WorldWideScience

Sample records for test wells

  1. Role of well testing in civil engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, D.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of well testing is to derive a value of the permeability of the geologic medium or to measure the velocity or quantity of fluid flow. The types of tests typically employed on civil engineering projects are simple borehole tests, packer or pressure tests in boreholes, permeameter tests, well pumping tests, and in-hole tests using well flow meters or tracer tests. New problem areas which demand new approaches are mentioned

  2. Harmonic pulse testing for well performance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, Peter A.; Salina Borello, Eloisa; Verga, Francesca; Viberti, Dario

    2018-01-01

    Harmonic testing was developed as a form of well testing that can be applied during ongoing production or injection operations, as a pulsed signal is superimposed on the background pressure trend. Thus no interruption of well and reservoir production is needed before and during the test. If the

  3. Well test analysis in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, K.

    1987-04-01

    The behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. These models are based on the assumption that a fracture system under well test conditions may be represented by two concentric regions, one representing a small number of fractures that dominates flow near the well, and the other representing average conditions farther away from the well. Type curves are presented that can be used to find the flow parameters of these two regions and the extent of the inner concentric region. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented.

  4. Nevada test site water-supply wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, D.; Donithan, D.; Seaber, P.

    1996-05-01

    A total of 15 water-supply wells are currently being used at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of this report is to bring together the information gleaned from investigations of these water-supply wells. This report should serve as a reference on well construction and completion, static water levels, lithologic and hydrologic characteristics of aquifers penetrated, and general water quality of water-supply wells at the NTS. Possible sources for contamination of the water-supply wells are also evaluated. Existing wells and underground nuclear tests conducted near (within 25 meters (m)) or below the water table within 2 kilometers (km) of a water-supply were located and their hydrogeologic relationship to the water-supply well determined

  5. Recommended well drilling and testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.; Wilson, C.

    1978-07-01

    A well drilling and testing program is recommended by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to identify the hydrology of deep basalts in the Pasco Basin. The ultimate objective of this program is to assist in determining the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository on the Hanford Reservation. The recommended program has been staged for maximum effectiveness. In the first stage, six wells have been identified for drilling and testing which, when coupled with existing wells, will provide sufficient data for a preliminary overview of basin hydrology and a preliminary determination of the hydrologic suitability of the deep basalt for a repository site. The rate at which the first stage wells are drilled and tested will depend upon the date at which a preliminary determination of site suitability is required. It was assumed that a preliminary determination of suitability would be required in 1980, in which case all six first stage wells would be drilled in FY 1979. If the results of the first stage analysis are favorable for repository siting, tentative repository sites can be identified and a second stage hydrology program can be implemented to provide the necessary details of the flow system. To accomplish this stage, a number of deep wells would be required at locations both inside and outside the basin, with specific sites to be identified as the work progresses to obtain maximum utility of existing data. A program is recommended for testing in each new well and for completion of testing in each existing well. Recommended tests include borehole geophysics, pressure and permeability testing, geochemical sampling, tracer testing, hydrofracturing and borehole fracture logging. The entire data collection program is oriented toward providing the information required to establish and verify an accurate numerical model of the Pasco Basin

  6. Well test analysis in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, K.

    1986-04-01

    In this study the behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented. This model develops an explicit solution in the porous matrix as well as in the discrete fractures. Because the model does not require the assumptions of the conventional double porosity approach, it may be used to simulate cases where double porosity models fail.

  7. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

  8. Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

    1981-03-01

    The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  9. Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J.

    1981-03-01

    The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted

  10. Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. McLin; W. Stone

    2004-08-01

    Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the

  11. WES: A well test analysis expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensch, A.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes part of the development of an expert system in the domain of well-test analysis. This work has been done during my final internship, completed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The report is divided in three parts: the first one gives a description of the state of the project at the time I first began to work on it, and raises some problems that have to be solved. The second section shows the results that have been reached, and the last one draws conclusions from these results and proposes extensions that would be useful in the future

  12. Warren Hunt to test granite well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, W.

    1996-01-01

    Various theories which purport to explain the existence of the Alberta oil sands, were discussed briefly. One theory, held among others by Warren Hunt, speculates that oil is formed deep in the Precambrian basement and not in the higher sedimentary rock. According to this theory, methane in the crust is the abiogenic product that results from hydrogen reacting with silicon carbide in the lower mantle. As it rises through the fractures, it encounters the microbiota, and hydrogen is stripped away making larger molecules until only bitumen remains. Hunt and other adherents of this theory believe that hydrocarbon reservoirs are replenished as oil is produced, hence there is no end to the world's oil supply. This theory is about to be tested by retesting a granite well near Fort McMurray, which was suspended in September 1994, when funding dried up. Kaleeda Enterprises, owners of the well, believe that the well bottom is currently in a granite pool, and oil will be found by deepening the well to 2,150 metres from the current 1,650 metres. While this is not universally accepted, if true, the abiogenic theory would go a long way towards explaining the origin of the oil sands

  13. Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slevinsky, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

  14. Deepwater extended well testing in the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cribbs, M.E. Jr.; Voss, J.D.; DeCarlo, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines deepwater Gulf of Mexico well testing and the need for extended well testing from the oil company's perspective. Well test objectives together with possible facility arrangements are examined as they integrate with the DeepStar project's modular field development facility arrangement

  15. Drilling and testing specifications for the McGee well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    The McGee Well is a part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project's subsurface site selection and characterization activities. Information from the McGee Well support site hydrologic characterization and repository design. These test specifications include details for the drilling and testing of the McGee. It includes the predicted stratigraphy, the drilling requirements, description of tests to be conducted, intervals selected for hydrologic testing, and a schedule of the drilling and testing activities. 19 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Tritium activities in selected wells on the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, B.F.

    1993-05-01

    Literature and data were reviewed related to radionuclides in groundwater on and near the Nevada Test Site. No elevated tritium activities have been reported outside of the major testing regions of the Nevada Test Site. Three wells were identified as having water with above-background (>50 pCi/l) tritium activities: UE-15d Water Well; USGS Water Well A; and USGS Test Well B Ex. Although none of these wells have tritium activities greater than the Nevada State Drinking Water standard (20,000 pCi/l), their time-series tritium trends may be indicative to potential on-site radionuclide migration

  17. Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.; Layne, R.R.

    1994-11-01

    A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it's industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported

  18. Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it`s industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported.

  19. Study on the petroleum recovery technology: well testing analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Dae Gee; Kim, Se Joon; Kim, Hyun Tae [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Well testing is one of the most widely used tools to characterize reservoirs throughout the entire life of petroleum exploration and production. In this study, we first try to set up a procedure of computer aided well test analysis and then attempt to characterize potential reservoirs by performing well test analysis for some of the exploratory wells in the Korean continental shelf. A couple of gas well testing data already published in the literature were also analyzed and compared. First task was to analyze the drill stem test(DST) in KCS-1 gas well. The second analysis was also DST data on multi-rate gas wells. The third case is a Devonian shale reservoir. The final problem is a multi-rate drawdown test without early time pressure data. It is now possible to analyze insufficient well test data with less accuracy. One remark should be pointed out on multi-rate gas well testing. It is recommended to have variable skins rather than a constant skin because rate dependent skins due to turbulence of gas flow must be considered in addition to the mechanical skin. (author). 14 refs.

  20. Characteristic Value Method of Well Test Analysis for Horizontal Gas Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ping Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of characteristic value method of well test analysis for horizontal gas well. Owing to the complicated seepage flow mechanism in horizontal gas well and the difficulty in the analysis of transient pressure test data, this paper establishes the mathematical models of well test analysis for horizontal gas well with different inner and outer boundary conditions. On the basis of obtaining the solutions of the mathematical models, several type curves are plotted with Stehfest inversion algorithm. For gas reservoir with closed outer boundary in vertical direction and infinite outer boundary in horizontal direction, while considering the effect of wellbore storage and skin effect, the pseudopressure behavior of the horizontal gas well can manifest four characteristic periods: pure wellbore storage period, early vertical radial flow period, early linear flow period, and late horizontal pseudoradial flow period. For gas reservoir with closed outer boundary both in vertical and horizontal directions, the pseudopressure behavior of the horizontal gas well adds the pseudosteady state flow period which appears after the boundary response. For gas reservoir with closed outer boundary in vertical direction and constant pressure outer boundary in horizontal direction, the pseudopressure behavior of the horizontal gas well adds the steady state flow period which appears after the boundary response. According to the characteristic lines which are manifested by pseudopressure derivative curve of each flow period, formulas are developed to obtain horizontal permeability, vertical permeability, skin factor, reservoir pressure, and pore volume of the gas reservoir, and thus the characteristic value method of well test analysis for horizontal gas well is established. Finally, the example study verifies that the new method is reliable. Characteristic value method of well test analysis for horizontal gas well makes the well test analysis

  1. Interpretation of fracture system geometry using well test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.W.; Geier, J.E.

    1990-11-01

    This report presents three methods of determining fracture geometry and interconnection from well test information. Method 1 uses evidence for boundary effects in the well test to determine the distance to and type of fracture boundary. Method 2 uses the spatial dimension of the well test to infer the geometry of the fracture-conduit system. Method 3 obtains information of the spacing and transmissivity distribution of individual conductive fractures from fixed-interval-length (FIL) well tests. The three methods are applied to data from the Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) at the 360 m level of the Stripa Mine. The focus of the technology development is the constant-pressure welltest, although the general approaches apply to constant-rate well test, and to a much lesser extent slug or pulse test, which are relatively insensitive to boundaries and spatial dimension. Application of the techniques to the N and W holes in the SCV area shows that there is little evidence for boundary effects in the well test results. There is, on the other hand, considerable variation in the spatial dimension of the well test data ranging from sub-linear (fractures which decrease in conductivity with distance from the hole) to spherical, for three-dimensional fracture systems. The absence of boundary effects suggest that the rock mass in the SCV area contains a well connected fracture system. Major uncertainties in the analysis of well test data limit the use of single borehole measurements. Without assuming the value of specific storage, one can reliably determine only the spatial dimension, and, for two dimensional flow only, the transmissivity. Among the uncertainties are the effective well radius, the degree to which the fracture conduits fill the n-dimensional space in which flow occurs, and the cross-sectional area of the conduits at the wellbore. This report presents a complete development of constant-pressure well test methods for cylindrical flow and flow of arbitrary

  2. A method for evaluating horizontal well pumping tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langseth, David E; Smyth, Andrew H; May, James

    2004-01-01

    Predicting the future performance of horizontal wells under varying pumping conditions requires estimates of basic aquifer parameters, notably transmissivity and storativity. For vertical wells, there are well-established methods for estimating these parameters, typically based on either the recovery from induced head changes in a well or from the head response in observation wells to pumping in a test well. Comparable aquifer parameter estimation methods for horizontal wells have not been presented in the ground water literature. Formation parameter estimation methods based on measurements of pressure in horizontal wells have been presented in the petroleum industry literature, but these methods have limited applicability for ground water evaluation and are based on pressure measurements in only the horizontal well borehole, rather than in observation wells. This paper presents a simple and versatile method by which pumping test procedures developed for vertical wells can be applied to horizontal well pumping tests. The method presented here uses the principle of superposition to represent the horizontal well as a series of partially penetrating vertical wells. This concept is used to estimate a distance from an observation well at which a vertical well that has the same total pumping rate as the horizontal well will produce the same drawdown as the horizontal well. This equivalent distance may then be associated with an observation well for use in pumping test algorithms and type curves developed for vertical wells. The method is shown to produce good results for confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in the absence of delayed yield response. For unconfined aquifers, the presence of delayed yield response increases the method error.

  3. Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

  4. Well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This Code has been prepared for use as a guide to safe practice for those concerned with well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. It is intended to provide information and guidance on those well control activities associated with high pressure wells which have an impact on safety offshore, and therefore require detailed care and attention. The Code has been produced in a United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) context, but the principles and recommendations have general relevance to similar operations elsewhere. Each chapter of the Code covers an important aspect of well control and has an introduction which describes the part each activity plays in the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. (Author)

  5. EXPLORATION WELL TEST CASE HISTORY CONFIRMS IMPORTANCE OF DST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Damjanić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Drill stem testing of the exploration well consisted of two flow and two pressure build-up periods. Gas was obtained. Modified isochronal test was used during testing the well after completion. Except gas, small quantity of condensate and traces of oil and water were obtained. Both pressure build-up analyses showed that formation permeability is low. DST pressure build-up analysis showed that wellbore damage is present. This was proved later, when acid treatment was performed, by which skin was removed and production increased significantly. Data obtained by well testing are very important for future productivity prediction and determination of optimal well completion and surface facility construction (the paper is published in Croatian.

  6. Well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This Code has been prepared for use as a guide to safe practice for those concerned with well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. It is intended to provide information and guidance on those well control activities associated with high pressure wells which have an impact on safety offshore, and therefore require detailed care and attention. The Code has been produced in a United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) context, but the principles and recommendations have general relevance to similar operations elsewhere. (author)

  7. Statistical Estimation of Heterogeneities: A New Frontier in Well Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, S. P.; Guadagnini, A.; Illman, W. A.; Riva, M.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2001-12-01

    Well-testing methods have traditionally relied on analytical solutions of groundwater flow equations in relatively simple domains, consisting of one or at most a few units having uniform hydraulic properties. Recently, attention has been shifting toward methods and solutions that would allow one to characterize subsurface heterogeneities in greater detail. On one hand, geostatistical inverse methods are being used to assess the spatial variability of parameters, such as permeability and porosity, on the basis of multiple cross-hole pressure interference tests. On the other hand, analytical solutions are being developed to describe the mean and variance (first and second statistical moments) of flow to a well in a randomly heterogeneous medium. Geostatistical inverse interpretation of cross-hole tests yields a smoothed but detailed "tomographic" image of how parameters actually vary in three-dimensional space, together with corresponding measures of estimation uncertainty. Moment solutions may soon allow one to interpret well tests in terms of statistical parameters such as the mean and variance of log permeability, its spatial autocorrelation and statistical anisotropy. The idea of geostatistical cross-hole tomography is illustrated through pneumatic injection tests conducted in unsaturated fractured tuff at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The idea of using moment equations to interpret well-tests statistically is illustrated through a recently developed three-dimensional solution for steady state flow to a well in a bounded, randomly heterogeneous, statistically anisotropic aquifer.

  8. Drilling and testing hot, high-pressure wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAndrew, R. (Ranger Oil Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Parry, N. (Phillips Petroleum Company United Kingdom Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Prieur, J.M. (Conoco UK Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Wiggelman, J. (Shell UK Exploration and Production, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Diggins, E. (Brunei Shell Petroleum (Brunei Darussalam)); Guicheney, P. (Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)); Cameron, D.; Stewart, A. (Dowell Schlumberger, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    Meticulous planning and careful control of operations are needed to safely drill and test high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Techniques, employed in the Central Graben in the UK sector of the North Sea, where about 50 HTHP wells have been drilled, are examined. Three main areas of activity are covered in this comprehensive review: drilling safety, casing and cementation, and testing. The three issues at the heart of HTHP drilling safety are kick prevention, kick detection and well control. Kicks are influxes of reservoir fluid into the well. Test equipment and operations are divided into three sections: downhole, subsea and surface. Also details are given of how this North Sea experience has been used to help plan a jackup rig modification for hot, high-pressure drilling off Brunei. 16 figs., 32 refs.

  9. Guide 52 status update : electronic capture of well test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronemeyer, W.

    1998-01-01

    As of 1 January 1999 the electronic submission of well test data is a stated requirement of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). Well test data is used for reserves assessment, reservoir characterization, depletion mechanism, enhanced productivity, pooling, equity disputes, monitoring pool depletion, and monitoring enhanced recovery. The challenge will be the inter-operability with popular e-mail software and security threats. The system, which will be available to everyone, promises to be affordable, simple, secure, flexible, able to convert charts and graphs, use recognized acceptable standards, and be compatible with EUB databases

  10. New method of analyzing well tests in fractured wells using sandface pressure and rate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, M.; Almehaideb, R.; Abou-Kassem, J. [U.A.E. University, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    1998-05-01

    Analysis of variable flow rate tests has been of special interest recently because in many cases it is impractical to keep a flow rate constant long enough to perform a drawdown test. Further, in many other drawdown and buildup tests, the early data were influenced by wellbore storage effects, and the duration of these effects could be quite long for low-permeability reservoirs. This paper presents a mathematical model which describes drawdown and buildup tests in hydraulically fractured wells. This new method uses a specialized plot approach to analyze the linear flow data and combines it with the superposition of constant-rate solution method for the analysis of psuedoradial flow data. It does not require prior knowledge of the fracture type (uniform-flux or infinite-conductivity); in fact it predicts the fracture type. This method is useful for the analysis of simultaneously measured downhole pressure and sandface rate data. 12 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Principal permeability determination from multiple horizontal well tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economides, M. [Texas A and M Univ., TX (United States); Munoz, A.; Ehlig-Economides, C.

    1998-12-31

    A method for obtaining principal permeability magnitudes and direction that requires only the linear flow regime from transient tests in three horizontal wells oriented in three distinct and arbitrary directions, is described. Well design optimization strategies require knowledge of both the principal permeability orientation as well as the horizontal permeability magnitudes. When the degree of horizontal permeability anisotropy (i.e. permeability in the bedding plane with respect to direction) is significant, the productivity of a long horizontal well will depend greatly on its direction, especially when the well is first brought into production. Productivities have been found to deviate substantially among wells in the same reservoir and this deviation has been attributed to differences in well orientation. In view of this fact, measuring permeability anisotropy becomes a compelling necessity. The success of the proposed method is illustrated by a case study in which the principal permeability magnitudes and direction from three wells were used to predict the productivity of a fourth well within 10 per cent. Use of the computed principal permeabilities from the case study, it was possible to forecast the cumulative production to show the significance of well trajectory optimization on the discounted cash flow and the net present value. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Aquifer test at well SMW-1 near Moenkopi, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Rob; Bills, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hopi villages of Lower Moencopi and Upper Moenkopi are on the Hopi Indian Reservation south of Tuba City in northern Arizona. These adjacent Hopi villages, located west and north of the confluence of Pasture Canyon Wash and Moenkopi Wash, are dependent on groundwater withdrawals from three wells that penetrate the N aquifer and from two springs that discharge from the N aquifer. The N aquifer is the principal aquifer in this region of northern Arizona and is composed of thick beds of sandstone between less permeable layers of siltstone and mudstone. The fine-grained character of the N aquifer inhibits rapid movement of water and large yields to wells; however, the aquifer is moderately productive at yields generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the study area. In recent years, the water level has declined in the three public-supply wells and the flow from the springs has decreased, causing concern that the current water supply will not be able to accommodate peak demand and allow for residential and economic growth. In addition to the challenge imposed by declining groundwater levels, the water-supply wells and springs are located about 2 miles downgradient from the Tuba City Landfill site where studies are ongoing to determine if uranium and other metals in groundwater beneath the landfill are higher than regional concentrations in the N aquifer. In August 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Hopi Tribe, conducted an aquifer test on well SMW-1, designed to help the Hopi Tribe determine the potential yield and water quality of the N aquifer south of Moenkopi Wash as a possible source of additional water supply. Well SMW-1 was drilled south of Moenkopi Wash to a depth of 760 feet below land surface before being backfilled and cased to about 300 feet. The well penetrates, in descending order, the Navajo Sandstone and the Kayenta Formation, both units of the N aquifer. The pre-test water level in the well was 99.15 feet below land

  13. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Pau (France)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  14. Well completion report on installation of horizontal wells for in-situ remediation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.; Corey, J.C.; Wright, L.M.

    1989-08-01

    A project to drill and install two horizontal vapor extraction/air-injection wells at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina, was performed in September and October of 1988. This study was performed to test the feasibility of horizontal drilling technologies in unconsolidated sediments and to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping of volatile organics from the ground water and unsaturated soils. A tremendous amount of knowledge was obtained during the drilling and installation of the two test wells. Factors of importance to be considered during design of another horizontal well drilling program follow. (1) Trips in and out of the borehole should be minimized to maintain hole stability. No reaming to enlarge the hole should be attempted. (2) Drilling fluid performance should be maximized by utilizing a low solids, low weight, moderate viscosity, high lubricity fluid. Interruption of drilling fluid circulation should be minimized. (3) Well materials should possess adequate flexibility to negotiate the curve. A flexible guide should be attached to the front of the well screen to guide the screen downhole. (4) Sands containing a minor amount of clay are recommended for completion targets, as better drilling control in the laterals was obtained in these sections

  15. Determination of Fracture System Geometry from Well Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the research and development for the description of the hydraulic geometry of fracture networks are discussed. The studies on fracture networks have developed on the premise that the structural geological information on fracture geometries could be used to develop the realistic models of flow. It has been widely recognized that a relatively small portion of natural fracture networks controls a major portion of groundwater flow. The key to efficient network modeling is to identify that portion of networks. It is the main purpose of this paper to discuss the methods for characterizing the hydraulic geometry of fracture flow systems. The methods described in this paper cover three approaches for defining the hydraulic geometry of fracture networks, that is, the determination of conductive fracture frequency in boreholes, the use of transient pressure and flow responses in single holes, and the use of cross hole test to assess connectivity. The information which can be obtained by each test is shown. Flow logging, well test distribution and conductive fracture frequency are discussed. The transient analysis of single hole well test and the cross hole analysis of well test for fracture network geometry are reported. The data taken by various methods together can provide network characterization. (K.I.)

  16. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion

  17. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion.

  18. ANAPPRES: An expert system for interference well-test analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, V.M.; Iglesias, E.R.; Arellano, J.; Schwarzblat, M.

    1988-01-01

    We present ANAPPRES V1.0, the first version of a computerized expert system capable of analyzing constant- and variable-flowrate interference tests, in which there is one active well and an arbitrary number of observation wells, in liquid-saturated homogeneous reservoirs. ANAPPRES successfully couples mathematical models, optimization techniques, heuristic knowledge and computerized graphics, a combination not often found in published expert systems. Its main advantages are that it is user friendly, requires essentially no experience on the part of the analyst, eliminates subjectivity associated with earlier techniques of analysis, can handle complex cases and large data sets, completes the analysis of even the most complex cases (including plotting the results) in one run, and is significantly faster than a human expert.

  19. Simulation and interpretation of inter-well tracer tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugstad Øyvind

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In inter-well tracer tests (IWTT, chemical compounds or radioactive isotopes are used to label injection water and gas to establish well connections and fluid patterns in petroleum reservoirs. Tracer simulation is an invaluable tool to ease the interpretation of IWTT results and is also required for assisted history matching application of tracer data. In this paper we present a new simulation technique to analyse and interpret tracer results. Laboratory results are used to establish and test formulations of the tracer conservation equations, and the technique is used to provide simulated tracer responses that are compared with observed tracer data from an extensive tracer program. The implemented tracer simulation methodology use a fast post-processing of previously simulated reservoir simulation runs. This provides a fast, flexible and powerful method for analysing gas tracer behaviour in reservoirs. We show that simulation time for tracers can be reduced by factor 100 compared to solving the tracer flow equations simultaneously with the reservoir fluid flow equations. The post-processing technique, combined with a flexible built-in local tracer-grid refinement is exploited to reduce numerical smearing, particularly severe for narrow tracer pulses.

  20. Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Focal Plane Array Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A.; Choi, K. K.; Das, N. C.; La, A.; Jhabvala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The corrugated quantum-well infrared photodetector (C-QWIP) uses total internal reflection to couple normal incident light into the optically active quantum wells. The coupling efficiency has been shown to be relatively independent of the pixel size and wavelength thus making the C-QWIP a candidate for detectors over the entire infrared spectrum. The broadband coupling efficiency of the C-QWIP makes it an ideal candidate for multiwavelength detectors. We fabricated and tested C-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs) with cutoff wavelengths of 11.2 and 16.2 micrometers. Each FPA has 256 x 256 pixels that are bump-bonded to a direct injection readout circuit. Both FPAs provided infrared imagery with good aesthetic attributes. For the 11.2-micrometers FPA, background-limited performance (BLIP) was observed at 60 K with f/3 optics. For the 16.2-micrometers FPA, BLIP was observed at 38 K. Besides the reduction of dark current in C-QWIP structures, the measured internal quantum efficiency (eta) remains to be high. The values for responsivity and quantum efficiency obtained from the FPA results agree well with those measured for single devices.

  1. Development and test of a plastic deep-well pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q H; Gao, X F; Xu, Y; Shi, W D; Lu, W G; Liu, W

    2013-01-01

    To develop a plastic deep-well pump, three methods are proposed on structural and forming technique. First, the major hydraulic components are constructed by plastics, and the connection component is constructed by steel. Thus the pump structure is more concise and slim, greatly reducing its weight and easing its transportation, installation, and maintenance. Second, the impeller is designed by maximum diameter method. Using same pump casing, the stage head is greatly increased. Third, a sealing is formed by impeller front end face and steel end face, and two slots are designed on the impeller front end face, thus when the two end faces approach, a lubricating pair is formed, leading to an effective sealing. With above methods, the pump's axial length is greatly reduced, and its stage head is larger and more efficient. Especially, the pump's axial force is effectively balanced. To examine the above proposals, a prototype pump is constructed, and its testing results show that the pump efficiency exceeds the national standard by 6%, and the stage head is improved by 41%, meanwhile, its structure is more concise and ease of transportation. Development of this pump would provide useful experiences for further popularity of plastic deep-well pumps

  2. Allergy tests: Comparison between the Radio-Allergo-Sorbent Test (RAST) and cutaneous test as well as inhalative provocation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenstrass, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    As this publication has shown, the Radio-Allergo-Sorbent Test (RAST) is well suited for investigation programs. Absence of physical strain for the patient, precise reproducibility of the results and fair agreement with other test methods are above all qualities in favour of RAST. Its main disadvantages are the as yet rather restricted spectrum of allergens and expensiveness and high technical requirement. Substantial technical requirements are also involved with the inhalative provocation test, if properly carried out, but here the spectrum of allergens is by far greater. On the other hand, it exposes patients to great physical strain. The skin tests are most simple to carry out but present the largest position of misresults and are less reproducible than the two former procedures. The Radio-Immuno-Sorbent Test (RIST) can provide very useful results as a preliminary test but is also very costly owing to its high technical demands. - In conclusion, RAST is most conveniently used as a co-test in a complete investigation program where it constitutes a valuable aid. As a sole alternative to skin tests and inhalative provocation tests it is a yet not recommendable for the above-mentioned reasons. Although not able to replace the two conventional methods within the foreseeable future, it is expected to be used more widely on further development. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  4. Hydrogeologic testing plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This report discusses methods of hydraulic testing which are recommended for use in the Deep Hydronest Test Wells at the proposed high level nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The deep hydronest wells are intended to provide geologic, geophysical and hydrologic information on the interval from the Upper San Andres Formation to the base of the Pennsylvanian system at the site. Following the period of drilling and testing, the wells will be converted into permanent monitoring installations through which fluid pressures and water quality can be monitored at various depths in the section. 19 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Reliability and Validity Testing of Modified Structured Wellness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wellness on a general scale is a major global concern as it is perpendicular to ... questionnaire was administered to 1030 students from four different colleges of ... and finance; self-expression and social integration; exercise, sleep and food; ...

  6. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmayr, Ricarda; Crede, Julia; McElvany, Nele; Wirthwein, Linda

    2016-01-01

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female...

  7. Reliability and Validity Testing of Modified Structured Wellness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wellness on a general scale is a major global concern as it is perpendicular to achieving monumental success in a drive towards global health challenges. The health status and wellbeing of university students should be a major concern as they constitute young adolescent population and are prone to risky lifestyle.

  8. Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

  9. Design and Testing of Recharge Wells in a Coastal Aquifer: Summary of Field Scale Pilot Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Guttman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surplus water from seawater desalination plants along the Israeli Coast can be injected underground for seasonal storage. Two pilot projects were established to simulate the movement of air bubbles and changes in the well hydraulic parameters during pumping and recharging. The study showed that it is impossible to remove the smaller air bubbles (dissolved air that are created during the injection process, even when the injection pipe is fully saturated. The pumping tests showed that there were large differences in the well hydraulic parameters between the pumping and the recharge tests despite that they were conducted at the same well. Two mechanisms are responsible for the reduction in the aquifer coefficients during the recharge event. The first mechanism is the pressures that the injected water needs to overcome; the aquifer pressure and the pore water pressure it is supposed to replace at the time of the injection. The second mechanism is the pressure that the injected water needs to overcome the clogging process. It is expressed as the high water level inside the recharge well in comparison to the small rising of the water level in the observation wells. This research gives good insight into the injection mechanism through wells and is essential for any further development of injection facilities and for the operation and management protocols.

  10. A well test analysis method accounting for pre-test operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, D.B.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2003-01-01

    We propose to use regular monitoring data from a production or injection well for estimating the formation hydraulic properties in the vicinity of the wellbore without interrupting the operations. In our approach, we select a portion of the pumping data over a certain time interval and then derive our conclusions from analysis of these data. A distinctive feature of the proposed approach differing it form conventional methods is in the introduction of an additional parameter, an effective pre-test pumping rate. The additional parameter is derived based on a rigorous asymptotic analysis of the flow model. Thus, we account for the non-uniform pressure distribution at the beginning of testing time interval caused by pre-test operations at the well. By synthetic and field examples, we demonstrate that deviation of the matching curve from the data that is usually attributed to skin and wellbore storage effects, can also be interpreted through this new parameter. Moreover, with our method, the data curve is matched equally well and the results of the analysis remain stable when the analyzed data interval is perturbed, whereas traditional methods are sensitive to the choice of the data interval. A special efficient minimization procedure has been developed for searching the best fitting parameters. We enhanced our analysis above with a procedure of estimating ambient reservoir pressure and dimensionless wellbore radius. The methods reported here have been implemented in code ODA (Operations Data Analysis). A beta version of the code is available for free testing and evaluation to interested parties

  11. 30 CFR 250.1152 - How do I conduct well tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I conduct well tests? 250.1152 Section... Tests and Surveys § 250.1152 How do I conduct well tests? (a) When you conduct well tests you must: (1... during completion, recompletion, reworking, or treatment operations before you start a well test; (2...

  12. A General Semi-Analytical Solution for Three Types of Well Tests in Confined Aquifers with a Partially Penetrating Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw-Yang Yang Hund-Der Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This note develops a general mathematical model for describing the transient hydraulic head response for constant-head test, constant-flux test, and slug test in a radial confined aquifer system with a partially penetrating well. The Laplace-domain solution for the model is derived by applying the Laplace transform with respect to time and finite Fourier cosine transform with respect to the z-direction. This new solution has been shown to reduce to the constant-head test when discounting the wellbore storage and maintaining a constant well water level. This solution can also be reduced to the constant-flux test solution when discounting the wellbore storage and keeping a constant pumping rate in the well. Moreover, the solution becomes the slug test solution when there is no pumping in the well. This general solution can be used to develop a single computer code to estimate aquifer parameters if coupled with an optimization algorithm or to assess the effect of well partial penetration on hydraulic head distribution for three types of aquifer tests.

  13. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmayr, Ricarda; Crede, Julia; McElvany, Nele; Wirthwein, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In the context of adolescents' subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents' SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students' academic achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students' GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic achievement and test anxiety on adolescents' SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  14. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda eSteinmayr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB, research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is however still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57 completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of one year. Grade Point Average (GPA indicated students’ academic achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction. Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  15. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godchaux, Frank A.

    1981-06-01

    This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

  16. 30 CFR 250.1151 - How often must I conduct well production tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How often must I conduct well production tests... Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1151 How often must I conduct well production tests? (a) You must conduct well production tests as shown in the following table: You must conduct: And you must submit to...

  17. New modelling of transient well test and rate decline analysis for a horizontal well in a multiple-zone reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Ren-Shi; Guo, Jian-Chun; Jia, Yong-Lu; Zhu, Shui-Qiao; Rao, Zheng; Zhang, Chun-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The no-type curve with negative skin of a horizontal well has been found in the current research. Negative skin is very significant to transient well test and rate decline analysis. This paper first presents the negative skin problem where the type curves with negative skin of a horizontal well are oscillatory. In order to solve the problem, we propose a new model of transient well test and rate decline analysis for a horizontal well in a multiple-zone composite reservoir. A new dimensionless definition of r D is introduced in the dimensionless mathematical modelling under different boundaries. The model is solved using the Laplace transform and separation of variables techniques. In Laplace space, the solutions for both constant rate production and constant wellbore pressure production are expressed in a unified formula. We provide graphs and thorough analysis of the new standard type curves for both well test and rate decline analysis; the characteristics of type curves are the reflections of horizontal well production in a multiple-zone reservoir. An important contribution of our paper is that our model removed the oscillation in type curves and thus solved the negative skin problem. We also show that the characteristics of type curves depend heavily on the properties of different zones, skin factor, well length, formation thickness, etc. Our research can be applied to a real case study

  18. Performance evaluation testing of wells in the gradient control system at a federally operated Confined Disposal Facility using single well aquifer tests, East Chicago, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, David C.; Unthank, Michael D.

    2016-12-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed tests to evaluate the hydrologic connection between the open interval of the well and the surrounding Calumet aquifer in response to fouling of extraction well pumps onsite. Two rounds of air slug testing were performed on seven monitoring wells and step drawdown and subsequent recovery tests on three extraction wells on a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Confined Disposal Facility (CDF) in East Chicago, Indiana. The wells were tested in 2014 and again in 2015. The extraction and monitoring wells are part of the gradient control system that establishes an inward gradient around the perimeter of the facility. The testing established a set of protocols that site personnel can use to evaluate onsite well integrity and develop a maintenance procedure to evaluate future well performance.The results of the slug test analysis data indicate that the hydraulic connection of the well screen to the surrounding aquifer material in monitoring wells on the CDF and the reliability of hydraulic conductivity estimates of the surrounding geologic media could be increased by implementing well development maintenance. Repeated air slug tests showed increasing hydraulic conductivity until, in the case of the monitoring wells located outside of the groundwater cutoff wall (MW–4B, MW–11B, MW–14B), the difference in hydraulic conductivity from test to test decreased, indicating the results were approaching the optimal hydraulic connection between the aquifer and the well screen. Hydraulic conductivity values derived from successive tests in monitoring well D40, approximately 0.25 mile south of the CDF, were substantially higher than those derived from wells on the CDF property. Also, values did not vary from test to test like those measured in monitoring wells located on the CDF property, which indicated that a process may be affecting the connectivity of the wells on the CDF property to the Calumet aquifer. Derived hydraulic conductivity

  19. Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment

  20. 30 CFR 250.460 - What are the requirements for conducting a well test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Other Drilling Requirements § 250.460 What are the requirements for conducting a well test? (a) If you intend to conduct a well test, you must include your projected plans for the test with your APD (form MMS...) You must give the District Manager at least 24-hours notice before starting a well test. [68 FR 8423...

  1. A Comprehensive Well Testing Implementation during Exploration Phase in Rantau Dedap, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaedi, M. T.; Alfiady; Putra, A. P.; Martikno, R.; Situmorang, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the implementation of comprehensive well testing programs during the 2014-2015 exploration drilling in Rantau Dedap Geothermal Field. The well testing programs were designed to provide reliable data as foundation for resource assessment as well as useful information for decision making during drilling. A series of well testing survey consisting of SFTT, completion test, heating-up downhole logging, discharge test, chemistry sampling was conducted to understand individual wells characteristics such as thermodynamic state of the reservoir fluid, permeability distribution, well output and fluid chemistry. Furthermore, interference test was carried out to investigate the response of reservoir to exploitation.

  2. Re-analysis of hydraulic tests conducted for well 4A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    During 1992, a series of hydrologic characterization tests were conducted at the well 4A -- 4T test facility complex. Details concerning these tests are described in Swanson (1992). Two of the tests, a constant-rate discharge test conducted on March 30, 1992 and a slug interference test performed on April 15, 1992, are the focus of this report

  3. Microbiological analyses of samples from the H-Area injection well test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.; Franck, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    Microbial populations in well water from monitoring wells at the test site were one to three orders of magnitude higher than well water from the Cretaceous aquifer (used as dilution water for the tests) or from a control well adjacent to the test site facility. Coupons samples placed in monitoring and control wells demonstrated progressive adhesion by microbes to materials used in well construction. Samples of material scraped from test well components during abandonment of the test site project revealed the presence of a variety of attached microbes including iron bacteria. Although the injection wells at the actual remediation facility for the F- and H-Area seepage basins remediation project are expected to be subjected to somewhat different conditions (e.g. considerably lower iron concentrations) than was the case at the test site, the potential for microbiologically mediated clogging and fouling within the process should be considered. A sampling program that includes microbiological testing is highly recommended

  4. Site study plan for intermediate hydrology clusters tests wells Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic characteristics of intermediate-depth formations at the proposed Deaf Smith County, Texas, repository site, wells called Intermediate Hydrology clusters will test the Dewey Lake, Alibates, Salado, Yates, Upper and Lower Seven Rivers, and Queen Grayburg Formations. Sixteen wells will be installed at six locations. One location will have four wills, two locations will have three wells, and three locations will have two wells for a total of 16 wells. Testing of the formations is to proceed from the bottom up, with 2-day pumping tests at the less permeable formations. Tracer tests and tests for verticall hydraulic properties will be designed and performed after other hydrologic tests are completed. After testing, selected wells are to be completed as single or possibly dual monitoring wells to observe water-level trends. To develop a hydrogeologic testing plan, the response of each formation to potential testing procedures was evaluated using design values and an assumend range for hydraulic parameters. These evaluations indicate that hydraulic properties of a sandy zone of the Dockum, the lower Sever Rivers, and possibly the Alibates and Queen/Grayburg can be determined by pumping tests. Standard of shut-in slug tests must be conducted in the remaining formations. Tests of very long duration would be required to determine the verticla properties of less permeable formations. Tracer tests would also require weeks or months. 61 figs., 34 refs., 4 tabs

  5. The theory and method of two-well field test for in-situ leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yixuan; Huo Jiandang; Xiang Qiulin; Tang Baobin

    2007-01-01

    Because leaching area in field test for in-situ leaching uranium is not accounted exactly, the reliability of obtaining parameters by calculating can not be ensured, and the whole test needs a long time and great investment. In two-well field test, lixiviant is injected from one well, pregnant solution is pumped out from the other, flow rate of the production well is more than that of the injection well, and uranium is not recoveried. In the case of keeping invariable ratio of pumping capacity to injecting capacity during the testing process, leaching area is not variable, can be exactly calculated. The full field test needs six months to one year. Two-well test is a scientific, rapid, minimal spending field test method, and is widely used in Commonwealth of Independent States. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of geostatistical parameters based on well tests; Estimation de parametres geostatistiques a partir de tests de puits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, Y.

    1997-10-20

    Geostatistical tools are increasingly used to model permeability fields in subsurface reservoirs, which are considered as a particular random variable development depending of several geostatistical parameters such as variance and correlation length. The first part of the thesis is devoted to the study of relations existing between the transient well pressure (the well test) and the stochastic permeability field, using the apparent permeability concept.The well test performs a moving permeability average over larger and larger volume with increasing time. In the second part, the geostatistical parameters are evaluated using well test data; a Bayesian framework is used and parameters are estimated using the maximum likelihood principle by maximizing the well test data probability density function with respect to these parameters. This method, involving a well test fast evaluation, provides an estimation of the correlation length and the variance over different realizations of a two-dimensional permeability field

  7. Geohydrologic data for test well USW G-4, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C.B.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, hydrologic monitoring, core analysis, water chemistry, pumping tests, and packer-injection tests for test well USW G-4. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for underground storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW G-4 was drilled to a total depth of 915 meters through volcanic rocks, consisting mostly of ash-flow tuff. Depth of water in the well during and after drilling and testing ranged from 538 to 544 meters below land surface, at approximate altitude of 728 meters above sea level. Drawdown in the well was about 3 meters after test pumping more than 5,000 minutes at a rate of 16 liters per second. A borehold-flow survey indicated that almost all water withdrawn from the well was contributed by the zone between a depth of about 865 and 915 meters below land surface. Analysis of a composite water sample collected after well completion showed the water to contain 216 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, with relatively large concentrations of silica, sodium, and bicarbonate. (USGS)

  8. Effects of seasonal and well construction variables on soil vapor extraction pilot tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.; Hudon, N.; Bass, D.

    1995-01-01

    The selection and design of an effective soil vapor extraction system is dependent upon data generated from pilot testing. Therefore, it is critical to understand factors that may affect the testing prior to selecting or designing a system. In Sebago Lake Village, Maine, two adjacent gasoline stations experienced a release. Gasoline migrated through fine sand into the groundwater and discharged to a small stream. Soil vapor extraction was investigated as a remedial alternative to reduce volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated soil. Three soil vapor extraction pilot tests were performed at one of the sites and one test at the other site. The results of the testing varied. Data collected during a summer test indicated soil vapor extraction was less likely to work. The wells tested were installed using an excavator. An adequate surface seal was not present in any of the tested wells. An additional test was performed in the winter using wells installed by a drill rig. Winter test results indicated that soil vapor extraction could be effective. Another test was performed after a horizontal soil vapor extraction system with a surface seal was installed. The results of this testing indicated that soil vapor extraction was more effective than predicted by the earlier tests. Tests performed on the other property indicated that the horizontal wells were more effective than the vertical wells. Testing results were affected by the well installation method, well construction, proximity to manmade structures, and the season in which testing was performed. Understanding factors that affect the testing is critical in selecting and designing the system

  9. Analysis of constant-head well tests in nonporous fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.; Remer, J.

    1981-01-01

    If one compares the results of steady analyses and transient flowrate analyses, the error in assuming steady flow is less than an order of magnitude for reasonable values of storativity, and this error can be minimized through proper choice of radius of influence. Although the steady flow assumptions do not result in large errors in the calculation of permeability, careful design of constant-head well tests can yield not only storativity, but also qualitative information on the areal extent of permeable zones or fractures tested. Constant-head well tests have several major advantages over other well test techniques in low permeability rock. Unlike pump tests, wellbore storage effects are virtually nonexistant. Provided low-flow measurement apparatus is available, constant-level tests are far more rapid than slug tests and, unlike pulse tests, compliance of equipment is not a factor, since the system is maintained at constant pressure throughout the test

  10. Testing in power plant construction as well as in the petrochemical and chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, N.; Schittko, H.

    1978-01-01

    In general, the upgrading of requirements for the most different fields of engineering is also characterized by a corresponding effort in testing. In this context especially nondestructive tests of materials are of outstanding importance. In the fields of power plant construction (among others, components for nuclear power plants) as well as petrochemical and chemical industry considered here, almost all nondestructive test methods are applied. This paper discusses not so much theoretical testing problems, but rather test objects as well as specifications and testing equipment. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Geohydrologic data for test well USW H-5, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, C.B.; Robison, J.H.; Spengler, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents data on drilling operations, lithology, borehold geophysics, water-level monitoring, core analysis, ground-water chemistry, pumping tests, and packer-injection tests for test well USW H-5. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW H-5 was drilled to a total depth of 1219 meters through volcanic rocks consisting mostly of ash-flow tuff. Depth to water in the well ranged between 703.8 and 707.2 meters below land surface, at an approximate altitude of 704 meters above sea level. Drawdown in the well exceeded 6 meters after test pumping more than 3000 minutes at a rate of 10 liters per second. Borehole-flow surveys showed that about 90 percent of the water in the well is contributed by the zone between 707 and about 820 meters below land surface. Two composite water samples collected after well completion contained 206 and 220 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Sodium and bicarbonate were the predominant dissolved anion and cation. The concentration of dissolved silica was 48 milligrams per liter in both samples, which is a relatively large concentration for most natural waters. 6 references, 19 figures, 6 tables

  12. Geohydrologic data for test well USW H-5, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C.B.; Robison, J.H.; Spengler, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents data on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, water-level monitoring, core analysis, ground-water chemistry, pumping tests, and packer-injection tests for test well USW H-5. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW H-5 was drilled to a total depth of 1,219 meters through volcanic rocks consisting mostly of ash-flow tuff. Depth to water in the well ranged between 703.8 and 707.2 meters below land surface, at an approximate altitude of 704 meters above sea level. Drawdown in the well exceeded 6 meters after test pumping more than 3,000 minutes at a rate of 10 liters per second. Borehole-flow surveys showed that about 90 percent of the water in the well is contributed by the zone between 707 and about 820 meters below land surface. Two composite water samples collected after well completion contained 206 and 220 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Sodium and bicarbonate were the predominant dissolved anion and cation. The concentration of dissolved silica was 48 milligrams per liter in both samples, which is a relatively large concentration for most natural waters.

  13. Analysis of Well ER-EC-2a Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-2a during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-2a Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  14. Analysis of well ER-18-2 testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-18-2 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-18-2 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  15. Analysis of Well ER-EC-7 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-7 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program was documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-7 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  16. Analysis of Well ER-EC-8 testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-8 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-8 Data Report for development and Hydraulic Testing.

  17. Analysis of Well ER-EC-4 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-4 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-4 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  18. Analysis of Well ER-EC-5 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-5 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-5 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  19. Analysis of Well ER-EC-6 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-6 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-6 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  20. Analysis of Well ER-EC-1 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-1 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-1 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  1. The usefulness of multi-well aquifer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, S.C.; Benton, D.J.; Herweijer, J.C.; Sims, P.

    1990-01-01

    Three large-scale (100 m) and seven small-scale (3-7 m) multi-well aquifer tests were conducted in a heterogeneous aquifer to determine the transmissivity distribution across a one-hectare test site. Two of the large-scale tests had constant but different rates of discharge; the remaining large-scale test had a discharge that was pulsed at regulated intervals. The small-scale tests were conducted at two well clusters 20 m apart. The program WELTEST was written to analyze the data. By using the methods of non-linear least squares regression analysis and Broyden's method to solve for non-linear extrema, WELTEST automatically determines the best values of transmissivity and the storage coefficient. The test results show that order of magnitude differences in the calculated transmissivities at a well location can be realized by varying the discharge rate at the pumping well, the duration of the aquifer test, and/or the location of the pumping well. The calculated storage coefficients for the tests cover a five-order magnitude range. The data show a definite trend for the storage coefficient to increase with the distance between the pumping and the observation wells. This trend is shown to be related to the orientation of high hydraulic conductivity zones between the pumping and the observation wells. A comparison among single-well aquifer tests, geological investigations and multi-well aquifer tests indicate that the multi-well tests are poorly suited for characterizing a transmissivity field. (Author) (11 refs., 14 figs.)

  2. Pumping and recovery test analysis of groundwater Well in Martajasah, Bangkalan, Madura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adi Gunawan Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Martajasah is one of the villages in Bangkalan Region, Madura, which have difficulty of fresh water. This area has a lot of potential that can be developed, particularly the potential of religious tourism. To increase the utilization potential of the region and support the public healthy, in 2007 PPGN - BATAN cooperated with the Government of Bangkalan has made one (I) exploration/production groundwater - wells with the expectation it can meet a demand of fresh water in the Martajasah Village area. To determine the capacity of the wells, the maximum discharge pumping and the optimum discharge pumping from the wells pumping test it is necessary should be conducted, which includes step draw down pumping test, constant rate pumping test and recovery test. The purpose of this activity is to determine amount of well loss, loss of aquifer, well hydraulics equations and the value of the efficiency of wells to determine the optimum and maximum discharge wells and calculate the value of transmissivity / transmissivity (T) from the aquifer. The scope of these activities include the preparation of working equipment, testing of all equipment, measurement of static groundwater table, pumping test, and analysis of pumping test. Based on the result from step draw down test, well hydraulics equations obtained Sw = 0.0079 Q + 0.000003 Q 2 , so that according to the well hydraulics equations are than obtained a maximum pumping discharge (Q max ) = 3.9 liters / second (336.7 m 3 ) / days) with the well efficiency (E) = 89%, so the optimum pumping discharge (Q opt )=3.455 liters / second = 298.52 m 3 /day. Based on the result from constant rate pumping test and recovery test showed adequate transmissivity of wells, i e T = 136.5 m 2 / day = 5.6875 m 2 / hour = 0.094 m 2 /minute. (author)

  3. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data gathered... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property...

  4. Drilling a deep geologic test well at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Arthur P.; Seefelt, Ellen L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), is drilling a deep geologic test well at Hilton Head Island, S.C. The test well is scheduled to run between mid-March and early May 2011. When completed, the well will be about 1,000 feet deep. The purpose of this test well is to gain knowledge about the regional-scale Floridan aquifer, an important source of groundwater in the Hilton Head area. Also, cores obtained during drilling will enable geologists to study the last 60 million years of Earth history in this area.

  5. Data Acquisition for Low-Temperature Geothermal Well Tests and Long-Term Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P J

    1992-03-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

  6. Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.

    1992-09-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

  7. Hydrologic test plans for large-scale, multiple-well tests in support of site characterization at Hanford, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, P.M.; Stone, R.; Lu, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project is preparing plans for tests and has begun work on some tests that will provide the data necessary for the hydrogeologic characterization of a site located on a United States government reservation at Hanford, Washington. This site is being considered for the Nation's first geologic repository of high level nuclear waste. Hydrogeologic characterization of this site requires several lines of investigation which include: surface-based small-scale tests, testing performed at depth from an exploratory shaft, geochemistry investigations, regional studies, and site-specific investigations using large-scale, multiple-well hydraulic tests. The large-scale multiple-well tests are planned for several locations in and around the site. These tests are being designed to provide estimates of hydraulic parameter values of the geologic media, chemical properties of the groundwater, and hydrogeologic boundary conditions at a scale appropriate for evaluating repository performance with respect to potential radionuclide transport

  8. Siting study for Test Area North potable water deep well project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1993-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of various locations for a new potable ground water well at Test Area North (TAN). The new well is proposed to replace two existing wells located within a trichloroethylene (TCE) plume. Several locations were evaluated using computer simulations based on the hydrogeology of the site. The modeling effort involved: (1) producing a water table map, (2) superimposing the effects of pumping the proposed new production well on the water table map using the model CAPZONE, and (3) calculating the capture zone for these wells using the GWPATH model. A three dimensional contaminant transport model was used to evaluate siting a well in a deeper horizon of the aquifer. The following scenarios were investigated: (1) placing a new well 500 ft north of the existing wells; (2) locating a well 3,000 ft northwest of the existing wells; (3) deepening one of the existing wells 100 to 150 ft to produce water from beneath an interbed that acts as a hydraulic barrier; and (4) drilling a new well about 500 ft northwest of the existing wells to produce water from beneath the interbed. The recommended new well site (fourth scenario) is northwest of the existing wells, with the well completed from 500 to 600 ft below land surface to produce water from beneath the Q-R interbed. Locating the well northwest of the existing wells places the new well out of the TCE plume and reduces the possibility of transporting contaminated water across the interbed

  9. Hydraulic-test interpretations for Well DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.

    1986-11-01

    Eleven different zones were tested in Well DOE-2 in five phases of testing between 1984 and 1986. Testing techniques included a constant-head, borehole-infiltration test, drill-stem tests, slug tests, pressure-pulse tests, and multiwell pumping tests. Four of the zones tested - the lower Dewey Lake Red Beds, the Tamarisk Member of the Rustler Formation, the lower unnamed member of the Rustler Formation and Rustler/Salado contact, and the entire Salado Formation - had permeabilities too low to measure with the equipment and test techniques used. The other zones had permeabilities ranging over six orders of magnitude. No saturated strata were encountered above the Rustler Formation, although parts of the middle Dewey Lake Red Beds appear to have appreciable permeability

  10. Gulf Coast Programmatic Environmental Assessment Geothermal Well Testing: The Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    In accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 711, environmental assessments are being prepared for significant activities and individual projects of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). This environmental assessment of geopressure well testing addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environments, and possible impacts in a broad sense. The specific part of the program addressed by this environmental assessment is geothermal well testing by the take-over of one or more unsuccessful oil wells before the drilling rig is removed and completion of drilling into the geopressured zone. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. In the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource. The project addressed by this environmental assessment is the performance of a geothermal well test in high potential geothermal areas. Well tests involve four major actions each of which may or may not be required for each of the well tests. The four major actions are: site preparation, drilling a salt-water disposal well, actual flow testing, and abandonment of the well.

  11. Test-Retest Reliability of the Salutogenic Wellness Promotion Scale (SWPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. M.; Moore, J. B.; Hayden, B. M.; Becker, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the temporal stability (i.e. test-retest reliability) of the Salutogenic Wellness Promotion Scale (SWPS) using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Current intraclass results were also compared to previously published interclass correlations to support the use of the intraclass method for test-retest…

  12. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  13. Analysis of pumping tests of partially penetrating wells in an unconfined aquifer using inverse numerical optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvilshøj, S.; Jensen, K. H.; Barlebo, H. C.; Madsen, B.

    1999-08-01

    Inverse numerical modeling was applied to analyze pumping tests of partially penetrating wells carried out in three wells established in an unconfined aquifer in Vejen, Denmark, where extensive field investigations had previously been carried out, including tracer tests, mini-slug tests, and other hydraulic tests. Drawdown data from multiple piezometers located at various horizontal and vertical distances from the pumping well were included in the optimization. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, specific storage, and specific yield were estimated, assuming that the aquifer was either a homogeneous system with vertical anisotropy or composed of two or three layers of different hydraulic properties. In two out of three cases, a more accurate interpretation was obtained for a multi-layer model defined on the basis of lithostratigraphic information obtained from geological descriptions of sediment samples, gammalogs, and flow-meter tests. Analysis of the pumping tests resulted in values for horizontal hydraulic conductivities that are in good accordance with those obtained from slug tests and mini-slug tests. Besides the horizontal hydraulic conductivity, it is possible to determine the vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, and specific storage based on a pumping test of a partially penetrating well. The study demonstrates that pumping tests of partially penetrating wells can be analyzed using inverse numerical models. The model used in the study was a finite-element flow model combined with a non-linear regression model. Such a model can accommodate more geological information and complex boundary conditions, and the parameter-estimation procedure can be formalized to obtain optimum estimates of hydraulic parameters and their standard deviations.

  14. Miravalles Geothermal Project: Portable Well Flow Test Equipment and Procedures Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    The well flow test program has been designed to facilitate the gathering of information, with portable test equipment, from various wells with regard to their capability of flow, the quality of steam produced at various back pressures, the composition and quantity of noncondensable gases flashed from the wells and the composition and quantity of solids in the well's liquid streams (brine). The test program includes procedures for obtaining the following basic flow data pertinent to the plant power cycle design: (1) Effluent steam and brine flows, pressures and temperatures; (2) Noncondensable and dissolved gas contents in steam and brine; (3) H{sub s}S content in gases formed; and (4) Solids content and chemical analysis of steam and brine.

  15. Ambiguity in measuring matrix diffusion with single-well injection/recovery tracer tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessoff, S.C.; Konikow, Leonard F.

    1997-01-01

    Single-well injection/recovery tracer tests are considered for use in characterizing and quantifying matrix diffusion in dual-porosity aquifers. Numerical modeling indicates that neither regional drift in homogeneous aquifers, nor heterogeneity in aquifers having no regional drift, nor hydrodynamic dispersion significantly affects these tests. However, when drift is coupled simultaneously with heterogeneity, they can have significant confounding effects on tracer return. This synergistic effect of drift and heterogeneity may help explain irreversible flow and inconsistent results sometimes encountered in previous single-well injection/recovery tracer tests. Numerical results indicate that in a hypothetical single-well injection/recovery tracer test designed to demonstrate and measure dual-porosity characteristics in a fractured dolomite, the simultaneous effects of drift and heterogeneity sometimes yields responses similar to those anticipated in a homogeneous dual-porosity formation. In these cases, tracer recovery could provide a false indication of the occurrence of matrix diffusion. Shortening the shut-in period between injection and recovery periods may make the test less sensitive to drift. Using multiple tracers having different diffusion characteristics, multiple tests having different pumping schedules, and testing the formation at more than one location would decrease the ambiguity in the interpretation of test data.

  16. Analysis of pumping tests: Significance of well diameter, partial penetration, and noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, M.; Ghiassi, K.; Mehnert, E.

    1999-01-01

    The nonlinear least squares (NLS) method was applied to pumping and recovery aquifer test data in confined and unconfined aquifers with finite diameter and partially penetrating pumping wells, and with partially penetrating piezometers or observation wells. It was demonstrated that noiseless and moderately noisy drawdown data from observation points located less than two saturated thicknesses of the aquifer from the pumping well produced an exact or acceptable set of parameters when the diameter of the pumping well was included in the analysis. The accuracy of the estimated parameters, particularly that of specific storage, decreased with increases in the noise level in the observed drawdown data. With consideration of the well radii, the noiseless drawdown data from the pumping well in an unconfined aquifer produced good estimates of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities and specific yield, but the estimated specific storage was unacceptable. When noisy data from the pumping well were used, an acceptable set of parameters was not obtained. Further experiments with noisy drawdown data in an unconfined aquifer revealed that when the well diameter was included in the analysis, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield and vertical hydraulic conductivity may be estimated rather effectively from piezometers located over a range of distances from the pumping well. Estimation of specific storage became less reliable for piezemeters located at distances greater than the initial saturated thickness of the aquifer. Application of the NLS to field pumping and recovery data from a confined aquifer showed that the estimated parameters from the two tests were in good agreement only when the well diameter was included in the analysis. Without consideration of well radii, the estimated values of hydraulic conductivity from the pumping and recovery tests were off by a factor of four.The nonlinear least squares method was applied to pumping and recovery aquifer test data in

  17. Emotional Intelligence Relates to Well-Being: Evidence from the Situational Judgment Test of Emotional Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrus, Jeremy; Betancourt, Anthony; Holtzman, Steven; Minsky, Jennifer; MacCann, Carolyn; Roberts, Richard D

    2012-07-01

    This research was conducted to examine whether people high in emotional intelligence (EI) have greater well-being than people low in EI. The Situational Test of Emotion Management, Scales of Psychological Well-being, and Day Reconstruction Method were completed by 131 college students. Responses to the Situational Test of Emotion Management were strongly related to eudaimonic well-being as measured by responses on the Scales of Psychological Well-being (r=.54). Furthermore, the ability to manage emotions was related to hedonic well-being, correlating with both the frequency of experienced positive affect and the frequency of experienced negative affect, as measured by the Day Reconstruction Method. Two aspects of these results suggest a relationship between EI and well-being. First, the observed relationship between ability EI and psychological well-being is the largest reported in the literature to date. Second, this study is the first use of the Day Reconstruction Method to examine the relationship between well-being and EI. Results are discussed in terms of the potential for training emotion management to enhance well-being. Methodological advances for future research are also suggested. © 2012 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being © 2012 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  18. Effects of Barometric Fluctuations on Well Water-Level Measurements and Aquifer Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FA Spane, Jr.

    1999-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within underlying aquifer systems. Well water-level elevation measurements from selected wells within these aquifer systems commonly form the basis for delineating groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). In addition, the analysis of water-level responses obtained in wells during hydrologic tests provides estimates of hydraulic properties that are important for evaluating groundwater-flow velocity and transport characteristics. Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head (i.e., sum of the water-table elevation and the atmospheric pressure at the water-table surface) within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. Temporal variations in barometric pressure may also adversely affect well water-level responses obtained during hydrologic tests. If significant, adjustments or removal of these barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydraulic property determination. This report examines the effects of barometric fluctuations on well water-level measurements and evaluates adjustment and removal methods for determining areal aquifer head conditions and aquifer test analysis. Two examples of Hanford Site unconfined aquifer tests are examined that demonstrate barometric response analysis and illustrate the predictive/removal capabilities of various methods for well water-level and aquifer total head values. Good predictive/removal characteristics were demonstrated with best corrective results provided by multiple-regression deconvolution methods.

  19. Trials and tribulations of a new regulation: coal bed methane water well testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lintott, D.; Swyngedouw, C.; Schneider, E. [Norwest Labs, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lintott, D.; Swyngedouw, C.; Schneider, E. [Bodycote Testing Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    As of January 2006, coalbed methane (CBM) activity in Alberta was at 3600 producing wells with the potential for 25,000 to 50,000 wells. Coalbed methane risks and regulations were discussed. Regulatory initiatives, politics of coalbed methane, and a regulatory timeline was provided and the trials of a new regulation were presented. Other topics of discussion included: methane sampling and analysis; dissolved methane in water; gas isotopes; routine water potability; microbiology testing; and, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB)/iron-related bacteria (IRB) method validation. The results of the microbial testing were presented. Although relatively few positive coliforms in wells were analyzed, most wells demonstrated positive presence for iron and sulfate bacteria. It was recommended that further research be conducted to evaluate the water sulfide concentration/turbidity, along with other parameters with presence and concentration of SRB and IRB bacteria as an indication of poor water quality. refs., tabs.

  20. Field tests and evaluations of the IAEA Active-Well Coincidence Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Rinard, P.M.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates field tests of the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) at Winfrith and Dounreay, United Kingdom. The applicability of the AWCC for assaying the uranium content of a wide variety of materials was demonstrated and calibration curves were generated. The AWCC was used in three modes (fast, thermal, and passive) while assaying powders, pellets, cartridges, plates, assorted residues, and materials-testing-reactor fuel assemblies

  1. Analysis of hydromechanical well tests in fractured sedimentary rock at the NAWC site, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, L.C.; Hisz, D.B.; Ebenhack, J.F.; Fowler, D.E.; Tiedeman, C.R.; Germanovich, L.N.

    2009-01-01

    Hydromechanical well tests involve measuring and interpreting displacements along with hydraulic heads that result when a hydraulic stress is applied to a well. The motivation behind this type of test is that the displacement measurements provide information about the constitutive properties and structure of the aquifer that go beyond what can be derived from pressure signals alone. We used a borehole extensometer to measure transient displacements with a resolution of +/- 25 nm during well tests in fractured mudstone and sandstone at the former Naval Air Warfare Center in West Trenton, New Jersey. One well showed opening displacements on the order of 300nm during slug tests with maximum head changes of 7 m. Inversion of the transient signals suggest that a conductive fracture (aperture = 380 ??m, normal stiffness = 8??10 8 Pa/m) was largely responsible for the pressure signal, but the displacement signal appears to have resulted from both the fracture and deformation of the enveloping sandstone (E = 5 GPa, permeability = 0.6 md). At another well, an anomalous but repeatable signal was characterized by closing displacements during increasing pressure. This displacement signal can be explained by a hydraulically active fracture below the extensometer that became pressurized and compressed the overly sediments. Poroelastic theoretical analyses were inverted to estimate parameters and verify interpretations. Copyright 2009 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association.

  2. Site study plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    Wells called Deep Hydronest Wells will be installed at six locations at the Deaf Smith County Site to characterize hydraulic parameters in the geologic column between the top of the San Andres Formation and the base of Pennsylvanian System. Three hydronests will be drilled during early stages of site characterization to provide data for performance assessment modeling. Four wells are proposed for each of these 3 nests. Results of drilling, testing, and preliminary modeling will direct drilling and testing activities at the last 3 nests. Two wells are proposed at each of the last 3 nests for a total of 18 wells. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which this program will operate. Drilling and hydrologic testing of the first Deep Hydronest will begin early in the Surface Investigation Program. Drilling and testing of the first three Deep Hydronests will require about 18 months. After 12 months of evaluating and analyzing data from the first three hydronests, the remaining three hydronests will be drilled during a 12-month period. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be used to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 36 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, Clyde Q.

    1979-01-01

    Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

  4. Laboratory testing of the in-well vapor-stripping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, T.J.; Francois, O.

    1996-03-01

    The Volatile organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) was implemented by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Technology Development to develop and test new technologies for the remediation of organic chemicals in the subsurface. One of the technologies being tested under the VOC-Arid ID is the in-well vapor-stripping system. The in-well vapor-stripping concept was initially proposed by researchers at Stanford University and is currently under development through a collaboration between workers at Stanford University and DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The project to demonstrate the in-well vapor-stripping technology is divided into three phases: (1) conceptual model and computer simulation, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) field demonstration. This report provides the methods and results of the laboratory testing in which a full-scale replica was constructed and tested above ground in a test facility located at DOE's Hanford Site, Washington. The system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase

  5. Successful well test application of portable multi-phase flow meter for high gas-volume and high water-cut wells in east Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaura, Jiten D.; Finley, D.B. [PT Halliburton Indonesia, Jakarta (Indonesia); Sudradjat, Wangsa; Riyanto, Latief [Tota E and P Indonesie, Jakarta (Indonesia); Halverson, Martin [FlowSys AS, Bergen (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    Recently, testing was needed on production wells in East Kalimantan. The wells were in a mature field, and productivity from the wells field featured high water cut (WC) and extremely high gas-volume fractions (GVF). The WC and GVF ranged from 80 to 100% and 90 to 100%, respectively. Moreover, most of the wells are low productivity so they are very sensitive to back-pressure. The high WC, high GVF and low-productivity from these wells in this area present an extreme challenge for accurate production measurement. Barges are commonly used to perform well services in the swamp area of this marginal field, and production allocations from wells in this difficult area were previously monitored and measured with conventional well-test equipment on-board a well testing barge. The well test equipment traditionally used requires a large footprint, and the associated flaring presents an environmental situation in this sensitive swamp area. Hence, the MPFM solution was chosen. To better meet the challenges presented by the testing conditions, a portable multiphase flow meter (MPFM) was chosen to perform the testing from the well-testing barge. For comparative purposes, the MPFM was installed on the barge immediately upstream of the well testing equipment. Initial measurements with the MPFM yielded results that were {+-} 30% of the test separator reading. A slight modification was introduced to the MPFM system in the form of a gas knock-out (GKO) vessel. Subsequent measurements with the modified MPFM system yielded readings that were {+-}10% of the test separator reading. (author)

  6. Standard for baseline water-well testing for coalbed methane/natural gas in coal operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Interest in developing coalbed methane (CBM) is increasing with the decline of conventional natural gas reserves. In Alberta, where CBM is in the early stages of development, the drilling, production and operational rules for CBM are the same as those that apply to natural gas. The government of Alberta is presently examining the rules and regulations that apply to CBM to determine if they are appropriate for responsible development and balanced with environmental protection. CBM development has the potential to affect water aquifers and water supply. As such, a new standard has been developed by Alberta Environment in collaboration with the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board which requires that companies involved in the development of shallow CBM must offer to test rural Albertan's water wells prior to drilling. The companies will submit baseline groundwater data to both Alberta Environment and the landowner. The broader application of groundwater testing will also support Alberta Environment's objective of mapping all groundwater resources in the province. This new standard will help achieve continued protection of provincial groundwater resources and Albertan's groundwater supplies. It will also facilitate responsible CBM development and the government's Water for Life strategy. This document explained the protocols for testing, sampling and analyzing groundwater. The standard provides scientific information to support achievement of the outcomes as well as a regulatory basis for water well testing and baseline data collection prior to CBM development. If a landowner registers a complaint regarding a perceived change in well water quantity and quality after CBM development, then the developers must retest the water well to address the landowner's concerns. The tests evaluate water well capacity, water quality, routine potability and analysis for water quality parameters, including major ionic constituents, bacteriological analysis and presence or absence of gas

  7. Well test: production analysis and allocation measurement; Teste de poco: analise da producao e medicao de apropriacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geron, Luis Carlos [Smar Equipamentos Industriais Ltda., Sertaozinho, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Aplicacoes; Tateishi, Sergio Hideki [Smar Equipamentos Industriais Ltda, Sertaozinho, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2008-07-01

    The well test is an instrument frequently used to evaluate the production capacity of wells and it usually has specific requirements in the flow measurement, that are not necessary in the flow measurement system for custody transfer applications. Starting with the requirement to measure the injected product in the well when it is in the recuperation phase and it also includes compliance to specific standards for allocation measurement, because these hydrocarbon products are not treated as well as that ones in the production streams. Other important issue associated to the well test is the employment of new technologies, that helps to reduce the uncertainty of measurement as digital communication between the field devices and the flow computer through an open protocol as the Foundation Field bus. Another indication of technology evolution in the flow measurement focusing a lower uncertainty is the new version of API MPMS 11.1:2004, that requires calculation with double precision floating point, as well the correction factors with 5 decimal digits. (author)

  8. Using outcrop data for geological well test modelling in fractured reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aljuboori, F.; Corbett, P.; Bisdom, K.; Bertotti, G.; Geiger, S.

    2015-01-01

    Outcrop fracture data sets can now be acquired with ever more accuracy using drone technology augmented by field observations. These models can be used to form realistic, deterministic models of fractured reservoirs. Fractured well test models are traditionally seen to be finite or infinite

  9. Parallel approach to identifying the well-test interpretation model using a neurocomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Edward A., Jr.; Dagli, Cihan H.

    1996-03-01

    The well test is one of the primary diagnostic and predictive tools used in the analysis of oil and gas wells. In these tests, a pressure recording device is placed in the well and the pressure response is recorded over time under controlled flow conditions. The interpreted results are indicators of the well's ability to flow and the damage done to the formation surrounding the wellbore during drilling and completion. The results are used for many purposes, including reservoir modeling (simulation) and economic forecasting. The first step in the analysis is the identification of the Well-Test Interpretation (WTI) model, which determines the appropriate solution method. Mis-identification of the WTI model occurs due to noise and non-ideal reservoir conditions. Previous studies have shown that a feed-forward neural network using the backpropagation algorithm can be used to identify the WTI model. One of the drawbacks to this approach is, however, training time, which can run into days of CPU time on personal computers. In this paper a similar neural network is applied using both a personal computer and a neurocomputer. Input data processing, network design, and performance are discussed and compared. The results show that the neurocomputer greatly eases the burden of training and allows the network to outperform a similar network running on a personal computer.

  10. Preliminary environmental analysis of a geopressured-geothermal test well in Brazoria County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, W.A.; McGraw, M.; Gustavson, T.C.; Meriwether, J.

    1977-11-16

    Preliminary environmental data, including current land use, substrate lithology, soils, natural hazards, water resources, biological assemblages, meteorological data, and regulatory considerations have been collected and analyzed for approximately 150 km/sup 2/ of land near Chocolate Bayou, Brazoria County, Texas, in which a geopressured-geothermal test well is to be drilled in the fall of 1977. The study was designed to establish an environmental data base and to determine, within spatial constraints set by subsurface reservoir conditions, environmentally suitable sites for the proposed well. Preliminary analyses of data revealed the eed for focusing on the following areas: potential for subsidence and fault activation, susceptibility of test well and support facilities to fresh- and salt-water flooding, possible effects of produced saline waters on biological assemblages and groundwaer resources, distribution of expansive soils, and effect of drilling and associated support activities on known archeological-cultural resources.

  11. Preliminary Test Results of Heshe Hydrogeological Experimental Well Station in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, P.; Liu, C.; Lin, M.; Chan, W.; Lee, T.; Chia, Y.; Teng, M.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Safe disposal of radioactive waste is a critical issue for the development of nuclear energy. The design of final disposal system is based on the concept of multiple barriers which integrate the natural barriers and engineering barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive wastes. As groundwater is the major medium that can transport radionuclides to our living environment, it is essential to characterize groundwater flow at the disposal site. Taiwan is located at the boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. Geologic formations are often fractured due to tectonic compression and extension. In this study, a well station for the research and development of hydrogeological techniques was established at the Experimental Forest of the National Taiwan University in central Taiwan. There are 10 testing wells, ranging in depth from 25 m to 100 m, at the station. The bedrock beneath the regolith is highly fractured mudstone. As fracture is the preferential pathway of the groundwater flow, the focus of in-situ tests is to investigate the location of permeable fractures and the connection of permeable fractures. Several field tests have been conducted, including geophysical logging, heat-pulse flowmeter, hydraulic test, tracer test and double packer test, for the development of advanced technologies to detect the preferential groundwater flow in fractured rocks.

  12. Test plan for reactions between spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating the long-term performance of a high-level nuclear waste form, spent fuel from commercial reactors. Permanent disposal of the spent fuel is possible in a potential repository to be located in the volcanic tuff beds near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. During the post-containment period the spent fuel could be exposed to water condensation since of the cladding is assumed to fail during this time. Spent fuel leach (SFL) tests are designed to simulate and monitor the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel under this condition. This Test Plan addresses the anticipated conditions whereby spent fuel is contacted by small amounts of water that trickle through the spent fuel container. Two complentary test plans are presented, one to examine the reaction of spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions and the second to examine the reaction of unirradiated UO 2 pellets and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions. The former test plan examines the importance of the water content, the oxygen content as affected by radiolysis, the fuel burnup, fuel surface area, and temperature. The latter test plant examines the effect of the non-presence of Teflon in the test vessel

  13. Psychometric testing of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale-Mandarin version in Taiwanese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Woung-Ru; Kao, Chen-Yi

    2017-06-01

    The spiritual well-being of terminally ill cancer patients is an important indicator of the quality of their lives and of the quality of hospice care, but no validated tools are available for assessing this indicator in Taiwan. The present cross-sectional study validated the Spiritual Well-Being Scale-Mandarin version (SWBS-M) by testing its psychometric properties in 243 cancer patients from five teaching hospitals throughout Taiwan. Construct validity was tested by factor analysis and hypothesis testing. Patients' spiritual well-being and quality of life were assessed using the SWBS-M and the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQoL), respectively. Overall, the SWBS-M had an internal consistency/reliability of 0.89. Exploratory factor analysis showed that the SWBS-M had an underlying two-factor structure, explaining 46.94% of the variance. SWBS-M scores correlated moderately with MQoL scores (r = 0.48, p spiritual well-being was inversely related to their average pain level during the previous 24 hours (r = -0.183, p = 0.006). Cancer patients' spiritual well-being also differed significantly with their experience of pain (t = -3.67, p spiritual well-being than those without pain. Our findings support a two-factor model for the SWBS-M in terminally ill Taiwanese cancer patients. We recommend testing the psychometric properties of the SWBS-M in different patient populations to verify its factorial structure in other Asian countries.

  14. INITIAL TEST WELL CONDITIONING AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.D. Oliver; J.C. Dinsmoor; S.J. Goldstein; I. Reyes; R. De La Garza

    2005-07-11

    Three test wells, PB-1, PB-2, and PB-3, were drilled at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a natural analogue study to evaluate radionuclide transport processes during March-April 2003. The initial pumping to condition the wells was completed during December 2003. The PB-1 well, drilled immediately adjacent to the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, terminating 20 m below the top of the measured water level. The PB-2 and PB-3 wells, which were drilled on opposite sides of PB-1 at a radial distance of approximately 40 to 50 m outside of the remaining projected ore body, were also drilled to about 20 m below the top of the measured water level. Each test well was completed with 4-inch (10.2-cm) diameter PVC casing with a slotted liner below the water table. Initial conditioning of all three wells using a submersible pump at low pump rates [less than 1 gallon (3.8 1) per minute] resulted in measurable draw down and recoveries. The greatest drawdown ({approx}15 m) was observed in PB-2, whereas only minor (<1 m) drawdown occurred in PB-3. For PB-1 and PB-2, the water turbidity decreased as the wells were pumped and the pH values decreased, indicating that the contamination from the drilling fluid was reduced as the wells were conditioned. Test wells PB-1 and PB-2 showed increased inflow after several borehole volumes of fluid were removed, but their inflow rates remained less that the pumping rate. Test well PB-3 showed the smallest drawdown and least change in pH and conductivity during initial pumping and quickest recovery with a rise in measured water level after conditioning. The 195 gallons (750 l) of water pumped from PB-3 during conditioning was discharged through a household sponge. That sponge showed measurable gamma radiation, which decayed to background values in less than 12 hours. Preliminary interpretations include filtration of a radioisotope source with a short half-life or of a radioisotope that volatized as the sponge

  15. INITIAL TEST WELL CONDITIONING AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, R.D.; Dinsmoor, J.C.; Goldstein, S.J.; Reyes, I.; De La Garza, R.

    2005-01-01

    Three test wells, PB-1, PB-2, and PB-3, were drilled at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a natural analogue study to evaluate radionuclide transport processes during March-April 2003. The initial pumping to condition the wells was completed during December 2003. The PB-1 well, drilled immediately adjacent to the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, terminating 20 m below the top of the measured water level. The PB-2 and PB-3 wells, which were drilled on opposite sides of PB-1 at a radial distance of approximately 40 to 50 m outside of the remaining projected ore body, were also drilled to about 20 m below the top of the measured water level. Each test well was completed with 4-inch (10.2-cm) diameter PVC casing with a slotted liner below the water table. Initial conditioning of all three wells using a submersible pump at low pump rates [less than 1 gallon (3.8 1) per minute] resulted in measurable draw down and recoveries. The greatest drawdown (∼15 m) was observed in PB-2, whereas only minor (<1 m) drawdown occurred in PB-3. For PB-1 and PB-2, the water turbidity decreased as the wells were pumped and the pH values decreased, indicating that the contamination from the drilling fluid was reduced as the wells were conditioned. Test wells PB-1 and PB-2 showed increased inflow after several borehole volumes of fluid were removed, but their inflow rates remained less that the pumping rate. Test well PB-3 showed the smallest drawdown and least change in pH and conductivity during initial pumping and quickest recovery with a rise in measured water level after conditioning. The 195 gallons (750 l) of water pumped from PB-3 during conditioning was discharged through a household sponge. That sponge showed measurable gamma radiation, which decayed to background values in less than 12 hours. Preliminary interpretations include filtration of a radioisotope source with a short half-life or of a radioisotope that volatized as the sponge dried

  16. Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical ampersand Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities

  17. Vulnerability to alcohol consumption, spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being: test of a theory 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Luz Patricia Díaz; Sanchez, Alba Idaly Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to demonstrate the relations among vulnerability, self-transcendence and well-being in the young adult population and the effect of each of these variables on the adoption of low-risk consumption conducts. Method: quantitative and cross-sectional correlation study using structural equations analysis to test the relation among the variables. Results: an inverse relation was evidenced between vulnerability to alcohol consumption and spiritual transcendence (β-0.123, p 0.025) and a direct positive relation between spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being (β 0.482, p 0.000). Conclusions: the relations among the variables spiritual transcendence, vulnerability to alcohol consumption and psychosocial well-being, based on Reed's Theory, are confirmed in the population group of young college students, concluding that psychosocial well-being can be achieved when spiritual transcendence is enhanced, as the vulnerability to alcohol consumption drops. PMID:27276017

  18. Vulnerability to alcohol consumption, spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being: test of a theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Patricia Díaz Heredia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to demonstrate the relations among vulnerability, self-transcendence and well-being in the young adult population and the effect of each of these variables on the adoption of low-risk consumption conducts. Method: quantitative and cross-sectional correlation study using structural equations analysis to test the relation among the variables. Results: an inverse relation was evidenced between vulnerability to alcohol consumption and spiritual transcendence (β-0.123, p 0.025 and a direct positive relation between spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being (β 0.482, p 0.000. Conclusions: the relations among the variables spiritual transcendence, vulnerability to alcohol consumption and psychosocial well-being, based on Reed's Theory, are confirmed in the population group of young college students, concluding that psychosocial well-being can be achieved when spiritual transcendence is enhanced, as the vulnerability to alcohol consumption drops.

  19. Geohydrology of rocks penetrated by test well USW H-6, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, R.W.; Reed, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Test well USW H-6 is one of several wells drilled in the Yucca Mountain area near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site for investigations related to isolation of high-level nuclear waste. This well was drilled to a depth of 1,220 meters. Rocks penetrated are predominantly ash-flow tuffs of Tertiary age, with the principal exception of dacitic(?) lave penetrated at a depth from 877 to 1,126 meters. The composite static water level was about 526 meters below the land surface; the hydraulic head increased slightly with depth. Most permeability in the saturated zone is in two fractured intervals in Crater Flat Tuff. Based on well-test data using the transitional part of a dual-porosity solution, an interval of about 15 meters in the middle part of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has a calculated transmissivity of about 140 meters squared per day, and an interval of about 11 meters in the middle part of the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has a calculated transmissivity of about 75 meters squared per day. The upper part of the Bullfrog Member has a transmissivity of about 20 meters squared per day. The maximum likely transmissivity of any rocks penetrated by the test well is about 480 meters squared per day, based on a recharge-boundary model. The remainder of the open hole had no detectable production. Matrix hydraulic conductivity ranges from less than 5 x 10 -5 to 1 x 10 -3 meter per day. Ground water is a sodium bicarbonate type that is typical of water from tuffaceous rock of southern Nevada. The apparent age of the water is about 14,6000 years. 29 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs

  20. A New Kind of Single-Well Tracer Test for Assessing Subsurface Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. K.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Lu, Z.; Reimus, P. W.; Katzman, D.

    2017-12-01

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests have historically been interpreted using the idealized assumption of tracer path reversibility (i.e., negligible background flow), with background flow due to natural hydraulic gradient being an un-modeled confounding factor. However, we have recently discovered that it is possible to use background flow to our advantage to extract additional information about the subsurface. To wit: we have developed a new kind of single-well tracer test that exploits flow due to natural gradient to estimate the variance of the log hydraulic conductivity field of a heterogeneous aquifer. The test methodology involves injection under forced gradient and withdrawal under natural gradient, and makes use of a relationship, discovered using a large-scale Monte Carlo study and machine learning techniques, between power law breakthrough curve tail exponent and log-hydraulic conductivity variance. We will discuss how we performed the computational study and derived this relationship and then show an application example in which our new single-well tracer test interpretation scheme was applied to estimation of heterogeneity of a formation at the chromium contamination site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed core hole records exist at the same site, from which it was possible to estimate the log hydraulic conductivity variance using a Kozeny-Carman relation. The variances estimated using our new tracer test methodology and estimated by direct inspection of core were nearly identical, corroborating the new methodology. Assessment of aquifer heterogeneity is of critical importance to deployment of amendments associated with in-situ remediation strategies, since permeability contrasts potentially reduce the interaction between amendment and contaminant. Our new tracer test provides an easy way to obtain this information.

  1. Environmental Assessment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Well Flow Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-11-01

    The Hawaii Geothermal Project, a coordinated research effort of the University of Hawaii, funded by the County and State of Hawaii, and ERDA, was initiated in 1973 in an effort to identify, generate, and use geothermal energy on the Big Island of Hawaii. A number of stages are involved in developing geothermal power resources: exploration, test drilling, production testing, field development, power plant and powerline construction, and full-scale production. Phase I of the Project, which began in the summer of 1973, involved conducting exploratory surveys, developing analytical models for interpretation of geophysical results, conducting studies on energy recovery from hot brine, and examining the legal and economic implications of developing geothermal resources in the state. Phase II of the Project, initiated in the summer of 1975, centers on drilling an exploratory research well on the Island of Hawaii, but also continues operational support for the geophysical, engineering, and socioeconomic activities delineated above. The project to date is between the test drilling and production testing phase. The purpose of this assessment is to describe the activities and potential impacts associated with extensive well flow testing to be completed during Phase II.

  2. Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters

  3. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 443 Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The drilling program described in this report is part of a new corrective action strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The drilling program included drilling two boreholes, geophysical well logging, construction of two monitoring/validation (MV) wells with piezometers (MV-4 and MV-5), development of monitor wells and piezometers, recompletion of two existing wells (HTH-1 and UC-1-P-1S), removal of pumps from existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), redevelopment of piezometers associated with existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), and installation of submersible pumps. The new corrective action strategy includes initiating a new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period to validate the compliance boundary at CNTA (DOE 2007). The new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period begins upon completion of the new monitor wells and collection of samples for laboratory analysis. The new strategy is described in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan addendum (DOE 2008a) that the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved (NDEP 2008)

  4. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 443 Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-12-01

    The drilling program described in this report is part of a new corrective action strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The drilling program included drilling two boreholes, geophysical well logging, construction of two monitoring/validation (MV) wells with piezometers (MV-4 and MV-5), development of monitor wells and piezometers, recompletion of two existing wells (HTH-1 and UC-1-P-1S), removal of pumps from existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), redevelopment of piezometers associated with existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), and installation of submersible pumps. The new corrective action strategy includes initiating a new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period to validate the compliance boundary at CNTA (DOE 2007). The new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period begins upon completion of the new monitor wells and collection of samples for laboratory analysis. The new strategy is described in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan addendum (DOE 2008a) that the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved (NDEP 2008).

  5. Pumping test and fluid sampling report - Sawyer No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Sawyer No. 1 well, Donley County, Texas. Sawyer No. 1 well is located along the eastern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution within the Permian salt section. These data were collected by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation working in conjunction with the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology as part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. These data support studies to determine the hydrologic characteristics of deep water-bearing formations. Formation fluid studies samples were analyzed in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. These data were collected from June until October, 1981. Zone isolation for pump testing was accomplished in November, 1981. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  6. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Testing Activity, Frio Formation, Texas and Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to provide the environmental input into the Division of Geothermal Energy's decisions to expand the geothermal well testing activities to include sites in the Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana. It is proposed that drilling rigs be leased before they are removed from sites in the formation where drilling for gas or oil exploration has been unsuccessful and that the rigs be used to complete the drilling into the geopressured zone for resource exploration. This EA addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environment, and the possible impacts in a broad sense as they apply to the Gulf Coast well testing activity of the Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram of the Department of Energy. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay, Atlas) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. in the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource.

  7. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Overview of scientific and technical program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R.B.; Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Anderson, B.J.; Digert, S.A.; Pospisil, G.; Baker, R.; Weeks, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was drilled within the Alaska North Slope (ANS) Milne Point Unit (MPU) from February 3 to 19, 2007. The well was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA) project co-sponsored since 2001 by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help determine whether ANS gas hydrate can become a technically and commercially viable gas resource. Early in the effort, regional reservoir characterization and reservoir simulation modeling studies indicated that up to 0.34 trillion cubic meters (tcm; 12 trillion cubic feet, tcf) gas may be technically recoverable from 0.92 tcm (33 tcf) gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation near industry infrastructure within ANS MPU, Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), and Kuparuk River Unit (KRU) areas. To further constrain these estimates and to enable the selection of a test site for further data acquisition, the USGS reprocessed and interpreted MPU 3D seismic data provided by BPXA to delineate 14 prospects containing significant highly-saturated gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The "Mount Elbert" site was selected to drill a stratigraphic test well to acquire a full suite of wireline log, core, and formation pressure test data. Drilling results and data interpretation confirmed pre-drill predictions and thus increased confidence in both the prospect interpretation methods and in the wider ANS gas hydrate resource estimates. The interpreted data from the Mount Elbert well provide insight into and reduce uncertainty of key gas hydrate-bearing reservoir properties, enable further refinement and validation of the numerical simulation of the production potential of both MPU and broader ANS gas hydrate resources, and help determine viability of potential field sites for future extended term production testing. Drilling and data acquisition operations demonstrated that gas hydrate

  8. Asphalts tests using onshore drilling oil wells residues; Ensaios asfalticos utilizando residuos de perfuracao onshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, Adriano Elisio de F.L.; Rodrigues, John Kennedy G.; Ferreira, Heber Carlos; Lucena, Leda Christiane de F.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Lucena, Luciana de F.L. [Faculdade de Ciencias Sociais Aplicada (FACISA), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The drilling cuttings are one of the residues produced by the oils industries in large amounts during the drilling of oil wells. An alternative of final disposal of the drilling cutting residue is its utilization in asphalt mixtures. Based on this alternative, it was realized chemical and granulometric analysis and tests (Marshall and indirect tensile strength), on the asphaltic mixture using the residue from the oil drilling wells (well: 1-POTI-4-RN, located at Governador DIX-Sept Rosado - RN - Brazil). The achieved results to Marshall test indicated that for the analyzed mixture, the ideal content of residue that can be incorporated to the asphaltic composition and attend at the DNIT-ES 31 (2006) is 5%. To the indirect tensile strength test, the results showed a strength value higher than the minimum limit requested by the DNIT (0,65 MPa). The achieved results indicated the possibility of the utilization of the drilling cuttings in asphaltic pavements as fine aggregate, obeying the percentage limits, as an alternative to the final disposal. (author)

  9. Initial SVE Well Testing for the A-Area Miscellaneous Rubble Pile (ARP) Trenches Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RIHA, BRIAN

    2004-01-01

    The A-Area Miscellaneous Rubble Pile (ARP) is a 5.9 acre unit located at the southern end of A/M Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Disposal activities at ARP began in the early 1950s. The exact dates of operation and material disposed in the unit remain unknown. Within the ARP exists a smaller, approximately 2 acre, sub unit identified as the Trenches Area. The Trenches Area is dominated by a T-shaped trench (approximately 50 feet wide) containing 8 to 12 feet of ash material. This T-shaped trench will be referred to as the ARP Trench. Vegetation has been removed from the Trenches Area and a lower permeability earthen cover now covers the ARP Trench. The ARP active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) remediation system consists of seven extraction wells and twelve monitoring wells that were pushed into the vadose zone of the ARP Trench. The remediation system was designed based on the pre-design study conducted in 2002. The purpose of the initial soil vapor extraction (SVE) well testing was to verify the integrity and functionality of the nineteen wells installed in the ARP Trench. The well integrity was evaluated based on the flow rate, vacuum, and indication that soil gas and not surface air was pulled from the well. Soil gas was defined as gas with levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) above ambient concentrations (400-700 ppmv). Volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured at each well to determine the initial distribution of the contamination. In addition, the subsurface vacuum distribution was measured around each extraction well as a relative measure of the influence of each well

  10. Numerical Well Testing Interpretation Model and Applications in Crossflow Double-Layer Reservoirs by Polymer Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents numerical well testing interpretation model and analysis techniques to evaluate formation by using pressure transient data acquired with logging tools in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. A well testing model is established based on rheology experiments and by considering shear, diffusion, convection, inaccessible pore volume (IPV, permeability reduction, wellbore storage effect, and skin factors. The type curves were then developed based on this model, and parameter sensitivity is analyzed. Our research shows that the type curves have five segments with different flow status: (I wellbore storage section, (II intermediate flow section (transient section, (III mid-radial flow section, (IV crossflow section (from low permeability layer to high permeability layer, and (V systematic radial flow section. The polymer flooding field tests prove that our model can accurately determine formation parameters in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. Moreover, formation damage caused by polymer flooding can also be evaluated by comparison of the interpreted permeability with initial layered permeability before polymer flooding. Comparison of the analysis of numerical solution based on flow mechanism with observed polymer flooding field test data highlights the potential for the application of this interpretation method in formation evaluation and enhanced oil recovery (EOR.

  11. Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume 1. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The Prairie Canal Company, Inc. Well No. 1, approximately 8 miles south of the city of Lake Charles, Louisiana, was tested through the annulus between 5-1/2 inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 14,782 to 14,820 feet. The geological section was the Hackberry Sand, a member of the Oligocene Frio formation. Produced water was injected into a disposal well which was perforated in several Miocene Sands from 3070 to 4600 feet. Original plans were to test a section of the Hackberry sand from 14,976 to 15,024 feet. This primary zone, however, produced a large amount of sand, shale, gravel, and rocks during early flow periods and was abandoned in favor of the secondary zone. Four pressure drawdown flow tests and three pressure buildup tests were conducted during a 12-day period. A total of 36,505 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was approximately 7100 BWPD. The gas-to-water ratio, measured during testing, ranged from 41 to 50 SCF/BBL. There is disagreement as to the saturation value of the reservoir brine, which may be between 43.3 and 49.7 SCF/BBL. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 88.4 mole percent. The CO/sub 2/ content averaged 8.4 mole percent. Measured values of H/sub 2/S in the gas were between 12 and 24 ppM.

  12. Siting and constructing very deep monitoring wells on the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, J.J.; Jacobson, R.L.; Russell, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Many aspects of the Nevada Test Site's (NTS) hydrogeologic setting restrict the use of traditional methods for the siting and construction of ground-water characterization and monitoring wells. The size of the NTS precludes establishing high-density networks of characterization wells, as are typically used at smaller sites. The geologic complexity and variability of the NTS requires that the wells be criticality situated. The hydrogeologic complexity requires that each well provide access to many aquifers. Depths to ground water on the NTS require the construction of wells averaging approximately 1000 meters in depth. Wells meeting these criteria are uncommon in the ground-water industry, therefore techniques used by petroleum engineers are being employed to solve certain siting-, design- and installation-related problems. To date, one focus has been on developing completion strings that facilitate routine and efficient ground-water sampling from multiple intervals in a single well. The method currently advocated employs a new design of sliding side door sleeve that is actuated by an electrically operated hydraulic shifting tool. Stemming of the wells is being accomplished with standard materials (cement based grouts and sands); however, new stemming methods are being developed, to accommodate the greater depths, to minimize pH-related problems caused by the use of cements, to enhance the integrity of the inter-zone seals, and to improve the representativeness of radionuclide analyses performed on ground-water samples. Bench-scale experiments have been used to investigate the properties of more than a dozen epoxy-aggregate grout mixtures -- materials that are commonly used in underwater sealing applications

  13. Report of testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Richard J.; Longmire, Patrick; Rogers, David B.; Mullen, Ken

    1999-01-01

    During drilling of regional aquifer characterization borehole R-25, located in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at Technical Area (TA) 16, groundwater samples were collected from perched zones of saturation and the regional aquifer that contained elevated levels of high explosive (HE) compounds. One of the nearest Los Alamos County municipal supply wells potentially located down gradient from borehole R-25 is PM-4, located on Mesita del Buey at the west end of TA-54. During the winter of 1998 and 1999 the pump in PM-4 had been removed from the well for scheduled maintenance by the Los Alamos County Public Utilities Department (PUD). Because the pump was removed from PM-4, the opportunity existed to enter the well to (1) perform tests to determine where within the regional aquifer groundwater entered the well and (2) collect groundwater samples from the producing zones for analyses to determine if HE contaminants were present in discrete zones within the regional aquifer. The report of the activities that were performed during March 1999 for the testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4 is provided. The report provides a description of the field activities associated with the two phases of the project, including (1) the results of the static and dynamic spinner log surveys, and (2) a description of the sampling activities and the field-measured groundwater quality parameters that were obtained during sampling activities. This report also provides the analytical results of the groundwater samples and a brief discussion of the results of the project

  14. Deep n-well MAPS in a 130 nm CMOS technology: Beam test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, N.; Avanzini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Ceccanti, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Crescioli, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Forti, F.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Gregucci, S.; Mammini, P.; Marchiori, G.; Massa, M.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Piendibene, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report on recent beam test results for the APSEL4D chip, a new deep n-well MAPS prototype with a full in-pixel signal processing chain obtained by exploiting the triple well option of the CMOS 0.13μm process. The APSEL4D chip consists of a 4096 pixel matrix (32 rows and 128 columns) with 50x50μm 2 pixel cell area, with custom readout architecture capable of performing data sparsification at pixel level. APSEL4D has been characterized in terms of charge collection efficiency and intrinsic spatial resolution under different conditions of discriminator threshold settings using a 12 GeV/c proton beam in the T9 area of the CERN PS. We observe a maximum hit efficiency of 92% and we estimate an intrinsic resolution of about 14μm. The data driven approach of the tracking detector readout chips has been successfully used to demonstrate the possibility to build a Level 1 trigger system based on associative memories. The analysis of the beam test data is critically reviewed along with the characterization of the device under test.

  15. Leachate flow around a well in MSW landfill: Analysis of field tests using Richards model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, R; Oxarango, L; Sbartai, B; Tinet, A-J; Olivier, F; Dias, D

    2017-05-01

    During the lifespan of a Municipal Solid Waste landfill, its leachate drainage system may get clogged. Then, as a consequence of rainfall, leachate generation and possibly leachate injection, the moisture content in the landfill increases to the point that a leachate mound could be created. Therefore, pumping the leachate becomes a necessary solution. This paper presents an original analysis of leachate pumping and injection in an instrumented well. The water table level around the well is monitored by nine piezometers which allow the leachate flow behaviour to be captured. A numerical model based on Richards equation and an exponential relationship between saturated hydraulic conductivity and depth is used to analyze the landfill response to pumping and injection. Decreasing permeability with depth appears to have a major influence on the behaviour of the leachate flow. It could have a drastic negative impact on the pumping efficiency with a maximum quasi-stationary pumping rate limited to approximately 1m 3 /h for the tested well and the radius of influence is less than 20m. The numerical model provides a reasonable description of both pumping and injection tests. However, an anomalous behaviour observed at the transition between pumping and recovery phases is observed. This could be due to a limitation of the Richards model in that it neglects the gas phase behaviour and other double porosity heterogeneous effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parallel susceptibility testing of bacteria through culture-quantitative PCR in 96-well plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The methods combining culture and quantitative PCR(qPCR offer new solutions for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing(AST. However, the multiple steps of DNA extraction and cold storage of PCR reagents needed make them unsuitable for rapid high throughput AST. In this study, a parallel culture-qPCR method was developed to overcome above problems. Method: In this method, bacteria culture and DNA extraction automatically and simultaneously completed through using a common PCR instrument as a controllable heating device. A lyophilized 16S rDNA targeted qPCR reagent was also developed, which was stable and could be kept at 4 °C for long time and at 37 °C for about two months. Result: Testing of 36 P. aeruginosa isolates and 28 S. aureus isolates showed that the method had good agreements with the standard broth microdilution method, with an overall agreement of 97.22% (95% CI, 85.83–99.51 for P. aeruginosa and 96.43% (95% CI, 79.76–99.81 for S. aureus. This method could test 12 samples against a panel of up to 7 antibiotics simultaneously in two 96-well PCR plates within 4 h, which greatly improves the testing efficiency of the culture-qPCR method. Conclusion: With rapidness to obtain results and the capabilities for automation and multiple-sample testing, the parallel culture-qPCR method would have great potentials in clinical labs. Keywords: Antibiotic susceptibility testing, Thermo-cold lysis, Lyophilized qPCR reagent, Quantitative PCR, Bacteria

  17. Geohydrology of test well USW H-1, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, F.E.; Thordarson, W.; Pyles, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains the results of hydraulic testing, hydrologic monitoring, and geophysical logging of test well USW H-1, one of several wells drilled in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site in cooperation with the US Department of Energy for investigations related to the isolation of high-level radioactive wastes. All rocks penetrated by the well to a total depth of 1829 meters were of volcanic origin and of Tertiary age. Hydraulic head in the zone 688 to 741 meters below land surface was 730 meters above sea level and at a depth of 572 meters below land surface. Deeper zones had hydraulic heads of 781 meters above sea level or higher, indicating an upward component of ground-water flow at the site. The most transmissive zone, with an apparent transmissivity of about 150 meters squared per day, is in the Prow Pass Member of the Crater Flat Tuff in the depth range from 572 to 688 meters below land surface. The remainder of the penetrated rocks in the saturated zone, 688 to 1829 meters, has an apparent transmissivity of about 1 meter squared per day. The most transmissive part of the lower depth range is in the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff in the depth interval from 736 to 741 meters. The apparent hydraulic conductivity of the rocks in this lower depth interval from 688 to 1829 meters commonly ranges between 10 -4 and 10 -7 meter per day. Water chemistry is typical of tuffaceous rocks of southern Nevada. The water is a sodium bicarbonate type and has an apparent age of 12,000 to 13,000 years before present, as determined by carbon-14 dating

  18. Note: A well-confined pulsed low-energy ion beam: Test experiments of Ar+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Tian, Shan Xi

    2018-06-01

    Here we report a pulsed low-energy ion beam source for ion-molecule reaction study, in which the ions produced by the pulsed electron impact are confined well in the spatial size of each bunch. In contrast to the ion focusing method to reduce the transverse section of the beam, the longitudinal section in the translational direction is compressed by introducing a second pulse in the ion time-of-flight system. The test experiments for the low-energy argon ions are performed. The present beam source is ready for applications in the ion-molecule reaction dynamics experiments, in particular, in combination with the ion velocity map imaging technique.

  19. Site Release Report for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.E. Rasmuson

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope and aspect were chosen for comparison to

  20. Site Release Reports for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.E. Rasmuson

    2002-04-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope

  1. Establishing a 'Physician's Spiritual Well-being Scale' and testing its reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C K; Li, P Y; Lai, M L; Lin, M H; Bridge, D T; Chen, H W

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Physician's Spiritual Well-Being Scale (PSpWBS). The significance of a physician's spiritual well-being was explored through in-depth interviews with and qualitative data collection from focus groups. Based on the results of qualitative analysis and related literature, the PSpWBS consisting of 25 questions was established. Reliability and validity tests were performed on 177 subjects. Four domains of the PSpWBS were devised: physician's characteristics; medical practice challenges; response to changes; and overall well-being. The explainable total variance was 65.65%. Cronbach α was 0.864 when the internal consistency of the whole scale was calculated. Factor analysis showed that the internal consistency Cronbach α value for each factor was between 0.625 and 0.794 and the split-half reliability was 0.865. The scale has satisfactory reliability and validity and could serve as the basis for assessment of the spiritual well-being of a physician.

  2. Summary of data concerning radiological contamination at well PM-2, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.M.; Locke, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of water from well Pahute Mesa No. 2 (PM-2), on Pahute Mesa in the extreme northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, indicated tritium concentrations above background levels in August 1993. A coordinated investigation of the tritium occurrence in well PM-2 was undertaken by the Hydrologic Resources Management Program of the US Department of Energy. Geologic and hydrologic properties of the hydrogeologic units were characterized using existing information. Soil around the well and water quality in the well were characterized during the investigation. The purpose of this report is to present existing information and results from a coordinated investigation of tritium occurrence. The objectives of the overall investigation include: (1) determination of the type and concentration of contamination; (2) identification of the source and mechanism of contamination; (3) estimation of the extent of radiological contamination; (4) initiation of appropriate monitoring of the contamination; and (5) reporting of investigation results. Compiled and tabulated data of the area are presented. The report also includes characterization of geology, soil, hydrology, and water quality data

  3. Field Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Alfred [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This research project addresses one of the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Storage Program (CSP) aimed at developing Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage. The technology field-tested in this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP), which utilizes a biologically-based process to precipitate calcium carbonate. If properly controlled MICP can successfully seal fractures, high permeability zones, and compromised wellbore cement in the vicinity of wellbores and in nearby caprock, thereby improving the storage security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide. This report describes an MICP sealing field test performed on a 24.4 cm (9.625 inch) diameter well located on the Gorgas Steam Generation facility near Jasper, Alabama. The research was aimed at (1) developing methods for delivering MICP promoting fluids downhole using conventional oil field technologies and (2) assessing the ability of MICP to seal cement and formation fractures in the near wellbore region in a sandstone formation. Both objectives were accomplished successfully during a field test performed during the period April 1-11, 2014. The test resulted in complete biomineralization sealing of a horizontal fracture located 340.7 m (1118 feet) below ground surface. A total of 24 calcium injections and six microbial inoculation injections were required over a three day period in order to achieve complete sealing. The fractured region was considered completely sealed when it was no longer possible to inject fluids into the formation without exceeding the initial formation fracture pressure. The test was accomplished using conventional oil field technology including an 11.4 L (3.0 gallon) wireline dump bailer for injecting the biomineralization materials downhole. Metrics indicating successful MICP sealing included reduced injectivity during seal formation, reduction in pressure falloff, and

  4. Dosimetry of irradiation models. The 96-well clonogenic assay for testing radiosensitivity of cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulmala, J.; Rantanen, V.; Turku Univ.; Pekkola-Heino, K.; Turku Univ.; Tuominen, J.; Grenman, R.; Turku Univ.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation experiments with cells in single cell suspension in test tubes and on 96-well plates were carried out and compared. The cells originated from cell lines established from carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and from endometrical carcinoma. Two irradiation models were constructed. Both models allowed the absorbed doses to the cells to be administered with a high accuracy in both experimental settings (better than 5.0%). These irradiation models were compared on cancer cell lines with dissimilar inherent radiation sensitivity and histologic type (UM-SCC-1 resistant, UM-SCC-14A sensitive, and UT-EC-2B highly sensitive); various radiation doses were used. The fractions of surviving cells as a function of radiation dose were compared: there was no significant difference between cells irradiated in test tubes and cells irradiated in 96-well plates. Thus, if the absorbed doses in cells suspended in a tube and in a plate were the same, the survival was similar regardless of the type of irradiation model. (orig.)

  5. Elasticity and expansion test performance of geopolymer as oil well cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridha, S.; Hamid, A. I. Abd; Halim, A. H. Abdul; Zamzuri, N. A.

    2018-04-01

    History has shown that geopolymer cement provides high compressive strength as compared to Class G cement. However, the research had been done at ambient temperature, not at elevated condition which is the common oil well situation. In this research, the physical and mechanical properties performance of the oil well cement were investigated by laboratory work for two types of cement that are geopolymer and Class G cement. The cement samples were produced by mixing the cement according to the API standards. Class C fly ash was used in this study. The alkaline solution was prepared by mixing sodium silicate with NaOH solution. The NaOH solution was prepared by diluting NaOH pellets with distilled water to 8M. The cement samples were cured at a pressure of 3000 psi and a temperature of 130 °C to simulate the downhole condition. After curing, the physical properties of the cement samples were investigated using OYO Sonic Viewer to determine their elastic properties. Autoclave expansion test and compressive strength tests were conducted to determine the expansion value and the strength of the cement samples, respectively. The results showed that the geopolymer cement has a better physical and mechanical properties as compared with Class G cement at elevated condition.

  6. Well test mathematical model for fractures network in tight oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwu, Pengxiang; Liu, Tongjing; Jiang, Baoyi; Wang, Rui; Yang, Peidie; Yang, Jiping; Wang, Zhaoming

    2018-02-01

    Well test, especially build-up test, has been applied widely in the development of tight oil reservoirs, since it is the only available low cost way to directly quantify flow ability and formation heterogeneity parameters. However, because of the fractures network near wellbore, generated from artificial fracturing linking up natural factures, traditional infinite and finite conductivity fracture models usually result in significantly deviation in field application. In this work, considering the random distribution of natural fractures, physical model of fractures network is proposed, and it shows a composite model feature in the large scale. Consequently, a nonhomogeneous composite mathematical model is established with threshold pressure gradient. To solve this model semi-analytically, we proposed a solution approach including Laplace transform and virtual argument Bessel function, and this method is verified by comparing with existing analytical solution. The matching data of typical type curves generated from semi-analytical solution indicates that the proposed physical and mathematical model can describe the type curves characteristic in typical tight oil reservoirs, which have up warping in late-term rather than parallel lines with slope 1/2 or 1/4. It means the composite model could be used into pressure interpretation of artificial fracturing wells in tight oil reservoir.

  7. Hydrogeologic data from the US Geological Survey test wells near Waycross, Ware County, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.E.; Krause, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Two wells were constructed near Waycross, Ware County, Georgia, from July 1980 to May 1981 to collect stratigraphic, structural, geophysical, hydrologic, hydraulic, and geochemical information for the U.S. Geological Survey Tertiary Limestone Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. Data collection included geologic sampling and coring, borehole geophysical logging, packer testing, water-level measuring, water-quality sampling, and aquifer testing. In the study area, the Tertiary limestone aquifer system is about 1,300 feet thick and is confined and overlain by about 610 feet of clastic sediments. The aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomite, and minor evaporites and has high porosity and permeability. A 4-day continuous discharge aquifer test was conducted, from which a transmissivity of about 1 million feet squared per day and a storage coefficient of 0.0001 were calculated. Water from the upper part of the aquifer is of a calcium bicarbonate type. The deeper highly mineralized zone produces a sodium bicarbonate type water in which concentrations of magnesium, sulfate, chloride, sodium, and some trace metals increase with depth. (USGS)

  8. Geophysical logging and hydrologic testing of deep basalt flows in the Rattlesnake Hills Well Number One

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, R.E.; Eddy, P.A.; Deju, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Geophysical logging and hydrologic testing were conducted in the Rattlesnake Hills Well Number One located along the western boundary of the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. Three-dimensional velocity, Seisviewer and caliper logging were completed across 2,000 feet of basalt rock within the Wanapum and Grande Ronde formations. Drillstem testing focused along a 250-foot interval of the Grande Ronde Formation. Individual high- (approx. 2.7-2.9 grams per cubic centimeter) and low-density (approx. 2.3-2.6 grams per cubic centimeter) basalt zones within the Wanapum Formation are generally less than 50 feet thick. Within the estimated thickness of the Grande Ronde Formation, 85 percent of the low-density zones are less than 50 feet thick, compared to 55 percent of those of higher density. The Grande Ronde Formation has 13 high-density zones varying in thickness from 51 to 230 feet. Logging data suggest the thicknesses of low-density are independent of the thicknesses of the associated and underlying higher density columnar basalts. Eleven drillstem tests were conducted across selected intervals within the Grande Ronde Formation. Hydraulic conductivity values calculated for the low-density basalt zones ranged between 1.7 x 10 -7 and 3.8 x 10 -9 centimeters per second; those for high-density zones were between 1.1 x 10 -8 and 4.7 x 10 -9 centimeters per second

  9. EBR-II blanket fuel leaching test using simulated J-13 well water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a pulsed-flow leaching test using simulated J-13 well water leachant. This test was performed on three blanket fuel segments from the ANL-W EBR-II nuclear reactor which were originally made up of depleted uranium (DU). This experiment was designed to mimic conditions which would exist if, upon disposal of this material in a geological repository, it came in direct contact with groundwater. These segments were contained in pressure vessels and maintained at a constant temperature of 90 C. Weekly aliquots of leachate were taken from the three vessels and replaced with an equal volume of fresh leachant. These weekly aliquots were analyzed for both 90 Sr and 137 Cs. The results of the pulsed-flow leach test showed the formation of uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and uranium hydride (UH 3 ) particulate with rapid release of the 137 Cs and 90 Sr to the leachant. On the fifth week of sampling, one of the vessels became over pressurized and vented gas when opened. The most reasonable explanation for the presence of gas in this vessel is that the unoxidized uranium metal in the blanket segment could have reacted with the surrounding water leachant to form hydrogen. However, an investigation is currently being undertaken to both qualify and quantify H 2 formation during uranium spent nuclear fuel corrosion in water

  10. Work-family conflict, locus of control, and women's well-being: tests of alternative pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Noraini M

    2002-10-01

    The author tested for the 3 possible pathways (i.e., direct, moderator, and mediator effects) in which locus of control can influence the relationship between work-family conflict and well-being. The author predicted that work-family conflict would be negatively correlated with well-being. In a sample of 310 Malaysian employed women with families, work-family conflict was a significant predictor of both job satisfaction and distress--negatively related to job satisfaction and positively related to symptoms of distress. More important, the results provided support for the effects of all 3 pathways of control on the relationship between work-family conflict and well-being, depending on the outcome measure: For job satisfaction, locus of control had direct effects, acted as a partial mediator, and played a significant moderating role. In contrast, only the direct effect of locus of control predicted distress. The author discusses those findings with reference to the literature on work-family conflict, locus of control, and the issue of stress-distress specificity.

  11. Development and psychometric testing of a new geriatric spiritual well-being scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Karen S

    2008-09-01

    Aims and objectives.  Assess the psychometric properties of a new geriatric spiritual well-being scale (GSWS), specifically designed for older adults. Background.  Religiosity and spiritual wellness must be measured as two distinct concepts to prevent confounding them as synonymous among atheist and agnostic population. Design.  A test-retest survey design was used to estimate the psychometric properties. Methods.  A convenience sample of 138 community-dwelling older adults was drawn from the inner city of Detroit. Data were collected using telephone survey interviews. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, structural equation modelling, reliability analyses, and point-biserial correlations. Results.  The factorial validity of the proposed model was not supported by the data. Fit indices were χ(2)  = 185.98, d.f. = 98, P atheists have spiritual needs that do not include religious beliefs or practices. Thus, assessing patients' religious beliefs and practices prior to assessing spiritual well-being is essential to prevent bias. © 2008 The Author. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Coring operations, core sedimentology, and lithostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, K.; Boswell, R.; Collett, T.

    2011-01-01

    In February 2007, BP Exploration (Alaska), the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Geological Survey completed the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) in the Milne Point Unit on the Alaska North Slope. The program achieved its primary goals of validating the pre-drill estimates of gas hydrate occurrence and thickness based on 3-D seismic interpretations and wireline log correlations and collecting a comprehensive suite of logging, coring, and pressure testing data. The upper section of the Mount Elbert well was drilled through the base of ice-bearing permafrost to a casing point of 594??m (1950??ft), approximately 15??m (50??ft) above the top of the targeted reservoir interval. The lower portion of the well was continuously cored from 606??m (1987??ft) to 760??m (2494??ft) and drilled to a total depth of 914??m. Ice-bearing permafrost extends to a depth of roughly 536??m and the base of gas hydrate stability is interpreted to extend to a depth of 870??m. Coring through the targeted gas hydrate bearing reservoirs was completed using a wireline-retrievable system. The coring program achieved 85% recovery of 7.6??cm (3??in) diameter core through 154??m (504??ft) of the hole. An onsite team processed the cores, collecting and preserving approximately 250 sub-samples for analyses of pore water geochemistry, microbiology, gas chemistry, petrophysical analysis, and thermal and physical properties. Eleven samples were immediately transferred to either methane-charged pressure vessels or liquid nitrogen for future study of the preserved gas hydrate. Additional offsite sampling, analyses, and detailed description of the cores were also conducted. Based on this work, one lithostratigraphic unit with eight subunits was identified across the cored interval. Subunits II and Va comprise the majority of the reservoir facies and are dominantly very fine to fine, moderately sorted, quartz, feldspar, and lithic fragment-bearing to

  13. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

    2012-09-01

    Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

  14. Hydrologic testing in wells near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.S.; Olsen, J.H.; Ralston, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Snake River Plain aquifer beneath the INEL is often viewed as a 2-dimensional system, but may actually possess 3-dimensional properties of concern. A straddle-packer system is being used by the State's INEL Oversight Program to isolate specific aquifer intervals and define the 3-dimensional chemical and hydrologic characteristics of the aquifer. The hydrologic test results from wells USGS 44, 45, and 46 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant indicate that: (1) Vertical variation in static head is less than 0.3 feed, (2) barometric efficiencies are between 25 and 55 percent, and (3) the system responds to distant pumping as a multi-layered, but interconnected system. 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  15. How Well Does the Latest Anthropomorphic Test Device Mimic Human Impact Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Nate; Somers, Jeff; Caldewll, Erin; Gernhardt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the NASA Occupant Protection Group is to understand the human tolerance to dynamic loading. This knowledge has to come through indirect approaches such as existing human response databases, anthropometric test devices (ATD), animal testing, post-­-mortem human subjects, and models. This study investigated the biofidelity of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's ATD named the THOR (test device for human occupant restraint). If THOR responds comparably to humans, then it could potentially be used as a human surrogate to help validate space vehicle requirements for occupant protection. The THOR responses to frontal and spinal impacts (ranging from 8 to 12 G with rise times of 40, 70, and 100 ms) were measured and compared to human volunteer responses (95 trials in frontal and 58 in spinal) previously collected by the U. S. Air Force on the same horizontal impact accelerator. The impact acceleration profiles tested are within the expected range of multi-­-purpose crew vehicle (MPCV) landing dynamics. A correlation score was calculated for each THOR to human comparison using CORA (CORrelation and Analysis) software. A two-­-parameter beta distribution model fit was obtained for each dependent variable using maximum likelihood estimation. For frontal impacts, the THOR head x-­-acceleration peak response correlated with the human response at 8 and 10-­-G 100 ms but not 10-­-G 70 ms. The phase lagged the human response. Head z-­-acceleration was not correlated. Chest x-­-acceleration was in phase, had a higher peak response, and was well correlated with lighter subjects (Cora = 0.8 for 46 kg vs. Cora = 0.4 for 126 kg). Head x-­-displacement had a leading phase. Several subjects responded with the same peak displacement but the mean of the group was lower. The shoulder x-­-displacement was in phase but had higher peaks than the human response. For spinal impacts, the THOR head x-­-acceleration was not well correlated. Head and

  16. EBR-II blanket fuel leaching test using simulated J-13 well water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J. E.

    1998-05-15

    A pulsed-flow leaching test is being conducted using three EBR-II blanket fuel segments. These samples are immersed in simulated J-13 well water. The samples are kept at a constant temperature of 90 C. Leachate is exchanged weekly and analyzed for various nuclides which are of interest from a mobility and longevity point of view. Our primary interest is in the longer-lived species such as {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am. In addition, the behavior of U, Pu, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs are being analyzed. During the course of this experiment, an interesting observation has been made involving one of the samples which could indicate the possible rapid ''anoxic'' oxidation of uranium metal to UO{sub 2}.

  17. Societal Conditions and the Gender Difference in Well-Being: Testing a Three-Stage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Miron; Li, Chen; Diener, Edward F

    2017-03-01

    Findings from a meta-analysis on gender differences in self-esteem (Zuckerman et al., 2016) suggest that the relation between the degree to which societal conditions are favorable to women and gender difference in self-esteem might be quadratic; when conditions improve, women's self-esteem (relative to that of men) trends downward but when conditions continue to improve, women's self-esteem begins to trend upward. Testing whether these relations generalize to subjective well-being, the present study found a quadratic relation between improving societal conditions and the gender difference in life satisfaction and positive affect (women are lower than men when societal conditions are moderately favorable compared to when they are at their worst and at their best); the relation was linear for negative emotion (women report more negative emotions than men when societal conditions are better). Directions for future research that will address potential explanations for these results are proposed.

  18. Characterization of Rock Mechanical Properties Using Lab Tests and Numerical Interpretation Model of Well Logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tight gas reservoir in the fifth member of the Xujiahe formation contains heterogeneous interlayers of sandstone and shale that are low in both porosity and permeability. Elastic characteristics of sandstone and shale are analyzed in this study based on petrophysics tests. The tests indicate that sandstone and mudstone samples have different stress-strain relationships. The rock tends to exhibit elastic-plastic deformation. The compressive strength correlates with confinement pressure and elastic modulus. The results based on thin-bed log interpretation match dynamic Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio predicted by theory. The compressive strength is calculated from density, elastic impedance, and clay contents. The tensile strength is calibrated using compressive strength. Shear strength is calculated with an empirical formula. Finally, log interpretation of rock mechanical properties is performed on the fifth member of the Xujiahe formation. Natural fractures in downhole cores and rock microscopic failure in the samples in the cross section demonstrate that tensile fractures were primarily observed in sandstone, and shear fractures can be observed in both mudstone and sandstone. Based on different elasticity and plasticity of different rocks, as well as the characteristics of natural fractures, a fracture propagation model was built.

  19. Flow to partially penetrating wells in unconfined heterogeneous aquifers: Mean head and interpretation of pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, G.; Lessoff, S. C.

    2011-06-01

    A partially penetrating well of length Lw and radius Rw starts to pump at constant discharge Qw at t = 0 from an unconfined aquifer of thickness D. The aquifer is of random and stationary conductivity characterized by KG (geometric mean), σY2 (log conductivity variance), and I and Iv (the horizontal and vertical integral scales). The flow problem is solved under a few simplifying assumptions commonly adopted in the literature for homogeneous media: Rw/Lw ≪ 1, linearization of the free surface condition, and constant drainable porosity n. Additionally, it is assumed that Rw/I well boundary conditions) and that a first-order approximation in σY2 (extended to finite σY2 on a conjectural basis) is adopted. The solution is obtained for the mean head field and the associated water table equation. The main result of the analysis is that the flow domain can be divided into three zones for : (1) the neighborhood of the well R ≪ I, where = (Qw/LwKA)h0(R, z, tKefuv/nD), with h0 being the zero-order solution pertaining to a homogeneous and isotropic aquifer, KA being the conductivity arithmetic mean, and Kefuv being the effective vertical conductivity in mean uniform flow, (2) an exterior zone R ⪆ I in which ?H? = (Qw/LwKefuh)h0(R?, z, tKefuv/nD), with Kefuh being the horizontal effective conductivity, and (3) an intermediate zone in which the solution requires a few numerical quadratures, not carried out here. The application to pumping tests reveals that identification of the aquifer parameters for homogeneous and anisotropic aquifers by commonly used methods can be applied for the drawdown measured in an observation well of length Low?Iv (to ensure exchange of space and ensemble head averages) in the second zone in order to identify Kefuh, Kefuv, and n. In contrast, the use of the drawdown in the well (first zone) leads to an overestimation of Kefuh by the factor KA/Kefuh.

  20. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willits, M.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.

    1979-12-01

    The Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, located in the East Franklin area of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, is the first successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Well-of-Opportunity program. The section tested was the MA-6 sand of lower Miocene age which has produced large quantities of gas from the adjacent but structurally separated Garden City field. In the subject well the observed temperature was 270{sup 0}F (132{sup 0}C) and the measured gradient was 0.77 psi/ft. The gross sand thickness was 270 feet, the net sand thickness 190 feet, and the tested interval 58 net feet. The temperatures and pressures encountered approached the limits of the surface-recording bottomhole pressure gauge and particularly the single-conductor cables on which the gauges were run. The objectives of the tests were all accomplished, and data were obtained which will contribute to the overall assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource of the Upper Gulf of Mexico basin. In general, the gas solubility (22.8 scf/bbl) was as expected for the temperature, pressure, and salinity of the brine. The produced water was more saline than expected (160,000 mg/l). The high concentrations of dissolved solids, coupled with the evolution of CO{sub 2} from these waters during production, created a scaling problem in the tubular goods and surface equipment that will have to be addressed in future tests.

  1. Single well injection withdrawal tests (SWIW) in fractured rock. Some aspects on interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, Ivars

    2007-08-01

    Single-Well-Injection-Withdrawal, SWIW, tests are used to try to extract information on fracture apertures, sorption and diffusion properties and dispersion information in individual fractures. It is done by injecting a given amount of traced water into an isolated fracture. After a waiting period water is withdrawn from the fracture and the tracer concentration is measured. The concentration time curve is fitted to a model and the parameter values quantifying the different interaction mechanisms are determined. A number of different mechanisms influence the recovery of the tracer. One or more of the following mechanisms are considered. They include: dispersion due to velocity differences, sorption on fracture surface and on infill, diffusion in rock fragments in the fracture, diffusion between 'streamlines', diffusion into rock matrix and other stagnant water volumes, sorption kinetics and slow drift of the plume caused by the natural gradient. Many of the interaction mechanisms can influence the recovery curve in a similar way. For example, diffusion into rock matrix water and into stagnant water in the fracture adjacent to the flowing channels cannot be distinguished if only one tracer is used. Tracers with different properties can in principle be used but they will encounter different parts of the fracture, the sorbing tracer will move out less from the injection point than a nonsorbing tracer will. Diffusion and sorption in small particles in the flowpath can influence the recovery curve in a similar way as rock matrix diffusion does. Dispersion caused by diffusion between 'streamlines', Taylor dispersion, can give very different results in channels of different shapes. Such dispersion effects can be difficult to distinguish from matrix diffusion effects. Dispersion coefficients obtained in a SWIW test may have little relation to dispersion of a tracer moving from A to B. This is partly due to the different mechanisms and partly due to different time scales

  2. Single well injection withdrawal tests (SWIW) in fractured rock. Some aspects on interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Single-Well-Injection-Withdrawal, SWIW, tests are used to try to extract information on fracture apertures, sorption and diffusion properties and dispersion information in individual fractures. It is done by injecting a given amount of traced water into an isolated fracture. After a waiting period water is withdrawn from the fracture and the tracer concentration is measured. The concentration time curve is fitted to a model and the parameter values quantifying the different interaction mechanisms are determined. A number of different mechanisms influence the recovery of the tracer. One or more of the following mechanisms are considered. They include: dispersion due to velocity differences, sorption on fracture surface and on infill, diffusion in rock fragments in the fracture, diffusion between 'streamlines', diffusion into rock matrix and other stagnant water volumes, sorption kinetics and slow drift of the plume caused by the natural gradient. Many of the interaction mechanisms can influence the recovery curve in a similar way. For example, diffusion into rock matrix water and into stagnant water in the fracture adjacent to the flowing channels cannot be distinguished if only one tracer is used. Tracers with different properties can in principle be used but they will encounter different parts of the fracture, the sorbing tracer will move out less from the injection point than a nonsorbing tracer will. Diffusion and sorption in small particles in the flowpath can influence the recovery curve in a similar way as rock matrix diffusion does. Dispersion caused by diffusion between 'streamlines', Taylor dispersion, can give very different results in channels of different shapes. Such dispersion effects can be difficult to distinguish from matrix diffusion effects. Dispersion coefficients obtained in a SWIW test may have little relation to dispersion of a tracer moving from A to B. This is partly due to the different mechanisms and partly due to

  3. Analyses of production tests and MDT tests conducted in Mallik and Alaska methane hydrate reservoirs : what can we learn from these well tests?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, M.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H. [Japan Oil Engineering Co., Tokyo (Japan); Masuda, Y. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Engineering; Yamamoto, K. [Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Dallimore, S.R. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada; Collett, T.S. [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Hancock, S.H. [APA Petroleum Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper described a series of pressure drawdown tests conducted to evaluate a modular formation dynamics tester (MDT) wireline tool. The tests were conducted at the Mallik methane hydrate (MH) reservoir as well as in MH reservoirs in Alaska over a period of several years. Production tests were also conducted to evaluate depressurization methods, and measure production and bottomhole pressure (BHP) below known MH stability pressures in order to estimate permeability and MH dissociation radius properties. The results of the tests were then history-matched using a numerical simulator. An analysis of the simulation study showed that the MDT tests were useful in estimating initial effective permeability levels in the presence of MH. However, wellbore storage erased important data used to indicate the radius of MH dissociation and effective permeability after partial MH dissociation. The study also showed that steady flow conditions must be established before obtaining solutions from history-matched production tests. Parameters accurately estimated using the MDT and production tests were outlined, and suggestions for future designs and analyses for MH reservoirs were presented. 14 refs., 7 tabs., 17 figs.

  4. Drilling and Testing the DOI041A Coalbed Methane Well, Fort Yukon, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur; Barker, Charles E.; Weeks, Edwin P.

    2009-01-01

    The need for affordable energy sources is acute in rural communities of Alaska where costly diesel fuel must be delivered by barge or plane for power generation. Additionally, the transport, transfer, and storage of fuel pose great difficulty in these regions. Although small-scale energy development in remote Arctic locations presents unique challenges, identifying and developing economic, local sources of energy remains a high priority for state and local government. Many areas in rural Alaska contain widespread coal resources that may contain significant amounts of coalbed methane (CBM) that, when extracted, could be used for power generation. However, in many of these areas, little is known concerning the properties that control CBM occurrence and production, including coal bed geometry, coalbed gas content and saturation, reservoir permeability and pressure, and water chemistry. Therefore, drilling and testing to collect these data are required to accurately assess the viability of CBM as a potential energy source in most locations. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Alaska Department of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), the Doyon Native Corporation, and the village of Fort Yukon, organized and funded the drilling of a well at Fort Yukon, Alaska to test coal beds for CBM developmental potential. Fort Yukon is a town of about 600 people and is composed mostly of Gwich'in Athabascan Native Americans. It is located near the center of the Yukon Flats Basin, approximately 145 mi northeast of Fairbanks.

  5. Geohydrologic and drill-hole data for test well USW H-4, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, M.S.; Thordarson, William; Eshom, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on drilling operations, lithology, geophysical well logs, sidewall-core samples, water-level monitoring, pumping tests, injection tests, radioactive-tracer borehole flow survey, and water chemistry for test well USW H-4. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW H-4 was drilled in ash-flow tuff to a total depth of 1,219 meters. Depth to water below land surface was 519 meters or at an altitude of 730 meters above sea level. After test pumping at a rate of 17.4 liters per second for approximately 9 days, the drawdown was 4.85 meters. A radioactive borehole-flow survey indicated that the Bullfrog Member was the most productive geologic unit, producing 36.5 percent of the water in the well. The second most productive geologic unit was the Tram Member, which produced 32 percent of the water. The water in test well USW H-4 is predominantly a soft, sodium bicarbonate type of water typical of water produced in tuffaceous rocks in southern Nevada. (USGS)

  6. Vulnerability to alcohol consumption, spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being: test of a theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Luz Patricia Díaz; Sanchez, Alba Idaly Muñoz

    2016-06-07

    to demonstrate the relations among vulnerability, self-transcendence and well-being in the young adult population and the effect of each of these variables on the adoption of low-risk consumption conducts. quantitative and cross-sectional correlation study using structural equations analysis to test the relation among the variables. an inverse relation was evidenced between vulnerability to alcohol consumption and spiritual transcendence (β-0.123, p 0.025) and a direct positive relation between spiritual transcendence and psychosocial well-being (β 0.482, p 0.000). the relations among the variables spiritual transcendence, vulnerability to alcohol consumption and psychosocial well-being, based on Reed's Theory, are confirmed in the population group of young college students, concluding that psychosocial well-being can be achieved when spiritual transcendence is enhanced, as the vulnerability to alcohol consumption drops. demonstrar as relações entre vulnerabilidade, autotranscendência e bem-estar na população adulta jovem e o efeito de cada uma destas variáveis na adoção de condutas de baixo risco de consumo. estudo quantitativo, transversal do tipo correlacional que utilizou a análise estatística de Equações Estruturais para comprovar a relação entre as variáveis. evidenciou-se uma relação inversa entre a vulnerabilidade ao consumo do álcool e a transcendência espiritual (β-0.123, p 0.025) e uma relação direta positiva entre a transcendência espiritual e o bem-estar psicossocial (β 0.482, p 0.000). Conclusões: as relações das variáveis transcendência espiritual, vulnerabilidade ao consumo do álcool e bem-estar psicossocial, fundamentadas na Teoria de Reed, são confirmadas no grupo populacional de jovens adultos universitários, concluindo que é possível alcançar o bem-estar psicossocial quando se incrementa a transcendência espiritual, enquanto a vulnerabilidade ao consumo do álcool se reduz. demostrar las relaciones entre

  7. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

  8. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  9. Licensure tests for special education teachers: how well they assess knowledge of reading instruction and mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotsky, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    To determine the extent to which knowledge of evidence-based reading instruction and mathematics is assessed on licensure tests for prospective special education teachers, this study drew on information provided by Educational Testing Service (ETS), the American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence, and National Evaluation Systems (now Evaluation Systems group of Pearson). It estimated the percentage of test items on phonemic awareness, phonics, and vocabulary knowledge and on mathematics content. It also analyzed descriptions of ETS's tests of "principles of teaching and learning." Findings imply that prospective special education teachers should be required to take both a dedicated test of evidence-based reading instructional knowledge, as in California, Massachusetts, and Virginia, and a test of mathematical knowledge, as in Massachusetts. States must design their own tests of teaching principles to assess knowledge of evidence-based educational theories.

  10. A multiple-well method for immunohistochemical testing of many reagents on a single microscopic slide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, P E; Letica, L H; Shakui, P; Averill, D R

    1988-09-01

    Multiple wells (M-wells) have been made over tissue sections on single microscopic slides to simultaneously localize binding specificity of many antibodies. More than 20 individual 4-microliter wells over tissue have been applied/slide, representing more than a 5-fold improvement in wells/slide and a 25-fold reduction in reagent volume over previous methods. More than 30 wells/slide have been applied over cellular monolayers. To produce the improvement, previous strategies of placing specimens into wells were changed to instead create wells over the specimen. We took advantage of the hydrophobic properties of paint to surround the wells and to segregate the various different primary antibodies. Segregation was complete on wells alternating with and without primary monoclonal antibody. The procedure accommodates both frozen and paraffin sections, yielding slides which last more than a year. After monoclonal antibody detection, standard histologic stains can be applied as counterstains. M-wells are suitable for localizing binding of multiple reagents or sample unknowns (polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies, hybridoma supernatants, body fluids, lectins) to either tissues or cells. Their small sample volume and large number of sample wells/slide could be particularly useful for early screening of hybridoma supernatants and for titration curves in immunohistochemistry (McKeever PE, Shakui P, Letica LH, Averill DR: J Histochem Cytochem 36:931, 1988).

  11. An interferon-gamma release assay test performs well in routine screening for tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Danielsen, Allan; Fløe, Andreas; Lillebæk, Troels

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A positive interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is regarded as proof of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We conducted an evaluation of the IGRA test “T-SPOT.TB” to test its performance during clinical routine use by analysing the positivity rate and odds, effect of season...... and sensitivity. Material and methods: Data from T-SPOT.TB testing together with age and test indications (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) candidate, contact investigation or suspicion of tuberculosis (TB)) were combined with mycobac­teria culture results. Results: A total of 1,809 patients were tested....... Conclusive results were achieved for 1,780 patients (98.4%). Among these, 4.6% of anti-TNFα candidates, 19.3% of contacts and 24.4% of TB suspects tested positive. Compared with anti-TNFα candidates, the odds for a positive result were significantly higher for contact investigations (odds ratio (OR), mean...

  12. How Well Does the Sum Score Summarize the Test? Summability as a Measure of Internal Consistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeman, J.J.; De, Jong N.H.

    2018-01-01

    Many researchers use Cronbach's alpha to demonstrate internal consistency, even though it has been shown numerous times that Cronbach's alpha is not suitable for this. Because the intention of questionnaire and test constructers is to summarize the test by its overall sum score, we advocate

  13. Passageless Comprehension on the "Nelson-Denny Reading Test": Well above Chance for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Chris; Lindstrom, Jennifer; Nelson, Jason; Lindstrom, William; Gregg, K. Noel

    2010-01-01

    The comprehension section of the "Nelson-Denny Reading Test" (NDRT) is widely used to assess the reading comprehension skills of adolescents and adults in the United States. In this study, the authors explored the content validity of the NDRT Comprehension Test (Forms G and H) by asking university students (with and without at-risk…

  14. Testing the Main Determinants of Teachers' Professional Well-Being by Using a Mixed Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the perception of professional well-being appears as a problematic issue in past studies. Literature reviews show that previous studies have not yet reached an agreement on measures of teachers' professional well-being. Furthermore, when we consider the cultural context, a research gap becomes clearer. The aim of this study was to…

  15. Investigation of resonant signals recorded at well J-11, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.W.

    1981-07-01

    After the Farm event, gages measuring horizontal accelerations at the bottom of Well J-11 began resonating at about 3 to 5 hertz on each shot. This investigation of possible causes concludes that the material surrounding the well casing has fallen away, allowing the casing to move freely in horizontal directions and causing the undesirable resonance

  16. The microdose rapid 14C urea breath test compares well with the original rapid 14 breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellon, M.S.; Bartholomeusz, F.D.L.; Chatterton, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The 14 C urea breath test (CUBT) is a sensitive test used in the detection of H. pylori infection. The rapid 14 CUBT using 185 KBq of 14 C urea showed a sensitivity of 100% when tested in 36 patients. The aim of this study was to compare the results of the 14 CUBT performed following the ingestion of 37KBq microdose 14 C urea capsule (Bicapsule, Trimed) with the earlier method which uses 185 KBq 14 C urea. 19 patients (nine female age 21-52 yrs) were studied. All subjects first underwent a 14 CUBT with the microdose capsule and a single 15 minute post ingestion sample. An hour later the test was repeated but with a dose of 185 KBq 14 C urea in liquid form. A normal result was taken as 2 = 0.92). This is shown above. The Rapid 14 CUBT performed following the microdose capsule whilst reducing patient radiation exposure is an accurate test for the detection of H. pylori. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  18. Optimal energy efficiency policies and regulatory demand-side management tests: How well do they match?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Under conventional models, subsidizing energy efficiency requires electricity to be priced below marginal cost. Its benefits increase when electricity prices increase to finance the subsidy. With high prices, subsidies are counterproductive unless consumers fail to make efficiency investments when private benefits exceed costs. If the gain from adopting efficiency is only reduced electricity spending, capping revenues from energy sales may induce a utility to substitute efficiency for generation when the former is less costly. This goes beyond standard 'decoupling' of distribution revenues from sales, requiring complex energy price regulation. The models' results are used to evaluate tests in the 2002 California Standard Practice Manual for assessing demand-side management programs. Its 'Ratepayer Impact Measure' test best conforms to the condition that electricity price is too low. Its 'Total Resource Cost' and 'Societal Cost' tests resemble the condition for expanded decoupling. No test incorporates optimality conditions apart from consumer choice failure.

  19. Mobility limitation in self-described well-functioning older adults : importance of endurance walk testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonsick, Eleanor M; Newman, Anne B; Visser, Marjolein; Goodpaster, Bret; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Rubin, Susan; Nevitt, Michael C; Harris, Tamara B

    BACKGROUND: Mobility limitations are prevalent, potentially reversible precursors to mobility loss that may go undetected in older adults. This study evaluates standardized administration of an endurance walk test for identifying unrecognized and impending mobility limitation in community elders.

  20. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report

  1. Testing a community water supply well located near a stream for susceptibility to stream contamination and low-flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Maddox, N. S.; Tysor, E. H.; Swanson, J.; Degon, A.; Howard, J.; Tsinnajinnie, L.; Frisbee, M. D.; Wilson, J. L.; Newman, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    A community well is the primary water supply to the town of El Rito. This small rural town in is located in a semi-arid, mountainous portion of northern New Mexico where water is scarce. The well is 72 meters from a nearby intermittent stream. Initial tritium sampling suggests a groundwater connection between the stream and well. The community is concerned with the sustainability and future quality of the well water. If this well is as tightly connected to the stream as the tritium data suggests, then the well is potentially at risk due to upstream contamination and the impacts of extended drought. To examine this, we observed the well over a two-week period performing pump and recovery tests, electrical resistivity surveys, and physical observations of the nearby stream. We also collected general chemistry, stable isotope and radon samples from the well and stream. Despite the large well diameter, our pump test data exhibited behavior similar to a Theis curve, but the rate of drawdown decreased below the Theis curve late in the test. This decrease suggests that the aquifer is being recharged, possibly through delayed yield, upwelling of groundwater, or from the stream. The delayed yield hypothesis is supported by our electrical resistivity surveys, which shows very little change in the saturated zone over the course of the pump test, and by low values of pump-test estimated aquifer storativity. Observations of the nearby stream showed no change in stream-water level throughout the pump test. Together this data suggests that the interaction between the stream and the well is low, but recharge could be occurring through other mechanisms such as delayed yield. Additional pump tests of longer duration are required to determine the exact nature of the aquifer and its communication with the well.

  2. Design and testing of a heat transfer sensor for well exploration tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soprani, Stefano; Just Nørgaard, Anders; Nesgaard, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    The exploration of oil, gas, and geothermal wells is moving towards increasingly harsher downhole environments, requiring more and more advanced drilling and intervention tools. The high downhole temperatures threaten the correct functionality of intervention equipment and of standard downhole...

  3. Charge collection control using retrograde well tested by proton microprobe irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayama, Hirokazu; Takai, Mikio; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Satoh, Shinichi; Sonoda, Kenichirou; Katani, Norihiko.

    1993-01-01

    Soft error reduction by high-energy ion-implanted layers has been investigated by novel evaluation techniques using high-energy proton microprobes. A retrograde well formed by 160 and 700 keV boron ion implantation could completely suppress soft errors induced by the proton microprobes at 400 keV. The proton-induced current revealed the charge collection efficiency for the retrograde well structure. The collected charge for the retrograde well in the soft-error mapping was proved to be lower than the critical charge of the measured DRAMs(dynamic random-access memories). Complementary use of soft-error mapping and ion-induced-current measurement could clarify well structures immune against soft errors. (author)

  4. A Generic analytical solution for modelling pumping tests in wells intersecting fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewandel, Benoît; Lanini, Sandra; Lachassagne, Patrick; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe

    2018-04-01

    The behaviour of transient flow due to pumping in fractured rocks has been studied for at least the past 80 years. Analytical solutions were proposed for solving the issue of a well intersecting and pumping from one vertical, horizontal or inclined fracture in homogeneous aquifers, but their domain of application-even if covering various fracture geometries-was restricted to isotropic or anisotropic aquifers, whose potential boundaries had to be parallel or orthogonal to the fracture direction. The issue thus remains unsolved for many field cases. For example, a well intersecting and pumping a fracture in a multilayer or a dual-porosity aquifer, where intersected fractures are not necessarily parallel or orthogonal to aquifer boundaries, where several fractures with various orientations intersect the well, or the effect of pumping not only in fractures, but also in the aquifer through the screened interval of the well. Using a mathematical demonstration, we show that integrating the well-known Theis analytical solution (Theis, 1935) along the fracture axis is identical to the equally well-known analytical solution of Gringarten et al. (1974) for a uniform-flux fracture fully penetrating a homogeneous aquifer. This result implies that any existing line- or point-source solution can be used for implementing one or more discrete fractures that are intersected by the well. Several theoretical examples are presented and discussed: a single vertical fracture in a dual-porosity aquifer or in a multi-layer system (with a partially intersecting fracture); one and two inclined fractures in a leaky-aquifer system with pumping either only from the fracture(s), or also from the aquifer between fracture(s) in the screened interval of the well. For the cases with several pumping sources, analytical solutions of flowrate contribution from each individual source (fractures and well) are presented, and the drawdown behaviour according to the length of the pumped screened interval of

  5. Single-well injection-withdrawal tests (SWIW). Investigation of evaluation aspects under heterogeneous crystalline bedrock conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordqvist, Rune; Gustafsson, Erik

    2004-08-01

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests have been identified by SKB as an investigation method for solute transport properties in the forthcoming site investigations. A previous report presents a literature study as well as scoping calculations for SWIW tests in homogeneous crystalline bedrock environments. The present report comprises further scoping calculations under assumptions of heterogeneous bedrock conditions. Simple but plausible homogeneous evaluation models are tested on simulated SWIW tests in hypothetical heterogeneous two-dimensional fractures. The results from this study indicate that heterogeneity may cause effects of flow irreversibility when background hydraulic gradients are significant and the tested section is located in a dominating flow path. This implies that such conditions make it more difficult to interpret results from SWIW tests of longer duration with sorbing and/or diffusing tracers. Sorption and diffusion processes may be best studied when SWIW tests are conducted in borehole sections with low natural flow rates

  6. High-resolution well-log derived dielectric properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Goldberg, D.; Collett, T.; Hunter, R.

    2011-01-01

    A dielectric logging tool, electromagnetic propagation tool (EPT), was deployed in 2007 in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert Well), North Slope, Alaska. The measured dielectric properties in the Mount Elbert well, combined with density log measurements, result in a vertical high-resolution (cm-scale) estimate of gas hydrate saturation. Two hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs about 20 m thick were identified using the EPT log and exhibited gas-hydrate saturation estimates ranging from 45% to 85%. In hydrate-bearing zones where variation of hole size and oil-based mud invasion are minimal, EPT-based gas hydrate saturation estimates on average agree well with lower vertical resolution estimates from the nuclear magnetic resonance logs; however, saturation and porosity estimates based on EPT logs are not reliable in intervals with substantial variations in borehole diameter and oil-based invasion.EPT log interpretation reveals many thin-bedded layers at various depths, both above and below the thick continuous hydrate occurrences, which range from 30-cm to about 1-m thick. Such thin layers are not indicated in other well logs, or from the visual observation of core, with the exception of the image log recorded by the oil-base microimager. We also observe that EPT dielectric measurements can be used to accurately detect fine-scale changes in lithology and pore fluid properties of hydrate-bearing sediments where variation of hole size is minimal. EPT measurements may thus provide high-resolution in-situ hydrate saturation estimates for comparison and calibration with laboratory analysis. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. How well does the 30-second Chair Stand Test predict rehabilitation needs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen Bruun, Inge; Nørgaard, Birgitte; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    of functional decline. The 30-Second Chair Stand Test (30s-CST) is recommended by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority for screening of functional decline in elderly citizens living in their own home. However, its validity with hospitalized patients is undocumented, and it is unclear whether loss...... performance, e) patient-related data. Both patients and health professionals will contribute to the face validity assessment. Results The results will be available by the end of 2014. Conclusions Face validations of 30s-CST and DEMMI are relevant as validated tests for short-term hospitalized patients...

  8. A single well pumping and recovery test to measure in situ acrotelm transmissivity in raised bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, van der S.

    2004-01-01

    A quasi-steady-state single pit pumping and recovery test to measure in situ the transmissivity of the highly permeable upper layer of raised bogs, the acrotelm, is described and discussed. The basic concept is the expanding depression cone during both pumping and recovery. It is shown that applying

  9. Environmental assessment of proposed geothermal well testing in the Tigre Lagoon Oil Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    An environmental assessment is made of the proposed testing of two geopressured, geothermal aquifers in central coastal Louisiana. On the basis of an analysis of the environmental setting, subsurface characteristics, and the proposed action, potential environmental impacts are determined and evaluated together with potential conflicts with federal, state, and local programs. (LBS )

  10. Diabetes Intrusiveness and Wellness among Elders: A Test of the Illness Intrusiveness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Vaughn A.; Killian, Tim; Roessler, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Using data collected from 147 predominately African American senior citizens in Arkansas, this research examined the Illness Intrusiveness Model (Devins, 1991; Devins & Seland, 1987; Devins & Shnek, 2000) to explain variations in wellness specifically related to participants' adaptation to diabetes. The theoretical model hypothesized that…

  11. Hydrogeologic characterization of wells HTH-1, UE18r, UE6e, and HTH-3, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, B.F.; McKay, W.A.; Chapman, J.B.; Tyler, S.W.

    1991-06-01

    Monitoring for the migration of contaminants in groundwater or for the proper design of nuclear test emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) requires proper placement and completion of monitoring wells. This is only possible if the hydrogeologic system is understood in a regional and local context, necessitating data from existing wells and boreholes. Though the NTS Groundwater Characterization Project will be drilling wells, their great expense limits the number of new wells. However, there are many existing boreholes and wells on the NTS which have not been completely evaluated hydrologically. Some of these are incorporated in the Long Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), others are related to the testing programs. In all cases, additional site investigation in necessary to properly interpret the hydrogeologic data from these wells. Monitoring wells on the NTS are poorly characterized with regard to aquifers penetrated, vertical hydraulic gradients, and vertical variations in water quality. One of the goals of the well validation program was to gain a thorough understanding of the parameters needed to interpret the source and fate potential hazardous and radioactive substances that may be detected in these wells in the future. One of the most critical parameters for monitoring is the knowledge of what aquifer or geologic unit is being sampled when a water sample is collected. Pumped water samples are weighted most heavily to the water quality of the most productive (highest transmissivity) aquifer penetrated by the well

  12. Construction, Geology, and Aquifer Testing of the Maalo Road, Aahoaka Hill, and Upper Eleele Tank Monitor Wells, Kauai, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuka, Scot K.

    2005-01-01

    The Maalo Road, Aahoaka Hill, and Upper Eleele Tank monitor wells were constructed using rotary drilling methods between July 1998 and August 2002 as part of a program of exploratory drilling, aquifer testing, and hydrologic analysis on Kauai. Aquifer tests were conducted in the uncased boreholes of the wells. The Maalo Road monitor well in the Lihue Basin penetrated 915 feet, mostly through mafic lava flows. Most of the rock samples from this well had chemical compositions similar to the Koloa Volcanics, but the deepest sample analyzed had a composition similar to the Waimea Canyon Basalt. Water temperature ranged from 25.6 to 27.4 degrees Celsius and specific conductance ranged from 303 to 627 microsiemens per centimeter during aquifer testing. Discharge rate ranged from 174 to 220 gallons per minute and maximum drawdown was 138.25 ft during a 7-day sustained-discharge test, but the test was affected by pump and generator problems. The Aahoaka Hill monitor well in the Lihue Basin penetrated 804 feet, mostly through mafic lava flows and possibly dikes. The well penetrated rocks having chemical compositions similar to the Waimea Canyon Basalt. During the first three hours of a sustained-discharge aquifer test in which the discharge rate varied between 92 and 117 gallons per minute, water temperature was 24.6 to 25.6 degrees Celsius, and specific conductance was 212 to 238 microsiemens per centimeter; this test was halted after a short period because drawdown was high. In a subsequent 7-day test, discharge was 8 to 23 gallons per minute, and maximum drawdown was 37.71 feet after 1,515 minutes of testing. The Upper Eleele Tank monitor well is near the Hanapepe River Valley. The well penetrated 740 feet through soil, sediment, mafic lava flows, volcanic ash, and scoria. Rocks above a depth of 345 feet had compositions similar to the Koloa Volcanics, but a sample from 720 to 725 feet had a composition similar to rocks of the Waimea Canyon Basalt. During a 7-day aquifer

  13. Perfectionistic Concerns, Social Negativity, and Subjective Well-Being: A Test of the Social Disconnection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Sean P; Kehayes, Ivy-Lee L; Leonard, Kenneth E; Fraser, Ronald; Stewart, Sherry H

    2017-06-01

    Partner-specific perfectionistic concerns (PC) include concern over mistakes, self-criticism, and socially prescribed perfectionism as it pertains to one's partner. The social disconnection model proposes that PC influences well-being indirectly through interpersonal problems. Thus, we hypothesized that social negativity (expressed anger, hostility, and rejection) would mediate the relationship between dyadic PC and subjective well-being. Data from 203 romantic dyads (92.1% heterosexual) were collected using self-report surveys and a four-wave, 4-week longitudinal design. Participants were predominantly female (53.1%), young (M = 22.69 years), and Caucasian (82.3%). Data were analyzed using an actor-partner interdependence model with multilevel structural equation modeling. There were significant actor effects at the between-subjects and within-subjects levels, and significant partner effects for the relationship between PC and social negativity at the within-subject level. Social negativity mediated the relationships between PC and both negative affect and life satisfaction. However, positive affect was more weakly related to PC and social negativity. The social disconnection model was supported. PC was positively associated with one's own social negativity and evoked hostile behaviors from one's partner. Hostile, rejecting behaviors reduced the well-being of the actor, but not the partner. Results suggest perfectionism may be best understood within an interpersonal context. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Reduction in exposure to arsenic from drinking well-water in Bangladesh limited by insufficient testing and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, A; Schoenfeld, A; Ahmed, K M; van Geen, A

    2017-01-01

    This study considers potential policy responses to the still very high levels of exposure to arsenic (As) caused by drinking water from shallow tubewells in rural Bangladesh. It examines a survey of 4,109 households in 76 villages of Araihazar upazila conducted two years after a national testing campaign swept through the area. The area is adjacent to the region where a long-term study was initiated in 2000 and where households are periodically reminded of health risks associated with well-water elevated in As. Results confirm that testing spurs switching away from unsafe wells, although the 27% fraction who switched was only about half of that in the long-term study area. By village, the fraction of households that switched varied with the availability of safe wells and the distance from the long-term study area. Lacking follow-up testing, two years only after the campaign 21% of households did not know the status of their well and 21% of households with an unsafe well that switched did so to an untested well. Well testing is again urgently needed in Bangladesh and should be paired with better ways to raise awareness and the installation of additional deep community wells.

  15. Test plan for qualification of the S-type fiberglass materials for use as the liquid observation well casing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    This test plan presents the guidelines and requirements for acceptance of the S-type fiberglass material for use as the liquid observation well casing material. The plan for evaluating the physical properties of the candidate fiberglass materials when subjected to radiation, corrosive chemicals, and high temperatures typically found in the waste tanks are outlined. The tests also include tube connection evaluations. Finally, the test plan identifies the participants, their responsibilities, and the schedule for completion of the work

  16. Depth-dependent groundwater quality sampling at City of Tallahassee test well 32, Leon County, Florida, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, W. Scott; Wacker, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Public-supply wells sometimes produce water of less than desirable quality because contaminants can migrate to the open interval of wells through preferential pathways. If these pathways can be identified, zones that produce poor quality water can be excluded during the well-construction process. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed geophysical testing methods that can be used to delineate zones of high permeability in test wells. Once the highly permeable zones are identified, water-quality data can be collected from each zone to identify whether any of the zones produce water of poor quality. The zones producing poor quality water can then be cased off in the final well design so that they do not contribute flow to the production well, reducing subsequent water-treatment costs.

  17. Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-01-01

    A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites, Corrective Action Unit 443'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first phase involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data, and inputting the data into a three-dimensional numerical model to depict groundwater flow. The output from the groundwater flow model was used in a transport model to simulate the migration of a radionuclide release (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second phase of modeling (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after NDEP reviewed the first model. This phase was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third phase of modeling updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003). Corrective action alternatives were evaluated and an alternative was submitted in the ''Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for CAU 443 is Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and will control inadvertent exposure to contaminated groundwater at CAU 443

  18. Analysis of well test data from selected intervals in Leuggern deep borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasaki, K.

    1990-07-01

    Applicability of the PTST technique was verified by conducting a sensitivity study to the various parameters. The study showed that for ranges of skin parameters the true formation permeability was still successfully estimated using the PTST analysis technique. The analysis technique was then applied to field data from the deep borehole in Leuggern, Northern Switzerland. The analysis indicated that the formation permeability may be as much as one order of magnitude larger than the value based on no-skin analysis. Swabbing data from the Leuggern deep borehole were also analyzed assuming that they are constant pressure tests. The analysis of the swabbing data indicates that the formation transmissivity is as much as 20 times larger than the previously obtained value. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland

  19. A Test of Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity: Large, Well-Ordered Insulin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Lovelace, Jeff; Bellamy, Henry D.; Snell, Edward H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Crystals of insulin grown in microgravity on space shuttle mission STS-95 were extremely well-ordered and unusually large (many > 2 mm). The physical characteristics of six microgravity and six earth-grown crystals were examined by X-ray analysis employing superfine f slicing and unfocused synchrotron radiation. This experimental setup allowed hundreds of reflections to be precisely examined for each crystal in a short period of time. The microgravity crystals were on average 34 times larger, had 7 times lower mosaicity, had 54 times higher reflection peak heights and diffracted to significantly higher resolution than their earth grown counterparts. A single mosaic domain model could account for reflections in microgravity crystals whereas reflections from earth crystals required a model with multiple mosaic domains. This statistically significant and unbiased characterization indicates that the microgravity environment was useful for the improvement of crystal growth and resultant diffraction quality in insulin crystals and may be similarly useful for macromolecular crystals in general.

  20. How to test for diagonalizability: the discretized PT-invariant square-well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigert, S.

    2005-01-01

    Given a non-Hermitian matrix M, the structure of its minimal polynomial encodes whether M is diagonalizable or not. This note explains how to determine the minimal polynomial of a matrix without going through its characteristic polynomial. The approach is applied to a quantum mechanical particle moving in a square well under the influence of a piece-wise constant PT-symmetric potential. Upon discretizing the configuration space, the system is described by a matrix of dimension three which turns out not to be diagonalizable for a critical strength of the interaction. The systems develops a three-fold degenerate eigenvalue, and two of the three eigenfunctions disappear at this exceptional point, giving a difference between the algebraic and geometric multiplicity of the eigenvalue equal to two. (author)

  1. On-call work and physicians' well-being: testing the potential mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, T; Puttonen, S; Elovainio, M

    2014-07-01

    On-call duties have been rated to be among the most stressful aspects of physicians' work. On-call work has been associated, for example, with medical errors, injuries and lower well-being. Thus, because it is not possible to remove on-call duties, measures to decrease the negative ramifications of on-call work are needed. To examine whether working on-call would predict psychological distress, job satisfaction and work ability in a 4-year follow-up and whether sleeping problems or work interference with family (WIF) would act as mechanisms in these associations. Questionnaires in 2006 and 2010 among physicians in Finland. The mediation analyses were conducted using methods suggested by Preacher and Hayes to examine direct and indirect effects with multiple mediators. There were 1541 respondents (60% women) of whom 52% had on-call duties. Sleeping problems and WIF acted as mechanisms in the association of existence of on-call duties with high distress, low job satisfaction and low work ability. On-call work was associated with higher levels of sleeping problems and WIF, and the number of active on-call hours was associated with higher levels of WIF, but not with sleeping problems. According to our results, one way to attenuate on-call work's negative ramifications is to make it easier for on-call physicians to connect work and family lives and develop work arrangements to promote better sleep and protected sleep time. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Processing and geologic analysis of conventional cores from well ER-20-6 No. 1, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prothro, L.B.; Townsend, M.J.; Drellack, S.L. Jr

    1997-09-01

    In 1996, Well Cluster ER-20-6 was drilled on Pahute Mesa in Area 20, in the northwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The three wells of the cluster are located from 166 to 296 meters (m) (544 to 971 feet [ft]) southwest of the site of the underground nuclear test code-named BULLION, conducted in 1990 in Emplacement Hole U-20bd. The well cluster was planned to be the site of a forced-gradient experiment designed to investigate radionuclide transport in groundwater. To obtain additional information on the occurrence of radionuclides, nature of fractures, and lithology, a portion of Well ER-20-6 No. 1, the hole closest to the explosion cavity, was cored for later analysis. Bechtel Nevada (BN) geologists originally prepared the geologic interpretation of the Well Cluster ER-20-6 site and documented the geology of each well in the cluster. However, the cores from Well ER-20-6 No. 1 were not accessible at the time of that work. As the forced-gradient experiment and other radio nuclide migration studies associated with the well cluster progressed, it was deemed appropriate to open the cores, describe the geology, and re-package the core for long-term air-tight storage. This report documents and describes the processing, geologic analysis, and preservation of the conventional cores from Well ER20-6 No. 1

  3. Processing and geologic analysis of conventional cores from well ER-20-6 No. 1, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prothro, L.B., Townsend, M.J.; Drellack, S.L. Jr. [and others

    1997-09-01

    In 1996, Well Cluster ER-20-6 was drilled on Pahute Mesa in Area 20, in the northwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The three wells of the cluster are located from 166 to 296 meters (m) (544 to 971 feet [ft]) southwest of the site of the underground nuclear test code-named BULLION, conducted in 1990 in Emplacement Hole U-20bd. The well cluster was planned to be the site of a forced-gradient experiment designed to investigate radionuclide transport in groundwater. To obtain additional information on the occurrence of radionuclides, nature of fractures, and lithology, a portion of Well ER-20-6 No. 1, the hole closest to the explosion cavity, was cored for later analysis. Bechtel Nevada (BN) geologists originally prepared the geologic interpretation of the Well Cluster ER-20-6 site and documented the geology of each well in the cluster. However, the cores from Well ER-20-6 No. 1 were not accessible at the time of that work. As the forced-gradient experiment and other radio nuclide migration studies associated with the well cluster progressed, it was deemed appropriate to open the cores, describe the geology, and re-package the core for long-term air-tight storage. This report documents and describes the processing, geologic analysis, and preservation of the conventional cores from Well ER20-6 No. 1.

  4. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  5. Pumping test and fluid sampling report - Mansfield No. 1 (PD-4) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This report contains pumping test and fluid sampling data collected at Mansfield No. 1 well, located in Oldham County, in the Permian Basin of Texas. These data were collected by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation to support studies of fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. The testing and sampling took place between October 1981 and October 1982. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated. 4 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  6. Influences on domestic well water testing behavior in a Central Maine area with frequent groundwater arsenic occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sara V; Marvinney, Robert G; Zheng, Yan

    2015-02-01

    In 2001 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) adopted a new standard for arsenic (As) in drinking water of 10 μg/L, replacing the old standard of 50 μg/L. However, for the 12% of the U.S. population relying on unregulated domestic well water, including half of the population of Maine, it is solely the well owner's responsibility to test and treat the water. A mailed household survey was implemented in January 2013 in 13 towns of Central Maine with the goal of understanding the population's testing and treatment practices and the key behavior influencing factors in an area with high well-water dependency and frequent natural groundwater As. The response rate was 58.3%; 525 of 900 likely-delivered surveys to randomly selected addresses were completed. Although 78% of the households reported that their well has been tested, half of it was more than 5 years ago. Among the 58.7% who believe they have tested for As, most do not remember the results. Better educated, higher income homeowners who more recently purchased their homes are most likely to have included As when last testing. While households agree that water and As-related health risks can be severe, they feel low personal vulnerability and there are low testing norms overall. Significant predictors of including As when last testing include: having knowledge that years of exposure increases As-related health risks (risk knowledge), knowing who to contact to test well water (action knowledge), believing that regular testing does not take too much time (instrumental attitude), and having neighbors who regularly test their water (descriptive norm). Homeowners in As-affected communities have the tendency to underestimate their As risks compared to their neighbors. The reasons for this optimistic bias require further study, but low testing behaviors in this area may be due to the influence of a combination of norm, ability, and attitude factors and barriers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Two-well recirculation tracer tests at the H-2 hydropad, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    Two recirculation tracer tests were performed on the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the H-2 hydropad at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The first test, which used pentafluorobenzoate (PFB), sodium benzoate, and a suite of halocarbons for tracers, was terminated before breakthrough at the pumping well because of equipment failure. The second test, which used sodium thiocyanate (SCN) and difluorochlorobromomethane (BCF) as tracers, proceeded normally and lasted 270 days. During the second test, the tracer injected during the first test was recovered. Tracer test analyses for the two tests were performed only for the PFB tracer injected during the first test and recovered during the second, and for SCN. Analysis of the PFB recovery was crudely modeled as a one-dimensional pulse-injection test. The SCN tracer used in the second test was analyzed with the homogeneous, isotropic Grove and Beetem one-dimensional porous-medium recirculating flow test model. In general, model predictions are in poor agreement with the field measurements. Discrepancies could be produced by the combined effects of local nonhomogeneities, matrix diffusion, and possible sorption or degradation of the tracer during the test. The best overall match between the SCN breakthrough curve predicted by the semianalytical model and that observed in measurements was achieved using a porosity that ranged from 17% to 19% and a dispersivity of 16 to 18 ft. A match based only on the early part of the breakthrough curve, however, yielded a porosity of 11.5% and a dispersivity of 8 ft. The latter porosity might more closely represent the effective porosity of the Culebra, if the SCN degraded during the test

  8. Adolescent Siblings of Individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: Testing a Diathesis-Stress Model of Sibling Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsmond, Gael I.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a diathesis-stress model of well-being for siblings who have a brother or sister with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data were collected from 57 adolescents and their mothers. Sisters reported higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms than brothers. Having a family history of ASDs was associated…

  9. Results of testing the E9 multiple probe lateral logging device in deep wells in the eastern Pre-caucasus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarchuk, A.F.; Kochetkov, V.T.; Kucherov, R.A.

    1981-07-01

    The integrated lateral logging device E9 developed for investigating deep and extra-deep wells, permitting measurement of apparent resistances by three probes at different depths, is described. It is heat and pressure resistant (up to 200/degree/C, 120 MPa). The tests showed that under certain favorable conditions the device is fairly effective.

  10. Geohydrology of volcanic tuff penetrated by test well UE-25b#1, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoud, R.G.; Lobmeyer, D.H.; Whitfield, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Test well UE-25bNo1, located on the east side of Yucca Mountain in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, was drilled to a total depth of 1,220 meters and hydraulically tested as part of a program to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a nuclear-waste repository. The well penetrated almost 46 meters of alluvium and 1,174 meters of Tertiary volcanic tuffs. The composite hydraulic head for aquifers penetrated by the well was 728.9 meters above sea level (471.4 meters below land surface) with a slight decrease in loss of hydraulic head with depth. Average hydraulic conductivities for stratigraphic units determined from pumping tests, borehole-flow surveys, and packer-injection tests ranged from less than 0.001 meter per day for the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff to 1.1 meters per day for the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff. The small values represented matrix permeability of unfractured rock; the large values probably resulted from fracture permeability. Chemical analyses indicated that the water is a soft sodium bicarbonate type, slightly alkaline, with large concentrations of dissolved silica and sulfate. Uncorrected carbon-14 age dates of the water were 14,100 and 13,400 years. (USGS)

  11. Tritium in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the East Kazakhstan Oblast of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Peter I; Vintró, Luis León; Omarova, Aigul; Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali; Nápoles, Humberto Jiménez; Priest, Nicholas D

    2005-06-01

    The concentration of tritium has been determined in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the Sarzhal, Tel'kem, Balapan and Degelen Mountains areas of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. The data show that levels of tritium in domestic well waters within the settlement of Sarzhal are extremely low at the present time with a median value of 4.4 Bq dm(-3) (95% confidence interval:4.1-4.7 Bq dm(-3)). These levels are only marginally above the background tritium content in surface waters globally. Levels in the atomic craters at Tel'kem 1 and Tel'kem 2 are between one and two orders of magnitude higher, while the level in Lake Balapan is approximately 12,600 Bq dm(-3). Significantly, levels in streams and test-tunnel waters sourced in the Degelen Mountains, the site of approximately 215 underground nuclear tests, are a further order of magnitude higher, being in the range 133,000--235,500 Bq dm(-3). No evidence was adduced which indicates that domestic wells in Sarzhal are contaminated by tritium-rich waters sourced in the Degelen massif, suggesting that the latter are not connected hydrologically to the near-surface groundwater recharging the Sarzhal wells. Annual doses to humans arising from the ingestion of tritium in these well waters are very low at the present time and are of no radiological significance.

  12. Tritium in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the East Kazakhstan Oblast of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Peter I [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Vintro, Luis Leon [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Omarova, Aigul [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Napoles, Humberto Jimenez [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Priest, Nicholas D [School of Health and Social Sciences, Middlesex University, Enfield EN3 4SA (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    The concentration of tritium has been determined in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the Sarzhal, Tel'kem, Balapan and Degelen Mountains areas of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. The data show that levels of tritium in domestic well waters within the settlement of Sarzhal are extremely low at the present time with a median value of 4.4 Bq dm{sup -3} (95% confidence interval: 4.1-4.7 Bq dm{sup -3}). These levels are only marginally above the background tritium content in surface waters globally. Levels in the atomic craters at Tel'kem 1 and Tel'kem 2 are between one and two orders of magnitude higher, while the level in Lake Balapan is approximately 12 600 Bq dm{sup -3}. Significantly, levels in streams and test-tunnel waters sourced in the Degelen Mountains, the site of approximately 215 underground nuclear tests, are a further order of magnitude higher, being in the range 133 000-235 500 Bq dm{sup -3}. No evidence was adduced which indicates that domestic wells in Sarzhal are contaminated by tritium-rich waters sourced in the Degelen massif, suggesting that the latter are not connected hydrologically to the near-surface groundwater recharging the Sarzhal wells. Annual doses to humans arising from the ingestion of tritium in these well waters are very low at the present time and are of no radiological significance.

  13. Cross-well slug testing in unconfined aquifers: A case study from the Sleepers River Watershed, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitz, K.; Dripps, W.

    1999-01-01

    Normally, slug test measurements are limited to the well in which the water level is perturbed. Consequently, it is often difficult to obtain reliable estimates of hydraulic properties, particularly if the aquifer is anisotropic or if there is a wellbore skin. In this investigation, we use partially penetrating stress and observation wells to evaluate specific storage, radial hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy of the aquifer, and the hydraulic conductivity of the borehole skin. The study site is located in the W9 subbasin of the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont. At the site, ~3 m of saturated till are partially penetrated by a stress well located in the center of the unconfined aquifer and six observation wells located above, below, and at the depth of the stress well at radial distances of 1.2 and 2.4 m. The observation wells were shut in with inflatable packers. The semianalytical solution of Butler (1995) was used to conduct a sensitivity analysis and to interpret slug test results. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the response of the stress well is primarily sensitive to radial hydraulic conductivity, less sensitive to anisotropy and the conductivity of the borehole skin, and nearly insensitive to specific storage. In contrast, the responses of the observation wells are sensitive to all four parameters. Interpretation of the field data was facilitated by generating type curves in a manner analogous to the method of Cooper et al. (1967). Because the value of radial hydraulic conductivity is obtained from a match point, the number of unknowns is reduced to three. The estimated values of radial hydraulic conductivity and specific storage are comparable to those derived from the methods of Bouwer and Rice (1976) and Cooper et al. (1967). The values and skin conductivity, however, could not have been obtained without the use of observation wells.Normally, slug test measurements are limited to the well in which the water level is perturbed

  14. Research and field tests of staged fracturing technology for casing deformation sections in horizontal shale gas wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimeng Liao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal shale gas well fracturing is mostly carried out by pumping bridge plugs. In the case of casing deformation, the bridge plug can not be pumped down to the designated position, so the hole sections below the deformation could not be stimulated according to the design program. About 30% of horizontal shale gas wells in the Changning and Weiyuan Blocks, Sichuan Basin, suffer various casing deformation after fracturing. Previously, the hole sections which could not be stimulated due to casing deformation were generally abandoned. As a result, the resources controlled by shale gas wells weren't exploited effectively and the fracturing effect was impacted greatly. There are a lot of difficulties in investigating casing deformation, such as complex mechanisms, various influencing factors and unpredictable deformation time. Therefore, it is especially important to seek a staged fracturing technology suitable for the casing deformation sections. In this paper, the staged fracturing technology with sand plugs inside fractures and the staged fracturing technology with temporary plugging balls were tested in casing deformation wells. The staged fracturing technology with sand plugs inside fractures was carried out in the mode of single-stage perforation and single-stage fracturing. The staged fracturing technology with temporary plugging balls was conducted in the mode of single perforation, continuous fracturing and staged ball dropping. Then, two kinds of technologies were compared in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, they were tested on site. According to the pressure response, the pressure monitoring of the adjacent wells and the microseismic monitoring in the process of actual fracturing, both technologies are effective in the stimulation of the casing deformation sections, realizing well control reserves efficiently and guaranteeing fracturing effects. Keywords: Shale gas, Horizontal well, Casing deformation, Staged

  15. Evaluation of Low or High Permeability of Fractured Rock using Well Head Losses from Step-Drawdown Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Geon Young; Koh, Yong Kwon; Kim, Hyoung Soo

    2012-01-01

    The equation of the step-drawdown test 's w = BQ+CQ p ' written by Rorabaugh (1953) is suitable for drawdown increased non-linearly in the fractured rocks. It was found that value of root mean square error (RMSE) between observed and calculated drawdowns was very low. The calculated C (well head loss coefficient) and P (well head loss exponent) value of well head losses (CQ p ) ranged 3.689 x 10 -19 - 5.825 x 10 -7 and 3.459 - 8.290, respectively. It appeared that the deeper depth in pumping well the larger drawdowns due to pumping rate increase. The well head loss in the fractured rocks, unlike that in porous media, is affected by properties of fractures (fractures of aperture, spacing, and connection) around pumping well. The C and P value in the well head loss is very important to interpret turbulence interval and properties of high or low permeability of fractured rock. As a result, regression analysis of C and P value in the well head losses identified the relationship of turbulence interval and hydraulic properties. The relationship between C and P value turned out very useful to interpret hydraulic properties of the fractured rocks.

  16. Why American Students Do Not Learn To Read Very Well: The Unintended Consequences of Tittle II and Teacher Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Stotsky

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The 1998 reauthorization of the Higher Education Act requires states to report annually to the U.S. Department of Education the number of prospective teachers at each of their teacher training institutions who pass the state’s tests for licensure. However, the law left decisions on what licensure tests to require, what to assess on them, and their passing scores up to each state.This paper provides an analysis of the descriptions of the subject tests assessing reading instructional knowledge that prospective elementary teachers in this country take for licensure: those offered by Educational Testing Service, a variety of those provided by National Evaluation Systems, and the one offered by American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence. I examined these descriptions to determine whether the tests appear to address three major components of a research-based approach to reading pedagogy (instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, and vocabulary knowledge, the weights attached to knowledge of these three components, and the quality of the sample questions they provide. In order to estimate the percentage of test items addressing these three components on each test, I drew on information on the websites of the three major organizations that develop teacher tests as well as of the states that have contracts with NES. To judge by the topics mentioned in the profile for the tests that states require for elementary licensure and the weights attached to the sections of the test containing these topics, most of ETS’s tests devote a tiny proportion of their content to these three components. These tests are used by over 35 states for licensure. The profiles of the tests developed by NES for its client states for elementary licensure range from some that are similar to the ETS tests to some that substantially address these three components.I also analyzed the profiles of the tests required for licensure as a reading teacher, reading specialist

  17. Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Wells R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.G.McLin; W.J. Stone

    2004-06-01

    Hydrologic information is essential for environmental efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Testing at new characterization wells being drilled to the regional aquifer (''R wells'') to improve the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the Pajarito Plateau is providing such information. Field tests were conducted on various zones of saturation penetrated by the R wells to collect data needed for determining hydraulic properties. This document provides details of the design and execution of testing as well as an analysis of data for five new wells: R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31. One well (R-13) was evaluated by a pumping test and the rest (R-9i, R-19, R-22, and R-31) were evaluated by injection tests. Characterization well R-9i is located in Los Alamos Canyon approximately 0.3 mi west of the Route 4/Route 502 intersection. It was completed at a depth of 322 ft below ground surface (bgs) in March 2000. This well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Both screens were tested. Screen 1 is completed at about 189-200 ft bgs in fractured basalt, and screen 2 is completed at about 270-280 ft bgs in massive basalt. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 1 data suggests that the fractured basalt has a transmissivity (T) of 589 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 7.1 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 83 ft. The injection test data from the massive basalt near screen 2 were analyzed by the Bouwer-Rice slug test methodology and suggest that K is 0.11 ft/day, corresponding to a T of about 2.8 ft{sup 2}/day based on a saturated thickness of 25 ft. Characterization well R-13 is located in Mortandad Canyon just west of the eastern Laboratory boundary. It was completed at a depth of 1029 ft bgs in February 2002. This well was constructed with one 60-ft long screen positioned about 125 ft below the regional water table. This screen is completed at about 958-1019 ft bgs and straddles the

  18. A comparison between standard well test evaluation methods used in SKB's site investigations and the generalised radial flow concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin, Sven; Ludvigson, Jan-Erik; Leven, Jakob

    2011-09-01

    According to the strategy for hydrogeological characterisation within the SKB's site investigation programme, two single-hole test methods are available for testing and parameterisation of groundwater flow models - constant-head injection testing with the Pipe String System (PSS method) and difference flow logging with the Posiva Flow Log (PFL method). This report presents the results of an investigation to assess discrepancies in the results of single-hole transmissivity measurements using these methods in the Forsmark site characterisation. The investigation explores the possibility that the source of the discrepancy observed lies in the assumptions of the flow geometry that are inherent to the methods used for standard constant-head injection well test analysis and difference flow logging analysis, respectively. In particular, the report looks at the generalised radial flow (GRF) concept by Barker (1988) as a means that might explain some of the differences. A confirmation of the actual flow geometries (dimensions) observed during hydraulic injection tests could help to identify admissible conceptual models for the tested system, and place the hydraulic testing with the PSS and PFL test methods in its full hydrogeological context. The investigation analyses 151 constant-head injection tests in three cored boreholes at Forsmark. The results suggest that the transmissivities derived with standard constant-head injection well test analysis methods and with the GRF concept, respectively, are similar provided that the dominating flow geometry during the testing is radial (cylindrical). Thus, having flow geometries with dimensions other than 2 affects the value of the interpreted transmissivity. For example, a flow system with a dimension of 1 may require an order of magnitude or more, higher transmissivity to produce the same flow rates. The median of the GRF flow dimensions of all 151 constant-head injection tests is 2.06 with 33% of the tests in the range 1

  19. Field Testing of an In-well Point Velocity Probe for the Rapid Characterization of Groundwater Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorno, T.; Devlin, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Reliable estimates of groundwater velocity is essential in order to best implement in-situ monitoring and remediation technologies. The In-well Point Velocity Probe (IWPVP) is an inexpensive, reusable tool developed for rapid measurement of groundwater velocity at the centimeter-scale in monitoring wells. IWPVP measurements of groundwater speed are based on a small-scale tracer test conducted as ambient groundwater passes through the well screen and the body of the probe. Horizontal flow direction can be determined from the difference in tracer mass passing detectors placed in four funnel-and-channel pathways through the probe, arranged in a cross pattern. The design viability of the IWPVP was confirmed using a two-dimensional numerical model in Comsol Multiphysics, followed by a series of laboratory tank experiments in which IWPVP measurements were calibrated to quantify seepage velocities in both fine and medium sand. Lab results showed that the IWPVP was capable of measuring the seepage velocity in less than 20 minutes per test, when the seepage velocity was in the range of 0.5 to 4.0 m/d. Further, the IWPVP estimated the groundwater speed with a precision of ± 7%, and an accuracy of ± 14%, on average. The horizontal flow direction was determined with an accuracy of ± 15°, on average. Recently, a pilot field test of the IWPVP was conducted in the Borden aquifer, C.F.B. Borden, Ontario, Canada. A total of approximately 44 IWPVP tests were conducted within two 2-inch groundwater monitoring wells comprising a 5 ft. section of #8 commercial well screen. Again, all tests were completed in under 20 minutes. The velocities estimated from IWPVP data were compared to 21 Point Velocity Probe (PVP) tests, as well as Darcy-based estimates of groundwater velocity. Preliminary data analysis shows strong agreement between the IWPVP and PVP estimates of groundwater velocity. Further, both the IWPVP and PVP estimates of groundwater velocity appear to be reasonable when

  20. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin

  1. Estimates of ambient groundwater velocity in the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain from single-well tracer tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.; Umari, M.J.; Roback, R.; Earle, John; Darnell, Jon; Farnham, Irene

    2002-01-01

    The saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada is expected to serve as the final barrier to radionuclide transport from the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The alluvium will act as a barrier if radionuclides breach the engineered barriers in the repository, move through the unsaturated zone beneath the repository to the water table, and then migrate through saturated volcanic tuffs to the alluvium. Three single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests were conducted between December 2000 and April 2001 in the saturated alluviuni at NC-EWDP-19D1, a Nye County-Early Warning Drilling Program well located about 18 km south of Yucca Mountain. The tests had the objectives of (1) distinguishing between a single- and a dual-porosity conceptual radionuclide transport model for the alluvium, and (2) obtaining estimates of ambient groundwater velocity in the alluvium.

  2. Acceptance test procedure for the ultra high pressure bore head for use in the self-installing liquid observation well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertelendy, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    In order to monitor waste stored in single-shell tanks, liquid observation wells (LOWs) are installed to permit periodic insertion of instrumentation probes to evaluate the waste cross sections. An ultra high pressure water bore head, developed for installing instrument trees, was adapted for use with the LOWs. The modification facilitates the removal of the high pressure water feed system after installation. This document describes a series of tests that ensures that the design meets all the functional requirements

  3. Derivation and application of mathematical model for well test analysis with variable skin factor in hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skin factor is often regarded as a constant in most of the mathematical model for well test analysis in oilfields, but this is only a kind of simplified treatment with the actual skin factor changeable. This paper defined the average permeability of a damaged area as a function of time by using the definition of skin factor. Therefore a relationship between a variable skin factor and time was established. The variable skin factor derived was introduced into existing traditional models rather than using a constant skin factor, then, this newly derived mathematical model for well test analysis considering variable skin factor was solved by Laplace transform. The dimensionless wellbore pressure and its derivative changed with dimensionless time were plotted with double logarithm and these plots can be used for type curve fitting. The effects of all the parameters in the expression of variable skin factor were analyzed based on the dimensionless wellbore pressure and its derivative. Finally, actual well testing data were used to fit the type curves developed which validates the applicability of the mathematical model from Sheng-2 Block, Shengli Oilfield, China.

  4. MODELING OF FLOW AND TRANSPORT INDUCED BY PRODUCTION OF HYDROFRACTURE-STIMULATED GAS WELLS NEAR THE RULISON NUCLEAR TEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Rex A. [Navarro Research and Engineering; Cooper, Clay [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Falta, Ronald [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2012-09-17

    The Piceance Basin in western Colorado contains significant reserves of natural gas in poorly connected, low-permeability (tight) sandstone lenses of the Mesaverde Group. The ability to enhance the production of natural gas in this area has long been a goal of the oil and gas industry. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, participated in three tests using nuclear detonations to fracture tight formations in an effort to enhance gas production. The tests were conducted under Project Plowshare, a program designed to identify peaceful, beneficial uses for nuclear devices. The first, Project Gasbuggy, was conducted in 1967 in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The two subsequent tests, Project Rulison in 1969 and Project Rio Blanco in 1973, were in the Piceance Basin. The ability to enhance natural gas production from tight sands has become practical through advances in hydraulic fracturing technology (hydrofracturing). This technology has led to an increase in drilling activity near the Rulison site, raising concerns that contamination currently contained in the subsurface could be released through a gas well drilled too close to the site. As wells are drilled nearer the site, the DOE Office of Legacy Management has taken the approach outlined in the June 2010 Rulison Path Forward document (DOE 2010), which recommends a conservative, staged approach to gas development. Drillers are encouraged to drill wells in areas with a low likelihood of encountering contamination (both distance and direction from the detonation zone are factors) and to collect data from these wells prior to drilling nearer the site’s 40 acre institutional control boundary (Lot 11). Previous modeling results indicate that contamination has been contained within Lot 11 (Figure 1). The Path Forward document couples the model predictions with the monitoring of gas and produced water from the gas wells

  5. Well water quality in rural Nicaragua using a low-cost bacterial test and microbial source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Patricia; Aw, Tiong Gim; Urquhart, Gerald R; Galeano, Miguel Ruiz; Rose, Joan B

    2016-04-01

    Water-related diseases, particularly diarrhea, are major contributors to morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Monitoring water quality on a global scale is crucial to making progress in terms of population health. Traditional analytical methods are difficult to use in many regions of the world in low-resource settings that face severe water quality issues due to the inaccessibility of laboratories. This study aimed to evaluate a new low-cost method (the compartment bag test (CBT)) in rural Nicaragua. The CBT was used to quantify the presence of Escherichia coli in drinking water wells and aimed to determine the source(s) of any microbial contamination. Results indicate that the CBT is a viable method for use in remote rural regions. The overall quality of well water in Pueblo Nuevo, Nicaragua was deemed unsafe, and results led to the conclusion that animal fecal wastes may be one of the leading causes of well contamination. Elevation and depth of wells were not found to impact overall water quality. However rope-pump wells had a 64.1% reduction in contamination when compared with simple wells.

  6. Interpretation of geophysical well-log measurements in drill hole UE25a-1, Nevada Test Site, Radioactive Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Daniels, J.J.; Scott, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    An exploratory hole (UE25a-1) was drilled at Nevada Test Site (NTS) to determine the suitability of pyroclastic deposits as storage sites for radioactive waste. Studies have been conducted to investigate the stratigraphy, structure, mineralogy, petrology, and physical properties of the tuff units encountered in the drill hole. This report deals with the interpretation of physical properties for the tuff units from geophysical well-log measurements. The ash-flow and bedded tuff sequences at NTS comprise complex lithologies of variously welded tuffs with superimposed crystallization and altered zones. To characterize these units, resistivity, density, neutron, gamma-ray, induced polarization, and magnetic susceptibility geophysical well-log measurements were made. Although inherently subjective, a consistent interpretation of the well-log measurements was facilitated by a computer program designed to interpret well logs either individually or simultaneously. The broad features of the welded tuff units are readily distinguished by the geophysical well-log measurements. However, many details revealed by the logs indicate that more work is necessary to clarify the casual elements of well-log response in welded tuffs

  7. The Spotlight activity: Development and feasibility test of a naturalistic attention-redirection well-being intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Shin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive activities, such as savoring, gratitude, and optimism, have been shown to boost positive emotions and reduce negative emotions. We argue that a shared mechanism driving their well-being benefits is the redirection of attention. In this feasibility study, we develop and pilot-test this mechanism with a novel positive activity intervention, the “spotlight activity,” that taught participants how to become mindful of where their attention was and to redirect it as needed. Individuals (initial N = 108 were randomly assigned to a 5-week spotlight activity intervention or to a waitlist control group and were assessed on measures of psychological well-being, need satisfaction, and hassles and uplifts. Preliminary results showed that, at post-test, the spotlight group reported significantly higher life satisfaction, meaning in life, and general weekly affect, as well as significantly lower negative affect and hassle intensity. The study provided initial evidence for the feasibility of a novel attention-redirection intervention and its potential to increase psychological well-being.

  8. Two-phase flow in volatile oil reservoir using two-phase pseudo-pressure well test method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, M.; Ahmadi, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    A study was conducted to better understand the behaviour of volatile oil reservoirs. Retrograde condensation occurs in gas-condensate reservoirs when the flowing bottomhole pressure (BHP) lowers below the dewpoint pressure, thus creating 4 regions in the reservoir with different liquid saturations. Similarly, when the BHP of volatile oil reservoirs falls below the bubblepoint pressure, two phases are created in the region around the wellbore, and a single phase (oil) appears in regions away from the well. In turn, higher gas saturation causes the oil relative permeability to decrease towards the near-wellbore region. Reservoir compositional simulations were used in this study to predict the fluid behaviour below the bubblepoint. The flowing bottomhole pressure was then exported to a well test package to diagnose the occurrence of different mobility regions. The study also investigated the use of a two-phase pseudo-pressure method on volatile and highly volatile oil reservoirs. It was concluded that this method can successfully predict the true permeability and mechanical skin. It can also distinguish between mechanical skin and condensate bank skin. As such, the two-phase pseudo-pressure method is particularly useful for developing after-drilling well treatment and enhanced oil recovery process designs. However, accurate relative permeability and PVT data must be available for reliable interpretation of the well test in volatile oil reservoirs. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  9. Well-logging method using well-logging tools run through a drill stem test string for determining in-situ change in formation water saturation values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertl, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A logging tool (pulsed neutron or neutron-gamma ray) whose response indicates formation water saturation value, is run through an opening extending through a portion of a drill stem test string. A sample portion of the formation fluid in the zone of interest is removed and another logging run is made. The differences between the plots of the two logging runs indicate the formation potential productivity in the zone of interest

  10. Testing the dualistic model of passion using a novel quadripartite approach: A look at physical and psychological well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Benjamin J I; Verner-Filion, Jérémie; Gaudreau, Patrick; Bailis, Daniel S; Lafrenière, Marc-André K; Vallerand, Robert J

    2018-03-10

    Passion research has focused extensively on the unique effects of both harmonious passion and obsessive passion (Vallerand, 2015). We adopted a quadripartite approach (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) to test whether physical and psychological well-being are distinctly related to subtypes of passion with varying within-person passion combinations: pure harmonious passion, pure obsessive passion, mixed passion, and non-passion. In four studies (total N = 3,122), we tested whether passion subtypes were differentially associated with self-reported general health (Study 1; N = 1,218 undergraduates), health symptoms in video gamers (Study 2; N = 269 video game players), global psychological well-being (Study 3; N = 1,192 undergraduates), and academic burnout (Study 4; N = 443 undergraduates) using latent moderated structural equation modeling. Pure harmonious passion was generally associated with more positive levels of physical health and psychological well-being compared to pure obsessive passion, mixed passion, and non-passion. In contrast, outcomes were more negative for pure obsessive passion compared to both mixed passion and non-passion subtypes. This research underscores the theoretical and empirical usefulness of a quadripartite approach for the study of passion. Overall, the results demonstrate the benefits of having harmonious passion, even when obsessive passion is also high (i.e., mixed passion), and highlight the costs associated with a pure obsessive passion. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A new method for pressure test analysis of a vertically fractured well producing commingled zones in bounded square reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Mohammed E.; Abou-Kassem, J.H. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, UAE University, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    1997-07-15

    Although hydraulically or naturally fractured wells located in stratified bounded reservoirs are common, reliable techniques available to analyze the pressure test data for such reservoirs are lacking. This paper presents a mathematical model that describes the pressure behavior of a vertically fractured well located in a stratified, bounded, square reservoir. The fracture can be either a uniform flux or an infinite conductivity fracture. It was found that the dimensionless pressure function and its derivative and the fractional production rate from the different layers are mainly controlled by the fracture penetration into the formation, and that transmissibility and storativity affect the fractional production rate and the pressure derivative but have little effect on the dimensionless pressure function. Type curves of dimensionless pressure and dimensionless pressure derivative can be used to evaluate the reservoir characteristics. The selection of the appropriate type curve is guided by the behavior of the layer fractional production rate obtained from flow rate survey carried out during well testing. Type curves for uniform flux and infinite conductivity fractures exhibit similar features. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the new method of analysis presented in this paper

  12. Leggett-Garg tests of macrorealism for bosonic systems including double-well Bose-Einstein condensates and atom interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Zárate, L.; Opanchuk, B.; He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D.

    2018-04-01

    We construct quantifiable generalizations of Leggett-Garg tests for macro- and mesoscopic realism and noninvasive measurability that apply when not all outcomes of measurement can be identified as arising from one of two macroscopically distinguishable states. We show how quantum mechanics predicts a negation of the Leggett-Garg premises for strategies involving ideal negative-result, weak, and minimally invasive ("nonclumsy") projective measurements on dynamical entangled systems, as might be realized with Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential, path-entangled NOON states, and atom interferometers. Potential loopholes associated with each strategy are discussed.

  13. Ground-water sampling of the NNWSI (Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation) water table test wells surrounding Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuska, N.A.

    1988-12-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) study of the water table in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, completed 16 test holes on the Nevada Test Site and Bureau of Land Management-administered lands surrounding Yucca Mountain. These 16 wells are monitored by the USGS for water-level data; however, they had not been sampled for ground-water chemistry or isotropic composition. As part of the review of the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) sampled six of these wells. The goal of this sampling program was to measure field-dependent parameters of the water such as electrical conductivity, pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen, and to collect samples for major and minor element chemistry and isotopic analysis. This information will be used as part of a program to geochemically model the flow direction between the volcanic tuff aquifers and the underlying regional carbonate aquifer

  14. Simplified mathematical models for interpreting the results of tests carried out by labelling the whole piezometric column in water wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, H.A.

    1974-01-01

    Approximate methods used to interpret the results of tests based on radioactive tracer dilution in a single water well by labelling the whole piezometric column are described; these simple mathematical models have been used to obtain semi-quantitative data on the apparent velocity (horizontal) in non-homogeneous aquifers with flow rates of metres daily. Measurements have also been made in a homogeneous aquifer with velocities of centimetres daily. Interpretation is based on determination of the average concentration for the various well zones; this involves recognition of a mean velocity for each region. All the tracer dilution effects that are not due to horizontal or vertical flow between two zones, i.e. convection, artificial mixing, diffusion and so on, are grouped together as a single term, which is taken arbitrarily to be proportional to the difference in concentration between the regions under consideration; its value is obtained from the experimental dilution curve. The model was applied to the solution of the three cases encountered most frequently during our measurements in Colombia: (a) when the well penetrates a permeable zone and adjacent impermeable zone; (b) when the well penetrates a permeable zone contained between impermeable regions; and (c) when the well traverses an aquifer with two adjacent zones of different permeability contained between impermeable zones. The shape of the dilution curve (logarithm of concentration versus time, usually with two or more slopes) is predicted by the model, the approximate nature of which is consistent with the fact that the method of labelling the whole piezometric column is semi-quantitative. The results obtained for measurements made when there are considerable vertical flows are apparently correct, but there is no other experimental measurement available to confirm them. (author) [es

  15. Characterizing Structural and Stratigraphic Heterogeneities in a Faulted Aquifer Using Pump Tests with an Array of Westbay Multilevel Monitoring Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.; Zhurina, E. N.

    2001-12-01

    We are developing and assessing field testing and analysis methodologies for quantitative characterization of aquifer heterogenities using data measured in an array of multilevel monitoring wells (MLW) during pumping and recovery well tests. We have developed a unique field laboratory to determine the permeability field in a 20m by 40m by 70m volume in the fault partitioned, siliciclastic Hickory aquifer system in central Texas. The site incorporates both stratigraphic variations and a normal fault system that partially offsets the aquifer and impedes cross-fault flow. We constructed a high-resolution geologic model of the site based upon 1050 m of core and a suite of geophysical logs from eleven, closely spaced (3-10m), continuously cored boreholes to depths of 125 m. Westbay multilevel monitoring systems installed in eight holes provide 94 hydraulically isolated measurement zones and 25 injection zones. A good geologic model is critical to proper installation of the MLW. Packers are positioned at all significant fault piercements and selected, laterally extensive, clay-rich strata. Packers in adjacent MLW bracket selected hydrostratigraphic intervals. Pump tests utilized two, uncased, fully penetrating irrigation wells that straddle the fault system and are in close proximity (7 to 65 m) to the MLW. Pumping and recovery transient pressure histories were measured in 85 zones using pressure transducers with a resolution of 55 Pa (0.008 psi). The hydraulic response is that of an anisotropic, unconfined aquifer. The transient pressure histories vary significantly from zone to zone in a single MLW as well as between adjacent MLW. Derivative plots are especially useful for differentiating details of pressure histories. Based on the geologic model, the derivative curve of a zone reflects its absolute vertical position, vertical stratigraphic position, and proximity to either a fault or significant stratigraphic heterogeneity. Additional forward modeling is needed to

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  17. Test of virtual photon theory. [Cross sections, square-well potential, 0 to 300 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, E T; Tomusiak, E L [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon (Canada). Saskatchewan Accelerator Lab.

    1976-11-30

    In order to extract a photodisintegration cross section in the c.m. system from an electrodisintegration cross section measured in the lab system, one has to assume that the electrons are mostly scattered forward and that the monopole contributions are negligible. To test the validity of these approximations, a square well potential was assumed for the initial and final states and the photodisintegration cross section was calculated exactly within this model. These results were then compared with the results one would obtain using the virtual photon theory approximations for electron energies of 0-300 MeV and excitation energies up to 40 MeV. In comparing the two results, it is shown how and why the virtual photon theory approximations fail in certain kinematical regions.

  18. Study on properties and testing methods of thermo-responsive cementing system for well cementing in heavy oil thermal recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, thermo-responsive cement slurry system were being developed, the properties of conventional cement slurry, compressive strength high temperature of cement sheath, mechanical properties of cement sheath and thermal properties of cement sheath were being tested. Results were being used and simulated by Well-Life Software, Thermo-responsive cement slurry system can meet the requirements of heavy oil thermal recovery production. Mechanical and thermal properties of thermo-responsive cement sheath were being tested. Tensile fracture energy of the thermo-responsive cement sheath is larger than conventional cement. The heat absorption capacity of conventional cement sheath is larger than that of thermo-responsive cement sheath, this means more heat is needed for the unit mass once increasing 1.0 °C, which also indicates that thermo-responsive cement own good heat insulating and preservation effects. The heat conductivity coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of thermo-responsive cement is less than and conventional cement, this means that thermo-responsive cement have good heat preservation and insulation effects with good thermal expansion stabilities.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area 09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546

  20. Analysis of the magnetic susceptibility well log in drill hole UE25a-5, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Daniels, J.J.; Scott, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements have been shown to be dependent upon the magnetite content of rocks with variations in rock susceptibility arising from changes in the shape, size, composition, and quantity of the contained magnetite grains. The present study was undertaken to determine the factor(s) responsible for the variation in magnetic susceptibility measurements from borehole UE25a-5 on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The well logs and sample analyses presented in this paper form part of a larger geophysical well-logging project studying the physical properties of welded tuffs at NTS. The ash-flow sheets at NTS appear to be the products of single compositionally zoned magmas that tend, within a cooling unit, to erupt hotter, more mafic, and more crystal-rich with time. These factors, however, have little effect on the degree to which the tuffs become welded. Furthermore, zones of crystallization and alteration are superimposed upon the welded units. X-ray data show poor correspondence between the relative abundance of magnetite in a sample and the borehole magnetic susceptibility measurement associated with it. Curie balance experiments demonstrate no change in the magnetic mineralogy that could account for the susceptibility variation. Thin-section observations corroborate the x-ray data, but indicate a proportional relationship between the borehole susceptibility measurements and the grain-size distribution of magnetite. The association of magnetic susceptibility anomalies with the crystal-rich zones of the welded tuffs will aid in the identification and correlation of the eruptive sequences at NTS

  1. Transparency of genetic testing services for 'health, wellness and lifestyle': analysis of online prepurchase information for UK consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jacqueline A; Gertz, Rena; Amato, Joan; Pagliari, Claudia

    2017-08-01

    The declining cost of DNA sequencing has been accompanied by a proliferation of companies selling 'direct-to-consumer genetic testing' (DTC-GT) services. Many of these are marketed online as tools for enabling citizens to make more informed decisions about their health, wellness and lifestyle. We assessed the 'information for consumers' provided by these companies at the prepurchase stage, which could influence initial decisions to part with money, data or tissue samples. A scoping exercise revealed 65 DTC-GT companies advertising their services online to consumers in the United Kingdom, of which 15 met our inclusion criteria. We benchmarked their consumer information against the good practice principles developed by the UK Human Genetics Commission (HGC). No provider complied with all the HGC principles and overall levels of compliance varied considerably. Although consent for testing was discussed by all but one company, information about data reuse for research or other purposes was often sparse and consent options limited or unclear. Most did not provide supplementary support services to help users better understand or cope with the implications of test results. We provide recommendations for updating the preconsumer transparency aspects of the HGC guidelines to ensure their fitness-for-purpose in this rapidly changing market. We also recommend improving coordination between relevant governance bodies to ensure minimum standards of transparency, quality and accountability. Although DTC-GT has many potential benefits, close partnership between consumers, industry and government, along with interdisciplinary science input, are essential to ensure that these innovations are used ethically and responsibly.

  2. Well pressure and rate history match in numerical reservoir simulator in Santos Basin gas wells; Ajuste automatizado de testes de formacao e de producao no simulador numerico de reservatorios de pocos de gas na Bacia de Santos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Alexandre Monticuco [Petroleo Brasileiro, S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a methodology and shows some results from an automated adjust of the numerical reservoir simulation model accomplished during Drill Steam Test (DST - before the completion of the well) and a Production Test (PT - after completion of the well) in a gas field HPHT (High Pressure High Temperature) horizontal well in Santos Basin. The achievement of these tests in the numerical reservoir simulator is very useful in the characterization of reservoir properties in different areas of reservoir, mainly in regions without data from basic petrophysics (cores and sidewall cores). The adjust of the drill steam test and production test can support the characterization of the test drainage area and forecast the well potential before and after the well completion including these effects in the simulation model. These effects can show a reasonable reduction in production of this well, confirming the importance of these data inside of the simulation model. Between the period of the drill steam test and production test, the well was temporarily abandoned with drilling fluid providing a reduction in their potential. The results of these adjusts respect the bottom hole pressures and observed gas rates showing the consistency of the analysis. The achievement of these tests provides adjust of many reservoir properties: horizontal and vertical permeabilities (during the DST) and the well effective length and skin (during the PT). These tools demonstrate to be relevant and robust to achieve these adjusts and easy application considering lots of variables. The parallel processing had a substantial functions in this job, because the large number of simulation made. (author)

  3. Testing tubewell platform color as a rapid screening tool for arsenic and manganese in drinking water wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ashis; Nath, Bibhash; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Halder, Dipti; Kundu, Amit K; Mandal, Ujjal; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chatterjee, Debashis; Jacks, Gunnar

    2012-01-03

    A low-cost rapid screening tool for arsenic (As) and manganese (Mn) in groundwater is urgently needed to formulate mitigation policies for sustainable drinking water supply. This study attempts to make statistical comparison between tubewell (TW) platform color and the level of As and Mn concentration in groundwater extracted from the respective TW (n = 423), to validate platform color as a screening tool for As and Mn in groundwater. The result shows that a black colored platform with 73% certainty indicates that well water is safe from As, while with 84% certainty a red colored platform indicates that well water is enriched with As, compared to WHO drinking water guideline of 10 μg/L. With this guideline the efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity of the tool are 79%, 77%, and 81%, respectively. However, the certainty values become 93% and 38%, respectively, for black and red colored platforms at 50 μg/L, the drinking water standards for India and Bangladesh. The respective efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity are 65%, 85%, and 59%. Similarly for Mn, black and red colored platform with 78% and 64% certainty, respectively, indicates that well water is either enriched or free from Mn at the Indian national drinking water standard of 300 μg/L. With this guideline the efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity of the tool are 71%, 67%, and 76%, respectively. Thus, this study demonstrates that TW platform color can be potentially used as an initial screening tool for identifying TWs with elevated dissolved As and Mn, to make further rigorous groundwater testing more intensive and implement mitigation options for safe drinking water supplies.

  4. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  5. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  6. Uranium isotopes in well water samples as drinking sources in some settlements around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Tomita, Junpei; Sakaguchi, Aya; Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Hoshi, Masaharu; Apsalikov, Kazbek N

    Radiochemical results of U isotopes ( 234 U, 235 U and 238 U) and their activity ratios are reported for well waters as local sources of drinking waters collected from the ten settlements around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS), Kazakhstan. The results show that 238 U varies widely from 3.6 to 356 mBq/L (0.3-28.7 μg/L), with a factor of about 100. The 238 U concentrations in some water samples from Dolon, Tailan, Sarzhal and Karaul settlements are comparable to or higher than the World Health Organization's restrictive proposed guideline of 15 μg (U)/L. The 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios in the measured water samples are higher than 1, and vary between 1.1 and 7.9, being mostly from 1.5 to 3. The measured 235 U/ 238 U activity ratios are around 0.046, indicating that U in these well waters is of natural origin. It is probable that the elevated concentration of 238 U found in some settlements around the SNTS is not due to the close-in fallout from nuclear explosions at the SNTS, but rather to the intensive weathering of rocks including U there. The calculated effective doses to adults resulting from consumption of the investigated waters are in the range 1.0-18.7 μSv/y. Those doses are lower than WHO and IAEA reference value (100 μSv/y) for drinking water.

  7. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  8. Analysis of modular dynamic formation test results from the Mount Elbert-01 stratigraphic test well, Milne Point unit, North Slope Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV (United States)]|[West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rose, K.; Boswell, R. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV (United States); Wilder, J.W. [Akron Univ., Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Math; Kurihara, M. [Japan Oil Engineering Co. Ltd., Kachidoki, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); White, M.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States). Hydrology Group; Moridis, G.J. [California Univ., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Wilson, S.J. [Ryder Scott Co. LP., Denver, CO (United States); Pooladi-Darvish, M. [Fekete Associates Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Masuda, Y. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Geosystem Engineering; Collett, T.S. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center; Hunter, R.B. [ASRC Energy Services, Anchorage, AK (United States); Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohiraku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Laboratory

    2008-07-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) are leading an international effort to compare methane hydrate reservoir simulators. The purpose of the research is to exchange information regarding gas hydrate dissociation and physical properties enabling improvements in methane hydrate reservoir modeling, to build confidence in all the leading simulators through exchange of ideas and cross-validation of simulator results on common datasets of escalating complexity, and to establish a depository of gas hydrate related experiment/production scenarios with the associated predictions of these established simulators that can be used for ongoing and future comparison purposes. In order to accomplish these objectives, a team of researchers was brought together to construct a series of problems designed to test/compare the performance of the leading gas hydrate simulators. This paper discussed a project that involved history matches of one 12-hour test that included an initial stage of pressure drawdown and response in which pressures were maintained above the level where gas hydrate dissociation would occur; a second stage with 15 min of flow and 97 min buildup that included gas hydrate dissociation and gas production; and a third stage of 116 min of flow and 266 min of buildup. The test also included temperature measurements taken by a device attached to the modular dynamics formation tester's (MDT) intake screen. The paper presented the MDT data, MDT flow test, and history matching setup and results including estimates of initial formation permeability and analyses of the various unique features exhibited by the MDT results. Five different simulators were used to conduct the history matches. Simulations utilized detailed information collected across the reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness, porosity, hydrate saturation, intrinsic permeability, pore water salinity

  9. Occupations at Risk and Organizational Well-Being: An Empirical Test of a Job Insecurity Integrated Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumbolo, Antonio; Urbini, Flavio; Callea, Antonino; Lo Presti, Alessandro; Talamo, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    One of the more visible effects of the societal changes is the increased feelings of uncertainty in the workforce. In fact, job insecurity represents a crucial occupational risk factor and a major job stressor that has negative consequences on both organizational well-being and individual health. Many studies have focused on the consequences about the fear and the perception of losing the job as a whole (called quantitative job insecurity), while more recently research has begun to examine more extensively the worries and the perceptions of losing valued job features (called qualitative job insecurity). The vast majority of the studies, however, have investigated the effects of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity separately. In this paper, we proposed the Job Insecurity Integrated Model aimed to examine the effects of quantitative job insecurity and qualitative job insecurity on their short-term and long-term outcomes. This model was empirically tested in two independent studies, hypothesizing that qualitative job insecurity mediated the effects of quantitative job insecurity on different outcomes, such as work engagement and organizational identification (Study 1), and job satisfaction, commitment, psychological stress and turnover intention (Study 2). Study 1 was conducted on 329 employees in private firms, while Study 2 on 278 employees in both public sector and private firms. Results robustly showed that qualitative job insecurity totally mediated the effects of quantitative on all the considered outcomes. By showing that the effects of quantitative job insecurity on its outcomes passed through qualitative job insecurity, the Job Insecurity Integrated Model contributes to clarifying previous findings in job insecurity research and puts forward a framework that could profitably produce new investigations with important theoretical and practical implications.

  10. Occupations at Risk and Organizational Well-Being: An Empirical Test of a Job Insecurity Integrated Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumbolo, Antonio; Urbini, Flavio; Callea, Antonino; Lo Presti, Alessandro; Talamo, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    One of the more visible effects of the societal changes is the increased feelings of uncertainty in the workforce. In fact, job insecurity represents a crucial occupational risk factor and a major job stressor that has negative consequences on both organizational well-being and individual health. Many studies have focused on the consequences about the fear and the perception of losing the job as a whole (called quantitative job insecurity), while more recently research has begun to examine more extensively the worries and the perceptions of losing valued job features (called qualitative job insecurity). The vast majority of the studies, however, have investigated the effects of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity separately. In this paper, we proposed the Job Insecurity Integrated Model aimed to examine the effects of quantitative job insecurity and qualitative job insecurity on their short-term and long-term outcomes. This model was empirically tested in two independent studies, hypothesizing that qualitative job insecurity mediated the effects of quantitative job insecurity on different outcomes, such as work engagement and organizational identification (Study 1), and job satisfaction, commitment, psychological stress and turnover intention (Study 2). Study 1 was conducted on 329 employees in private firms, while Study 2 on 278 employees in both public sector and private firms. Results robustly showed that qualitative job insecurity totally mediated the effects of quantitative on all the considered outcomes. By showing that the effects of quantitative job insecurity on its outcomes passed through qualitative job insecurity, the Job Insecurity Integrated Model contributes to clarifying previous findings in job insecurity research and puts forward a framework that could profitably produce new investigations with important theoretical and practical implications. PMID:29250013

  11. Occupations at Risk and Organizational Well-Being: An Empirical Test of a Job Insecurity Integrated Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chirumbolo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the more visible effects of the societal changes is the increased feelings of uncertainty in the workforce. In fact, job insecurity represents a crucial occupational risk factor and a major job stressor that has negative consequences on both organizational well-being and individual health. Many studies have focused on the consequences about the fear and the perception of losing the job as a whole (called quantitative job insecurity, while more recently research has begun to examine more extensively the worries and the perceptions of losing valued job features (called qualitative job insecurity. The vast majority of the studies, however, have investigated the effects of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity separately. In this paper, we proposed the Job Insecurity Integrated Model aimed to examine the effects of quantitative job insecurity and qualitative job insecurity on their short-term and long-term outcomes. This model was empirically tested in two independent studies, hypothesizing that qualitative job insecurity mediated the effects of quantitative job insecurity on different outcomes, such as work engagement and organizational identification (Study 1, and job satisfaction, commitment, psychological stress and turnover intention (Study 2. Study 1 was conducted on 329 employees in private firms, while Study 2 on 278 employees in both public sector and private firms. Results robustly showed that qualitative job insecurity totally mediated the effects of quantitative on all the considered outcomes. By showing that the effects of quantitative job insecurity on its outcomes passed through qualitative job insecurity, the Job Insecurity Integrated Model contributes to clarifying previous findings in job insecurity research and puts forward a framework that could profitably produce new investigations with important theoretical and practical implications.

  12. Well installation, single-well testing, and particle-size analysis for selected sites in and near the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin, north-central Colorado, 2003-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jennifer A.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Arnold, L. Rick

    2011-01-01

    This report describes results from a groundwater data-collection program completed in 2003-2004 by the U.S. Geological Survey in support of the South Platte Decision Support System and in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board. Two monitoring wells were installed adjacent to existing water-table monitoring wells. These wells were installed as well pairs with existing wells to characterize the hydraulic properties of the alluvial aquifer and shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer in and near the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin. Single-well tests were performed in the 2 newly installed wells and 12 selected existing monitoring wells. Sediment particle size was analyzed for samples collected from the screened interval depths of each of the 14 wells. Hydraulic-conductivity and transmissivity values were calculated after the completion of single-well tests on each of the selected wells. Recovering water-level data from the single-well tests were analyzed using the Bouwer and Rice method because test data most closely resembled those obtained from traditional slug tests. Results from the single-well test analyses for the alluvial aquifer indicate a median hydraulic-conductivity value of 3.8 x 10-5 feet per second and geometric mean hydraulic-conductivity value of 3.4 x 10-5 feet per second. Median and geometric mean transmissivity values in the alluvial aquifer were 8.6 x 10-4 feet squared per second and 4.9 x 10-4 feet squared per second, respectively. Single-well test results for the shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer indicate a median hydraulic-conductivity value of 5.4 x 10-6 feet per second and geometric mean value of 4.9 x 10-6 feet per second. Median and geometric mean transmissivity values for the shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer were 4.0 x 10-5 feet squared per second and 5.9 x 10-5 feet squared per second, respectively. Hydraulic-conductivity values for the alluvial aquifer in and near the Lost Creek Designated

  13. Aquifer test results, 200-UP-1 operable unit IRM plume: Wells 299-W19-39 and 299-W19-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, L.C.

    1996-03-01

    An aquifer test was conducted at 200-UP-1 extraction well 299-W19-39 from September 6 to 8, 1995. The testing process consisted of pumping groundwater from the extraction well, using the surface treatment system to purify the water, and reinjecting the water through well 299-W19-36. Multiple observation wells were used to measure the response of the aquifer during the pumping and recovery phases of the test. Tables 1 and 2 list each well monitored and give well location and configuration information. Pretest monitoring initiated on August 31, 1995 was used to establish water-level trends and barometric pressure responses in the extraction, injection, and observation wells. Water-level monitoring continued for about 2 weeks after pumping ceased. The objectives of the aquifer test were to determine large-scale aquifer properties to confirm hydraulic conductivity input values used in previous numerical modeling work, to evaluate the long-term performance of the extraction and monitoring wells, and to estimate the radial extent of the drawdown cone (i.e., the expected capture area and depth). All of the test objectives were met. A discussion of the test results follows

  14. Geophysical log analysis of selected test and residential wells at the Shenandoah Road National Superfund Site, East Fishkill, Dutchess County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard J.; Anderson, J. Alton; Williams, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed geophysical logs from 20 test wells and 23 residential wells at the Shenandoah Road National Superfund Site in East Fishkill, New York, from 2006 through 2010 as part of an Interagency Agreement to provide hydrogeologic technical support to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 2. The geophysical logs collected include caliper, gamma, acoustic and optical televiewer, deviation, electromagnetic-induction, magnetic-susceptibility, fluid-property, and flow under ambient and pumped conditions. The geophysical logs were analyzed along with single-well aquifer test data and drilling logs to characterize the lithology, fabric, fractures, and flow zones penetrated by the wells. The results of the geophysical log analysis were used as part of the hydrogeologic characterization of the site and in the design of discrete-zone monitoring installations in the test wells and selected residential wells.

  15. Goal striving, goal attainment, and well-being: adapting and testing the self-concordance model in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alison; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Duda, Joan

    2007-12-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) and the self-concordance model (Sheldon & Elliot, 1999), this study examined the motivational processes underlying goal striving in sport as well as the role of perceived coach autonomy support in the goal process. Structural equation modeling with a sample of 210 British athletes showed that autonomous goal motives positively predicted effort, which, in turn, predicted goal attainment. Goal attainment was positively linked to need satisfaction, which, in turn, predicted psychological well-being. Effort and need satisfaction were found to mediate the associations between autonomous motives and goal attainment and between attainment and well-being, respectively. Controlled motives negatively predicted well-being, and coach autonomy support positively predicted both autonomous motives and need satisfaction. Associations of autonomous motives with effort were not reducible to goal difficulty, goal specificity, or goal efficacy. These findings support the self-concordance model as a framework for further research on goal setting in sport.

  16. A work-family conflict/subjective well-being process model: a test of competing theories of longitudinal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Russell A; Wayne, Julie Holliday; Ford, Michael T

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we examine competing predictions of stress reaction models and adaptation theories regarding the longitudinal relationship between work-family conflict and subjective well-being. Based on data from 432 participants over 3 time points with 2 lags of varying lengths (i.e., 1 month, 6 months), our findings suggest that in the short term, consistent with prior theory and research, work-family conflict is associated with poorer subjective well-being. Counter to traditional work-family predictions but consistent with adaptation theories, after accounting for concurrent levels of work-family conflict as well as past levels of subjective well-being, past exposure to work-family conflict was associated with higher levels of subjective well-being over time. Moreover, evidence was found for reverse causation in that greater subjective well-being at 1 point in time was associated with reduced work-family conflict at a subsequent point in time. Finally, the pattern of results did not vary as a function of using different temporal lags. We discuss the theoretical, research, and practical implications of our findings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. It's just as well kids don't vote: the positioning of children through public discourse around national testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Troels; Meaney, Tamsin

    2014-06-01

    The importance of mathematics or its alter ego `numeracy' is being cemented in the public's mind with the instigation of national, high-stakes testing in Australia. Discussions about national testing in press releases, online news articles and online public comments tacitly attribute importance to mathematics. In these discussions, children are positioned as commodities, with mathematics achievement being the value that can be added to them. Deficit language identified some children as being less valuable commodities and less likely to gain value from schooling. In the same public discourse, the value of the sort of mathematics that can be assessed in these tests appeared to be so accepted that it did not need to be mentioned. This has social justice implications.

  18. The development and testing of a fieldworthy system of improved fluid pumping device and liquid sensor for oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckman, W.G.

    1991-12-31

    A major expenditure to maintain oil and gas leases is the support of pumpers, those individuals who maintain the pumping systems on wells to achieve optimum production. Many leases are marginal and are in remote areas and this requires considerable driving time for the pumper. The Air Pulse Oil Pump System is designed to be an economical system for the shallow stripper wells. To improve on the economics of this system, we have designed a Remote Oil Field Monitor and Controller to enable us to acquire data from the lease to our central office at anytime and to control the pumping activities from the central office by using a personal computer. The advent and economics of low-power microcontrollers have made it feasible to use this type of system for numerous remote control systems. We can also adapt this economical system to monitor and control the production of gas wells and/or pump jacks.

  19. Testing measurement invariance in the International Social Survey Program Health 2011 – the mental well-being scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deurzen, I.A.; Roosma, F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In the present contribution we address the measurement invariance of a new mental well-being scale of three items that was applied in the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) Health 2011 module. Our aim is to establish if and for how many countries (partial) scalar invariance is

  20. Job insecurity and well-being in the temporary workforce : Testing volition and contract expectations as boundary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhard-Oettel, C.; Rigotti, T.; Clinton, M.; de Jong, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether temporary contract volition and workers' expectations for contract renewal are boundary conditions to explain differences in temporary workers' job insecurity feelings and well-being. It is hypothesized that (1) low volition through higher job insecurity indirectly

  1. Laboratory testing and field implementation of scale inhibitor squeeze treatments to subsea and platform horizontal wells, North Sea Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, M. M.; Lewis, M. [Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Tomlinson, C. J.; Pritchard, A. R. P. [Enterprise Oil Plc, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Field results from a number of scale squeeze treatments carried out on subsea and platform horizontal wells in the Nelson Field of the North Sea are presented. Scale inhibitor chemicals are reviewed along with factors which influence inhibitor selection for both horizontal and highly deviated wells. Formation brine/inhibitor incompatibility, formation minerals/inhibitor incompatibility, and the potential for sand production and oil-in-water process as a result of these incompatibilities, are discussed. Practical difficulties in squeezing subsea horizontal wells, the use of chemical stabilizers to reduce formation brine/inhibitor incompatibility, variation of pump rates to encourage propagation of inhibitor along the wellbore, and the potential of fluid diversion are outlined, stressing the significance of production logging data (or good reservoir simulation data), to evaluate the location of water production prior to the squeeze treatment. Results of these treatments show that with the correct laboratory evaluation of both scale inhibitor and divertor agents, and with appropriate utilization of production logging or reservoir simulation data, it is possible to carry out scale inhibitor squeeze treatments of subsea and platform horizontal wells without having to resort to coiled tubing. 22 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs

  2. Well-Being on Campus: Testing the Effectiveness of an Online Strengths-Based Intervention for First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Selda; Sun-Selisik, Z. Eda

    2016-01-01

    The present research examined the effectiveness of an 8-week online strengths-based intervention in promoting subjective and psychological well-being of first year university students. The intervention was composed of five modules pertaining to (a) finding and cultivating on character strengths, (b) regulation of emotions and increasing positive…

  3. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: The Pleasant Bayou no. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, F. J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R. A.

    The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed.

  4. Slug Test Characterization Results for Multi-Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of CERCLA Operable Unit OU ZP-1 Wells 299-W11-43, 299-W15-50, and 299-W18-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2010-06-21

    The following report presents test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within three Operable Unit (OU) ZP-1 wells: 299-W11-43 (C4694/Well H), 299-W15-50 (C4302/Well E), and 299-W18-16 (C4303/Well D). These wells are located within south-central region of the Hanford Site 200-West Area (Figure 1.1). The test intervals were characterized as the individual boreholes were advanced to their final drill depths. The primary objective of the hydrologic tests was to provide information pertaining to the areal variability and vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at these locations within the OU ZP-1 area. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor well strategies for OU and Waste Management Area locations.

  5. Slug Test Characterization Results for Multi-Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of CERCLA Operable Unit OU UP-1 Wells 299-W19-48, 699-30-66, and 699-36-70B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2010-06-15

    This report presents test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within three Operable Unit (OU) UP-1 wells: 299-W19-48 (C4300/Well K), 699-30-66 (C4298/Well R), and 699-36-70B (C4299/Well P). These wells are located within, adjacent to, and to the southeast of the Hanford Site 200-West Area. The test intervals were characterized as the individual boreholes were advanced to their final drill depths. The primary objective of the hydrologic tests was to provide information pertaining to the areal variability and vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at these locations within the OU UP-1 area. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor well strategies for OU and Waste Management Area locations.

  6. Agreement between pre-post measures of change and transition ratings as well as then-tests

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Thorsten; Richter, Susanne; Raspe, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Background Different approaches have been developed for measuring change. Direct measurement of change (transition ratings) requires asking a patient directly about his judgment about the change he has experienced (reported change). With indirect measures of change, the patients? status is assessed at different time points and differences between them are calculated (measured change). When using the quasi-indirect approach (?then-test?), patients are asked after an intervention to rate their ...

  7. Preliminary assessment of the waveform inversion method for interpretation of cross-well seismic data from the thermal production test, JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Research Center for Seismology and Volcanology; Shimizu, S. [Japan National Oil Co., Chiba (Japan); Asakawa, E. [JGI Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Kamei, R.; Matsuoka, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Civil and Earth Resources Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 3L-38 and 4L-38 test wells were subjected to repeated cross-well seismic surveys before and during the gas production test from the gas-hydrate-bearing layer at a depth of about 905 to 920 m. High-resolution velocity images in the gas-hydrate-bearing layer were obtained using the frequency-domain nonlinear waveform inversion method. An acoustic waveform inversion method was used along with the frequency-domain approach in order to detect the change in acoustic properties of the gas-hydrate-bearing layer resulting from gas production. The layered structures with small lateral heterogeneities were reconstructed by tomography analysis of preprocessed waveform data using a smaller number of source-receiver pairs. Preliminary results reveal high velocity and very high attenuation in the gas-hydrate-bearing layers. No obvious velocity decreases were noted. Information for further detailed processing was also gathered.

  8. Methodologies, solutions, and lessons learned from heavy oil well testing with an ESP, offshore UK in the Bentley field, block 9/3b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Barny; Lucas-Clements, Charles; Kew, Steve [Xcite Energy Resources (United Kingdom); Shumakov, Yakov; Camilleri, Lawrence; Akuanyionwu, Obinna; Tonoglu, Ahmet [Schlumberger (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in hydrocarbon demand that led to the production of heavy oil fields in the United Kingdom continental shelf (UKCS). Most of the activity has been confined to exploration and appraisal drilling, the reason being the high uncertainty of the reservoir and fluid properties. Due to the operational complexity inherent to heavy oil, the use of conventional appraisal-well testing technology is limited. A novel technique developed to determine the most appropriate technology for testing wells with heavy oil using an electrical submersible pump (ESP) is presented in this paper. This technique was applied in the Bentley field. Some of the technical challenges include, maintaining fluid mobility using a surface-testing equipment, obtaining accurate flow measurements, a short weather window, and oil and gas separation for metering. Combining technologies such as dual-energy gamma ray venturi multiphase flowmeter, realtime monitoring, and ESP completion made it possible to execute the well test.

  9. Estimation of Lithofacies Proportions Using Well and Well Test Data Estimation des proportions lithologiques à partir des données de puits et d'essais de puits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanc G.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A crucial step of the two commonly used geostatistical methods for modeling heterogeneous reservoirs : the sequential indicator simulation and the truncated Gaussian simulation is the estimation of the lithofacies local proportion (or probability density functions. Well-test derived permeabilities show good correlation with lithofacies proportions around wells. Integrating well and well-test data in estimating lithofacies proportions could permit the building of more realistic models of reservoir heterogeneity. However this integration is difficult because of the different natures and measurement scales of these two types of data. This paper presents a two step approach to integrating well and well-test data into heterogeneous reservoir modeling. First lithofacies proportions in well-test investigation areas are estimated using a new kriging algorithm called KISCA. KISCA consists in kriging jointly the proportions of all lithofacies in a well-test investigation area so that the corresponding well-test derived permeability is respected through a weighted power averaging of lithofacies permeabilities. For multiple well-tests, an iterative process is used in KISCA to account for their interaction. After this, the estimated proportions are combined with lithofacies indicators at wells for estimating proportion (or probability density functions over the entire reservoir field using a classical kriging method. Some numerical examples were considered to test the proposed method for estimating lithofacies proportions. In addition, a synthetic lithofacies reservoir model was generated and a well-test simulation was performed. The comparison between the experimental and estimated proportions in the well-test investigation area demonstrates the validity of the proposed method. La méthode de simulation gaussienne seuillée et la méthode de simulation séquentielle d'indicatrices sont aujourd'hui couramment utilisées pour générer des mod

  10. Cognition, imagery and coping among adolescents with social anxiety and phobia: testing the Clark and Wells model in the population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranta, Klaus; Tuomisto, Martti T; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Rantanen, Päivi; Marttunen, Mauri

    2014-01-01

    The Clark and Wells' cognitive model of social phobia suggests that self-focused attention, negative observer-perspective images of oneself and safety behaviours maintain anxiety in subjects with SP. Empirical research among adults supports the model, but limited evidence for it has been obtained in other age groups or in the general population. We examined automatic thoughts, imagery, safety behaviours and general coping of adolescents with social anxiety and phobia. These were elicited by a thought listing procedure in a recalled, distressing social situation. The target variables were compared between adolescents with high versus normal self-reported social anxiety (HSA/NSA) and between adolescents with clinical/subclinical SP (SP/SSP) versus no diagnosis. Adolescents with HSA reported overall negative thoughts, negative observer-perspective images and safety behaviours more frequently than adolescents with NSA. The SP/SSP group displayed the same difference, and clearer, relative to the no diagnosis group, but additionally reported negative thoughts focused more often on self. Minor differences in coping were found between the groups. The study suggests that adolescents with SP already display the negative self-focused cognitions, observer-perspective imagery and behavioural pattern found among adults with SP. Social anxiety associates with observer-perspective imagery and safety behaviours in adolescence. Adolescents with clinical social phobia report frequent negative self-focused thoughts. However, such negative cognitions focused on self do not associate to self-reported social anxiety. The cognitive model of social phobia (Clark & Wells, 1995) is applicable to adolescents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Comparison of CO2 Detection Methods Tested in Shallow Groundwater Monitoring Wells at a Geological Sequestration Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenborn, Harry M.; Jain, Jinesh N.

    2016-05-17

    The geological storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is one method of reducing the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere. Monitoring programs typically determine baseline conditions in surface and near-surface environments before, during, and after CO2 injection to evaluate if impacts related to injection have occurred. Because CO2 concentrations in groundwater fluctuate naturally due to complex geochemical and geomicrobiologicalinteractions, a clear understanding of the baseline behavior of CO2 in groundwater near injection sites is important. Numerous ways of measuring aqueous CO2 in the field and lab are currently used, but most methods have significant shortcomings (e.g., are tedious, lengthy, have interferences, or have significant lag time before a result is determined). In this study, we examined the effectiveness of two novel CO2 detection methods and their ability to rapidly detect CO2in shallow groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Illinois Basin –Decatur Project geological sequestration site. The CarboQC beverage carbonation meter was used to measure the concentration of CO2 in water by monitoring temperature and pressure changes and calculating the PCO2 from the ideal gas law. Additionally, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) CO< sub>2sensor enclosed in a gas-permeable, water-impermeable membrane measured CO2by determining an equilibrium concentration. Results showed that the CarboQC method provided rapid (< 3 min) and repeatable results under field conditions within a measured concentration range of 15 –125 mg/L CO2. The NDIR sensor results correlated well (r2= 0.93) with the CarboQC data, but CO2 equilibration required at least 15 minutes, making the method somewhat less desirable under field conditions. In contrast, NDIR-based sensors have a greater potential for long-term deployment. Both

  12. Applying Petroleum the Pressure Buildup Well Test Procedure on Thermal Response Test—A Novel Method for Analyzing Temperature Recovery Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kurevija

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of Thermal Response Testing (TRT is a well-known part of the sizing process of the geothermal exchange system. Multiple parameters influence the accuracy of effective ground thermal conductivity measurement; like testing time, variable power, climate interferences, groundwater effect, etc. To improve the accuracy of the TRT, we introduced a procedure to additionally analyze falloff temperature decline after the power test. The method is based on a premise of analogy between TRT and petroleum well testing, since the origin of both procedures lies in the diffusivity equation with solutions for heat conduction or pressure analysis during radial flow. Applying pressure build-up test interpretation techniques to borehole heat exchanger testing, greater accuracy could be achieved since ground conductivity could be obtained from this period. Analysis was conducted on a coaxial exchanger with five different power steps, and with both direct and reverse flow regimes. Each test was set with 96 h of classical TRT, followed by 96 h of temperature decline, making for almost 2000 h of cumulative borehole testing. Results showed that the ground conductivity value could vary by as much as 25%, depending on test time, seasonal period and power fluctuations, while the thermal conductivity obtained from the falloff period provided more stable values, with only a 10% value variation.

  13. Single-well reactive tracer test and stable isotope analysis for determination of microbial activity in a fast hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbery, L.; Cassiani, G.; Andreotti, G.; Ricchiuto, T.; Semple, K.T.

    2004-01-01

    Single-well reactive tracer tests, such as the push-pull test are useful tools for characterising in-situ bioattenuation processes in contaminated aquifers. However, the analytical models that are used to interpret push-pull data may be over-simplified, and potentially overlook important processes responsible for the frequent discrepancy between predicted and observed results obtained from push-pull tests. In this study, the limitations underlying the push-pull test methodology were investigated and were supported with results from a push-pull test conducted in a sulphate-reducing aquifer contaminated by crude oil. Poor ( 20% mass recoveries were achieved. Push-pull test data collected from sulphate-reducing aquifers indicate that the assumption of a well-mixed batch reactor system is incorrect and that reaction rates obtained from push-pull tests in such systems may be affected by the extraction regime implemented. Evidence of microbial respiration of the reactive tracer was provided by stable sulphur isotope analysis, from which an isotope fractionation factor of +9.9±8.1%o was estimated. The stable isotope data support the argument that reaction rates calculated using push-pull tests are not uniformly distributed in space and time and are likely to be influenced by heterogeneities in the flow field. - Reaction rates calculated by push-pull tests are not uniformly distributed in time and space

  14. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  15. How Well Do Customers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomic Testing Services Comprehend Genetic Test Results? Findings from the Impact of Personal Genomics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergren, Jenny E; Gornick, Michele C; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Kalia, Sarah S; Uhlmann, Wendy R; Ruffin, Mack T; Mountain, Joanna L; Green, Robert C; Roberts, J Scott

    2015-01-01

    To assess customer comprehension of health-related personal genomic testing (PGT) results. We presented sample reports of genetic results and examined responses to comprehension questions in 1,030 PGT customers (mean age: 46.7 years; 59.9% female; 79.0% college graduates; 14.9% non-White; 4.7% of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity). Sample reports presented a genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes, carrier screening summary results for >30 conditions, results for phenylketonuria and cystic fibrosis, and drug response results for a statin drug. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of participant comprehension. Participants exhibited high overall comprehension (mean score: 79.1% correct). The highest comprehension (range: 81.1-97.4% correct) was observed in the statin drug response and carrier screening summary results, and lower comprehension (range: 63.6-74.8% correct) on specific carrier screening results. Higher levels of numeracy, genetic knowledge, and education were significantly associated with greater comprehension. Older age (≥ 60 years) was associated with lower comprehension scores. Most customers accurately interpreted the health implications of PGT results; however, comprehension varied by demographic characteristics, numeracy and genetic knowledge, and types and format of the genetic information presented. Results suggest a need to tailor the presentation of PGT results by test type and customer characteristics. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Well Test Analysis of Naturally Fractured Vuggy Reservoirs with an Analytical Triple Porosity – Double Permeability Model and a Global Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Susana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the automatic characterization of Naturally Fractured Vuggy Reservoirs via well test analysis, using a triple porosity-dual permeability model. The inter-porosity flow parameters, the storativity ratios, as well as the permeability ratio, the wellbore storage effect, the skin and the total permeability will be identified as parameters of the model. In this work, we will perform the well test interpretation in Laplace space, using numerical algorithms to transfer the discrete real data given in fully dimensional time to Laplace space. The well test interpretation problem in Laplace space has been posed as a nonlinear least squares optimization problem with box constraints and a linear inequality constraint, which is usually solved using local Newton type methods with a trust region. However, local methods as the one used in our work called TRON or the well-known Levenberg-Marquardt method, are often not able to find an optimal solution with a good fit of the data. Also well test analysis with the triple porosity-double permeability model, like most inverse problems, can yield multiple solutions with good match to the data. To deal with these specific characteristics, we will use a global optimization algorithm called the Tunneling Method (TM. In the design of the algorithm, we take into account issues of the problem like the fact that the parameter estimation has to be done with high precision, the presence of noise in the measurements and the need to solve the problem computationally fast. We demonstrate that the use of the TM in this study, showed to be an efficient and robust alternative to solve the well test characterization, as several optimal solutions, with very good match to the data were obtained.

  17. Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

  18. Development and Pilot Test of the Workplace Readiness Questionnaire, a Theory-Based Instrument to Measure Small Workplaces' Readiness to Implement Wellness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Peggy A; Helfrich, Christian D; Chan, K Gary; Allen, Claire L; Hammerback, Kristen; Kohn, Marlana J; Parrish, Amanda T; Weiner, Bryan J; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2017-01-01

    To develop a theory-based questionnaire to assess readiness for change in small workplaces adopting wellness programs. In developing our scale, we first tested items via "think-aloud" interviews. We tested the revised items in a cross-sectional quantitative telephone survey. The study setting comprised small workplaces (20-250 employees) in low-wage industries. Decision-makers representing small workplaces in King County, Washington (think-aloud interviews, n = 9), and the United States (telephone survey, n = 201) served as study subjects. We generated items for each construct in Weiner's theory of organizational readiness for change. We also measured workplace characteristics and current implementation of workplace wellness programs. We assessed reliability by coefficient alpha for each of the readiness questionnaire subscales. We tested the association of all subscales with employers' current implementation of wellness policies, programs, and communications, and conducted a path analysis to test the associations in the theory of organizational readiness to change. Each of the readiness subscales exhibited acceptable internal reliability (coefficient alpha range, .75-.88) and was positively associated with wellness program implementation ( p < .05). The path analysis was consistent with the theory of organizational readiness to change, except change efficacy did not predict change-related effort. We developed a new questionnaire to assess small workplaces' readiness to adopt and implement evidence-based wellness programs. Our findings also provide empirical validation of Weiner's theory of readiness for change.

  19. Deep groundwater flow systems and their characterization in single-well settings by ''push-pull'' tracer tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebig-Schubert, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates the growing importance of deep groundwater research and the increasing demand for the development of suitable single-well test methods. At the forefront of the research on groundwater in the deep underground, radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories, CO 2 storage, geothermal energy supply, and aquifer storage and recovery systems (ASR) are on the agenda. The developments of suitable methods for investigating these resources are a main target. Currently available methods show considerable limitations. Accordingly, comprehensive methods for the hydraulic and hydrochemical characterization of deeper aquifers with single-well access are needed. Therefore, the goal of this PhD thesis was to identify, test, and enhance potentially suitable single-well methods for characterization of groundwater flow and solute transport in such settings. For this, several Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal (''push-pull'') tracer tests were applied at the Hamasato field site (Horonobe, Japan) in a ∝100 m deep groundwater monitoring well. Aim was to characterize the impact of a dynamic saltwater-freshwater interface on a coastal aquifer. Based on the experiences of the first methodological test, a second field campaign was conducted. This campaign focused on a systematic evaluation of the push-pull tracer test method for the first time at all. The experiments focused on the investigation of the so-called ''chaser'' and its impact on the test results. The chaser is a specific part of many push-pull tracer tests setups. From these experiments, a specific test design for the investigation of the saltwater-freshwater interface in a single-well setting was developed. The application of this design on questions regarding different fluids within the same system, e.g. different mineralized fluids (saltwater-freshwater-interface, ASR) or temperatures (geothermal research), are promising future approaches for this

  20. Deep groundwater flow systems and their characterization in single-well settings by ''push-pull'' tracer tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebig-Schubert, Klaus

    2014-11-21

    This thesis demonstrates the growing importance of deep groundwater research and the increasing demand for the development of suitable single-well test methods. At the forefront of the research on groundwater in the deep underground, radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories, CO{sub 2} storage, geothermal energy supply, and aquifer storage and recovery systems (ASR) are on the agenda. The developments of suitable methods for investigating these resources are a main target. Currently available methods show considerable limitations. Accordingly, comprehensive methods for the hydraulic and hydrochemical characterization of deeper aquifers with single-well access are needed. Therefore, the goal of this PhD thesis was to identify, test, and enhance potentially suitable single-well methods for characterization of groundwater flow and solute transport in such settings. For this, several Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal (''push-pull'') tracer tests were applied at the Hamasato field site (Horonobe, Japan) in a ∝100 m deep groundwater monitoring well. Aim was to characterize the impact of a dynamic saltwater-freshwater interface on a coastal aquifer. Based on the experiences of the first methodological test, a second field campaign was conducted. This campaign focused on a systematic evaluation of the push-pull tracer test method for the first time at all. The experiments focused on the investigation of the so-called ''chaser'' and its impact on the test results. The chaser is a specific part of many push-pull tracer tests setups. From these experiments, a specific test design for the investigation of the saltwater-freshwater interface in a single-well setting was developed. The application of this design on questions regarding different fluids within the same system, e.g. different mineralized fluids (saltwater-freshwater-interface, ASR) or temperatures (geothermal research), are promising future approaches for

  1. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  2. Hydraulic characterization of volcanic rocks in Pahute Mesa using an integrated analysis of 16 multiple-well aquifer tests, Nevada National Security Site, 2009–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Jackson, Tracie R.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Damar, Nancy A.; Fenelon, Joseph M.; Reiner, Steven R.

    2017-01-20

    An improved understanding of groundwater flow and radionuclide migration downgradient from underground nuclear-testing areas at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, requires accurate subsurface hydraulic characterization. To improve conceptual models of flow and transport in the complex hydrogeologic system beneath Pahute Mesa, the U.S. Geological Survey characterized bulk hydraulic properties of volcanic rocks using an integrated analysis of 16 multiple-well aquifer tests. Single-well aquifer-test analyses provided transmissivity estimates at pumped wells. Transmissivity estimates ranged from less than 1 to about 100,000 square feet per day in Pahute Mesa and the vicinity. Drawdown from multiple-well aquifer testing was estimated and distinguished from natural fluctuations in more than 200 pumping and observation wells using analytical water-level models. Drawdown was detected at distances greater than 3 miles from pumping wells and propagated across hydrostratigraphic units and major structures, indicating that neither faults nor structural blocks noticeably impede or divert groundwater flow in the study area.Consistent hydraulic properties were estimated by simultaneously interpreting drawdown from the 16 multiple-well aquifer tests with an integrated groundwater-flow model composed of 11 well-site models—1 for each aquifer test site. Hydraulic properties were distributed across volcanic rocks with the Phase II Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model. Estimated hydraulic-conductivity distributions spanned more than two orders of magnitude in hydrostratigraphic units. Overlapping hydraulic conductivity ranges among units indicated that most Phase II Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model units were not hydraulically distinct. Simulated total transmissivity ranged from 1,600 to 68,000 square feet per day for all pumping wells analyzed. High-transmissivity zones exceeding 10,000 square feet per day exist near caldera margins and extend

  3. Conceptual and analytical modeling of fracture zone aquifers in hard rock. Implications of pumping tests in the Pohjukansalo well field, east-central Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveinen, J.

    2001-01-01

    Fracture zones with an interconnected network of open fractures can conduct significant groundwater flow and as in the case of the Pohjukansalo well field in Leppaevirta, can yield sufficiently for small-scale municipal water supply. Glaciofluvial deposits comprising major aquifers commonly overlay fracture zones that can contribute to the water balance directly or indirectly by providing hydraulic interconnections between different formations. Fracture zones and fractures can also transport contaminants in a poorly predictable way. Consequently, hydrogeological research of fracture zones is important for the management and protection of soil aquifers in Finland. Hydraulic properties of aquifers are estimated in situ by well test analyses based on analytical models. Most analytical models rely on the concepts of radial flow and horizontal slab aquifer. In Paper 1, pump test responses of fracture zones in the Pohjukansalo well field were characterised based on alternative analytical models developed for channelled flow cases. In Paper 2, the tests were analysed based on the generalised radial flow (GRF) model and a concept of a fracture network possessing fractional flow dimension due to limited connectivity compared to ideal 2- or 3- dimensional systems. The analysis provides estimates of hydraulic properties in terms of parameters that do not have concrete meaning when the flow dimension of the aquifer has fractional values. Concrete estimates of hydraulic parameters were produced by making simplified assumptions and by using the composite model developed in Paper 3. In addition to estimates of hydraulic parameters, analysis of hydraulic tests provides qualitative information that is useful when the hydraulic connections in the fracture system are not well known. However, attention should be paid to the frequency of drawdown measurements-particularly for the application of derivative curves. In groundwater studies, analytical models have been also used to estimate

  4. Analysis of pumping test data: Sawyer No. 1, Mansfield No. 1, Zeeck No. 1, and J. Friemel No. 1 wells: Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilton, D.E.; Picking, L.W.; Deltufo, A.M.; Fontaine, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    From June 1981 through August 1984, four deep hydrogeologic test wells were drilled in the Palo Duro Basin of Texas. The wells were part of an area characterization program to evaluate the basin for suitable high-level radioactive waste repository sites. Pumping test data from four wells, Sawyer No. 1, Mansfield No. 1, Zeeck No. 1, J. Friemel No. 1, have been analyzed using numerical simulation and type-curve comparison techniques. The testing procedure consisted of several pumping cycles. Each cycle consisted of a period of constant-rate pumping followed by a period of recovery. A method was developed to include the effects of prior cyclic pumping/recovery history while recovery for each cycle was plotted. From the recovery curves, preliminary values of transmissivity and initial formation pressure were estimated, and aquifer boundary configurations were assessed. This preliminary information was used as initial input to a finite-element model of the test zone, and parameters were refined through trial and error until an acceptable match between modeled and actual curves was obtained. 15 refs., 138 figs., 40 tabs

  5. Testing the sensitivity of pumpage to increases in surficial aquifer system heads in the Cypress Creek well-field area, West-Central Florida : an optimization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yobbi, Dann K.

    2002-01-01

    Tampa Bay depends on ground water for most of the water supply. Numerous wetlands and lakes in Pasco County have been impacted by the high demand for ground water. Central Pasco County, particularly the area within the Cypress Creek well field, has been greatly affected. Probable causes for the decline in surface-water levels are well-field pumpage and a decade-long drought. Efforts are underway to increase surface-water levels by developing alternative sources of water supply, thus reducing the quantity of well-field pumpage. Numerical ground-water flow simulations coupled with an optimization routine were used in a series of simulations to test the sensitivity of optimal pumpage to desired increases in surficial aquifer system heads in the Cypress Creek well field. The ground-water system was simulated using the central northern Tampa Bay ground-water flow model. Pumping solutions for 1987 equilibrium conditions and for a transient 6-month timeframe were determined for five test cases, each reflecting a range of desired target recovery heads at different head control sites in the surficial aquifer system. Results are presented in the form of curves relating average head recovery to total optimal pumpage. Pumping solutions are sensitive to the location of head control sites formulated in the optimization problem and as expected, total optimal pumpage decreased when desired target head increased. The distribution of optimal pumpage for individual production wells also was significantly affected by the location of head control sites. A pumping advantage was gained for test-case formulations where hydraulic heads were maximized in cells near the production wells, in cells within the steady-state pumping center cone of depression, and in cells within the area of the well field where confining-unit leakance is the highest. More water was pumped and the ratio of head recovery per unit decrease in optimal pumpage was more than double for test cases where hydraulic heads

  6. Does Emotions Communication Ability Affect Psychological Well-Being? A Study with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) v2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciano, Tiziana; Curci, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the current study was to provide evidence regarding the relationship between emotions communication ability--in terms of emotional intelligence (EI)--and psychological well-being. Additionally, the study explored the moderating effect of sex on this relationship. Participants filled in the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, General Health Questionnaire, Psychological General Well-Being Index, and Depression Questionnaire. Results showed the moderating role of sex in the relationship between EI ability and psychological well-being. Furthermore, the associations between EI and psychological well-being measures were generally higher for men than for women, supporting the idea that sex needs to be taken into account when considering EI measures. The potential helpfulness of EI and emotions communications ability in promoting mental health is discussed.

  7. A comparison between standard well test evaluation methods used in SKB's site investigations and the generalised radial flow concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB (Sweden)); Ludvigson, Jan-Erik; Leven, Jakob (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2011-09-15

    According to the strategy for hydrogeological characterisation within the SKB's site investigation programme, two single-hole test methods are available for testing and parameterisation of groundwater flow models - constant-head injection testing with the Pipe String System (PSS method) and difference flow logging with the Posiva Flow Log (PFL method). This report presents the results of an investigation to assess discrepancies in the results of single-hole transmissivity measurements using these methods in the Forsmark site characterisation. The investigation explores the possibility that the source of the discrepancy observed lies in the assumptions of the flow geometry that are inherent to the methods used for standard constant-head injection well test analysis and difference flow logging analysis, respectively. In particular, the report looks at the generalised radial flow (GRF) concept by Barker (1988) as a means that might explain some of the differences. A confirmation of the actual flow geometries (dimensions) observed during hydraulic injection tests could help to identify admissible conceptual models for the tested system, and place the hydraulic testing with the PSS and PFL test methods in its full hydrogeological context. The investigation analyses 151 constant-head injection tests in three cored boreholes at Forsmark. The results suggest that the transmissivities derived with standard constant-head injection well test analysis methods and with the GRF concept, respectively, are similar provided that the dominating flow geometry during the testing is radial (cylindrical). Thus, having flow geometries with dimensions other than 2 affects the value of the interpreted transmissivity. For example, a flow system with a dimension of 1 may require an order of magnitude or more, higher transmissivity to produce the same flow rates. The median of the GRF flow dimensions of all 151 constant-head injection tests is 2.06 with 33% of the tests in the range 1

  8. Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Analysis of a multiple-well interference test in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-Hole complex, May--June 1995, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldon, A.L.; Umari, A.M.A.; Earle, J.D.; Fahy, M.F.; Gemmell, J.M.; Darnell, J.

    1998-01-01

    A multiple-well interference (pumping) test was conducted in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain, Nev., from May 22 to June 12, 1995, by the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. This pumping test was conducted as part of investigations to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for the storage of high-level nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository. During the test, borehole UE-25 c number-sign 3 was pumped for 10 days at an average rate of 17.9 liters per second. Drawdown in 6 observation wells completed in Miocene tuffaceous rocks 29.0--3,525.6 meters from the pumping well ranged from 0 to 0.42 meters 14,000 minutes after pumping started. The spatial distribution of this drawdown indicates that a northwest-trending zone of discontinuous faults might be affecting ground-water movement in the Miocene tuffaceous rocks near the C-holes. No drawdown was observed in a borehole completed in a regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifer 630.0 meters from the pumping well. Consequently, it could not be determined during the pumping test if the Miocene tuffaceous rocks are connected hydraulically to the regional aquifer. Analyses of drawdown and recovery indicate that the Miocene tuffaceous rocks in the vicinity of the C-holes have transmissivity values of 1,600--3,200 meters squared per day, horizontal hydraulic conductivity values of 6.5--13 meters per day, vertical hydraulic conductivity values of 0.2--1.7 meters per day, storativity values of 0.001--0.003, and specific yield values of 0.01--0.2

  11. WIPP Hydrology Program: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico, Hydrologic Data Report No. 5: Parts, A-WIPP-13 multipad test; B-H-4c, P-17, ERDA-9, and Cabin Baby-1 slug tests; C-Engle and Carper well pumping tests; D-WIPP-12, H-14, and H-15 drill-stem tests; E-Water-level data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stensrud, W.A.; Bame, M.A.; Lantz, K.D.; LaVenue, A.M.; Palmer, J.B.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Part A of this report describes the objectives, scope, design, equipment, and methodology for a long-term pumping test conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The test was conducted to provide technical assistance as part of the ongoing hydrologic characterization of the WIPP site. The test is referred to as the northern multipad pumping test, because it was designed to create a hydraulic stress over a wide area of the northern half of the WIPP site. The fluid-pressure and water-level recovery in both pumping and observation wells were monitored for a minimum of 72 days. The test interval was the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Twenty-three observation wells completed in the Culebra dolomite were monitored at least once a month as part of the regional water-level monitoring program. Severl wells completed in the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation were monitored during the test to assess the possibility of Magenta-Culebra communication in the expected area of influence of this test. The succeeding sections of this part of Hydrologic Data Report No. 5 present detailed descriptions of the test objectives, pretest data collection, test equipment and test-well configuration, the observation-well network, and test results. 3 refs., 147 figs., 107 tabs

  12. Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

    1978-09-01

    The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

  13. Summary of hydrologic testing in Tertiary limestone aquifer, Tenneco offshore exploratory well--Atlantic OCS, lease-block 427 (Jacksonville NH 17-5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Richard H.; Bush, Peter W.; Krause, Richard E.; Miller, James A.; Sprinkle, Craig L.

    1982-01-01

    A summary of hydrologic testing in an offshore oil-test well (LB427) drilled for Tenneco, Inc., 55 miles east of Fernandina Beach, Florida, is presented. The interval tested (1,050 to 1,070 feet below sea level) is in a calcarenite that is equivalent to the Ocala Limestone (late Eocene) of onshore Florida and South Georgia. At this site the Ocala forms the highly productive Tertiary limestone aquifer system of the southeastern United States. Pressure-head measurements indicate an equivalent freshwater head of 24 to 29 feet above sea level. These pressure-head measurements and an earlier one made in the nearby JOIDES J- I hole are the only hydraulic head determinations to date in the offshore extensions of any of the aquifers underlying the Atlantic coastal plain. A drill-stem test recovered water samples containing about 7,000 milligrams per liter chloride. However, seawater used in the drilling process apparently contaminated the samples and the formation water is considered slightly fresher. The head and salinity data from the Tenneco well suggest that the sampled interval lies in the transition zone between fresh and seawater in the limestone aquifer. These data, when viewed with similar data from JOIDES J-I, show the transition zone to slope very slightly landward. The interface position is probably intermediate between a position compatible with present-day heads and a position compatible with predevelopment heads.

  14. Spiritual well-being and quality of life among Icelanders receiving palliative care: data from Icelandic pilot-testing of a provisional measure of spiritual well-being from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, G H; Sigurdardottir, V; Gunnarsdottir, S; Sigurbjörnsson, E; Traustadottir, R; Kelly, E; Young, T; Vivat, B

    2017-03-01

    Palliative care focuses on improving quality of life (QoL). This study examined the feasibility of the Icelandic version of a provisional European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) measure of spiritual well-being (SWB), and explored the relationship between SWB and QoL for palliative care patients in Iceland. Instruments from the EORTC were used: the provisional measure of SWB, which was undergoing pilot-testing in Iceland, and the EORTC QLQ C15-PAL. The correlation between scores was examined and descriptive statistics were used. Structured interviews explored feasibility. Thirty persons participated with average age 72 years. Belief in God or a higher power had the mean 3.33 on a 1-4 scale and the mean for overall SWB was 5.73 on a 1-7 scale. The mean score for global health/QoL was 59.4, physical functioning 48.5 and emotional functioning 78.9 on a 0-100 scale. Overall QoL was positively correlated with SWB showing r(30) = 0.386, P = 0.035. The participants found that answering the provisional EORTC QLQ-SWB prompted an emotional response and took the opportunity to discuss the subject. The provisional SWB measure was found relevant for the Icelandic context, and the study indicates that SWB and QoL are closely connected. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The relationship between office type and job satisfaction: Testing a multiple mediation model through ease of interaction and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterbring, Tobias; Pareigis, Jörg; Wästlund, Erik; Makrygiannis, Alexander; Lindström, Anton

    2018-05-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional study investigated the associations between office type (cellular, shared-room, small open-plan, and medium-sized open-plan) and employees' ease of interaction with coworkers, subjective well-being, and job satisfaction. Methods A brief survey including measures of office type, ease of interaction with coworkers, subjective well-being, and job satisfaction was sent electronically to 1500 Swedish real-estate agents, 271 of whom returned usable surveys. The data were analyzed using a regression-based serial multiple mediation model (PROCESS Model 6), which tested whether the relationship between office type and job satisfaction would be mediated by ease of interaction and, in turn, subjective well-being. Results A negative relationship was found between the number of coworkers sharing an office and employees' job satisfaction. This association was serially mediated by ease of interaction with coworkers and subjective well-being, with employees working in small and medium-sized open-plan offices reporting lower levels of both these aspects than employees who work in either cellular or shared-room offices. Conclusions Open-plan offices may have short-term financial benefits, but these benefits may be lower than the costs associated with decreased job satisfaction and well-being. Therefore, decision-makers should consider the impact of office type on employees rather than focusing solely on cost-effective office layout, flexibility, and productivity.

  16. Determination of the geothermal well damage from its production tests; Determinacion del dano en pozos geotermicos a partir de sus pruebas de produccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon Aguilar, Alfonso; Izquierdo Montalvo, Georgina; Arellano Gomez, Victor [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-06-13

    In this work the evolution is described that undergoes the factor of damage in a well during its productive stage, which is identifiable from the diminution in the characteristics of its production. It is mentioned that during the productive stage of wells, its declination is, in many occasions, synonymous of the damage presence. Traditionally, the damage effect is determined from the equations for analysis of the transitory tests of pressure. Nevertheless, the execution of this type of tests requires relatively long periods of time to obtain the stabilization of the well and of significant costs. By the previous facts the development of techniques to determine the damage from production tests was initiated. In this article is presented the curve-type of geothermal inflow affected by the damage, from which the value of this one in a geothermal well for the time in which its test of production is realized can be determined. A methodology is proposed to determine the damage effect in the well using the proposed curve-type and its applicability with examples of test measurements of well discharge is demonstrated in Mexican geothermal fields. From the conducted analyses it is found that the numerical value of the damage determined in selected wells increases based on the time of exploitation, which indicates a deterioration of its productive characteristics. The previous statements aid to constitute a technical endorsement for the decision making, on the pertinent actions that can be executed in the well. [Spanish] En este trabajo se describe la evolucion que sufre el factor de dano en un pozo durante su etapa productiva, el cual es identificable a partir de la disminucion en las caracteristicas de su produccion. Se menciona que durante la etapa productiva de los pozos, su declinacion es, en muchas ocasiones, sinonimo de la presencia de dano. Tradicionalmente, el efecto de dano se determina a partir de las ecuaciones para analisis de las pruebas transitorias de presion

  17. Assessing hydraulic connections across a complex sequence of volcanic rocks - Analysis of U-20 WW multiple-well aquifer test, Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Fenelon, Joseph M.; Halford, Keith J.; Reiner, Steven R.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater beneath Pahute Mesa flows through a complexly layered sequence of volcanic rock aquifers and confining units that have been faulted into distinct structural blocks. Hydraulic property estimates of rocks and structures in this flow system are necessary to assess radionuclide migration near underground nuclear testing areas. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used a 12 month (October 1, 2008— October 1, 2009) intermittent pumping schedule of well U-20 WW and continuously monitored water levels in observation wells ER-20-6 #3, UE-20bh 1, and U-20bg as a multi-well aquifer test to evaluate hydraulic connections across structural blocks, bulk hydraulic properties of volcanic rocks, and the hydraulic significance of a major fault. Measured water levels were approximated using synthetic water levels generated from an analytical model. Synthetic water levels are a summation of environmental water-level fluctuations and a Theis (1935) transform of the pumping signal from flow rate to water-level change. Drawdown was estimated by summing residual differences between measured and synthetic water levels and the Theis-transformed pumping signal from April to September 2009. Drawdown estimates were used in a three‑dimensional numerical model to estimate hydraulic properties of distinct aquifers, confining units, and a major fault.

  18. Americium, plutonium and uranium contamination and speciation in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the Sarzhal region of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Vintró, L; Mitchell, P I; Omarova, A; Burkitbayev, M; Jiménez Nápoles, H; Priest, N D

    2009-04-01

    New data are reported on the concentrations, isotopic composition and speciation of americium, plutonium and uranium in surface and ground waters in the Sarzhal region of the Semipalatinsk Test Site, and an adjacent area including the settlement of Sarzhal. The data relate to filtered water and suspended particulate from (a) streams originating in the Degelen Mountains, (b) the Tel'kem 1 and Tel'kem 2 atomic craters, and (c) wells on farms located within the study area and at Sarzhal. The measurements show that (241)Am, (239,240)Pu and (238)U concentrations in well waters within the study area are in the range 0.04-87mBq dm(-3), 0.7-99mBq dm(-3), and 74-213mBq dm(-3), respectively, and for (241)Am and (239,240)Pu are elevated above the levels expected solely on the basis of global fallout. Concentrations in streams sourced in the Degelen Mountains are similar, while concentrations in the two water-filled atomic craters are somewhat higher. Suspended particulate concentrations in well waters vary considerably, though median values are very low, at 0.01mBq dm(-3), 0.08mBq dm(-3) and 0.32mBq dm(-3) for (241)Am, (239,240)Pu and (238)U, respectively. The (235)U/(238)U isotopic ratio in almost all well and stream waters is slightly elevated above the 'best estimate' value for natural uranium worldwide, suggesting that some of the uranium in these waters is of test-site provenance. Redox analysis shows that on average most of the plutonium present in the microfiltered fraction of these waters is in a chemically reduced form (mean 69%; 95% confidence interval 53-85%). In the case of the atomic craters, the proportion is even higher. As expected, all of the americium present appears to be in a reduced form. Calculations suggest that annual committed effective doses to individual adults arising from the daily ingestion of these well waters are in the range 11-42microSv (mean 21microSv). Presently, the ground water feeding these wells would not appear to be contaminated with

  19. Americium, plutonium and uranium contamination and speciation in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the Sarzhal region of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon Vintro, L. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)], E-mail: luis.leon@ucd.ie; Mitchell, P.I.; Omarova, A. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Burkitbayev, M. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Al-Faraby Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Jimenez Napoles, H. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Priest, N.D. [School of Health and Social Sciences, Middlesex University, Enfield, EN3 4SA (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    New data are reported on the concentrations, isotopic composition and speciation of americium, plutonium and uranium in surface and ground waters in the Sarzhal region of the Semipalatinsk Test Site, and an adjacent area including the settlement of Sarzhal. The data relate to filtered water and suspended particulate from (a) streams originating in the Degelen Mountains, (b) the Tel'kem 1 and Tel'kem 2 atomic craters, and (c) wells on farms located within the study area and at Sarzhal. The measurements show that {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 238}U concentrations in well waters within the study area are in the range 0.04-87 mBq dm{sup -3}, 0.7-99 mBq dm{sup -3}, and 74-213 mBq dm{sup -3}, respectively, and for {sup 241}Am and {sup 239,240}Pu are elevated above the levels expected solely on the basis of global fallout. Concentrations in streams sourced in the Degelen Mountains are similar, while concentrations in the two water-filled atomic craters are somewhat higher. Suspended particulate concentrations in well waters vary considerably, though median values are very low, at 0.01 mBq dm{sup -3}, 0.08 mBq dm{sup -3} and 0.32 mBq dm{sup -3} for {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 238}U, respectively. The {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotopic ratio in almost all well and stream waters is slightly elevated above the 'best estimate' value for natural uranium worldwide, suggesting that some of the uranium in these waters is of test-site provenance. Redox analysis shows that on average most of the plutonium present in the microfiltered fraction of these waters is in a chemically reduced form (mean 69%; 95% confidence interval 53-85%). In the case of the atomic craters, the proportion is even higher. As expected, all of the americium present appears to be in a reduced form. Calculations suggest that annual committed effective doses to individual adults arising from the daily ingestion of these well waters are in the range 11-42 {mu}Sv (mean 21 {mu

  20. Hanford wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGhan, V.L.; Myers, D.A.; Damschen, D.W.

    1976-03-01

    The Hanford Reservation contains about 2100 wells constructed from pre-Hanford Works to the present. As of Jan. 1976, about 1800 wells still exist, 850 of which were drilled to the groundwater table; 700 still contain water. This report provides the most complete documentation of these wells and supersedes all previous compilations, including BNWL-1739

  1. A 96-well-plate-based optical method for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and its application to susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsken, Mathias; Di Fiore, Stefano; Römling, Ute; Häussler, Susanne

    2010-08-01

    A major reason for bacterial persistence during chronic infections is the survival of bacteria within biofilm structures, which protect cells from environmental stresses, host immune responses and antimicrobial therapy. Thus, there is concern that laboratory methods developed to measure the antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic bacteria may not be relevant to chronic biofilm infections, and it has been suggested that alternative methods should test antibiotic susceptibility within a biofilm. In this paper, we describe a fast and reliable protocol for using 96-well microtiter plates for the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms; the method is easily adaptable for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. This method is based on bacterial viability staining in combination with automated confocal laser scanning microscopy. The procedure simplifies qualitative and quantitative evaluation of biofilms and has proven to be effective for standardized determination of antibiotic efficiency on P. aeruginosa biofilms. The protocol can be performed within approximately 60 h.

  2. Analysis of Single-Hole and Cross-Hole Tracer Tests Conducted at the Nye County Earl Warning Drilling Program Well Complex, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Umari; J.D. Earle; M.F. Fahy

    2006-01-01

    As part of the effort to understand the flow and transport characteristics downgradient from the proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, single- and cross-hole tracer tests were conducted from December 2004 through October 2005 in boreholes at the Nye County 22 well complex. The results were analyzed for transport properties using both numerical and analytical solutions of the governing advection dispersion equation. Preliminary results indicate effective flow porosity values ranging from 1.0 x 10 -2 for an individual flow path to 2.0 x 10 -1 for composite flow paths, longitudinal dispersivity ranging from 0.3 to 3 m, and a transverse horizontal dispersivity of 0.03 m. Individual flow paths identified from the cross-hole testing indicate some solute diffusion into the stagnant portion of the alluvial aquifer

  3. FY1997 report on test well drilling and well investigation for the Akinomiya area survey in the geothermal development promotion survey; 1997 nendo chinetsu sokushin chosa. Akinomiya chiiki chosa shisui kussaku koji oyobi kosei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In order to extract promising areas with high geothermal feasibility, the Akinomiya area was surveyed by drilling test wells. In the N9-AY-3 excavating work, the first stage (depth from 15 to 33 m) used the water-free excavation to prevent adverse effects on the water sources. The second stage (depth from 33 to 409 m) reached the targeted depth with slanted excavation. The third stage drilled into depths from 409 to 1,006 m. The fourth stage was targeted to drill down to 1,802 m, but an entire lost returns have occurred at the depth of 1,598 m, whereas lost water drilling was performed by using fresh water, and the drilling was terminated at the targeted depth. The AY-4 excavation was also advanced with the first, second, third and fourth stage method, and when the entire lost returns have occurred at 1,196 m, the lost water drilling was carried out by using fresh water, and the drilling was terminated at the scheduled 1,505 m. The AY-5 excavation was also advanced with the first, second, third and fourth stage method. The first and second stages used water-free excavation (using air hammers) to avoid influence on the nearby spa areas. The third stage went down to 405 m performing coring, but the entire lost returns occurred at 298 m. The excavation rate was very high, and the core recovery rate reached 100%. The fourth stage presented the same coring condition as that for the third stage down to 1,002 m. (NEDO)

  4. Evaluation of cross borehole tests at selected wells in the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite at the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevenell, L.A.; McMaster, B.W.; Desmarais, K.M.

    1995-05-01

    Several waste disposal sites are located on or adjacent to the karstic Maynardville Limestone (Cmn) and the Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ccr) at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant. These formations receive contaminants from nearby disposal sites, and transport of these contaminants through the formations can be quite rapid due to the karst flow system. Groups of wells, aligned perpendicular to strike, were drilled to investigate the characteristics of the Cmn, and these wells are identified as Pickets. In order to evaluate transport processes through the karst aquifer, the formations must be characterized. As one component of this characterization effort, cross borehole tests were conducted where water was injected into one well at a site, and water level responses were monitored in nearby wells to determine the directions in which quick flow is more dominant. The ultimate objective of the studies of the Cmn is to characterize the hydrologic characteristics of the karst aquifer and to identify the generalized configuration of the conduit systems and portions subject to a significant quick flow component (i.e., higher hydraulic conductivity zones). The resultant conceptual model will be useful in constructing numerical models to be used to predict flow paths

  5. Demonstration of In situ Anaerobic Transformation of Toluene and Xylene Using Single-Well Push-Pull Tests and Deuterated BTEX Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J. A.; Reusser, D. E.; Beller, H. R.; Istok, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    Obtaining unambiguous evidence of in-situ transformation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in the subsurface is a difficult task. Recently, benzylsuccinic acid and its methyl analogues were shown to be unequivocal degradation products of anaerobic toluene and xylene biodegradation. Conducting tracer tests at BTEX-contaminated field sites is problematic because background contaminant concentrations potentially interfere with the interpretation of field test data. To avoid the time and cost associated with removing background contaminants, alternative approaches are needed. Deuterated analogs of toluene and xylene are well-suited for use in field tracer tests because they are inexpensive and can be distinguished analytically from background toluene and xylene. In this study, single-well push-pull tests, in which deuterated toluene and xylene were injected, were performed to assess the in-situ anaerobic biotransformation of toluene and xylene in BTEX-contaminated wells. A total of 4 single-well push-pull tests were conducted at BTEX-contaminated field sites near Portland, OR and Kansas City, KS. Test solutions consisting of 100 mg/L bromide, 250 mg/L nitrate, 0.4 to 2.5 mg/L toluene-d8, and 0.4 to 1.0 mg/L o-xylene-d10.were injected at a rate of 0.5 - 2 L/min. During the extraction phase, samples were taken daily to biweekly for up to 30 days. Samples for volatile organic analytes were collected in 40-mL volatile organic analysis (VOA) vials without headspace. Samples for BSA and methyl-BSA were collected in 1 L glass bottles and preserved with 5% (w/w) formalin. Samples were shipped on ice and stored at 4 C until analysis. Unambiguous evidence of toluene and xylene biotransformation was obtained with the in-situ formation of BSA and methyl-BSA. The concentrations of BSA ranged from below the detection limit (0.2 ug/L) to 1.5 ug/L. The concentrations of methyl-BSA ranged from below detection to the quantitation limit (0.7 ug/L). The highest BSA

  6. Water Well Locations - Conservation Wells

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The conservation well layer identifies the permitted surface location of oil and gas conservation wells that have not been plugged. These include active, regulatory...

  7. Amazing wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, E.; Leschart, M.; Mahoney, J.; Smith, M.

    2002-02-01

    Six wells and a drilling rig, setting company, national and world records such as deepest well, longest horizontal well, and record setting completion technology are described. Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is mainly responsible for these outstanding successes. Discovered more than 20 years ago by a then Imperial oil scientist (Dr. Roger Butler) SAGD promises recovery rates of about 70 per cent for the right reservoir; more than twice the 25 to 30 per cent recovery rate with cyclic stimulation at Cold Lake and an average recovery rate of about 28 per cent for all Alberta light, medium and heavy oil wells. The seven facilities discussed in this article are : (1) Alberta Energy Company's Forest Hill oil sands project near Cold Lake, the first commercial SAGD operation where well pairs are producing 1,200-1,500 bbls per day; (2) Talisman Energy's Lovett River wells, which hold the company's depth record for a horizontal well in the Alberta Foothills; (3) Also owned by Talisman Energy in the Buchan Field in the North Sea, this well is famous for the fact that it was drilled with coiled tubing from a floating production vessel; : (4) in the Peco Field, south of Edson Alberta and owned by EOG Resources Canada, this well holds the Canadian offshore record for a single run using rotary steerable technology; (5) Burlington Resources Canada 's Burlington HZ Hinton 2-34-52-26 W5M well is best known for its record setting extended reach open hole coiled tubing job; (6) another Burlington Resources well holds the record for the deepest one-trip whipstock system ever run in Canada and milled successfully in one trip; and (7) a drilling rig in the Wabasca-Brintnell area of northern Alberta, owned by Canadian Natural Resources Limited, holds the record for drilling the largest number of horizontal holes in one year with the same rig.

  8. Coaching in self-efficacy improves care responses, health and well-being in dementia carers: a pre/post-test/follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Lynn; Stein-Parbury, Jane; White, Danielle; McNeill, Georgene; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Zaratan, Beverley

    2016-05-04

    Maintaining the health and well-being of family carers of people with dementia is vital, given their potential for experiencing burden associated with the role. The study aimed to help dementia carers develop self-efficacy, be less hassled by the caring role and improve their health and well-being with goal-directed behaviour, by participating in an eight module carer coaching program. The study used mixed methods in a pre/post-test/follow-up design over 24 months, with assignment of consented dementia carers to either individualised (n = 16) or group coaching (n = 32), or usual carer support services (n = 43), depending on preference. Care-giving self-efficacy and hassles, carer health, well-being and goal-directed behaviours were assessed over time. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to compare changes over time and the effects of coaching on carer self-efficacy, hassles and health, using the Univariate General Linear Model (GLM). All carers were hassled by many aspects of caring at baseline. Participants receiving coaching reported non-significant improvements in most areas of self-efficacy for caring, hassles associated with caring and self-reported health at post-test and follow-up, than did carers receiving usual carer support. Group coaching had greater success in helping carers to achieve their goals and to seek help from informal and formal support networks and services. The study outcomes were generally positive, but need to be interpreted cautiously, given some methodological limitations. It has been shown, however, that health staff can assist dementia carers to develop self-efficacy in better managing their family member's limitations and behaviour, seek help from others and attend to their health. Teaching carers to use goal-directed behaviour may help them achieve these outcomes.

  9. Tests and indicators for improving the pedagogical control of the legs force of long and middle distance, as well as sport walk 12-15 school categories athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Santana-García

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The control of the yield inside the process of sport training is one of the instruments that guarantee that it is made on the base of solid arguments as for the correspondence among the loads or preparation stimuli that must receive the sportsman and its condition to assimilate it. Due to the deficiencies, detected during a preliminary diagnosis based on the content analysis, measurement and mathematical statistical methods that corroborate the necessity to perfect elements of the sportsmen preparation management, a study begins with the in o rde r to give solution to the scientific problem: How to improve the pedagogic control of the legs force on Long and Middle distance, as well as Sport Walk athletes at 12 - 15 yeas school categories from “Ormani Arenado” Initial Sport School of Pinar del Río? It has the objective to select tests and indicators that improve this pedagogic control. There were used different methods and investigation instruments such as, analysis and synthesis, the measurement, as well as the descriptive and inferential statistic, which allowed the selection of the test of the ten jumps to include it in the protocol of evaluation of the physical performance set for the school categories, with procedures that brings forth four indicators on the sportsman's state. Its feasibility is being evaluating at present in an extended study certified by the provincial commission of Athletics. The contributions of this research, favor to the results of the investigative project “The evaluation and planning of the training in Long and Middle distance, as well as Sport Walk athletes in Pinar del Río”, answering, at the same time, to the fourth technological demand of the Athletics in this western county of Cuba.

  10. Live Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Live Well Mental Health Substance Use Smoking Healthy Diet Physical Activity Family Planning Living with HIV: Travel ... to his or her health and well-being. Smoking - Tobacco use is the ... year. Healthy Diet - No matter your HIV status, healthy eating is ...

  11. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls

  12. Rapid Screening of Psychological Well-Being of Patients with Chronic Illness: Reliability and Validity Test on WHO-5 and PHQ-9 Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Fang Vivienne Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intended to test the reliability and validity of two simple psychological screening scales, the World Health Organization Well-being Index (WHO-5 and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9, in patients with chronic illness in Taiwan and to understand the psychological well-being of patients with chronic illness (e.g., metabolic syndrome in Taiwan and the incidences of psychological problems that follow. The research design of this study was a descriptive cross-sectional study. The sample comprised 310 patients with metabolic syndrome (MS, aged 20 years or more, from the outpatient clinic of a municipal hospital in Taiwan. This study used questionnaires to collect basic information, including physiological indices, WHO-5 and PHQ-9 that were used. “Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS,” and “World Health Organization Quality of Life—Short-form Version for Taiwan (WHOQOL”. Results are as follows: (1 compared to PHQ-9, the reliability and validity of WHO-5 are better for screening the psychological well-being of patients with chronic illness. (2 The features of WHO-5 are high sensitivity, briefness, and ease-of-use. The incidence of depression in patients with metabolic syndrome was approximately 1.0–6.5%, which is significantly lower than that of western countries.

  13. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

  14. Hanford wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-08-01

    Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details

  15. Preselecting Well Test Interpretation Models Using External Data Présélection de modèles d'interprétation de tests de puits par l'utilisation de données externes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison I.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The first stage in interpreting a well test is concerned with identifying a well test interpretation (WTI model for the reservoir that is consistent with all the known data and whose theoretical output response is qualitatively similar to the actual well test response. Conventionally, engineers identify WTI models by using WTI software to plot functions of well test pressure against time and then diagnose components of WTI models from their characteristic curve signatures, together with evidence from external (geological and engineering data. This paper focuses on the use of external data for preselecting WTI models, which can then be verified using conventional well test analysis techniques. The KADS methodology for developing knowledge based systems (KBS was adopted and the inference layer structure for the WTI model preselection task was derived. The WTI model preselection task will form one part of a KBS for well test interpretation, SPIRIT, being developed jointly by Artificial Intelligence Applications Institute and Heriot-Watt University. La première étape dans l'interprétation d'un test de puits est celle de l'identification d'un modèle d'interprétation (WTI pour le réservoir, qui soit en accord avec l'ensemble des données connues, et dont la sortie théorique est qualitativement semblable à celle du puits testé. Pour ceci, les ingénieurs de réservoir utilisent habituellement des logiciels WTI qui calculent et tracent la pression de test de puits en fonction du temps. Cela leur permet de diagnostiquer les composantes des modèles WTI à partir de leurs signatures caractéristiques, le diagnostic étant complété par la prise en compte d'informations externes, de géologie ou d'ingénierie. Cet article est consacré à l'utilisation de données externes pour la préselection des modèles WTI, modèles qui peuvent être ensuite validés au moyen de techniques classiques d'analyse de tests de puits. La méthodologie de d

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various

  17. Neuropsychological Testing in Pathologically Verified Alzheimer Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia: How Well Do the Uniform Data Set Measures Differentiate Between Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Aaron R; Leger, Gabriel C; Miller, Justin B; Banks, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    Differences in cognition between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are well described in clinical cohorts, but have rarely been confirmed in studies with pathologic verification. For emerging therapeutics to succeed, determining underlying pathology early in the disease course is increasingly important. Neuropsychological evaluation is an important component of the diagnostic workup for AD and FTD. Patients with FTD are thought to have greater deficits in language and executive function while patients with AD are more likely to have deficits in memory. To determine if performance on initial cognitive testing can reliably distinguish between patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and AD neuropathology. In addition, are there other factors of the neuropsychological assessment that can be used to enhance the accuracy of underlying pathology? Using a logistic regression we retrospectively compared neurocognitive performance on initial evaluation of 106 patients with pathologically verified FTLD (pvFTLD), with 558 pathologically verified AD (pvAD) patients from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center using data from the Uniform Data Set (UDS) and the neuropathology data set. As expected, pvFTLD patients were younger, demonstrated better memory performance, and had more neuropsychiatric symptoms than pvAD patients. Other results were less predictable: pvFTLD patients performed better on one test of executive function (trail making test part B) but worse on another (digit span backward). Performance on language testing did not strongly distinguish the 2 groups. To determine what factors led to a misdiagnosis of AD in patients with FTLD, we further analyzed a small group of pvFTLD patients. These patients demonstrated older age and lower Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire counts compared with accurately diagnosed cases. Other than memory, numerical scores of neurocognitive performance on the UDS are of limited value in

  18. Feeling younger and identifying with older adults: Testing two routes to maintaining well-being in the face of age discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana M Armenta

    Full Text Available Integrating the social identity and aging literatures, this work tested the hypothesis that there are two independent, but simultaneous, responses by which adults transitioning into old age can buffer themselves against age discrimination: an individual response, which entails adopting a younger subjective age when facing discrimination, and a collective response, which involves increasing identification with the group of older adults. In three experimental studies with a total number of 488 older adults (50 to 75 years of age, we manipulated age discrimination in a job application scenario and measured the effects of both responses on perceived health and self-esteem. Statistical analyses include individual study results as well as a meta-analysis on the combined results of the three studies. Findings show consistent evidence only for the individual response, which was in turn associated with well-being. Furthermore, challenging previous research, the two responses (adopting a younger subjective age and increasing group identification were not only theoretically, but also empirically distinct. This research complements prior research by signaling the value of considering both responses to discrimination as complementary rather than mutually exclusive.

  19. Draw your assay: Fabrication of low-cost paper-based diagnostic and multi-well test zones by drawing on a paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola-Reynoso, Stephanie; Heim, Andrew P; Halbertsma-Black, Julian; Zhao, C; Tevis, Ian D; Çınar, Simge; Cademartiri, Rebecca; Liu, Xinyu; Bloch, Jean-Francis; Thuo, Martin M

    2015-11-01

    Interest in low-cost diagnostic devices has recently gained attention, in part due to the rising cost of healthcare and the need to serve populations in resource-limited settings. A major challenge in the development of such devices is the need for hydrophobic barriers to contain polar bio-fluid analytes. Key approaches in lowering the cost in diagnostics have centered on (i) development of low-cost fabrication techniques/processes, (ii) use of affordable materials, or, (iii) minimizing the need for high-tech tools. This communication describes a simple, low-cost, adaptable, and portable method for patterning paper and subsequent use of the patterned paper in diagnostic tests. Our approach generates hydrophobic regions using a ball-point pen filled with a hydrophobizing molecule suspended in a solvent carrier. An empty ball-point pen was filled with a solution of trichloro perfluoroalkyl silane in hexanes (or hexadecane), and the pen used to draw lines on Whatman® chromatography 1 paper. The drawn regions defined the test zones since the trichloro silane reacts with the paper to give a hydrophobic barrier. The formation of the hydrophobic barriers is reaction kinetic and diffusion-limited, ensuring well defined narrow barriers. We performed colorimetric glucose assays and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) using the created test zones. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, we fabricated multiple devices on a single piece of paper and demonstrated the reproducibility of assays on these devices. The overall cost of devices fabricated by drawing are relatively lower (

  20. Militantly Well

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigh, Henrik Erdman

    2015-01-01

    futures that transcend conflict engagement and wartime suffering for young militiamen. It clarifies the positive prospects that are expected to lie beyond the known horrors of war. Though conflict and warfare may provide strange points of departure for talking about well-being, imaginaries of happiness...... stand out from a background of hardship and are talked about in both a quite concrete way, as a lack of insecurity, as well as in an abstract way, as realization of social being. However, for most of the people I talk to, happiness remains elusive and evades their desperate attempts to grasp it...

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC No. 1 and Addendum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Strand

    2006-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145, Wells and Storage Holes in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the six CASs within CAU 145. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 1, 2005, through November 8, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 145 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Analytes detected during the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) were evaluated against appropriate final action levels to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at one of the six CASs in CAU 145 and required the evaluation of corrective action alternatives. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 145 revealed the following: CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13 do not contain contamination; and CAS 03-25-01 has pentachlorophenol and arsenic contamination in the subsurface soils. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the six CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 145. No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13. Close in place is the preferred corrective action

  2. Modes of occurrence and accumulation mechanism of methane hydrate -result of meti exploratory test wells ''Tokai-Oki To Kumano-Nada''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Tetsuya; Namikawa, Takatoshi; Nakamizu, Masaru; Tsuji, Yoshihiro; Okui, Toshiharu; Kawasaki, Masayuki; Ochiai, Koji

    2005-07-01

    In the Nankai Trough, offshore central Japan, seismic data indicates widespread existence of BSR, which is interpreted as an indicator of bottom boundary of methane hydrate bearing zone. Methane hydrate is regarded as future possible natural gas resource. However, the volume, distribution and occurrence of hydrate have been poorly understood. In order to obtain data for the understanding of methane hydrate occurrence and volume estimation, METI exploratory test wells ''Tokai-oki to Kumano-nada'' were drilled from January to May in 2004. First, LWD (Logging While Drilling) was carried out at 16 sites that were selected based on 2D and 3D seismic interpretation. Secondly, coring was carried out at 4 sites where high concentration of methane hydrate was expected based on resistivity log curve. In addition, continuous formation temperature measurement was carried out in order to investigate in-situ temperature condition in hydrate bearing sediments. Coring was carried out using both ODP type core sampler and PTCS (Pressure Temperature Core Sampler). PTCS coring were mainly focused on the hydrate bearing zone. Hydrate was confirmed in the pore space of turbidite sandstone layer in two of these sites, while it was confirmed as massive or layered condition in mud in one of the sites. Coring results suggest that most of hydrate were concentrated in sand layers in the alternation of sand and mud. The evidence may indicates permeable sandstone is ideal for hydrate accumulation. Hydrate dissociation and gas measurement test on board was also carried out and natural hydrate saturation data, which may calibrate logging results, was obtained. (Author)

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various

  5. Wellness centrum

    OpenAIRE

    Krchňák, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Diplomová práce „Wellness centrum'' je zpracována ve formě prováděcí dokumentace obsahující všechny náležitosti dle platných norem a předpisů. Navržený objekt je řešen jako třípodlažní budova. Objekt slouží veřejnosti k rekreaci a sportu. V 1S je umístěno technické zázemí, zázemí pro zaměstnance, šatny a posilovna. V 1 NP se nachází kavárna a wellness. Ve 2NP se nachází kanceláře pro administrativu budovy, masáže, solárium, šatny a fitness sál. Budova je založena na základových patkách a nosn...

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well • 06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole • 25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping • 25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 556 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities began on February 7 and were completed on June 19, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 556 data were evaluated based on the data quality assessment process, which demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at one of the four CASs in CAU 556 that required the completion of a corrective action. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 556 revealed the following: • Corrective Action Sites 06-20-04, 06-99-09, and 25-64-01 do not contain contamination at

  7. Macroscopic models for single-phase flows in fractured porous medium: application to well tests; Modeles macroscopiques pour les ecoulements monophasiques en milieu poreux fracture: application aux tests de puits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landereau, P.

    2000-12-01

    We consider pressure diffusion in fractured media, with application to well test interpretation. Using the volume averaging theory of Quintard and Whitaker, the local problem is replaced by a double-porosity large scale description. The parameters of the latter may be computed solving small scale closure problems on a representative volume. Using suitable numerical methods, we have performed a systematic study of these parameters as a function of the topology of the fracture network and matrix to fracture permeability contrast. We find that the matrix permeability plays a significant role near a percolation threshold. Next, we studied the exchange coefficient parameter, by unifying the different definitions of the literature in a single framework using a Fourier analysis. Finally, we applied our technique to well-test interpretation in fractured media by comparing large scale solutions to high resolution direct simulations. We find that at short time scale, very fine grid blocks are needed to get good accuracy. In that case, a good agreement is observed between large scale averaged results and reference simulations. (author)

  8. Wellness hotel

    OpenAIRE

    Bambas, Vratislav

    2013-01-01

    Novostavba Wellness hotelu. Objekt je částečně podsklepen. Hotel se skládá ze tří částí. Střední trakt je železobetonový skelet a má pět nadzemních podlaží. Tato část slouží jako vstupní hala a hlavní schodiště. Boční trakty mají čtyři nadzemní podlaží a jejich nosný systém je příčný stěnový, zděný, ze systému Porotherm. V suterénu se nachází zázemí hotelu a bazén. Do přízemí je umístěno restaurační zařízení. Ve druhém patře se nacházejí pokoje, posilovna a služby. V posledním patře jsou pouz...

  9. Well acidizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Street, E H

    1980-01-23

    The apparatus relates in particular to a well-treating process in which an aqueous acid solution having a pH of < 2 is injected into a subterranean reservoir in a manner such that materials that contain ferric ions are present in the acid and, as the acid reacts within the reservoir and attains a pH exceeding 3, tend to be precipitated as ferric ion-containing solid materials that may plug the pores of the reservoir. Such a precipitation is prevented by dissolving in the acid solution an amount of 5-sulfosalicylic acid which is at least sufficient to sequester significant proportions of ferric ions when the pH of the acid is from 0.5 to 3 but is less than enough to cause a significant salting-out of solid materials, and an amount of citric acid which is at least sufficient to sequester significant proportions of ferric ions when the pH of the acid is from 3 to 6 but is less than enough to precipitate a significant amount of calcium citrate. The amount of the 5-sulfosalicylic acid may be from 0.01 to 0.05 moles/l and the amount of citric acid is from 0.001 to 0.009 moles/l. 11 claims.

  10. Testing methodology of diamond composite inserts to be used in the drilling of petroleum wells; Metodologia de testes de insertos compositos diamantados a serem usados na perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrovnitchii, G.S.; Filgueira, M.; Skury, A.L.D.; Tardim, R.C. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: rtardim@terra.com.br

    2006-07-01

    The useful life of the inserts used in the cutters of the drills for perforation of oil wells determines the quality of the perforation as well as the productivity. Therefore, the research of the wear of insert is carried through with the objective to foretell the most important properties of the inserts. Due to the fact of the UENF to be developing the processes of composites sintering to the synthetic diamond base, it is interesting to define the testing methodology of the gotten inserts. The proposed methodology is based on the evaluation of the wear suffered by de sample. For this end a micro processed 'Abrasimeter', model AB800-E, manufactured for the Contenco Company was used. The instrument capacity is 1,36 kVA; axial load applied in the cutter up to 50 kgf; rotation of table speed 20 rpm; course of the tool in radial direction speed before 2 m/min; dimensions of the granite block D = 808 mm, d = 484 mm, h = 50 mm. The gotten results show that the proposed methodology can be used for the evaluation of the inserts of the cutters applied in perforation drills. (author)

  11. Behavioral Determinants of Switching to Arsenic-Safe Water Wells: An Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Health Education Interventions Coupled With Water Arsenic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Inauen, Jennifer; Perin, Jamie; Tighe, Jennifer; Hasan, Khaled; Zheng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    More than 100 million people globally are estimated to be exposed to arsenic in drinking water that exceeds the World Health Organization guideline of 10 µg/L. In an effort to develop and test a low-cost sustainable approach for water arsenic testing in Bangladesh, we conducted a randomized controlled trial which found arsenic educational…

  12. Contractor for geopressured-geothermal sites: Final contract report, Volume 1, fiscal years 1986--1990 (5 years), testing of wells through October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Field tests and studies were conducted to determine the production behavior of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and their potential as future energy sources. Results are presented for Gladys McCall Site, Pleasant Bayou Site, and Hulin Site.

  13. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  14. IN SITU DESTRUCTION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON COMPOUNDS IN GROUNDWATER USING CATALYTIC REDUCTIVE REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION IN A REACTIVE WELL: TESTING AND OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCES. (R825421)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A groundwater treatment technology based on catalytic reductive dehalogenation has been developed to efficiently destroy chlorinated hydrocarbons in situ using a reactive well approach. The treatment process utilizes dissolved H2 as an electron donor, in...

  15. User's guide for polyethylene-based passive diffusion bag samplers to obtain volatile organic compound concentrations in wells. Part 2, Field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion samplers installed in observation wells were found to be capable of yielding representative water samples for chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The samplers consisted of polyethylene bags containing deionized water and relied on diffusion of chlorinated volatile organic compounds through the polyethylene membrane. The known ability of polyethylene to transmit other volatile compounds, such as benzene and toluene, indicates that the samplers can be used for a variety of volatile organic compounds. In wells at the study area, the volatile organic compound concentrations in water samples obtained using the samplers without prior purging were similar to concentrations in water samples obtained from the respective wells using traditional purging and sampling approaches. The low cost associated with this approach makes it a viable option for monitoring large observation-well networks for volatile organic compounds.

  16. The development and testing of a fieldworthy system of improved fluid pumping device and liquid sensor for oil wells. Fourth quarter technical progress report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckman, W.G.

    1991-12-31

    A major expenditure to maintain oil and gas leases is the support of pumpers, those individuals who maintain the pumping systems on wells to achieve optimum production. Many leases are marginal and are in remote areas and this requires considerable driving time for the pumper. The Air Pulse Oil Pump System is designed to be an economical system for the shallow stripper wells. To improve on the economics of this system, we have designed a Remote Oil Field Monitor and Controller to enable us to acquire data from the lease to our central office at anytime and to control the pumping activities from the central office by using a personal computer. The advent and economics of low-power microcontrollers have made it feasible to use this type of system for numerous remote control systems. We can also adapt this economical system to monitor and control the production of gas wells and/or pump jacks.

  17. Selected Data for Wells and Test Holes Used in Structure-Contour Maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills Area, South Dakota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carter, Janet M

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected data on wells and test holes that were used in the construction of structure-contour maps of selected formations that contain major aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota...

  18. Testing causal models of job characteristics and employee well-being : a replication study using cross-lagged structural equation modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doest, ter L.; Jonge, de J.

    2006-01-01

    This study re-evaluated causal relationships between job characteristics (demands, autonomy, social support) and employee well-being (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion) in a methodological replication of De Jonge et al.'s (2001) two-wave panel study. The principal difference was the 2-year time

  19. Testing a Model of Women's Personal Sense of Justice, Control, Well-Being, and Distress in the Context of Sexist Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ann R.; Bolton Holz, Kenna

    2010-01-01

    Popular media convey notions that the United States is a postfeminist culture, where sexism is a thing of the past and gender equality prevails. Empirical data suggest otherwise. Further, links between group-based discrimination and psychological distress have been well documented (e.g., in bisexual and gay Latino men, African Americans, Asian…

  20. Longitudinal relation between general well-being and self-esteem : Testing differences for adolescents admitted to secure residential care and after discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, C.S.; Laan, A.J.; Bongers, I.L.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the longitudinal relation between general well-being and self-esteem of male adolescents with severe psychiatric disorders. Moreover, the transition out of secure residential care was studied. Adolescents (N = 172) were assessed three times with 6 months between each

  1. Technology’s present situation and the development prospects of energy efficiency monitoring as well as performance testing & analysis for process flow compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, L.; Yang, Q.; Liu, G.; Tang, B.; Xiao, J.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the background of performance testing of in-service process flow compressors set in user field are introduced, the main technique barriers faced in the field test are summarized, and the factors that result in real efficiencies of most process flow compressors being lower than the guaranteed by manufacturer are analysed. The authors investigated the present operational situation of process flow compressors in China and found that low efficiency operation of flow compressors is because the compressed gas is generally forced to flow back into the inlet pipe for adapting to the process parameters variety. For example, the anti-surge valve is always opened for centrifugal compressor. To improve the operation efficiency of process compressors the energy efficiency monitoring technology was overviewed and some suggestions are proposed in the paper, which is the basis of research on energy efficiency evaluation and/or labelling of process compressors.

  2. School Satisfaction among Adolescents: Testing Different Indicators for Its Measurement and Its Relationship with Overall Life Satisfaction and Subjective Well-Being in Romania and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ferran; Baltatescu, Sergiu; Bertran, Irma; Gonzalez, Monica; Hatos, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from two samples of adolescents aged 13-16 from Romania and Spain (N = 930 + 1,945 = 2,875). The original 7-item version of the Personal Well-Being Index (PWI) was used, together with an item on overall life satisfaction (OLS) and a set of six items related to satisfaction with school. A confirmatory factor analysis of…

  3. Do implicit motives and basic psychological needs interact to predict well-being and flow? : Testing a universal hypothesis and a matching hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schüler, Julia; Brandstätter, Veronika; Sheldon, Kennon M.

    2013-01-01

    Self-Determination Theory (Deci and Ryan in Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior. Plenum Press, New York, 1985) suggests that certain experiences, such as competence, are equally beneficial to everyone’s well-being (universal hypothesis), whereas Motive Disposition Theory (McClelland in Human motivation. Scott, Foresman, Glenview, IL, 1985) predicts that some people, such as those with a high achievement motive, should benefit particularly from such experiences (match...

  4. The importance of autonomy support and the mediating role of work motivation for well-being: testing self-determination theory in a Chinese work organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Youyan; Chua, Bee Leng; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Ryan, Richard M; Chan, Wai Yen

    2015-08-01

    We examine relations between perceived organisational autonomy support and different types of work motivation and well-being outcomes in 266 teachers from two government schools in China. We hypothesised that greater autonomy support would be associated with more autonomous forms of employee motivation, and that teacher motivation would in turn mediate the effects of autonomy support on indicators of work well-being (i.e., job satisfaction, work stress and physical ill symptoms). Results generally supported the hypothesised relations between perceived autonomy support and SDT's five types of motivations. Findings also showed that perceived autonomy support predicted job satisfaction directly and indirectly through the mediating roles of intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, introjected regulation and external regulation. Perceived autonomy support predicted work stress directly and indirectly through the mediating roles of external regulation and amotivation. Autonomy support also predicted illness symptoms via the mediating roles of intrinsic motivation, introjected regulation and amotivation. The current findings highlight how perceived organisational support for autonomy relates to motivational differences in a Chinese work context, and the potential relevance of autonomy support for employee well-being. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  5. Determination and maintenance of DE minimis risk for migration of residual tritium (3H) from the 1969 Project Rulison nuclear test to nearby hydraulically fractured natural gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeffrey I; Chapman, Jenny B

    2013-05-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was a proof-of-concept experiment that was conducted under the Plowshare Program in 1969 in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin in west-central Colorado. Today, commercial production of natural gas is possible from low permeability, natural gas bearing formations like that of the Williams Fork Formation using modern hydraulic fracturing techniques. With natural gas exploration and production active in the Project Rulison area, this human health risk assessment was performed in order to add a human health perspective for site stewardship. Tritium (H) is the radionuclide of concern with respect to potential induced migration from the test cavity leading to subsequent exposure during gas-flaring activities. This analysis assumes gas flaring would occur for up to 30 d and produce atmospheric H activity concentrations either as low as 2.2 × 10 Bq m (6 × 10 pCi m) from the minimum detectable activity concentration in produced water or as high as 20.7 Bq m (560 pCi m), which equals the highest atmospheric measurement reported during gas-flaring operations conducted at the time of Project Rulison. The lifetime morbidity (fatal and nonfatal) cancer risks calculated for adults (residents and workers) and children (residents) from inhalation and dermal exposures to such activity concentrations are all below 1 × 10 and considered de minimis. The implications for monitoring production water for conforming health-protective, risk-based action levels also are examined.

  6. Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: Analysis of water and dissolved natural gas: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankind, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

    1978-09-01

    The presence of large volumes of hot water (250-425 F) containing dissolved natural gas in the Gulf of Mexico coastal areas at depths of 5,000 to 25,000 feet (the geopressured zone) has been known for several years. Because natural gas and oil from conventional production methods were relatively inexpensive prior to 1973, and because foreign oil was readily available, no economic incentive existed for developing this resource. With the oil embargo and the resulting rapid escalation in prices of oil and gas since 1973, a new urgency exists for examining the economic potential of the geopressured-geothermal resource. The main objective of the research reported here was to determine the volume of gas dissolved in the geopressured water, as well as the qualitative and quantitative composition of the water and the dissolved gas. A further objective was to use an existing shut-in gas well so that drilling time and the attendant costs could be avoided.

  7. Simulation calculations on the construction of the energy-tagged photon beam as well as development and test of the side drift chambers of the Bonn SAPHIR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnen, T.

    1990-01-01

    The SAPHIR-detector is built up at the continuous photon beam of the Electron Stretcher and Accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The equipment is designed for investigations of reactions with more then two particles in the final state and for photon energies up to 3.5 GeV. A tagging-system determines the energy of the Bremsstrahlung-photons and a set-up of five large driftchambers measures the tracks of the charged particles. This work describes a program which was used to develop the best design of the tagging-hodoscope. In a second part the tests of the planar side-chambers and their evaluation is described. These measurements were carried out to fix the gasfilling and the parameters of the best working point. It is shown, that the chambers can reach a resolution of σ≤200 μm. (orig.) [de

  8. Accuracy of molecular diagnostics in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid: comparison of commercial and modified mosaic indirect immunofluorescence tests as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Seraszek-Jaros, Agnieszka; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Pietkiewicz, Paweł; Bartkiewicz, Paweł; Dmochowski, Marian

    2017-02-01

    Pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP) are identified by autoantibodies (abs) against desmoglein 1, 3 (DSG1/3) and BP180/BP230, respectively. A novel mosaic to indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) using purified BP180 recombinant proteins spotted on slide and transfected cells expressing BP230, DSG1, DSG3 is available. The commercial (IgG detection) and modified (IgG4 detection) mosaic for indirect immunofluorescence (IIFc - IIF commercial, IIFm - IIF modified) and IgG ELISAs were evaluated in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP) molecular diagnostics. To compare diagnostic accuracy of commercial (IgG detection) and modified (IgG4 detection) mosaic IIF assay and to examine the diagnostic value of ELISAs in relation to mosaic IIF in routine laboratory diagnostics of pemphigus and BP. Sera from 37 BP and 19 pemphigus patients were studied. Associations between tests were assessed using Fisher's exact test. There are associations between the positive/negative samples detected by IIFc with desmoglein1 (DSG1)/desmoglein3 (DSG3)/BP230 transfected cells and ELISAs and no association between anti-BP180 IgG detection by IIFc and ELISA. IIFm with DSG1 and DSG3 showed both 100% sensitivity and 100% and 78% specificity, respectively, and 100% and 83% positive predictive value in relation to IIFc. IIFm with BP230 had 87% specificity, 55% sensitivity, whereas IIFm with BP180 had a 100% sensitivity and 13% specificity in relation to IIFc. The IIFc with DSG1/DSG3/BP230 transfected cells, excluding BP180 spots, is an alternative method to ELISA in pemphigus/BP diagnostics. IgG4 antibodies, both pathogenically and diagnostically important, are inconsistently detectable with IIFm.

  9. Accuracy of molecular diagnostics in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid: comparison of commercial and modified mosaic indirect immunofluorescence tests as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Gornowicz-Porowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP are identified by autoantibodies (abs against desmoglein 1, 3 (DSG1/3 and BP180/BP230, respectively. A novel mosaic to indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using purified BP180 recombinant proteins spotted on slide and transfected cells expressing BP230, DSG1, DSG3 is available. The commercial (IgG detection and modified (IgG4 detection mosaic for indirect immunofluorescence (IIFc – IIF commercial, IIFm – IIF modified and IgG ELISAs were evaluated in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP molecular diagnostics. Aim : To compare diagnostic accuracy of commercial (IgG detection and modified (IgG4 detection mosaic IIF assay and to examine the diagnostic value of ELISAs in relation to mosaic IIF in routine laboratory diagnostics of pemphigus and BP. Material and methods : Sera from 37 BP and 19 pemphigus patients were studied. Associations between tests were assessed using Fisher’s exact test. Results: There are associations between the positive/negative samples detected by IIFc with desmoglein1 (DSG1/desmoglein3 (DSG3/BP230 transfected cells and ELISAs and no association between anti-BP180 IgG detection by IIFc and ELISA. IIFm with DSG1 and DSG3 showed both 100% sensitivity and 100% and 78% specificity, respectively, and 100% and 83% positive predictive value in relation to IIFc. IIFm with BP230 had 87% specificity, 55% sensitivity, whereas IIFm with BP180 had a 100% sensitivity and 13% specificity in relation to IIFc. Conclusions : The IIFc with DSG1/DSG3/BP230 transfected cells, excluding BP180 spots, is an alternative method to ELISA in pemphigus/BP diagnostics. IgG4 antibodies, both pathogenically and diagnostically important, are inconsistently detectable with IIFm.

  10. Summary of micrographic analysis of selected core samples from Well ER-20-6n number 1 in support of matrix diffusion testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-20-6number s ign1 was cored to determine fracture and lithologic properties proximal to the BULLION test cavity. Selected samples from ER-20-6number s ign1 were subjected to matrix and/or fracture diffusion experiments to assess solute movement in this environment. Micrographic analysis of these samples suggests that the similarity in bulk chemical composition results in very similar mineral assemblages forming along natural fractures. These samples are all part of the mafic-poor Calico Hills Formation and exhibit fracture-coating mineral assemblages dominated by mixed illite/smectite clay and illite, with local opaline silica (2,236 and 2, 812 feet), and zeolite (at 2,236 feet). Based on this small sample population, the magnitude to which secondary phases have formed on fracture surfaces bears an apparently inverse relationship to the competency of the host lithology, reflected by variations in the degree of fracturing and the development of secondary phases on fracture surfaces. In the flow breccia at 2,851 feet, thinly developed, localized coatings are developed along persistent open fracture apertures in this competent rock type. Fractures in the devitrified lava from 2,812 feet are irregular, and locally blocked by secondary mineral phases. Natural fractures on the zeolitized tuff from 2,236 feet are discontinuous and irregular and typically obstructed with secondary mineral phases. There are also a second set of clean fractures in the 2,236 foot sample which lack secondary mineral phases and are interpreted to have been induced by the BULLION test. Based on these results, it is expected that matrix diffusion will be enhanced in samples where potentially transmissive fractures exhibit the greatest degree of obstruction (2,236>2,812=2,835>2,851). It is unclear what influence the induced fractures observed at 2,236 feet may have on diffusion given the lack of knowledge on their extent. It is assumed that the bulk matrix diffusion characteristics of the

  11. Field Psychometric Testing of the Instrument for Assessment of Psychological Predictors of Well-Being and Quality of Life in People with HIV or AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remor, Eduardo; Fuster-RuizdeApodaca, Maria José; Ballester-Arnal, Rafael; Gómez-Martínez, Sandra; Fumaz, Carmina R; González-Garcia, Marian; Ubillos-Landa, Silvia; Aguirrezabal-Prado, Arrate; Molero, Fernando; Ruzafa-Martínez, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The Screenphiv, a screening measure for psychological issues related to HIV, was psychometrically tested in a study involving 744 HIV-infected people in Spain. Participants ages 18-82 (M = 43.04, 72 % men, 28 % women) completed an assessment protocol that included the Screenphiv and the MOS-HIV. A trained interviewer also collected relevant illness-related clinical data and socio-demographics from the participants. A confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the goodness of fit of the Screenphiv's theoretical model and confirmed six first-order factors and two second-order factors [RMSEA (IC 90 %) = 0.07 (0.07-0.08)]. No floor or ceiling effects were observed for the scores. Cronbach's alphas were acceptable for all of the factors (from 0.65 to 0.92). Criterion-related validity also achieved; Screenphiv scores were related to socio-demographic and clinical variables and MOS-HIV summary scores. The Screenphiv is a reliable and valid measure, ready to use in research and clinical settings in Spain.

  12. Spermatozoa isolated from cat testes retain their structural integrity as well as a developmental potential after refrigeration for up to 7 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buarpung, Sirirak; Tharasanit, Theerawat; Thongkittidilok, Chommanart; Comizzoli, Pierre; Techakumphu, Mongkol

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency of preservation media for isolated feline testicular spermatozoa as well as the concentrations of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on: (1) the membrane (sperm membrane integrity (SMI)) and DNA integrity of spermatozoa; and (2) the developmental potential of spermatozoa after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Isolated cat spermatozoa were stored in HEPES-M199 medium (HM) or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS) at 4°C for up to 7 days. Results indicated that HM maintained a better SMI than DPBS throughout the storage periods (P > 0.05). When spermatozoa were stored in HM supplemented with BSA at different concentrations (4, 8 or 16 mg/ml), SMI obtained from HM containing 8 and 16 mg/ml BSA was higher than with 4 mg/ml BSA (P 0.05). In summary, cat spermatozoa immediately isolated from testicular tissue can be stored as a suspension in basic buffered medium at 4°C for up to 7 days. BSA supplementation into the medium improves membrane integrity of the spermatozoa during cold storage. Testicular spermatozoa stored in HM containing 16 mg/ml BSA retained full in vitro developmental potential after ICSI, similar to that of fresh controls even though DNA integrity had slightly declined.

  13. Investigations in fiscal 1986 on promotion of geothermal development. Part 2. Report on precision structural test well drilling and investigation works in Otaki area; 1986 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa hokokusho. 2. Otaki chiiki seimitsu kozo shisui oyobi chosa koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-09-01

    With an objective of promotion of geothermal development in the Otaki area in Nagano Prefecture, precision structural test well drilling and investigation works have been carried out, and the result thereof reported. The investigated area is an inclined land with an area of 70 km{sup 2} at altitudes of 1,000 to 2,000 m in the southern foot of the Mitake volcano having Otaki River as the southern border. The investigation has performed during the period from March 2 to September 30, 1987 the drilling of the N61-OT-5 test well hole (depth of 502.0 m), temperature logging, temperature restoration test, water injection test, and core test. The result of the investigation may be summarized as follows: existence of the stratigraphic succession as predicted by ground surface investigation, and existence of the Mesozoic and Palaeozoic strata of the Mino belt were verified; the Mesozoic and Palaeozoic strata of the Mino belt being the base bed have only small cracks, and very little alteration can be identified; X-ray diffraction of powder from test drilled cores recognized very little minerals altered by hot water; and the temperature logging and temperature restoration test identified no temperature indication that clearly indicates existence of heat sources. As a conclusion, there is no alteration due to hot water down to 500 m below the surface in the vicinity of the investigation well, and the possibility of a geothermal reservoir to exist is extremely low. (NEDO)

  14. Laboratory testing of rock and salt samples for determination of specific gravity and total porosity of the Zeeck No. 1 well (PD-7), Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This report contains the specific gravity and total porosity determinations for rock and salt samples from Zeeck No. 1 Well of the Permian Basin. The laboratory test samples were measured for water content, apparent specific gravity, specific gravity of solids, total porosity and effective porosity. Specimen descriptions including specimen number, formation/group, and lithologic description as well as typical data sheets are included in the appendices. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  15. Second invitational well-testing symposium proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The symposium dealt with the state of the art of injection of fluids underground, and its application to geothermal systems in particular. Separate abstracts were prepared for fourteen papers and three abstracts of papers were listed by title. Three papers were previously abstracted for EDB.

  16. Full-scale testing and early production results from horizontal air sparging and soil vapor extraction wells remediating jet fuel in soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, R.J.; Bianco, P.; Pressly, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    Jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated at the International Arrivals Building (IAB) of the JFK International Airport in Jamaica, New York, are being remediated using soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). The areal extent of the contaminated soil is estimated to be 70 acres and the volume of contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 2.3 million gallons. The remediation uses approximately 13,000 feet of horizontal SVE (HSVE) wells and 7,000 feet of horizontal AS (HAS) wells. The design of the HSVE and HAS wells was based on a pilot study followed by a full-scale test. In addition to the horizontal wells, 28 vertical AS wells and 15 vertical SVE wells are used. Three areas are being remediated, thus, three separate treatment systems have been installed. The SVE and AS wells are operated continuously while groundwater will be intermittently extracted at each HAS well, treated by liquid phase activated carbon and discharged into stormwater collection sewerage. Vapors extracted by the SVE wells are treated by vapor phase activated carbon and discharged into ambient air. The duration of the remediation is anticipated to be between two and three years before soil and groundwater are remediated to New York State cleanup criteria for the site. Based on the monitoring data for the first two months of operation, approximately 14,600 lbs. of vapor phase VOCs have been extracted. Analyses show that the majority of the VOCs are branched alkanes, branched alkenes, cyclohexane and methylated cyclohexanes

  17. Computational fluid dynamics and experimental tests helping to understand the gravel pack displacement in petroleum wells; Fluidodinamica computacional (CFD) e testes experimentais ajudam a compreender o fenomeno do deslocamento do gravel pack em pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Joao Vicente Martins de; Leal, Rafael Amorim Ferreira; Martins, Andre Leibsohn; Calderon, Agostinho; Ferreira, Marcus Vinicius Duarte [Petrobras S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mails: ivmm@petrobras.com.br, rafaelleal@petrobras.com.br, aleibsohn@petrobras.com.br, agoscal@petrobras.com.br, mvdferreira@petrobras.com.br; Simoes, Bruno; Barbosa, Diego [Halliburton, Novo Cavaleiros, Macae, RJ (Brazil)], E-mails: bruno.simoes@halliburton.com.br, diego.barbosa@halliburton.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In the petroleum exploitation and production in deep water, at the fields operated by PETROBRAS, Brazil, one of the problems frequently found is the need of elimination of sand production, having in mind that the most of those fields produce from the non consolidated sandstones. The opened well Gravel Packing is the technique most used for that task. Due to the fact of Gravel Packing operations occurs at thousand of meters below the surface, it is necessary the computational simulation for forecasting how particle deposition (Gravel) in the well occurs. So, it was used the commercial pack of fluid dynamics FLUENT 12, which calculates the fluid velocity field, coupled to another commercial pack, the EDEM, based on discrete elements that treat of particle mechanics. The coupling of the two software has shown adequate the comparison of the computational results with the experimental data shows a good adjustment. Besides, it was possible to simulate problems of well early clogging, showing that the computational simulation is strong and capable of captivating such a phenomena.

  18. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 2001 - October 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, G.

    2003-01-01

    This annual monitoring and inspection report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Injection Well during the October 2001 to October 2002 period. The U-3fi Injection Well is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. Inspections of the Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit closure. The objective of the neutron logging is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft)

  19. History and practice of material research on the examples of Material Testing and Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA) Stuttgart, liquid crystals and screen technology as well as superconductivity. An interdisciplinary teaching project of the University of Stuttgart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, Klaus; Webel, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of material research and its history is not very common among scientists and engineers alike. Within the scope of an interdisciplinary teaching project carried out for the first time in the summer semester 2014 and ever since then every summer semester at the University of Stuttgart, an attempt is made to approach material research both from a scientific, technical and historical perspective. The Material Testing and Materials Testing Institute in Stuttgart (MPA), the liquid crystals and the screen technology as well as the superconductivity were selected as topics, which have a long tradition in research and teaching in Stuttgart. In this anthology the materials of the teaching project are summarized. [de

  20. Using open hole and cased-hole resistivity logs to monitor gas hydrate dissociation during a thermal test in the mallik 5L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.I.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Dubourg, I.

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates, which are naturally occurring ice-like combinations of gas and water, have the potential to provide vast amounts of natural gas from the world's oceans and polar regions. However, producing gas economically from hydrates entails major technical challenges. Proposed recovery methods such as dissociating or melting gas hydrates by heating or depressurization are currently being tested. One such test was conducted in northern Canada by the partners in the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program. This paper describes how resistivity logs were used to determine the size of the annular region of gas hydrate dissociation that occurred around the wellbore during the thermal test in the Mallik 5L-38 well. An open-hole logging suite, run prior to the thermal test, included array induction, array laterolog, nuclear magnetic resonance and 1.1-GHz electromagnetic propagation logs. The reservoir saturation tool was run both before and after the thermal test to monitor formation changes. A cased-hole formation resistivity log was run after the test.Baseline resistivity values in each formation layer (Rt) were established from the deep laterolog data. The resistivity in the region of gas hydrate dissociation near the wellbore (Rxo) was determined from electromagnetic propagation and reservoir saturation tool measurements. The radius of hydrate dissociation as a function of depth was then determined by means of iterative forward modeling of cased-hole formation resistivity tool response. The solution was obtained by varying the modeled dissociation radius until the modeled log overlaid the field log. Pretest gas hydrate production computer simulations had predicted that dissociation would take place at a uniform radius over the 13-ft test interval. However, the post-test resistivity modeling showed that this was not the case. The resistivity-derived dissociation radius was greatest near the outlet of the pipe that circulated hot water in the wellbore

  1. Properties of samples containing natural gas hydrate from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, determined using Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing laboratory study, preliminary acoustic, strength, and hydraulic conductivity results are presented from a suite of tests conducted on four natural-gas-hydrate-containing samples from the Mackenzie Delta JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well. The gas hydrate samples were preserved in pressure vessels during transport from the Northwest Territories to Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where multistep tests were performed using GHASTLI (Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument), which recreates pressure and temperature conditions that are stable for gas hydrate. Properties and changes in sediment behaviour were measured before, during, and after controlled gas hydrate dissociation. Significant amounts of gas hydrate occupied the sample pores and substantially increased acoustic velocity and shear strength.

  2. Application of Formation Testing While Drilling (GeoTap) for acquiring formation pressure data from the Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    A new technology to acquire wireline quality pressure tests using a Logging While Drilling approach has been successfully implemented few years ago in Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic. The Formation Tester While Drilling tool (GeoTap) uses a testing sequence similar to wireline tools. A single probe is extended to the borehole wall and a small pretest volume withdrawn from the formation. The resulting pressure transient is then analyzed for formation pressure, formation permeability and mobility information. Up-link and down-link capabilities have been added to achieve test control and quality feedback. An efficient downlink algorithm is used downhole to analyze the data. The parameters and pressure data are transmitted to the surface in real-time for continuous monitoring of the test. More detailed pressure data is recorded and retrieved after returning to surface. Use of a quartz gauge allows excellent accuracy. Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli fields consist of layered sand reservoirs alternation with shale sequences and detailed pressure data is acquired on a high percentage of wells in order to understand lateral and vertical continuity of different flow units. The formation tester can be utilized with the 'triple combo' Logging While Drilling string which eliminates the need to rig up wireline on many wells. Wireline formation tester runs are time consuming - particularly if high deviation or high overbalance conditions are encountered requiring pipe conveyed techniques. Non-Productive Time is high when the wireline tools are stuck and fishing operations are required. The Sperry Drilling GeoTap formation pressure tester service provides real-time formation pressure measurements. It bridges the critical gap between drilling safety and optimization, by providing early and reliable measurements of key reservoir properties, while improving reservoir understanding and completion design in real

  3. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 91: AREA 3 U3 fi INJECTION WELL, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER 2003 - OCTOBER 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary of inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This report covers the annual period November 2003 through October 2004. Site inspections of CAU 91 are performed every six months to identify any significant changes that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit. Inspection results for the current period indicate that the overall condition of the concrete pad, perimeter fence, and warning signs is good

  4. Hybrid Capture-Based Comprehensive Genomic Profiling Identifies Lung Cancer Patients with Well-Characterized Sensitizing Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Point Mutations That Were Not Detected by Standard of Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, James H; Schrock, Alexa B; Johnson, Adrienne; Lipson, Doron; Gay, Laurie M; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Elvin, Julia A; Shakir, Abdur; Ruehlman, Peter; Reckamp, Karen L; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M

    2018-03-14

    In our recent study, of cases positive for epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR ) exon 19 deletions using comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP), 17/77 (22%) patients with prior standard of care (SOC) EGFR testing results available were previously negative for exon 19 deletion. Our aim was to compare the detection rates of CGP versus SOC testing for well-characterized sensitizing EGFR point mutations (pm) in our 6,832-patient cohort. DNA was extracted from 40 microns of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections from 6,832 consecutive cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of various histologies (2012-2015). CGP was performed using a hybrid capture, adaptor ligation-based next-generation sequencing assay to a mean coverage depth of 576×. Genomic alterations (pm, small indels, copy number changes and rearrangements) involving EGFR were recorded for each case and compared with prior testing results if available. Overall, there were 482 instances of EGFR exon 21 L858R (359) and L861Q (20), exon 18 G719X (73) and exon 20 S768I (30) pm, of which 103 unique cases had prior EGFR testing results that were available for review. Of these 103 cases, CGP identified 22 patients (21%) with sensitizing EGFR pm that were not detected by SOC testing, including 9/75 (12%) patients with L858R, 4/7 (57%) patients with L861Q, 8/20 (40%) patients with G719X, and 4/7 (57%) patients with S768I pm (some patients had multiple EGFR pm). In cases with available clinical data, benefit from small molecule inhibitor therapy was observed. CGP, even when applied to low tumor purity clinical-grade specimens, can detect well-known EGFR pm in NSCLC patients that would otherwise not be detected by SOC testing. Taken together with EGFR exon 19 deletions, over 20% of patients who are positive for EGFR -activating mutations using CGP are previously negative by SOC EGFR mutation testing, suggesting that thousands of such patients per year in the U.S. alone could experience improved clinical

  5. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-October 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiason, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Injection Well during the October 2000 to October 2001 period. The U-3fi Injection Well is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. Inspections of the Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-ft) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that may be indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself

  6. Pilot-testing the French version of a provisional European organisation for research and treatment of cancer (EORTC) measure of spiritual well-being for people receiving palliative care for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucette, A; Brédart, A; Vivat, B; Young, T

    2014-03-01

    Spiritual well-being is increasingly recognised as an important aspect of patients' quality of life when living with a potentially life-limiting illness such as cancer. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is developing a measure for assessing spiritual well-being cross-culturally for people receiving palliative care for cancer. The pilot-testing phase of the study explored potential problems related to the content and administration of a provisional version of this measure. The French version was pilot-tested with 12 patients in a palliative and supportive day care unit in Paris. Participants were asked to complete the measure and the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL before being interviewed about their responses. The administration of the measure enabled participants to express the difficulties and existential concerns they experienced. The items were not considered intrusive, despite the sensitive topic of the measure. This article considers difficulties with items pertaining to 'religion' and 'spirituality' in the context of French culture. Overall, this measure appears to enhance holistic care, by providing caregivers with a means of broaching spirituality issues, a topic otherwise difficult to discuss in the context of palliative care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  8. Testing joint inversion techniques of gravity data and cosmic ray muon flux at a well-characterized site for use in the detection of subsurface density structures beneath volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosburn, K.; Roy, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Guardincerri, E.

    2017-12-01

    Obtaining accurate static and time-dependent shallow subsurface density structure beneath volcanic, hydrogeologic, and tectonic targets can help illuminate active processes of fluid flow and magma transport. A limitation of using surface gravity measurements for such imaging is that these observations are vastly underdetermined and non-unique. In order to hone in on a more accurate solution, other data sets are needed to provide constraints, typically seismic or borehole observations. The spatial resolution of these techniques, however, is relatively poor, and a novel solution to this problem in recent years has been to use attenuation of the cosmic ray muon flux, which provides an independent constraint on density. In this study we present a joint inversion of gravity and cosmic ray muon flux observations to infer the density structure of a target rock volume at a well-characterized site near Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA. We investigate the shallow structure of a mesa formed by the Quaternary ash-flow tuffs on the Pajarito Plateau, flanking the Jemez volcano in New Mexico. Gravity measurements were made using a Lacoste and Romberg D meter on the surface of the mesa and inside a tunnel beneath the mesa. Muon flux measurements were also made at the mesa surface and at various points within the same tunnel using a muon detector having an acceptance region of 45 degrees from the vertical and a track resolution of several milliradians. We expect the combination of muon and gravity data to provide us with enhanced resolution as well as the ability to sense deeper structures in our region of interest. We use Bayesian joint inversion techniques on the gravity-muon dataset to test these ideas, building upon previous work using gravity inversion alone to resolve density structure in our study area. Both the regional geology and geometry of our study area is well-known and we assess the inferred density structure from our gravity-muon joint inversion within this known

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2002-01-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the

  10. Testing Testing Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Craig; O'Neill, Thomas; Wright, Benjamin D.; Woodcock, Richard W.; Munoz-Sandoval, Ana; Gershon, Richard C.; Bergstrom, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Articles in this special section consider (1) flow in test taking (Craig Deville); (2) testwiseness (Thomas O'Neill); (3) test length (Benjamin Wright); (4) cross-language test equating (Richard W. Woodcock and Ana Munoz-Sandoval); (5) computer-assisted testing and testwiseness (Richard Gershon and Betty Bergstrom); and (6) Web-enhanced testing…

  11. How effective and cost-effective are innovative combinatorial technologies and practices for supporting older people with long-term conditions to remain well in the community? An evaluation protocol for an NHS Test Bed in North West England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varey, Sandra; Hernández, Alejandra; Palmer, Tom M; Mateus, Céu; Wilkinson, Joann; Dixon, Mandy; Milligan, Christine

    2018-02-28

    The Lancashire and Cumbria Innovation Alliance (LCIA) Test Bed is a partnership between the National Health Service in England, industry (led by Philips) and Lancaster University. Through the implementation of a combination of innovative health technologies and practices, it aims to determine the most effective and cost-effective ways of supporting frail older people with long-term conditions to remain well in the community. Among the Test Bed's objectives are to improve patient activation and the ability of older people to self-care at home, reduce healthcare system utilisation, and deliver increased workforce productivity. Patients aged 55 years and over are recruited to four cohorts defined by their risk of hospital admission, with long-term conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia, diabetes and heart failure. The programme is determined on an individual basis, with a range of technologies available. The evaluation is adopting a two-phase approach: phase 1 includes a bespoke patient survey and a mass matched control analysis; and phase 2 is using observational interviews with patients, and weekly diaries, action learning meetings and focus groups with members of staff and other key stakeholders. Phase 1 data analysis consists of a statistical evaluation of the effectiveness of the programme. A health economic analysis of its costs and associated cost changes will be undertaken. Phase 2 data will be analysed thematically with the aid of Atlas.ti qualitative software. The evaluation is located within a logic model framework, to consider the processes, management and participation that may have implications for the Test Bed's success. The LCIA Test Bed evaluation has received ethical approval from the Health Research Authority and Lancaster University's Faculty of Health and Medicine Research Ethics Committee. A range of dissemination methods are adopted, including deliberative panels to validate findings and develop outcomes for policy

  12. Radioisotope techniques in oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Prabuddha

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope techniques are quite useful in oil exploration and exploitation. Nuclear logging offers a way of gathering information on porosity, permeability, fluid saturations, hydrocarbon types and lithology. Some of the interesting applications in well drilling are determining depth of filtrate invasion, detection of lost circulation, drill-bit erosion control; primary cement measurements and well completions such as permanent tubular markers, perforation position marking, detection of channeling behind casing and gravel pack operations. Radioisotopes have been successfully used in optimizing production processes such as production profiling injection profiling, corrosion measurements and well to well tracer tests. (author)

  13. Preserving Employee Privacy in Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E

    2017-07-01

    The proposed "Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act" states that the collection of information about the manifested disease or disorder of a family member shall not be considered an unlawful acquisition of genetic information. The bill recognizes employee privacy protections that are already in place and includes specific language relating to nondiscrimination based on illness. Why did legislation expressly intending to "preserve wellness programs" generate such antipathy about wellness among journalists? This article argues that those who are committed to preserving employee wellness must be equally committed to preserving employee privacy. Related to this, we should better parse between discussions and rules about commonplace health screenings versus much less common genetic testing.

  14. Results of test of acid fluids neutralization in the well H-43, Los Humeros geothermal field, Puebla; Resultados de la prueba de neutralizacion de fluidos acidos en el pozo H-43, campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Puebla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Armenta, Magaly del Carmen; Ramirez Montes, Miguel; Sandoval Medina, Fernando; Rosales Lopez, Cesar [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: magaly.flores@cfe.gob.mx

    2011-07-15

    The well H-43 was drilled in Los Humeros Geothermal Field, Pue., in 2007 and 2008. When well production was measured, it was found the well produced acid fluids with high corrosion potential. Then it was decided to try to neutralize the acidity of the H-43 fluids by adding a solution of sodium hydroxide. This is a basic substance used to neutralize mainly the acid groups H+, and the goal was to raise the pH of the fluids to minimize its corrosive features. First sodium hydroxide was injected into the well to protect the casing of 244.4 mm (9 5/8 in) against corrosion and then all the surface installations. It was possible to increase the pH of the well fluid from 5.2 up to 6.8 without altering the steam production, thus demonstrating the neutralization procedure is feasible. The approximate costs of the neutralization tests performed, including equipment for the proposed neutralization system, the neutralizer (NaOH), and drilling the well are about 71.4 million pesos (around 5.5 million USD). We estimate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 and a return on investment in five years, considering the income from energy sales at present value. [Spanish] El pozo H-43 fue perforado en el campo de Los Humeros, Pue., en 2007-2008, y al evaluar su produccion se encontro que producia fluidos acidos de alto potencial corrosivo. Se decidio por tanto realizar una prueba para neutralizar la acidez de los fluidos de este pozo, que consistio en agregarle una solucion de hidroxido de sodio. Esta es una sustancia basica que neutraliza principalmente los grupos acidos H+, con lo que se buscaba aumentar el pH del fluido lo necesario para reducir al maximo su caracter corrosivo. La inyeccion del hidroxido de sodio se realizo dentro del pozo a fin de proteger de la corrosion a la tuberia de revestimiento de 244.4 mm (9 5/8 pulgadas), y posteriormente a todos los equipos superficiales. Como resultado de la prueba, se logro aumentar el pH del fluido producido por el pozo de 5.2 a un maximo de 6

  15. Model wells for nuclear well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittle, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Considerations needed in the design and construction of model wells for nuclear log calibration are covered, with special attention to neutron porosity logging and total γ-ray logging. Pulsed neutron decay-time and spectral γ-ray logging are discussed briefly. The American Petroleum Institute calibration facility for nuclear logs is a good starting point for similar or expanded facilities. A few of its shortcomings are mentioned; they are minor. The problem of fluid saturation is emphasized. Attention is given to models made of consolidated rock and those containing unconsolidated material such as Ottawa sand. Needed precautions are listed. A similarity method is presented for estimating the porosity index of formations that are not fully saturated. (author)

  16. A comparative analysis of reliability, maintainability and availability for two alternatives of the production submarine systems: ANM and submarine ducts versus BOP and a subsea well testing tree; Analise comparativa da confiabilidade, mantenabilidade e disponibilidade para duas alternativas de sistemas submarino de producao: ANM e dutos submarinos versus BOP e arvore submarina de teste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Arlindo Antonio de; Polillo Filho, Adolfo; Santos, Otto Luiz Alcantara [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This technical article presents a study using the concepts of the Engineering of the Reliability and Risk Analysis with the objective of doing a comparative evaluation of the reliability of two alternative production systems for a marine well: one composed by a wet christmas tree (ANM) producing through underwater ducts (flow lines) and other, usually used in tests of long duration, using a subsea BOP and a subsea well testing tree (AST). The central point of the work was the evaluation of the probability of happening an event considered as critic, denominated 'critical flaw', during the well production life. The work uses one of the procedures and methodologies adopted in the Well Construction Engineering, GERISK, together with four computer applications for data treatment, generation of flaw distribution curves and times of repair, modelling and Monte Carlo simulations. The adopted strategy was the one of starting from the existent report, to assume an interval for the possible real value of the relevant parameters and then to establish the scenarios (more probable, optimist and pessimist). Based on those sceneries, the considered premises, the modelling and the reliabilities obtained for each one of the variables, the simulations have been made. As results, are presented the medium readiness, MTTFF (Mean Time To First Failure), the number of flaws and the expected costs. The work also displays the sensibility analysis in respect to the time of production of the well. (author)

  17. A comparative analysis of reliability, maintainability and availability for two alternatives of the production submarine systems: ANM and submarine ducts versus BOP and a subsea well testing tree; Analise comparativa da confiabilidade, mantenabilidade e disponibilidade para duas alternativas de sistemas submarino de producao: ANM e dutos submarinos versus BOP e arvore submarina de teste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Arlindo Antonio de; Polillo Filho, Adolfo; Santos, Otto Luiz Alcantara [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This technical article presents a study using the concepts of the Engineering of the Reliability and Risk Analysis with the objective of doing a comparative evaluation of the reliability of two alternative production systems for a marine well: one composed by a wet christmas tree (ANM) producing through underwater ducts (flow lines) and other, usually used in tests of long duration, using a subsea BOP and a subsea well testing tree (AST). The central point of the work was the evaluation of the probability of happening an event considered as critic, denominated 'critical flaw', during the well production life. The work uses one of the procedures and methodologies adopted in the Well Construction Engineering, GERISK, together with four computer applications for data treatment, generation of flaw distribution curves and times of repair, modelling and Monte Carlo simulations. The adopted strategy was the one of starting from the existent report, to assume an interval for the possible real value of the relevant parameters and then to establish the scenarios (more probable, optimist and pessimist). Based on those sceneries, the considered premises, the modelling and the reliabilities obtained for each one of the variables, the simulations have been made. As results, are presented the medium readiness, MTTFF (Mean Time To First Failure), the number of flaws and the expected costs. The work also displays the sensibility analysis in respect to the time of production of the well. (author)

  18. Development and application of the capacity to make tests of dynamic displacement in samples of oil well drilling cores; Desarrollo y aplicacion de la capacidad para realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras L, Enrique; Garcia M, Pablo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    In the Laboratory of Deposits of the Gerencia de Geotermia of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) the capacity has been developed to make tests of dynamic oil displacement by means of gas or brine injection in samples of oil well drilling cores. Also the methodologies to interpret the results of these tests in terms of dynamics and the efficiency of the oil recovery in terms of the relative permeability have been developed. These capacities represent a very important contribution towards the improvement of the insufficiency that exists in the country to make the large amount of tests of dynamic displacement that demand the different Actives of PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEP), since they satisfy their necessities of data on which the activities of design and implementation of the most suitable techniques for the hydrocarbon recovery of the oil deposits lean. In the present work these capacities are described and some examples are presented of the results that have been obtained from their application in special studies of drilling cores, which have been recently made in the Laboratory of Deposits of the IIE for diverse Actives of PEP exploitation. [Spanish] En el laboratorio de yacimientos de la Gerencia de Geotermia del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) se ha desarrollado la capacidad de realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico de aceite mediante inyeccion de salmuera o de gases en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros. Tambien se han desarrollado las metodologias para interpretar los resultados de estas pruebas en terminos de la dinamica y la eficiencia de la recuperacion de aceite y en terminos de la permeabilidades relativas. Estas capacidades representan una contribucion muy importante hacia el mejoramiento de la insuficiencia que existe en el pais para realizar la gran cantidad de pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico que demandan los diferentes activos de explotacion de PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion (PEP), ya

  19. Employee wellness program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Well-designed wellness programs can keep healthy employees healthy, support employees with : health risks to improve their health behaviors, and facilitate organizational efforts to achieve : workforce performance goals. : Productivity lost through a...

  20. Environmental restoration using horizontal wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.; Hazen, T.C.; Corey, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that under sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy, technical personnel from the Savannah River Laboratory and other DOE laboratories, universities and private industry have completed a full scale demonstration of environmental remediation using horizontal wells. The test successfully removed approximately 7250 kg of contaminants. A large amount of characterization and monitoring data was collected to aid in interpretation of the test and to provide the information needed for future environmental restorations that employ directionally drilled wells as extraction or delivery systems

  1. The wellness syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  2. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  3. Trions in quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Peeters, F M; Varga, K

    2002-01-01

    The ground-state energy of three-particle systems consisting of electrons and holes as found in semiconducting quantum wells is studied. The degree of confinement is determined by the quantum-well width and we can vary the dimensionality of the system from two to three dimensions. The energy levels of the system can further be altered by the application of an external magnetic field which is directed perpendicular to the well. Refs.5 (author)

  4. Staying Well at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Employee wellness directly affects business/industry operations and costs. When employees are helped and encouraged to stay well, this people-positive policy results in triple benefits: reduced worker absenteeism, increased employee productivity, and lower company expenditures for health costs. Health care programs at the worksite offer these…

  5. hand- dug well

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misrak

    wells at the vicinity of three major refuse dumpsite taking measurement of depth of the well, diameter, volume of water, distance ... The total coliform bacteria count shows that the water is exposed to serious and complex contaminations, which .... Bacterial plate count was carried out using the pour plate method with nutrient ...

  6. Water Treatment Technology - Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on wells provides instructional materials for five competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: dug, driven, and chilled wells, aquifer types, deep well…

  7. Encyclopedia of well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbrandes, R.

    1985-01-01

    The 16 chapters of this book aim to provide students, trainees and engineers with a manual covering all well-logging measurements ranging from drilling to productions, from oil to minerals going by way of geothermal energy. Each chapter is a summary but a bibliography is given at the end of each chapter. Well-logging during drilling, wireline logging equipment and techniques, petroleum logging, data processing of borehole data, interpretation of well-logging, sampling tools, completion and production logging, logging in relief wells to kill off uncontrolled blowouts, techniques for high temperature geothermal energy, small-scale mining and hydrology, logging with oil-base mud and finally recommended logging programs are all topics covered. There is one chapter on nuclear well-logging which is indexed separately. (UK)

  8. Pumping potential wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Forest, C.; Wang, E. Y.; Intrator, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmonotonic plasma potential structures are a common feature of many double layers and sheaths. Steady state plasma potential wells separating regions having different plasma potentials are often found in laboratory experiments. In order to exist, such structures all must find a solution to a common problem. Ions created by charge exchange or ionization in the region of the potential well are electrostatically confined and tend to accumulate and fill up the potential well. The increase in positive charge should eliminate the well. Nevertheless, steady state structures are found in which the wells do not fill up. This means that it is important to take into account processes which 'pump' ions from the well. As examples of ion pumping of plasma wells, potential dips in front of a positively biased electro collecting anode in a relatively cold, low density multidipole plasma is considered. Pumping is provided by ion leaks from the edges of the potential dip or by oscillating the applied potential. In the former case the two dimensional character of the problem is shown to be important.

  9. Pumping potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Forest, C.; Wang, E.Y.; Intrator, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmonotonic plasma potential structures are a common feature of many double layers and sheaths. Steady state plasma potential wells separating regions having different plasma potentials are often found in laboratory experiments. In order to exist, all such structures must find a solution to a common problem. Ions created by charge exchange or ionization in the region of the potential well are electrostatically confined and tend to accumulate and fill up the potential well. The increase in positive charge should eliminate the well. Nevertheless, steady state structures are found in which the wells do not fill up. This means that it is important to take into account processes which pump ions from the well. As examples of ion pumping of plasma wells, potential dips in front of a positively biased electron collecting anode in a relatively cold, low density, multidipole plasma are considered. Pumping is provided by ion leaks from the edges of the potential dip or by oscillating the applied potential. In the former case the two-dimensional character of the problem is shown to be important

  10. Pumping potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Forest, C.; Wang, E.Y.; Intrator, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmonotonic plasma potential structures are a common feature of many double layers and sheaths. Steady state plasma potential wells separating regions having different plasma potentials are often found in laboratory experiments. In order to exist, such structures all must find a solution to a common problem. Ions created by charge exchange or ionization in the region of the potential well are electrostatically confined and tend to accumulate and fill up the potential well. The increase in positive charge should eliminate the well, but steady state structures are found in which the wells do not fill up. This means that it is important to take into account processes which 'pump' ions from the well. As examples of ion pumping of plasma wells, potential dips in front of a positively biased electron collecting anode in a relatively cold, low density multidipole plasma are considered. Pumping is provided by ion leaks from the edges of the potential dip or by oscillating the applied potential. In the former case the two dimensional character of the problem is shown to be important. (author)

  11. Dry well cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki.

    1997-01-01

    A plurality of blowing ports with introduction units are disposed to a plurality of ducts in a dry well, and a cooling unit comprising a cooler, a blower and an isolating valve is disposed outside of the dry well. Cooling air and the atmosphere in the dry well are mixed to form a cooling gas and blown into the dry well to control the temperature. Since the cooling unit is disposed outside of the dry well, the maintenance of the cooling unit can be performed even during the plant operation. In addition, since dampers opened/closed depending on the temperature of the atmosphere are disposed to the introduction units for controlling the temperature of the cooling gas, the temperature of the atmosphere in the dry well can be set to a predetermined level rapidly. Since an axial flow blower is used as the blower of the cooling unit, it can be contained in a ventilation cylinder. Then, the atmosphere in the dry well flowing in the ventilation cylinder can be prevented from leaking to the outside. (N.H.)

  12. Well performance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.K.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.; Scott, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a comprehensive oil or gas well performance model. The model contains six distinct sections: stimulation design, tubing and/or casing flow, reservoir and near-wellbore calculations, production forecasting, wellbore heat transmission, and economics. These calculations may be performed separately or in an integrated fashion with data and results shared among the different sections. The model analysis allows evaluation of all aspects of well completion design, including the effects on future production and overall well economics

  13. Optimizing well intervention routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Ronaldo O. [PETROBRAS S.A., Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Schiozer, Denis J.; Bordalo, Sergio N. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Centro de Estudo do Petroleo (CEPETRO)]. E-mail: denis@dep.fem.unicamp.br; bordalo@dep.fem.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    This work presents a method for optimizing the itinerary of work over rigs, i.e., the search for the route of minimum total cost, and demonstrates the importance of the dynamics of reservoir behaviour. The total cost of a route includes the rig expenses (transport, assembly and operation), which are functions of time and distances, plus the losses of revenue in wells waiting for the rig, which are also dependent of time. A reservoir simulator is used to evaluate the monetary influence of the well shutdown on the present value of the production curve. Finally, search algorithms are employed to determine the route of minimal cost. The Simulated Annealing algorithm was also successful in optimizing the distribution of a list of wells among different work over rigs. The rational approach presented here is recommended for management teams as a standard procedure to define the priority of wells scheduled for work over. (author)

  14. Agricultural Drainage Well Intakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Locations of surface intakes for registered agriculture drainage wells according to the database maintained by IDALS. Surface intakes were located from their...

  15. Firemní wellness

    OpenAIRE

    Ondrušová, Denisa

    2012-01-01

    Předmětem bakalářské práce je návrh firemního wellness – „Hubnu v dubnu“ pro zvolenou firmu. Tato práce obsahuje všechny potřebné informace, které jsou nutné k vytvoření konkrétní nabídky firemního wellness. Finální návrh bude připraven pro zařazení do portfolia CESA VUT v Brně. The topic of this bachelor thesis is a draft of a company wellness program - "Hubnu v dubnu" for a selected company. This thesis contains all the necessary information required to create specific offer for company ...

  16. Gratitude and Well Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    The word “gratitude” has a number of different meanings, depending on the context. However, a practical clinical definition is as follows—gratitude is the appreciation of what is valuable and meaningful to oneself; it is a general state of thankfulness and/or appreciation. The majority of empirical studies indicate that there is an association between gratitude and a sense of overall well being. However, there are several studies that indicate potential nuances in the relationship between gratitude and well being as well as studies with negative findings. In terms of assessing gratitude, numerous assessment measures are available. From a clinical perspective, there are suggested therapeutic exercises and techniques to enhance gratitude, and they appear relatively simple and easy to integrate into psychotherapy practice. However, the therapeutic efficacy of these techniques remains largely unknown. Only future research will clarify the many questions around assessment, potential benefits, and enhancement of gratitude. PMID:21191529

  17. Single well techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The single well technique method includes measurement of parameters of groundwater flow in saturated rock. For determination of filtration velocity the dilution of radioactive tracer is measured, for direction logging the collimeter is rotated in the probe linked with the compass. The limiting factor for measurement of high filtration velocities is the occurrence of turbulent flow. The single well technique is used in civil engineering projects, water works and subsurface drainage of liquid waste from disposal sites. The radioactive tracer method for logging the vertical fluid movement in bore-holes is broadly used in groundwater survey and exploitation. (author)

  18. Well swab collar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1969-04-09

    A well swab collar which can be hoisted to bring well fluids upward through a pipe string is described. An elastic swab is used to swab a pipe having a predetermined diameter. The swab consists of a circular shaped elastomer body having an outer diameter a little smaller than the inner diameter of the pipe. The body is divided into multiple swab elements by ring-shaped grooves in the body. The swab element has truncated conical surfaces directed radially at an outward angle, then downward and consequently at an angle inward and then downward. (19 claims)

  19. Making Democracy Work Well

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loftis, Matthew; Petrova, Tsveta

    2017-01-01

    of electoral competition and 2) on this impact at the local (rather than national) level. Accordingly, we test whether local electoral competition, operationalized as vote concentration, impacts local development, measured with average wage growth. Our analysis utilizes data from a large sample of Polish...

  20. Time well spent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    adult outcomes, others find null effects. This study shows that differences in the average duration of foster care stays explain parts of these discordant findings and then test how foster care duration shapes later life outcomes using administrative data on 7 220 children. The children experienced...

  1. Radiometric well logging instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    The technical properties of well instruments for radioactive logging used in the radiometric logging complexes PKS-1000-1 (''Sond-1'') and PRKS-2 (''Vitok-2'') are described. The main features of the electric circuit of the measuring channels are given

  2. Why Does Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2010-01-01

    There is something disappointing about life. It is messy and out of control. It seems the more one tries to put life in order, the more ordering there is to do. The more one seeks explanations, the more confusing things become. Life's an impossible task. Maybe one should just give up. Or, then again, one might as well keep trying. It's this…

  3. Alive and Well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pion, Ronald J.; DelliQuadri, Lyn

    1979-01-01

    Suggests an approach to health education that addresses the innate human drive for physical, mental, and spiritual well-being and to the inherent potential to learn behaviors that facilitate it. This approach involves parents and teachers, because children's behaviors are deeply influenced by them. (Author/BEF)

  4. Optimization of well field management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Kirstine

    Groundwater is a limited but important resource for fresh water supply. Differ- ent conflicting objectives are important when operating a well field. This study investigates how the management of a well field can be improved with respect to different objectives simultaneously. A framework...... for optimizing well field man- agement using multi-objective optimization is developed. The optimization uses the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm 2 (SPEA2) to find the Pareto front be- tween the conflicting objectives. The Pareto front is a set of non-inferior optimal points and provides an important tool...... for the decision-makers. The optimization framework is tested on two case studies. Both abstract around 20,000 cubic meter of water per day, but are otherwise rather different. The first case study concerns the management of Hardhof waterworks, Switzer- land, where artificial infiltration of river water...

  5. Fracturing formations in wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daroza, R A

    1964-05-15

    This well stimulation method comprises introducing through the well bore a low-penetrating, dilatant fluid, and subjecting the fluid to sufficient pressure to produce fractures in the formation. The fluid is permitted to remain in contact with the formation so as to become diluted by the formation fluids, and thereby lose its properties of dilatancy. Also, a penetrating fluid, containing a propping agent suspended therein, in introduced into contact with the fractures at a pressure substantially reduced with respect to that pressure which would have been required, prior to the fracturing operation performed using the low-penetrating dilatant fluid. The propping agent is deposited within the fractures, and thereafter, fluid production is resumed from the fractured formation. (2 claims)

  6. Sealing wells with gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E C

    1967-10-01

    A new system is being used in Mexico to temporarily plug producing wells. The temporary seal is a gel with a catalyst. The use of this temporary plug allows gas-lift wells to be taken off production in order to carry out emergency repairs. The gel solidifies by the action of the catalyst to a high temperature (70 - 150/sup 0/C). By locating the bottom of the tubing at the top of the production interval, the gel material will go into the permeable formation, and immediately set. When the gel has solidified, it seals off the horizon that must not be stimulated, and leaves the others exposed to the acid action. When the treatment is finished, the gel, by action of the catalyst, is liquefied and removed from the formation, being produced with the oil.

  7. Oil well spill trough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigington, J.R. Sr.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process involving an oil well and rig having a casing, a platform on the rig extending around the casing. This patent describes improvement in pulling the tubing from the casing; disconnecting joints of tubing thereby; and spilling liquids from the casing, catching spilled liquids from the casing in a basin below the platform, draining the basin substantially simultaneously; connecting the drain hole to a tank, and reducing the pressure in the tank to less than atmospheric pressure. This paper also describes an oil well and rig having a casing; the rig having a platform extending around the casing. This patent describes improvement in a basin surrounding the casing and connected thereto, the basin below the platform, a drain connection in the lower part of the basin, a conduit connected to the drain, and means for applying a suction to the conduit

  8. Wellness interventions for anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Haleh; Kain, Zeev N

    2018-06-01

    The review examines the different preventive measures that have been found to be useful to abolish or decrease the negative effects of burnout and increase resilience in anesthesiologists. Studies in anesthesiology cite autonomy, control of the work environment, professional relationships, leadership, and organizational justice as the most important factors in job satisfaction. Factors such as difficulty in balancing personal and professional life, poor attention to wellness, work alcoholism, and genetic factors increase an individual's susceptibility to burnout. Exposure to chronic or repeated stress instigates a spectrum of autonomic, endocrine, immunologic, and behavioral responses that activate the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Investigating the difference in psychobiologic reactivity, as well as defining the psychological symptoms that are characteristic to individuals vulnerable to stress-induced illness, would enable scientists to better look into the modalities to eradicate the negative effects. Recent studies have shown that a combination of individual and structural changes in institutions can increase resilience in physicians. Burnout is a pathological syndrome that is triggered by constant levels of high stress. A combination of individual efforts as well as structural interventions can help to increase wellbeing in physicians.

  9. Quantum well lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zory, Jr, Peter S; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the information necessary for the reader to achieve a thorough understanding of all aspects of QW lasers - from the basic mechanism of optical gain, through the current technolgoical state of the art, to the future technologies of quantum wires and quantum dots. In view of the growing importance of QW lasers, this book should be read by all those with an active interest in laser science and technology, from the advanced student to the experienced laser scientist.* The first comprehensive book-length treatment of quantum well lasers* Provides a detailed treatment

  10. Drilling and well technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milheim, K. [Mining University Leoben Institute for Drilling Technology, (Austria)

    1996-12-31

    Over a billion dollars a year is lost by exploration and production companies drilling wells because of the lack of learn curve management (LMC) practices. This paper presents the importance of the LMC concept, what it is, why LMC has not yet been recognized as a major initiative for improving drilling cost performance. The paper discusses the different types of planning, problems with implementation of plans, the use and misuse of drilling results and data bases, and the lack of post analysis practices. The major point of the paper is to show the massive savings that can be achieved by valuing LMC, learning LMC and successfully implementing LMC. . 2 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Construction, completion, and testing of replacement monitoring wells MW 3-2, MW 6-2, MW 7-2, and MW 11-2, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, February through April 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliman, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    In February and March 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey Western Regional Research Drilling Operation constructed replacement monitoring wells MW 3–2, MW 6–2, MW 7–2, and MW 11–2 as part of a regional ground-water monitor- ing network for the Mountain Home Air Force Base, Elmore County, Idaho. Total well depths ranged from 435.5 to 456.5 feet, and initial depth-to-water measurements ranged from about 350 to 375 feet below land surface. After completion, wells were pumped and onsite measurements were made of water temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved oxygen. At each well, natural gamma, spontaneous potential, resistivity, caliper, and temperature logs were obtained from instruments placed in open boreholes. A three- dimensional borehole flow analysis was completed for MW 3–2 and MW 11–2, and a video log was obtained for MW 11–2 to annotate lithology and note wet zones in the borehole above saturated rock.

  12. Helping Children Actively Design How They Learn about Health and Wellness: The Institute of Play Tests an Online Social Networking Tool within a Game-Based School Curriculum. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Youth rarely receive opportunities to craft their own strategies around health and wellness within contexts relevant to them. From 2009 to 2010, the Institute of Play, based in New York, developed Being Me, a social networking site, to enable sixth-graders at the Quest to Learn public school to explore, discover and document a range of ideas…

  13. Modeling Quantum Well Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Alexandru Anghel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In semiconductor laser modeling, a good mathematical model gives near-reality results. Three methods of modeling solutions from the rate equations are presented and analyzed. A method based on the rate equations modeled in Simulink to describe quantum well lasers was presented. For different signal types like step function, saw tooth and sinus used as input, a good response of the used equations is obtained. Circuit model resulting from one of the rate equations models is presented and simulated in SPICE. Results show a good modeling behavior. Numerical simulation in MathCad gives satisfactory results for the study of the transitory and dynamic operation at small level of the injection current. The obtained numerical results show the specific limits of each model, according to theoretical analysis. Based on these results, software can be built that integrates circuit simulation and other modeling methods for quantum well lasers to have a tool that model and analysis these devices from all points of view.

  14. Evaluation of CLSI M44-A2 Disk Diffusion and Associated Breakpoint Testing of Caspofungin and Micafungin Using a Well-Characterized Panel of Wild-Type and fks Hot Spot Mutant Candida Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Park, Steven; Brown, Steven; Pfaller, Michael; Perlin, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Disk diffusion testing has recently been standardized by the CLSI, and susceptibility breakpoints have been established for several antifungal compounds. For caspofungin, 5-μg disks are approved, and for micafungin, 10-μg disks are under evaluation. We evaluated the performances of caspofungin and micafungin disk testing using a panel of Candida isolates with and without known FKS echinocandin resistance mechanisms. Disk diffusion and microdilution assays were performed strictly according to CLSI documents M44-A2 and M27-A3. Eighty-nine clinical Candida isolates were included: Candida albicans (20 isolates/10 mutants), C. glabrata (19 isolates/10 mutants), C. dubliniensis (2 isolates/1 mutant), C. krusei (16 isolates/3 mutants), C. parapsilosis (14 isolates/0 mutants), and C. tropicalis (18 isolates/4 mutants). Quality control strains were C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. krusei ATCC 6258. The correlations between zone diameters and MIC results were good for both compounds, with identical susceptibility classifications for 93.3% of the isolates by applying the current CLSI breakpoints. However, the numbers of fks hot spot mutant isolates misclassified as being susceptible (S) (very major errors [VMEs]) were high (61% for caspofungin [S, ≥11 mm] and 93% for micafungin [S, ≥14 mm]). Changing the disk diffusion breakpoint to S at ≥22 mm significantly improved the discrimination. For caspofungin, 1 VME was detected (a C. tropicalis isolate with an F76S substitution) (3.5%), and for micafungin, 10 VMEs were detected, the majority of which were for C. glabrata (8/10). The broadest separation between zone diameter ranges for wild-type (WT) and mutant isolates was seen for caspofungin (6 to 12 mm versus −4 to 7 mm). In conclusion, caspofungin disk diffusion testing with a modified breakpoint led to excellent separation between WT and mutant isolates for all Candida species. PMID:21357293

  15. Description of calls from private well owners to a national well water hotline, 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridpath, Alison; Taylor, Ethel; Greenstreet, Charlene; Martens, Margaret; Wicke, Heather; Martin, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Water Systems Council (WSC) is a national, non-profit organization providing education and resources to private household well owners. Since 2003, WSC has provided wellcare®, a toll-free telephone hotline to answer questions from the public regarding well stewardship. In order to identify knowledge gaps regarding well stewardship among private well owners, we obtained data from WSC and reviewed calls made during 2013 to wellcare®. WSC records data from each wellcare® call—including caller information, primary reason for call, main use of well water, and if they were calling about a cistern, private well, shared well, or spring. We searched for calls with key words indicating specific contaminants of interest and reviewed primary reasons for calls. Calls classified as primarily testing-related were further categorized depending on whether the caller asked about how to test well water or how to interpret testing results. During 2013, wellcare® received 1100 calls from private well owners who were residents of 48 states. Among these calls, 87 (8%) mentioned radon, 83 (8%) coliforms, 51 (5%) chemicals related to fracking, 34 (3%) arsenic, and 32 (3%) nitrates key words. Only 38% of private well owners reported conducting any well maintenance activities, such as inspecting, cleaning, repairing the well, or testing well water, during the previous 12 months. The primary reason for calls were related to well water testing (n = 403), general information relating to wells (n = 249), contaminants (n = 229), and well water treatment (n = 97). Among calls related to testing, 319 had questions about how to test their well water, and 33 had questions about how to interpret testing results. Calls from private well owners to the wellcare® Hotline during 2013 identified key knowledge gaps regarding well stewardship; well owners are generally not testing or maintaining their wells, have questions about well water testing treatment, and concerns about well water contaminants

  16. Description of calls from private well owners to a national well water hotline, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridpath, Alison, E-mail: etf4@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, MS-F-60, Chamblee, GA 30341 (United States); Taylor, Ethel [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, MS-F-60, Chamblee, GA 30341 (United States); Greenstreet, Charlene; Martens, Margaret; Wicke, Heather [Water Systems Council, 1101 30th St NW, Washington, DC 20007 (United States); Martin, Colleen [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, MS-F-60, Chamblee, GA 30341 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Water Systems Council (WSC) is a national, non-profit organization providing education and resources to private household well owners. Since 2003, WSC has provided wellcare®, a toll-free telephone hotline to answer questions from the public regarding well stewardship. In order to identify knowledge gaps regarding well stewardship among private well owners, we obtained data from WSC and reviewed calls made during 2013 to wellcare®. WSC records data from each wellcare® call—including caller information, primary reason for call, main use of well water, and if they were calling about a cistern, private well, shared well, or spring. We searched for calls with key words indicating specific contaminants of interest and reviewed primary reasons for calls. Calls classified as primarily testing-related were further categorized depending on whether the caller asked about how to test well water or how to interpret testing results. During 2013, wellcare® received 1100 calls from private well owners who were residents of 48 states. Among these calls, 87 (8%) mentioned radon, 83 (8%) coliforms, 51 (5%) chemicals related to fracking, 34 (3%) arsenic, and 32 (3%) nitrates key words. Only 38% of private well owners reported conducting any well maintenance activities, such as inspecting, cleaning, repairing the well, or testing well water, during the previous 12 months. The primary reason for calls were related to well water testing (n = 403), general information relating to wells (n = 249), contaminants (n = 229), and well water treatment (n = 97). Among calls related to testing, 319 had questions about how to test their well water, and 33 had questions about how to interpret testing results. Calls from private well owners to the wellcare® Hotline during 2013 identified key knowledge gaps regarding well stewardship; well owners are generally not testing or maintaining their wells, have questions about well water testing treatment, and concerns about well water contaminants

  17. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing

  18. Improving taxonomic accuracy for fungi in public sequence databases: applying ‘one name one species’ in well-defined genera with Trichoderma/Hypocrea as a test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strope, Pooja K; Chaverri, Priscila; Gazis, Romina; Ciufo, Stacy; Domrachev, Michael; Schoch, Conrad L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ITS (nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer) RefSeq database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is dedicated to the clear association between name, specimen and sequence data. This database is focused on sequences obtained from type material stored in public collections. While the initial ITS sequence curation effort together with numerous fungal taxonomy experts attempted to cover as many orders as possible, we extended our latest focus to the family and genus ranks. We focused on Trichoderma for several reasons, mainly because the asexual and sexual synonyms were well documented, and a list of proposed names and type material were recently proposed and published. In this case study the recent taxonomic information was applied to do a complete taxonomic audit for the genus Trichoderma in the NCBI Taxonomy database. A name status report is available here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/TaxIdentifier/tax_identifier.cgi. As a result, the ITS RefSeq Targeted Loci database at NCBI has been augmented with more sequences from type and verified material from Trichoderma species. Additionally, to aid in the cross referencing of data from single loci and genomes we have collected a list of quality records of the RPB2 gene obtained from type material in GenBank that could help validate future submissions. During the process of curation misidentified genomes were discovered, and sequence records from type material were found hidden under previous classifications. Source metadata curation, although more cumbersome, proved to be useful as confirmation of the type material designation. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA177353 PMID:29220466

  19. Welborix, a Novel Approach Towards User-Interface Technology in Well-Performance Simulation WELBORIX, une approche originale de l'interface utilisateur en simulation de tests de puits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overboom G. R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Shell Research has developed an integrated well-performance simulation tool that is widely used throughout the Shell Group. However, users do not fully appreciate its advanced functionality because of the cumbersome way in which relevant input data have to be composed. To alleviate this hindrance, the WELBORIX project was initiated, the aim of which was to build an adaptive human-computer interface for an existing wellbore simulator. The main aim of the research demonstrator WELBORIX, however, was to identify general requirements for a system designed to simplify a complex interaction between human and computer. When an experienced user of the simulator models a problem, he or she draws on an extensive body of knowledge. Applying knowledge-engineering techniques, the WELBORIX interface helps a less experienced user to work with the simulator by dealing with the complexity of the input. The compositon of a valid set of input parameters is described in a knowledge base, and the process of the human-computer interaction is controlled by an inference engine that is based on backward chaining. Moreover, facts derived during the computer's reasoning process determine the composition of the output and the sequence in which it is presented to the user. A special mechanism has been designed to obtain any needed factual information that cannot be derived from rules; it consists of a transparent layer connecting the missing facts with user-interface components. The adaptative human-computer interface of WELBORIX enables occasional users to interact with the wellbore simulator in a natural way, calling objects by their common name. The experienced user, on the other hand, does not have to sacrifice any of the system's flexibility; he or she is free to take short cuts. The user controls a session through a direct-manipulation, graphic user interface, which offers combined text and graphics, context-dependent help and multiple representations of data. Object

  20. Transient well flow in layered aquifer systems: the uniform well-face drawdown solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemker, C. J.

    1999-11-01

    Previously a hybrid analytical-numerical solution for the general problem of computing transient well flow in vertically heterogeneous aquifers was proposed by the author. The radial component of flow was treated analytically, while the finite-difference technique was used for the vertical flow component only. In the present work the hybrid solution has been modified by replacing the previously assumed uniform well-face gradient (UWG) boundary condition in such a way that the drawdown remains uniform along the well screen. The resulting uniform well-face drawdown (UWD) solution also includes the effects of a finite diameter well, wellbore storage and a thin skin, while partial penetration and vertical heterogeneity are accommodated by the one-dimensional discretization. Solutions are proposed for well flow caused by constant, variable and slug discharges. The model was verified by comparing wellbore drawdowns and well-face flux distributions with published numerical solutions. Differences between UWG and UWD well flow will occur in all situations with vertical flow components near the well, which is demonstrated by considering: (1) partially penetrating wells in confined aquifers, (2) fully penetrating wells in unconfined aquifers with delayed response and (3) layered aquifers and leaky multiaquifer systems. The presented solution can be a powerful tool for solving many well-hydraulic problems, including well tests, flowmeter tests, slug tests and pumping tests. A computer program for the analysis of pumping tests, based on the hybrid analytical-numerical technique and UWG or UWD conditions, is available from the author.

  1. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley

  2. Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Donald G.

    2002-03-11

    The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

  3. Structural Validation of the Holistic Wellness Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Charlene; Applegate, E. Brooks; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The Holistic Wellness Assessment (HWA) is a relatively new assessment instrument based on an emergent transdisciplinary model of wellness. This study validated the factor structure identified via exploratory factor analysis (EFA), assessed test-retest reliability, and investigated concurrent validity of the HWA in three separate samples. The…

  4. Testing Significance Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim I. Krueger

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The practice of Significance Testing (ST remains widespread in psychological science despite continual criticism of its flaws and abuses. Using simulation experiments, we address four concerns about ST and for two of these we compare ST’s performance with prominent alternatives. We find the following: First, the 'p' values delivered by ST predict the posterior probability of the tested hypothesis well under many research conditions. Second, low 'p' values support inductive inferences because they are most likely to occur when the tested hypothesis is false. Third, 'p' values track likelihood ratios without raising the uncertainties of relative inference. Fourth, 'p' values predict the replicability of research findings better than confidence intervals do. Given these results, we conclude that 'p' values may be used judiciously as a heuristic tool for inductive inference. Yet, 'p' values cannot bear the full burden of inference. We encourage researchers to be flexible in their selection and use of statistical methods.

  5. Reducing uncertainty in geostatistical description with well testing pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, A.C.; He, Nanqun [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States); Oliver, D.S. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Geostatistics has proven to be an effective tool for generating realizations of reservoir properties conditioned to static data, e.g., core and log data and geologic knowledge. Due to the lack of closely spaced data in the lateral directions, there will be significant variability in reservoir descriptions generated by geostatistical simulation, i.e., significant uncertainty in the reservoir descriptions. In past work, we have presented procedures based on inverse problem theory for generating reservoir descriptions (rock property fields) conditioned to pressure data and geostatistical information represented as prior means for log-permeability and porosity and variograms. Although we have shown that the incorporation of pressure data reduces the uncertainty below the level contained in the geostatistical model based only on static information (the prior model), our previous results assumed did not explicitly account for uncertainties in the prior means and the parameters defining the variogram model. In this work, we investigate how pressure data can help detect errors in the prior means. If errors in the prior means are large and are not taken into account, realizations conditioned to pressure data represent incorrect samples of the a posteriori probability density function for the rock property fields, whereas, if the uncertainty in the prior mean is incorporated properly into the model, one obtains realistic realizations of the rock property fields.

  6. Well completion report - G. Friemel No. 1 (PD-5) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This report provides a brief description and history of the drilling and testing program conducted at the G. Friemel No. 1 well, located in eastern Deaf Smith County about 4 miles north of Dawn, Texas. Drilling and testing were performed by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation as a part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. Figures showing site layout and final well design are provided. Testing programs are described, and stratigraphic data derived from the well are summarized. Data derived from geophysical well logs, drill-stem tests, and other testing programs are presented in the appendixes. Drilling of the well started on February 23, 1982, and was completed on March 31, 1982, at a total depth of 2710 feet. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  7. Hanford well custodians. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, A.L.; Underwood, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Site Groundwater Protection Management Program recognized the need to integrate monitoring well activities in a centralized manner. A key factor to Hanford Site well integration was the need to clearly identify a responsible party for each of the wells. WHC was asked to identify all wells on site, the program(s) using each well, and the program ultimately responsible for the well. This report lists the custodian and user(s) for each Hanford well and supplies a comprehensive list of all decommissioned and orphaned wells on the Hanford Site. This is the first update to the original report released in December 1993

  8. Horizontal wells in subsurface remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losonsky, G.; Beljin, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on horizontal wells which offer an effective alternative to vertical wells in various environmental remediation technologies. Hydrogeological advantages of horizontal wells over vertical wells include a larger zone of influence, greater screen length, higher specific capacity and lower groundwater screen entrance velocity. Because of these advantages, horizontal wells can reduce treatment time and costs of groundwater recovery (pump-and-treat), in situ groundwater aeration (sparging) and soil gas extraction (vacuum extraction). Horizontal wells are also more effective than vertical wells in landfill leachate collection (under-drains), bioremediation, and horizontal grout injection

  9. Well completion report - Holtzclaw No. 1 (PD-10) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the drilling and testing of the Holtzclaw No. 1 well, located in south-central Randall County, approximately 2 miles north of Happy, Texas. Drilling and testing were performed by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation as part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. This report describes the drilling and testing activities actually performed (compared to the Field Test Plan), describes the problems encountered, and provides recommendations for future work. Data gathered during drilling and testing of the well are included as appendices to this report. Drilling of the well began March 1, 1983. The well was drilled to a total depth of 2884.4 feet and was capped on April 1, 1983. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  10. Well data summary sheets. Vol. 33: North sea wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This 33rd volume of the `Well Data Summary sheets` includes data from seven recently released offshore wells from the North Sea. The wells Baron-2, S.E. Adda-1 and Skjold Flank-1 were presented in our `Well Data Summary Sheets, special volume`, published May 1, 1997. In volume 33, the wells Baron-2 and Skjold Flank-1 are updated with respect to information on sidewall cores. Information regarding all released well data, included in our well data summary sheets, are available on GEUS homepage: http://www.geus.dk/ or the departments homepage: http://www.geus.dk/departments/geol-info-data-centre/geoldata.htm/. A complete index of releases wells in volumes 17-33 is included. (au)

  11. Resonant Tunnelling in Barrier-in-Well and Well-in-Well Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang-Hong, Yao; Zhang-Yan; Wei-Wu, Li; Yong-Chun, Shu; Zhan-Guo, Wang; Jing-Jun, Xu; Guo-Zhi, Jia

    2008-01-01

    A Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for a barrier in a quantum well and a quantum well in another well structure by the transfer matrix technique. Effect of structure parameters on the transmission probabilities is investigated in detail. The results suggest that symmetry plays an important role in the coupling effect between the quantum wells. The relationship between the width of the inner well and the resonant energy levels in well-in-well structures is also studied. It is found that the ground state energy and the second resonant energy decrease with increasing width of the inner well, while the first resonant energy remains constant

  12. EcoWellness: The Missing Factor in Holistic Wellness Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ryan F.; Myers, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of multidisciplinary literature has delineated the benefits that natural environments have on physical and mental health. Current wellness models in counseling do not specifically address the impact of nature on wellness or how the natural world can be integrated into counseling. The concept of EcoWellness is presented as the…

  13. Well completion report - Zeeck No. 1 (PD-7) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The drilling and testing of Zeeck No. 1 well, located in central Swisher County, about 4 miles east of Tulia, Texas, are described. Drilling and testing were performed by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation as a part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. This report describes the drilling and testing activities actually performed (compared to the Field Test Plan), describes the problems encountered, and provides recommendations for future work. Data gathered during drilling and testing of the well are included as appendices to this report. Drilling and testing of the well were completed in 125 days from the spud date on April 9, 1982, to demobilization on August 12, 1982. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  14. Well completion report - Detten No. 1 (PD-6) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The drilling and testing of Detten No. 1 well, located in Deaf Smith County, about 8 miles north of Hereford, Texas, are described. Drilling and testing were performed by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation as a part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. This report describes the drilling and testing activities actually performed (compared to the Field Test Plan), describes the problems encountered, and provides recommendations for future work. Data gathered during drilling and testing of the well are included as appendices to this report. Drilling of the well began February 26, 1982. The drilling and testing activities terminated at a total depth of 2839 feet and were completed on May 5, 1982. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  15. Investigation of well redevelopment techniques for the MWD Well Field, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroening, D.E.; Snipes, D.S.; Falta, R.W.; Benson, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Clemson University, in cooperation with the Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating well treatment techniques at the Mixed Waste Disposal (MWD) Well Field at SRS. This well field consists of fifteen wells screened in three aquifers with a downward trending head gradient. Based on aquifer performance tests of the MWD wells, it has been determined that many of the wells exhibit low well efficiencies and high skin factors, indicative of damaged wells. Bacterial investigations show that the biological activity in these wells is low, probably due to a high pH environment. Evaluation of the Calcite Saturation Index for each well indicates that nearly all of the MWD wells have the potential for precipitating calcite and calcite deposits have been observed on downhole equipment. The calcite deposits may occur due to the dissolution of the grout mixtures by waters infiltrating down the well annulus driven by the downward head gradient with subsequent precipitation of calcite in the higher pH sand pack. Well rehabilitation techniques currently under investigation include acidification, hydraulic fracturing and traditional physical methods. In addition to treating the wells at MWD, the authors plan to perform aquifer performance tests and evaluate post-treatment skin factors. Further research into the long term effects of well treatment will be conducted, focusing on long term chemical changes brought about by the treatments

  16. Spectral Noise Logging for well integrity analysis in the mineral water well in Asselian aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Kantyukov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mineral water well with decreasing salinity level according to lab tests. A well integrity package including Spectral Noise Logging (SNL, High-Precision Temperature (HPT logging and electromagnetic defectoscopy (EmPulse was performed in the well which allowed finding casing leaks and fresh water source. In the paper all logging data were thoroughly analyzed and recommendation for workover was mentioned. The SNL-HPT-EmPulse survey allowed avoiding well abandonment.

  17. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

    2001-01-01

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden and Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently in the final stages of developing and testing our new Microsoft(trademark) Access/Excel based software. We will be processing this well data and identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies. Preparation of the final technical report is underway

  18. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

    2001-01-01

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden and Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft(trademark) Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process this well data and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway

  19. How well can centenarians hear?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongping Mao

    Full Text Available With advancements in modern medicine and significant improvements in life conditions in the past four decades, the elderly population is rapidly expanding. There is a growing number of those aged 100 years and older. While many changes in the human body occur with physiological aging, as many as 35% to 50% of the population aged 65 to 75 years have presbycusis. Presbycusis is a progressive sensorineural hearing loss that occurs as people get older. There are many studies of the prevalence of age-related hearing loss in the United States, Europe, and Asia. However, no audiological assessment of the population aged 100 years and older has been done. Therefore, it is not clear how well centenarians can hear. We measured middle ear impedance, pure-tone behavioral thresholds, and distortion-product otoacoustic emission from 74 centenarians living in the city of Shaoxing, China, to evaluate their middle and inner ear functions. We show that most centenarian listeners had an "As" type tympanogram, suggesting reduced static compliance of the tympanic membrane. Hearing threshold tests using pure-tone audiometry show that all centenarian subjects had varying degrees of hearing loss. More than 90% suffered from moderate to severe (41 to 80 dB hearing loss below 2,000 Hz, and profound (>81 dB hearing loss at 4,000 and 8,000 Hz. Otoacoustic emission, which is generated by the active process of cochlear outer hair cells, was undetectable in the majority of listeners. Our study shows the extent and severity of hearing loss in the centenarian population and represents the first audiological assessment of their middle and inner ear functions.

  20. How Well Can Centenarians Hear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhongping; Zhao, Lijun; Pu, Lichun; Wang, Mingxiao; Zhang, Qian; He, David Z. Z.

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in modern medicine and significant improvements in life conditions in the past four decades, the elderly population is rapidly expanding. There is a growing number of those aged 100 years and older. While many changes in the human body occur with physiological aging, as many as 35% to 50% of the population aged 65 to 75 years have presbycusis. Presbycusis is a progressive sensorineural hearing loss that occurs as people get older. There are many studies of the prevalence of age-related hearing loss in the United States, Europe, and Asia. However, no audiological assessment of the population aged 100 years and older has been done. Therefore, it is not clear how well centenarians can hear. We measured middle ear impedance, pure-tone behavioral thresholds, and distortion-product otoacoustic emission from 74 centenarians living in the city of Shaoxing, China, to evaluate their middle and inner ear functions. We show that most centenarian listeners had an “As” type tympanogram, suggesting reduced static compliance of the tympanic membrane. Hearing threshold tests using pure-tone audiometry show that all centenarian subjects had varying degrees of hearing loss. More than 90% suffered from moderate to severe (41 to 80 dB) hearing loss below 2,000 Hz, and profound (>81 dB) hearing loss at 4,000 and 8,000 Hz. Otoacoustic emission, which is generated by the active process of cochlear outer hair cells, was undetectable in the majority of listeners. Our study shows the extent and severity of hearing loss in the centenarian population and represents the first audiological assessment of their middle and inner ear functions. PMID:23755251

  1. Creating Wellness in Your Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tager, Mark J.

    1983-01-01

    Wellness programs emphasize positive motivation and usually include health awareness campaigns, behavior change programs, and cost containment strategies. Guides are offered for beginning wellness programs in school districts. (MLF)

  2. Gas in your water well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    In Alberta, the presence of carbon dioxide, methane or hydrogen sulphide in water wells is common. The aim of this paper is to provide information to private owners of water wells. It is stated in this document that spurting taps or a gurgling noise indicate that there is gas in your water well; you can determine which gas it is by collecting a sample and having it analyzed. In order to address the risks associated with the presence of gas in the water well, the well pit or well pump should be properly vented to avoid any oxygen deficiency in the atmosphere. It is also possible to get rid of the gas by lowering the pump intake. It is also mentioned that the development of coalbed methane in Alberta should not contaminate private wells since regulations aimed at avoiding this have been implemented. This paper provided useful information to help private owners manage the presence of gas in their water wells.

  3. Nationwide rural well water survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkka-Niemi, K.; Sipilae, A.; Hatva, T.; Hiisvirta, L.; Lahti, K.; Alfthan, G.

    1993-01-01

    The quality of water in 1 421 drinking-water wells was monitored in a nationwide well water study. Samples were taken once from all wells, and during three seasons from 421 wells. The wells were selected in such a way that me sample would be as representative as possible of the quality of the drinking-water in households' own wells in rural areas. The study comprised general water quality parameters, influence of sampling season, and factors related to the type, the condition and the pollution of the wells. In part of the well waters selenium, radioactivity and pesticides were determined. The effect of plumbing materials on the quality of water was also examined. (33 refs., 148 figs., 71 tabs.)

  4. Ideas for Improving Retirement Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Anna M

    Employers can and should take steps to support retirement and financial wellness. This article provides a framework for retirement wellness informed by research conducted or supported by the Society of Actuaries. Research insights about Americans' finances, planning, decisions, money management, debt, retiree income shocks and other areas point to ways employers can provide retirement wellness support as a vital part of an overall benefit program. The author suggests several key considerations employers should pay attention to in order to improve retirement wellness.

  5. Insomnia and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nancy A.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Stevens, Natalie; Nelson, Christy A.; Karlson, Cynthia; McCurdy, Danyale

    2007-01-01

    Most Americans have occasional problems with insomnia. The relationship of insomnia to illness is well known. However, insomnia may also relate to lower levels of well-being. Although there are various definitions of well-being, one of the most clearly articulated and comprehensive models identifies 2 overarching constructs, psychological…

  6. Well completion report - Harman No. 1 (PD-8) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the drilling and testing of Harman No. 1 well, located in north-central Swisher county, about 7 miles north of Tulia, Texas. Drilling and testing were performed by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation as a part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. Stone and Webster worked under a contract with the US Department of Energy's Program Manager: Battelle Project Management Division, Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation. This report describes the drilling and testing activities actually performed (compared to the Field Test Plan), describes the problems encountered, and provides recommendations for future work. Data gathered during drilling and testing of the well are included as appendices to this report. Drilling of the well began July 29, 1982, and was completed September 7, 1982, when a cement plug was set between the depths of 1220 and 1400 feet. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated. 5 figures, 4 tables

  7. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  8. Uranium speciation and removal from well water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz, B.; DeVol, T.; Navratil, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the form of uranium present in the well water and to test the effectiveness of common household treatment devices to remove uranium and radium. Batch tests with activated carbon, iron powder, anion exchange resin and cation exchange resin were used to characterize the form of uranium in the drinking water. In the tests, water and the separation materials were first equilibrated, filtered and then analyzed by alpha spectrometry. The results of the batch tests showed that it is possible to remove greater than 90% of the uranium and radium in the drinking water by using any of the sorbents listed above. Simple filtration with 0.1 μm had little to no impact on uranium removal. Results of tests using household treatment devices will also be presented. (authors)

  9. Unstable well behaviour in gas well liquid loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wijhe, A. van

    2017-01-01

    Liquid loading is the mechanism that is associated with increased liquid hold-up and liquid back flow at lower gas flow rates in gas production wells. In laboratory, most liquid loading experiments are performed at fixed gas and liquid rates (mass flow controlled). In the field, the well behavior is

  10. Wellness for Older Workers and Retirees. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Robert C.

    Company-sponsored wellness programs are particularly important for older employees inasmuch as they are at greater risk of disease and disability than are their younger counterparts and their health care and health insurance costs are generally higher. As the cost of retirement benefits rises, wellness programs for retirees are becoming…

  11. Existential Well-Being Spirituality or Well-Being?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anja; Garssen, Bert; Vingerhoets, Ad J. J. M.

    Measures of spirituality often contain the dimension existential well-being (EWB). However, EWB has been found to overlap with emotional and psychological well-being. Using the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List (SAIL), we have further investigated the overlap between aspects of spirituality

  12. Synthesis of mordenite in geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konoya, M [Geological Survey of Hokkaido, Japan

    1970-03-01

    A study of the possible synthesis of mordenite in geothermal wells was conducted. In 1966 as part of a series of exploratory geothermal investigations, a 500 m well was drilled which had a temperature at 250 m of 120/sup 0/C. The well has constant temperature and constant pressure and has been used to study alteration. Specimens which were placed in the well were tested for mordenite. Mordenite was synthesized when Benki clay and a 10% KOH solution were placed in a Teflon tube at 250 m (120/sup 0/C and 22.3 kg/cm/sup 2/) for three months. No mordenite was synthesized when obsidian powder was used. These results indicate the possibility of synthesis of zeolite and clay minerals in geothermal wells. Two figures and four tables are provided.

  13. Tool for treating subterranean wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, L.; Randermann, E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a system for treating subterranean wells. It comprises: elongated treatment tool having inflatable packers, a support tube connected to one end of the tool operable to lower tool from a well head into a well and to supply liquid to tool, the tool providing valve means operable in response changes in tension ins aid tube and without rotating the tube sequentially: (a) inflate the packers to isolate one portion of the from the remaining portions thereof and to lock the against movement along the well; (b) inject treatment fluid supplied to the tool through support tube into the one portion of the well and (c) deflate the packers permitting further movement of tool along the well

  14. Does Globalization Affect Human Well-Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Chang

    2007-01-01

    The prevailing theorizing of globalization's influence of human well-being suggests to assess both the favorable and unfavorable outcomes. This study formulates a dialectical model, adopts a comprehensive globalization measure and uses a three-wave panel data during 1980-2000 to empirically test direct and indirect effects of global flows' human…

  15. General well function for soil vapor extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perina, Tomas

    2014-04-01

    This paper develops a well function applicable to extraction of groundwater or soil vapor from a well under the most common field test conditions. The general well function (Perina and Lee, 2006) [12] is adapted to soil vapor extraction and constant head boundary at the top. For groundwater flow, the general well function now applies to an extraction well of finite diameter with uniform drawdown along the screen, finite-thickness skin, and partially penetrating an unconfined, confined, and leaky aquifer, or an aquifer underneath a reservoir. With a change of arguments, the model applies to soil vapor extraction from a vadose zone with no cover or with leaky cover at the ground surface. The extraction well can operate in specified drawdown (pressure for soil vapor) or specified flowrate mode. Frictional well loss is computed as flow-only dependent component of the drawdown inside the extraction well. In general case, the calculated flow distribution is not proportional to screen length for a multiscreen well.

  16. Revivals in an infinite square well in the presence of a δ well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugalter, G.A.; Sorokin, V.A.; Das, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated quantum revivals of wave packets in a one-dimensional infinite square well potential containing a δ well in the middle. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation for this composite potential admits formally exact solutions. We present analytical results for revival properties in three physically motivated approximations: wave packets containing eigenstates with large numbers in the presence of an arbitrary δ well, 'shallow' and 'deep' δ wells. Analytical results in the case of a 'shallow' δ well have been tested numerically

  17. Simplified Casing Program for Development Wells in Mahu Well Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zongyu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Mahu well block of Junggar basin, the complex formation has many sets of pressure system. Especially, the formation with microcracks in the middle layer is loose and the pressure bearing capacity is low. Lost circulation is prone to occur in this layer. At present, high investment and long drilling period were the main problems in the exploration and development process. The geostress 3D model of Mahu well block was established by means of logging and drilling data. The model provided the three-pressure profiles of Mahu well block for casing program optimization and safety drilling. Each well could be optimized the intermediate casing setting position. The intermediate casing was saved 160 meters long. The total of drilling speed was improved 5 times compared with the past drilling process. Slim hole drilling technology raised ROP 51.96% higher, and the average drilling period is shorten to 24.83 days.

  18. The well-being questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J; Van Der Ploeg, Henk M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Well-being Questionnaire (W-BQ) has been designed to measure psychological well-being in people with a chronic somatic illness and is recommended by the World Health Organization for widespread use. However, studies into the factor structure of this instrument are still limited...

  19. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  20. IADC's well control accreditation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropla, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    WellCAP is a well control accreditation program devised and implemented by the International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC). It is a worldwide comprehensive system that defines a well control training curriculum, establishes minimum standards and recommends guidelines for course structure. The program began in mid-1993 and is viewed as a means for training institutions to demonstrate industry recognition to customers, contractors and local governments. Schools can apply to have their courses accredited. The accreditation system is administered by a review panel. The application process requires that the school perform a detailed review of its curriculum and operations and bring them in line with the WellCAP curriculum and accreditation criteria. Currently, more than 75 schools around the world have requested application materials for WellCAP. To date fifteen schools have been fully accredited

  1. Well logging radioactive detector assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osburn, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a well logging instrument of the type having a radioactive logging sub having a sealed chamber and have a radioactive source for emitting radioactive energy into the well formation, the instrument having a radioactive energy detector for detecting gamma rays resulting from the emission of the radioactive energy into the well formation, and means for pressing the sub against the well of the well, an improved Dewar flask for the detector. It comprises: an inner housing formed of titanium and containing the detector; an outer housing formed of titanium, having a cylindrical side wall surrounding the inner housing and separated by a clearance which is evacuated, the outer housing being located within the sealed chamber in the sub of the instrument; a window section formed in the side wall of the outer housing adjacent the detector and on a side of the side wall closest to the wall of the well when the sub is pressed against the wall of the well; and wherein the inner housing has a cylindrical side wall that is of lesser wall thickness than the wall thickness of the side wall of the outer housing other than in the window section

  2. Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  3. The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Jessica L; Nothelle, Stephanie

    2018-02-01

    The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit is an annual preventive health benefit, which was created in 2011 as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The visit provides an opportunity for clinicians to review preventive health recommendations and screen for geriatric syndromes. In this article, the authors review the requirements of the Annual Wellness Visit, discuss ways to use the Annual Wellness Visit to improve the care of geriatric patients, and provide suggestions for how to incorporate this benefit into a busy clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recompletion Report for Well UE-10j

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Existing Well UE-10j was deepened and recompleted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was originally drilled to a total depth of 725.4 meters in 1965 for use as a hydrologic test hole in the northern portion of Yucca Flat in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located up-gradient of the Yucca Flat underground test area and penetrates deep into the Paleozoic rocks that form the lower carbonate aquifer of the NTS and surrounding areas. The original 24.4-centimeter-diameter borehole was drilled to a depth of 725.4 meters and left uncompleted. Water-level measurements were made periodically by the U.S. Geological Survey, but access to the water table was lost between 1979 and 1981 due to hole sloughing. In 1993, the hole was opened to 44.5 centimeters and cased off to a depth of 670.0 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 796.4 meters. The depth to water in the open borehole was measured at 658.7 meters on March 18, 1993

  5. Well-posed optimization problems

    CERN Document Server

    Dontchev, Asen L

    1993-01-01

    This book presents in a unified way the mathematical theory of well-posedness in optimization. The basic concepts of well-posedness and the links among them are studied, in particular Hadamard and Tykhonov well-posedness. Abstract optimization problems as well as applications to optimal control, calculus of variations and mathematical programming are considered. Both the pure and applied side of these topics are presented. The main subject is often introduced by heuristics, particular cases and examples. Complete proofs are provided. The expected knowledge of the reader does not extend beyond textbook (real and functional) analysis, some topology and differential equations and basic optimization. References are provided for more advanced topics. The book is addressed to mathematicians interested in optimization and related topics, and also to engineers, control theorists, economists and applied scientists who can find here a mathematical justification of practical procedures they encounter.

  6. Fremont Tree-Well Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Fremont Tree-Well Filter Spine project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  7. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  8. 7 Steps to Aging Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section 7 Steps to Aging Well Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute on Aging is a publication from NIA that has strength, ...

  9. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. This paper discusses a detailed Study Plan which was prepared describing planned geochronology and field studies to assess the chronology of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center and other Quaternary volcanic centers in the region. A paper was published discussing the geomorphic and soil evidence for a late Pleistocene or Holoceno age for the main cone of the center. The purpose of this paper was to expose the ideas concerning the age of the Lathrop Wells center to scientific scrutiny. Additionally, field evidence was described suggesting the Lathrop Wells center may have formed from multiple eruptive events with significant intervals of no activity between events. This interpretation breaks with established convention in the volcanological literature that small volume basalt centers are monogenetic

  10. Oil wells and gas wells: aspects of radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, S.M.V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present and analyse the main radiological protection problems associated with non destructive inspections of oil wells, with the view of minimizing the dose to members of the public living in nearby urban zones. Problems related to the surveillance of such activities and the need for well formulated procedures are also discussed based on specific Brasilian regulations. Finally, some examples of radiological accidents that have occured in urban zones are described including the methodology employed for the rescue of Iridium-192 sources and for the estimate of radiation doses for workers and general public. (author) [pt

  11. Method of installing well conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houser, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method of installing a well conductor in a marine environment. It comprises sealing a well conductor with a watertight plug; submerging the conductor from an elevated platform; adding additional conductor lengths to the conductor as needed thereby forming a conductor string; adjusting the buoyancy of the string to control the lowering of the string to the sea floor; and drilling through the plug after the conductor string has achieved the desired penetration depth

  12. Magnetic well for plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valfells, A.; Chiu, Y.C.

    1977-01-01

    A multipole magnetic well for plasma confinement includes a plurality of current-carrying coils placed on planes corresponding to the facets of a regular polyhedron that can be symmetrically circumscribed about a sphere. The direction of current in the coils is such as to minimize the flux density at the center of the polyhedron, thereby providing a confinement well with three-dimensional symmetry having an increasing flux density in all directions from the center. 16 claims, 18 figures

  13. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  14. Well completion report - J. Friemel No. 1 (PD-9) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the drilling and testing of J. Friemel No. 1 well, located in north-central Deaf Smith County, approximately 17 miles north of Hereford, Texas. Drilling and testing were performed by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation as a part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. This report describes the drilling and testing activities actually performed (compared to the Field Test Plan), describes the problems encountered, and provides recommendations for future work. Data gathered during drilling and testing of the well are included as appendices to this report. Rigging up and drilling of the rat and mouse holes began on October 15, 1982. The rig was demobilized on March 18, 1983. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  15. Well integrity in heavy oil wells : challenges and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoutaou, S.; Osman, T.M.; Mjthab, M. [Schlumberger (Syrian Arab Republic); Succar, N. [Oudeh Petroleum, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2010-07-01

    The Oudeh Petroleum Company (OPC) has used cyclic steam (the Huff and Puff technique) since 2006 to produce heavy oil from its OPC field that has an estimated 79.49 to 95.39 million cubic meters of oil contained in the Jurassic and Triassic reservoirs of the Butmah and Kurachine formations in Syria. Accumulations of oil and gas are present in the main Oudeh structure at depths between 1300 and 2250 meters. The Huff and Puff technique involves 3 phases. In the first phase which lasts about 1 month, steam is injected at 348 degrees C and 17.MPa to melt the wax condensate in the formation in order to decrease heavy oil viscosity. Phase 2 involves 3 soaking days. In phase 3, which lasts 2 to 3 months, the production rate is doubled compared to wells without steam. The cycle is then resumed once the pressure drops. The temperature cycling can compromise the well integrity through loss of hydraulic isolation in the cement sheath and thereby reduce hydrocarbon recovery. This paper described how the OPC has managed to achieved complete well integrity using an advanced cement system in more than 200 wells exposed to steam injection temperatures up to 348 degrees C and the associated high induced thermal stresses. The methodology for risk analysis of the cement sheath failure under steam stimulation was described along with the selection criteria for the advanced cement system to withstand temperature cycling. Two case histories involving a 50 well database were presented. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

  16. Well screening for matrix stimulation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, N; Solano, R; Gidley, J; Reyes, C.A; Rodriguez; Kondo, F; Hernandez, J

    1998-01-01

    Matrix acidizing is a stimulation technique only applicable to wells with surrounding damage. It is therefore very important to differentiate the real formation damage from the damage caused by flow Ni dynamic effects. The mechanical damage corresponds to flow restrictions caused by partial penetration, poor perforation as well as to reduce diameters of the production tubing. The dynamic effects are generated by inertia caused by high flow rates and high-pressure differentials. A common practice in our oil fields is to use a general formulation as acid treatment, most of the times without previous lab studies that guarantee the applicability of the treatment in the formation. Additionally, stimulation is randomly applied even treating undamaged wells with negative results and in the best of the cases, loss of the treatment. The selection of the well for matrix stimulation is an essential factor for the success of the treatment. Selection is done through the evaluation of the skin factor (S) and of the economic benefits of reducing the skin in comparison to the cost of the work. The most appropriate tool for skin evaluation is a good pressure test where the radial flow period can be identified. Nevertheless, we normally find-outdated tests most of the times taken with inaccurate tools. The interpretation problem is worsened by completions in which there is simultaneous production from several sand packages and it is difficult to individually differentiate damage factors. This works states a procedure for the selection of wells appropriate for stimulation; it also proposes a method to evaluate the skin factor when there are no accurate interpretations of the pressure tests. A new and increasingly applied methodology to treat wells with high water cuts, which are usually discarded due to the risk of stimulating water zones, is also mentioned

  17. Λ and Σ well depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Eiji

    1982-01-01

    The Λ well depth was calculated by taking into account the effect of the ΛΣ conversion. Takahashi et al. obtained the separate type of potentials which described the hyperon-nucleon interaction up to p waves. Two types of the potentials among several types they obtained were used to calculate the Λ well depth. The G matrix was easily calculated, and the Λ well depth was obtained by integrating the G matrix in momentum space up to the Fermi surface. The effect of the ΛΣ conversion was given by an equation. The total Λ well depth was estimated to be 9.13 MeV and 49.36 MeV for each type of potential, respectively. It was concluded that the argument by Bodmer et al. was not correct. The Σ well depth was also calculated using the potential obtained by Takahashi et al. for I = 1/2 and the one obtained by Σ + p → Σ + p scattering data for I = 3/2. The obtained value 35.30 MeV may be overestimated, and the experimental value is expected to be in the range from 20 MeV to 30 MeV. (Ito, K.)

  18. Modeling multi-lateral wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, H. J.; Fong, W. S. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A method for modeling multi-lateral wells by using a computational scheme embedded in a general-purpose, finite difference simulator was described. The calculation of wellbore pressure profile for each lateral included the frictional pressure drop along the wellbore and proper fluid mixing at lateral connection points. To obtain a good production profile the Beggs and Brill correlation, a homogenous flow model, and the model proposed by Ouyang et al, which includes an acceleration term and accounts for the lubrication effect due to radial influx, were implemented. Well performance prediction results were compared using the three models. The impact of different tubing sizes on the well performance and the prediction contribution from each lateral were also studied. Results of the study in the hypothetical example and under normal field operating conditions were reviewed. 7 refs., 10 tabs., 3 figs.

  19. Quantum-Well Thermophotovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudlich, Alex; Ignatiev, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic cells containing multiple quantum wells have been invented as improved means of conversion of thermal to electrical energy. The semiconductor bandgaps of the quantum wells can be tailored to be narrower than those of prior thermophotovoltaic cells, thereby enabling the cells to convert energy from longer-wavelength photons that dominate the infrared-rich spectra of typical thermal sources with which these cells would be used. Moreover, in comparison with a conventional single-junction thermophotovoltaic cell, a cell containing multiple narrow-bandgap quantum wells according to the invention can convert energy from a wider range of wavelengths. Hence, the invention increases the achievable thermal-to-electrical energy-conversion efficiency. These thermophotovoltaic cells are expected to be especially useful for extracting electrical energy from combustion, waste-heat, and nuclear sources having temperatures in the approximate range from 1,000 to 1,500 C.

  20. Well drilling summary report for well 199-N-106A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, L.D.

    1996-02-01

    Past liquid waste disposal practices within the 100-N Area have resulted in the contamination of the underlying sediments and groundwater. The release of large volumes of liquid effluent to the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities caused the transport of 90 Sr and other contaminants to the groundwater. Further discussion of 100-N Area hydrogeology is provided in Hartman and Lindsey (1993). A pump-and-treat system combined with a vertical barrier is the preferred alternative for the N Springs Expedited Response Action. This document is a compilation of the data collected during the drilling of well 199-N-106A, an extraction well for the 100-N Pump-and-Treat Project

  1. Health and Wellness Policy Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Cavico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective is an ethical brief overview and examination of “wellness” policies in the modern workplace using practical examples and a general application of utilitarianism. Many employers are implementing policies that provide incentives to employees who lead a “healthy” lifestyle. The authors address how these policies could adversely affect “non-healthy” employees. There are a wide variety of ethical issues that impact wellness policies and practices in the workplace. The authors conclude that wellness programs can be ethical, while also providing a general reflective analysis of healthcare challenges in order to reflect on the externalities associated with such policies in the workplace.

  2. Health and Wellness Policy Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavico, Frank J.; Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.

    2013-01-01

    This perspective is an ethical brief overview and examination of “wellness” policies in the modern workplace using practical examples and a general application of utilitarianism. Many employers are implementing policies that provide incentives to employees who lead a “healthy” lifestyle. The authors address how these policies could adversely affect “non-healthy” employees. There are a wide variety of ethical issues that impact wellness policies and practices in the workplace. The authors conclude that wellness programs can be ethical, while also providing a general reflective analysis of healthcare challenges in order to reflect on the externalities associated with such policies in the workplace. PMID:24596847

  3. In situ bioremediation via horizontal wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazen, T.C.; Looney, B.B.; Enzien, M.; Dougherty, J.M.; Wear, J.; Fliermans, C.B.; Eddy, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The test consisted of methane mixed with air into the contaminated aquifer via a horizontal well and extraction from the vadose zone via a parallel horizontal well. This configuration has the advantage of simultaneously stimulating methanotrophic activity in both the groundwater and vadose zone, and inhibiting spread of the contaminant plume. Groundwater was monitored biweekly from 13 wells for a variety of chemical and microbiological parameters. Groundwater from wells in affected areas showed increases in methanotrophs of more than 1 order of magnitude every 2 weeks for several weeks after 1% methane-in-air injection was started. Some wells had increases as much as 7 orders of magnitude. Simultaneous with the increase in methanotrophs was a decrease in water and soil gas concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethane (PCE). Two wells declined in TCE/PCE concentration in the water by more than 90% to below 2 ppb. All of the wells in the affected zone showed significant decreases in contaminants in less than one month. Chloride concentrations in the water were inversely correlated with TCE/PCE concentration. Four of five vadose zone piezometers declined from concentration as high as 10,000 ppm to less than 5 ppm in less than 6 weeks. The fifth cluster also declined by more than 95%. After only three months on injection, a decline in TCE/PCE in the sediment of more than 30% was also observed, with TCE/PCE being undetectable in most sediments at the end of the 14-month test. Gene probes and direct isolation from the water and sediment revealed that the right types of methanotrophs were being stimulated and that isolates could degrade TCE at a high rate

  4. Natural Radionuclides in Private Wells | RadTown USA | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    About 15 percent of Americans use private wells as their main source of drinking water. Those who use private wells should remember: Test for radionuclides every three years. Take appropriate steps if radionuclide levels are higher than EPA's limits.

  5. Welling up asylum seekers’ memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardt, Clemens; van Hoven, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    “Memories well up out of the depths of the unconscious and/or work away as (dis)enabling background. They are not static information, but are reworked in the light of current practice, and at the same time shape that practice” (Jones and Garde‐Hansen, 2012: 161).The aim of the forthcoming paper is

  6. Environmental protection for subsea wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, R.J.; Osborne, R.S.; Elwood, J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for receiving and containing surplus fluid from a subsea well installation on the ocean floor including a subsea wellhead assembly disposed in an enclosed protective chamber. It comprises a fluid-carrying conduit connected to the exterior of the protective chamber in fluid communication with the interior of the protective chamber; an inflatable dracon disposed upon and against the ocean floor in protective relation thereto when deflated and releasably connected in fluid communication to an outlet of the conduit; and pressure-balanced relief valve means disposed in the conduit between the outlet and the protective chamber for communicating surplus fluid from the interior of such chamber to the dracon when the fluid pressure within such chamber exceeds a predetermined value. This patent describes a method of completing an underwater well. It comprises installing a hollow cylindrical silo body with attached conductor guide casing into the sea floor; drilling and casing a well through the silo body and conductor guide casing; installing a wellhead assembly on top of the drilled and cased well inside of the silo body; installing a pressure-containing lid on top of the silo body, forming an enclosed protective chamber and isolating the interior of the chamber from the surrounding hydrostatic head of the sea water

  7. Wellness lessons from transportation companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe wellness programs and offer two suggestions for improving how they are delivered to commercial drivers and operators. It is not a large sample empirical study from which generalizations can be made. Rather, t...

  8. The Well Siblings of Schizophrenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Laurel; Chase, Laura

    1979-01-01

    Explores the impact of having a schizophrenic sibling. Subjects functioned at high levels of adjustment. Separated from their families, there followed a period of reinvolvement, including responsibility for the ill sibling. Younger siblings expressed guilt over being well, whereas older siblings expressed guilt over earlier sibling rivalry.…

  9. Spring valve for well completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbatov, P T

    1966-07-22

    A spring-loaded valve for well completion consists of a housing with a spring-loaded closing element. In order to protect the closing element from corrosion which might lower the pressure drop, the closing element is made in the form of a piston. It is tightly connected with sealing elements. The housing has orifices, overlapping the piston in the initial position.

  10. Parenthood and Well-Being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, Anne; Mandemakers, Jornt J.; Voorpostel, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    This study contributes to our knowledge on the association between parenthood and psychological well-being by examining whether pre-parenthood lifestyles (leisure and paid work) moderate the transition to parenthood. We expected that people with less active lifestyles would find it easier to

  11. Evaluating an employee wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sankar; Wendel, Jeanne

    2013-12-01

    What criteria should be used to evaluate the impact of a new employee wellness program when the initial vendor contract expires? Published academic literature focuses on return-on-investment as the gold standard for wellness program evaluation, and a recent meta-analysis concludes that wellness programs can generate net savings after one or two years. In contrast, surveys indicate that fewer than half of these programs report net savings, and actuarial analysts argue that return-on-investment is an unrealistic metric for evaluating new programs. These analysts argue that evaluation of new programs should focus on contract management issues, such as the vendor's ability to: (i) recruit employees to participate and (ii) induce behavior change. We compute difference-in-difference propensity score matching estimates of the impact of a wellness program implemented by a mid-sized employer. The analysis includes one year of pre-implementation data and three years of post-implementation data. We find that the program successfully recruited a broad spectrum of employees to participate, and it successfully induced short-term behavior change, as manifested by increased preventive screening. However, the effects on health care expenditures are positive (but insignificant). If it is unrealistic to expect new programs to significantly reduce healthcare costs in a few years, then focusing on return-on-investment as the gold standard metric may lead to early termination of potentially useful wellness programs. Focusing short-term analysis of new programs on short-term measures may provide a more realistic evaluation strategy.

  12. Staying well in old age: Predicting older adults’ wellness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia von Humboldt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an ageing world, the potential for ageing well in older people is still relatively unexplored.Literature has suggested that a sense of coherence (SOC is an important factor with regard to retaining a good quality of life in old age. To explore whether satisfaction with life (SWL, as well as sociodemographic, health- and lifestyle-related variables, are predictors of SOC in a community-dwelling sample of older adults and to assess significant differences in SOC amongst the four nationalities studied. Cross-national research encompassing a community-dwelling sample of 454 older adults aged 75 years and above was undertaken. Sense of coherence was assessed using the Orientation to Life Questionnaire and Satisfaction with Life (SWL was measured using the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Structural equation modelling was used to investigate a structural model of the self-reported SOC, comprising sociodemographic variables (age, gender, marital status, professional status, educational level, family’s annual income and standard of living arrangements, as well as SWL, lifestyle and health-related (physical activity and recent disease characteristics. Significant predictors were physical activity (β = 0.804; p < 0.001, recent disease (β = 0.501; p < 0.001 and SWL (β = 0.07; p = 0.004.These variables accounted for approximately 57.5%of the variability of SOC. Moreover, differences with regard to SOC were also found amongst the four nationality groups (F(3= 5.204; p = 0.002. Physical activity is the strongest predictor of self-reported SOC. Other predictors are the absence of a recent disease and SWL. The four nationalities presented significant differences with regard to SOC. This study highlighted the need for understanding the potential factors (in particular physical activity and further health-related characteristicsthat impact on older adults’ SOC.

  13. Kidney function tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney function tests are common lab tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working. Such tests include: ... Oh MS, Briefel G. Evaluation of renal function, water, electrolytes ... and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  14. Structural Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  15. Well engineering in the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaafsma, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    Shell U.K. Exploration and Production, Operator in the U.K. sector of the North Sea for Shell and Esso, has adopted a corporate strategy in line with the 'Drilling in the Nineties' concept proposed by Shell International Petroleum Maatschappij B.V. (SIPM) for all Shell Operating Companies. Within Shell Expro the 'Drilling in the Nineties' concept has been broadened to incorporate the drilling, well services and equipment supply areas with the resultant name change to iWell Engineering in the Nineties'. (WIN 90's). This strategy has now been implemented and has substantially changed the modus operandi between operator and contractor with a strong emphasis on long term partnership relations with lead contractors. This paper summarises the strategy that has been developed, the implications of implementing this strategy; the implications to both a major operator and numerous contractor suppliers; the results to date; and the course of future partnership relations. (orig.)

  16. Spacecraft Architecture and well being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ören, Ayşe

    2016-07-01

    As we embark on a journey for new homes in the new worlds to lay solid foundations, we should consider not only the survival of frontiers but also well-being of those to live in zero gravity. As a versatile science, architecture encompasses abstract human needs as well. On our new different direction in the course of the Homo sapiens evolution, we can do this with designs addressing both our needs and senses. Well-being of humans can be achieved by creating environments supporting the cognitive and social stages in the evolution process. Space stations are going through their own evolution process. Any step taken can serve as a reference for further attempts. When studying the history of architecture, window designing is discussed in a later phase, which is the case for building a spaceship as well. We lean on the places we live both physically and metaphorically. The feeling of belonging is essential here, entailing trans-humanism, which is significant since the environment therein is like a dress comfortable enough to fit in, meeting needs without any burden. Utilizing the advent of technology, we can create moods and atmospheres to regulate night and day cycles, thus we can turn claustrophobic places into cozy or dream-like places. Senses provoke a psychological sensation going beyond cultural codes as they are rooted within consciousness, which allows designers to create a mood within a space that tells a story and evokes an emotional impact. Color, amount of light, sound and odor are not superficial. As much as intangible, they are real and powerful tools with a physical presence. Tapping into induction, we can solve a whole system based on a part thereof. Therefore, fractal designs may not yield good results unless used correctly in terms of design although they are functional, which makes geometric arrangement critical.

  17. Well-Being and Objectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Bożydar Wiśniewski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I investigate the issue of whether there exists an objective element of well-being, completely independent of anyone’s desires, interests and preferences. After rejecting health-based and convention-based approaches to objectivity, I conclude that the element in question consists in respecting autonomy, voluntariness of every purposive agent and the principle of non-aggression.

  18. Is supergravity well-posed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isenberg, J.; Bao, D.; Yasskin, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    One rather fundamental question concerning supergravity remains unresolved: Is supergravity a well-posed field theory? That is, does a set of certain (Cauchy) data specified on some initial spacelike surface determine a unique, causally propagating spacetime solution of the supergravity field equations (at least in some finite neighborhood of the initial surface)? In this paper, the authors give a very brief report on work directed towards answering this question. (Auth.)

  19. Implementing an effective wellness program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, N. [Bruce Power Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Bruce Power is one of the largest nuclear sites in the world, with more than 3,700 employees. The utility strives to be one of Canada's most dynamic and innovative teams. The values of Bruce Power include: safety first; profit through progress; openness; respect and recognition; and professional and personal integrity. With respect to health and safety, Bruce Power strives to have zero medically treated injuries. Details of the healthy workplace committee were presented as well as details of the health and wellness program. Charts of health and mental health screening strategies were presented. Other programs include: an excellent benefits package; flexible working hours; family care days; banked time; an electronic suggestion box; and station condition records. It was noted that there is a strong external focus on health and safety as well. Details of community involvement and sponsorship were presented, along with details of on-site fitness facilities and fitness membership subsidies. Details of the National Quality Institute certification were also provided, including physical environment; lifestyle behaviours; and psycho-social environment. The importance of strong leadership in encouraging feedback, team talk and continuous leadership development was emphasized. Strategies to strengthen leadership include new hiring criteria for managers; management days; first line manager academy; a mentoring program; and task observation and coaching. Communication strategies include articles in weekly newspapers; monthly safety meeting video segments; posters and electronic signs; and voice mail messages from the chief executive officer. Details of the Eat Smart and Weight Challenge certification were provided. The management at human resources faces the challenge of continual change, demographics, and the fact that wellness is difficult to measure. tabs., figs.

  20. Gas Well Testing Analysis Using Finite-Difference Models and Optimization Techniques Analyse d'essais de puits de gaz par des modèles utilisant la méthode des différences finies et par des techniques d'optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darderes E. A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In reservoir engineering studies of gas fields, three important parameters are needed: the permeability-thickness product, the skin factor, and the inertial-turbulent factor. Several methods have been proposed to determine these parameters from gas well tests. The most powerful one is the pseudo-steady state analysis, where a linear dependence on a semilogarithmic plot is found between the real gas pseudo-pressure and time. Another one is the type-curve matching. Both have drawbacks because they can be rigorously applied only to specific cases. An automated type-curve match, which provides a general method to analyze well test data, is presented in this paper. It is based on the adjustment of a numerical model to gas well test data, by means of optimization techniques. The numerical model is the solution of the second order strongly non-linear partial differential equation which rules the radial flow of real gases towards a well. The differential equation is solved by finite-differences, taking into account the variation of gas properties with pressure. In order to simulate any gas well test, appropriate initial and boundary conditions are imposed. The least squares method is used to minimize residual differences between actual pressures measured during test and computed pressures. Two optimization techniques are applied to obtain the best estimate of parameters that minimize the sum of the square of the residuals: the univariate method of Fibonacci [1] and the multivariate method of Marquardt [1, 2]. This procedure is applied to a single-rate and a two-rate drawdown test. Numerical results showed excellent agreement with well test data. Les études de gisements de gaz rendent indispensables la connaissance de trois paramètres importants : la capacité de flux (produit de la perméabilité par l'épaisseur de la couche productrice, l'effet de peau et le facteur d'inertie et de turbulence. On connaît plusieurs méthodes pour déterminer ces