with weight 13,028 g from 10,028 g nyamplung seed oil. The characteristic of soap based on SNI were water content of 25,287%, fatty acid of 72,177%, free alkali 0,082%, unsoap fatty or free fatty 0,834%, and mineral oil was negative. Soap base on nyamplung seed oil have antibacterial activity against bacteria Staphylococus aureus with diameter of inhibition zone 14,701 mm.

  1. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  2. Validation of the Erlangen Test of Activities of Daily Living in Persons with Mild Dementia or Mild Cognitive Impairment (ETAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttenberger, Katharina; Reppermund, Simone; Schmiedeberg-Sohn, Anke; Book, Stephanie; Graessel, Elmar

    2016-05-26

    There are currently no valid, fast, and easy-to-administer performance tests that are designed to assess the capacities to perform activities of daily living in persons with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, such measures are urgently needed for determining individual support needs as well as the efficacy of interventions. The aim of the present study was therefore to validate the Erlangen Test of Activities of Daily Living in Persons with Mild Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment (ETAM), a performance test that is based on the International Classification of Functioning and Health (ICF), which assesses the relevant domains of living in older adults with MCI and mild dementia who live independently. The 10 ICF-based items on the research version of the ETAM were tested in a final sample of 81 persons with MCI or mild dementia. The items were selected for the final version in accordance with 6 criteria: 1) all domains must be represented and have equal weight, 2) all items must load on the same factor, 3) item difficulties and item discriminatory powers, 4) convergent validity (Bayer Activities of Daily Living Scale [B-ADL]) and discriminant validity (Mini Mental State Examination [MMSE], Geriatric Depression Scale 15 [GDS-15]), 5) inter-rater reliabilities of the individual items, 6) as little material as possible. Retest reliability was also examined. Cohen's ds were calculated to determine the magnitudes of the differences in ETAM scores between participants diagnosed with different grades of severity of cognitive impairment. The final version of the ETAM consists of 6 items that cover the five ICF domains communication, mobility, self-care, domestic life (assessed by two 3-point items), and major life areas (specifically, the economic life sub-category) and load on a single factor. The maximum achievable score is 30 points (6 points per domain). The average administration time was 35 min, 19 of which were needed for pure item

  3. Accuracy of immunodiagnostic tests for active tuberculosis using single and combined results: a multicenter TBNET-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Goletti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical application of IFN-gamma release assays (IGRAs has recently improved the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection. In a multicenter study of the Tuberculosis Network European Trialsgroup (TBNET we aimed to ascertain in routine clinical practice the accuracy of a novel assay using selected peptides encoded in the mycobacterial genomic region of difference (RD 1 for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis in comparison with tuberculin skin test (TST, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube (Cellestis Ltd., Carnegie, Australia and T-SPOT.TB (Oxfordimmunotec, Abingdon, UK. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 425 individuals from 6 different European centres were prospectively enrolled. We found that sensitivity of the novel test, TST, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB was respectively 73.1%, 85.3%, 78.1%, and 85.2%; specificity was respectively 70.6%, 48.0%, 61.9% and 44.3%; positive likelihood ratios were respectively 2.48, 1.64, 2.05, and 1.53; negative likelihood ratios were respectively 0.38, 0.31, 0.35, 0.33. Sensitivity of TST combined with the novel test, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB increased up to 92.4%, 97.7% and 97.1%, respectively. The likelihood ratios of combined negative results of TST with, respectively, the novel test, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB were 0.19, 0.07 and 0.10. CONCLUSIONS: The assay based on RD1 selected peptides has similar accuracy for active tuberculosis compared with TST and commercial IGRAs. Then, independently of the spectrum of antigens used in the assays to elicit mycobacterial specific immune responses, the novel test, IGRAs, and the TST do not allow an accurate identification of active tuberculosis in clinical practice. However, the combined use of the novel assay or commercial IGRAs with TST may allow exclusion of tuberculosis.

  4. ACTIVITY TEST AND REGENERATION OF NiMo/Z CATALYST FOR HYDROCRACKING OF WASTE PLASTIC FRACTION TO GASOLINE FRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiansono Rodiansono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Activity test and regeneration of NiMo/active natural zeolite catalyst for hydrocracking of waste plastic fraction of polyprophylene (PP type have been carried out. The catalysts was prepared by loading Mo followed by Ni Metals onto the natural zeolite (Z sample, then calcined at 500oC, oxidized and reduced at 400oC under nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen stream, respectively. The characterization of catalysts including spesific surface area, average pore radius, and total pore volume were performed by gas sorption analyzer, amount of total acid sites was determined by gas sorption method, and acid site strength was confirmed by IR spectroscopy. The hydrocracking process was carried out in a semi-flow reactor system at 360 oC and catalyst:feed ratio 0.5 under hydrogen stream (150 mL/hour. The feed was vaporized from the pyrolisis reactor into the hydrocracking reactor. A liquid product was collected and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. The characterization results showed that spesific surface area, average pore radius, and total pore volume of the Z sample decreased after loading of the Ni and Mo metals. Amount of total acid sites of the NiMo/Z catalyst was higher than that of the Z sample. The activity of NiMo/Z catalyst decreased after several continously runs. Its regeneration produced the NiMo/Z reg catalyst with similar activity and selectivity to the fresh catalyst (NiMo/Z. The activity of catalysts at the optimum condition followed the order of NiMo/Z reg>NiMo/Z>Z (conversion of hydrocarbon C>12 and NiMo/Z reg>NiMo/Z>Z (total yield of gasoline fraction. The selectivity of catalysts for C7-C8 product followed the order of Z>NiMo/Z>NiMo/Z reg. Keywords: activity, polyprophylene, catalyst, gasoline fraction.

  5. Physico-chemical characterization and antibacterial activity of different types of honey tested on strains isolated from hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junie Lia M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The first aim of the study was to compare the antibacterial activity of several types of honey of different origins, against some bacterial resistant strains. The strains had been isolated from patients. The second aim was to discover the correlations between the antibacterial character of honey and the physico-chemical properties of the honey. Ten honey samples (polyfloral, linden, acacia, manna, and sunflower from the centre of Romania were tested to determine their antibacterial properties against the following bacterial species: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, and Listeria monocytogenes. Bacterial cultures in nutrient broth and the culture medium Mueller-Hinton agar were used. The susceptibility to antibiotics was performed using the disk diffusion method. All honey samples showed antibacterial activity on the isolated bacterial strains, in particular polyfloral (inhibition zone 13-21 mm in diameter - because it is the source of several plants, and manna (inhibition zone 13-19.5 mm in diameter, and sunflower (inhibition zone 14-18.5 mm in diameter. Pure honey has a significant antibacterial activity against some bacteria which are resistant to antibiotics. Bacterial strains differed in their sensitivity to honeys. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were the most sensitive. The present study revealed that honey antibacterial activity depends on the origin of the honey. We also found that there was a significant correlation between antibacterial activity of honeys and the colour of the honey but not between acidity and pH. The statistical analysis showed that the honey type influences the antibacterial activity (diameter of the bacterial strains inhibition zones.

  6. Influence of pressure changes on recruitment pattern and neck muscle activities during Cranio-Cervical Flexion Tests (CCFTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junhyung; Hur, Jingang; Ko, Taesung

    2015-01-01

    The muscle activity of the deep cervical flexors is emphasized more than that of the superficial cervical flexors, and it has been reported that functional disorders of the longuscolli are found in patients who experience neck pain. The objective of this study was to analyze the recruitment patterns and muscle activities of the cervical flexors during Cranio-Cervical Flexion Tests (CCFTs) through real-time ultrasonography and surface electromyography with a view to presenting appropriate pressure levels for deep cervical flexor exercise protocols based on the results of the analysis. The twenty subjects without neck pain were trained until they became accustomed to CCFTs, and the pressure level was increased gradually from 20 mmHg to 40 mmHg by increasing the pressure level 5 mmHg at a time. Real-time ultrasonography images of the longuscolli and the sternocleidomastoid were taken to measure the amounts of changes in the thicknesses of these muscles, and surface electromyography was implemented to observe the muscle activity of the sternocleidomastoid. The measured value is RMS. According to the results of the ultrasonography, the muscle thicknesses of both the longuscolli and the sternocleidomastoid showed significant increases, as the pressure increased up to 40 mmHg (p< 0.05). The differences in the muscle thicknesses at all individual pressure levels showed significant increases (p< 0.05). According to the results of the electromyography, the muscle activity of the sternocleidomastoid gradually increased as the pressure increased up to 40 mmHg, the increases were significant between 20 mmHg and 25 mmHg, between 30 mmHg and 35 mmHg (p< 0.05). The pressure levels of exercise methods at which the muscle activity of the deep cervical flexors is maximally increased and the muscle activity of the superficial cervical flexors is minimally increased are 25 mmHg-30 mmHg.

  7. Activity of telavancin and comparator antimicrobial agents tested against Staphylococcus spp. isolated from hospitalised patients in Europe (2007-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Jones, Ronald N

    2010-10-01

    The activity of telavancin was evaluated against Staphylococcus spp. collected from European hospitals as part of an international surveillance study (2007-2008). A total of 7534 staphylococcal clinical isolates [5726 Staphylococcus aureus and 1808 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS)] were included. Isolates were tested for susceptibility according to reference methods and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were interpreted based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) 2010 and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) 2009 criteria. Telavancin breakpoints approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were applied. Telavancin activity was evaluated against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) displaying several antibiogram resistance patterns, including multidrug-resistant isolates. Telavancin was active against S. aureus [MIC(50/90) values (MICs for 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively)=0.12/0.25mg/L; 100.0% susceptible] and CoNS (MIC(50/90)=0.12/0.25mg/L), inhibiting all isolates at Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus lugdunensis and Staphylococcus xylosus (MIC(50)=0.12 mg/L) compared with Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Staphylococcus warneri (MIC(50)=0.25mg/L). Overall, telavancin exhibited MIC(90) results two- to eight-fold lower than comparators (daptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, vancomycin and linezolid). Based upon MIC(90) values, telavancin demonstrated potent in vitro activity against a contemporary (2007-2008) collection of Staphylococcus spp. recovered from nearly 30 European medical centres. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. In Vitro Activities of Isavuconazole and Comparator Antifungal Agents Tested against a Global Collection of Opportunistic Yeasts and Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Shawn A.; Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a new broad-spectrum triazole with a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile. We report the MIC distributions for isavuconazole and 111 isolates of Candida (42 Candida albicans, 25 Candida glabrata, 22 Candida parapsilosis, 14 Candida tropicalis, and 8 Candida krusei isolates), as determined by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Also, the relative activities of isavuconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and the three echinocandins were assessed against a recent (2011) global collection of 1,358 isolates of Candida spp., 101 of Aspergillus spp., 54 of non-Candida yeasts, and 21 of non-Aspergillus molds using CLSI BMD methods. The overall essential agreement (EA) (±2 log2 dilutions) between the CLSI and EUCAST methods was 99.1% (EA at ±1 log2 dilution, 90.1% [range, 80.0 to 100.0%]). The activities of isavuconazole against the larger collection of Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. were comparable to those of posaconazole and voriconazole; the MIC90 values for isavuconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole against Candida spp. were 0.5, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml and against Aspergillus spp. were 2, 1, and 1 μg/ml, respectively. Isavuconazole showed good activities against Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC90, 0.12 μg/ml) and other non-Candida yeasts (MIC90, 1 μg/ml) but was less potent against non-Aspergillus molds (MIC90, >8 μg/ml). Isavuconazole MIC values for three mucormycete isolates were 4, 1, and 2 μg/ml, whereas all three were inhibited by 1 μg/ml posaconazole. Isavuconazole demonstrates broad-spectrum activity against this global collection of opportunistic fungi, and the CLSI and EUCAST methods can be used to test this agent against Candida, with highly comparable results. PMID:23740727

  9. Antibacterial Activity Test, Evaluation of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Screening of Some Extracts of Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusmiati Kusmiati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a rich biodiversity country where various medicinal plants are existed. One species of medicinal plants is Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa, Amaranthaceae. This species is native to Central America and has been widely spread to the tropics. To date the species can be easily found at the home gardens as an ornamental plant. Medicinal plants has been used for generations by traditional people. It was empirically proven that medicinal plants have ability to cure certain diseases such as dysentery. All parts of this plant can be used as medicine. However, only the flower of the species was used in this study. Objective of the study was to identify the highest antimicrobial activity of Gomphrene globosa flower extract using ethanol, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol solvents. Gomphrena globosa flower was extracted using 96% ethanol and then was by partitied using petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-buthanol respectively. The extracts were then evaporated using a rotapavor until condensed extract was obtained. Phytochemical screening was done on both of the flower powder and extract. Result of Pharmacognosy evaluation of the Globe Amaranth flower as follows: water content 8.17%, total ash content 9.11%, acid-insoluble ash 1.50%, acid-soluble ash 6.43%, water-soluble extract 10.79%, ethanol-soluble extract 3.51% and dry content 10.19%. The condensed extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Shigella dysenteriae. Result of antibacterial activity test by agar diffusion method showed that the higner concentration of the extract led to higher bacterial inhibition zone. The highest antimicrobial activity was obtained from n-butanol extract as indicated by a significant inhibition zone around paper disk

  10. In vitro activities of isavuconazole and comparator antifungal agents tested against a global collection of opportunistic yeasts and molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Isavuconazole is a new broad-spectrum triazole with a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile. We report the MIC distributions for isavuconazole and 111 isolates of Candida (42 Candida albicans, 25 Candida glabrata, 22 Candida parapsilosis, 14 Candida tropicalis, and 8 Candida krusei isolates), as determined by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Also, the relative activities of isavuconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and the three echinocandins were assessed against a recent (2011) global collection of 1,358 isolates of Candida spp., 101 of Aspergillus spp., 54 of non-Candida yeasts, and 21 of non-Aspergillus molds using CLSI BMD methods. The overall essential agreement (EA) (±2 log2 dilutions) between the CLSI and EUCAST methods was 99.1% (EA at ±1 log2 dilution, 90.1% [range, 80.0 to 100.0%]). The activities of isavuconazole against the larger collection of Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. were comparable to those of posaconazole and voriconazole; the MIC90 values for isavuconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole against Candida spp. were 0.5, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml and against Aspergillus spp. were 2, 1, and 1 μg/ml, respectively. Isavuconazole showed good activities against Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC90, 0.12 μg/ml) and other non-Candida yeasts (MIC90, 1 μg/ml) but was less potent against non-Aspergillus molds (MIC90, >8 μg/ml). Isavuconazole MIC values for three mucormycete isolates were 4, 1, and 2 μg/ml, whereas all three were inhibited by 1 μg/ml posaconazole. Isavuconazole demonstrates broad-spectrum activity against this global collection of opportunistic fungi, and the CLSI and EUCAST methods can be used to test this agent against Candida, with highly comparable results.

  11. The production and activity test of cellulases using bagasse substrate on Aspergillus niger isolated from Clove field, Kare, Madiun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhi, Muh. Waskito; Sulistyarsi, Ani; Pujiati

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillus sp is a microorganism which has a high ability to produce cellulase enzymes. In producing Cellulase enzymes requires appropriate concentration and incubation time to obtain optimum enzyme activity. This study aimed to determine the effect of inoculum concentration and incubation time towards production and activity of cellulases from Aspergillus sp substrate bagasse. This research used experiments method; completely randomized design with 2 factorial repeated 2 times. The treatment study include differences inoculum (K) 5% (K1), 15% (K2) 25%, (K3) and incubation time (F) that is 3 days (F1), 6 days (F2), 9 days (F3), 12 days (F4). The data taken from the treatment are glucose reduction and protein levels of crude cellulase enzyme activity that use Nelson Somogyi and Biuret methods. Analysis of variance ANOVA data used two paths with significance level of 5% then continued with LSD test. The results showed that: Fhit>Ftab. Thus, there is effect of inoculum concentrations and incubation time toward activity of crude cellulases of Aspergillus sp. The highest glucose reduction of treatment is K3F4 (concentration of inoculum is 25% with 12 days incubation time) amount 12.834 g / ml and the highest protein content is K3F4 (concentration of inoculum is 25% with with 12 days incubation time) amount 0.740 g / ml.

  12. Free Fatty Acid Concentration and Carboxy methyl cellulase Activity of Some Formulas of Protected Fat-proteins Tested In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilis Hartati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the levels of free fatty acids and carboxymethylcellulase activity (cmc-ase activity of some protected fat-proteins base on in vitro Tilley and Terry method. Two sources of fat, i.e. crude palm oil and fish oil and three sources of protein i.e. skim milk, soybean flour and soybean meal were used in the formulation of protected fat-protein, and thus there were six treatment combinations. The filtrate from the in vitro test was analyzed for the levels of free fatty acids and  cmcase activity. The result of this research indicates that different combinations of feed materials and fat give different content of free fatty acid in first stage and second stage in vitro, with the best results in the combination treatment of skim milk and palm oil that give the lowest result of  free fatty acid concentration in fisrt stage in vitro (0.168% and the highest result free fatty acid concentration in second stage in vitro ( 4.312% . The activity of CMC-ase was not influenced by different  sources of fat and protein. It can be concluded was that the protection of the combination between skim milk and CPO gives the highest protection results.

  13. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During

  14. Diagnostic Test in College Algebra for Freshman Non-Education Students of Westmead International School: Input to Proposed Remedial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhemson C. Elis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The major thrust of this study is to develop a diagnostic test in college algebra to know the level of performance in College Algebra of non – education freshman students of Westmead International School through the use of a diagnostic test. The researcher used the descriptive method of research. The level of performance of freshman non – education students of Westmead International School in Algebraic operation has a mean of 80.66 with the highest score of 88 percent and lowest score of 68, while 22 or 31.43 percent had an average performance ranging from 79 - 84. This indicates that students had average mathematical skills and knowledge acquired from their mathematics foundation during high school. The level of performance of freshman non – education students of Westmead International School in arithmetic operation has 77.78 of the mean score with the highest score of 94 and lowest score of 68, which indicates that the students have difficulties in some areas in arithmetic operations. There was a significant relationship between mathematics foundation and the level of performance of the students. The output made by the researcher was a set of Remedial Activities in College Algebra, which is composed of different topics based on the result of the study and on the suggestions of the college instructors of Westmead International School based on their observation. The topics were operation on integers, operation involving polynomials, and special products. It was recommended that the freshman college students need to take the diagnostic test in College Algebra to determine their level of performance. If they fail in the diagnostic test, they will take Math Plus (Basic Mathematics instead of College Algebra. The students with good performance in the diagnostic test will take College Algebra.

  15. Salivary cortisol, heart rate, electrodermal activity and subjective stress responses to the Mannheim Multicomponent Stress Test (MMST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Tatyana; Schmahl, Christian; Wüst, Stefan; Bohus, Martin

    2012-06-30

    The availability of effective laboratory paradigms for inducing psychological stress is an important requirement for experimental stress research. Reliable protocols are scarce, usually laborious and manpower-intensive. In order to develop an economical, easily applicable standardized stress protocol, we have recently tailored the Mannheim Multicomponent Stress Test (MMST). This test has been shown to induce relatively high stress responses without focusing on social-evaluative components. In this study we evaluated changes in electrodermal activity and salivary cortisol in response to the MMST. The MMST simultaneously combines cognitive (mental arithmetic), emotional (affective pictures), acoustic (white noise) and motivational stressors (loss of money). This study comprised two independent experiments. For experiment 1, 80 female subjects were recruited; 30 subjects (15 females) participated in experiment 2. Significant changes in electrodermal activity and salivary cortisol levels in response to MMST exposure were found. Subjective stress and heart rate responses were significantly increased in both experiments. These results indicate that the MMST is an economical stress paradigm which is also applicable in larger cohorts or multicenter studies for investigating stress reactions. As social-evaluative threat is not the main stress component of the MMST, this procedure represents a useful and complementary alternative to other established stress protocols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Usability test of a hand exoskeleton for activities of daily living: an example of user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenara, Maria; Cempini, Marco; Gómez, Cristina; Cortese, Mario; Martín, Cristina; Medina, Josep; Vitiello, Nicola; Opisso, Eloy

    2017-01-01

    (1) To assess a robotic device (Handexos) during the design process with regard to usability, end user satisfaction and safety, (2) to determine whether Handexos can improve the activities of daily living (ADLs) of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients and stroke patients with upper-limb dysfunction. During a 2-year development stage of the device, a total of 37 participants (aged 22-68), 28 clinicians (experts) and nine patients with SCI or stroke (end users) were included in a user-centered design process featuring usability tests. They performed five grasps wearing the device. The assessments were obtained at the end of the session by filling out a questionnaire and making suggestions. The experts' opinion was that the modified device was an improvement over the preliminary version, although this was not reflected in the scores. Whereas end user scores for comfort, grasp, performance and safety were above the sufficiency threshold, the scores for year 2 were lower than those for year 1. The findings demonstrate that although Handexos meets the initial functional requirements and underlines the potential for assisting SCI and post-stroke subjects in ADLs, several aspects such as mechanical complexity and low adaptability to different hand sizes need to be further addressed. Implications for Rehabilitation Wearable robotics devices could improve the activities of daily living in patients with spinal cord injury or stroke. They could be a tool for rehabilitation of the upper limb. Further usability tests to improve this type of tools are recommended.

  17. Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

  18. Effects of a hydroalcoholic extract of Turnera diffusa Willd. ex Schult., Turneraceae, in tests for adaptogenic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia G. Bezerra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess whether Turnera diffusa Willd. ex Schult., Turneraceae, (TD, plant known in popular medicine as tonic and aphrodisiac, has other effects that are characteristic of an adaptogen substance, such as improvement of the memory and reduction of the damage caused by stress. We carried out an initial screening to detect a possible toxicity of the plant. In that phase of the study we used tests of observational screening; evaluation of acute toxicity; measurement of motor activity and motor coordination, and sleeping time induced by pentobarbital, and observed that the extract presented low toxicity and no stimulant or depressant effect on the animals. We then performed specific tests for the evaluation of an adaptogen effect. TD did not protect the stomach of the animals from the formation of ulcers, neither did it alter the plasmatic levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and corticosterone of the animals submitted to immobilization and cold. As regards the evaluation of memory in passive avoidance, TD did not inhibit scopolamine-induced amnesia. Additionally, the hydroalcoholic extract presented low antioxidant activity in vitro. In the models used, TD produced no changes in relation to a possible adaptogen effect.

  19. Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment: OECD Activities on the Development and Use of Adverse Outcome Pathways and Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuratani, Yuki; Horie, Masashi; Leinala, Eeva

    2018-01-09

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) works with member countries and other stakeholders to improve and harmonize chemical assessment methods. In 2012, the OECD Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) Development Programme started. The Programme has published six AOPs thus far and more than 60 AOPs are under various stages of development under the Programme. This article reviews recent OECD activities on the use of AOPs in developing Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessments (IATAs). The guidance document for the use of AOPs in developing IATA, published in 2016, provides a framework for developing and using IATA and describes how IATA can be based on an AOP. The guidance document on the reporting of defined approaches to be used within IATA, also published in 2016, provides a set of principles for reporting defined approaches to testing and assessment to facilitate their evaluation. In the guidance documents, the AOP concept plays an important role for building IATA approaches in a science-based and transparent way. In 2015, the IATA Case Studies Project was launched to increase experience with the use of IATA and novel hazard methodologies by developing case studies, which constitute examples of predictions that are fit-for-regulatory use. This activity highlights the importance of international collaboration for harmonizing and improving chemical safety assessment methods. © 2018 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  20. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondervan, Daniel K; Palafox, Lorena; Hernandez, Jorge; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-04-18

    Robotic arm therapy devices that incorporate actuated assistance can enhance arm recovery, motivate patients to practice, and allow therapists to deliver semi-autonomous training. However, because such devices are often complex and actively apply forces, they have not achieved widespread use in rehabilitation clinics or at home. This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a simple, mechanically passive device that provides robot-like assistance for active arm training using the principle of mechanical resonance. The Resonating Arm Exerciser (RAE) consists of a lever that attaches to the push rim of a wheelchair, a forearm support, and an elastic band that stores energy. Patients push and pull on the lever to roll the wheelchair back and forth by about 20 cm around a neutral position. We performed two separate pilot studies of the device. In the first, we teste