WorldWideScience

Sample records for test trains

  1. Fuel cell hybrid drive train test facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bruinsma; Edwin Tazelaar; Bram Veenhuizen; I. Zafina; H. Bosma

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in the near future as prime energy source on board of road-going vehicles. In order to be able to test all important functional aspects of a fuel cell hybrid drive train, the Automotive Institute of the HAN University has decided to realize a

  2. Fuel cell hybrid drive train test facility

    OpenAIRE

    Bruinsma, J.; Tazelaar, Edwin; Veenhuizen, Bram; Zafina, I.; Bosma, H.

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in the near future as prime energy source on board of road-going vehicles. In order to be able to test all important functional aspects of a fuel cell hybrid drive train, the Automotive Institute of the HAN University has decided to realize a stationary test facility, comprising an 8 kW PEM stack and a 185 [Ah] 48 [V] NiCd battery, which is connected to an asynchronous motor, which is loaded by an eddy current brake. The objective of the test ...

  3. EMG Biofeedback Training Versus Systematic Desensitization for Test Anxiety Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, John L.; Cabianca, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Biofeedback training to reduce test anxiety among university students was investigated. Biofeedback training with systematic desensitization was compared to an automated systematic desensitization program not using EMG feedback. Biofeedback training is a useful technique for reducing test anxiety, but not necessarily more effective than systematic…

  4. Intermittent Testing and Training for High-Level Football Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    on the Yo-Yo IR2 test and other field- and laboratory tests of intermittent interval training performed as anaerobic speed-endurance production training is very limited for football players. Hence, this latter question is examined in Study IV.In Study I we find no differences in anthropometric...... times, RSA, or jump performances. Hence, our results indicate that short-term anaerobic production training is effective for improving acceleration and intermittent exercise performance among well-trained junior elite players.In conclusion, the present thesis provides evidence that the traditional...... on four articles that focus on physical testing and training for elite and sub-elite football players.The first article (Study I) aims to identify and establish aerobic capacities and anthropometric characteristics of elite female football players with the use of laboratory tests, and to examine whether...

  5. Train-to-Train Impact Test of Crash-Energy Management Passenger Rail Equipment: Occupant Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-06

    As part of an ongoing passenger rail crashworthiness effort, : a full-scale impact test of a train with crash energy management : (CEM) passenger cars was conducted on March 23, 2006. In : this test, a train made up of a CEM cab car, four CEM coach :...

  6. Computer-aided training and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.В. Русаловський

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available  A range of tasks related to increasing efficiency of learning process and testing by means of information technologies and automation of those processes come under review in this article. Efficiency of learning and testing using traditional methods vs. analogous methods utilizing personal computers is compared. It is stated that utilizing computer enables to eliminate certain shortcomings of traditional learning and testing methods. Basic technological steps of learning and testing associated with using “Auto-Examinator” computer-based learning, testing software package are reviewed. Conclusions on benefits of use of computer-based learning and testing software for both teachers and students are drawn.

  7. Training simulater for core physics test of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoizumi, Atsushi

    1989-03-01

    The core physics tests are done at the start-up test and the annual inspection of PWR in order to confirm the safety and the design. In these tests, some special equipement/operations are required. Therefore, in order to maintain these special techniques, we developed the training simulator for core physical tests using a digital computer.

  8. Sign Language Interpreter Training, Testing, and Accreditation: An International Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Jemina

    2004-01-01

    The article explores sign language interpreter training, testing, and accreditation in three major English-speaking countries, Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, by providing an overview of the training and assessment of sign language interpreters in each country. The article highlights the reasons these countries can be…

  9. Distributed training, testing, and decision aids within one solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strini, Robert A.; Strini, Keith

    2002-07-01

    Military air operations in the European theater require U.S. and NATO participants to send various mission experts to 10 Combined Air Operations Centers (CAOCs). Little or no training occurs prior to their arrival for tours of duty ranging between 90 days to 3 years. When training does occur, there is little assessment of its effectiveness in raising CAOC mission readiness. A comprehensive training management system has been developed that utilizes traditional and web based distance-learning methods for providing instruction and task practice as well as distributed simulation to provide mission rehearsal training opportunities on demand for the C2 warrior. This system incorporates new technologies, such as voice interaction and virtual tutors, and a Learning Management System (LMS) that tracks trainee progress from academic learning through procedural practice and mission training exercises. Supervisors can monitor their subordinate's progress through synchronous or asynchronous methods. Embedded within this system are virtual tutors, which provide automated performance measurement as well as tutoring. The training system offers a true time management savings for current instructors and training providers that today must perform On the Job Training (OJT) duties before, during and after each event. Many units do not have the resources to support OJT and are forced to maintain an overlap of several days to minimally maintain unit readiness. One CAOC Commander affected by this paradigm has advocated supporting a beta version of this system to test its ability to offer training on-demand and track the progress of its personnel and unit readiness. If successful, aircrew simulation devices can be connected through either Distributed Interactive Simulation or High Level Architecture methods to provide a DMT-C2 air operations training environment in Europe. This paper presents an approach to establishing a training, testing and decision aid capability and means to assess

  10. Realism Training Through Decision-Theoretic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, David W.

    Decision-theoretic testing is used to explore whether students can improve their realism, i.e. congruence between reported and true probabilities. Randomized sets of math problems were presented at computer terminals to 49 seventh graders from two classes (high/low achievers) over a period of three weeks. The subject assigned values to each of…

  11. Training in multiple breath washout testing for respiratory physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Katherine; Elborn, J Stuart; Tunney, Michael M; O'Neill, Philip; Rowan, Stephen; Martin, Susan; Bradley, Judy M

    2018-03-01

    The development of multiple breath washout (MBW) testing in respiratory disease highlights the need for increased awareness amongst respiratory physiotherapists and a potential opportunity for professional development in the use of an important outcome measure for clinical trials. To rationalise how MBW may be a useful assessment tool for respiratory physiotherapists and to describe a local MBW training and certification programme for physiotherapists. The respiratory Multidisciplinary Team in the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust (BHSCT) identified a need for MBW testing to be available to facilitate clinical research and assessment. A 2day training programme consisting of prereading preparation, self-directed learning, theory presentations, practical demonstrations and hands-on practice was developed and delivered. All participants underwent a certification process. We have demonstrated the successful training and certification of clinical and research physiotherapists and encourage other respiratory physiotherapists to consider MBW test training. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Train-to-train impact test of crash energy management passenger rail equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    On March 23, 2006, a full-scale test was conducted on a passenger rail train retrofitted with newly developed cab and coach car crush zone designs. This test was conducted as part of a larger testing program to establish the degree of enhanced perfor...

  13. Train-to-Train Impact Test of Crash-Energy Management Passenger Rail Equipment: Structural Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    On March 23, 2006, a full-scale test was conducted on a : passenger rail train retrofitted with newly developed cab end : and non-cab end crush zone designs. This test was conducted : as part of a larger testing program to establish the degree of : e...

  14. Test Anxiety Reduction and Confidence Training: A Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Noah; Driscoll, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to replicate prior research in which a brief counter-conditioning and confidence training program was found to reduce anxiety and raise test scores. First-semester college students were screened with the Westside Test Anxiety Scale, and the 25 identified as having high or moderately-high anxiety were randomly divided…

  15. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Noyes

    2012-03-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  16. A 1-year study of endurance runners: training, laboratory tests, and field tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Andy; Hopker, James; Cardinale, Marco; Cunniffe, Brian; Passfield, Louis

    2014-11-01

    To examine the training and concomitant changes in laboratory- and field-test performance of highly trained endurance runners. Fourteen highly trained male endurance runners (mean ± SD maximal oxygen uptake [VO2max] 69.8 ± 6.3 mL · kg-1 · min-1) completed this 1-y training study commencing in April. During the study the runners undertook 5 laboratory tests of VO2max, lactate threshold (LT), and running economy and 9 field tests to determine critical speed (CS) and the modeled maximum distance performed above CS (D'). The data for different periods of the year were compared using repeated-measures ANOVA. The influence of training on laboratory- and field-test changes was analyzed by multiple regression. Total training distance varied during the year and was lower in May-July (333 ± 206 km, P = .01) and July-August (339 ± 206 km, P = .02) than in the subsequent January-February period (474 ± 188 km). VO2max increased from the April baseline (4.7 ± 0.4 L/min) in October and January periods (5.0 ± 0.4 L/min, P ≤ .01). Other laboratory measures did not change. Runners' CS was lowest in August (4.90 ± 0.32 m/s) and highest in February (4.99 ± 0.30 m/s, P = .02). Total training distance and the percentage of training time spent above LT velocity explained 33% of the variation in CS. Highly trained endurance runners achieve small but significant changes in VO2max and CS in a year. Increases in training distance and time above LT velocity were related to increases in CS.

  17. Central Line Proficiency Test Outcomes after Simulation Training versus Traditional Training to Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, Ali A; Bhide, Vandana Y; Moss, Jimmy L; Silvers, Scott M; Johnson, Margaret M; Maniaci, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    Studies have shown the importance of simulation-based training on the outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion by trainees. To compare the performance of internal medicine trainees who underwent standardized simulation training of CVC insertion with that of internal medicine trainees who had traditional CVC training and were already deemed competent to perform the procedure during a proficiency evaluation using a training mannequin. Trainees who perform CVC insertion were enrolled in the institutional Central Line Workshop, which includes both an online and an experiential simulation component. The training is followed by a certification station proficiency assessment. Residents and fellows previously certified competent to perform CVC placement without supervision completed the online module, but they could opt out of the experiential component and proceed directly to the evaluation. Forty-eight trainees participated in the study. Twenty-one (44%), 15 (31%), 6 (13%), 1 (2%), 2 (4%), and 3 (6%) were in postgraduate year 1 (PGY1), PGY2, PGY3, PGY4, PGY5, and PGY6, respectively. Twenty-nine completed the hands-on instruction, 28 (97%) of whom successfully passed the simulation-based assessment on their first attempt. Nineteen trainees previously credentialed to perform CVC placement without supervision opted out of the simulation-based experiential training. Of these, five (26%) failed in their first attempt (P = 0.02 vs. trainees who completed the simulation training). Standardized simulation-based training can improve CVC insertion proficiency, even among trainees with previous experience sufficient to have been deemed competent in the procedure. Improved performance at simulation-based testing may translate to improved outcomes of CVC placement by trainees.

  18. Occupant Protection Experiments in Support of a Full-scale Train-to-Train Crash Energy Management Equipment Collision Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-31

    The Federal Railroad Administration sponsored a full-scale train-to-train crash energy management (CEM) technology test that was conducted on March 23, 2006, at the Transportation Technology Center in Pueblo, Colorado. The Volpe National Transportati...

  19. Agility in Team Sports: Testing, Training and Factors Affecting Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Darren J; Gabbett, Tim J; Nassis, George P

    2016-03-01

    Agility is an important characteristic of team sports athletes. There is a growing interest in the factors that influence agility performance as well as appropriate testing protocols and training strategies to assess and improve this quality. The objective of this systematic review was to (1) evaluate the reliability and validity of agility tests in team sports, (2) detail factors that may influence agility performance, and (3) identify the effects of different interventions on agility performance. The review was undertaken in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. We conducted a search of PubMed, Google Scholar, Science Direct, and SPORTDiscus databases. We assessed the methodological quality of intervention studies using a customized checklist of assessment criteria. Intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.80-0.91, 0.10-0.81, and 0.81-0.99 for test time using light, video, and human stimuli. A low-level reliability was reported for youth athletes using the video stimulus (0.10-0.30). Higher-level participants were shown to be, on average, 7.5% faster than their lower level counterparts. Reaction time and accuracy, foot placement, and in-line lunge movement have been shown to be related to agility performance. The contribution of strength remains unclear. Efficacy of interventions on agility performance ranged from 1% (vibration training) to 7.5% (small-sided games training). Agility tests generally offer good reliability, although this may be compromised in younger participants responding to various scenarios. A human and/or video stimulus seems the most appropriate method to discriminate between standard of playing ability. Decision-making and perceptual factors are often propositioned as discriminant factors; however, the underlying mechanisms are relatively unknown. Research has focused predominantly on the physical element of agility. Small-sided games and video training may offer effective

  20. Optimally splitting cases for training and testing high dimensional classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Richard M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We consider the problem of designing a study to develop a predictive classifier from high dimensional data. A common study design is to split the sample into a training set and an independent test set, where the former is used to develop the classifier and the latter to evaluate its performance. In this paper we address the question of what proportion of the samples should be devoted to the training set. How does this proportion impact the mean squared error (MSE of the prediction accuracy estimate? Results We develop a non-parametric algorithm for determining an optimal splitting proportion that can be applied with a specific dataset and classifier algorithm. We also perform a broad simulation study for the purpose of better understanding the factors that determine the best split proportions and to evaluate commonly used splitting strategies (1/2 training or 2/3 training under a wide variety of conditions. These methods are based on a decomposition of the MSE into three intuitive component parts. Conclusions By applying these approaches to a number of synthetic and real microarray datasets we show that for linear classifiers the optimal proportion depends on the overall number of samples available and the degree of differential expression between the classes. The optimal proportion was found to depend on the full dataset size (n and classification accuracy - with higher accuracy and smaller n resulting in more assigned to the training set. The commonly used strategy of allocating 2/3rd of cases for training was close to optimal for reasonable sized datasets (n ≥ 100 with strong signals (i.e. 85% or greater full dataset accuracy. In general, we recommend use of our nonparametric resampling approach for determing the optimal split. This approach can be applied to any dataset, using any predictor development method, to determine the best split.

  1. Carboy Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, Daniel [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These training vary from web-based cyber security training for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  2. Intermittent Testing and Training for High-Level Football Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    players, or if they are not sufficiently specific for the physical football match performance requirements.The results of Study II indicates that the Yo-Yo IR2 test has a high discriminant andconcurrent validity as it both discriminates between players of different within- (top- vs. mid- vs. bottom-teams...... x 35 m, and moderate correlations between Yo-Yo IR2 and IR1 test performances and sprint speed at 20 and 35 m are revealed. Both Study II and III indicate that sub-maximal heart rate (HR) during the Yo-Yo IR tests is related to test performance, and as Study III shows, good reproducibility of sub......-endurance production training is effective and appropriate. The enhanced anaerobic capacities, as expressed through the improved Yo-Yo IR2 performance and acceleration performance, are likely to be of practical significancefor football players as it is shown that top teams have superior capacity in speed...

  3. Sensory submodalities testing in neurolinguistic programming, part of mental training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Teodor GROSU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: this study is part of a larger work, which involves increasing sporting performance by applying mental training techniques – special techniques of neurolinguistic programming. In this case we will discuss some aspects of the test application Jacobson S. (2011. Purpose of study and hypothesis: In neurolinguistic programming (NLP we have studied the relationship between sensory submodalities, in accordance with the Jacobson test (2011. We wanted to check the degree of significance of the mean difference parameters studied and if the materiality result falls within the objective parameters. If ideomotor representations of athletes are completed with multiple sensations of all sensory submodalities such as visual, auditory, kinesthetic, olfactory and gustatory, the possibility of applying the techniques of NLP (neurolinguistic programming will have more effective results. Methods and material: two records were made by using two tests, test1 and test2 on master students of the University “Babes-Bolyai” Cluj-Napoca, from FEFS from APS department (training and sports performance. The statistical indicators were calculated on elements of descriptive statistics and the data is presented using indicators of centrality, location and distribution. Statistical analysis of non-parametric Wilcoxon test was used for sample pairs (data uneven distribution/rank. Materiality tests used was α=0.05 (5%, α=0.01 (1% or α=0.001. Results and deliberations: to detect the correlation between the two variables we used the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (ρ. Statistical analysis was performed using the correlation coefficients Colton’s rule. It was found that no statistically significant differences were observed (p>0.05 in the statistical analysis of sample pairs Jacobson test values (times T1-T2. This is a result of the short timeframe – just one month – for objectives reasons. However, many of them appear in a good and a very good

  4. Balancing standardized testing with personalized training in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aadil Ahmed, Muhammad Abbas Abid, Nasir I Bhatti Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Students pursuing a medical career in the US are subject to standardized testing at regular intervals. These standardized tests not only quantify the milestones students have already achieved, but also define the path for future achievements. The purpose of these examinations is to help students become self-directed, lifelong learners – an essential attribute of a medical professional. However, whether preparing for these examinations actually makes students such disciplined learners needs to be examined. Especially during residency training with its limited time and unpredictable exposure, trainees must learn in the most efficient way for their learning styles, and thus develop attributes that will be helpful to them in their medical career. In this review, we propose that a personalized, learner-centered approach tailored to residents’ educational needs and preferences can not only fulfill learning interests and objectives but also serve as a time-efficient and cost-effective approach for graduate medical education. Keywords: standardized testing, personalized training, surgery

  5. GPS (Global Positioning System) Data Link for Test and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    exercisej. Virst, because GPS -ill be world-wide, the range need I not be tied to a specific piece of real estate ; variety in training is thus; muc...terminal as well. The data bus thus provides a menas for solving two prcblems associated with the use of operational aircraft in tests and instrýA... real -time or near real -time player positions would p..obably be required; this, in turn, would "probably require a GPS set at the range receiving station

  6. Balancing standardized testing with personalized training in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aadil; Abid, Muhammad Abbas; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2017-01-01

    Students pursuing a medical career in the US are subject to standardized testing at regular intervals. These standardized tests not only quantify the milestones students have already achieved, but also define the path for future achievements. The purpose of these examinations is to help students become self-directed, lifelong learners - an essential attribute of a medical professional. However, whether preparing for these examinations actually makes students such disciplined learners needs to be examined. Especially during residency training with its limited time and unpredictable exposure, trainees must learn in the most efficient way for their learning styles, and thus develop attributes that will be helpful to them in their medical career. In this review, we propose that a personalized, learner-centered approach tailored to residents' educational needs and preferences can not only fulfill learning interests and objectives but also serve as a time-efficient and cost-effective approach for graduate medical education.

  7. Monitoring Training Progress During Exercise Training in Cancer Survivors : A Submaximal Exercise Test as an Alternative for a Maximal Exercise Test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Zonderland, Maria L.; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J.

    May AM, van Weert E, Korstjens 1, Hoekstra-Weebers JE, van der Schans CP, Zonderland ML, Mesters 1, van den Borne B, Ros WJ. Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors: a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test? Arch Phys Med Rehabil

  8. Exercise testing and training in people with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, H; Collett, J; Debono, K; Quinn, L; Jones, K; Kelson, M J; Simpson, S A; Playle, R; Backx, K; Wasley, D; Nemeth, A H; Rosser, A; Izardi, H; Busse, M

    2015-02-01

    To explore exercise response in people with Huntington's disease (HD). Experimental observational study with a randomly allocated subgroup before/after interventional study. Community. People with HD (n=30) and a healthy comparator group (n=20). Thirteen people from the HD group were randomly allocated to an exercise training program. Heart rate (HR) and perceived exertion on the Borg-CR10 scale (RPE) during a submaximal cycle ergometer exercise test (three minute unloaded and nine minute 65%-75%HRmaximum phase). Expired air and lactate measures were available for 8 people with HD during the exercise. A 12 week gym and home walking exercise programme (n=13). People with HD achieved a lower work rate at nine minutes (82±42(0-195) v 107±35(50 -185) Watts (phealthy group and did not achieve a steady state HR during unloaded cycling. People with HD also demonstrated higher than expected lactate at three 2.5±2.5(1.1-8)mmo.L-1 and nine 3.8±1.9(1.2-6.6)mmo.L-1 minutes and respiratory exchange ratio at three 0.78±0.03 (0.74-0.81) and nine minutes 0.94±0.11(0.81-1.15). After exercise training there were no changes observed in HR or RPE responses during the exercise test. There was a large variability in the observed metabolic and physiological responses to exercise in people with HD. The observed exercise responses suggest that altered exercise prescription parameters may be required for people with HD and that exercise response and factors' affecting this requires further investigation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Impact of relationships between test and training animals and among training animals on reliability of genomic prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Lund, M S; Sun, D; Zhang, Q; Su, G

    2015-10-01

    One of the factors affecting the reliability of genomic prediction is the relationship among the animals of interest. This study investigated the reliability of genomic prediction in various scenarios with regard to the relationship between test and training animals, and among animals within the training data set. Different training data sets were generated from EuroGenomics data and a group of Nordic Holstein bulls (born in 2005 and afterwards) as a common test data set. Genomic breeding values were predicted using a genomic best linear unbiased prediction model and a Bayesian mixture model. The results showed that a closer relationship between test and training animals led to a higher reliability of genomic predictions for the test animals, while a closer relationship among training animals resulted in a lower reliability. In addition, the Bayesian mixture model in general led to a slightly higher reliability of genomic prediction, especially for the scenario of distant relationships between training and test animals. Therefore, to prevent a decrease in reliability, constant updates of the training population with animals from more recent generations are required. Moreover, a training population consisting of less-related animals is favourable for reliability of genomic prediction. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Comparison of Anxiety Management Training and Desensitization in Reducing Test and Other Anxieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Shelton, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Effects of systematic desensitization and anxiety management training in reducing test anxiety and generalizing to other anxieties were compared. Both desensitization and anxiety management training produced significant reduction of text anxiety, but by follow-up, anxiety management training produced significantly more test-anxiety reduction on…

  11. 49 CFR 1544.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... individual must have completed initial, recurrent, and appropriate specialized training as specified in this... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals... Qualifications When the Aircraft Operator Performs Screening § 1544.407 Training, testing, and knowledge of...

  12. 49 CFR 1546.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... completed initial, recurrent, and appropriate specialized training as specified in this section and the... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals... Carrier Conducts Screening § 1546.407 Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform...

  13. Preparations for a train-to-train impact test of crash-energy management passenger rail equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-16

    Preparations are ongoing for a full-scale train-to-train : impact test of crash-energy management (CEM) equipment, : during which a cab car-led passenger consist, initially moving : at 30 mph, will impact a standing locomotive-led consist. The : coll...

  14. The effect of prevalence of disease on performance of residents and fellows during training for interpreting DBT in a test-train-test observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Christiane M.; Chang Sen, Lauren; Degnan, Andrew; Delic, Joseph; Pai, Sarah; Sagreiya, Hersh; Sparrow, Mark; Thomas, Ernestine; Yannes, Michael; Gur, David

    2017-03-01

    There are no data on the effect of disease prevalence during training for interpreting digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) based screening examinations on the performance of residents and fellows. We assessed the performance of six residents (four after one breast imaging rotation and two after two rotations) and two fellows in breast imaging when interpreting DBT screening examinations in a multi-case, mode balanced, test- train-test retrospective reader study (127 training and 160 testing cases). Half were trained with feedback of verified truth after reviewing each case with low prevalence of disease (13/127) and half with high prevalence (52/128). The pre- and post- training dataset was the same. Performance measures were compared (sensitivity, specificity and AUC). Readers trained with the low prevalence set decreased the overall recall rate of non-cancer cases (FPF from 0.21 to 0.13, post six months of specialty training in each group had no significant changes in sensitivity, specificity, or AUC after training (smallest p>0.07). Both residents with two rotations experience had significant changes in sensitivity and specificity (highest p<0.028), but not in AUC. Early training with low disease prevalence of "what not to recall" should be included during training.

  15. Incremental Validity of New Computerized Aptitude Tests for Predicting Training Performance in Nine Navy Technical Schools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolfe, John H; Larson, Gerald E; Alderton, David L

    2006-01-01

    During their second week of basic training, 4,989 Navy recruits assigned to one of nine technical training schools were administered a battery of six experimental computerized aptitude tests measuring four constructs...

  16. Testing aerodynamic loads caused by trains in the open air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeg, P. [Deutsche Bahn AG, Muenchen (Germany); Bolten, K.A. [Deutsche Bahn AG, Minden (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aerodynamic processes which occur in the vicinity of trains as they move under an open sky or outside of railway tunnels. The application of aerodynamics to railways is not limited to individual components or assemblies of the railway system. Rather, it deals with the broader problem of ensuring safe and efficient interaction between trains, the infrastructure and operations. This article deals in particular with train-induced aerodynamic loads.

  17. Radiological Worker II Training, Course 20301 (Live), Course 12909 (Test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jimmy D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Radiological worker training is the basic building block for any additional radiological training you may receive. Upon completing radiological worker training, you will have the basic knowledge needed to work safely, using proper radiological practices, in areas where radiological hazards exist. You will also have a better understanding of the hazards and responsibilities associated with radiological work to help prevent the carelessness that can occur when working continually with or around radioactive material. This course does not qualify you for any specific radiological work. You may be required to take additional training at individual facilities to address facility- and job-specific hazards and procedures.

  18. Generation of test tasks in the expert-training systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Игорь Леонидович Братчиков

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes methods of generating test tasks that use the knowledge bases of academic disciplines that are formed on the basis of a knowledge production model as well as the apparatus of formal grammars. We present two experimental expert-training systems Formula Tutor and Teoretik, focused mainly on studying the exact sciences. In the Formula Tutor system generation of tasks carried out in two stages: first, by applying the production rules, and then, if necessary, using the outputs in context-free formal grammar. To give tasks to the student familiar forms the apparatus of templates is used. The analysis of student answers is performed by comparing them with the correct answers. If the answer is a mathematical formula it is converted то standard form before comparison. In the Teoretik system production model is also applied. Unlike the first system production rules are used to fix the dependencies of terms of educational discipline. For example, in the course Geometry Ray Dot, Geometric figure shows that to understand the definition of angle the student should know the definition of the ray, dot and geometric figure. The tasks in the system formed by mixing pieces of definitions and provide selectively-constructed answers. Examples in the paper illustrate advantages of described methods.

  19. The response of the lactate minimum test to a 12-week swimming training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Eduardo Zapaterra; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Despite the utilization of lactate minimum test (LMT) in training, its intensity response to training remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to verify alterations of LMT intensity in swimmers during a 12-week training protocol. Eight swimmers were submitted to three LMT assessmen...

  20. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton’s second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable. PMID:28095441

  1. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhi Yang

    Full Text Available A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton's second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable.

  2. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Li, Zhiwei; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton's second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable.

  3. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  4. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  5. Testing and training of the pelvic floor muscles after childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, A; Larsson, B; Pschera, H

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective study of 83 women, two different physiotherapy methods for strengthening the pelvic floor muscles after childbirth were evaluated. The training program was carried out by the patients at home for 12 weeks, starting 8 weeks after spontaneous uneventful delivery. Forty-two women did pelvic floor exercises in accordance with the method presented by Kegel. Forty-one women used standard vaginal cones with weights increasing in 10 g stages from 20 to 100 g, to be retained in the vagina both when standing erect and moving. Pelvic floor muscle strength, defined as the weight in grams of the heaviest cone that could be retained in the vagina, was recorded before and after the 12-week training period. Training with vaginal cones produced significantly better pelvic floor muscle strength than did exercise without cones.

  6. An Experimental Test of the LEADER MATCH Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Dean E.

    Fiedler's Contingency Model of Leadership Effectiveness, which asserts that leadership effectiveness is a function of leadership style and situational context, is the basis for a leadership training program called Leader Match. This study attempts to replicate previous research which has demonstrated improved performance attributable to the Leader…

  7. Developing and Testing a Video Tutorial for Software Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Video tutorials for software training are rapidly becoming popular. A set of dedicated guidelines for the construction of such tutorials was recently advanced in Technical Communication (Van der Meij & Van der Meij, 2013). The present study set out to assess the cognitive and motivational

  8. Effect of the Canadian Air Force training programme on a submaximal exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappagoda, C T; Linden, R J; Newell, J P

    1979-07-01

    Validation of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship as an index of 'cardiorespiratory fitness' requires the demonstration of systematic alterations in this relationship concomitant with interventions designed to alter physical fitness. To fulfil those criteria a longitudinal training/de-training study was undertaken. Previously sedentary adult subjects undertook the Canadian Airforce 5BX-XBX exercise programme. Submaximal exercise tests were performed before and after training, and following several weeks cessation of training. A regression line of submaximal heart rate on submaximal oxygen consumption was calculated from the data of each submaximal exercise test. Alterations in the regression lines were examined for each subject individually by testing statistically for difference in slope and elevation between any pair of lines. Subjects who undertook the training/de-training study demonstrated significant systematic alterations in the elevation of the regression lines concomitant with periods of training and de-training. The reproducibility of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship was examined in two additional groups of subjects. Group A repeated a submaximal test on 3 or 4 successive days; Group B were tested before and after 16 weeks of normal activity. Subjects in Group A demonstrated non significant, random alterations in the regression lines on repeated testing and subjects in Group B demonstrated random, though on occasion significant, alterations in the regression lines. The elevation of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship is therefore a valid index for detecting sequential changes in 'cardiorespiratory fitness' in individual subjects.

  9. Multidimensional Aptitude Battery-Second Edition Intelligence Testing of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Training Candidates Compared with Manned Airframe Training Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , and autism spectrum disorders ) and not on very high functioning populations such as aviators...whether such persons are aeromedically suitable to pursue such a challenging and high-risk occupation. Our current understanding of the psychological ...Retzlaff P, Barto E, Ree MJ, Teachout MS. Standard cognitive psychological tests predict military pilot training outcomes. Aviat Psychol Appl Hum Factors

  10. Reading Test-Taking Strategies in General Training IELTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Vahede

    2015-01-01

    The significance of gaining a better understanding of how test-taking strategies are used has been recognized by researchers. Considering this fact, this study aimed at investigating the test-taking strategies which were employed by IELTS candidates in reading comprehension test. Besides, it tried to take into account the differences among…

  11. Effects of technique-focused training in conjunction with physical readiness training on Army physical fitness test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Mark D; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Gill, Norman W; Shaffer, Scott W

    2017-01-01

    The Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) is a semiannual requirement. While conducting physical readiness training (PRT) is a requirement for all Soldiers, there is no requirement to train Soldiers on techniques that may help to optimize their performance on the APFT. A cohort of 34 officers that attended the Army Medical Department Basic Officer Leadership Course completed a technique-focused training program in conjunction with their required PRT program subsequent to failing one or more events on their initial APFT. The training consisted of a 30-minute video lesson and an individualized performance assessment completed by an Army physical therapist. Upon retest 10 days after the initial test, 27 (79.4%) participants passed the APFT with a mean improvement of 22.3 points on their overall APFT score. When evaluating change in performance by event based on failing the event initially, the observed improvement was an increase of over 9 push-ups, over 11 sit-ups, and nearly 2 minutes on the run event. The addition of a technique-focused training program to an existing PRT program can result in significant short-term improvement for those with substandard APFT performance.

  12. Redirecting learners' attention during training: effects on cognitive load, transfer test performance and training efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merriënboer, J.J.G.; Schuurman, Jan Gerrit; de Croock, M.B.M.; Paas, F.G.W.C.

    2002-01-01

    Cognitive load theory provides guidelines for improving the training of complex cognitive skills and their transfer to new situations. One guideline states that extraneous cognitive load that is irrelevant to the construction of cognitive schemata should be minimised. Experiment 1 (N=26) compares

  13. Applicant Reactions to a Situational Judgment Test Used for Selection into Initial Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Durksen, Tracy L.; Rowett, Emma; Patterson, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    We considered applicants' perceptions of the use of a pilot situational judgment test (SJT) designed for selection into primary and secondary teacher training programs in the UK. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 304 applicants (73% female) to two postgraduate (PGCE) training programs in the 2013-2014 application cycle.…

  14. Could situational judgement tests be used for selection into dental foundation training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, F; Ashworth, V; Mehra, S; Falcon, H

    2012-07-13

    To pilot and evaluate a machine-markable situational judgement test (SJT) designed to select candidates into UK dental foundation training. Single centre pilot study. UK postgraduate deanery in 2010. Seventy-four candidates attending interview for dental foundation training in Oxford and Wessex Deaneries volunteered to complete the situational judgement test. The situational judgement test was developed to assess relevant professional attributes for dentistry (for example, empathy and integrity) in a machine-markable format. Test content was developed by subject matter experts working with experienced psychometricians. Evaluation of psychometric properties of the pilot situational judgement test (for example, reliability, validity and fairness). Scores in the dental foundation training selection process (short-listing and interviews) were used to examine criterion-related validity. Candidates completed an evaluation questionnaire to examine candidate reactions and face validity of the new test. Forty-six candidates were female and 28 male; mean age was 23.5-years-old (range 22-32). Situational judgement test scores were normally distributed and the test showed good internal reliability when corrected for test length (α = 0.74). Situational judgement test scores positively correlated with the management, leadership and professionalism interview (N = 50; r = 0.43, p situational judgement test is designed to test non-cognitive professional attributes beyond clinical knowledge. Most candidates perceived the situational judgement test as relevant to dentistry, appropriate for their training level, and fair. This initial pilot study suggests that a situational judgement test is an appropriate and innovative method to measure professional attributes (eg empathy and integrity) for selection into foundation training. Further research will explore the long-term predictive validity of the situational judgement test once candidates have entered training.

  15. Reading Test-taking Strategies in General Training IELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahede Nosrati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The significance of gaining a better understanding of how test-taking strategies are used has been recognized by researchers. Considering this fact, this study aimed at investigating the test-taking strategies which were employed by IELTS candidates in reading comprehension test. Besides, it tried to take into account the differences among strategies used for different tasks. In order to gather data, two instruments were employed: the think-aloud protocol, and an IELTS reading test. The obtained data were analyzed and interpreted qualitatively by the researcher. The findings indicated that candidates employed 15 different strategies which were categorized in 3 stages, pre-reading, reading, and post-reading stages. Furthermore, it was revealed that test-takers used certain strategies differently, depending on the type of the task. The findings provide a better understanding of strategy use among IELTS candidates and help teachers to improve their approaches toward teaching and learning goals. Keywords: Test-taking Strategy, Test-taker, Reading Comprehension, Language Learning Strategy, IELTS

  16. Effects of basic training on acute physiological responses to a combat loaded run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santtila, Matti; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kraemer, William J; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of an 8-week basic training (BT) with added strength training (ST) or endurance training (ET) on both the performance of a 3K-combat loaded run test and the acute neuromuscular and hormonal responses. All training groups improved (p < 0.001) their run-test times: ST by 12.4%, ET by 11.6%, and normal training (NT) by 10.2%. Significant acute decreases were observed in maximal isometric force of leg extensors (p < 0.01-0.05) in all subject groups following the run. Increases were observed in acute testosterone responses (p < 0.001) after the test in all groups both at pre- and post-training. However, ET and NT demonstrated lower (p < 0.001-0.05) acute post-training serum cortisol responses than ST. In conclusion, the present results indicate that within a demanding BT, the added training for ET and especially ST may be compromised in their adaptation potential due to interference from the demands of BT.

  17. Prerequisites, requirements, stresses and strains, training and performance tests for the horses

    OpenAIRE

    Westermann, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    One aim of this study was to investigate the emphasis (requirements, stresses and strains) and the actual qualifying (training guide, performance test) of horses in EAI. Another aim was to work out proposals for a standardizable quality management for those horses (development of a guideline for the utilisation and training as well as a performance test for horses in EAI, an instructor licence “EAI” for suppliers, additions to the education guidelines within the horse-related apprenticeships ...

  18. Balancing standardized testing with personalized training in surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed A; Abid MA; Bhatti NI

    2016-01-01

    Aadil Ahmed, Muhammad Abbas Abid, Nasir I Bhatti Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Students pursuing a medical career in the US are subject to standardized testing at regular intervals. These standardized tests not only quantify the milestones students have already achieved, but also define the path for future achievements. The purpose of these examinations is to help students become self-directed, l...

  19. Counselors' Test Use Practices: Indicators of the Adequacy of Measurement Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Patricia B.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Surveyed counselors (n=672) about extent to which they incorporate basic principles of good testing practices in work and whether practices are learned in preservice education, in service training, or from reading ethical standards/guidelines. Found that many counselors engaged in good test use practices, adhering to many important test-use…

  20. Personality Testing and Workplace Training: Exploring Stakeholders, Products and Purpose in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Henriette; Kroon, Brigitte; Poell, Rob F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how and why personality tests are used in workplace training. This research paper is guided by three research questions that inquire about the role of external and internal stakeholders, the value of psychometric and practical considerations in test selection, and the purpose of personality test use…

  1. Effect of training with and without a load on military fitness tests and marksmanship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, David P; Ringleb, Stacie I; Naik, Dayanand N; Butowicz, Courtney M

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether military-style training performed while carrying a weighted vest and backpack (Load condition) resulted in superior training adaptations (specifically, changes in military fitness and marksmanship) than did more conventional training (No-Load condition). A total of 33 college-aged men and women (16 Load, 17 No-Load) completed all testing and 9 weeks of training (1 h·d, 4 d·wk). No-Load training consisted of military calisthenics, sprints, agility drills, and running. Load training was similar except that running was replaced with stair climbing, and Load increased across the 9 weeks to 20 kg for women and 30 kg for men. Pretraining and posttraining, all subjects performed an uphill treadmill test with full load to determine peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)peak), the marine physical fitness test (PFT) and combat fitness test (CFT) without load, other fitness tests, and an indoor marksmanship test using a laser-fitted carbine. The marksmanship test was performed with full load and done before and immediately after a 200-m shuttle run performed in 60 seconds. Both groups significantly improved their VO(2)peak, PFT, and CFT scores by similar amounts. Pretraining, shooting score decreased significantly after the 200-m run and then rapidly recovered, with no difference between groups. A similar, but nonsignificant, pattern in shooting scores was seen in both groups posttraining. In conclusion, loaded training did not produce measurable advantages compared with unloaded training in this population. A strenuous anaerobic challenge caused a temporary reduction in marksmanship.

  2. Development of knowledge tests for multi-disciplinary emergency training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, J. L.; Thellesen, L.; Strandbygaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    , 40 out of originally50 items were included in the final MCQ test. The MCQ test wasable to distinguish between levels of competence, and good con-struct validity was indicated by a significant difference in the meanscore between consultants and first-year trainees, as well as betweenfirst......-year trainees and medical and midwifery students. Evaluationof the item–total correlation analysis in the 40 items set revealed that11 items needed re-evaluation, four of which addressed contentissues in local clinical guidelines. A Cronbach’s alpha of 0.83 forreliability was found, which is acceptable...

  3. Monitoring training response in young Friesian dressage horses using two different standardised exercise tests (SETs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Cornelis Marinus; Houterman, Willem; Ploeg, Margreet; Ducro, Bart; Boshuizen, Berit; Goethals, Klaartje; Verdegaal, Elisabeth-Lidwien; Delesalle, Catherine

    2017-02-14

    Most Friesian horses reach their anaerobic threshold during a standardized exercise test (SET) which requires lower intensity exercise than daily routine training. to study strengths and weaknesses of an alternative SET-protocol. Two different SETs (SETA and SETB) were applied during a 2 month training period of 9 young Friesian dressage horses. SETB alternated short episodes of canter with trot and walk, lacking long episodes of cantering, as applied in SETA. Following parameters were monitored: blood lactic acid (BLA) after cantering, average heart rate (HR) in trot and maximum HR in canter. HR and BLA of SETA and SETB were analyzed using a paired two-sided T-test and Spearman Correlation-coefficient (p* horses showed a significant training response based upon longitudinal follow-up of BLA. Horses with the lowest fitness at start, displayed the largest training response. BLA was significantly lower in week 8 compared to week 0, in both SETA and SETB. A significantly decreased BLA level after cantering was noticeable in week 6 in SETA, whereas in SETB only as of week 8. In SETA a very strong correlation for BLA and average HR at trot was found throughout the entire training period, not for canter. Young Friesian horses do reach their anaerobic threshold during a SET which requires lower intensity than daily routine training. Therefore close monitoring throughout training is warranted. Longitudinal follow up of BLA and not of HR is suitable to assess training response. In the current study, horses that started with the lowest fitness level, showed the largest training response. During training monitoring HR in trot rather than in canter is advised. SETB is best suited as a template for daily training in the aerobic window.

  4. A train-to-train impact test of crash energy management passenger rail equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-04

    This paper gives an overview of the in-line full-scale impact tests conducted by the Federal : Railroad Administration and discusses a strategy for preventing override between colliding : equipment. Override of the impacting equipment during a passen...

  5. Developmental Potential of Professional Test as a Method of Training Future Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Neumoeva-Kolchedantseva E.V.

    2018-01-01

    The article is devoted to studying the developmental perspectives of the method of professional test. It offers an understanding of the professional test as a method of «locally immersing» students in professional activities at the stage of university training. It also describes an experience of evaluating professional tests aimed at mastering work actions defined in the professional standard for teachers. The article examines research data on the impact of the professional test on the develo...

  6. A Submaximal Running Test With Postexercise Cardiac Autonomic and Neuromuscular Function in Monitoring Endurance Training Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Ville; Nummela, Ari; Laine, Tanja; Hynynen, Esa; Mikkola, Jussi; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2017-01-01

    Vesterinen, V, Nummela, A, Laine, T, Hynynen, E, Mikkola, J, and Häkkinen, K. A submaximal running test with postexercise cardiac autonomic and neuromuscular function in monitoring endurance training adaptation. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 233-243, 2017-The aim of this study was to investigate whether a submaximal running test (SRT) with postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR), heart rate variability (HRV), and countermovement jump (CMJ) measurements could be used to monitor endurance training adaptation. Thirty-five endurance-trained men and women completed an 18-week endurance training. Maximal endurance performance and maximal oxygen uptake were measured every 8 weeks. In addition, SRTs with postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ measurements were carried out every 4 weeks. Submaximal running test consisted of two 6-minute stages at 70 and 80% of maximum heart rate (HRmax) and a 3-minute stage at 90% HRmax, followed by a 2-minute recovery stage for measuring postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ test. The highest responders according to the change of maximal endurance performance showed a significant improvement in running speeds during stages 2 and 3 in SRT, whereas no changes were observed in the lowest responders. The strongest correlation was found between the change of maximal endurance performance and running speed during stage 3, whereas no significant relationships were found between the change of maximal endurance performance and the changes of postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ. Running speed at 90% HRmax intensity was the most sensitive variable to monitor adaptation to endurance training. The present submaximal test showed potential to monitor endurance training adaptation. Furthermore, it may serve as a practical tool for athletes and coaches to evaluate weekly the effectiveness of training program without interfering in the normal training habits.

  7. Science from evaluation: testing hypotheses about differential effects of three youth-focused suicide prevention trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel; Del Quest, Aisling

    2015-01-01

    As part of an evaluation component of a youth suicide prevention, a quasi-experimental repeated measures design tested hypotheses about two brief suicide prevention gatekeeper trainings (Question, Persuade, Refer [QPR] and RESPONSE) and one longer suicide intervention skills training (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training [ASIST]). All three trainings showed large changes in prevention attitudes and self-efficacy, largely maintained at follow-up. ASIST trainees had large increases in asking at-risk youth about suicide at follow-up. Convergent with other research, modeling and role-play in training are crucial to increased prevention behaviors. Practice and research implications are discussed, including social work roles in suicide prevention and research.

  8. Abbreviated Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training for Test Anxiety among College Students: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, Teresa; Lundervold, Duane A.; Ament, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Effect of abbreviated upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT) on two self-report measures of test anxiety was examined using a quasi-experimental pre-post between groups (N = 20) research design with self-referred college students. At time 1 (T1) assessment, all participants completed the Abbreviated Test Anxiety Scale (ATAS) and were trained…

  9. Evaluation of farmed cod products by a trained sensory panel and consumers in different test settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sveinsdottir, K.; Martinsdottir, E.; Thorsdottir, F.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.; Kole, A.; Thorsdottir, I.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory characteristics of farmed cod exposed to low or conventional stress levels prior to slaughter were evaluated by a trained sensory panel. Consumers in two different settings, central location test (CLT) and home-use test (HUT), also tasted the products and rated them according to overall

  10. Personality testing and workplace training : Exploring stakeholders, products and purpose in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundgren, H.; Kroon, B.; Poell, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how and why personality tests are used in workplace training. This research paper is guided by three research questions that inquire about the role of external and internal stakeholders, the value of psychometric and practical considerations in test

  11. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... air test device must be connected to the end of the train or block of cars that will be nearest to the... connected to other than the end nearest to the controlling locomotive. (c) Except as provided in this..., after which, a Class III brake test shall be performed as prescribed by § 232.211. (1) If the cars are...

  12. Training Probation and Parole Officers to Provide Substance Abuse Treatment: A Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, John A.; Herie, Marilyn; Martin, Garth; Turner, Bonnie J.

    1998-01-01

    The results of field-testing a substance-abuse treatment protocol are reported. Ten probation and parole officers were trained in Structured Relapse Prevention, and 55 clients were treated. Incentives and barriers to treatment are highlighted. The use of this type of field test as a dissemination technique is discussed. (EMK)

  13. Exercise testing, limitation and training in patients with cystic fibrosis. A personalized approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise testing and training are cornerstones in regular CF care. However, no consensus exists in literature about which exercise test protocol should be used for individual patients. Furthermore, divergence exists in insights about both the dominant exercise limiting mechanisms and the

  14. Developmental Potential of Professional Test as a Method of Training Future Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumoeva-Kolchedantseva E.V.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to studying the developmental perspectives of the method of professional test. It offers an understanding of the professional test as a method of «locally immersing» students in professional activities at the stage of university training. It also describes an experience of evaluating professional tests aimed at mastering work actions defined in the professional standard for teachers. The article examines research data on the impact of the professional test on the development of professional competencies (work actions in future teachers. The research involved 50 third- and fourth-year students of the Tyumen State University majoring in «Teacher Education» («Primary School Education».The results confirm the positive dynamics of work actions after the completion of professional tests, which points to the developmental potential of the professional test as a method of training future teachers.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity (ATTACC) Model to User-specified Starting Parameters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Alan

    1999-01-01

    ...) program is a methodology for estimating training and testing land carrying capacity. The methodology is used to determine land rehabilitation and maintenance costs associated with land-based training and other uses...

  16. Testing geoscience data visualization systems for geological mapping and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.; Huffman, J. N.; Forsberg, A. S.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Ivanov, M. A.; Dickson, J. L.; Senthil Kumar, P.

    2008-09-01

    Traditional methods of planetary geological mapping have relied on photographic hard copy and light-table tracing and mapping. In the last several decades this has given way to the availability and analysis of multiple digital data sets, and programs and platforms that permit the viewing and manipulation of multiple annotated layers of relevant information. This has revolutionized the ability to incorporate important new data into the planetary mapping process at all scales. Information on these developments and approaches can be obtained at http://astrogeology.usgs. gov/ Technology/. The processes is aided by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (see http://astrogeology. usgs.gov/Technology/) and excellent analysis packages (such as ArcGIS) that permit co-registration, rapid viewing, and analysis of multiple data sets on desktop displays (see http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/Projects/ webgis/). We are currently investigating new technological developments in computer visualization and analysis in order to assess their importance and utility in planetary geological analysis and mapping. Last year we reported on the range of technologies available and on our application of these to various problems in planetary mapping. In this contribution we focus on the application of these techniques and tools to Venus geological mapping at the 1:5M quadrangle scale. In our current Venus mapping projects we have utilized and tested the various platforms to understand their capabilities and assess their usefulness in defining units, establishing stratigraphic relationships, mapping structures, reaching consensus on interpretations and producing map products. We are specifically assessing how computer visualization display qualities (e.g., level of immersion, stereoscopic vs. monoscopic viewing, field of view, large vs. small display size, etc.) influence performance on scientific analysis and geological mapping. We have been exploring four different environments: 1) conventional

  17. Stability analysis and testing of a train of centrifugal compressors for high pressure gas injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmott, E.A. [Dresser-Rand Co., Olean, NY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the rotor dynamic stability analysis and the PTC-10 Class 1 test of a three body centrifugal compressor train for high pressure natural gas injection services. This train had a full load full pressure string test on hydrocarbon gases to a final discharge pressure of 500 BAR (7250 PSIA). Each compressor is of the back to back configuration, and is equipped with tilting pad seals, damper bearings, and a honeycomb labyrinth at the division wall with shunt holes. The driver is a gas turbine.

  18. The response of the lactate minimum test to a 12-week swimming training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Zapaterra Campos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the utilization of lactate minimum test (LMT in training, its intensity response to training remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to verify alterations of LMT intensity in swimmers during a 12-week training protocol. Eight swimmers were submitted to three LMT assessments: beginning of the season, T0; after four, T4; and twelve weeks, T12. The LMT consisted of a 200m maximal effort and, after eight minutes of passive rest, five incremental stages of 200m swimming. The intensities of the incremental stages were defined subjectively ("very light," "light," "moderate," "hard," and "all-out". The training was divided in two blocks of periodization: endurance training period (ETP, T0 - T4, and quality plus taper period (QTP, T4 - T12. The LMT intensity of T4 and T12 were significantly higher than T0. We conclude that LMT is modified due to swimming training and can be used for training prescription and detection of aerobic capacity alterations during a season.

  19. [Impact of a training model for the Child Development Evaluation Test in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael; Cruz-Ortiz, Leopoldo Alfonso; Baqueiro-Hernández, César Iván; Martain-Pérez, Itzamara Jacqueline; Palma-Tavera, Josuha Alexander; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; O'Shea-Cuevas, Gabriel; Aceves-Villagrán, Daniel; Carrasco-Mendoza, Joaquín; Antillón-Ocampo, Fátima Adriana; Villagrán-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Vargas-López, Guillermo; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    The Child Development Evaluation (CDE) Test is a screening tool designed and validated in Mexico for the early detection of child developmental problems. For professionals who will be administering the test in primary care facilities, previous acquisition of knowledge about the test is required in order to generate reliable results. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of a training model for primary care workers from different professions through the comparison of knowledge acquired during the training course. The study design was a before/after type considering the participation in a training course for the CDE test as the intervention. The course took place in six different Mexican states from October to December 2013. The same questions were used before and after. There were 394 participants included. Distribution according to professional profile was as follows: general physicians 73.4%, nursing 7.7%, psychology 7.1%, nutrition 6.1% and other professions 5.6%. The questions with the lowest correct answer rates were associated with the scoring of the CDE test. In the initial evaluation, 64.9% obtained a grade lower than 20 compared with 1.8% in the final evaluation. In the initial evaluation only 1.8% passed compared with 75.15% in the final evaluation. The proposed model allows the participants to acquire general knowledge about the CDE Test. To improve the general results in future training courses, it is required to reinforce during training the scoring and interpretation of the test together with the previous lecture of the material by the participants. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. AGR-1 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Lance Cole; Scott Ploger; Philip Winston; Binh Pham; Michael Abbott

    2011-01-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment ended on November 6, 2009, after 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor, achieving a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in March 2010 for post-irradiation examination. The first PIE activities included non-destructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and the graphite fuel holders. Dimensional measurements of the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsules shells were performed using a custom vision measurement system (for outer diameters and lengths) and conventional bore gauges (for inner diameters). Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Neutron radiography of the intact Capsule 2 showed a high degree of detail of interior components and confirmed the observation that there was no major damage to the capsule. Disassembly of the capsules was initiated using procedures qualified during out-of-cell mockup testing. Difficulties were encountered during capsule disassembly due to irradiation-induced changes in some of the capsule components’ properties, including embrittled niobium and molybdenum parts that were susceptible to fracture and swelling of the graphite fuel holders that affected their removal from the capsule shells. This required various improvised modifications to the disassembly procedure to avoid damage to the fuel compacts. Ultimately the capsule disassembly was successful and only one compact from Capsule 4 (out of 72 total in the test train) sustained damage during the disassembly process, along with the associated graphite holder. The compacts were generally in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor

  1. [Training in iterative hypothesis testing as part of psychiatric education. A randomized study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampen-Imkamp, S; Alte, C; Sipos, V; Kordon, A; Hohagen, F; Schweiger, U; Kahl, K G

    2012-01-01

    The improvement of medical education is at the center of efforts to reform the studies of medicine. Furthermore, an excellent teaching program for students is a quality feature of medical universities. Besides teaching of disease-specific contents, the acquisition of interpersonal and decision-making skills is important. However, the cognitive style of senior physicians leading to a diagnosis cannot easily be taught. Therefore, the following study aimed at examining whether specific training in iterative hypothesis testing (IHT) may improve the correctness of the diagnostic process. Seventy-one medical students in their 9th-11th terms were randomized to medical teaching as usual or to IHT training for 4 weeks. The intervention group received specific training according to the method of IHT. All students were examined by a multiple choice (MC) exam and additionally by simulated patients (SP). The SPs were instructed to represent either a patient with depression and comorbid anxiety and substance use disorder (SP1) or to represent a patient with depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and acute suicidal tendencies (SP2). All students identified the diagnosis of major depression in the SPs, but IHT-trained students recognized more diagnostic criteria. Furthermore, IHT-trained students recognized acute suicide tendencies in SP2 more often and identified more comorbid psychiatric disorders. The results of the MC exam were comparable in both groups. An analysis of the satisfaction with the different training programs revealed that the IHT training received a better appraisal. Our results point to the role of IHT in teaching diagnostic skills. However, the results of the MC exam were not influenced by IHT training. Furthermore, our results show that students are in need of training in practical clinical skills.

  2. Factors affecting initial training success of blood glucose testing in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamer, Lisa A; Haller, Rachel L; Thiele, Erica J; Freeman, Hani D; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes can be a problem for captive chimpanzees. Accurate blood glucose (BG) readings are necessary to monitor and treat this disease. Thus, obtaining voluntary samples from primates through positive reinforcement training (PRT) is critical. The current study assessed the voluntary participation of 123 chimpanzees in BG sampling and investigated factors that may contribute to individual success. All subjects participate in regular PRT sessions as part of a comprehensive behavioral management program. Basic steps involved in obtaining BG values include: voluntarily presenting a finger/toe; allowing digit disinfection; holding for the lancet device; and allowing blood collection onto a glucometer test strip for analysis. We recorded the level of participation (none, partial, or complete) when each chimpanzee was first asked to perform the testing procedure. Nearly 30% of subjects allowed the entire procedure in one session, without any prior specific training for the target behavior. Factors that affected this initial successful BG testing included sex, personality (chimpanzees rated higher on the factor "openness" were more likely to participate with BG testing), and past training performance for "present-for-injection" (chimpanzees that presented for their most recent anesthetic injection were more likely to participate). Neither age, rearing history, time since most recent anesthetic event nor social group size significantly affected initial training success. These results have important implications for captive management and training program success, underlining individual differences in training aptitude and the need for developing individual management plans in order to provide optimal care and treatment for diabetic chimpanzees in captivity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pilot program on distance training in spirometry testing - the technology feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowiński, Adam; Romański, Emil; Bieleń, Przemysław; Bednarek, Michał; Puścińska, Elżbieta; Goljan-Geremek, Anna; Pływaczewski, Robert; Śliwinski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Office spirometry has been widely used in recent years by general practitioners in primary care setting, thus the need for stricter monitoring of the quality of spirometry has been recognized. A spirometry counseling network of outpatients clinics was created in Poland using portable spirometer Spirotel. The spirometry data were transferred to counseling centre once a week. The tests sent to the counseling centre were analyzed by doctors experienced in the analysis of spirometric data. In justified cases they sent their remarks concerning performed tests to the centres via e-mail. We received 878 records of spirometry tests in total. Data transmission via the telephone was 100% effective. The quality of spirometry tests performed by outpatients clinics was variable. The use of spirometers with data transfer for training purposes seems to be advisable. There is a need to proper face-to-face training of spirometry operators before an implementation of any telemedicine technology.

  4. [Effects of education and strength training on functional tests among older people with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez S, Christian Edgardo; Fernández G, Rubén; Zurita O, Félix; Linares G, Daniel; Farías M, Ariel

    2014-04-01

    Hip and knee osteoarthritis are important causes of pain and disability among older people. Education and strength training can alleviate symptoms and avoid functional deterioration. To assess muscle strength, fall risk and quality of life of older people with osteoarthritis and the effects of physiotherapy education and strength training on these variables. Thirty participants aged 78 ± 5 years (63% women) were randomly assigned to receive physiotherapy (Controls), physiotherapy plus education (Group 1) and physiotherapy plus strength training (group 2). At baseline and after 16 weeks of intervention, patients were evaluated with the Senior Fitness Test, Timed Up and Go and Quality of Life score short form (SF-36). During the intervention period, Senior Fitness Test and Timed Up and Go scores improved in all groups and SF-36 did not change. The improvement in Senior Fitness Test and Timed Up and Go was more marked in Groups 1 and 2 than in the control group. Education and strength training improve functional tests among older people with osteoarthritis.

  5. Novel methods of inspiratory muscle training via the Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance (TIRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalin, Lawrence P; Arena, Ross

    2015-04-01

    The favorable effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in health and disease are becoming much more apparent. A variety of IMT methods exist, but few studies have compared IMT methods. The purpose of this article is to review the methods and outcomes of the Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance (TIRE).

  6. AGR-2 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploger, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Demkowciz, Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The AGR 2 irradiation experiment began in June 2010 and was completed in October 2013. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in July 2014 for post-irradiation examination (PIE). The first PIE activities included nondestructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and their graphite fuel holders. Dimensional metrology was then performed on the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsule shells. AGR 2 disassembly and metrology were performed with the same equipment used successfully on AGR 1 test train components. Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Disassembly of the AGR 2 test train and its capsules was conducted rapidly and efficiently by employing techniques refined during the AGR 1 disassembly campaign. Only one major difficulty was encountered while separating the test train into capsules when thermocouples (of larger diameter than used in AGR 1) and gas lines jammed inside the through tubes of the upper capsules, which required new tooling for extraction. Disassembly of individual capsules was straightforward with only a few minor complications. On the whole, AGR 2 capsule structural components appeared less embrittled than their AGR 1 counterparts. Compacts from AGR 2 Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6 were in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor damage or markings were visible using high resolution photographic inspection. Compact dimensional measurements indicated radial shrinkage between 0.8 to 1.7%, with the greatest shrinkage observed on Capsule 2 compacts that were irradiated at higher temperature. Length shrinkage ranged from 0.1 to 0.9%, with by far the lowest axial shrinkage on Capsule 3 compacts

  7. Fun During Knee Rehabilitation: Feasibility and Acceptability Testing of a New Android-Based Training Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Spickschen, Thomas Sanjay; Colcuc, Christian; Hanke, Alexander; Clausen, Jan-Dierk; James, Paul Abraham; Horstmann, Hauke

    2017-01-01

    The initial goals of rehabilitation after knee injuries and operations are to achieve full knee extension and to activate quadriceps muscle. In addition to regular physiotherapy, an android-based knee training device is designed to help patients achieve these goals and improve compliance in the early rehabilitation period. This knee training device combines fun in a computer game with muscular training or rehabilitation. Our aim was to test the feasibility and acceptability of this new device. 50 volunteered subjects enrolled to test out the computer game aided device. The first game was the high-striker game, which recorded maximum knee extension power. The second game involved controlling quadriceps muscular power to simulate flying an aeroplane in order to record accuracy of muscle activation. The subjects evaluated this game by completing a simple questionnaire. No technical problem was encountered during the usage of this device. No subjects complained of any discomfort after using this device. Measurements including maximum knee extension power, knee muscle activation and control were recorded successfully. Subjects rated their experience with the device as either excellent or very good and agreed that the device can motivate and monitor the progress of knee rehabilitation training. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first android-based tool available to fast track knee rehabilitation training. All subjects gave very positive feedback to this computer game aided knee device.

  8. A Study to Estimate the Effectiveness of Visual Testing Training for Aviation Maintenance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Lewis Lyle

    2007-01-01

    The Air Commerce Act of 1926 set the beginning for standards in aviation maintenance. Even after deregulation in the late l970s, maintenance standards and requirements still have not changed far from their initial criteria. After a potential candidate completes Federal Aviation Administration training prerequisites, they may test for their Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) certificate. Performing maintenance in the aviation industry for a minimum of three years, the technician may then test for their Inspection Authorization (IA). After receiving their Airframe and Powerplant certificate, a technician is said to have a license to perform. At no time within the three years to eligibility for Inspection Authorization are they required to attend higher-level inspection training. What a technician learns in the aviation maintenance industry is handed down from a seasoned technician to the new hire or is developed from lessons learned on the job. Only in Europe has the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) required higher-level training for their aviation maintenance technicians in order to control maintenance related accidents (Lu, 2005). Throughout the 1990s both the General Accounting Office (GAO) and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) made public that the FAA is historically understaffed (GAO, 1996). In a safety recommendation the NTSB stated "The Safety Board continues to lack confidence in the FAA's commitment to provide effective quality assurance and safety oversight of the ATC system (NTSB, 1990)." The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been known to be proactive in creating safer skies. With such reports you would suspect the FAA to also be proactive in developing more stringent inspection training for aviation maintenance technicians. The purpose of this study is to estimate the effectiveness of higher-level inspection training, such as Visual Testing (VT) for aviation maintenance technicians, to improve the safety of aircraft and to make

  9. CERN Technical training 2008 - Learning for the LHC: Special Workshop demonstrating reliability with accelerated testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Larry Edson’s workshop will show examples of quantitative reliability predictions based upon accelerated testing and demonstrate that reliability testing during the prototyping phase will help ascertain product shortcomings. When these weak points are addressed and the redesigned product is re-tested, the reliability of that product will become much higher. These methodologies successfully used in industry might be exceedingly useful also for component development in particle physics where reliability is of the utmost importance. This training will provide participants with the skills necessary to demonstrate reliability requirements using accelerated testing methods. The workshop will focus on accelerated test design that employs increased stress levels. This approach has the advantage of reducing test time, sample size and test facility resources. The methodologies taught are applicable to all types of stresses, spanning the elec...

  10. CERN Technical training 2008 - Learning for the LHC: Special workshop demonstrating reliability with accelerated testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Larry Edson’s workshop will show examples of quantitative reliability predictions based upon accelerated testing and demonstrate that reliability testing during the prototyping phase will help ascertain product shortcomings. When these weak points are addressed and the redesigned product is re-tested, the reliability of that product will become much higher. These methodologies successfully used in industry might be exceedingly useful also for component development in particle physics where reliability is of the utmost importance. This training will provide participants with the skills necessary to demonstrate reliability requirements using accelerated testing methods. The workshop will focus on accelerated test design that employs increased stress levels. This approach has the advantage of reducing test time, sample size and test facility resources. The methodologies taught are applicable to all types of stresses, spanning the elec...

  11. CERN Technical training 2008 - Learning for the LHC: Special Workshop demonstrating reliability with accelerated testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Larry Edson’s workshop will show examples of quantitative reliability predictions based upon accelerated testing and demonstrates that reliability testing during the prototyping phase will help ascertain product shortcomings. When these weak points are addressed and the redesigned product is re-tested, the reliability of that product will become much higher. These methodologies successfully used in industry might be exceedingly useful also for component development in particle physics where reliability is of utmost importance. This training will provide participants with the skills necessary to demonstrate reliability requirements using accelerated testing methods. The workshop will focus on accelerated test design that employs increased stress levels. This approach has the advantage of reducing test time, sample size and test facility resources. The methodologies taught are applicable to all types of stresses, spanning the electro...

  12. Training and testing ERP-BCIs under different mental workload conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yufeng; Wang, Peiyuan; Chen, Yuqian; Gu, Bin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Ming, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Objective. As one of the most popular and extensively studied paradigms of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), event-related potential-based BCIs (ERP-BCIs) are usually built and tested in ideal laboratory settings in most existing studies, with subjects concentrating on stimuli and intentionally avoiding possible distractors. This study is aimed at examining the effect of simultaneous mental activities on ERP-BCIs by manipulating various levels of mental workload during the training and/or testing of an ERP-BCI. Approach. Mental workload was manipulated during the training or testing of a row-column P300-speller to investigate how and to what extent the spelling performance and the ERPs evoked by the oddball stimuli are affected by simultaneous mental workload. Main results. Responses of certain ERP components, temporal-occipital N200 and the late reorienting negativity evoked by the oddball stimuli and the classifiability of ERP features between targets and non-targets decreased with the increase of mental workload encountered by the subject. However, the effect of mental workload on the performance of ERP-BCI was not always negative but depended on the conditions where the ERP-BCI was built and applied. The performance of ERP-BCI built under an ideal lab setting without any irrelevant mental activities declined with the increasing mental workload of the testing data. However, the performance was significantly improved when an ERP-BCI was built under an appropriate mental workload level, compared to that built under speller-only conditions. Significance. The adverse effect of concurrent mental activities may present a challenge for ERP-BCIs trained in ideal lab settings but which are to be used in daily work, especially when users are performing demanding mental processing. On the other hand, the positive effects of the mental workload of the training data suggest that introducing appropriate mental workload during training ERP-BCIs is of potential benefit to the

  13. On-track test of tilt control strategies for less motion sickness on tilting trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Rickard; Kufver, Björn; Berg, Mats

    2012-07-01

    Carbody tilting is today a mature and inexpensive technology that permits higher train speeds in horizontal curves, thus shortening travel time. However, tilting trains run a greater risk of causing motion sickness than non-tilting ones. It is likely that the difference in motions between the two train types contributes to the observed difference in risk of motion sickness. Decreasing the risk of motion sickness has until now been equal to increasing the discomfort related to quasi-static lateral acceleration. But, there is a difference in time perception between discomfort caused by quasi-static quantities and motion sickness, which opens up for new solutions. One proposed strategy is to let the local track conditions influence the tilt and give each curve its own optimised tilt angle. This is made possible by new tilt algorithms, storing track data and using a positioning system to select the appropriate data. The present paper reports from on-track tests involving more than 100 test subjects onboard a tilting train. A technical approach is taken evaluating the effectiveness of the new tilt algorithms and the different requirements on quasi-static lateral acceleration and lateral jerk in relative terms. The evaluation verifies that the rms values important for motion sickness can be influenced without changing the requirements on quasi-static lateral acceleration and lateral jerk. The evaluation shows that reduced quantities of motions assumed to have a relation to motion sickness also lead to a reduction in experienced motion sickness. However, a limitation of applicability is found as the lowest risk of motion sickness was not recorded for the test case with motions closest to those of a non-tilting train. An optimal level of tilt, different from no tilt at all, is obtained. This non-linear relation has been observed by other researchers in laboratory tests.

  14. Should trained lay providers perform HIV testing? A systematic review to inform World Health Organization guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C E; Yeh, P T; Johnson, C; Baggaley, R

    2017-12-01

    New strategies for HIV testing services (HTS) are needed to achieve UN 90-90-90 targets, including diagnosis of 90% of people living with HIV. Task-sharing HTS to trained lay providers may alleviate health worker shortages and better reach target groups. We conducted a systematic review of studies evaluating HTS by lay providers using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Peer-reviewed articles were included if they compared HTS using RDTs performed by trained lay providers to HTS by health professionals, or to no intervention. We also reviewed data on end-users' values and preferences around lay providers preforming HTS. Searching was conducted through 10 online databases, reviewing reference lists, and contacting experts. Screening and data abstraction were conducted in duplicate using systematic methods. Of 6113 unique citations identified, 5 studies were included in the effectiveness review and 6 in the values and preferences review. One US-based randomized trial found patients' uptake of HTS doubled with lay providers (57% vs. 27%, percent difference: 30, 95% confidence interval: 27-32, p Cambodia, Malawi, and South Africa comparing testing quality between lay providers and laboratory staff found little discordance and high sensitivity and specificity (≥98%). Values and preferences studies generally found support for lay providers conducting HTS, particularly in non-hypothetical scenarios. Based on evidence supporting using trained lay providers, a WHO expert panel recommended lay providers be allowed to conduct HTS using HIV RDTs. Uptake of this recommendation could expand HIV testing to more people globally.

  15. Preliminary Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Electronic Combat Test Capability, Utah Test and Training Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    ECTC tests. Each threat site will be equipped with intrusion alarms. Approximately seven security cameras will be located at key road intersections in...warning of enemy aircraft. A key objective of the ECTC is to evaluate how successfully combinations of "blue" systems work together. Figure 2.1-3...region. Some of the more common rodents in lower elevations are the chisel-toothed kangaroo rat ( Dipodomys microps), the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida

  16. Basketball ability testing and category for players with mental retardation: 8-month training effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Emanuele; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Baldari, Carlo; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Guidetti, Laura

    2012-06-01

    Although sport for athletes with mental retardation (MR) is achieving an important role, the literature concerning basketball tests and training is still poor. The aims of this study were to verify whether the basketball test battery could be an appropriate modality to classify the players in the Promotion (Pro) category, to assess basketball abilities before (PRE) and after (POST) an 8-month training in players with MR in relation to Competitive (Comp) and Pro categories, to analyze the variation of specific basketball abilities based on subjects' MR diagnosis. Forty-one male basketball players with MR (17 Comp and 24 Pro; age range 18-45 years; MR: 15% mild, 54% moderate, 29% severe, and 2% profound) were assessed PRE and POST training through the basketball test battery, which assessed 4 ability levels of increasing difficulty (from I to IV), each one characterized by the analysis of fundamental areas (ball handling, reception, passing, and shooting). Level I was significantly changed after the intervention period regardless of the Category, whereas shooting was affected by the interaction between Category and Intervention. The results showed significant differences between categories in the scores of individual global, level I, level II, level III, and in all fundamental areas. Individual global score in both categories significantly increased. The players of Comp significantly improved in level III, in ball handling, reception, passing, and shooting scores. The players of Pro improved significantly in level II, in ball handling, reception, and passing scores. Individual global, ability levels I-III, and fundamental area scores were negatively correlated to the MR level indicating that the players with a lower MR obtained higher ability scores. In conclusion, it was found that the basketball test battery could be useful for improving and monitoring training in both Comp and Pro players.

  17. Role of Breathing Conditions During Exercise Testing on Training Prescription in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Steidle-Kloc, Eva; Bergamin, Marco; Weiss, Gertraud; Ermolao, Andrea; Lamprecht, Bernd; Studnicka, Michael; Niebauer, Josef

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated whether different breathing conditions during exercise testing will influence measures of exercise capacity commonly used for training prescription in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Twenty-seven patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec = 45.6 [9.4]%) performed three maximal exercise tests within 8 days, but at least 48 hrs apart. Subjects were thereby breathing either room air through a tightly fitting face mask like during any cardiopulmonary exercise test (MASK), room air without mask (No-MASK), or 10 l/min of oxygen via nasal cannula (No-MASK + O2). Cycling protocols were identical for all tests (start = 20 watts, increment = 10 males/5 females watts/min). Maximal work rate (90.4 [33.8], 100.3 [34.8], 107.4 [35.9] watts, P exercise testing resulted in an 18.8% difference in maximal work rate, likely causing underdosing or overdosing of exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Face masks reduced whereas supplemental oxygen increased patients' exercise capacity. For accurate prescription of exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathing conditions during testing should closely match training conditions.

  18. The 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test versus the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1: relationship and sensitivity to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Rabbani, Alireza

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between performance of the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 (Yo-YoIR1) and the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15IFT) and to compare the sensitivity of both tests to training. Fourteen young soccer players performed both tests before and after an 8-wk training intervention, which included 6 sessions/wk: 2 resistance training sessions, 2 high-intensity interval training sessions after technical training (4 sets of 3:30 min of generic running and small-sided games [4v4] during the first and second 4-wk periods, respectively [90-95% maximal HR], interspersed with 3 min at 60-70% maximal HR), and 2 tactical-only training sessions. There was a large correlation between 30-15IFT and Yo-YoIR1 (r = .75, 90% confidence limits [CL] 0.57;0.86). While within-test percentage changes suggested a greater sensitivity to training for the Yo-YoIR1 (+35%, 90%CL 24;45) than for the 30-15IFT (+7%; 4;10), these changes were similarly rated as almost certain (with chances for greater/similar/lower values after training of 100/0/0 for both tests) and moderate, ie, standardized difference, ES = +1.2 90%CL (0.9;1.5) for Yo-YoIR1 and ES = +1.1 (0.7;1.5) for 30-15IFT. The difference in the change between the 2 tests was clearly trivial (0/100/0, ES = -0.1, 90%CL -0.1;-0.1). Both tests might evaluate slightly different physical capacities, but their sensitivity to training is almost certainly similar. These results also highlight the importance of using standardized differences instead of percentage changes in performance to assess the actual training effect of an intervention.

  19. Measured maximal oxygen uptake in a multi-stage shuttle test and treadmill-run test in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, A R; Chia, M Y H; Teh, K C

    2005-09-01

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare the measured maximal oxygen uptake (MVO2max) during the 20 m multi-stage shuttle test (MST) with MVO2max during an incremental treadmill-run test (TRT), and ii) to establish the reliability of MVO2max during MST, in trained athletes. 8 well-trained endurance-athletes (END) and 8 athletes involved in team games (GAM) performed the MST twice (i.e. MST1 and MST2) and the TRT once, in 3 separate sessions. MVO2maxx attained in the MST and TRT was measured using a portable respiratory analyser (model K4 RQ, Cosmed). MVO2max attained in the MST and TRT were significantly different for the END athletes (4.1+/-0.28 vs 4.45+/-0.31 Lxmin-1, P0.05). The 95% limits of agreement for MVO2max in the MST in Lxmin-1 were -0.67 to 0.27. MVO2max in MST1 and MST2 were not significantly different for END athletes (4.18+/-0.39 vs 4.1+/-0.28 Lxmin-1, P>0.05) and GAM athletes (4.01+/-0.55 vs 4.01+/-0.51 Lxmin-1, P>0.05). Reliability indicators for MVO2max in Lxmin-1 for MST test-retest were: typical error (TE)=0.14, coefficient of variation (CV)=3.5 and intra-class correlation (ICC)=0.90. MVO2max in the MST was lower than that measured in the TRT for the END athletes but not for the GAM athletes. Sport-specificity was an important consideration, especially when testing END athletes for VO2max. MVO2max in the MST showed acceptable levels of reproducibility.

  20. Test blueprints for psychiatry residency in-training written examinations in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffas, Eisha M; Sequeira, Reginald P; Namla, Riyadh A Al; Al-Harbi, Khalid S

    2012-01-01

    The postgraduate training program in psychiatry in Saudi Arabia, which was established in 1997, is a 4-year residency program. Written exams comprising of multiple choice questions (MCQs) are used as a summative assessment of residents in order to determine their eligibility for promotion from one year to the next. Test blueprints are not used in preparing examinations. To develop test blueprints for the written examinations used in the psychiatry residency program. Based on the guidelines of four professional bodies, documentary analysis was used to develop global and detailed test blueprints for each year of the residency program. An expert panel participated during piloting and final modification of the test blueprints. Their opinion about the content, weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be sampled in each cognitive category as defined by modified Bloom's taxonomy were elicited. Eight global and detailed test blueprints, two for each year of the psychiatry residency program, were developed. The global test blueprints were reviewed by experts and piloted. Six experts participated in the final modification of test blueprints. Based on expert consensus, the content, total weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be included in each cognitive category were determined for each global test blueprint. Experts also suggested progressively decreasing the weightage for recall test items and increasing problem solving test items in examinations, from year 1 to year 4 of the psychiatry residence program. A systematic approach using a documentary and content analysis technique was used to develop test blueprints with additional input from an expert panel as appropriate. Test blueprinting is an important step to ensure the test validity in all residency programs.

  1. Assessment of a Newly Developed, Active Pneumatic-Driven, Sensorimotor Test and Training Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Haslinger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The sensorimotor system (SMS plays an important role in sports and in every day movement. Several tools for assessment and training have been designed. Many of them are directed to specific populations, and have major shortcomings due to the training effect or safety. The aim of the present study was to design and assess a dynamic sensorimotor test and training device that can be adjusted for all levels of performance. The novel pneumatic-driven mechatronic device can guide the trainee, allow independent movements or disrupt the individual with unpredicted perturbations while standing on a platform. The test-reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Subjects were required to balance their center of pressure (COP in a target circle (TITC. The time in TITC and the COP error (COPe were recorded for analysis. The results of 22 males and 14 females (23.7 ± 2.6 years showed good to excellent test–retest reliability. The newly designed Active Balance System (ABS was then compared with the Biodex Balance System SD® (BBS. The results of 15 females, 14 males (23.4 ± 1.6 years showed modest correlation in static and acceptable correlation in dynamic conditions, suggesting that ABS could be a reliable and comparable tool for dynamic balance assessments.

  2. Pulse-train Stimulation of Primary Somatosensory Cortex Blocks Pain Perception in Tail Clip Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soohyun; Hwang, Eunjin; Lee, Dongmyeong; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2017-04-01

    Human studies of brain stimulation have demonstrated modulatory effects on the perception of pain. However, whether the primary somatosensory cortical activity is associated with antinociceptive responses remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the antinociceptive effects of neuronal activity evoked by optogenetic stimulation of primary somatosensory cortex. Optogenetic transgenic mice were subjected to continuous or pulse-train optogenetic stimulation of the primary somatosensory cortex at frequencies of 15, 30, and 40 Hz, during a tail clip test. Reaction time was measured using a digital high-speed video camera. Pulse-train optogenetic stimulation of primary somatosensory cortex showed a delayed pain response with respect to a tail clip, whereas no significant change in reaction time was observed with continuous stimulation. In response to the pulse-train stimulation, video monitoring and local field potential recording revealed associated paw movement and sensorimotor rhythms, respectively. Our results show that optogenetic stimulation of primary somatosensory cortex at beta and gamma frequencies blocks transmission of pain signals in tail clip test.

  3. Neurocognitive enhancement in older adults: comparison of three cognitive training tasks to test a hypothesis of training transfer in brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strenziok, Maren; Parasuraman, Raja; Clarke, Ellen; Cisler, Dean S; Thompson, James C; Greenwood, Pamela M

    2014-01-15

    The ultimate goal of cognitive enhancement as an intervention for age-related cognitive decline is transfer to everyday cognitive functioning. Development of training methods that transfer broadly to untrained cognitive tasks (far transfer) requires understanding of the neural bases of training and far transfer effects. We used cognitive training to test the hypothesis that far transfer is associated with altered attentional control demands mediated by the dorsal attention network and trained sensory cortex. In an exploratory study, we randomly assigned 42 healthy older adults to six weeks of training on Brain Fitness (BF-auditory perception), Space Fortress (SF-visuomotor/working memory), or Rise of Nations (RON-strategic reasoning). Before and after training, cognitive performance, diffusion-derived white matter integrity, and functional connectivity of the superior parietal cortex (SPC) were assessed. We found the strongest effects from BF training, which transferred to everyday problem solving and reasoning and selectively changed integrity of occipito-temporal white matter associated with improvement on untrained everyday problem solving. These results show that cognitive gain from auditory perception training depends on heightened white matter integrity in the ventral attention network. In BF and SF (which also transferred positively), a decrease in functional connectivity between SPC and inferior temporal lobe (ITL) was observed compared to RON-which did not transfer to untrained cognitive function. These findings highlight the importance for cognitive training of top-down control of sensory processing by the dorsal attention network. Altered brain connectivity - observed in the two training tasks that showed far transfer effects - may be a marker for training success. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical Training Outcome Predictions With Biomechanics, Part I: Army Physical Fitness Test Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sih, Bryant L; Negus, Charles H

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) is the first step in preparing soldier trainees for the physical demands of the military. Unfortunately, a substantial number of trainees fail BCT due to failure on the final Army Physical Fitness Test (also known as the "end of cycle" APFT). Current epidemiological studies have used statistics to identify several risk factors for poor APFT performance, but these studies have had limited utility for guiding regimen design to maximize APFT outcome. This is because such studies focus on intrinsic risks to APFT failure and do not utilize detailed BCT activity data to build models which offer guidance for optimizing the training regimen to improve graduation rates. In this study, a phenomenological run performance model that accounts for physiological changes in fitness and fatigue due to training was applied to recruits undergoing U.S. Army BCT using high resolution (minute-by-minute) activity data. The phenomenological model was better at predicting both the final as well as intermediate APFTs (R(2) range = 0.55-0.59) compared to linear regression models (LRMs) that used the same intrinsic input variables (R(2) range = 0.36-0.50). Unlike a statistical approach, a phenomenological model accounts for physiological changes and, therefore, has the potential to not only identify trainees at risk of failing BCT on novel training regimens, but offer guidance to regimen planners on how to change the regimen for maximizing physical performance. This paper is Part I of a 2-part series on physical training outcome predictions. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. Reliability of the Single-Visit Field Test of Critical Speed in Trained and Untrained Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Nimmerichter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in adults have shown that the critical intensity during running and cycling estimated from three prediction trials interspersed by 30 min is valid and reliable. To establish the reliability of the single-visit field test to determine critical speed (CS and the distance above critical speed (D′ in adolescents, 29 trained and 14 untrained participants (mean ± SD age: 17.5 ± 0.5 years performed three tests on a 400-m outdoor track separated by 48 h. Each test consisted of three distances selected to result in finishing times between 2 and 15 min that must be completed as fast as possible. CS and D′ were modeled using the linear 1/time model (Speed = D′(1/t + CS. While the coefficient of variation (CV of CS was between 2.4% and 4.3%, the CV of D′ was 9.3% to 13.6%. Also the intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.919 to 0.983 for CS and from 0.325 to 0.828 for D′. The results show that the single-visit field test provides reliable estimates of CS but not D′ in trained and untrained adolescents.

  6. The role of cardiopulmonary exercise test for individualized exercise training recommendation in young obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hoble

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is affecting a growing segment of the population and should be considered a serious health problem which will lead to medical complications and decreased life span. Lifestyle changes by adopting healthy food and increase energy consumption through physical activity is the most important treatment for obesity. Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET is considered the gold standard for exercise capacity assessment. Purpose: This study is aiming to demonstrate that individualized exercise training programs, designed using CPET results, leads to increase of physical fitness, aerobic capacity, ventilatory and cardiac exercise performance in young obese subjects.Material and method:We performed a prospective research study of 6 months. 43 sedentary subjects without contraindications to exercise, 21.3±3.1 years old, 93% female were included in the study. Assessments were made at baseline and after six months of intervention and consists of cardiopulmonary exercise test on bicycle ergometer. After we recorded oxygen uptake at aerobic threshold (AT, anaerobic threshold (in the range of respiratory compensation point – RCP and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max we designed the training program according to these parameters and individualized heart rate training zones of each subject. Exercise training (60 minutes/session, 3 sessions/week was performed taking in consideration the training zones and using a circuit on cardio devices. Each subject was supervised by a physiotherapist and using heart rate monitors. The number of subjects evaluated at the end of the study was 27 (dropout rate 37%.Results:After six months of intervention we noticed an improvement of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max (from 22.7±3.69 to 27.44±5.55, aerobic threshold (VO2_AT (from 15.48±2.66 to 20.07±4.64 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001 and anaerobic threshold (VO2_RCP (from 20.3±3.66 to 25.11±5.84 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001, cardiac performance during exercise evaluated trough maximal oxygen

  7. Joint Installed System Test Facility (JISTF) Infrared Sensor Simulation/Stimulation Enhancement: Dynamic Virtual Reality Simulation/Stimulation Technologies for Test, Evaluaiton, and Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joyner, Tom

    1999-01-01

    ... to maximize use of scarce testing and training investment resources. This paper addresses the capabilities and development of the JISTF IRSS system under the sponsorship of the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD...

  8. An interactive two-step training and management model of point-of-care glucose testing in northern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Liisa; Liikanen, Eeva; Melkko, Tarja; Ebeling, Tapani; Kouri, Timo

    2011-06-01

    To assess an interactive 2-step training and management model for nurses in glucose point-of-care testing (POCT). The training of the nursing staff by the point-of-care coordinator of the laboratory started with interactive sessions with contact persons who subsequently trained their nursing colleagues at the Oulu University Hospital in northern Finland. The 2-step training model was applied in blood glucose testing as a pilot study. Functional quality was assessed through interviews with clinical contact persons and a questionnaire was given to the trained nurses. Technical quality was assessed through control measurements by laboratory and nursing staff. Training succeeded because of basic resources (trainers' knowledge and skills, organized contents of training and place), interpersonal communication and high-quality interactions. Nurses were especially satisfied with the prerequisite training of the contact persons (mean score 1.58, Likert scale from -2 to +2, strongly disagree - strongly agree). Day-to-day repeatabilities of less than 3% were achieved in control measurements by both nursing and laboratory staff. The interactive 2-step training and management model could be implemented in the clinical units using a reasonable amount of laboratory resources. The goal of good functional and technical quality in point-of-care testing in the clinical units was achieved. Despite successful implementation, POCT needs continuous support from the laboratory.

  9. Associations Between Functional Movement Screening, the Y Balance Test, and Injuries in Coast Guard Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosio-Lima, Ludmila; Knapik, Joseph J; Shumway, Richard; Reynolds, Katy; Lee, Youngil; Greska, Eric; Hampton, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Tests that have the ability to predict injuries in various military and athletic populations are important because of the role they could play in primary prevention. Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and Y Balance Tests (YBT) may provide this prognostic ability. This study examined the association between injuries and age, physical characteristics, FMS, and upper and lower body YBTs among Coast Guard Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT) candidates. Thirty-one male Coast Guard Maritime Security Response Team candidates were administered the 7 FMS tests and lower- and upper-body YBTs before their intense 2-month training course. Age, height, weight, and body mass index were also obtained. Physical training-related injuries were recorded during the course. Injury incidence was 41%. Older age and lower scores on either FMS or the upper-body YBT were associated with higher injury risk. Performance of the lower-body YBT was not associated with injury risk. This is the first investigation showing that lower scores on the upper-body YBT were associated with higher injury risk and is in consonance with previous investigations demonstrating associations between lower FMS scores and higher injury risk. Certain limitations need to be addressed. Future studies should determine if FMS and the YBTs have prognostic ability in other populations. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Verification Testing to Confirm VO2max in Altitude-Residing, Endurance-Trained Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherwax, R M; Richardson, T B; Beltz, N M; Nolan, P B; Dalleck, L

    2016-06-01

    We sought to explore the utility of the verification trial to confirm individual attainment of 'true' VO2max in altitude-residing, endurance-trained runners during treadmill exercise. 24 elite endurance-trained men and women runners (age=21.5±3.3 yr, ht=174.8±9.3 cm, body mass=60.5±6.7 kg, PR 800 m 127.5±13.1 s) completed a graded exercise test (GXT) trial (VO2max=60.0±5.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)), and returned 20 min after incremental exercise to complete a verification trial (VO2max=59.6±5.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) of constant load, supramaximal exercise. The incidence of 'true' VO2max confirmation using the verification trial was 24/24 (100%) with all participants revealing differences in VO2max≤3% (the technical error of our equipment) between the GXT and verification trials. These findings support use of the verification trial to confirm VO2max attainment in altitude-residing, endurance-trained runners. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John Dennis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Francine Joyce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  12. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John Dennis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Francine Joyce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  13. Test blueprints for psychiatry residency in-training written examinations in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaffas EM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eisha M Gaffas,1 Reginald P Sequeira,2 Riyadh A Al Namla,1 Khalid S Al-Harbi31Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain; 3King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The postgraduate training program in psychiatry in Saudi Arabia, which was established in 1997, is a 4-year residency program. Written exams comprising of multiple choice questions (MCQs are used as a summative assessment of residents in order to determine their eligibility for promotion from one year to the next. Test blueprints are not used in preparing examinations.Objective: To develop test blueprints for the written examinations used in the psychiatry residency program.Methods: Based on the guidelines of four professional bodies, documentary analysis was used to develop global and detailed test blueprints for each year of the residency program. An expert panel participated during piloting and final modification of the test blueprints. Their opinion about the content, weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be sampled in each cognitive category as defined by modified Bloom's taxonomy were elicited.Results: Eight global and detailed test blueprints, two for each year of the psychiatry residency program, were developed. The global test blueprints were reviewed by experts and piloted. Six experts participated in the final modification of test blueprints. Based on expert consensus, the content, total weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be included in each cognitive category were determined for each global test blueprint. Experts also suggested progressively decreasing the weightage for recall test items and increasing problem solving test items in examinations, from year 1 to year 4 of the psychiatry residence program.Conclusion: A systematic

  14. Locomotor training with body weight support in SCI : EMG improvement is more optimally expressed at a low testing speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Van de Crommert, H. W. A. A.; Rijken, H.; van Kuppevelt, D. H. J. M.; Duysens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Study design: Case series. Objectives: To determine the optimal testing speed at which the recovery of the EMG (electromyographic) activity should be assessed during and after body weight supported (BWS) locomotor training. Setting: Tertiary hospital, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

  15. Locomotor training with body weight support in SCI: EMG improvement is more optimally expressed at a low testing speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Crommert, H.W.A.A. van de; Rijken, H.; Kuppevelt, D.H. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Case series. OBJECTIVES: To determine the optimal testing speed at which the recovery of the EMG (electromyographic) activity should be assessed during and after body weight supported (BWS) locomotor training. SETTING: Tertiary hospital, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

  16. Genetic Testing for Sports Performance, Responses to Training and Injury Risk: Practical and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alun G; Wackerhage, Henning; Day, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses practical and ethical considerations regarding genetic tests to predict performance and/or risk of exercise-related injury or illness. Various people might wish to conduct sport-related genetic tests for a variety of reasons. For example, an individual might seek personal genetic information to help guide their own sport participation. A sports coach might wish to test young athletes to aid team selection or individualize training. A physician might want to predict the risk of injury or illness in athletes and advise regarding selection or preventative measures. An insurance company might seek to estimate the risk of career-threatening injury for athletes based partly on genetic information. Whilst this information is, in part, encoded in our DNA sequence, the available tests allow generally only a poor prediction of the aforementioned variables. In other words, the current genetic tests and analysis methods are not powerful enough to inform important decisions in sport to a substantial degree. It is particularly disappointing that more than half of the commercially available genetic tests related to exercise and sport do not appear to identify publicly the genetic variants they assess, making scrutiny by academic scholars and consumers (or their representatives) impossible. There are also challenging ethical issues to consider. For example, the imposition of genetic tests on individuals (especially young people) by third parties is potentially susceptible to abuse. Scientists and practitioners should understand the limitations of the tests currently available, the ethical concerns and the importance of counselling before and after testing so that they are only used in a responsible manner. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Predictive validity of a written knowledge test of skills for an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, A.W.M.; Jansen, J.J.; Zuithoff, P.; Dusman, H.; Tan, L.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the validity of a written knowledge test of skills for performance on an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice. METHODS: A randomly-selected sample of 47 trainees in general practice took a knowledge test of skills, a general knowledge test and an OSCE. The OSCE

  18. Training level does not influence the rating of perceived exertion during an incremental test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hideki Okano

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Different training levels, combined with experience in performing exhaustive exercise, may produce different sensations of fatigue. The objective of this study was to compare the rating of perceived exertion (RPE between cyclists and non-cyclists during a maximal incremental test (ITMAX. Twenty-three subjects were recruited and divided into a cyclist group (CG (n = 12; age: 26.5 ± 4.7 years, body weight: 68.2 ± 11kg, height: 176 ± 8.6 cm and a non-cyclist group (NCG (n = 11; 25.2 ± 4.0 years, body weight: 72.9 ± 9 kg, height: 175.1 ± 6.3 cm. All subjects per formed an ITMAX unt i l exhaust ion on a cycl ing simulator, start ing at 0 W and with increment s of 20 W.min-1. RPE was measured at 30-second intervals during ITMAX and the maximal power output (PMAX of each subject was also recorded. The total time of each test was normalized to the percentage of completed trial (10% to 100%, intervals of 10%, and the corresponding RPE was recorded. PMAX was 368 ± 12.7 W and 256 ± 11.2 W for CG and NCG, respectively (P < 0.01. No significant difference in median RPE was observed between groups at any time point. In conclusion, RPE responses did not differ between CG and NCG during ITMAX, suggesting that training level does not influence RPE.

  19. THE EFFECT OF CAFFEINE SUPPLEMENTATION ON TRAINED INDIVIDUALS SUBJECTED TO MAXIMAL TREADMILL TEST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicio, Viviane Martins Mana; Fett, Carlos Alexandre; Salicio, Marcos Adriano; Brandäo, Camila Fernanda Costa Cunha Moraes; Stoppiglia, Luiz Fabrizio; Fett, Waléria Christiane Rezende; Botelho, And Clovis

    2017-01-01

    Intense physical training increases oxidative stress and inflammation, resulting into muscle and cellular damage. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of caffeine supplementation on trained young individuals subjected to two treadmill maximal tests. It was a double-blind and crossover study comprising 24 active individuals within the age group 18-30 years. The comparisons were conducted: the effect of exercise (week 1 x 2) and caffeine intake (GC x GP) on thiobarbituric acid (TBARS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) variables during pre-exercise time (30 min. after caffeine or placebo intake) and post-exercise (5 min after treadmill test). The comparison between weeks 1 and 2 showed increase in the first week, in the following items: TBARS, IL-6 and IL-10 in the GC and GP groups. The comparison within the same week showed that GC individuals presented lower post-exercise TBARS values in the first and second weeks; IL- 6 presented higher post-exercise values in the GC group in both weeks. The paired analysis comparing pre- and post-exercise, with and without caffeine showed that IL-6 presented higher post-exercise values in the GC group. Caffeine used by athletes can decrease oxidative stress. The increased IL-6 suggest that this ergogenic supplement may stimulate muscle hypertrophy, since IL-6 has myokine effect. However, the caffeine effect on IL-6 level and muscle hypertrophy increase should be better investigated in future studies.

  20. Test statistics for the identification of assembly neurons in parallel spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picado Muiño, David; Borgelt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years numerous improvements have been made in multiple-electrode recordings (i.e., parallel spike-train recordings) and spike sorting to the extent that nowadays it is possible to monitor the activity of up to hundreds of neurons simultaneously. Due to these improvements it is now potentially possible to identify assembly activity (roughly understood as significant synchronous spiking of a group of neurons) from these recordings, which-if it can be demonstrated reliably-would significantly improve our understanding of neural activity and neural coding. However, several methodological problems remain when trying to do so and, among them, a principal one is the combinatorial explosion that one faces when considering all potential neuronal assemblies, since in principle every subset of the recorded neurons constitutes a candidate set for an assembly. We present several statistical tests to identify assembly neurons (i.e., neurons that participate in a neuronal assembly) from parallel spike trains with the aim of reducing the set of neurons to a relevant subset of them and this way ease the task of identifying neuronal assemblies in further analyses. These tests are an improvement of those introduced in the work by Berger et al. (2010) based on additional features like spike weight or pairwise overlap and on alternative ways to identify spike coincidences (e.g., by avoiding time binning, which tends to lose information).

  1. Test Statistics for the Identification of Assembly Neurons in Parallel Spike Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Picado Muiño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years numerous improvements have been made in multiple-electrode recordings (i.e., parallel spike-train recordings and spike sorting to the extent that nowadays it is possible to monitor the activity of up to hundreds of neurons simultaneously. Due to these improvements it is now potentially possible to identify assembly activity (roughly understood as significant synchronous spiking of a group of neurons from these recordings, which—if it can be demonstrated reliably—would significantly improve our understanding of neural activity and neural coding. However, several methodological problems remain when trying to do so and, among them, a principal one is the combinatorial explosion that one faces when considering all potential neuronal assemblies, since in principle every subset of the recorded neurons constitutes a candidate set for an assembly. We present several statistical tests to identify assembly neurons (i.e., neurons that participate in a neuronal assembly from parallel spike trains with the aim of reducing the set of neurons to a relevant subset of them and this way ease the task of identifying neuronal assemblies in further analyses. These tests are an improvement of those introduced in the work by Berger et al. (2010 based on additional features like spike weight or pairwise overlap and on alternative ways to identify spike coincidences (e.g., by avoiding time binning, which tends to lose information.

  2. Graded Exercise Testing Versus Simulated Competition Exercise in Trained Older Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; Rougoor, Guus; van Kasteel, Paul Y; Greany, John; de Koning, Jos J; Hill, Ethan; Porcari, John P; Allen, Brian; Foster, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-based rehabilitation is a standard therapy for patients with heart disease. Despite examples of patients who have extended normal rehabilitation exercise into competitive participation, there are no clear-cut guidelines for patients whether they should participate in competitive-level exercise. This study investigated the occurrence of complications, physiologic responses, and exercise patterns during simulated competitive exercise in active, older nonathletes (most with a history of cardiovascular disease) and compared these with responses during maximal incremental exercise. Fourteen trained older males, 7 with stable cardiovascular disease, performed an incremental exercise test and time trial of 55 kJ (equivalent to running ∼1 mile) on a semirecumbent stepping ergometer. Variables of gas exchange, hemodynamics, perception, and power output were measured in both tests. Subjects attained a remarkably high physiologic and psychologic strain (respiratory exchange ratio >1.0; average peak rating of perceived exertion >8) in both tests, with no evidence of symptomatic, hemodynamic, or electrocardiographic abnormalities. Peak physiologic responses were not significantly different between simulated competition and incremental exercise. The fixed-work time trial was finished in 8.97 ± 1.85 minutes, mean power output of 100 ± 26 W. Results showed a distinct pacing pattern in the relative power output, consisting of a conservative start, an even-paced middle portion, and an end spurt. Results suggest that in trained individuals with normal incremental exercise test results, competitive-level efforts may be undertaken with no apparent side effects. This may provide a strategy whereby physicians can advise patients concerning their decision to perform in competitive events.

  3. Training-test module in the system of pedagogical control of physical fitness in lower grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Peleshenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to substantiate model characteristics of physical fitness of elementary school students of secondary schools through the introduction of training and test module in the pedagogical control. Material : the study involved 320 boys and 278 girls in grades 1-4 schools in Kharkov number number 57, 112, 166. Results : the level of physical fitness of elementary school students with available motor tests and the results are compared between the experimental data and control classes. Found that the introduction of educational test module in the process of physical education in the experimental classes has enhanced the level of physical fitness. In the experimental classes compared to the control classes, there was an increase of indicators (boys 22.2%, girls 24.6%. Conclusions : the introduction of educational test module in the pedagogical control for primary school pupils, will improve the physical fitness of children in the experimental classes, compared with controls, as well as to determine the averages on basic motor tests that can be used as a model characteristics of physical fitness.

  4. THE RELIABILITY OF 1- AND 3RM TESTS OF UNILATERAL STRENGTH IN TRAINED AND UNTRAINED MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ Hoff

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the 1- and 3RM tests for the modified unilateral squat. Thirty untrained (22 women, 8 men and 22 trained (12 women, 10 men subjects participated in the study. The trained group had a minimum of 1 year lower-body training experience but had not participated in unilateral training prior to the study. After practicing proper technique with light loads, the subjects used the barbell squat to complete a 1- and 3RM pretest and posttest. In each group half of the subjects completed the 1RM tests prior to the 3RM tests while half of the subjects completed the 3RM tests first. A rest period of 48 hours was allowed between each test. Twenty subjects, randomly selected from the two groups, completed a third session of the 1RM test 3 days after the 1RM posttest. Intraclass correlation coefficients were recorded. Differences between pre- and posttest measures were determined by the paired-sample t-test. The 1- and 3RM tests were found to be significantly reliable for trained men, r = 0.98 and r = 0.97, untrained men, r = 0.99 and r = 0.97, trained women r = 0.99 and r = 0.94, and untrained women, r = 0.97 and r = 0.87, respectively. Posttest scores for the 1- and 3RM tests significantly improved above baseline levels in each group (p < 0.05. Strength scores did not significantly increase during the third 1RM test (p = 0.22. The data indicate that the modified unilateral squat can be measured with high reliability using the 1- and 3RM tests. The improved posttest scores indicate that a pretest session should take place before recording baseline measurements

  5. A Rapidly-Incremented Tethered-Swimming Test for Defining Domain-Specific Training Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessôa Filho Dalton M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a tethered-swimming incremental test comprising small increases in resistive force applied every 60 seconds could delineate the isocapnic region during rapidly-incremented exercise. Sixteen competitive swimmers (male, n = 11; female, n = 5 performed: (a a test to determine highest force during 30 seconds of all-out tethered swimming (Favg and the ΔF, which represented the difference between Favg and the force required to maintain body alignment (Fbase, and (b an incremental test beginning with 60 seconds of tethered swimming against a load that exceeded Fbase by 30% of ΔF followed by increments of 5% of ΔF every 60 seconds. This incremental test was continued until the limit of tolerance with pulmonary gas exchange (rates of oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production and ventilatory (rate of minute ventilation data collected breath by breath. These data were subsequently analyzed to determine whether two breakpoints defining the isocapnic region (i.e., gas exchange threshold and respiratory compensation point were present. We also determined the peak rate of O2 uptake and exercise economy during the incremental test. The gas exchange threshold and respiratory compensation point were observed for each test such that the associated metabolic rates, which bound the heavy-intensity domain during constant-work-rate exercise, could be determined. Significant correlations (Spearman’s were observed for exercise economy along with (a peak rate of oxygen uptake (ρ = .562; p < 0.025, and (b metabolic rate at gas exchange threshold (ρ = −.759; p < 0.005. A rapidly-incremented tethered-swimming test allows for determination of the metabolic rates that define zones for domain-specific constant-work-rate training.

  6. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 as a high intensity training tool: aerobic and anaerobic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Callan, Louise; Donohoe, Jessica; Melican, Ruth; Holden, Sinéad

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of using the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) as a high intensity training tool for sedentary university female students. Baseline measures were recorded for body fat percentage, Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) peak power and mean power, and Yo-Yo IR1 performance. Subjects were matched in pairs for body fat percentage and then randomly allocated to the intervention group (INT) (n=12) or control group (CON) (n=13). The INT undertook a 6-week training programme twice a week using the Yo-Yo IR1. The CON undertook no training. The INT increased their Yo-Yo IR1 performance (230±38m baseline vs 403±152m post-training), WAnT peak power (970±176 Watts baseline vs 1148±159 Watts post-training), and WAnT mean power (399±55 Watts baseline vs 439±53 Watts post-training) (p0.05). The results of this study show that a 6-week high intensity intermittent training programme using the Yo-Yo IR1 as a training intervention increases both aerobic and anaerobic capacity in a sedentary female population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The development and testing of a unique and flexible training module for residents and fellows using digital breast tomosythesis (DBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Christiane M.; Drescher, John; King, Jill L.; Logue, Durwin; Klym, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2017-03-01

    The transition from FFDM to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) necessitates new approaches for training radiology residents and fellows that highlight depiction differences between the same abnormalities on the two modalities. We developed a unique, flexible training module that enables training with complete feedback, as well as testing performance before and after use of this training module. Currently, 219 examinations, with priors and other relevant information, are included. Using a special interface to the Secure View workstation (Hologic), we developed a management program that displays each case in a randomized manner and in a sequential mode (i.e. FFDM first followed by FFDM+DBT) and allows the reader to rate the case followed by viewing the images side by side with results of the full imaging based history (reporting) by the screening interpreter, the diagnostic workup interpreter (when applicable), and the actual pathology (biopsy and/or surgical). This approach allows the reader to review their correct and/or incorrect interpretation at each step of the management decision making. The module also has sets of pre- and post-training cases, allowing for a test-train-test study to be performed, if so desired. Two observer studies using 18 radiologists, residents, and fellows have been performed using this module, to date. The training module was assembled, tested, and implemented. We found it to be extremely flexible and useful in training. After completing two observer performance studies, the module was installed in our clinical facility and is currently being used to train residents and fellows at their own pace. All users found this module to be useful and extremely informative.

  8. Interactive internet-based clinical education: an efficient and cost-savings approach to point-of-care test training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Herschel; Chan, Kee; Anaya, Henry D; Goetz, Matthew B

    2011-06-01

    We successfully created and implemented an effective HIV rapid testing training and certification curriculum using traditional in-person training at multiple sites within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. Considering the multitude of geographically remote facilities in the nationwide VA system, coupled with the expansion of HIV diagnostics, we developed an alternate training method that is affordable, efficient, and effective. Using materials initially developed for in-person HIV rapid test in-services, we used a distance learning model to offer this training via live audiovisual online technology to educate clinicians at a remote outpatient primary care VA facility. Participants' evaluation metrics showed that this form of remote education is equivalent to in-person training; additionally, HIV testing rates increased considerably in the months following this intervention. Although there is a one-time setup cost associated with this remote training protocol, there is potential cost savings associated with the point-of-care nurse manager's time productivity by using the Internet in-service learning module for teaching HIV rapid testing. If additional in-service training modules are developed into Internet-based format, there is the potential for additional cost savings. Our cost analysis demonstrates that the remote in-service method provides a more affordable and efficient alternative compared with in-person training. The online in-service provided training that was equivalent to in-person sessions based on first-hand supervisor observation, participant satisfaction surveys, and follow-up results. This method saves time and money, requires fewer personnel, and affords access to expert trainers regardless of geographic location. Further, it is generalizable to training beyond HIV rapid testing. Based on these consistent implementation successes, we plan to expand use of online training to include remote VA satellite facilities spanning

  9. The study features of test procedures of students' knowledge on the physical training lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobejnik V.A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to determine the significance of the relationship and special professional skills necessary to detect and correct errors and evaluating students in physical education classes. The surveys were a group of qualified teachers (n = 31 with different pedagogical experience. Each teacher was asked to arrange the professional quality of the places from 1 to 10. It was found that all investigated have a certain quality and a high level of relationship, but they are manifested in different periods of teaching. It is shown that the process of organizing and carrying out checks of expertise includes logically related mental operations which are the basis of test procedures of students' knowledge on the physical training lessons. Found that the most weighty qualities were related to skills: a rating, comment exposed estimate visually identify the error and determine its significance.

  10. Development of Non-hazardous Explosives for Security Training and Testing (NESTT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kury, J.W.; Simpson, R.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Hallowell, S.F. [Federal Aviation Administration, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ (United States). FAA Technical Center

    1996-01-01

    The security force at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) routinely used canines to search for explosives and other contraband substances. The use of threat quantities of explosive for realistic training in populated or sensitive Laboratory areas has not been permitted because of the hazard. To overcome this limitation a series of non-hazardous materials with authentic signatures have been prepared and evaluated. A series of materials has been prepared that have authentic properties of explosives but are non-hazardous. These NESTT materials are prepared by coating a few micron thick layer of an explosive on a non-reactive substrate. This produces a formulation with an authentic vapor and molecular signature. Authentic x-ray and oxygen/nitrogen density signatures are obtained through the appropriate choice of a substrate. The signatures of NESTT TNT and NESTT Comp. C-4 have been verified by instrument and canine (K-9) detection in a Beta Test Program.

  11. Testing and Training of the Eggbeater Kick Movement in Water Polo: Applicability of a New Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorri, Giovanni; Viero, Valerio; Triossi, Tamara; Tancredi, Virginia; Galvani, Christel; Bonifazi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In water polo, many of the technical actions and the contacts with the opponent take place in quasi-vertical floating position using 2 types of lower limb actions: the eggbeater kick is used most often in fighting and passing and the breaststroke kick in jumping and throwing. The aim of this study was to identify a new system to evaluate and to train the eggbeater kick movement and to verify its applicability. Twenty amateur players and 22 elite players participated in the study. A jacket, homemade and easy to make, allowing the application of an overload submerged in water but not hindering breathing or mobility, was used. Standard anthropometry and a test consisting of different trials of the eggbeater kick action until exhaustion with an increasing overload (5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 kg) were collected. Time to exhaustion and the overload estimated maximum value (OEMV) at second 2 were determined for each load. Body weight, height, and lower limb muscle performance of the elite and nonelite players were significantly different from each other (p ≤ 0.05). The effectiveness of the different measured variables in both subgroups and that of the OEMV was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Areas under the ROC curve for the different overloads were 0.72 (0.53-0.92) for 5 kg, 0.80 (0.68-0.90) for 7.5 kg, 0.87 (0.77-0.91) for 10 kg, and 0.88 (0.84-0.92) for 12.5 kg overload. Our results show that the test is sensitive enough and therefore can be used to plan and control training and injury recovery.

  12. Numerical simulations of LNG vapor dispersion in Brayton Fire Training Field tests with ANSYS CFX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ruifeng; Ng, Dedy; Cormier, Benjamin R; Mannan, M Sam

    2010-11-15

    Federal safety regulations require the use of validated consequence models to determine the vapor cloud dispersion exclusion zones for accidental liquefied natural gas (LNG) releases. One tool that is being developed in industry for exclusion zone determination and LNG vapor dispersion modeling is computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This paper uses the ANSYS CFX CFD code to model LNG vapor dispersion in the atmosphere. Discussed are important parameters that are essential inputs to the ANSYS CFX simulations, including the atmospheric conditions, LNG evaporation rate and pool area, turbulence in the source term, ground surface temperature and roughness height, and effects of obstacles. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to illustrate uncertainties in the simulation results arising from the mesh size and source term turbulence intensity. In addition, a set of medium-scale LNG spill tests were performed at the Brayton Fire Training Field to collect data for validating the ANSYS CFX prediction results. A comparison of test data with simulation results demonstrated that CFX was able to describe the dense gas behavior of LNG vapor cloud, and its prediction results of downwind gas concentrations close to ground level were in approximate agreement with the test data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Preferred teaching and testing methods of athletic training students and program directors and the relationship to styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Trenton E; Caswell, Shane V

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate differences between athletic training students' and program directors' preferences for teaching and testing methods and (2) to investigate the relationship between style and preferred teaching and testing methods using the Gregorc Style Delineator (GSD) and the Preferred Teaching and Testing Method Inventory (PTTMI). We cluster sampled 200 undergraduate students (100% return; 68 men, 132 women; mean age, 20.12 +/- 2.02 yrs) and simple random sampled 100 program directors (43% return; 22 men, 21 women; mean age, 40.05 +/- 9.30 yrs) from Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited athletic training education programs. We used a correlational research design to compare the preferred teaching and testing methods of undergraduate students and program directors. All subjects completed a demographic survey, the GSD, and the PTTMI. Our analyses included two separate 2 (role: student and program director) x 8 (method: teaching or testing techniques) and two separate 4 (style: concrete sequential, abstract sequential, abstract random, concrete random) x 8 (method: teaching and testing techniques) mixed-model analyses of variance. We found that athletic training students and program directors had significantly different preferences for teaching (p teaching or testing method. We recommend that athletic training and allied health educators consider implementing pedagogy that accentuates students' styles and consider self and students' preferences for preferred teaching and testing methods as time and topic permit.

  14. Pilot test of cooperative learning format for training mental health researchers and black community leaders in partnership skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, Danielle J; Brannock, Kristen; Breland-Noble, Alfiee; Parrish, Theodore

    2007-12-01

    To support reduction of racial disparities in mental health diagnosis and treatment, mental health researchers and black community-based organization (CBO) leaders need training on how to engage in collaborative research partnerships. In this study, we pilot tested a series of partnership skills training modules for researchers and CBO leaders in a collaborative learning format. Two different sets of three modules, designed for separate training of researchers and CBO leaders, covered considering, establishing and managing mental health research partnerships and included instructions for self-directed activities and discussions. Eight CBO leaders participated in 10 sessions, and six researchers participated in eight sessions. The effectiveness of the training content and format was evaluated through standardized observations, focus group discussions, participant evaluation forms and retrospective pre-/posttests to measure perceived gains in knowledge. Participants generally were satisfied with the training experience and gained new partnership knowledge and skills. Although the CBO leaders were more engaged in the cooperative learning process, this training format appealed to both audiences. Pilot testing demonstrated that: 1) our modules can equip researchers and CBO leaders with new partnership knowledge and skills and 2) the cooperative learning format is a well-received and suitable option for mental health research partnership training.

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Traditional Training Methods in Non-Traditional Training Programs for Adult Learners through a Pre-Test/Post-Test Comparison of Food Safety Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Caleb D.; Burris, Scott; Fraze, Steve; Doerfert, David; McCulloch, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of hot and cold food bars into grocery stores in an effort to capture a portion of the home meal replacement industry is presenting new challenges for retail food establishments. To ensure retail success and customer safety, employees need to be educated in food safety practices. Traditional methods of training are not meeting…

  16. A Quantitative Analysis of the Effect of Resistance Training on Strength Test Score Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-02

    M., Thomakos, P., … Mitrakou, A.(2005). Leptin and adiponectin responses in overweight inactive elderly following resistance training and detraining ...variables that would be thought of as aptitudes. If ATIs occur in resistance training, the interactions must be identified to match people to programs...Chatzinikolaou, A., Leontsini, D., Taxildaris, K. (2005). Strength training and detraining effects on muscular strength, anaerobic power, and mobility

  17. Scaling Up Psychological Treatments: A Countrywide Test of the Online Training of Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairburn, Christopher G; Allen, Elizabeth; Bailey-Straebler, Suzanne; O'Connor, Marianne E; Cooper, Zafra

    2017-06-16

    A major barrier to the widespread dissemination of psychological treatments is the way that therapists are trained. The current method is not scalable. Our objective was to conduct a proof-of-concept study of Web-centered training, a scalable online method for training therapists. The Irish Health Service Executive identified mental health professionals across the country whom it wanted to be trained in a specific psychological treatment for eating disorders. These therapists were given access to a Web-centered training program in transdiagnostic cognitive behavior therapy for eating disorders. The training was accompanied by a scalable form of support consisting of brief encouraging telephone calls from a nonspecialist. The trainee therapists completed a validated measure of therapist competence before and after the training. Of 102 therapists who embarked upon the training program, 86 (84.3%) completed it. There was a substantial increase in their competence scores following the training (mean difference 5.84, 95% Cl -6.62 to -5.05; P<.001) with 42.5% (34/80) scoring above a predetermined cut-point indicative of a good level of competence. Web-centered training proved feasible and acceptable and resulted in a marked increase in therapist competence scores. If these findings are replicated, Web-centered training would provide a means of simultaneously training large numbers of geographically dispersed trainees at low cost, thereby overcoming a major obstacle to the widespread dissemination of psychological treatments.

  18. 78 FR 35935 - National Institute for Occupational Health (NIOSH)-Certified B Readers; Training and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... working to update its B Reader training and certification program by developing digital- format training... Reader training and certification program might include the following: I--Knowledge Understand the... abnormalities for parenchymal and pleural disease (c) The meaning of profusion and how to use major/minor...

  19. Situational judgement tests in medical education and training: Research, theory and practice: AMEE Guide No. 100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara; Ashworth, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Why use SJTs? Traditionally, selection into medical education professions has focused primarily upon academic ability alone. This approach has been questioned more recently, as although academic attainment predicts performance early in training, research shows it has less predictive power for demonstrating competence in postgraduate clinical practice. Such evidence, coupled with an increasing focus on individuals working in healthcare roles displaying the core values of compassionate care, benevolence and respect, illustrates that individuals should be selected on attributes other than academic ability alone. Moreover, there are mounting calls to widen access to medicine, to ensure that selection methods do not unfairly disadvantage individuals from specific groups (e.g. regarding ethnicity or socio-economic status), so that the future workforce adequately represents society as a whole. These drivers necessitate a method of assessment that allows individuals to be selected on important non-academic attributes that are desirable in healthcare professionals, in a fair, reliable and valid way. What are SJTs? Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are tests used to assess individuals' reactions to a number of hypothetical role-relevant scenarios, which reflect situations candidates are likely to encounter in the target role. These scenarios are based on a detailed analysis of the role and should be developed in collaboration with subject matter experts, in order to accurately assess the key attributes that are associated with competent performance. From a theoretical perspective, SJTs are believed to measure prosocial Implicit Trait Policies (ITPs), which are shaped by socialisation processes that teach the utility of expressing certain traits in different settings such as agreeable expressions (e.g. helping others in need), or disagreeable actions (e.g. advancing ones own interest at others, expense). Are SJTs reliable, valid and fair? Several studies, including good

  20. Training Vegetable Parenting Practices Through a Mobile Game: Iterative Qualitative Alpha Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Leah; Beltran, Alicia; Buday, Richard; Hughes, Sheryl; O'Connor, Teresia; Baranowski, Janice; Dadabhoy, Hafza R; Diep, Cassandra S; Baranowski, Tom

    2015-07-24

    Vegetable consumption protects against chronic diseases, but many young children do not eat vegetables. One quest within the mobile application Mommio was developed to train mothers of preschoolers in effective vegetable parenting practices, or ways to approach getting their child to eat and enjoy vegetables. A much earlier version of the game, then called Kiddio, was alpha tested previously, but the game has since evolved in key ways. The purpose of this research was to alpha test the first quest, substantiate earlier findings and obtain feedback on new game features to develop an effective, compelling parenting game. Mothers of preschool children (n=20) played a single quest of Mommio 2 to 4 times, immediately after which a semi-structured interview about their experience was completed. Interviews were transcribed and double coded using thematic analysis methods. Mothers generally liked the game, finding it realistic and engaging. Some participants had difficulties with mechanics for moving around the 3-D environment. Tips and hints were well received, and further expansion and customization were desired. Earlier findings were supported, though Mommio players reported more enjoyment than Kiddio players. Continued development will include more user-friendly mechanics, customization, opportunities for environment interaction, and food parenting scenarios.

  1. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Training in Female Athletes: A Systematic Review of Injury Reduction and Results of Athletic Performance Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber Westin, Sue D

    2012-01-01

    Context: Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training programs have been published, but few have assessed the effects of training on both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. Objective...

  2. Testing an empirically derived mental health training model featuring small groups, distributed practice and patient discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrihy, Rachael C; Byrne, Mitchell K; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2009-02-01

    Internationally, family doctors seeking to enhance their skills in evidence-based mental health treatment are attending brief training workshops, despite clear evidence in the literature that short-term, massed formats are not likely to improve skills in this complex area. Reviews of the educational literature suggest that an optimal model of training would incorporate distributed practice techniques; repeated practice over a lengthy time period, small-group interactive learning, mentoring relationships, skills-based training and an ongoing discussion of actual patients. This study investigates the potential role of group-based training incorporating multiple aspects of good pedagogy for training doctors in basic competencies in brief cognitive behaviour therapy (BCBT). Six groups of family doctors (n = 32) completed eight 2-hour sessions of BCBT group training over a 6-month period. A baseline control design was utilised with pre- and post-training measures of doctors' BCBT skills, knowledge and engagement in BCBT treatment. Family doctors' knowledge, skills in and actual use of BCBT with patients improved significantly over the course of training compared with the control period. This research demonstrates preliminary support for the efficacy of an empirically derived group training model for family doctors. Brief CBT group-based training could prove to be an effective and viable model for future doctor training.

  3. Does training respiratory physicians in clinical respiratory physiology and interpretation of pulmonary function tests improve core knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patout, M; Sesé, L; Gille, T; Coiffard, B; Korzeniewski, S; Lhuillier, E; Pradel, A; Tardif, C; Chambellan, A; Straus, C; Matecki, S; Perez, T; Thiberville, L; Didier, A

    2018-01-01

    Lung function tests have a major role in respiratory medicine. Training in lung function tests is variable within the European Union. In this study, we have shown that an internship in a lung function tests laboratory significantly improved the technical and diagnostic skills of French respiratory trainees. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Reliability testing of a portfolio assessment tool for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competency-based education and the validity and reliability of workplace-based assessment of postgraduate trainees have received increasing attention worldwide.Family medicine was recognised as a speciality in South Africa six years ago and a satisfactory portfolio of learning is a prerequisite to sit the national exit exam. A massive scaling up of the number of family physicians is needed in order to meet the health needs of the country.Aim: The aim of this study was to develop a reliable, robust and feasible portfolio assessment tool (PAT for South Africa.Methods: Six raters each rated nine portfolios from the Stellenbosch University programme, using the PAT, to test for inter-rater reliability. This rating was repeated three months later to determine test–retest reliability. Following initial analysis and feedback the PAT was modified and the inter-rater reliability again assessed on nine new portfolios. An acceptable intra-classcorrelation was considered to be > 0.80.Results: The total score was found to be reliable, with a coefficient of 0.92. For test–retest reliability, the difference in mean total score was 1.7%, which was not statistically significant. Amongst the subsections, only assessment of the educational meetings and the logbook showed reliability coefficients > 0.80.Conclusion: This was the first attempt to develop a reliable, robust and feasible national portfolio assessment tool to assess postgraduate family medicine training in the South African context. The tool was reliable for the total score, but the low reliability of several sections in the PAT helped us to develop 12 recommendations regarding the use of the portfolio, the design of the PAT and the training of raters.

  5. Drive-train dynamics technology - State-of-the-art and design of a test facility for advanced development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgley, R. H.; Fleming, D. P.; Smalley, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program for the development and verification of drive-train dynamic technology is described along with its basis and the results expected from it. A central feature of this program is a drive-train test facility designed for the testing and development of advanced drive-train components, including shaft systems, dampers, and couplings. Previous efforts in designing flexible dynamic drive-train systems are reviewed, and the present state of the art is briefly summarized. The design of the test facility is discussed with major attention given to the formulation of the test-rig concept, dynamic scaling of model shafts, and the specification of design parameters. Specific efforts envisioned for the test facility are briefly noted, including evaluations of supercritical test shafts, stability thresholds for various sources and types of instabilities that can exist in shaft systems, effects of structural flexibility on the dynamic performance of dampers, and methods for vibration control in two-level and three-level flexible shaft systems.

  6. [Results of Training for Personnel Involved in Blood-Transfusion Testing Outside of Regular Work Hours at Saga University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Marie; Yamada, Naotomo; Higashitani, Takanori; Ohta, Shoichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing prior to blood transfusion outside of regular hours in many hospitals and clinics is frequently conducted by technicians without sufficient experience in such testing work. To obtain consistent test results regardless of the degree of laboratory experience with blood transfusion testing, the number of facilities introducing automated equipment for testing prior to blood transfusion is increasing. Our hospital's blood transfusion department introduced fully automated test equipment in October of 2010 for use when blood transfusions are conducted outside of regular hours. However, excessive dependence on automated testing can lead to an inability to do manual blood typing or cross-match testing when necessitated by breakdowns in the automated test equipment, in the case of abnormal specimen reactions, or other such case. In addition, even outside of normal working hours there are more than a few instances in which transfusion must take place based on urgent communications from clinical staff, with the need for prompt and flexible timing of blood transfusion test and delivery of blood products. To address this situation, in 2010 we began training after-hours laboratory personnel in blood transfusion testing to provide practice using test tubes manually and to achieve greater understanding of blood transfusion test work (especially in cases of critical blood loss). Results of the training and difficulties in its implementation for such after-hours laboratory personnel at our hospital are presented and discussed in this paper. [Original

  7. Off-season training habits and preseason functional test measures of division iii collegiate athletes: a descriptive report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumitt, Jason; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Manske, Robert C; Niemuth, Paul E; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2014-08-01

    Division III (D III) collegiate coaches are challenged to assess athletic readiness and condition their athletes during the preseason. However, there are few reports on off-season training habits and normative data of functional assessment tests among D III athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine off-season training habits of D III athletes and their relationships to the standing long jump (SLJ) and single-leg hop (SLH) tests. One-hundred and ninety-three athletes (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to the start of their sports seasons. Athletes reported their off-season training habits (weightlifting, cardiovascular exercise, plyometric exercise, and scrimmage) during the six weeks prior to the preseason. Athletes also performed three maximal effort SLJs and three SLHs. Male athletes reported training more hours per exercise category than their female counterparts. Mean SLJ distances (normalized to height) were 0.79 ± 0.10 for females and 0.94 ± 0.12 for males. Mean SLH distances for female athletes' right and left limbs were 0.66 (± 0.10) and 0.65 (± 0.10), respectively. Mean SLH distances for male athletes' right and left limbs were 0.75 (± 0.13) and 0.75 (± 0.12), respectively. Several significant differences between off-season training habits and functional test measures were found for both sexes: males [SLJ and weightlifting (p = 0.04); SLH and weightlifting (p = 0.04), plyometrics (p = 0.05)]; females [SLJ and plyometrics (p = 0.04); SLH and scrimmage (p = 0.02)]. This study provides normative data for off-season training habits and preseason functional test measures in a D III athlete population. Greater SLJ and SLH measures were associated with increased time during off-season training. The findings between functional tests and off-season training activities may be useful for sports medicine professionals and strength coaches when designing their preseason training programs. 4.

  8. Developing and pilot testing a comprehensive health literacy communication training for health professionals in three European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, Marise S; Sixsmith, Jane; Koot, Jaap A R; Meijering, Louise B; van Twillert, Sacha; Giammarchi, Cinzia; Bevilacqua, Roberta; Barry, Margaret M; Doyle, Priscilla; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; de Winter, Andrea F

    2018-01-01

    Skills to address different health literacy problems are lacking among health professionals. We sought to develop and pilot test a comprehensive health literacy communication training for various health professionals in Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Thirty health professionals participated in the study. A literature review focused on evidence-informed training-components. Focus group discussions (FGDs) explored perspectives from seventeen professionals on a prototype-program, and feedback from thirteen professionals following pilot-training. Pre-post questionnaires assessed self-rated health literacy communication skills. The literature review yielded five training-components to address functional, interactive and critical health literacy: health literacy education, gathering and providing information, shared decision-making, enabling self-management, and supporting behaviour change. In FGDs, professionals endorsed the prototype-program and reported that the pilot-training increased knowledge and patient-centred communication skills in addressing health literacy, as shown by self-rated pre-post questionnaires. A comprehensive training for health professionals in three European countries enhances perceived skills to address functional, interactive and critical health literacy. This training has potential for wider application in education and practice in Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A test of two training interventions to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucett, Julia; Garry, Mary; Nadler, Don; Ettare, Dennis

    2002-07-01

    We investigated, on behalf of a large electronics manufacturer, two types of worker training interventions for their efficacy in preventing unnecessary muscle tension and the symptoms of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The first intervention, Muscle Learning Therapy (MLT), used electromyographic (sEMG) feedback and operant conditioning to decrease muscle tension during complex work tasks. The second intervention used adult learning and cognitive behavioral techniques in small group discussion to advance the worker's capabilities for symptom and stress management and problem-solving. Workers were randomly assigned to a control group or one of the two treatment conditions. Prior to training, baseline data were collected using symptom diaries and sEMG recordings of the trapezius and forearm muscles of the left and right arms. The training interventions were conducted for 6 weeks with reinforcement training provided at 18 and 32 weeks post-baseline. Follow-up data were collected after the initial 6-week training period and at 32 weeks, prior to the reinforcement training. Symptom outcomes demonstrated significant differences at 6 weeks, increasing in severity for the control group and declining modestly for the educational group, with little change for the MLT group. These differences were not maintained at further follow-up. The MLT group was consistently effective in reducing muscle tension in the trapezius areas after 6 and 32 weeks, and was partially effective for the forearms. Further testing is recommended of these training interventions, especially with the inclusion of strategic, periodic reinforcement of the worker's learning.

  10. The effect of safety training involving non-destructive testing among students at specialized vocational high schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim Young Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education amd Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    By examining the safety issues involved in on-site training sessions conducted at specialized vocational high schools, and by analyzing the effects of non-destructive testing (NDT) safety training, this study aims to contribute to ensuring the general safety of high school students. Students who expressed an interest in participation were surveyed regarding current NDT training practices, as well as NDT safety training. A total of 361 students from 4 schools participated in this study; 37.7% (136 students) were from the Seoul metropolitan area and 62.3% (225 students) were from other areas. Of the respondents, 2.2% (8 students) reported having engaged in NDT. As a result of safety training, statistically significant improvements were observed in most areas, except for individuals with previous NDT experience. The areas of improvement included safety awareness, acquisition of knowledge, subjective knowledge levels, objective knowledge levels, and adjustments to existing personal attitudes. Even at absolutely necessary observation-only training sessions, it is crucial that sufficient safety training and additional safety measures be adequately provided.

  11. Effect of yoga training on one leg standing and functional reach tests in obese individuals with poor postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorrakate, Chaiyong; Kongsuk, Jutaluk; Pongduang, Chiraprapa; Sadsee, Boontiwa; Chanthorn, Phatchari

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of yoga training on static and dynamic standing balance in obese individuals with poor standing balance. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen obese volunteers were randomly assigned into yoga and control groups. The yoga training program was performed for 45 minutes per day, 3 times per week, for 4 weeks. Static and dynamic balance were assessed in volunteers with one leg standing and functional reach tests. Outcome measures were tested before training and after a single week of training. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance with Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc statistics was used to analyze the data. [Results] Obese individuals showed significantly increased static standing balance in the yoga training group, but there was no significant improvement of static or dynamic standing balance in the control group after 4 weeks. In the yoga group, significant increases in static standing balance was found after the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weeks. Compared with the control group, static standing balance in the yoga group was significantly different after the 2nd week, and dynamic standing balance was significantly different after the 4th week. [Conclusion] Yoga training would be beneficial for improving standing balance in obese individuals with poor standing balance.

  12. On the importance of the distance measures used to train and test knowledge-based potentials for proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Martin; Koehl, Patrice; Røgen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    geometry (Q* and MT). The corresponding eight potentials were tested on a large collection of decoy sets. We found that it is usually better to train a potential using an intrinsic distance measure. We also found that PPE outperforms PPD, emphasizing the benefits of capturing consistent information...... protein structures into energy values, while potentials from the second class are trained to mimic quantitatively the geometric differences between incorrectly folded models and native structures. In this paper, we focus on the relationship between energy and geometry when training the second class...... of knowledge-based potentials. We assume that the difference in energy between a decoy structure and the corresponding native structure is linearly related to the distance between the two structures. We trained two distance-based knowledge-based potentials accordingly, one based on all inter-residue distances...

  13. The predictive validity of a situational judgement test and multiple-mini interview for entry into postgraduate training in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Rowett, Emma; Hale, Robert; Grant, Marcia; Roberts, Chris; Cousans, Fran; Martin, Stuart

    2016-03-09

    Evidence for the predictive validity of situational judgement tests (SJTs) and multiple-mini interviews (MMIs) is well-established in undergraduate selection contexts, however at present there is less evidence to support the validity of their use in postgraduate settings. More research is also required to assess the extent to which SJTs and MMIs are complementary for predicting performance in practice. This study represents the first longitudinal evaluation of the complementary roles and predictive validity of an SJT and an MMI for selection for entry into postgraduate General Practice (GP) specialty training in Australia. Longitudinal data was collected from 443 GP registrars in Australia who were selected into GP training in 2010 or 2011. All 17 Regional Training Providers in Australia were asked to participate; performance data were received from 13 of these. Data was collected for participants' end-of-training assessment performance. Outcome measures include GP registrars' performance on the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) applied knowledge test, key feature problems and an objective structured clinical exam. Performance on the SJT, MMI and the overall selection score significantly predicted all three end-of-training assessments (r = .12 to .54), indicating that both of the selection methods, as well the overall selection score, have good predictive validity. The SJT and MMI provide incremental validity over each other for two of the three end-of-training assessments. The SJT and MMI were both significant positive predictors of all end-of-training assessments. Results provide evidence that they are complementary in predicting end-of-training assessment scores. This research adds to the limited literature at present regarding the predictive validity of postgraduate medical selection methods, and their comparable effectiveness when used in a single selection system. A future research agenda is proposed.

  14. Factors affecting initial training success of blood glucose testing in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reamer, Lisa A; Haller, Rachel L; Thiele, Erica J

    2014-01-01

    participation of 123 chimpanzees in BG sampling and investigated factors that may contribute to individual success. All subjects participate in regular PRT sessions as part of a comprehensive behavioral management program. Basic steps involved in obtaining BG values include: voluntarily presenting a finger......Type 2 diabetes can be a problem for captive chimpanzees. Accurate blood glucose (BG) readings are necessary to monitor and treat this disease. Thus, obtaining voluntary samples from primates through positive reinforcement training (PRT) is critical. The current study assessed the voluntary...... the entire procedure in one session, without any prior specific training for the target behavior. Factors that affected this initial successful BG testing included sex, personality (chimpanzees rated higher on the factor "openness" were more likely to participate with BG testing), and past training...

  15. Measuring the Effect of Using Simulated Security Awareness Training and Testing on Members of Virtual Communities of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L. Tidwell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Information security (Infosec has become a major challenge for all private and public organizations. The protecting of proprietary and secret data and the proper awareness of what is entailed in protecting this data is necessary in all organizations. How does simulation and training influence virtual communities of practice information security awareness over time and with a variety of security scenarios. Can members of a virtual community be significantly changed in how they respond to routine security processes and attempts to breach security or violate the security policy of their organization? How does deterrence play a role in this prevention and education? A study is planned that will train and test users of a virtual community of practice over a 3 month period of time, via a web interface, and using simulated events, to see if the planned security awareness training will be effective in changing their responses to the events and further testing.

  16. Preschool Social-Emotional Skills Training: A Controlled Pilot Test of the Making Choices and Strong Families Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Natalie W.; Fraser, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to pilot test a multicomponent program designed to prevent aggressive behavior in preschool children. The first program component was comprised of social-emotional skills training. It focused on improving the social information processing and emotional-regulation skills of children. The second component was…

  17. The Effect of Time-Management Training on Test-Anxiety and Self-Efficacy of Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Biook; Jenani, Shalaleh; Ahangari, Saeideh

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effect of time-management training on Iranian EFL learners' test-anxiety and self-efficacy. A quasi-experimental design was used. The study was carried out in Tabriz Azad University and University of Applied Sciences and Technology. Thirty-eight BA students majoring in TEFL who enrolled in the above mentioned…

  18. Testing the effect of medical positive reinforcement training on salivary cortisol levels in bonobos and orangutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Behringer

    Full Text Available The management of captive animals has been improved by the establishment of positive reinforcement training as a tool to facilitate interactions between caretakers and animals. In great apes, positive reinforcement training has also been used to train individuals to participate in simple medical procedures to monitor physical health. One aim of positive reinforcement training is to establish a relaxed atmosphere for situations that, without training, might be very stressful. This is especially true for simple medical procedures that can require animals to engage in behaviours that are unusual or use unfamiliar medical devices that can be upsetting. Therefore, one cannot exclude the possibility that the training itself is a source of stress. In this study, we explored the effects of medical positive reinforcement training on salivary cortisol in two groups of captive ape species, orangutans and bonobos, which were familiar to this procedure. Furthermore, we successfully biologically validated the salivary cortisol assay, which had already been validated for bonobos, for orangutans. For the biological validation, we found that cortisol levels in orangutan saliva collected during baseline conditions were lower than in samples collected during three periods that were potentially stressful for the animals. However, we did not find significant changes in salivary cortisol during medical positive reinforcement training for either bonobos or orangutans. Therefore, for bonobos and orangutans with previous exposure to medical PRT, the procedure is not stressful. Thus, medical PRT provides a helpful tool for the captive management of the two species.

  19. The Impact of Firm-Provided Training on Production: Testing for Firm-Size Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. de Kok (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe returns to firm-provided training depend on many different factors. Firm size is an important indicator of various of these factors, but recent research tends to neglect it. In this study the returns to firm-provided training are estimated, taking account of three possible firm-size

  20. Locomotor training with body weight support in SCI: EMG improvement is more optimally expressed at a low testing speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyns, P; Van de Crommert, H W A A; Rijken, H; van Kuppevelt, D H J M; Duysens, J

    2014-12-01

    Case series. To determine the optimal testing speed at which the recovery of the EMG (electromyographic) activity should be assessed during and after body weight supported (BWS) locomotor training. Tertiary hospital, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Four participants with incomplete chronic SCI were included for BWS locomotor training; one AIS-C and three AIS-D (according to the ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) Impairment Scale or AIS). All were at least 5 years after injury. The SCI participants were trained three times a week for a period of 6 weeks. They improved their locomotor function in terms of higher walking speed, less BWS and less assistance needed. To investigate which treadmill speed for EMG assessment reflects the functional improvement most adequately, all participants were assessed weekly using the same two speeds (0.5 and 1.5 km h(-1), referred to as low and high speed, respectively) for 6 weeks. The change in root mean square EMG (RMS EMG) was assessed in four leg muscles; biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius medialis and tibialis anterior. The changes in RMS EMG occurred at similar phases of the step cycle for both walking conditions, but these changes were larger when the treadmill was set at a low speed (0.5 km h(-1)). Improvement in gait is feasible with BWS treadmill training even long after injury. The EMG changes after treadmill training are more optimally expressed using a low rather than a high testing treadmill speed.

  1. Patient-led training on patient safety: a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V; Winterbottom, A; Symons, J; Thompson, Z; Quinton, N; Corrado, O J; Melville, C; Watt, I; Torgerson, D; Wright, J

    2013-09-01

    Training in patient safety is an important element of medical education. Most educational interventions on patient safety training adopt a 'health-professional lens' with limited consideration on the impact of safety lapses on the patient and their families and little or no involvement of patients in the design or delivery of the training. This paper describes a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a patient-led educational intervention to facilitate safety training amongst newly qualified doctors. Patients and/or carers who had experienced harm during their care shared narratives of their stories with trainees; this was followed by a focused discussion on patient safety issues exploring the causes and consequences of safety incidents and lessons to be learned from these. The intervention, which will be further tested in an NIHR-funded randomised controlled trial (RCT), was successfully implemented into an existing training programme and found acceptance amongst the patients and trainees. The pilot study proved to be a useful step in refining the intervention for the RCT including identifying appropriate outcome measures and highlighting organisational issues.

  2. Displaying fairness while delivering bad news: Testing the effectiveness of organizational bad news training in the layoff context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Manuela; König, Cornelius J; Koppermann, Christopher; Schilling, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Although giving bad news at work is a stressful experience, managers are often underprepared for this challenging task. As a solution, we introduce organizational bad news training that integrates (a) principles of delivering bad news from the context of health care (i.e., bad news delivery component), and (b) principles of organizational justice theory (i.e., fairness component). We argue that both the formal and fair delivery of bad news at work can be enhanced with the help of training to mitigate distress both for the messenger and the recipient. We tested the effectiveness of training for the delivery of a layoff as a typical bad news event at work. In 2 studies, we compared the performance of a training group (receiving both components of training) with that of a control group (Study 1, Study 2) and a basics group (receiving the bad news delivery component only; Study 2) during a simulated dismissal notification meeting. In general, the results supported our hypotheses: Training improved the formal delivery of bad news and predicted indicators of procedural fairness during the conversation in both studies. In Study 2, we also considered layoff victims' negativity after the layoff and found that training significantly reduced negative responses. This relationship was fully mediated by layoff victims' fairness perceptions. Despite preparation, however, giving bad news remained a challenging task in both studies. In summary, we recommend that organizations provide managers with organizational bad news training in order to promote professional and fair bad news conversations at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Effects of endurance training on reduction of plasma glucose during high intensity constant and incremental speed tests in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Abreu

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of endurance training on reduction of plasma glucose during high intensity constant and incremental speed tests in Wistar rats. We hypothesized that plasma glucose might be decreased in the exercised group during heavy (more intense exercise. Twenty-four 10-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to sedentary and exercised groups. The prescription of endurance exercise training intensity was determined as 60% of the maximum intensity reached at the incremental speed test. The animals were trained by running on a motorized treadmill, five days/week for a total period of 67 weeks. Plasma glucose during the constant speed test in the exercised group at 20 m/min was reduced at the 14th, 21st and 28th min compared to the sedentary group, as well at 25 m/min at the 21st and 28th min. Plasma glucose during the incremental speed test was decreased in the exercised group at the moment of exhaustion (48th min compared to the sedentary group (27th min. Endurance training positively modulates the mitochondrial activity and capacity of substrate oxidation in muscle and liver. Thus, in contrast to other studies on high load of exercise, the effects of endurance training on the decrease of plasma glucose during constant and incremental speed tests was significantly higher in exercised than in sedentary rats and associated with improved muscle and hepatic oxidative capacity, constituting an important non-pharmacological intervention tool for the prevention of insulin resistance, including type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Sensitivity of the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and cardiac autonomic responses to training in futsal players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Victor H; Pereira, Lucas A; de Souza, Eberton A; Leicht, Anthony S; Bertollo, Maurizio; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the sensitivity of maximal (Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery [IR] 1 and 2) and submaximal (5'-5') tests to identify training adaptations in futsal players along with the suitability of heart-rate (HR) and HR-variability (HRV) measures to identify these adaptations. Eleven male professional futsal players were assessed before (pretraining) and after (posttraining) a 5-wk period. Assessments included 5'-5' and Yo-Yo IR1 and IR2 performances and HR and HRV at rest and during the IR and 5'-5' tests. Magnitude-based-inference analyses examined the differences between pre- and posttraining, while relationships between changes in variables were determined via correlation. Posttraining, Yo-Yo IR1 performance likely increased while Yo-Yo IR2 performance almost certainly increased. Submaximal HR during the Yo-Yo IR1 and Yo-Yo IR2 almost certainly and likely, respectively, decreased with training. HR during the 5'-5' was very likely decreased, while HRV at rest and during the 5'-5' was likely increased after training. Changes in both Yo-Yo IR performances were negatively correlated with changes in HR during the Yo-Yo IR1 test and positively correlated with the change in HRV during the 5'-5'. The current study has identified the Yo-Yo IR2 as more responsive for monitoring training-induced changes of futsal players than the Yo-Yo IR1. Changes in submaximal HR during the Yo-Yo IR and HRV during the 5'-5' were highly sensitive to changes in maximal performance and are recommended for monitoring training. The 5'-5' was recommended as a time-efficient method to assess training adaptations for futsal players.

  5. Use of a national continuing medical education meeting to provide simulation-based training in temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills: a pre-test post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Edward G; Paparello, James J; Wayne, Diane B; Edwards, Cedric; Hoar, Stephanie; McQuillan, Rory; Schachter, Michael E; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Simulation-based-mastery-learning (SBML) is an effective method to train nephrology fellows to competently insert temporary, non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs). Previous studies of SBML for NTHC-insertion have been conducted at a local level. Determine if SBML for NTHC-insertion can be effective when provided at a national continuing medical education (CME) meeting. Describe the correlation of demographic factors, prior experience with NTHC-insertion and procedural self-confidence with simulated performance of the procedure. Pre-test - post-test study. 2014 Canadian Society of Nephrology annual meeting. Nephrology fellows, internal medicine residents and medical students. Participants were surveyed regarding demographics, prior NTHC-insertion experience, procedural self-confidence and attitudes regarding the training they received. NTHC-insertion skills were assessed using a 28-item checklist. Participants underwent a pre-test of their NTHC-insertion skills at the internal jugular site using a realistic patient simulator and ultrasound machine. Participants then had a training session that included a didactic presentation and 2 hours of deliberate practice using the simulator. On the following day, trainees completed a post-test of their NTHC-insertion skills. All participants were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) previously set at 79%. Trainees who did not reach the MPS were required to perform more deliberate practice until the MPS was achieved. Twenty-two individuals participated in SBML training. None met or exceeded the MPS at baseline with a median checklist score of 20 (IQR, 7.25 to 21). Seventeen of 22 participants (77%) completed post-testing and improved their scores to a median of 27 (IQR, 26 to 28; p < 0.001). All met or exceeded the MPS on their first attempt. There were no significant correlations between demographics, prior experience or procedural self-confidence with pre-test performance. Small sample-size and

  6. Training Materials and Data Requirements for Turret Organizational Maintenance Trainer (TOM-T) Training Test Support Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    protective (mrL-C-5501) Tags, identification TOOLS: Extension, socket wrench, 3/8 inch square drive, 5-inch Handle, socket wrench, ratchet, 3/8 inch square... levur . .. 1i 1t Oat lc iuv . TASK 2.14.24.2 REPLACE CWS CABLE ASSEMBLY AND LEVER (cont’d) 16. Inspect lever for bends or breaks. (If damaged, replace...preformed (front adapter) (four) Packing, preformed (sliptube) (four) Tags, identification (four for each soldier tested) Rags Liquid measure, two quart (two

  7. Sex differences in response to maximal exercise stress test in trained adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomin Åsa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex comparisons between girls and boys in response to exercise in trained adolescents are missing and we investigated similarities and differences as a basis for clinical interpretation and guidance. Methods A total of 24 adolescent females and 27 adolescent males aged 13–19 years underwent a maximal bicycle exercise stress test with measurement of cardiovascular variables, cardiac output, lung volumes, metabolic factors/lactate concentrations and breath-by-breath monitoring of ventilation, and determination of peak VO2. Results Maximum heart rate was similar in females (191 ± 9 bpm and males (194 ± 7 bpm, cardiac index at maximum exercise was lower in females (7.0 ± 1.0 l/min/m2 than in males (8.3 ± 1.4 l/min/m2, P 2 was lower in females (2.37 ± 0.34 l/min than in males (3.38 ± 0.49 l/min, P 2 was normalized to leg muscle mass sex differences disappeared (females: 161 ± 21 ml/min/kg vs. males: 170 ± 23 ml/min/kg. The increase in cardiac index during exercise is the key factor responsible for the greater peak VO2 in adolescent boys compared to girls. Conclusions Differences in peak VO2 in adolescent boys and girls disappear when peak VO2 is normalized to estimated leg muscle mass and therefore provide a tool to conduct individual and intersex comparisons of fitness when evaluating adolescent athletes in aerobic sports.

  8. Magnetic and electric field testing of the French train A Grande Vitesse (TGV). Volume 1 : analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The safety of magnetically levitated (maglev) and high speed rail (HSR) trains proposed for application in the United States is the responsibility of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). A franchise has been awarded to the Texas High Speed Rail...

  9. Test facilities for hybrid and electric drive trains; Stazione di prova sistemi di trazione ibridi ed elettrici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardini, G.; Ciancia, A.; De Andreis, L.; Pagni, G.; Pede, G.; Rossi, E.; Vellone, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1998-12-31

    ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) is conducting a large research and development programme on innovative vehicles with high energy efficiency and low environmental impact. In particular conducts activities on electric and hybrid vehicles. Testing and evaluation activities play a strong role in this programme. A complete characterization chain has been then defined and set up with a network of facilities which covers main testing needs for single components, subsystems and complete vehicles, in simulated and real operating conditions. The test facility which has been realised is able to experiment and fully characterise complete drive-trains (and subsystems) for pure electric and hybrid vehicles. It is composed by a different section for each subsystem: 1) power generation; 2) energy storage and management; 3) driving motors. Each section acts as an experimental island, able to operate alone or jointly with the other sections. In fact, all the sections are remotely controlled and managed in order to create different assembly of the drive-train. The facility has been sized to allow the testing of drive-trains and subsystems of small and medium-sized vehicles (up to minibuses), but an extension to larger vehicles is possible. During 1996 and part of 1997 the Drive train Test Facility has been completed and made operative. This paper mainly presents the final configurations of these novel testing systems with peculiar features and characteristics. [Italiano] ENEA (Ente Nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l`Energia e l`Ambiente) sta conducendo un vasto programma di ricerca e sviluppo sui veicoli innovativi ad alto rendimento energetico e basso impatto ambientale.

  10. A new phase for English teacher education in Italy. Testing and training for Tirocinio Formativo Attivo (TFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Pulcini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is a report on the programme of teacher training education, known nationally as Tirocinio Formativo Attivo (TFA, i.e. Active Educational Training, implemented at the University of Torino in 2012-2013, with particular reference to the training of teachers of English in Italian secondary schools. The novelty of this programme lies in the fact that, compared to the past, for the first time courses were entirely planned and managed by universities. The purpose of this report is to bear witness to a procedure which, in spite of its transitory nature, will contribute to the organization of future teacher education programmes, when they come into force, showing both weak and strong points that emerged throughout this experience. First, the criteria adopted for designing and evaluating competitive admission tests are described. Then the contents of the ELT course offered to trainees are presented and discussed.

  11. Improving communication and practical skills in working with inpatients who self-harm: a pre-test/post-test study of the effects of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Nienke; van Meijel, Berno; Koekkoek, Bauke; van der Bijl, Jaap; Kerkhof, Ad

    2014-03-04

    Differing perspectives of self-harm may result in a struggle between patients and treatment staff. As a consequence, both sides have difficulty communicating effectively about the underlying problems and feelings surrounding self-harm. Between 2009 and 2011, a programme was developed and implemented to train mental health care staff (nurses, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and occupational therapists) in how to communicate effectively with and care for patients who self-harm. An art exhibition focusing on self-harm supported the programme. Lay experts in self-harm, i.e. people who currently harm themselves, or who have harmed themselves in the past and have the skills to disseminate their knowledge and experience, played an important role throughout the programme. Paired sample t-tests were conducted to measure the effects of the training programme using the Attitude Towards Deliberate Self-Harm Questionnaire, the Self-Perceived Efficacy in Dealing with Self-Harm Questionnaire, and the Patient Contact Questionnaire. Effect sizes were calculated using r. Participants evaluated the training programme with the help of a survey. The questionnaires used in the survey were analysed descriptively. Of the 281 persons who followed the training programme, 178 completed the questionnaires. The results show a significant increase in the total scores of the three questionnaires, with large to moderate effect sizes. Respondents were positive about the training, especially about the role of the lay expert. A specialised training programme in how to care for patients who self-harm can result in a more positive attitude towards self-harm patients, an improved self-efficacy in caring for patients who self-harm, and a greater closeness with the patients. The deployment of lay experts is essential here.

  12. Validation of SINERGIA as training tool: a randomized study to test the transfer of acquired basic psychomotor skills to LapMentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano-Cuevas, J L; Sánchez-Margallo, F M; Sánchez-Peralta, L F; Pagador, J B; Enciso, S; Sánchez-González, P; Gómez-Aguilera, E J; Usón-Gargallo, J

    2011-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is commonly used in many surgical procedures but requires a learning process to develop the necessary skills. Virtual reality simulators play an essential role within the training curricula. This paper aims to determine whether training in SINERGIA VR simulator allows novice surgeons to improve their basic psychomotor laparoscopic skills. Forty-two people participated in this study, including 28 unexperience medical students and 14 expert surgeons who developed previously more than 100 laparoscopic procedures. Medical students made a pre-training test in LapMentor II; then, they trained in SINERGIA and they finally accomplished a post-training test in LapMentor II. Experts just made one trial in LapMentor II. A statistical analysis was carried out and results of pre- and post-training tests of novices were compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Pre- and post-training tests of novices were also compared with results of experts with Mann-Whitney U test. Most metrics provided by LapMentor II and included in this study show significant differences when comparing pre- and post-training tests of novices. Analysis of pre-training test of novices and experts results show significant differences in all analyzed metrics for all studied tasks. On the other hand, LapMentor was not able to distinguish between experts and novices after training in SINERGIA for any metric in the camera manipulation task and for some metrics of the other tasks. Training in SINERGIA VR simulator allows improvement of basic psychomotor laparoscpic skills and transferring them to another virtual simulator. Therefore, it could be used in laparoscopic surgery training programs.

  13. Aerobic exercise in adolescents with obesity: preliminary evaluation of a modular training program and the modified shuttle test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Baan-Slootweg Olga H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing activity levels in adolescents with obesity requires the development of exercise programs that are both attractive to adolescents and easily reproducible. The aim of this study was to develop a modular aerobic training program for adolescents with severe obesity, with a focus on variety, individual targets and acquiring physical skills. We report here the effects on aerobic fitness from a pilot study. Furthermore, we examined the feasibility of the modified shuttle test (MST as an outcome parameter for aerobic fitness in adolescents with severe obesity. Methods Fifteen adolescents from an inpatient body weight management program participated in the aerobic training study (age 14.7 ± 2.1 yrs, body mass index 37.4 ± 3.5. The subjects trained three days per week for 12 weeks, with each session lasting 30–60 minutes. The modular training program consisted of indoor, outdoor and swimming activities. Feasibility of the MST was studied by assessing construct validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change. Results Comparing pretraining and end of training period showed large clinically relevant and significant improvements for all aerobic indices: e.g. VO2 peak 17.5%, effect size (ES 2.4; Wmax 8%, ES 0.8. In addition, a significant improvement was found for the efficiency of the cardiovascular system as assessed by the oxygen pulse (15.8%, ES 1.6. Construct validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change of the MST were very good. MST was significantly correlated with VO2 peak (r = 0.79 and Wmax (r = 0.84 but not with anthropometric measures. The MST walking distance improved significantly by 32.5%, ES 2.5. The attendance rate at the exercise sessions was excellent. Conclusion This modular, varied aerobic training program has clinically relevant effects on aerobic performance in adolescents with severe obesity. The added value of our aerobic training program for body weight management programs

  14. Characterization and Fate of Gun and Rocket Propellant Residues on Testing and Training Ranges: Interim Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Recherche Scientifique Centre Eau, Terre, et Environnement 290, de la Couronne Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 CANADA Peter Woods British Army Training...series of large-column tests have been completed at Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique – Eau, Terre et Environnement . The columns were...Eau, Terre, et Environnement (INRS-ETE). Four lysimeters were used for the sampling of interstitial water (depths: 10, 30, 60 cm, and background

  15. The 30-15 intermittent fitness test: accuracy for individualizing interval training of young intermittent sport players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to gather evidence supporting the accuracy of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15IFT) for individualizing interval training of young intermittent sport players. In 59 young intermittent sport players (age, 16.2 +/- 2.3 years), we observed the relationships between the maximal running speed (MRS) reached at the end of the 30-15IFT (MRS30-15IFT) and physiological variables elicited by shuttle intermittent runs, including maximal oxygen uptake, explosive power of lower limbs, and the ability to repeat intense exercise bouts through cardiorespiratory recovery kinetics during exercise. To observe the capacity of the 30-15IFT to prescribe suitable running intensities for interval training sessions, we compared heart rates (HRs) reached during 3 series of intermittent runs, where distances were set according to the MRS30-15IFT and to MRS reached with 2 popular continuous field tests: the University of Montreal track test and the 20-m shuttle run test. The results show that the MRS30-15IFT is significantly correlated with all physiological variables elicited by shuttle intermittent runs (P intermittent runs, HR recorded during the runs based on MRS30-15IFT presented significantly less interindividual variation than when the continuously determined MRS were used as reference speeds. In conclusion, we can say that the 30-15IFT leads to an MRS that simultaneously takes into account various physiological qualities elicited when performing shuttle intermittent runs. For scheduling interval training sessions, the MRS30-15IFT appears to be an accurate reference speed for getting players with different physiological profiles to a similar level of cardiorespiratory demand and thus for standardizing training content.

  16. Summary of Threatened and Endangered Bat-Related Restrictions on Military Training, Testing, and Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    produced an occasional audible sound of barely detectable levels (1 to 2 dB) in one cave. Other than that, no training sounds were recorded above...Habitat. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Publication 420-004. Stoner, K.E., Karla A. O.-Salazar, Roxana C. R.-Fernández and

  17. Metacognitive training in patients recovering from a first psychosis: an experience sampling study testing treatment effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, Karin; Meijer, Carin J.; Verkerk, Oukje; Ackema, Onno; Krabbendam, Lydia; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive biases, negative affect and negative self-esteem are associated with paranoia in people with psychotic disorders. Metacognitive group training (MCT) aims to target these biases although research has shown mixed results. Our objective was to establish the effect of MCT on paranoid ideation

  18. Training vegetable parenting practices through a mobile game: Iterative qualitative alpha test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetable consumption protects against chronic diseases, but many young children do not eat vegetables. One quest within the mobile application Mommio was developed to train mothers of preschoolers in effective vegetable parenting practices, or ways to approach getting their child to eat and enjoy v...

  19. Testing a Resilience Training Program in Police Recruits: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Sandra L; Perkhounkova, Yelena; Hein, Maria; Bohr, Nicole L; Anderson, Amanda A

    2017-07-01

    Stress from multiple sources is inherent in law enforcement. However, it is possible to modify responses to stress with resilience training that includes teaching techniques to modify emotional and physical responses to stress, interface with mental health professionals, and practice sessions to improve self-regulation of responses to stress including coherence, a measure of heart rate variability. A gap exists in the research, however, regarding evaluation of the duration of effects after the initial resilience training. Subjects included ( N = 34) recruits enrolled in summer 2015 at the Milwaukee Police Academy. An experimental design was used to compare recruits who received resilience training to recruits in the control group. No statistically significant differences between the groups were found for self-reported measures of stress and resilience. For the treatment group ( n = 17), change in coherence was significant ( p Organizational Quality Assessment Emotional Buoyancy subscale correlated significantly with the number of practice sessions ( r = .63, p = .01) and marginally with change in coherence ( r = .47, p = .07). Results confirm several significant effects of resilience training with recruits.

  20. Training Humanitarian Professionals at a Distance: Testing the Feasibility of Distance Learning with Humanitarian Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollettino, Vincenzo; Bruderlein, Claude

    2008-01-01

    Training is an essential part of the professional development of staff working for international humanitarian organizations. While humanitarian workers are being deployed around the world to provide life-saving relief assistance in often-hazardous missions, it is imperative for organizations to ensure that staff members understand the mission and…

  1. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – effective method for evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to emphasize the role of cardiopulmonary exercise training (CPET in evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with a metabolic syndrome. Methods: We performed a prospective longitudinal study of 9 months. The study group consisted of 28 young patients (21.3±3.1 years old without contraindications to exercise, previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATPIII criteria. All patients were evaluating at baseline and after 3 months of intervention and at the end of the study (after 9 months. The evaluation consists in performing a CPET on bicycle ergometer in which subjects were monitored in terms of cardiac and respiratory parameters. The CPET results allow us to establish the range of effort intensity in which the patient should exercise in order to burn calories and achieve the maximum fat oxidation rate. All patients benefit from an intensive interval exercise training programme, supervised and guided by a physical therapist. Exercise training consisted in 50 minutes sessions, 3 times per week, at intensive endurance training zone (in the range of anaerobic threshold, completed by 1 minute interval in the range between anaerobic threshold (AT and respiratory compensation point (RCP, for every 5 minutes of training. Results: After 9 months of intervention we noticed an improvement of abdominal obesity (waist circumference decreased from 98.98±10.14 cm to 89.54±12.32 cm, p<0.001, physical fitness (V’O2peak increased from 1.83±0.33 l/min to 2.13±0.4 l/min, p<0.001 and endurance (Oxygen uptake in the range of anaerobic treshold increase from 1.27±0.27 l/min to 1.55±0.31 l/min, p<0.001. Conclusions: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing together with training zones determinations is a useful tool for assessing the exercise capacity and drawing up individual workouts. Active and closely monitored intervention by individualized exercise training programmes leads to

  2. Development and field testing of a consumer shared decision-making training program for adults with low literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Danielle M; Morony, Suzanne; Shepherd, Heather L; Smith, Sian K; Dhillon, Haryana M; Trevena, Lyndal; Hayen, Andrew; Luxford, Karen; Nutbeam, Don; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2015-10-01

    Given the scarcity of shared decision-making (SDM) interventions for adults with low literacy, we created a SDM training program tailored to this population to be delivered in adult education settings. Formative evaluation during program development included a review of the problem and previous efforts to address it, qualitative interviews with the target population, program planning and field testing. A comprehensive SDM training program was developed incorporating core SDM elements. The program aimed to improve students' understanding of SDM and to provide them with the necessary skills (understanding probabilistic risks and benefits, personal values and preferences) and self-efficacy to use an existing set of questions (the AskShareKnow questions) as a means to engage in SDM during healthcare interactions. There is an ethical imperative to develop SDM interventions for adults with lower literacy. Generic training programs delivered direct-to-consumers in adult education settings offer promise in a national and international environment where too few initiatives exist. Formative evaluation of the program offers practical insights into developing consumer-focused SDM training. The content of the program can be used as a guide for future efforts to engage consumers in SDM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress in response to aerobic and anaerobic power testing: influence of exercise training and carnitine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J; Smith, Webb A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the oxidative stress response to aerobic and anaerobic power testing, and to determine the impact of exercise training with or without glycine propionyl-L-carnitine (GPLC) in attenuating the oxidative stress response. Thirty-two subjects were assigned (double blind) to placebo, GPLC-1 (1g PLC/d), GPLC-3 (3g PLC/d) for 8 weeks, plus aerobic exercise. Aerobic (graded exercise test: GXT) and anaerobic (Wingate cycle) power tests were performed before and following the intervention. Blood was taken before and immediately following exercise tests and analyzed for malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and xanthine oxidase activity (XO). No interaction effects were noted. MDA was minimally effected by exercise but lower at rest for both GPLC groups following the intervention (p = 0.044). A time main effect was noted for H2O2 (p = 0.05) and XO (p = 0.003), with values increasing from pre- to postexercise. Both aerobic and anaerobic power testing increase oxidative stress to a similar extent. Exercise training plus GPLC can decrease resting MDA, but it has little impact on exercise-induced oxidative stress biomarkers.

  4. Field Test of the Unit Equal Opportunity Training Diagnosis and Assessment System (TDAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    not, however, designed to be used by the unit commander, but by a trained specialist in organizational diagnosis and intervention , the Organizational...of information, performing as much analysis and priority-setting as possible without human intervention so as to simplify the commander’s task in...about "women in this unit" where no women are assigned to the unit; - key item data on sexism where no such data are available; d. data for all warrant

  5. The Prestressed Track Beam Testing Technology of Shanghai Electromagnetic Levitation Train

    OpenAIRE

    Qing-biao WANG; Zhang, Cong; Xiao-kang WEN; Zhen-yue SHI

    2013-01-01

    Shanghai electromagnetic levitation train (maglev) is the first one that is constructed and operated commercially in the world. Many technological problems have to be tackled during its construction, and the most difficult problem in the civil engineering part is the making of prestressed track beam. It requires high precision because of its special function. The stretching control of the pre-tensioning force and the post-tensioning force in the making of prestressed track beam is ...

  6. Distribution and Fate of Energetics on DoD Test and Training Ranges: Interim Report 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Military Reservation (MMR) near Falmouth, MA (USA) on Cape Cod . The Training Ranges and Impact Area at Camp Edwards encompass approximately 14,000...were fired until 1997, when a moratorium on artillery and mortar firing was established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A compre...Sagamore Lens, a major groundwater recharge 102 Chapter 6 Update on Massachusetts Military Reservation area and the most productive portion of the Cape Cod

  7. Training of SMEs for frozen food shelf life testing and novel smart packaging application for cold chain monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofania Tsironi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Application of an optimized cold chain management system for frozen products can be assisted by monitoring with Time Temperature Integrators (TTI. TTI are smart labels that cumulatively show the product history in an easily measurable, time-temperature dependent change. In the IQ-Freshlabel European project enzymatic and photochromic TTI were developed and tested for frozen products. Further to the technical objectives, training activities were implemented to provide information and training to the staff of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs regarding the properties of the developed TTI and their utilization within food packaging, transport, storage and sale. In total, more than 276 European companies and consumers representing the frozen food industry, the packaging industry and food business operators were successfully trained. The objective of the present article is to describe a general methodology for frozen food shelf life testing and modelling, and the selection of appropriate TTI for specific foods. This document serves as a technical manual for SMEs, including a case study for frozen shrimp and application of enzymatic and photochromic TTI, aiming to build their capacities to understand and use TTI for frozen food products. The value of systematic modelling of the food quality kinetics as well as the response of the TTI in building an effective chill chain management system is also demonstrated. The TTI response study allows a reliable optimization and selection of TTI to be correlated to the target food product for which accurate information on temperature dependence is available.

  8. [Control System Design and Test of Digital Comprehensive Training Treadmill for Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiulin; Ma, Guanpo; Zhao, Jun; Hu, Xiufang

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the design of a treadmill of comprehensive training experiment for rats. The treadmill is composed of six tracks and two of them were designed as conventional plane, two were designed to swing right and left, and two were designed to swing back and forth. The power was provided by six motors. The MSP430F149 is used as core to adjust the swing rate and the grade of electric shock. The IAR for MSP430 is used to design the software. The speed of the six tracks could be adjusted between 0 and 30 m/min. The swing tracks of back and forth can be swung for 3-25 times per minute and the swing tracks of right and left for 3-32 times. The electric shock can be divided into three levels, i. e. strong, middle, and weak level for each track. The digital comprehensive training treadmill can meet different training needs, and provide experimental data for mechanism research of some related diseases.

  9. Accuracy and Criterion-Related Validity of the 20-M Shuttle Run Test in Well-Trained Young Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko D. Stojanovic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the specificity of a 20-m shuttle run test (SRT as a measure of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max in young well-trained basketball players. Thirty-four volunteers (mean ± SD; age 15.74 ± 1.23 years, height 187.61 ± 7.95 cm, body mass 74.09 ± 11.61 kg; training experience 6.30 ± 2.15 years participated in the study. The 20-m shuttle run test was performed wearing a portable gas analyzer (K4b2, Cosmed to measure VO2max during the test. SRT-derived VO2max underestimated directly measured values (48.91 ± 4,11 vs 55.45 ± 4.98. Mean bias was 6.54 ± 3.89 ml kg-1 min-1 (95% CI- 5.18 to 7.90 ml kg-1 min-1 . Typical error of the estimate was 3.85 ml/kg/min-1 (95% CI- 3.10 to 5.10 ml kg-1 min-1 ; ES= 0,77. There was a moderate correlation between VO2max directly measured and estimated by SRT (r= 0.65; 95% CI- 0.40 to 0.81, power = 0.84, p < 0.01. Although very popular among coaches, it seems that SRT is not an appropriate field test to measure maximal oxygen consumption in young well-trained basketball players.

  10. On the importance of the distance measures used to train and test knowledge-based potentials for proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carlsen

    Full Text Available Knowledge-based potentials are energy functions derived from the analysis of databases of protein structures and sequences. They can be divided into two classes. Potentials from the first class are based on a direct conversion of the distributions of some geometric properties observed in native protein structures into energy values, while potentials from the second class are trained to mimic quantitatively the geometric differences between incorrectly folded models and native structures. In this paper, we focus on the relationship between energy and geometry when training the second class of knowledge-based potentials. We assume that the difference in energy between a decoy structure and the corresponding native structure is linearly related to the distance between the two structures. We trained two distance-based knowledge-based potentials accordingly, one based on all inter-residue distances (PPD, while the other had the set of all distances filtered to reflect consistency in an ensemble of decoys (PPE. We tested four types of metric to characterize the distance between the decoy and the native structure, two based on extrinsic geometry (RMSD and GTD-TS*, and two based on intrinsic geometry (Q* and MT. The corresponding eight potentials were tested on a large collection of decoy sets. We found that it is usually better to train a potential using an intrinsic distance measure. We also found that PPE outperforms PPD, emphasizing the benefits of capturing consistent information in an ensemble. The relevance of these results for the design of knowledge-based potentials is discussed.

  11. Organization of Practical Training of Research Master Students Enrolled in the Program of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education”: Testing Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Maximov L. K.,; Maximova L. V.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the testing experience of the practical training of research master students in the integrative module of basic professional educational program of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education”, training direction of “Psycho-pedagogical education”. We reviewed the organization of the practical training, its object and purpose, formed competence and educational outcomes, the content and form of organization of activity of students that achieve these r...

  12. Effect of continuous and interval exercise training on the PETCO2 response during a graded exercise test in patients with coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Enéas A. Rocco; Prado, Danilo M L; Silva, Alexandre G.; Lazzari, Jaqueline M. A.; Bortz, Pedro C; Rocco,Débora F. M.; Carla G. Rosa; Valter Furlan

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the following: 1) the effects of continuous exercise training and interval exercise training on the end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PETCO2) response during a graded exercise test in patients with coronary artery disease; and 2) the effects of exercise training modalities on the association between PETCO2 at the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) and indicators of ventilatory efficiency and cardiorespiratory fitness in patients with co...

  13. MiRTE: Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game for Mass Casualty information systems design, testing and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xunyi; Ganz, Aura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game, MiRTE, that is used in the development, testing and training of Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) information systems for first responders. Using the Source game engine from Valve software, MiRTE creates immersive virtual environments to simulate various incident scenarios, and enables interactions between multiple players/first responders. What distinguishes it from a pure computer simulation game is that it can interface with external mass casualty incident management systems, such as DIORAMA. The game will enable system developers to specify technical requirements of underlying technology, and test different alternatives of design. After the information system hardware and software are completed, the game can simulate various algorithms such as localization technologies, and interface with an actual user interface on PCs and Smartphones. We implemented and tested the game with the DIORAMA system.

  14. Walking tests during the exercise training: Specific use for the cardiac rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Casillas, J.-M.; Hannequin, A.; Besson, D.; Benaïm, S.; Krawcow, C.; Laurent, Y.; Gremeaux, V.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Walk tests, principally the six-minute walk test (6mWT), constitute a safe, useful submaximal tool for exercise tolerance testing in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The 6mWT result reflects functional status, walking autonomy and efficacy of CR on walking endurance, which is more pronounced in patients with low functional capacity (heart failure - cardiac surgery). The 6mWT result is a strong predictor of mortality. However, clinically significant changes and reliability ...

  15. Implementation of a Microcomputer-Based Testing System in a Military Training Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-11

    proctoring program so that it could communicate with MIISA by emulating the General Electric Terminet terminals and the standard transaction protocols. 5...configured to function as proctoring stations. In addition to the standard testing system hardware, they contain a serial port to communicate with MIISA and...a printer to print test results. In normal operation only one proctoring station is used; the other is used as a standard testing station and is

  16. Metacognitive training in patients recovering from a first psychosis: an experience sampling study testing treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pos, Karin; Meijer, Carin J; Verkerk, Oukje; Ackema, Onno; Krabbendam, Lydia; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive biases, negative affect and negative self-esteem are associated with paranoia in people with psychotic disorders. Metacognitive group training (MCT) aims to target these biases although research has shown mixed results. Our objective was to establish the effect of MCT on paranoid ideation in patients with recent onset psychosis in a powerful experience sampling design. 50 patients between the age of 18 and 35 were included in a single-blind, parallel group RCT comparing MCT with occupational therapy (OT) as an active control condition. We assessed via questionnaires and experience sampling treatment effects on paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, the cognitive bias jumping to conclusion (JTC), and cognitive insight, as well as treatment effects on associations between negative affect, negative self-esteem and paranoid ideation. Patients in the MCT group did not show a decrease in paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, JTC-bias or an increase in cognitive insight compared with OT. However, negative affect showed a weaker association with paranoid ideation post-treatment in the MCT condition. In the OT condition, this association was stronger post-treatment. We tentatively suggest that patients with an early psychosis seemed to benefit from MCT in emotional learning compared with the OT condition. Despite the fact that the group training is well-received by patients, subsequent individual MCT (MCT+) may be indicated for stronger favorable effects on paranoid ideation.

  17. A pico-satellite assembled and tested during the 6th CanSat Leader Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Angel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the process to construct a pico-satellite mounted in a bottle of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) of 345 ml. The assembly and tests were made during the 6th CanSat Leader Training Program (CLTP-6) at University Hokkaido-Japan in the summer 2015. The pico-satellite was launched in the facilities of Uematsu Electric Co. Ltd. in Akabira-Japan by a paper model rocket, which achieved a height of approximately 100 m. The mission was designed to measure physical variables,...

  18. Validation of a Standardized Multiple-Choice Multicultural Competence Test: Implications for Training, Assessment, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillem, Angela R.; Bartoli, Eleonora; Bertsch, Kristin N.; McCarthy, Maureen A.; Constant, Kerra; Marrero-Meisky, Sheila; Robbins, Steven J.; Bellamy, Scarlett

    2016-01-01

    The Multicultural Counseling and Psychotherapy Test (MCPT), a measure of multicultural counseling competence (MCC), was validated in 2 phases. In Phase 1, the authors administered 451 test items derived from multicultural guidelines in counseling and psychology to 32 multicultural experts and 30 nonexperts. In Phase 2, the authors administered the…

  19. The Prestressed Track Beam Testing Technology of Shanghai Electromagnetic Levitation Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-biao WANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Shanghai electromagnetic levitation train (maglev is the first one that is constructed and operated commercially in the world. Many technological problems have to be tackled during its construction, and the most difficult problem in the civil engineering part is the making of prestressed track beam. It requires high precision because of its special function. The stretching control of the pre-tensioning force and the post-tensioning force in the making of prestressed track beam is most important during the construction. This paper introduces and analyses the technical features of vibrating wire sensors as well as the development, the research and the application of force sensor for pulling force measurement of anchor cable.

  20. Orthopedic In-Training Examination Question Metrics and Resident Test Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasse, John Mason; Haglin, Jack; Eltorai, Adam E M; Mulcahey, Mary K; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-06-23

    First administered in November 1963, the orthopedic in-training examination (OITE) is now distributed to more than 4000 residents in over 20 countries and has become important for evaluation of resident fund of knowledge. Several studies have assessed the effect of didactic programs on resident performance, but only recently has it become possible to assess detailed testtaking metrics such as time spent per question. Here, we report the first assessment of resident OITE performance utilizing this full electronic dataset from two large academic institutions. Full 2015 OITE score reports for all orthopedic surgery residents at two institutions were anonymized and compiled. For every question answered by each resident, the resident year, question content or domain, question result (correct or incorrect), and answer speed were recorded. Data were then analyzed to determine whether resident year, result, or domain affected answer speed and whether performance in each subspecialty domain varied based on resident year in training. Data was available for 46 residents and 12,650 questions. Mean answer speed for questions answered correctly, 54.0±48.1 s, was significantly faster than for questions answered incorrectly, 72.2±61.2 s (Pquestions, compared to only 40 seconds on basic science questions (Pquestions is often considered a sign of mastery of the material and more confidence in the answer. Though faster answer speed was strongly associated with correct answers, this study demonstrates that answer speed is not reliably associated with resident year. While answer speed varies between domains, it is likely that the majority of this variation is due to question type as opposed to confidence. Nevertheless, it is possible that in domains with more tiered experience such as shoulder, answer speed correlates strongly with resident year and percentage correct.

  1. 77 FR 39561 - Recommendations from Airman Testing Standards and Training Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... recommendations to enhance the content, process, and methodology for development of aeronautical knowledge testing... techniques. The FAA specifically tasked the ARC with providing recommendations on the content of these...

  2. Feasibility of using training cases from International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set for testing of International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Hu, Z W; Zhou, M W; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2014-12-01

    Descriptive comparison analysis. To evaluate whether five training cases of International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set (ISCICDS) are appropriate for testing the facts within the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) and could thus be used for testing its training effectiveness. The authors reviewed the five training cases from the ISCICDS and determined the sensory level (SL), motor level (ML) and American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) for the training cases. The key points from the training cases were compared with our interpretation of the key aspects of the ISNCSCI. For determining SL, three principles of ML, sacral sparing, complete injury, classification of AIS A, B, C and D, determining motor incomplete status through sparing of motor function more than three levels below the ML, there are corresponding case scenarios in ISCICDS. However, no case scenario shows classification of AIS E and the use of voluntary anal sphincter contraction for determination of motor incomplete status. Neurological level of injury could be deduced from the SL and ML. Finally, none of the cases include information about zone of partial preservation, sensory score or motor score. Majority of the facts related to SL, ML and AIS are included in the five training cases of ISCICDS. Thus, using these training cases, it is feasible to test the above facts within the ISNCSCI. It is suggested that the missing fact should be included in an update of the training cases.

  3. Feasibility of using training cases from International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set for testing of International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Hu, Z W; Zhou, M W

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive comparison analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether five training cases of International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set (ISCICDS) are appropriate for testing the facts within the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI......) and could thus be used for testing its training effectiveness. METHODS: The authors reviewed the five training cases from the ISCICDS and determined the sensory level (SL), motor level (ML) and American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) for the training cases. The key points from the training...... cases were compared with our interpretation of the key aspects of the ISNCSCI. RESULTS: For determining SL, three principles of ML, sacral sparing, complete injury, classification of AIS A, B, C and D, determining motor incomplete status through sparing of motor function more than three levels below...

  4. A prospective randomized study to test the transfer of basic psychomotor skills from virtual reality to physical reality in a comparable training setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Kai S; Ritz, Joerg P; Maass, Heiko; Cakmak, Hueseyin K; Kuehnapfel, Uwe G; Germer, Christoph T; Bretthauer, Georg; Buhr, Heinz J

    2005-03-01

    To test whether basic skills acquired on a virtual endoscopic surgery simulator are transferable from virtual reality to physical reality in a comparable training setting. For surgical training in laparoscopic surgery, new training methods have to be developed that allow surgeons to first practice in a simulated setting before operating on real patients. A virtual endoscopic surgery trainer (VEST) has been developed within the framework of a joint project. Because of principal limitations of simulation techniques, it is essential to know whether training with this simulator is comparable to conventional training. Devices used were the VEST system and a conventional video trainer (CVT). Two basic training tasks were constructed identically (a) as virtual tasks and (b) as mechanical models for the CVT. Test persons were divided into 2 groups each consisting of 12 novices and 4 experts. Each group carried out a defined training program over the course of 4 consecutive days on the VEST or the CVT, respectively. To test the transfer of skills, the groups switched devices on the 5th day. The main parameter was task completion time. The novices in both groups showed similar learning curves. The mean task completion times decreased significantly over the 4 training days of the study. The task completion times for the control task on Day 5 were significantly lower than on Days 1 and 2. The experts' task completion times were much lower than those of the novices. This study showed that training with a computer simulator, just as with the CVT, resulted in a reproducible training effect. The control task showed that skills learned in virtual reality are transferable to the physical reality of a CVT. The fact that the experts showed little improvement demonstrates that the simulation trains surgeons in basic laparoscopic skills learned in years of practice.

  5. Validity of the running repeated sprint ability test among playing positions and level of competitiveness in trained soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, A R; Mukherjee, S; Chia, M Y H; Teh, K C

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the construct validity of the running repeated sprint ability (rRSA) test to discriminate performances between: i) various playing positions (Study 1), and ii) teams of different level of competitiveness (Study 2), in trained soccer players. Study 1 comprised clubs' players participating in the top local professional league. Study 2 comprised professional and semiprofessional players from the National Under-23 and Youth squads respectively, and amateur-level players from a University team. The rRSA test protocol consisted of either 6 or 8 repetitions of 20-m all-out sprints, interspersed with a 20-s active recovery period. There were significant differences in the rRSA performance between goalkeepers and outfield-positions (p soccer players.

  6. Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF) for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter II, G.W.

    2003-06-18

    The objective of this research is to provide the DoD with a framework based on a systematic, risk-based approach to assess impacts for management of natural resources in an ecosystem context. This risk assessment framework is consistent with, but extends beyond, the EPA's ecological risk assessment framework, and specifically addresses DoD activities and management needs. MERAF is intended to be consistent with existing procedures for environmental assessment and planning with DoD testing and training. The intention is to supplement these procedures rather than creating new procedural requirements. MERAF is suitable for use for training and testing area assessment and management. It does not include human health risks nor does it address specific permitting or compliance requirements, although it may be useful in some of these cases. Use of MERAF fits into the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process by providing a consistent and rigorous way of organizing and conducting the technical analysis for Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) (Sigal 1993; Carpenter 1995; Canter and Sadler 1997). It neither conflicts with, nor replaces, procedural requirements within the NEPA process or document management processes already in place within DoD.

  7. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Garrick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of a section of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene, followed by a three-enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay, with banding patterns resolved via agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was designed using a large set of training data obtained from a public DNA sequence database, then evaluated using an independent test panel of Reticulitermes from the Southern Appalachian Mountains, for which species assignments were determined via phylogenetic comparison to reference sequences. After refining the interpretive framework, the PCR-RFLP assay was shown to provide accurate identification of four co-occurring species (the fifth species, R. hageni, was absent from the test panel, so accuracy cannot yet be extended to training data. The assay is cost- and time-efficient, and will help improve knowledge of Reticulitermes species distributions.

  8. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Ryan C; Collins, Benjamin D; Yi, Rachel N; Dyer, Rodney J; Hyseni, Chaz

    2015-06-09

    Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei) have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a section of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene, followed by a three-enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay, with banding patterns resolved via agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was designed using a large set of training data obtained from a public DNA sequence database, then evaluated using an independent test panel of Reticulitermes from the Southern Appalachian Mountains, for which species assignments were determined via phylogenetic comparison to reference sequences. After refining the interpretive framework, the PCR-RFLP assay was shown to provide accurate identification of four co-occurring species (the fifth species, R. hageni, was absent from the test panel, so accuracy cannot yet be extended to training data). The assay is cost- and time-efficient, and will help improve knowledge of Reticulitermes species distributions.

  9. Endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Borůvková, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Title: Endurance training Objectives: The aim of this research is to analyse the complexity of endurance growth for amateur cyclist. We will endeavour to suggest a suitable training plan for a 41 year old female. Method: All data was gained by collecting. The entry and final diagnostics were carried out by biomedical laboratory. A cycling ergometer was used in the maximum perseverance training test (spiroergometry). The maximum heart rate test was completed in the outdoor terrain. We also car...

  10. Orthopedic in-training examination question metrics and resident test performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mason DePasse

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available First administered in November 1963, the orthopedic in-training examination (OITE is now distributed to more than 4000 residents in over 20 countries and has become important for evaluation of resident fund of knowledge. Several studies have assessed the effect of didactic programs on resident performance, but only recently has it become possible to assess detailed testtaking metrics such as time spent per question. Here, we report the first assessment of resident OITE performance utilizing this full electronic dataset from two large academic institutions. Full 2015 OITE score reports for all orthopedic surgery residents at two institutions were anonymized and compiled. For every question answered by each resident, the resident year, question content or domain, question result (correct or incorrect, and answer speed were recorded. Data were then analyzed to determine whether resident year, result, or domain affected answer speed and whether performance in each subspecialty domain varied based on resident year in training. Data was available for 46 residents and 12,650 questions. Mean answer speed for questions answered correctly, 54.0±48.1 s, was significantly faster than for questions answered incorrectly, 72.2±61.2 s (P<0.00001. When considering both correct and incorrect answers, PGY-1s were slower than all other years (P<0.02. Residents spent a mean of nearly 80 seconds on foot and ankle and shoulder and elbow questions, compared to only 40 seconds on basic science questions (P<0.05. In education, faster answer speed for questions is often considered a sign of mastery of the material and more confidence in the answer. Though faster answer speed was strongly associated with correct answers, this study demonstrates that answer speed is not reliably associated with resident year. While answer speed varies between domains, it is likely that the majority of this variation is due to question type as opposed to confidence. Nevertheless, it is

  11. Testing a computer-based ostomy care training resource for staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    Fragmented teaching and ostomy care provided by nonspecialized clinicians unfamiliar with state-of-the-art care and products have been identified as problems in teaching ostomy care to the new ostomate. After conducting a literature review of theories and concepts related to the impact of nurse behaviors and confidence on ostomy care, the author developed a computer-based learning resource and assessed its effect on staff nurse confidence. Of 189 staff nurses with a minimum of 1 year acute-care experience employed in the acute care, emergency, and rehabilitation departments of an acute care facility in the Midwestern US, 103 agreed to participate and returned completed pre- and post-tests, each comprising the same eight statements about providing ostomy care. F and P values were computed for differences between pre- and post test scores. Based on a scale where 1 = totally disagree and 5 = totally agree with the statement, baseline confidence and perceived mean knowledge scores averaged 3.8 and after viewing the resource program post-test mean scores averaged 4.51, a statistically significant improvement (P = 0.000). The largest difference between pre- and post test scores involved feeling confident in having the resources to learn ostomy skills independently. The availability of an electronic ostomy care resource was rated highly in both pre- and post testing. Studies to assess the effects of increased confidence and knowledge on the quality and provision of care are warranted.

  12. Effect of treadmill testing and exercise training on self-efficacy in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Roberta K; DeMarco, Teresa; Haskell, William L

    2005-09-01

    Self-efficacy is a person's confidence in being able to successfully perform a specific activity or behavior. Self-efficacy has been shown to influence exercise capacity in patients post myocardial infarction, but has not been fully explored in patients with heart failure (HF). This study examined the impact of performance of a single treadmill exercise test and participation in a 3-month program of walking and resistance exercise on self-efficacy in HF patients. 24 patients were randomized to either a home-based walking and resistance exercise program or usual care for 3 months. Prior to enrollment into the exercise program all participants performed a single treadmill exercise test with respiratory gas analysis. Self-efficacy questionnaires were completed at 3 time points, 1) prior to performance of an exercise treadmill test; 2) immediately after completing an exercise test; and 3) at the end of a 3-month exercise program. Self-efficacy for walking (p=0.07), climbing (p=0.17), lifting (p=0.73) and general activity (p=0.15) did not improve after performance of a single treadmill exercise test and usual care. However, self-efficacy for walking increased after 3 months of a walking and resistance exercise program. (p=0.04). The findings from this study suggest that in patients with stable mild to moderate heart failure, self-efficacy is improved with participation in a home-based walking and endurance exercise program. Self-efficacy is not enhanced by performance of a single treadmill exercise test and usual care.

  13. Elite Female Basketball Players' Body-Weight Neuromuscular Training and Performance on the Y-Balance Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benis, Roberto; Bonato, Matteo; La Torre, Antonio La

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular training enhances unconscious motor responses by stimulating both the afferent signals and central mechanisms responsible for dynamic joint control. Dynamic joint-control training is a vital component of injury-prevention programs. To investigate the effects of body-weight neuromuscular training on Y-Balance Test (YBT) performance and postural control in female basketball players. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Basketball practice sessions. A total of 28 healthy elite female basketball players were randomly assigned to an experimental (n = 14) or a control group (n = 14). Before their regular practice sessions, the experimental group warmed up with body-weight neuromuscular exercises and the control group with standard tactical-technical exercises twice weekly for 8 weeks. Anterior-, posteromedial-, and posterolateral-reach and composite YBT scores were measured before and after 8 weeks of training. Improvement over baseline scores was noted in the posteromedial (right = 86.5 ± 4.5 cm versus 89.6 ± 2.2 cm, +3.5%, P = .049; left = 85.5 ± 4.3 cm versus 90.2 ± 2.7 cm, +5.5%, P = .038)- and posterolateral (right = 90.7 ± 3.6 cm versus 94.0 ± 2.7 cm, +3.6%, P = .016; left = 90.9 ± 3.5 cm versus 94.2 ± 2.6 cm, +3.6%, P = .011)-reach directions and in the composite YBT scores (right = 88.6% ± 3.2% versus 94.0% ± 1.8%, +5.4%, P = .0004; left = 89.2% ± 3.2% versus 94.5% ± 3.0%, +5.8%, P = .001) of the experimental group. No differences in anterior reach were detected in either group. Differences were noted in postintervention scores for posteromedial reach (right = 89.6 ± 2.2 cm versus 84.3 ± 4.4 cm, +4.1%, P = .005; left = 94.2 ± 2.6 cm versus 84.8 ± 4.4 cm, +10%, P = .003) and composite scores (right = 94.0% ± 1.8% versus 87.3% ± 2.0%, +7.1%, P = .003; left = 94.8% ± 3.0% versus 87.9% ± 3.4%, +7.3%, P basketball players as assessed with the YBT. Incorporating neuromuscular training into the workout routines for basketball players

  14. Global Aerodynamic Modeling for Stall/Upset Recovery Training Using Efficient Piloted Flight Test Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunningham, Kevin; Hill, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Flight test and modeling techniques were developed for efficiently identifying global aerodynamic models that can be used to accurately simulate stall, upset, and recovery on large transport airplanes. The techniques were developed and validated in a high-fidelity fixed-base flight simulator using a wind-tunnel aerodynamic database, realistic sensor characteristics, and a realistic flight deck representative of a large transport aircraft. Results demonstrated that aerodynamic models for stall, upset, and recovery can be identified rapidly and accurately using relatively simple piloted flight test maneuvers. Stall maneuver predictions and comparisons of identified aerodynamic models with data from the underlying simulation aerodynamic database were used to validate the techniques.

  15. Naturalistic Decision Making in Power Grid Operations: Implications for Dispatcher Training and Usability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin

    2008-11-17

    The focus of the present study is on improved training approaches to accelerate learning and improved methods for analyzing effectiveness of tools within a high-fidelity power grid simulated environment. A theory-based model has been developed to document and understand the mental processes that an expert power system operator uses when making critical decisions. The theoretical foundation for the method is based on the concepts of situation awareness, the methods of cognitive task analysis, and the naturalistic decision making (NDM) approach of Recognition Primed Decision Making. The method has been systematically explored and refined as part of a capability demonstration of a high-fidelity real-time power system simulator under normal and emergency conditions. To examine NDM processes, we analyzed transcripts of operator-to-operator conversations during the simulated scenario to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. The results of the analysis indicate that the proposed framework can be used constructively to map or assess the Situation Awareness Level of the operators at each point in the scenario. We can also identify the mental models and mental simulations that the operators employ at different points in the scenario. This report documents the method, describes elements of the model, and provides appendices that document the simulation scenario and the associated mental models used by operators in the scenario.

  16. Abdominopelvic kinesiotherapy for pelvic floor muscle training: a tested proposal in different groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Simone; Martinho, Natalia Miguel; Silva, Valéria Regina; Marques, Joseane; Alves, Fabiola Kenia; Riccetto, Cássio

    2015-12-01

    This video's proposal was to present one of the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training programs used in our research, and to study the effects of abdominopelvic kinesiotherapy on female PFM function. A total of 82 women participated in this study, 11 nulliparous, 13 primiparous pregnant, 20 primiparous postpartum and 38 postmenopausal women, who were evaluated first by digital palpation, then by either electromyography or vaginal dynamometry to investigate their PFM strength, followed by ICIQ UI-SF and ICIQ-OAB to evaluate urinary symptoms. This intervention protocol lasted for 60 min, three times a week, with a total of 10 sessions, and was supervised by a physiotherapist, using a gym ball, according to Marques and collaborators. A significant increase in PFM strength was observed by digital palpation in all groups. This finding was confirmed by electromyography in both pregnant (p = 0.0001) and postpartum (p = 0.0001) groups, as well as in 20 of the 38 women from the postmenopausal group (p = 0.003) then by vaginal dynamometry (p = 0.02) in the rest of the women (18) from the same group, with a concomitant decrease in urinary symptoms (p muscle strength and a decrease in urinary symptoms.

  17. The clinical importance of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and aerobic training in patients with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Arena,R; Myers,J; Guazzi,M

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The appropriate physiological response to an acute bout of progressive aerobic exercise requires proper functioning of the pulmonary, cardiovascular and skeletal muscle systems. Unfortunately, these systems are all negatively impacted in patients with heart failure (HF), resulting in significantly diminished aerobic capacity compared with apparently healthy individuals. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) is a noninvasive assessment technique that provides valuable insight in...

  18. Exercise testing of leg amputees and the result of prosthetic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Alsté, J A; Cruts, H E; Huisman, K; de Vries, J

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients undergoing rehabilitation following leg amputation were examined to determine cardiac status, which included clinical examination and a graded exercise ECG test, using an arm ergometer. Results were compared to final walking ability. It was found that the cardiac status of these patients was generally poor and that the exercise ECG results did co-relate to walking ability.

  19. Effect of training intensity on insulin sensitivity evaluated by insulin tolerance test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. Keizer; K. Backx; M.F. Mensink; dr. Lars B. Borghouts

    1999-01-01

    This research article shows that a high intensity exercise program compared to a low intensity exercise program of the same session duration and frequency, increases insulin sensitivity to a larger extend in healthy subjects. It also shows that the short insulin tolerance test can be used to detect

  20. The Savvy Caregiver Program: Developing and Testing a Transportable Dementia Family Caregiver Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Kenneth W.; Lewis, Marsha; Sherman, Carey Wexler; Tornatore, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development and field testing of the Savvy Caregiver Program, the transformation of a successful, academic-based caregiver psychoeducational program into a self-contained program that can be adopted in other locations. Design and Methods: Program development began with a prototype of a 12-hr course with the…

  1. Professional Development Training Needs of Department Chairpersons: A Test of the Biglan Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This test of the Biglan model demonstrated that differences did exist on certain tasks for clusters of department chairpersons. The tasks identified for each cluster represent professional development needs common to all chairs in the cluster and different from the needs of chairs in the other clusters. (Author/IRT)

  2. Combining predictions from linear models when training and test inputs differ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van Ommen (Thijs); N.L. Zhang (Nevin); J. Tian (Jin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMethods for combining predictions from different models in a supervised learning setting must somehow estimate/predict the quality of a model's predictions at unknown future inputs. Many of these methods (often implicitly) make the assumption that the test inputs are identical to the

  3. Test of Mindfulness-Based Psychosocial Skills Training to İmprove Insight and Functional Recovery in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Emine; Okanlı, Ayşe

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted with two groups (training and control) using a pretest/posttest design to determine the effect of mindfulness-based psychosocial skills training for improving insight and functional recovery levels in patients with schizophrenia. The study sample included 45 patients with schizophrenia (21 were in the training group/mindfulness-based psychosocial skills training and 24 were in the control group/standard drug medication). The data were collected using a Personal Information Form, Functional Remission of General Schizophrenia (FROGS) scale, and Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS). The training group was divided into two groups of 10 to 12 persons on average. Training was given as a group training for a total of 16 sessions, two sessions a week for 8 weeks. The training group scored significantly higher in functional recovery and insight levels than the control group after training ( p training has an effect on increasing the levels of insight and functional recovery in schizophrenia.

  4. To Go or Not to Go: A Proof of Concept Study Testing Food-Specific Inhibition Training for Women with Eating and Weight Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Robert; Nazar, Bruno P; Burgess, Emilee E; Lawrence, Natalia S; Cardi, Valentina; Treasure, Janet; Hirsch, Colette R

    2018-01-01

    Inefficient food-specific inhibitory control is a potential mechanism that underlies binge eating in bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Go/no-go training tools have been developed to increase inhibitory control over eating impulses. Using a within-subjects design, this study examined whether one session of food-specific go/no-go training, versus general inhibitory control training, modifies eating behaviour. The primary outcome measure was food consumption on a taste test following each training session. Women with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder had small non-significant reductions in high-calorie food consumption on the taste test following the food-specific compared with the general training. There were no effects on eating disorder symptomatic behaviour (i.e. binge eating/purging) in the 24 h post-training. The training task was found to be acceptable by the clinical groups. More research is needed with larger sample sizes to determine the effectiveness of this training approach for clinical populations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Environmental Assessment (EA): Proposed Missile Storage Improvements, Utah Test and Training Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    degrees Fahrenheit. One of these structures (Building 30260) was used for cryogenic or deep -freeze testing. They were hardened structures meant to...based paint (confirmed to contain lead by on-site inspections using a portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer) would be scraped , collected, and properly...according to basic survey standards for Building 30213 and submitted to Utah’s SHPO. The most relevant portions of the ILS form would be posted on the web

  6. Develop, build, and test a virtual lab to support vulnerability training system

    OpenAIRE

    Akgul, Turgut; Kargin, Coskun

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A computer security virtual lab architecture was developed and tested for functionality and performance. Four Dell PowerEdge 1650, dual processor, blade servers were configured as host machines with VMware and VNC running on a Linux RedHat 9 Kernel. An Apache-Tomcat web server was configured as the external interface to lab users. Web content was created, the site was secured with SSL, and Java Servlet functionality was enabled. Host m...

  7. Testing during Training: Why Does It Enhance Long-Term Motor Task Retention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    improvements associated with t-trial repetition been reported. Research- ers have shown that with verbal tasks t-trials not only contribute to acquisition...test trials on long-term recognition and recall. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1971, 10, 562-567. Jones, B. Role of central...ideas. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 1970, 83, 304-308. ,,d-.. ," 13 -l - - -" W~ll .Wi.~ Roy, E. A. Toward a typology of apraxia . Mouvement

  8. Enhanced referral prioritisation for acute adult dietetic services: A randomised control trial to test a web-based decision training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Priscilla; Gokalp, Hulya; Davies, Miranda; Tomlinson, Christopher; Hickson, Mary

    2017-08-26

    Dietitians in acute adult services need to prioritise dietetic referrals in order to manage their daily workload and ensure effective treatment of patients. Newly qualified dietitians do not usually receive specific training on prioritisation and could be helped with an evidence-based, effective, decision-training tool that is based on the practice of experienced dietitians. We developed an internationally available web-based decision-training tool designed to improve novice dietitians' ability to make dietetic prioritisation decisions. The training tool comprised of a pre-training task, a post-training task and training materials. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of the training tool on novices' ability for dietetic prioritisation. Pre-registration dietitians and recent graduates (one-year) from across the UK were invited to participate in this randomised controlled trial (RCT). Each participant made prioritisation decisions on a set of dietetic referral scenarios: 53 scenarios at pre-training and 27 at post-training. After pre-training the intervention group was presented with the training materials, whereas the control group was told to carry on with the post-training task. Participants did not know which group they had been randomly allocated to. We calculated i) level of agreement between decisions made by each novice and experts' consensus using Pearson correlation, intra-class correlation (ICC(2,1)); ii) intra-rater consistency using ICC(1,1) and iii) intra-group consistency using ICC (2,1). We compared group means at pre-training and post-training; estimated effect size using the degree of change from pre- to post-training, and 2-factor mixed ANOVA to assess overall effect of the training across the groups and time-points. 151 participants (69 in control and 82 in intervention) completed the trial. The groups did not differ in demographic characteristics. Both Pearson and ICC(2,1) correlations increased with training intervention; a

  9. Ramp-incremented and RPE-clamped test protocols elicit similar VO2max values in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Allison M; Midgley, Adrian W; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Hillman, Angela R

    2014-08-01

    The present study compared the efficacy of ramp incremented and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)-clamped test protocols for eliciting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Sixteen trained cyclists (age 34 ± 7 years) performed a ramp-incremented protocol and an RPE-clamped protocol 1 week apart in a randomized, counterbalanced order. The RPE-clamped protocol consisted of five, 2-min stages where subjects self-selected work rate and pedal cadence to maintain the prescribed RPE. After completing both test protocols subjects were asked which they preferred. The mean ± SD test time of 568 ± 72 s in the ramp protocol was not significantly different to the 600 ± 0 s in the RPE-clamped protocol (mean difference = 32 s; p = 0.09), or was the VO2max of 3.86 ± 0.73 L min(-1) in the ramp protocol significantly different to the 3.87 ± 0.72 L min(-1) in the RPE-clamped protocol (mean difference = 0.002 L min(-1); p = 0.97). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed for peak power output (p = 0.21), maximal minute ventilation (p = 0.97), maximal respiratory exchange ratio (p = 0.09), maximal heart rate (p = 0.51), and post-test blood lactate concentration (p = 0.58). The VO2max attained in the preferred protocol was significantly higher than the non-preferred protocol (mean difference = 0.14 L min(-1); p = 0.03). The RPE-clamped test protocol was as effective as the ramp-incremented protocol for eliciting VO2max and could be considered as a valid alternative protocol, particularly where a fixed test duration is desirable.

  10. Attention Feedback Awareness and Control Training (A-FACT): experimental test of a novel intervention paradigm targeting attentional bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Amit; Zvielli, Ariel

    2014-04-01

    We present an experimental investigation of a novel intervention paradigm targeting attentional bias - Attention Feedback Awareness and Control Training (A-FACT). A-FACT is grounded in the novel hypothesis that training awareness of (biased) attentional allocation will lead to greater self-regulatory control of attention and thereby ameliorate attentional bias and its maladaptive sequelae. To do so, A-FACT delivers computerized, personalized, real-time feedback regarding a person's (biased) allocation of attention concurrent with its expression. In a randomized control experimental design, we tested A-FACT relative to an active placebo control condition among anxious adults (N=40, 52.5% women, M(SD)=24.3(4) years old). We found that relative to the placebo control condition, A-FACT led to: (a) reduced levels of attentional bias to threat; (b) (non-significantly) lower rate of behavioral avoidance of exposure to an anxiogenic stressor; and (c) faster rate of emotional recovery following the stressor. The findings are discussed with respect to the novelty and significance of the proposed conceptual perspective, methodology, and intervention paradigm targeting attentional bias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Technical Considerations for Improvement of USAF Operational Training, Testing and Evaluation (OTT and E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-30

    30 JUNE 1975 q ~TECHNICAL CONSIDERA•TIONS FOR USAF OPERATIONAL TRAIIG TESTING AND EVALUATIO (TT&EI APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION...of this Report) Approved for Public Release - Distribution Unlimited 17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered In Block 20, If different...L LJ C9 - aCCa C= co =mp XE 0 a aLa C~= =b & -JA 0’-𔃺 z - -Lai’ = WE w.. _A oMac G = cm - cc0j -0, e 125 The total instrument error is a combination

  12. Architecture of a System for Interactive Training and Testing in Algorithms and Data Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tomašević

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose the architecture of a new software system for self-directed interactive learning and assessment in the domain of algorithms and data structures. The system extends Visual Simulator of Algorithms (VSA, a tool previously developed at the School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade. The system provides control of trainee's independence level, flexible input data set assignment and configurable automatic assessment of test-taker's actions. The paper describes the architecture of the proposed system and gives relevant implementation details.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention training in female athletes: a systematic review of injury reduction and results of athletic performance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber Westin, Sue D

    2012-01-01

    Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training programs have been published, but few have assessed the effects of training on both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. To determine if ACL injury prevention programs have a positive influence on both injury rates and athletic performance tests in female athletes. In August 2011, a search was conducted (1995-August 2011) of the PubMed, Science Direct, and CINAHL databases. Selected studies determined the effect of ACL intervention training programs on ACL incidence rates (determined by athlete-exposures) and athletic performance tests, such as isokinetic strength, vertical jump height, speed, agility, and dynamic balance. Because no single article contained both criteria, investigations were cross-referenced to obtain data on both factors from the same training programs. The authors reviewed the selected studies for cohort population numbers, age, sports, duration of study, program components, duration of training, number of athlete-exposures, ACL injury incidence rates, and results of athletic performance tests. Initially, 57 studies were identified that described 42 ACL injury prevention training programs. Of these, 17 studies that investigated 5 programs met the inclusion criteria. Two programs significantly reduced ACL injury rates and improved athletic performance tests: Sportsmetrics and the Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance program (PEP). Sportsmetrics produced significant increases in lower extremity and abdominal strength, vertical jump height, estimated maximal aerobic power, speed, and agility. Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance significantly improved isokinetic knee flexion strength but did not improve vertical jump height, speed, or agility. The other 3 programs (Myklebust, the "11," and Knee Ligament Injury Prevention) did not improve both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. Only the Sportsmetrics and PEP ACL intervention training programs had a

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 , 21 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries by G. GABRIELSE / Professor of Physics and Chair of the Harvard Physics Department, Spokesperson for the ATRAP Collaboration Lecture 1: Particle Traps: the World's Tiniest Accelerators A single elementary particle, or a single ion, can be confined in a tiny accelerator called a particle trap. A single electron was held this way for more than ten months, and antiprotons for months. Mass spectroscopy of exquisite precision is possible with such systems. CERN's TRAP Collaboration thereby compared the charge-to-mass ratios of the antiproton and proton to a precision of 90 parts per trillion, by far the most stringent CPT test done with a baryon system. The important ratio of the masses of the electron and proton have been similarly measured, as have a variety of ions masses, and the neutron mass is most accurately known from such measurements. An i...

  15. One-day workshop-based training improves physical activity prescription knowledge in Latin American physicians: a pre-test post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas Calle, Maria C; Lobelo, Felipe; Jiménez, Mario A; Páez, Diana C; Cortés, Sebastian; de Lima, Andrés; Duperly, John

    2016-12-05

    The physical inactivity pandemic and related non-communicable diseases have made it imperative for medical doctors (MDs) to effectively provide lifestyle counseling as part of prevention and treatment plans for patients. A one-day certification workshop was designed to improve MDs PA prescription knowledge, as part of the Exercise is Medicine® (EIM®) global health initiative. The objective was to determine knowledge gain of MDs participating in a standardized, one-day PA prescription workshop performed throughout Latin America (LA). A 20-question multiple-choice test on PA topics, based on international guidelines, was completed before and after the workshop. Pre and post-test analyses, without a control group, were performed on 1044 MDs after the 8-h workshop that was delivered 41 times across 12 LA countries, from January 2014 to January 2015. Knowledge improvement was determined using the class-average normalized gain and individual relative gain. T-tests with 95% confidence interval levels were conducted to analyze differences between MD specialties. Test scores improved on average from 67 to 82% after the workshop (p knowledge gain was higher for the workshop modules on screening/risk stratification and prescription (43% [CI: 39-48%] and 38% [CI: 34-42%], than for the module on PA benefits and risks (26% [CI: 23-28%]). This one-day workshop had a positive impact on the knowledge gain of MD's on the topic of PA prescription. Although all groups of specialties increased knowledge, GPs and family medicine MDs benefited the most. This short course is an effective continuing education strategy for teaching PA assessment, counseling and prescription to MDs in Latin America, a topic rarely included in the training of MD's in the region and the world. Further follow-up is needed to ascertain impact on PA counseling practices.

  16. 60 cm Drop Jump test assessment in 17 years old volleyball players in Albania under the influence of Plyometric Training

    OpenAIRE

    Lleshi Enkeleida

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of vertical jump through 60cm Drop Jump Test under the influence of Plyometric Training (PT) is the main purpose of this study. PT has been conducted for 12 weeks with volleyball players in Albania. The data were taken prior to afterwards PT for 12 week. 20 volleyball players Experimental (EX) group 10 players with average Age 17±1, BH186.3±5.1, BW 74.3 ± 6.1, BMI 22.25% ± 3.4 and also Control group (CO) 10 players with average Age17±0.9, BH 185.9 ± 8.4, BW 70.2±8.6, BMI 20.37%...

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1999-05-26

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

  18. Development and evaluation of training resources to prepare health professionals for counselling pregnant women about non-invasive prenatal testing for Down syndrome: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenford, Kerry; Daley, Rebecca; Lewis, Celine; Hill, Melissa; Chitty, Lyn S

    2017-04-27

    The availability of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidies is expanding rapidly throughout the world. Training health professionals to offer NIPT in a way that supports informed choice is essential for implementation. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a training package for health professionals to support the introduction of NIPT into clinical practice. Training on NIPT was offered to health professionals, primarily midwives, involved in Down syndrome screening and testing in eight hospitals located in England and Scotland as part of a research study evaluating the implementation of NIPT in the UK National Health Service. Training was evaluated using a mixed methods approach that included quantitative questionnaires at three time points and post-training qualitative interviews. The questionnaires measured confidence, self-perceived knowledge and actual knowledge about NIPT for Down syndrome. Interviews explored opinions about the training and experiences of offering NIPT. The training provided to the health professionals was found to positively impact on their confidence in discussing NIPT with women in their clinic, and both their perceived and actual knowledge and understanding of NIPT was improved. Knowledge remained weak in four areas; cell-free fetal DNA levels increase with gestation; turnaround time for NIPT results; cell-free fetal DNA is placental in origin; and NIPT false positive rate. Training materials, including a lesson plan, PowerPoint presentation and written factsheet on NIPT, have been developed and evaluated for use in educating midwives and supporting the introduction of NIPT. Implementation of training should include a greater focus on the areas where knowledge remained low. Some groups of midwives will need additional training or support to optimise their confidence in discussing NIPT with women.

  19. Evaluation of the proficiency of trained non-laboratory health staffs and laboratory technicians using a rapid and simple HIV antibody test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanal, Koum; Chou, Thai Leang; Sovann, Ly; Morikawa, Yasuo; Mukoyama, Yumi; Kakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2005-05-20

    In Cambodia, nearly half of pregnant women attend antenatal care (ANC), which is an entry point of services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). However, most of ANC services are provided in health centres or fields, where laboratory services by technicians are not available. In this study, those voluntary confidential counselling and testing (VCCT) counsellors involved in PMTCT were trained by experienced laboratory technicians in our centre on HIV testing using Determine (Abbot Laboratories) HIV1/2 test kits through a half-day training course, which consisted of use of a pipette, how to process whole blood samples, and how to read test result. The trained counsellors were midwives working for ANC and delivery ward in our centre without any experience on laboratory works. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of the training by evaluating the proficiency of the trained non-laboratory staffs. The trained counsellors withdrew blood sample after pre-test counselling following ANC, and performed the rapid test. Laboratory technicians routinely did the same test and returned reports of the test results to counsellors. Reports by the counsellors and the laboratory technicians were compared, and discordant reports in two groups were re-tested with the same rapid test kit using the same blood sample. Cause of discordance was detected in discussion with both groups. Of 563 blood samples tested by six trained VCCT counsellors and three laboratory technicians, 11 samples (2.0%) were reported positive in each group, however four discordant reports (0.7%) between the groups were observed, in which two positive reports and two negative reports by the counsellors were negative and positive by the laboratory technicians, respectively. Further investigation confirmed that all the reports by the counsellors were correct, and that human error in writing reports in the laboratory was a cause of these discordant reports. These findings

  20. Evaluation of the proficiency of trained non-laboratory health staffs and laboratory technicians using a rapid and simple HIV antibody test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukoyama Yumi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Cambodia, nearly half of pregnant women attend antenatal care (ANC, which is an entry point of services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT. However, most of ANC services are provided in health centres or fields, where laboratory services by technicians are not available. In this study, those voluntary confidential counselling and testing (VCCT counsellors involved in PMTCT were trained by experienced laboratory technicians in our centre on HIV testing using Determine (Abbot Laboratories HIV1/2 test kits through a half-day training course, which consisted of use of a pipette, how to process whole blood samples, and how to read test result. The trained counsellors were midwives working for ANC and delivery ward in our centre without any experience on laboratory works. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of the training by evaluating the proficiency of the trained non-laboratory staffs. The trained counsellors withdrew blood sample after pre-test counselling following ANC, and performed the rapid test. Laboratory technicians routinely did the same test and returned reports of the test results to counsellors. Reports by the counsellors and the laboratory technicians were compared, and discordant reports in two groups were re-tested with the same rapid test kit using the same blood sample. Cause of discordance was detected in discussion with both groups. Of 563 blood samples tested by six trained VCCT counsellors and three laboratory technicians, 11 samples (2.0% were reported positive in each group, however four discordant reports (0.7% between the groups were observed, in which two positive reports and two negative reports by the counsellors were negative and positive by the laboratory technicians, respectively. Further investigation confirmed that all the reports by the counsellors were correct, and that human error in writing reports in the laboratory was a cause of these discordant

  1. Reliability of a 5 x 6-s maximal cycling repeated-sprint test in trained female team-sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGawley, K; Bishop, D

    2006-11-01

    The present study examined the reliability of work and power measures during a 5 x 6-s cycle ergometer test of repeated-sprint ability. Nine, well-trained, female soccer players performed five, 5 x 6-s repeated-sprint tests on a front-access cycle ergometer on separate days. Sprints were separated by 24 s of active recovery. Absolute measures of total work done (W (tot)), total peak power (PP(tot)), work done during sprint 1 (W (1)) and peak power output during sprint 1 (PP(1)) were recorded. Decrement scores in work done (W (dec)) and peak power output (PP(dec)), and fatigue indices for work done (FI( W )) and peak power (FI( P )), were calculated. Significant improvements in all of the work and power measures were observed between trial 1 and subsequent trials (P x 6-s repeated-sprint cycling test. Furthermore, due to the large variation around performance decrement it was suggested that decrement scores ought to be interpreted with caution.

  2. A ground-based magnetic survey of Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada: data release and preliminary interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Bethany L.; Curry-Elrod, Erika; Drellack, Sigmund

    2014-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) is located in southern Nevada approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas. Frenchman Flat is a sedimentary basin located on the eastern edge of NNSS and extending eastward into the adjacent Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR).

  3. EVALUTION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF BALANCE TRAINING IN CONVENTIONAL PROSTHESIS VERSUS ULTRAMODERN PROSTHESIS IN UNILATERAL TRANSTIBIAL AMPUTEE BY USING FLAMINGO BALANCE TEST

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh; Vinod Kumar; Bharath Raju; Raja; Ravish; Mandeep; Hari Krishna; Rajeeva

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the effectiveness of balance training on unilateral transtibal amputee with conventional prosthesis and ultramodern prosthesis. To compare the Effectiveness of balance training in conventional prosthesis versus ultramodern prosthesis in unilateral transtibial amputee by using Flamingo balance test. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After obtaining informed consent from the patients, we studied a total of 40 patients, aged between 30- 60 yrs, where they were randomly ...

  4. The effectiveness of the Allen Carr smoking cessation training in companies tested in a quasi-experimental design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Zuidema, Rixt; Vos, Diederick; van Kalken, Marike

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Allen Carr training (ACt) is a popular one-session smoking cessation group training that is provided by licensed organizations that have the permission to use the Allen Carr method. However, few data are available on the effectiveness of the training. Methods: In a quasi-experimental

  5. Does child and adolescent mental health in-service training result in equivalent knowledge gain among cadres of non-specialist health workers in Uganda? A pre-test post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akol, Angela; Nalugya, Joyce; Nshemereirwe, Sylvia; Babirye, Juliet N; Engebretsen, Ingunn Marie Stadskleiv

    2017-01-01

    Early identification and management of child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) disorders helps to avert mental illness in adulthood but a CAMH treatment gap exists in Uganda. CAMH integration into primary health care (PHC) through in-service training of non-specialist health workers (NSHW) using the World Health Organisation (WHO) Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) Intervention Guide (IG) is a strategy to address this gap. However, results of such training are not supported by information on training development or delivery; and are undifferentiated by NSHW cadre. We aim to describe an in-service CAMH training for NSHW in Uganda and assess cadre-differentiated learning outcomes. Thirty-six clinical officers, nurses and midwives from 18 randomly selected PHC clinics in eastern Uganda were trained for 5 days on CAMH screening and referral using a curriculum based on the mhGAP-IG version 1.0 and PowerPoint slides from the International Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP). The residential training was evaluated through pre- and post- training tests of CAMH knowledge and attitudes using the participants' post-test scores; and the difference between pre-test and post-test scores. Two-tailed t-tests assessed differences in mean pre-test and post-test scores between the cadres; hierarchical linear regression tested the association between cadre and post test scores; and logistic regression evaluated the relationship between cadre and knowledge gain at three pre-determined cut off points. Thirty-three participants completed both pre-and post-tests. Improved mean scores from pre- to post-test were observed for both clinical officers (20% change) and nurse/midwives (18% change). Clinical officers had significantly higher mean test scores than nurses and midwives (p < 0.05) but cadre was not significantly associated with improvement in CAMH knowledge at the 10% (AOR 0.08; 95 CI [0.01, 1.19]; p = 0.066), 15% (AOR 0

  6. Increased correlation coefficient between the written test score and tutors' performance test scores after training of tutors for assessment of medical students during problem-based learning course in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiprakash, Heethal; Min, Aung Ko Ko; Ghosh, Sarmishtha

    2016-03-01

    This paper is aimed at finding if there was a change of correlation between the written test score and tutors' performance test scores in the assessment of medical students during a problem-based learning (PBL) course in Malaysia. This is a cross-sectional observational study, conducted among 264 medical students in two groups from November 2010 to November 2012. The first group's tutors did not receive tutor training; while the second group's tutors were trained in the PBL process. Each group was divided into high, middle and low achievers based on their end-of-semester exam scores. PBL scores were taken which included written test scores and tutors' performance test scores. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the two kinds of scores in each group. The correlation coefficient between the written scores and tutors' scores in group 1 was 0.099 (ptraining reinforces the importance of tutor training before their participation in the PBL course.

  7. Testing of a Hybrid FES-Robot Assisted Hand Motor Training Program in Sub-Acute Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRIGORAS, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available While hands-on therapy is the most commonly used technique for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke, it requires a therapist and residual activity and is best suited for active-assisted exercises. Robotic therapy on the other hand, can provide intention driven training in a motivating environment. We compared a robotic and standard therapy group, allowing intention driven finger flexion/extention respectively active-assisted exercises and a standard therapy only group. A total of 25 patients, 2 to 6 months post–stroke, with moderate motor deficit (Fugl-Meyer Assessment or FMA between 15 and 50, were randomly assigned in one of the groups. Patients practiced 30 minutes of hands-on therapy each day for 2 weeks with a supplementary 30 minutes of robotic therapy each day for patients in the experimental group. Subjects were evaluated using the FMA, Box and Blocks test (BBT and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS before and after the treatment. Patients in the experimental group showed higher average gain in all tests than those in the control group but only the SIS average gain was on the limit of statistical significance. This study shows the potential efficacy of robotic therapy for hand rehabilitation in subacute stroke patients.

  8. Development and pilot testing of a standardized training program for a patient-mentoring intervention to increase adherence to outpatient HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Jeffrey A; Mignogna, Joseph; Stanley, Melinda A; Davila, Jessica; Wear, Jackie; Amico, K Rivet; Giordano, Thomas P

    2012-03-01

    Although peer interventionists have been successful in medication treatment-adherence interventions, their role in complex behavior-change approaches to promote entry and reentry into HIV care requires further investigation. The current study sought to describe and test the feasibility of a standardized peer-mentor training program used for MAPPS (Mentor Approach for Promoting Patient Self-Care), a study designed to increase engagement and attendance at HIV outpatient visits among high-risk HIV inpatients using HIV-positive peer interventionists to deliver a comprehensive behavioral change intervention. Development of MAPPS and its corresponding training program included collaborations with mentors from a standing outpatient mentor program. The final training program included (1) a half-day workshop; (2) practice role-plays; and (3) formal, standardized patient role-plays, using trained actors with "real-time" video observation (and ratings from trainers). Mentor training occurred over a 6-week period and required demonstration of adherence and skill, as rated by MAPPS trainers. Although time intensive, ultimate certification of mentors suggested the program was both feasible and effective. Survey data indicated mentors thought highly of the training program, while objective rating data from trainers indicated mentors were able to understand and display standards associated with intervention fidelity. Data from the MAPPS training program provide preliminary evidence that peer mentors can be trained to levels necessary to ensure intervention fidelity, even within moderately complex behavioral-change interventions. Although additional research is needed due to limitations of the current study (e.g., limited generalizability due to sample size and limited breadth of clinical training opportunities), data from the current trial suggest that training programs such as MAPPS appear both feasible and effective.

  9. Conventional Training Versus Game-Based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Shooter) ( Bug Killer ) (Spy Plane) Conventional Training Versus Game-Based Training Anacapa Sciences, Inc. – Final Report, March 2006 Page...test- bed (which is described in more detail in Chapter 3.) Articles that referenced improved efficiency of training (e.g., reduced training time or...test- bed training programs. In designing the taxonomy, we also conferred with our expert consultant in the field of instructional design, Dr

  10. Effect of two additional interventions, test and reflection, added to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation training on seventh grade students' practical skills and willingness to act: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Anette; Hult, Håkan; Kreitz-Sandberg, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif; Nilsson, Lennart

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this research is to investigate if two additional interventions, test and reflection, after standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training facilitate learning by comparing 13-year-old students' practical skills and willingness to act. Seventh grade students in council schools of two municipalities in south-east Sweden. School classes were randomised to CPR training only (O), CPR training with a practical test including feedback (T) or CPR training with reflection and a practical test including feedback (RT). Measures of practical skills and willingness to act in a potential life-threatening situation were studied directly after training and at 6 months using a digital reporting system and a survey. A modified Cardiff test was used to register the practical skills, where scores in each of 12 items resulted in a total score of 12-48 points. The study was conducted in accordance with current European Resuscitation Council guidelines during December 2013 to October 2014. 29 classes for a total of 587 seventh grade students were included in the study. The total score of the modified Cardiff test at 6 months was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were the total score directly after training, the 12 individual items of the modified Cardiff test and willingness to act. At 6 months, the T and O groups scored 32 (3.9) and 30 (4.0) points, respectively (pskills. Reflection did not increase further CPR skills. At 6-month follow-up, no intervention effect was found regarding willingness to make a life-saving effort. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Nursing intensive care skills training: a nurse led, short, structured, and practical training program, developed and tested in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, A Pubudu; Stephens, Tim; Welch, John; Sigera, Chathurani; De Alwis, Sunil; Athapattu, Priyantha; Dharmagunawardene, Dilantha; Olupeliyawa, Asela; de Abrew, Ashwini; Peiris, Lalitha; Siriwardana, Somalatha; Karunathilake, Indika; Dondorp, Arjen; Haniffa, Rashan

    2015-04-01

    To assess the impact of a nurse-led, short, structured training program for intensive care unit (ICU) nurses in a resource-limited setting. A training program using a structured approach to patient assessment and management for ICU nurses was designed and delivered by local nurse tutors in partnership with overseas nurse trainers. The impact of the course was assessed using the following: pre-course and post-course self-assessment, a pre-course and post-course Multiple Choice Questionnaire (MCQ), a post-course Objective Structured Clinical Assessment station, 2 post-course Short Oral Exam (SOE) stations, and post-course feedback questionnaires. In total, 117 ICU nurses were trained. Post-MCQ scores were significantly higher when compared with pre-MCQ (P Nursing Intensive Care Skills Training was highly rated by participants and was effective in improving the knowledge of the participants. This sustainable short course model may be adaptable to other resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a training program for device operators in the Australian Government's Point of Care Testing in General Practice Trial: issues and implications for rural and remote practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Mark D; Mazzachi, Beryl C; Watkinson, Les; Shephard, Anne K; Laurence, Caroline; Gialamas, Angela; Bubner, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    From September 2005 to February 2007 the Australian Government funded the Point of Care Testing (PoCT) in General Practice Trial, a multi-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and satisfaction of PoCT in General Practice. In total, 53 practices (23 control and 30 intervention) based in urban, rural or remote locations across three states (South Australia [SA], New South Wales [NSW] and Victoria [VIC]) participated in the Trial. Control practices had pathology testing performed by their local laboratory, while intervention practices conducted pathology testing by PoCT. In total, 4968 patients (1958 control and 3010 intervention) participated in the Trial. The point-of-care (PoC) tests performed by intervention practices were: haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) on patients with diabetes, total cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol on patients with hyperlipidaemia, and international normalised ratio (INR) on patients on anticoagulant therapy. Three PoCT devices measured these tests: the Siemens DCA 2000 (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics, Melbourne, VIC, Australia) for HbA1c and urine ACR; Point of Care Diagnostics Cholestech LDX analyser (Point of Care Diagnostics; Sydney, NSW, Australia) for lipids; and the Roche CoaguChek S (Roche Diagnostics; Sydney, NSW, Australia) for INR. Point-of-care testing in the General Practice Trial was underpinned by a quality management framework which included an on-going training and competency program for PoCT device operators. This article describes the design, implementation and results of the training and competency program. An education and training resource package was developed for the Trial consisting of a training manual, a set of A3 laminated posters and a CD ROM. Five initial training workshops were held for intervention practices from each geographic region between August and October 2005

  13. A pico-satellite assembled and tested during the 6th CanSat Leader Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Colin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the process to construct a pico-satellite mounted in a bottle of polyethylene terephthalate (PET of 345 ml. The assembly and tests were made during the 6th CanSat Leader Training Program (CLTP-6 at University Hokkaido-Japan in the summer 2015. The pico-satellite was launched in the facilities of Uematsu Electric Co. Ltd. in Akabira-Japan by a paper model rocket, which achieved a height of approximately 100 m. The mission was designed to measure physical variables, such as temperature and humidity using electronic sensors. During the flight, we observed that the temperature inside the rocket was ∼0.5 °C higher than the temperature of the environment. We registered a humidity difference of ∼5%, measured between the maximum height and the landing point. The flight pattern was projected to a plane that covers an area of 50 m × 50 m by means the coordinates of a GPS.

  14. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  15. The self-paced VO2max test to assess maximal oxygen uptake in highly trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, James S; Hopker, James G; Mauger, Alexis R

    2015-03-01

    The novel self-paced maximal-oxygen-uptake (VO2max) test (SPV) may be a more suitable alternative to traditional maximal tests for elite athletes due to the ability to self-regulate pace. This study aimed to examine whether the SPV can be administered on a motorized treadmill. Fourteen highly trained male distance runners performed a standard graded exercise test (GXT), an incline-based SPV (SPVincline), and a speed-based SPV (SPVspeed). The GXT included a plateau-verification stage. Both SPV protocols included 5×2-min stages (and a plateau-verification stage) and allowed for self-pacing based on fixed increments of rating of perceived exertion: 11, 13, 15, 17, and 20. The participants varied their speed and incline on the treadmill by moving between different marked zones in which the tester would then adjust the intensity. There was no significant difference (P=.319, ES=0.21) in the VO2max achieved in the SPVspeed (67.6±3.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), 95%CI=65.6-69.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) compared with that achieved in the GXT (68.6±6.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), 95%CI=65.1-72.1 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Participants achieved a significantly higher VO2max in the SPVincline (70.6±4.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), 95%CI=68.1-73.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) than in either the GXT (P=.027, ES=0.39) or SPVspeed (P=.001, ES=0.76). The SPVspeed protocol produces VO2max values similar to those obtained in the GXT and may represent a more appropriate and athlete-friendly test that is more oriented toward the variable speed found in competitive sport.

  16. Dynamic Testing of Analogical Reasoning in 5- to 6-Year-Olds : Multiple-Choice Versus Constructed-Response Training Items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, C.E.; Heiser, W.J.; Resing, W.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple-choice (MC) analogy items are often used in cognitive assessment. However, in dynamic testing, where the aim is to provide insight into potential for learning and the learning process, constructed-response (CR) items may be of benefit. This study investigated whether training with CR or MC

  17. Can training in empathetic validation improve medical students' communication with patients suffering pain? A test of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Linton

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions:. We demonstrated that training empathetic validation results in improved communication thus extending previous findings to a medical setting with patients suffering pain. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to provide validation training for health care providers and this warrants further investigation in controlled studies.

  18. The Development and Validation of a Spanish Elicited Imitation Test of Oral Language Proficiency for the Missionary Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    The Missionary Training Center (MTC), affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, needs a reliable and cost effective way to measure the oral language proficiency of missionaries learning Spanish. The MTC needed to measure incoming missionaries' Spanish language proficiency for training and classroom assignment as well as to…

  19. A Test of Vision Training and Potential Antecedents to Leaders' Visioning Ability. [and] Invited Reaction: Enabling Visionary Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Peg; Greenberger, David B.; Meindl, James R.

    1998-01-01

    Thoms and Greenberger report how organizational leaders (n=111) who participated in vision training were compared to 50 who received other management training. The first group's visioning ability increased; their future time perspective and positivism were correlated with their visioning ability. Meindl offers a critique of Thoms's and…

  20. Can the Critical Power Model Explain the Increased Peak Velocity/Power During Incremental Test After Concurrent Strength and Endurance Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Benedito S; Greco, Camila C

    2017-08-01

    Denadai, BS and Greco, CC. Can the critical power model explain the increased peak velocity/power during incremental test after concurrent strength and endurance training? J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2319-2323, 2017-The highest exercise intensity that can be maintained at the end of a ramp or step incremental test (i.e., velocity or work rate at V[Combining Dot Above]O2max - Vpeak/Wpeak) can be used for endurance performance prediction and individualization of aerobic training. The interindividual variability in Vpeak/Wpeak has been attributed to exercise economy, anaerobic capacity, and neuromuscular capability, alongside the major determinant of aerobic capacity. Interestingly, findings after concurrent strength and endurance training performed by endurance athletes have challenged the actual contribution of these variables. The critical power model usually derived from the performance of constant-work rate exercise can also explain tolerance to a ramp incremental exercise so that, Vpeak/Wpeak can be predicted accurately. However, there is not yet discussion of possible concomitant improvements in the parameters of the critical power model and Vpeak/Wpeak after concurrent training and whether they can be associated with and therefore depend on different neuromuscular adaptations. Therefore, this brief review presents some evidence that the critical power model could explain the improvement of Vpeak/Wpeak and should be used to monitor aerobic performance enhancement after different concurrent strength- and endurance-training designs.

  1. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a home-based inspiratory muscle training programme in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using multiple inspiratory muscle tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoletou, Dimitra; Man, William D-C; Mustfa, Naveed; Moore, Julie; Rafferty, Gerrard; Grant, Robert L; Johnson, Lorna; Moxham, John

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based inspiratory muscle training (IMT) programme using multiple inspiratory muscle tests. Sixty-eight patients (37 M) with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (Mean [SD], FEV1 36.1 [13.6]% pred.; FEV1/FVC 35.7 [11.2]%) were randomised into an experimental or control group and trained with a threshold loading device at intensity >30% maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax) or muscle endurance (RME), chronic respiratory disease questionnaire (CRDQ), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) and the SF-36. Between-group changes were assessed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). PImax and perception of well-being improved significantly post-IMT [p = 0.04 and evaluation of changes in muscle function post-IMT. A seven-week, home-based inspiratory muscle training programme improves maximal inspiratory pressure and perception of well-being in patients with moderate to severe COPD but not sniff nasal inspiratory pressure or diaphragm contractility, respiratory muscle endurance and exercise capacity. Multiple tests are recommended for a more comprehensive assessment of changes in muscle function following inspiratory muscle training programmes. Therapists need to explore different community-based inspiratory muscle training regimes for COPD patients and identify the optimal exercise protocol that is likely to lead to improvements in diaphragm contractility and exercise capacity.

  2. Investigation of the Role of Training Health Volunteers in Promoting Pap Smear Test Use among Iranian Women Based on the Protection Motivation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremani, Leila; Harami, Zahra Khiyali; Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Keshavarzi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is known as one of the most prevalent types of cancers and a major public health problem in developing countries which can be detected by Pap test, prevented, and treated. Despite the effective role of Pap test in decreasing the incidence and mortality due to cervical cancer, it is still one the most common causes of cancer-related deaths among women, especially in developing countries. Thus, this study aimed to examine the effect of educational interventions implemented by health volunteers based on protection motivation theory (PMT) on promoting Pap test use among women. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 60 health volunteers and 420 women. The study participants were divided into an intervention and a control group. Data were collected using a valid self-reported questionnaire including demographic variables and PMT constructs which was completed by both groups before and 2 months after the intervention. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software, version 19 and were analyzed using Chi-square test, independent T-test, and descriptive statistical methods. Ptest use also increased by about 62.9% among the study women. This study showed a significant positive relationship between PMT-based training and Pap test use. The results also revealed the successful contribution of health volunteers to training cervical cancer screening. Thus, training interventions based on PMT are suggested to be designed and implemented and health volunteers are recommended to be employed for educational purposes and promoting the community's, especially women's, health.

  3. Sex-Based Effects on Immune Changes Induced by a Maximal Incremental Exercise Test in Well-Trained Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José P. Morgado

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies examining the immune response to acute intensive swimming have shown increased leukocytosis and lymphocyte populations. However, studies concerning mucosal immunity and sex differences remain controversial. The objective of the study was to examine sex differences on the immune response to maximal incremental swimming exercise in well trained swimmers. Participants (11 females, controlled for menstrual cycle phase effects; 10 males performed a maximal incremental 7x200 m front crawl set. Fingertip capillary blood samples were obtained after each 200 m swim for lactate assessment. Venous blood and saliva samples were collected before and 5 minutes after the swimming test to determine total numbers of leukocytes, lymphocytes and subpopulations, and serum and salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA levels. IgA secretion rate was calculated. Menstrual cycle phase did not influence the immune response to exercise. As for sex differences, exercise induced an increase in leukocytes, total lymphocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD16+/56+ in males. In females, only leukocytosis, of a lower magnitude than was observed in males, occurred. CD19+ increased and CD4+/CD8+ ratio decreased in both groups following exercise whilst IgA, SIgA concentrations, and srIgA did not change. Both males and females finished the incremental exercise very close to the targeted race velocity, attaining peak blood lactate concentrations of 14.6±2.25 and 10.4±1.99 mmol.L-1, respectively. The effect of a maximal incremental swimming task on immunity is sex dependent and more noticeable in men. Males, as a consequence of higher levels of immunosurveillance may therefore be at a lower risk of infection than females.

  4. Increased correlation coefficient between the written test score and tutors’ performance test scores after training of tutors for assessment of medical students during problem-based learning course in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heethal Jaiprakash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at finding if there was a change of correlation between the written test score and tutors’ performance test scores in the assessment of medical students during a problem-based learning (PBL course in Malaysia. This is a cross-sectional observational study, conducted among 264 medical students in two groups from November 2010 to November 2012. The first group’s tutors did not receive tutor training; while the second group’s tutors were trained in the PBL process. Each group was divided into high, middle and low achievers based on their end-of-semester exam scores. PBL scores were taken which included written test scores and tutors’ performance test scores. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the two kinds of scores in each group. The correlation coefficient between the written scores and tutors’ scores in group 1 was 0.099 (p<0.001 and for group 2 was 0.305 (p<0.001. The higher correlation coefficient in the group where tutors received the PBL training reinforces the importance of tutor training before their participation in the PBL course.

  5. Evaluation of Obturator and Sealing Cuff Properties for the M865 Training Projectile with Comparison to Ballistic Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoppel, C

    1999-01-01

    The nylon obturation and RTV sealing cuff for the M865 training round were evaluated to identity potential sources of ballistic variability associated with the material properties and material processing...

  6. The validity of the air traffic selection and training (AT-SAT) test battery in operational use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Applicants for the air traffic control specialist (ATCS) occupation from the general public and graduates from post-secondary institutions participating in the FAAs Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) must take and pass the Air Tra...

  7. Oxidative stress responses to a graded maximal exercise test in older adults following explosive-type resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Ceci

    2014-01-01

    In conclusion, the adherence to an EMRT protocol is able to induce a cellular adaptation allowing healthy elderly trained subjects to cope with the oxidative stress induced by an acute exercise more effectively than the aged-matched sedentary subjects.

  8. Two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test for sensory analysis of spread products as an alternative to descriptive analysis with trained panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Ah; den-Hollander, Elyn; Lee, Hye-Seong

    2018-03-01

    Descriptive analysis with a trained sensory panel has thus far been the most well defined methodology to characterize various products. However, in practical terms, intensive training in descriptive analysis has been recognized as a serious defect. To overcome this limitation, various novel rapid sensory profiling methodologies have been suggested in the literature. Among these, attribute-based methodologies such as check-all-that-apply (CATA) questions showed results comparable to those of conventional sensory descriptive analysis. Kim, Hopkinson, van Hout, and Lee (2017a, 2017b) have proposed a novel attribute-based methodology termed the two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with a novel output measure of applicability magnitude (d' A ) for measuring consumers' product usage experience throughout various product usage stages. In this paper, the potential of the two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with d' A was investigated as an alternative to conventional sensory descriptive analysis in terms of sensory characterization and product discrimination. Twelve commercial spread products were evaluated using both conventional sensory descriptive analysis with a trained sensory panel and two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with an untrained sensory panel. The results demonstrated that the 'double-faced applicability' test can be used to provide a direct measure of the applicability magnitude of sensory attributes of the samples tested in terms of d' A for sensory characterization of individual samples and multiple sample comparisons. This suggests that when the appropriate list of attributes to be used in the questionnaire is already available, the two-step rating-based 'double-faced applicability' test with d' A can be used as a more efficient alternative to conventional descriptive analysis, without requiring any intensive training process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Post-Closure Strategy for Use-Restricted Sites on the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada Test and Training Range, and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvas, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-03-26

    The purpose of this Post-Closure Strategy is to provide a consistent methodology for continual evaluation of post-closure requirements for use-restricted areas on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to consolidate, modify, or streamline the program. In addition, this document stipulates the creation of a single consolidated Post-Closure Plan that will detail the current post-closure requirements for all active use restrictions (URs) and outlines its implementation and subsequent revision. This strategy will ensure effective management and control of the post-closure sites. There are currently over 200 URs located on the NNSS, NTTR, and TTR. Post-closure requirements were initially established in the Closure Report for each site. In some cases, changes to the post-closure requirements have been implemented through addenda, errata sheets, records of technical change, or letters. Post-closure requirements have been collected from these multiple sources and consolidated into several formats, such as summaries and databases. This structure increases the possibility of inconsistencies and uncertainty. As more URs are established and the post-closure program is expanded, the need for a comprehensive approach for managing the program will increase. Not only should the current requirements be obtainable from a single source that supersedes all previous requirements, but the strategy for modifying the requirements should be standardized. This will enable more effective management of the program into the future. This strategy document and the subsequent comprehensive plan are to be implemented under the assumption that the NNSS and outlying sites will be under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the foreseeable future. This strategy was also developed assuming that regulatory control of the sites remains static. The comprehensive plan is not

  10. A New App for At-Home Cognitive Training: Description and Pilot Testing on Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchino, Andrea; Pedullà, Ludovico; Bonzano, Laura; Vassallo, Claudio; Battaglia, Mario Alberto; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Bove, Marco; Brichetto, Giampaolo

    2015-08-31

    Cognitive impairment is common in people with neurological diseases and severely affects their social and professional life. It has been shown that intensive and personalized cognitive rehabilitation (CR), based on working memory exercises, leads to improved cognitive status of healthy and cognitive-impaired subjects. New technologies would help to promote accessible, at-home, and self-managed CR interventions. The aim of this paper is to describe the design of Cognitive Training Kit (COGNI-TRAcK), an app for mobile devices, to self-administer an at-home, intensive, and personalized CR intervention based on working memory exercises, and test its disposability-to-use (usability, motivation to use, compliance to treatment) on cognitive-impaired patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). COGNI-TRAcK includes user-friendly interfaces for personal data input and management and for CR intervention configurations. Inner routines automatically implement adaptive working load algorithms and allow data processing and analysis. A dedicated team developed COGNI-TRAcK with C# programming language, by using the platform Xamarin Studio 4.0.10 for Android (API level 15 and following). Three exercises based on working memory are now available. To assess the disposability-to-use of the system, patients with MS were selected as likely users due to the young age of disease onset. Cognitive-impaired patients with MS (N=16) with a mean age of 49.06 years (SD 9.10) and a mean score of 3.75 (SD 1.92) on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were submitted to an 8-week at-home intervention administered by the app. The intervention consisted of 5 daily scheduled 30-minute sessions per week. Disposability-to-use of COGNI-TRAcK was investigated by means of a questionnaire administered to patients at the end of the training. The adherence to the treatment was 84% (33.4/40). Of the patients with MS, 94% (15/16) understood the instructions given, 100% (16/16) felt independent to use COGNI

  11. Sex-based effects on immune changes induced by a maximal incremental exercise test in well-trained swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, José P; Monteiro, Cristina P; Matias, Catarina N; Alves, Francisco; Pessoa, Pedro; Reis, Joana; Martins, Fátima; Seixas, Teresa; Laires, Maria J

    2014-09-01

    Studies examining the immune response to acute intensive swimming have shown increased leukocytosis and lymphocyte populations. However, studies concerning mucosal immunity and sex differences remain controversial. The objective of the study was to examine sex differences on the immune response to maximal incremental swimming exercise in well trained swimmers. Participants (11 females, controlled for menstrual cycle phase effects; 10 males) performed a maximal incremental 7x200 m front crawl set. Fingertip capillary blood samples were obtained after each 200 m swim for lactate assessment. Venous blood and saliva samples were collected before and 5 minutes after the swimming test to determine total numbers of leukocytes, lymphocytes and subpopulations, and serum and salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels. IgA secretion rate was calculated. Menstrual cycle phase did not influence the immune response to exercise. As for sex differences, exercise induced an increase in leukocytes, total lymphocytes, CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), and CD16(+)/56(+) in males. In females, only leukocytosis, of a lower magnitude than was observed in males, occurred. CD19(+) increased and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio decreased in both groups following exercise whilst IgA, SIgA concentrations, and srIgA did not change. Both males and females finished the incremental exercise very close to the targeted race velocity, attaining peak blood lactate concentrations of 14.6±2.25 and 10.4±1.99 mmol.L(-1), respectively. The effect of a maximal incremental swimming task on immunity is sex dependent and more noticeable in men. Males, as a consequence of higher levels of immunosurveillance may therefore be at a lower risk of infection than females. Key PointsMaximal exercise induces an immune response.This study investigated the influence of sex over the leukocytes subpopulations and mucosal immune responses to maximal swimming.Male swimmers showed a stronger increase of T helper, T cytotoxic and NK lymphocytes than

  12. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer with an internal-noise model in a train-test paradigm for cardiac SPECT defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankov, Jovan G.

    2013-10-01

    The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) has become a widely used approach for evaluating medical image quality, acting as a surrogate for human observers in early-stage research on assessment and optimization of imaging devices and algorithms. The CHO is typically used to measure lesion detectability. Its popularity stems from experiments showing that the CHO's detection performance can correlate well with that of human observers. In some cases, CHO performance overestimates human performance; to counteract this effect, an internal-noise model is introduced, which allows the CHO to be tuned to match human-observer performance. Typically, this tuning is achieved using example data obtained from human observers. We argue that this internal-noise tuning step is essentially a model training exercise; therefore, just as in supervised learning, it is essential to test the CHO with an internal-noise model on a set of data that is distinct from that used to tune (train) the model. Furthermore, we argue that, if the CHO is to provide useful insights about new imaging algorithms or devices, the test data should reflect such potential differences from the training data; it is not sufficient simply to use new noise realizations of the same imaging method. Motivated by these considerations, the novelty of this paper is the use of new model selection criteria to evaluate ten established internal-noise models, utilizing four different channel models, in a train-test approach. Though not the focus of the paper, a new internal-noise model is also proposed that outperformed the ten established models in the cases tested. The results, using cardiac perfusion SPECT data, show that the proposed train-test approach is necessary, as judged by the newly proposed model selection criteria, to avoid spurious conclusions. The results also demonstrate that, in some models, the optimal internal-noise parameter is very sensitive to the choice of training data; therefore, these models are prone

  13. Oxidative stress responses to a graded maximal exercise test in older adults following explosive-type resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceci, R.; Beltran Valls, M.R.; Duranti, G.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that low frequency, moderate intensity, explosive-type resistance training (EMRT) is highly beneficial in elderly subjects towards muscle strength and power, with a systemic adaptive response of anti-oxidant and stress-induced markers. In the present study, we aimed...... group. Apoptosis rates and DNA damage did not show any significant variation in relation to EMRT and/or GXT. In conclusion, the adherence to an EMRT protocol is able to induce a cellular adaptation allowing healthy elderly trained subjects to cope with the oxidative stress induced by an acute exercise...... to evaluate the impact of EMRT on oxidative stress biomarkers induced in old people (70-75 years) by a single bout of acute, intense exercise. Sixteen subjects randomly assigned to either a control, not exercising group ( n=8) or a trained group performing EMRT protocol for 12-weeks ( n=8), were submitted...

  14. Effects of intermittent aerobic training on passive avoidance test (shuttle box) and stress markers in the dorsal hippocampus of wistar rats exposed to administration of homocysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Dabidi Roshan, Valiollah; Pourasghar, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Elevated amino acid homocysteine (Hcy) levels and insufficient physical activity are the risk factors in Alzheimer disease (AD) development. The effect of intermittent aerobic training on memory retention test and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in the dorsal hippocampus of rats which were stimulated with Hcy is investigated. In order to determine the dose at which using Shuttle Box Test recognizes degenerative changes and/or memory impairment, 40 rats were injected by different dosages of Hcy to the dorsal hippocampus. It was observed that the required Hcy dose is 0.6 M. Then 44 rats were divided into four groups including training and control groups at 4 weeks of aerobic exercise in training and control groups at 8 weeks. To determine the effect of homocysteine on the memory impairment, Shuttle Box Test was used on treadmill (5 sessions/week, 12-18 m/min and 10-58.5 min). Hcy administration caused memory impairment and significant increase in TBARS. Significant decrease in TBARS level was noted after 8 weeks of aerobic exercise, but not after just 4 weeks of exercise compared with control group. In addition, performing 8 weeks of aerobic training led to significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) level and the time of avoidance learning test. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused learning and memory deficits probably by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the present study showed that regular moderate intensity intermittent exercise may reverse this process and exercise is recommended as a strategy to improve symptoms of senile neurodegenerative disease . None.

  15. Acute response to a 2-minute isometric exercise test predicts the blood pressure-lowering efficacy of isometric resistance training in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Somani, Yasina B.; Baross, Anthony W.; Brook, Robert D.; Milne, Kevin J.; McGowan, Cheri L.; Swaine, Ian L.

    2017-01-01

    Background:\\ud \\ud This work aimed to explore whether different forms of a simple isometric exercise test could be used to predict the blood pressure (BP)-lowering efficacy of different types of isometric resistance training (IRT) in healthy young adults. In light of the emphasis on primary prevention of hypertension, identifying those with normal BP who will respond to IRT is important. Also, heightened BP reactivity increases hypertension risk, and as IRT reduces BP reactivity in patients w...

  16. Testing a Web-Based, Trained-Peer Model to Build Capacity for Evidence-Based Practices in Community Mental Health Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Ramaris E; Adler, Abby; Frankel, Sarah A; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Pinedo, Paola; Evans, Arthur C; Beck, Aaron T; Creed, Torrey A

    2017-11-15

    Use of expert-led workshops plus consultation has been established as an effective strategy for training community mental health (CMH) clinicians in evidence-based practices (EBPs). Because of high rates of staff turnover, this strategy inadequately addresses the need to maintain capacity to deliver EBPs. This study examined knowledge, competency, and retention outcomes of a two-phase model developed to build capacity for an EBP in CMH programs. In the first phase, an initial training cohort in each CMH program participated in in-person workshops followed by expert-led consultation (in-person, expert-led [IPEL] phase) (N=214 clinicians). After this cohort completed training, new staff members participated in Web-based training (in place of in-person workshops), followed by peer-led consultation with the initial cohort (Web-based, trained-peer [WBTP] phase) (N=148). Tests of noninferiority assessed whether WBTP was not inferior to IPEL at increasing clinician cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) competency, as measured by the Cognitive Therapy Rating Scale. WBTP was not inferior to IPEL at developing clinician competency. Hierarchical linear models showed no significant differences in CBT knowledge acquisition between the two phases. Survival analyses indicated that WBTP trainees were less likely than IPEL trainees to complete training. In terms of time required from experts, WBTP required 8% of the resources of IPEL. After an initial investment to build in-house CBT expertise, CMH programs were able to use a WBTP model to broaden their own capacity for high-fidelity CBT. IPEL followed by WBTP offers an effective alternative to build EBP capacity in CMH programs, rather than reliance on external experts.

  17. [Training and testing for capillary blood glucose and ketone levels on triage: impact on the early management of diabetic ketoacidosis in an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ena, Javier; Amillo, Mónica; Panadero, Ana; Rosales, María; Guzmán-Libreros, Ángela Patricia; Navarro-Díaz, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    To study the impact of an intervention that included a training component and testing for glucose and ketone levels at the time of triage. The effect was evaluated on the basis of times to early management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in an emergency department. Quasi-experimental study with preintervention (January 2010 to November 2013) and postintervention (January 2014 to June 2015) periods in patients over the age of 15 years with DKA in a secondarycare hospital emergency department. The intervention consisted of training sessions for emergency physicians and nurses, the measurement of glucose on triage, and testing for ketonemia with beta-hydroxybutyrate strips on detection of a high glucose level. The outcome variables were the percentages of patients receiving intravenous insuline and isotonic saline within an hour of triage. We included 61 patients (preintervention, 41; postintervention, 20). The mean (SD) age was 40 (22) years and 36 (59%) were males. Adherence to clinical practice guidelines improved in the postintervention period. The rate of intravenous administration of insulin increased from 29.3% in the preintervention period to (75.0% postintervention (P=.001); isotonic saline administration increased from 51.2% to 80.0% (P=.031). A strategy that includes training and glucose and ketone testing on triage could facilitate earlier management of DKA in emergency departments.

  18. Acute Response to a 2-Minute Isometric Exercise Test Predicts the Blood Pressure-Lowering Efficacy of Isometric Resistance Training in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Yasina B; Baross, Anthony W; Brook, Robert D; Milne, Kevin J; McGowan, Cheri L; Swaine, Ian L

    2018-02-09

    This work aimed to explore whether different forms of a simple isometric exercise test could be used to predict the blood pressure (BP)-lowering efficacy of different types of isometric resistance training (IRT) in healthy young adults. In light of the emphasis on primary prevention of hypertension, identifying those with normal BP who will respond to IRT is important. Also, heightened BP reactivity increases hypertension risk, and as IRT reduces BP reactivity in patients with hypertension, it warrants further investigation in a healthy population. Forty-six young men and women (24 ± 5 years; 116 ± 10/ 68 ± 8 mm Hg) were recruited from 2 study sites: Windsor, Canada (n = 26; 13 women), and Northampton, United Kingdom (n = 20; 10 women). Resting BP and BP reactivity to an isometric exercise test were assessed prior to and following 10 weeks of thrice weekly IRT. Canadian participants trained on a handgrip dynamometer (isometric handgrip, IHG), while participants in the UK trained on an isometric leg extension dynamometer (ILE). Men and women enrolled in both interventions demonstrated significant reductions in systolic BP (P exercise test appears to be a viable tool to identify individuals who may respond to traditional IRT prescription.

  19. Use of a national continuing medical education meeting to provide simulation-based training in temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills: a pre-test post-test study

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Edward G.; Paparello, James J.; Wayne, Diane B.; Edwards, Cedric; Hoar, Stephanie; McQuillan, Rory; Schachter, Michael E.; Barsuk, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Simulation-based-mastery-learning (SBML) is an effective method to train nephrology fellows to competently insert temporary, non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs). Previous studies of SBML for NTHC-insertion have been conducted at a local level. Objectives Determine if SBML for NTHC-insertion can be effective when provided at a national continuing medical education (CME) meeting. Describe the correlation of demographic factors, prior experience with NTHC-insertion and procedu...

  20. Computerized training and proficiency testing. International Academy of Cytology Task Force summary. Diagnostic Cytology Towards the 21st Century: An International Expert Conference and Tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vooijs, G P; Davey, D D; Somrak, T M; Goodell, R M; Grohs, D H; Knesel, E A; Mango, L J; Mui, K K; Nielsen, M L; Wilbur, D C

    1998-01-01

    Computerized technologies probably will revolutionize the field of gynecologic cytology in the next century. Such technologies will be useful in both training and evaluating proficiency. However, manual screening/review of gynecologic cytology preparations is the current "gold standard" for both training and assessment of proficiency. Training programs for cytotechnologists and pathologists should provide instruction and experience in new technologies, but their introduction may depend on the availability of equipment and staff. Advantages of digital images for training include standardization of teaching sets and interactive capabilities, allowing educational feedback. Computerized support/assistance devices aid in complete screening of the slide during training and provide feedback to cytologists on screening techniques. Liquid-based cytopreparatory instruments facilitate multiple glass slides for teaching or testing. Proficiency testing (PT) in cytology has similar quality assurance goals as in other areas of the laboratory, but the subjective nature of cytologic analysis poses many challenges for implementation. There is consensus that all cytology practitioners would like to know the proficiency of the laboratory. However, the majority question the value and validity of any large-scale formal testing programs. Locator and diagnostic skills are both critical in cytology, but assessment of each skill may occur in different ways using computerized technologies. Any type of assessment should provide educational feedback to participants. Psychometric issues in PT include the consideration of different types of validity, including face, content, construct and criterion related. The reliability or consistency of the testing event is also critical. A valid and reliable correlation between work performance and performance on a PT needs to be established. The goal is to ensure that PT will identify submarginal practitioners and that persons successful on PT are in fact

  1. Sensory Desensitization Training for Successful Net Application and EEG/ERP Acquisition in Difficult to Test Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Cynthia P.; Flax, Judy; MacRoy-Higgins, Michelle; Fermano, Zena; Morgan-Byrne, Julie; Benasich, April A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of sensory desensitization training for 12 nonverbal children with autism to facilitate participation in an electrophysiological study assessing linguistic processing. Sensory desensitization was achieved for 10 of the 12 children and thus allowed collection of usable data in a passive linguistic paradigm.…

  2. Comparative Effects of Prescribed Weight-Training and Basketball Programs on Basketball Skill Test Scores of Ninth Grade Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H. Thomas, Jr.; Puckett, John R.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of weight-training and basketball programs on four basketball skills were evaluated with a pre- to posttest study of ninth-grade boys. No significant differences or trends were found among groups on the front shot, speed pass, jump and reach, or dribble. (Author/RD)

  3. Testing the Efficacy of an Education-Based Training Tool to Improve Diagnostic Accuracy of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to increase awareness of OCD symptomatology among doctoral students in clinical, counseling and school psychology through the implementation of a comprehensive OCD education-based training tool. Method: The program directors across all APA-accredited clinical, counseling, and school psychology doctoral graduate programs…

  4. Using short vignettes to disentangle perceived capability from motivation: a test using walking and resistance training behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Williams, David M; Mistry, Chetan D

    2016-07-01

    Self-efficacy is arguably the strongest correlate of physical activity, yet some researchers suggest this is because the construct confounds ability with motivation. We examine a more circumscribed construct, called perceived capability (PC), meant to measure ability but not motivation and propose that the construct will not be related to unskilled physical activities but may be linked to skilled behaviors. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether a PC construct can be stripped of motivation using a vignette approach in both walking and resistance training behaviors. Participants were a random sample of 248 university students, who were then randomly assigned to either answer resistance training or walking behavior questions. Both groups completed a PC measure and reasons for their answer before and after reading a vignette that clarified the phrasing of capability to a literal use of the term. PC was significantly (p resistance training. PC had significantly (p resistance training behavior. When PC was combined with intention to predict behavior, however, there was no significant (p > .05) difference in the amount of variance explained pre- to post-vignette. Thought listing showed that participants did not report capability barriers to walking and over half of the sample construed capability as motivation/other priorities pre-vignette. The findings support use of a vignette approach for researchers who wish to disentangle the assessment of PC from motivation while creating no overall loss in explained variance of physical activity.

  5. INTRA-RATER RELIABILITY OF THE MULTIPLE SINGLE-LEG HOP-STABILIZATION TEST AND RELATIONSHIPS WITH AGE, LEG DOMINANCE AND TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawle, Leanne; Freeman, Jennifer; Marsden, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Balance is a complex construct, affected by multiple components such as strength and co-ordination. However, whilst assessing an athlete's dynamic balance is an important part of clinical examination, there is no gold standard measure. The multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test is a functional test which may offer a method of evaluating the dynamic attributes of balance, but it needs to show adequate intra-tester reliability. The purpose of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of a dynamic balance test, the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test on the dominant and non-dominant legs. Intra-rater reliability study. Fifteen active participants were tested twice with a 10-minute break between tests. The outcome measure was the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test score, based on a clinically assessed numerical scoring system. Results were analysed using an Intraclass Correlations Coefficient (ICC2,1) and Bland-Altman plots. Regression analyses explored relationships between test scores, leg dominance, age and training (an alpha level of p = 0.05 was selected). ICCs for intra-rater reliability were 0.85 for the dominant and non-dominant legs (confidence intervals = 0.62-0.95 and 0.61-0.95 respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed scores within two standard deviations. A significant correlation was observed between the dominant and non-dominant leg on balance scores (R(2)=0.49, ptest demonstrated strong intra-tester reliability with active participants. Younger participants who trained more, have better balance scores. This test may be a useful measure for evaluating the dynamic attributes of balance. 3.

  6. Reliability and construct validity of Yo-Yo tests in untrained and soccer-trained school-girls aged 9-16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Póvoas, Susana C A; Castagna, Carlo; Soares, José Manuel da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The reliability and construct validity of three age-adapted-intensity Yo-Yo tests were evaluated in untrained (n=67) vs. soccer-trained (n=65) 9-16-year-old school-girls. Methods: Tests were performed 7 days apart for reliability (9-11-year-old: Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children......’s test; 12-13-year-old: Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 1; and 14-16-year-old: Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 2). Results: Yo-Yo distance covered was 43% (747±364 vs. 522±162 m), 83% (1236±514 vs. 674±231 m) and 137% (679±348 vs. 286±67 m) greater (P≤0.010) for the soccer-trained than...... during test and retest. Conclusion: The Yo-Yo tests are reliable for determining intermittent-exercise capacity and %HRpeak for soccer players and untrained 9-16-year-old girls. They also possess construct validity with better performances for soccer players compared to untrained age-matched girls...

  7. Respiratory muscle hemodynamic and metabolic adaptations to 16 weeks of training in varsity soccer players: near-infrared spectroscopy measurements during lung function tests (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R. Luke; Grob, Tanya; Sandhu, Komal; Schwab, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mobile, wireless near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instruments can be used during standard lung function tests to measure adaptations in respiratory muscle metabolism over weeks to months. In eight varsity soccer players at 0 weeks and after 16 weeks of routine training, commercially available mobile, wireless NIRS instruments were used to measure oxygenation and hemodynamics in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM, accessory inspiration muscle). During maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and forced vital capacity (FVC) maneuvers we determined peak or antipeak changes relative to baseline in oxygenation and hemodynamics: Δ%Sat (muscle oxygen saturation), ΔtHb (total hemoglobin), ΔO2Hb (oxygenated hemoglobin), and ΔHHb (deoxygenated hemoglobin). Subjects reported that the average training load was 13.3 h/week during the 16 study weeks, compared to 10.4 h/week during 12 prior weeks. After 16 weeks of training compared to 0 weeks we found statistically significant increases in SCM Δ%Sat (57.7%), ΔtHb (55.3%), and ΔO2Hb (56.7%) during MEP maneuvers, and in SCM Δ%Sat (64.8%), ΔtHb (29.4%), and ΔO2Hb (51.6%) during FVC maneuvers. Our data provide preliminary evidence that NIRS measurements during standard lung function tests are sufficiently sensitive to detect improvements or declines in respiratory muscle metabolism over periods of weeks to months due to training, disease, and rehabilitation exercise.

  8. Improving community health worker use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests in Zambia: package instructions, job aid and job aid-plus-training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Steven A; Jennings, Larissa; Chinyama, Masela; Masaninga, Fred; Mulholland, Kurt; Bell, David R

    2008-08-22

    Introduction of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) has boosted interest in parasite-based malaria diagnosis, leading to increased use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), particularly in rural settings where microscopy is limited. With donor support, national malaria control programmes are now procuring large quantities of RDTs. The scarcity of health facilities and trained personnel in many sub-Saharan African countries means that limiting RDT use to such facilities would exclude a significant proportion of febrile cases. RDT use by volunteer community health workers (CHWs) is one alternative, but most sub-Saharan African countries prohibit CHWs from handling blood, and little is known about CHW ability to use RDTs safely and effectively. This Zambia-based study was designed to determine: (i) whether Zambian CHWs could prepare and interpret RDTs accurately and safely using manufacturer's instructions alone; (ii) whether simple, mostly pictorial instructions (a "job aid") could raise performance to adequate levels; and (iii) whether a brief training programme would produce further improvement. The job aid and training programme were based on formative research with 32 CHWs in Luangwa District. The study team then recruited three groups of CHWs in Chongwe and Chibombo districts. All had experience treating malaria based on clinical diagnosis, but only six had prior RDT experience. Trained observers used structured observation checklists to score each participant's preparation of three RDTs. Each also read 10 photographs showing different test results. The first group (n = 32) was guided only by manufacturer's instructions. The second (n = 21) used only the job aid. The last (n = 26) used the job aid after receiving a three-hour training. Mean scores, adjusted for education, age, gender and experience, were 57% of 16 RDT steps correctly completed for group 1, 80% for group 2, and 92% for group 3. Mean percentage of test results interpreted correctly were 54% (group 1

  9. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers’ Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbro, Éimhín M.; Gill, Michelle M.; Reynolds, Joanna; Shelley, Katharine D.; Strasser, Susan; Sripipatana, Tabitha; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Mabey, David

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST) allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW) acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH) adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We illustrate that new

  10. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers' Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éimhín M Ansbro

    Full Text Available Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We

  11. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  12. Aerobic exercise in adolescents with obesity: preliminary evaluation of a modular training program and the modified shuttle test

    OpenAIRE

    Klijn, Peter HC; van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H; van Stel, Henk F

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Increasing activity levels in adolescents with obesity requires the development of exercise programs that are both attractive to adolescents and easily reproducible. The aim of this study was to develop a modular aerobic training program for adolescents with severe obesity, with a focus on variety, individual targets and acquiring physical skills. We report here the effects on aerobic fitness from a pilot study. Furthermore, we examined the feasibility of the modified shut...

  13. Volition-adaptive control for gait training using wearable exoskeleton: preliminary tests with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; López Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado Alonso, Fernando; Aranda López, Juan; Montesano Del Campo, Luis; Ama, Antonio J. del; Pons Rovira, Jose Luis

    2018-01-01

    Background Gait training for individuals with neurological disorders is challenging in providing the suitable assistance and more adaptive behaviour towards user needs. The user specific adaptation can be defined based on the user interaction with the orthosis and by monitoring the user intentions. In this paper, an adaptive control model, commanded by the user intention, is evaluated using a lower limb exoskeleton with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals (SCI). Methods A user...

  14. Volition-adaptive control for gait training using wearable exoskeleton: preliminary tests with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; López-Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Aranda, Joan; Montesano, Luis; del-Ama, Antonio J.; Pons, Jose L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Gait training for individuals with neurological disorders is challenging in providing the suitable assistance and more adaptive behaviour towards user needs. The user specific adaptation can be defined based on the user interaction with the orthosis and by monitoring the user intentions. In this paper, an adaptive control model, commanded by the user intention, is evaluated using a lower limb exoskeleton with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals (SCI). Methods A user intention...

  15. Special physical preparation of athletes in motor sport during testing methods basic training level of preparedness for competitive athlete load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednychenko M.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish the reasons for the high fatigue pilots during passage race course. Material : the study involved athletes and race car drivers depending on the rank of the competition. The total number surveyed was 140 people. Results : in vitro studies have established a pattern of growth of errors in the evaluation of the available jobs at different levels of fatigue. This asymmetry observed in the haptic display and reflex mean arterial pressure when simultaneous registration on the left and right side body. After the competition and training at a special physical training were examined 36 athletes. Comparison of the results display asymmetry haptic reflex and mean arterial pressure showed reliable changes in the resistance of the organism to a specific exertion racers. Conclusions : the optimal load is characterized by indicators of coordination and reflex reaction haptic mean arterial pressure. These indicators do not go beyond the norms of its symmetrical appearance. This characterizes a uniform and sufficient blood supply body during the execution of competitive and training load.

  16. Special physical preparation of athletes in motor sport during testing methods basic training level of preparedness for competitive athlete load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cherednychenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish the reasons for the high fatigue pilots during passage race course. Material : the study involved athletes and race car drivers depending on the rank of the competition. The total number surveyed was 140 people. Results : in vitro studies have established a pattern of growth of errors in the evaluation of the available jobs at different levels of fatigue. This asymmetry observed in the haptic display and reflex mean arterial pressure when simultaneous registration on the left and right side body. After the competition and training at a special physical training were examined 36 athletes. Comparison of the results display asymmetry haptic reflex and mean arterial pressure showed reliable changes in the resistance of the organism to a specific exertion racers. Conclusions : the optimal load is characterized by indicators of coordination and reflex reaction haptic mean arterial pressure. These indicators do not go beyond the norms of its symmetrical appearance. This characterizes a uniform and sufficient blood supply body during the execution of competitive and training load.

  17. Cardiac Parasympathetic Reactivation in Elite Soccer Players During Different Types of Traditional High-Intensity Training Exercise Modes and Specific Tests: Interests and Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellal, Alexandre; Casamichana, David; Castellano, Julen; Haddad, Monoem; Moalla, Wassim; Chamari, Karim

    2015-12-01

    The cardiac parasympathetic reactivation is currently used in soccer with a daily or weekly monitoring. However, previous studies have not investigated how this cardiac parasympathetic reactivation is in elite soccer players along different types of traditional high-intensity training exercise and specific tests. In this context, the present study aim to analyse it and to determine the interests and limits of this type of physiological information. The present study aims to examine how different traditional training exercise modes affect the cardiac parasympathetic reactivation function in elite soccer players. Twenty-two international soccer players participating in UEFA Champion's League took part in this study (age: 24.3 ± 4.2 years; height: 178.1 ± 6.2 cm; body mass: 80.3 ± 5.7 kg). Players performed different training methods including: short-duration intermittent exercises (INT) in-line and with changes of direction (COD) (10 - 10 seconds, 15 - 15 seconds, 30 - 30 seconds, e.g. an alternance of 10 - 10 seconds is 10 seconds of running according to the maximal aerobic speed (MAS) and 10-sec of recovery), INT including agility and technical skills (8 - 24-seconds), small-sided-games (SSGs) with and without goalkeepers (2 vs. 2, 3 vs. 3, 4 vs. 4), and repeated sprint ability (RSA) efforts (10 × 20 m, 10 × 30 m, 15 × 20 m). Heart rate (HR) decline was recorded 3 minutes after each exercise. HR declines were greater after the RSA compared to SSGs (P skills during INT, especially for the 30 - 30-seconds. This study revealed that cardiac parasympathetic reactivation function varied after INT, RSA and SSG, but also according to the rules manipulation. Therefore, this study provides interesting information for the training monitoring and players' recovery profile, with the aim of facilitating a more efficient planning and manipulation of training recovery strategies according to their fitness markers.

  18. Spaced cognitive training promotes training transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuowei eWang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive training studies yield wildly inconsistent results. One dimension on which studies vary is the scheduling of training sessions (Morrison & Chein, 2011. In this study, we systematically address whether or not spacing of practice influences training and transfer. We randomly assigned 115 fifth grade children to an active control group or one of four training groups who received working memory training based on a running span task (Zhao et al., 2011. All groups received the same total amount of training: 20 sessions of training with 60 trials for an average of 20 minutes per session. The training was spread across 2 days, 5 days, 10 days, or 20 days. The active control group received 20-minute sessions of math instruction for 20 sessions. Before and after training participants in all five groups performed a single transfer test that assessed fluid intelligence, the Raven's Progressive Matrices Test. Overall, participants in all four training groups improved significantly on the training task (at least partially, as reflected by increased speed. More importantly, the only training group to show significant improvement on the Raven's was the group who had the greatest amount of spacing (20 days group during training and improvement in this group was significantly higher than that of the control group.

  19. Quality of spirometry tests and pulmonary function changes among industrial company workers in Iran: a two-year before-and-after study following an intensive training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Lakeh, Maziar Moradi

    2013-03-01

    Quality improvement, standardisation of spirometry testing, and interpretation of results are critically important in the occupational setting. To determine the quality of spirometry tests and pulmonary function changes in two consecutive years among the personnel of an industrial company. This study was performed in an oil refinery in Iran in 2011. Data on 1,004 male personnel were evaluated before and after a training course conducted according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health guidelines. American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guidelines were used for assessment of the acceptability and repeatability criteria. The most common error in the first year of evaluation was forced vital capacity >6 seconds or a 1 second plateau. Acceptability and proper interpretation significantly improved after the course (p0.05). The results of this study show that the validity and quality of spirometric tests conducted in the studied company in Iran were unacceptable, but these improved significantly after the training intervention. The study demonstrated the lack of a systematic guideline for conducting spirometry and interpreting the results in the occupational setting in Iran, and emphasises the need for a nationwide programme to improve the quality of spirometry tests in this setting.

  20. Leave-one-out-training and leave-one-out-testing hidden markov models for a handwritten numeral recognizer: the implications of a single classifier and multiple classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Albert Hung-Ren; Cavalin, Paulo Rodrigo; Sabourin, Robert; de Souza Britto, Alceu

    2009-12-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) have been shown to be useful in handwritten pattern recognition. However, owing to their fundamental structure, they have little resistance to unexpected noise among observation sequences. In other words, unexpected noise in a sequence might "break" the normal transmission of states for this sequence, making it unrecognizable to trained models. To resolve this problem, we propose a leave-one-out-training strategy, which will make the models more robust. We also propose a leave-one-out-testing method, which will compensate for some of the negative effects of this noise. The latter is actually an example of a system with a single classifier and multiple classifications. Compared with the 98.00 percent accuracy of the benchmark HMMs, the new system achieves a 98.88 percent accuracy rate on handwritten digits.

  1. 78 FR 7049 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... warfare testing includes air-to-surface gunnery, missile, and rocket exercises. Testing is required to... new guns or gun rounds, missiles, rockets, and aircraft, and also in support of scientific research to... systems. Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Naval Research Laboratory (NLR) Testing As the Navy's Science...

  2. The effectiveness of the Allen Carr smoking cessation training in companies tested in a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Zuidema, Rixt; Vos, Diederick; van Kalken, Marike

    2014-09-13

    The Allen Carr training (ACt) is a popular one-session smoking cessation group training that is provided by licensed organizations that have the permission to use the Allen Carr method. However, few data are available on the effectiveness of the training. In a quasi-experimental design the effects of the existing practice of providing the ACt to smokers (n = 124) in companies on abstinence, were compared to changes in abstinence in a cohort of similar smokers in the general population (n = 161). To increase comparability of the smokers in both conditions, smokers in the control condition were matched on the group level on baseline characteristics (fourteen variables) to the smokers in the ACt. The main outcome measure was self-reported continuous abstinence after 13 months, which was validated using a CO measurement in the Act condition. Logistic regression analyses showed that when baseline characteristics were comparable, significantly more responding smokers were continuously abstinent in the ACt condition compared to the control condition, Exp(B) = 6.52 (41.1% and 9.6%, respectively). The all-cases analysis was also significant, Exp(B) = 5.09 (31.5% and 8.3%, respectively). Smokers following the ACt in their company were about 6 times more likely to be abstinent, assessed after 13 months, compared to similar smokers in the general population. Although smokers in both conditions did not differ significantly on 14 variables that might be related to cessation success, the quasi-experimental design allows no definite conclusion about the effectiveness of the ACt. Still, these data support the provision of the ACt in companies.

  3. Evaluating the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: a controlled pretest-post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Erin R; Chenery, Helen J

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of a communication skills training programme on community aged care staff's knowledge of communication support in dementia and on staff's care experience. Dementia can lead to impairments in communication. Therefore, quality community-based dementia care requires that staff be skilled communicators, equipped to facilitate interactions with people with dementia. The current investigation evaluated the effectiveness of the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia for Care Staff training programme with respect to knowledge of communication support and the staff/caregiver experience. A multi-centre controlled pretest/post-test design with randomised cohort allocation was used. Outcome measures were completed at baseline, immediately after training (training group only), and at three-month follow-up. Thirty-eight care staff working in community aged care participated and completed all outcome measures (training = 22; control = 16).Training and control groups completed the following outcome measures: knowledge of communication support strategies, self-efficacy, preparedness to provide care, strain in nursing care and attitude to dementia care. Staff in the training group provided written feedback on the training. A significant improvement in knowledge scores from baseline was found for the training group both immediately after training and at three-month follow-up. There was also a significant training effect for self-efficacy and preparedness to provide care. No significant difference was found for the control group for any measure. No significant training effects were found for measures of strain or attitudes to dementia care. Feedback from staff suggests that the training was well received. The MESSAGE training was positively received by staff and had a significant effect on care staff knowledge, and confidence to provide care for people with dementia. The easily accessible multimedia training programme is well received by

  4. Respiratory muscle training extends exercise tolerance without concomitant change to peak oxygen uptake: physiological, performance and perceptual responses derived from the same incremental exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, A M

    2013-08-01

    There is conjecture over the efficacy of respiratory muscle training (RMT). The aim of this study was to establish whether or not exercise tolerance, physical performance and effort perceptions are influenced by RMT. Thirty-six healthy males (age 24 ± 4) agreed to participate (experimental group (EXP) n = 18, control (CON) n = 18). RMT was performed using an inspiratory pressure-threshold training device at either 55% (EXP) or 10% (CON) of maximal inspiratory effort. Measurements of spirometry and maximal static inspiratory mouth pressure were taken before and after 4 weeks of RMT in addition to an incremental test to volitional exhaustion for the determination of: (i) V˙O(2) peak; (ii) maximal velocity at volitional exhaustion (vV˙O(2) peak)); (iii) time to volitional exhaustion; and (iv) effort perceptions. There were no differences in spirometry, but mean maximal static inspiratory mouth pressure increased significantly in EXP (P incremental exercise and demonstrated a significant flattening (plateau) of V˙O(2) after training. This suggests that RMT may promote an improved performance outcome vV˙O(2) peak probably as a result of blunted afferent sensations reducing the perceived discomfort of exercise at high ventilatory loads. © 2013 The Author. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  5. 78 FR 6977 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ..., and rocket exercises. Testing is required to ensure the equipment is fully functional for defense from surface threats. Testing may be conducted on new guns or run rounds, missiles, rockets, and aircraft, and... science and technology provider, ONR and NRL provide technology solutions for Navy and Marine Corps needs...

  6. Distance learning training in genetics and genomics testing for Italian health professionals: results of a pre and post-test evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Benedetta Michelazzo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProgressive advances in technologies for DNA sequencing and decreasing costs are allowing an easier diffusion of genetic and genomic tests. Physicians’ knowledge and confidence on the topic is often low and not suitable for manage this challenge. Tailored educational programs are required to reach a more and more appropriate use of genetic technologies.MethodsA distance learning course has been created by experts from different Italian medical associations with the support of the Italian Ministry of Health. The course was directed to professional figures involved in prescription and interpretation of genetic tests. A pretest-post-test study design was used to assess knowledge improvement. We analyzed the proportion of correct answers for each question pre and post-test, as well as the mean score difference stratified by gender, age, professional status and medical specialty.ResultsWe reported an improvement in the proportion of correct answers for 12 over 15 questions of the test. The overall mean score to the questions significantly increased in the post-test, from 9.44 to 12.49 (p-value < 0.0001. In the stratified analysis we reported an improvement in the knowledge of all the groups except for geneticists; the pre-course mean score of this group was already very high and did not improve significantly.ConclusionDistance learning is effective in improving the level of genetic knowledge. In the future, it will be useful to analyze which specialists have more advantage from genetic education, in order to plan more tailored education for medical professionals.

  7. The predictive validity of a situational judgement test, a clinical problem solving test and the core medical training selection methods for performance in specialty training .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Lopes, Safiatu; Harding, Stephen; Vaux, Emma; Berkin, Liz; Black, David

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to follow up a sample of physicians who began core medical training (CMT) in 2009. This paper examines the long-term validity of CMT and GP selection methods in predicting performance in the Membership of Royal College of Physicians (MRCP(UK)) examinations. We performed a longitudinal study, examining the extent to which the GP and CMT selection methods (T1) predict performance in the MRCP(UK) examinations (T2). A total of 2,569 applicants from 2008-09 who completed CMT and GP selection methods were included in the study. Looking at MRCP(UK) part 1, part 2 written and PACES scores, both CMT and GP selection methods show evidence of predictive validity for the outcome variables, and hierarchical regressions show the GP methods add significant value to the CMT selection process. CMT selection methods predict performance in important outcomes and have good evidence of validity; the GP methods may have an additional role alongside the CMT selection methods. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  8. The responsiveness and correlation between Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motor Status Scale, and the Action Research Arm Test in chronic stroke with upper-extremity rehabilitation robotic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xi-Jun; Tong, Kai-Yu; Hu, Xiao-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Responsiveness of clinical assessments is an important element in the report of clinical effectiveness after rehabilitation. The correlation could reflect the validity of assessments as an indication of clinical performance before and after interventions. This study investigated the correlation and responsiveness of Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Motor Status Scale (MSS), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), which are used frequently in effectiveness studies of robotic upper-extremity training in stroke rehabilitation. Twenty-seven chronic stroke patients were recruited for a 20-session upper-extremity rehabilitation robotic training program. This was a rater-blinded randomized controlled trial. All participants were evaluated with FMA, MSS, ARAT, MAS, and Functional Independent Measure before and after robotic training. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied for the analysis of correlation. The standardized response mean (SRM) and Guyatt's responsiveness index (GRI) were used to analyze responsiveness. Spearman's correlation coefficient showed a significantly high correlation (ρ=0.91-0.96) among FMA, MSS, and ARAT and a fair-to-moderate correlation (ρ=0.40-0.62) between MAS and the other assessments. FMA, MSS, and MAS on the wrist showed higher responsiveness (SRM=0.85-0.98, GRI=1.59-3.62), whereas ARAT showed relatively less responsiveness (SRM=0.22, GRI=0.81). The results showed that FMA or MSS would be the best choice for evaluating the functional improvement in stroke studies on robotic upper-extremity training with high responsiveness and good correlation with ARAT. MAS could be used separately to evaluate the spasticity changes after intervention in terms of high responsiveness.

  9. Arm-eye coordination test to objectively quantify motor performance and muscles activation in persons after stroke undergoing robot-aided rehabilitation training: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-Yu; Hu, Xiaoling; Li, Le; Sun, Rui

    2013-09-01

    This study designed an arm-eye coordination test to investigate the effectiveness of the robot-aided rehabilitation for persons after stroke. Six chronic poststroke subjects were recruited to attend a 20-session robot-aided rehabilitation training of elbow joint. Before and after the training program, subjects were asked to perform voluntary movements of elbow flection and extension by following sinusoidal trajectories at different velocities with visual feedback on their joint positions. The elbow angle and the electromyographic signal of biceps and triceps as well as clinical scores were evaluated together with the parameters. Performance was objectively quantified by root mean square error (RMSE), root mean square jerk (RMSJ), range of motion (ROM), and co-contraction index (CI). After 20 sessions, RMSE and ROM improved significantly in both the affected and the unaffected side based on two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05). There was significant lower RMSJ in the affected side at higher velocities (P < 0.05). There was significant negative correlation between average RMSE with different tracking velocities and Fugl-Meyer shoulder-elbow score (P < 0.05). There was also significant negative correlation between average RMSE and average ROM (P < 0.05), and moderate nonsignificant negative correlation with RMSJ, and CI. The characterization of velocity-dependent deficiencies, monitoring of training-induced improvement, and the correlation between quantitative parameters and clinical scales could enable the exploration of effects of different types of treatment and design progress-based training method to accelerate the processes of recovery.

  10. Subduction indices in Calabro-Sicilian arc : Training for Experimental Skills Testing and collaborative work for students in scientific terminal class in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Faustine; Bollori, Lucas; Villeneuve, Felix

    2017-04-01

    In France, at the end of the last year in high school, students of the scientific terminal class have written exams in all subjects they are studying, and in "Life and Earth's Sciences", they also have an Experimental Skills Testing in order to rate them in scientific approach. This one-hour evaluation is made of four steps: - During the first evaluation, students have to show that they are able to propose a scientific strategy connected to a scientific problem. - During the second evaluation, they have to experiment. - During the third evaluation, they have to introduce their results. - During the last evaluation, they have to deduce and conclude. The final testing take place at the end of May, but during all the school year, teachers have to train their students, and it's impossible to make them work on real subjects. Therefore, it's necessary to produce new subjects every year. Linked to a fall school in Sicily last October, my colleagues and I have decided to create a new Experimental Skills Test to use new examples and illustrate subduction in the Mediterranean Sea with Aeolian Islands. We would like to make our pupils understand what the Aeolian volcanism is due to, by using information, equipment and software, etc. we have in our classrooms in our high school. Since we have found several ways for our students to prove that the Aeolian Islands are linked to a subduction zone, we have decided, following our research, to divide the new experimental skills testing in three different tests, in order to make students train on most of the equipment and then to share their results to produce a collaborative final work.

  11. Results of experimental testing of system of future physical culture teachers’ training for art pedagogic means’ application in pedagogic functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Nizhevska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the research is devoted to seeking of ways to rising of quality of future physical culture teachers. Material: in experiment 436 students and 29 teachers participated. Results: it was found that readiness of future physical culture teachers for application of art pedagogic means in professional functioning is achieved through realization of appropriate block system. Such system ensures mastering by students of the following: theoretical principles of art pedagogic; mastering of art pedagogic skills in teaching and quasi professional functioning; acquiring of practical experience of art means’ application in period of pedagogic practice at schools. It was also determined that training system of future teachers includes the following three blocks: conceptual-target, knowledge-procedural; control-correcting. Conclusions: it is recommended to use such criteria of students’ readiness for application of art means in pedagogic functioning: motivation-axiological, cognitive-active, personality’s-reflexive.

  12. Local Residents Trained As ‘Influence Agents’ Most Effective In Persuading African Couples On HIV Counseling and Testing

    OpenAIRE

    LAMBDIN, Barrot; Kanweka, William; Inambao, Mubiana; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Shah, Heena; Linton, Sabriya; Wong, Frank,; Luisi, Nicole; Tichacek, Amanda; Kalowa, James; Chomba, Elwyn; Allen, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Couples in sub-Saharan Africa are the largest group in the world at risk for HIV infection. Couples counseling and testing programs have been shown to reduce HIV transmission, but such programs remain rare in Africa. Before couples counseling and testing can become the norm, it is essential to increase demand for the services. We evaluated the effectiveness of several promotional strategies during a two -year program in Kitwe and Ndola, Zambia. The program attracted more than 7,600 couples th...

  13. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  14. Training Master Students of "Education and Pedagogy" Enlarged Profession Group: Testing the Module "Personalization and Differentiation of Educational Work in Teaching Students of Different Categories"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postavnev V.M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main characteristics of the module "Individualization and differentiation of educational work with students of different categories of" innovative educational program of professional (teaching graduate. It provides an educational discipline module focused on two target groups of students who have significant differences in psycho-pedagogical training. It offers the option of building the interdisciplinary evaluation of students upon completion of the module and uncovered testing peculiarities of the module in terms of networking. We presented the role of the teacher-supervisor, the content and organization of advanced professional practice, of the potentialities of the individual blocks of practice in enriching the content and forms of the educational process in the magistracy. Based on the analysis results of the module there are conclusions about the capabilities of the module being tested in preparation of masters of pedagogical and psycho-pedagogical directions.

  15. Training level does not influence the rating of perceived exertion during an incremental test DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n3p159

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno de Paula Caraça Smirmaul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Different training levels, combined with experience in performing exhaustive exercise, may produce different sensations of fatigue. The objective of this study was to compare the rating of perceived exertion (RPE between cyclists and non-cyclists during a maximal incremental test (ITMAX. Twenty-three subjects were recruited and divided into a cyclist group (CG (n = 12; age: 26.5 ± 4.7 years, body weight: 68.2 ± 11kg, height: 176 ± 8.6 cm and a non-cyclist group (NCG (n = 11; 25.2 ± 4.0 years, body weight: 72.9 ± 9 kg, height: 175.1 ± 6.3 cm. All subjects performed an ITMAX until exhaustion on a cycling simulator, starting at 0 W and with increments of 20 W.min-1. RPE was measured at 30-second intervals during ITMAX and the maximal power output (PMAX of each subject was also recorded. The total time of each test was normalized to the percentage of completed trial (10% to 100%, intervals of 10%, and the corresponding RPE was recorded. PMAX was 368 ± 12.7 W and 256 ± 11.2 W for CG and NCG, respectively (P < 0.01. No significant difference in median RPE was observed between groups at any time point. In conclusion, RPE responses did not differ between CG and NCG during ITMAX, suggesting that training level does not influence RPE.

  16. Repeated testing improves achievement in a blended learning approach for risk competence training of medical students: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreckelsen, C; Juenger, J

    2017-09-26

    Adequate estimation and communication of risks is a critical competence of physicians. Due to an evident lack of these competences, effective training addressing risk competence during medical education is needed. Test-enhanced learning has been shown to produce marked effects on achievements. This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated tests implemented on top of a blended learning program for risk competence. We introduced a blended-learning curriculum for risk estimation and risk communication based on a set of operationalized learning objectives, which was integrated into a mandatory course "Evidence-based Medicine" for third-year students. A randomized controlled trial addressed the effect of repeated testing on achievement as measured by the students' pre- and post-training score (nine multiple-choice items). Basic numeracy and statistical literacy were assessed at baseline. Analysis relied on descriptive statistics (histograms, box plots, scatter plots, and summary of descriptive measures), bootstrapped confidence intervals, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and effect sizes (Cohen's d, r) based on adjusted means and standard deviations. All of the 114 students enrolled in the course consented to take part in the study and were assigned to either the intervention or control group (both: n = 57) by balanced randomization. Five participants dropped out due to non-compliance (control: 4, intervention: 1). Both groups profited considerably from the program in general (Cohen's d for overall pre vs. post scores: 2.61). Repeated testing yielded an additional positive effect: while the covariate (baseline score) exhibits no relation to the post-intervention score, F(1, 106) = 2.88, p > .05, there was a significant effect of the intervention (repeated tests scenario) on learning achievement, F(1106) = 12.72, p blended learning approach can be improved significantly by implementing a test-enhanced learning design, namely repeated testing. As

  17. Volition-adaptive control for gait training using wearable exoskeleton: preliminary tests with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; López-Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Aranda, Joan; Montesano, Luis; Del-Ama, Antonio J; Pons, Jose L

    2018-01-03

    Gait training for individuals with neurological disorders is challenging in providing the suitable assistance and more adaptive behaviour towards user needs. The user specific adaptation can be defined based on the user interaction with the orthosis and by monitoring the user intentions. In this paper, an adaptive control model, commanded by the user intention, is evaluated using a lower limb exoskeleton with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals (SCI). A user intention based adaptive control model has been developed and evaluated with 4 incomplete SCI individuals across 3 sessions of training per individual. The adaptive control model modifies the joint impedance properties of the exoskeleton as a function of the human-orthosis interaction torques and the joint trajectory evolution along the gait sequence, in real time. The volitional input of the user is identified by monitoring the neural signals, pertaining to the user's motor activity. These volitional inputs are used as a trigger to initiate the gait movement, allowing the user to control the initialization of the exoskeleton movement, independently. A Finite-state machine based control model is used in this set-up which helps in combining the volitional orders with the gait adaptation. The exoskeleton demonstrated an adaptive assistance depending on the patients' performance without guiding them to follow an imposed trajectory. The exoskeleton initiated the trajectory based on the user intention command received from the brain machine interface, demonstrating it as a reliable trigger. The exoskeleton maintained the equilibrium by providing suitable assistance throughout the experiments. A progressive change in the maximum flexion of the knee joint was observed at the end of each session which shows improvement in the patient performance. Results of the adaptive impedance were evaluated by comparing with the application of a constant impedance value. Participants reported that the movement of the

  18. How to Get Really Smart: Modeling Retest and Training Effects in Ability Testing using Computer-Generated Figural Matrix Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Philipp Alexander; Holling, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    The interpretation of retest scores is problematic because they are potentially affected by measurement and predictive bias, which impact construct validity, and because their size differs as a function of various factors. This paper investigates the construct stability of scores on a figural matrices test and models retest effects at the level of…

  19. English Proficiency Tests and Communication Skills Training for Overseas-Qualified Health Professionals in Australia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wette, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    This commentary reviews recent literature on a number of problematic issues arising from the use of English proficiency tests by registration bodies as the sole assessment of the professional communication skills of overseas qualified health professionals from non-English-speaking backgrounds. It discusses differences between the assessment…

  20. The effects of knee extensor eccentric training on functional tests in healthy subjects Os efeitos do treino isocinético excêntrico dos extensores do joelho nos testes funcionais em sujeitos saudáveis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleodório H. Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known that eccentric training increases muscle strength and promotes greater neural activation, and therefore has been used in the recovery of knee extensors. The hypothesis of this study was that there would be a strong correlation between knee extensor torque and functional tests. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between knee extensor peak torque and functional tests of agility (runs and propulsion (hop for distance after short-term isokinetic eccentric training. METHODS: Twenty healthy and active male undergraduate students (age 22.5±2.1 years; height 1.72±0.10 m; weight 67.8±9.5 kg; body mass index: 22.5±2.0 kg/m², with no abnormalities or history of injury of the limbs, performed an isokinetic assessment of the knee extensors and flexors and also functional tests before and after isokinetic training, which consisted of 3 sets of 10 MVECs at 30º/s, with 3 minutes of rest between sets, twice a week for 6 weeks. RESULTS: The eccentric training increased the extensor peak torque (16, 27 and 17%; PCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Sabe-se que o treino excêntrico aumenta a força muscular, promovendo uma maior ativação neural e, portanto, tem sido usado na recuperação do torque extensor. A hipótese deste estudo foi a de que possa existir uma forte correlação entre o torque extensor do joelho e os testes funcionais. OBJETIVOS: Correlacionar o torque extensor do joelho com os testes funcionais de agilidade (corridas e impulsão (saltos em distância após o treino isocinético excêntrico de curta duração. MÉTODOS: Vinte homens universitários, ativos e saudáveis (22,5±2,1 anos; 1,72±0,10 m; 67,8±9,5 kg; IMC 22,5±2,0 kg/m², sem reportar anormalidades ou história de lesão no membro inferior, realizaram avaliação isocinética do torque extensor e flexor do joelho e testes funcionais antes e depois do treino isocinético que consistiu em três séries de 10 CEVM a 30º/s, com 3 minutos de repouso entre as

  1. Design, implementation and evaluation of a training programme for school teachers in the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests as part of a basic first aid kit in southern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek-McManus, Stefan; Mathanga, Don P; Verney, Allison; Mtali, Austin; Ali, Doreen; Sande, John; Mwenda, Reuben; Ndau, Saidi; Mazinga, Charles; Phondiwa, Emmanuel; Chimuna, Tiyese; Melody, David; Roschnik, Natalie; Brooker, Simon J; Halliday, Katherine E

    2015-09-17

    With increasing levels of enrolment, primary schools present a pragmatic opportunity to improve the access of school children to timely diagnosis and treatment of malaria, increasingly recognised as a major health problem within this age group. The expanded use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) by community health workers (CHWs) has raised the prospect of whether teachers can provide similar services for school children. We describe and evaluate the training of primary school teachers to use a first aid kit containing malaria RDTs and ACT for the diagnosis and treament of uncomplicated malaria in school children in southern Malawi. We outline the development of the intervention as: (1) conception and design, (2) pilot training, (3) final training, and (4) 7-month follow up. The training materials were piloted at a four-day workshop in July 2013 following their design at national stakeholders meetings. The evaluation of the pilot training and materials were assessed in relation to increased knowledge and skill sets using checklist evaluations and questionnaires, the results of which informed the design of a final seven-day training programme held in December 2013. A follow up of trained teachers was carried out in July 2014 following 7 months of routine implementation. A total of 15 teachers were evaluated at four stages: pilot training, two weeks following pilot, final training and seven months following final training. A total of 15 and 92 teachers were trained at the pilot and final training respectively. An average of 93 % of the total steps required to use RDTs were completed correctly at the final training, declining to 87 % after 7 months. All teachers were observed correctly undertaking safe blood collection and handling, accurate RDT interpretation, and correct dispensing of ACT. The most commonly observed errors were a failure to wait 20 minutes before reading the test result, and adding an incorrect volume

  2. Combating automatic autobiographical associations: the effect of instruction and training in strategically concealing information in the autobiographical implicit association test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Rosenfeld, J Peter; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2012-10-01

    One of the most heavily debated questions in implicit social cognition is the extent to which implicit measures can be voluntarily controlled. The experiment reported here is the first to employ a novel strategy for intentionally controlling performance in the autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT). Specifically, when explicitly instructed to do so, participants were able to speed up their responses in the incongruent blocks of the aIAT and thus influence the outcome of the test. This effect was larger when the experimental instruction was followed by practice in speeding responses than when the instruction was given alone. A process-dissociation analysis suggested that the effect was due to reductions in the ability of participants' automatic associations to influence responses when instructions to speed up were provided. This experiment provides new insight into the potential for strategic control in the performance of implicit measures and into the interplay between automatic and controlled processes underlying performance on implicit measures.

  3. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Assessment (MPTA) Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    developmental technologies and products and services determined through market analysis. For most systems, the analysis shall consider and baseline...2. Time required 3. Resources (ranges, test equipment) – TRADOC i. Is there a Training Effectiveness Analysis ( TEA ) or formal training...failed tasks of training gaps) from New Equipment Training for any User or Operational Testing. - Training Effectiveness Analysis ( TEA ) a. Is

  4. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Karsten

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV, anaerobic running distance (D', sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1 performances.two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13 and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13. Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention. The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training.after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002 and CV values (p<0.001 with no significant changes in the SO group. 30-m sprint performance were slightly improved in the ST group with significantly decreased performance times identified in the SO group (p<0.001. Values for D' were slightly reduced in both groups (ST -44.5 m, 95% CI = -90.6 to 1.6; SO -42.6 m, 95% CI = -88.7 to 3.5.combining a 6-week moderate strength training with soccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer.

  5. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Bettina; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Kandemir, Gokhan; Hazir, Tahir; Klose, Andreas; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running distance (D'), sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1) performances. two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13) and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13). Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention). The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training. after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002) and CV values (p<0.001) with no significant changes in the SO group. 30-m sprint performance were slightly improved in the ST group with significantly decreased performance times identified in the SO group (p<0.001). Values for D' were slightly reduced in both groups (ST -44.5 m, 95% CI = -90.6 to 1.6; SO -42.6 m, 95% CI = -88.7 to 3.5). combining a 6-week moderate strength training with soccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer.

  6. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  7. Language training: French training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 30 January to 07 April 2006. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 30 January to 07 April 2006. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  8. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 11 October to 17 December 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: tel. 72844. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  9. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  10. Workmanship Training Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ashley; Sikes, Larry; Corbin, Cheryl; Rucka, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Special processes require special skills, knowledge and experienced application. For over 15 years, the NASA Johnson Space Center's Receiving, Inspection and Test Facility (RITF) has provided Workmanship Standards compliance training, issuing more than 500 to 800 training completion certificates annually. It is critical that technicians and inspectors are trained and that they maintain their proficiency to implement the applicable standards and specifications. Training services include 'hands-on' training to engineers, technicians, and inspectors in the areas of electrostatic discharge (ESD), soldering, fiber optics, lithium battery handling, torque and wire safety, and wire wrapping.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site; 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of

  12. How appropriate are the English language test requirements for non-UK-trained nurses? A qualitative study of spoken communication in UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, Carole; Garner, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Non-native speakers of English who hold nursing qualifications from outside the UK are required to provide evidence of English language competence by achieving a minimum overall score of Band 7 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) academic test. To describe the English language required to deal with the daily demands of nursing in the UK. To compare these abilities with the stipulated levels on the language test. A tracking study was conducted with 4 nurses, and focus groups with 11 further nurses. The transcripts of the interviews and focus groups were analysed thematically for recurrent themes. These findings were then compared with the requirements of the IELTS spoken test. The study was conducted outside the participants' working shifts in busy London hospitals. The participants in the tracking study were selected opportunistically;all were trained in non-English speaking countries. Snowball sampling was used for the focus groups, of whom 4 were non-native and 7 native speakers of English. In the tracking study, each of the 4 nurses was interviewed on four occasions, outside the workplace, and as close to the end of a shift as possible. They were asked to recount their spoken interactions during the course of their shift. The participants in the focus groups were asked to describe their typical interactions with patients, family members, doctors, and nursing colleagues. They were prompted to recall specific instances of frequently-occurring communication problems. All interactions were audio-recorded, with the participants' permission,and transcribed. Nurses are at the centre of communication for patient care. They have to use appropriate registers to communicate with a range of health professionals, patients and their families. They must elicit information, calm and reassure, instruct, check procedures, ask for and give opinions,agree and disagree. Politeness strategies are needed to avoid threats to face. They participate in medical

  13. Variação da pressão intraocular após teste submáximo de força no treinamento resistido Intraocular pressure variation after submaximal strength test in resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Conte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a variação da pressão intraocular (PIO decorrente da aplicação do teste de predição para uma repetição máxima (1RM. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados em estudo observacional 145 calouros (22,04 ± 4,17 anos; de ambos os sexos do curso de Educação Física da Escola Superior de Educação Física de Jundiaí (ESEFJ. Os critérios de exclusão foram: opacidade de meios, alteração de globo ocular ou ausência de globo ocular. Todos os participantes assinaram o Termo de Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido. A avaliação da PIO foi determinada por duas medidas consecutivas com o tonômetro de Perkins: i pré-teste: antes do teste de 1RM e ii pós-teste: logo após a realização do teste. O teste de 1RM consistiu em predizer o valor de uma repetição máxima através de repetições até a fadiga. Foram utilizados os seguintes exercícios resistidos: supino, pulley dorsal, desenvolvimento, rosca direta e leg press 45º. Como procedimento estatístico foi empregado o teste "t" de Student pareado. RESULTADOS: Ocorreu redução da PIO após a realização do teste de predição de 1RM: 13,48 ± 3,32 vs.10,20 ± 3,72 mmHg (pPURPOSE: To verify the intraocular pressure (IOP after sub-maximal strength test. METHODS: 145 Physical Education freshmen (22.04 ± 4.17 years old; female and male from Superior Physical Education School of Jundiaí (ESEFJ were evaluated in an observacional study. The exclusion criteria were: media opacity and eyeball absence or changes. All subjects agreed to take part in this research and signed up the Informed Consent. IOP was measured by Perkins tonometer: i pretest: just before the submaximal strength test performance and ii post-test: immediately after the strength test. The strength test consisted in the one-repetition-maximum-assessment through repetition until fatigue. Resistance training exercises such as bench press, pulley dorsal high, shoulder press, arm curl and leg press 45º were performed

  14. A critical review of anaesthetised animal models and alternatives for military research, testing and training, with a focus on blast damage, haemorrhage and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Robert D

    2013-11-01

    Military research, testing, and surgical and resuscitation training, are aimed at mitigating the consequences of warfare and terrorism to armed forces and civilians. Traumatisation and tissue damage due to explosions, and acute loss of blood due to haemorrhage, remain crucial, potentially preventable, causes of battlefield casualties and mortalities. There is also the additional threat from inhalation of chemical and aerosolised biological weapons. The use of anaesthetised animal models, and their respective replacement alternatives, for military purposes -- particularly for blast injury, haemorrhaging and resuscitation training -- is critically reviewed. Scientific problems with the animal models include the use of crude, uncontrolled and non-standardised methods for traumatisation, an inability to model all key trauma mechanisms, and complex modulating effects of general anaesthesia on target organ physiology. Such effects depend on the anaesthetic and influence the cardiovascular system, respiration, breathing, cerebral haemodynamics, neuroprotection, and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Some anaesthetics also bind to the NMDA brain receptor with possible differential consequences in control and anaesthetised animals. There is also some evidence for gender-specific effects. Despite the fact that these issues are widely known, there is little published information on their potential, at best, to complicate data interpretation and, at worst, to invalidate animal models. There is also a paucity of detail on the anaesthesiology used in studies, and this can hinder correct data evaluation. Welfare issues relate mainly to the possibility of acute pain as a side-effect of traumatisation in recovered animals. Moreover, there is the increased potential for animals to suffer when anaesthesia is temporary, and the procedures invasive. These dilemmas can be addressed, however, as a diverse range of replacement approaches exist, including computer and mathematical

  15. Team-Sport Athletes' Improvement of Performance on the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 2, but Not of Time-Trial Performance, With Intermittent Hypoxic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inness M, W H; Billaut, François; Aughey, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the time course for physical-capacity adaptations to intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) in team-sport athletes and the time course for benefits remaining after IHT. A pre-post parallel-groups design was employed, with 21 Australian footballers assigned to IHT (n = 10) or control (CON; n = 11) matched for training load. IHT performed eleven 40-min bike sessions at 2500-m altitude over 4 wk. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) was performed before; after 3, 6, and 11 IHT sessions; and 30 and 44 d after IHT. Repeated time trials (2- and 1-km TTs, with 5 min rest) were performed before, after, and 3 wk after IHT. Hemoglobin mass (Hb(mass)) was measured in IHT before and after 3, 6, 9, and 11 sessions. Baseline Yo-Yo IR2 was similar between groups. After 6 sessions, the change in Yo-Yo IR2 in IHT was very likely higher than CON (27% greater change, effect size 0.77, 90% confidence limits 0.20;1.33) and likely higher 1 d after IHT (23%, 0.68, 0.05;1.30). The IHT group's change remained likely higher than CON 30 d after IHT (24%, 0.72, 0.12;1.33) but was not meaningfully different 44 d after (12%, 0.36, -0.24;0.97). The change in 2-km TT performance between groups was not different throughout. For 1-km TT, CON improved more after IHT, but IHT maintained performance better after 3 wk. Hb(mass) was higher after IHT (2.7%, 0.40, -0.40;1.19). Short-duration IHT increased Yo-Yo IR2 compared with training-load-matched controls in 2 wk. An additional 2 wk of IHT provided no further benefit. These changes remained until at least 30 d posttraining. IHT also protected improvement in 1-km TT.

  16. F/FB-111 Avionics Test Station and Component Specialist/Technician. Automatic Test Stations Manual and Electronic Warfare Test Stations. Training Requirements Analysis (451X6). Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    A ALIGN AN/ALM-204 TEST STATION TRUs (Z1348) A CALIBRATE HPMA (Z1351) A CLEAN CONTACTS (F 210) A ORDER PARTS A REMOVE AND REPLACE COMPONENTS (TASK...MICROWAVE ASSEMBLIES ( HPMA ) 327 TASK : 01130 TASK STKTm2: PERFORM OPERATIONAL TEST OF LRUs THAT RUN ON THE AN/ALM-204 TEST STATION TASK NOTES: LRUu ARE...POWER AMPLIFIER HBR HIGH BAND RECEIVER HDI HORIZONTAL DISPLAY INDICATOR HF HIGH FREQUENCY HFPA HIGH FREQUENCY POWER AMPLIFIER HPMA HIGH POWER MICROWAVE

  17. Training safely, Training safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is the basic requirement of maritime safety education to guarantee the safety of teaching operation while training the crew's occupation safety capability. Marine Training Center of Shanghai Maritime University has undertaken the practical teaching of "marine survival" for many years and come up with the whole safety procedures of training. Based on the requirements of SOLAS convention and regulations of STCW over crew training, this paper introduces the safety allocation, utilization and maintenance of teaching equipments. Through the investigation of the safety situation of students' practical operation, the safety teaching method named "four in one" has been put forward, which includes the pre-teaching safety precaution, the whole monitor during the teaching process, the post-teaching summary evaluation, and the reset and standby of teaching facilities. Finally, during the learning and training of "marine survival", crews and students are called on to place priority on personal safety rather than acquisition of knowledge and skills. Only in this way can they be capable of self-protection and protection of others in the career of seafaring.

  18. Human Factors in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 09 (FY09) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; and 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  19. Test-Retest Reliability and Minimal Detectable Change of Randomized Dichotic Digits in Learning-Disabled Children: Implications for Dichotic Listening Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Pourbakht, Akram; Parand, Akram; Jalaie, Shohreh

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation of dichotic listening to digits is a common part of many studies for diagnosis and managing auditory processing disorders in children. Previous researchers have verified test-retest relative reliability of dichotic digits results in normal children and adults. However, detecting intervention-related changes in the ear scores after dichotic listening training requires information regarding trial-to-trial typical variation of individual ear scores that is estimated using indices of absolute reliability. Previous studies have not addressed absolute reliability of dichotic listening results. To compare the results of the Persian randomized dichotic digits test (PRDDT) and its relative and absolute indices of reliability between typical achieving (TA) and learning-disabled (LD) children. A repeated measures observational study. Fifteen LD children were recruited from a previously performed study with age range of 7-12 yr. The control group consisted of 15 TA schoolchildren with age range of 8-11 yr. The Persian randomized dichotic digits test was administered on the children under free recall condition in two test sessions 7-12 days apart. We compared the average of the ear scores and ear advantage between TA and LD children. Relative indices of reliability included Pearson's correlation and intraclass correlation (ICC 2,1 ) coefficients and absolute reliability was evaluated by calculation of standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC) using the raw ear scores. The Pearson correlation coefficient indicated that in both groups of children the ear scores of test and retest sessions were strongly and positively (greater than +0.8) correlated. The ear scores showed excellent ICC coefficient of consistency (0.78-0.82) and fair to excellent ICC coefficient of absolute agreement (0.62-0.74) in TA children and excellent ICC coefficients of consistency and absolute agreement in LD children (0.76-0.87). SEM and SEM% of the ear scores in TA

  20. Crossfit training changes brain-derived neurotrophic factor and irisin levels at rest, after wingate and progressive tests, and improves aerobic capacity and body composition of young physically active men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska-Cialowicz, E; Wojna, J; Zuwala-Jagiello, J

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a protein that stimulates processes of neurogenesis, the survival of neurons and microglia, stimulates neuroplasticity, and takes part in the differentiation of cells developed in the hippocampus. BDNF is also released from skeletal muscles during exercise and can facilitate cross-talk between the nervous and muscular system. Irisin, the exercise hormone, is also released from skeletal muscles and is involved in oxidation processes in the organism. It is a vital issue from the point of view of prophylaxis and treatment through exercise of age-related diseases (e.g. senile dementia), obesity, type-2 diabetes. The aim of the study was to assess the changes in BDNF and irisin levels in young people after a 3-month CrossFit training program. At baseline and after the training, levels of BDNF and irisin were assayed before and after Wingate and progressive tests. Physical performance, body mass and composition, and muscle circumferences were also measured. There were noted: an improvement in aerobic capacity, an increase in VO2max, a reduction in adipose tissue percentage in women and an increase in LBM in all subjects. After CrossFit training the resting BDNF level increased significantly in all subjects while the resting level of irisin decreased in women, without changes in men. The resting level of BDNF at baseline was higher in men than in women. At baseline we observed an increased level of BDNF in women after Wingate and progressive tests, but in men only after the progressive test. After 3 months of CrossFit training the level of BDNF increased in all subjects, and also was higher in men than in women. In women we did not observe significant differences after both tests in comparison to rest. After the training BDNF was lower in men after Wingate and progressive tests than at rest. At baseline irisin level decreased in women after the Wingate and progressive tests. Changes in men were not observed after both tests

  1. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in...

  2. Portable Virtual Training Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Reagan; Johnston, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Mission Operations Lab initiated a project to design, develop, deliver, test, and validate a unique training system for astronaut and ground support personnel. In an effort to keep training costs low, virtual training units (VTUs) have been designed based on images of actual hardware and manipulated by a touch screen style interface for ground support personnel training. This project helped modernized the training system and materials by integrating them with mobile devices for training when operators or crew are unavailable to physically train in the facility. This project also tested the concept of a handheld remote device to control integrated trainers using International Space Station (ISS) training simulators as a platform. The portable VTU can interface with the full-sized VTU, allowing a trainer co-located with a trainee to remotely manipulate a VTU and evaluate a trainee's response. This project helped determine if it is useful, cost effective, and beneficial for the instructor to have a portable handheld device to control the behavior of the models during training. This project has advanced NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) VTU capabilities with modern and relevant technology to support space flight training needs of today and tomorrow.

  3. Effects of Creatine and Sodium Bicarbonate Coingestion on Multiple Indices of Mechanical Power Output During Repeated Wingate Tests in Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, Corbin; Rogerson, David; Ranchordas, Mayur; Ruddock, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of creatine and sodium bicarbonate coingestion on mechanical power during repeated sprints. Nine well-trained men (age = 21.6 ± 0.9 yr, stature = 1.82 ± 0.05 m, body mass = 80.1 ±12.8 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced, crossover study using six 10-s repeated Wingate tests. Participants ingested either a placebo (0.5 g·kg(-1) of maltodextrin), 20 g·d(-1) of creatine monohydrate + placebo, 0.3 g·kg(-1) of sodium bicarbonate + placebo, or coingestion + placebo for 7 days, with a 7-day washout between conditions. Participants were randomized into two groups with a differential counterbalanced order. Creatine conditions were ordered first and last. Indices of mechanical power output (W), total work (J) and fatigue index (W·s(-1)) were measured during each test and analyzed using the magnitude of differences between groups in relation to the smallest worthwhile change in performance. Compared with placebo, both creatine (effect size (ES) = 0.37-0.83) and sodium bicarbonate (ES = 0.22-0.46) reported meaningful improvements on indices of mechanical power output. Coingestion provided small meaningful improvements on indices of mechanical power output (W) compared with sodium bicarbonate (ES = 0.28-0.41), but not when compared with creatine (ES = -0.21-0.14). Coingestion provided a small meaningful improvement in total work (J; ES = 0.24) compared with creatine. Fatigue index (W·s(-1)) was impaired in all conditions compared with placebo. In conclusion, there was no meaningful additive effect of creatine and sodium bicarbonate coingestion on mechanical power during repeated sprints.

  4. Dropouts and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Terry

    1984-01-01

    Exploring the uses of human capital theory to an analysis of effective adult education, the author tests several hypotheses. Focusing on teacher characteristics, he examines whether trained teachers are better than untrained and whether dropout rates are affected by adult education teacher training. (SK)

  5. A new possibility in thoracoscopic virtual reality simulation training: development and testing of a novel virtual reality simulator for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katrine; Bjerrum, Flemming; Hansen, Henrik Jessen; Petersen, René Horsleben; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Konge, Lars

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to develop virtual reality simulation software for video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy, to explore the opinions of thoracic surgeons concerning the VATS lobectomy simulator and to test the validity of the simulator metrics. Experienced VATS surgeons worked with computer specialists to develop a VATS lobectomy software for a virtual reality simulator. Thoracic surgeons with different degrees of experience in VATS were enrolled at the 22nd meeting of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) held in Copenhagen in June 2014. The surgeons were divided according to the number of performed VATS lobectomies: novices (0 VATS lobectomies), intermediates (1-49 VATS lobectomies) and experienced (>50 VATS lobectomies). The participants all performed a lobectomy of a right upper lobe on the simulator and answered a questionnaire regarding content validity. Metrics were compared between the three groups. We succeeded in developing the first version of a virtual reality VATS lobectomy simulator. A total of 103 thoracic surgeons completed the simulated lobectomy and were distributed as follows: novices n = 32, intermediates n = 45 and experienced n = 26. All groups rated the overall user realism of the VATS lobectomy scenario to a median of 5 on a scale 1-7, with 7 being the best score. The experienced surgeons found the graphics and movements realistic and rated the scenario high in terms of usefulness as a training tool for novice and intermediate experienced thoracic surgeons, but not very useful as a training tool for experienced surgeons. The metric scores were not statistically significant between groups. This is the first study to describe a commercially available virtual reality simulator for a VATS lobectomy. More than 100 thoracic surgeons found the simulator realistic, and hence it showed good content validity. However, none of the built-in simulator metrics could significantly distinguish between novice, intermediate

  6. Social Support and Motivation to Transfer as Predictors of Training Transfer: Testing Full and Partial Mediation Using Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Sarah; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Lewalter, Doris

    2018-01-01

    Social support and motivation to transfer are important components in conceptual models on transfer of training. Previous research indicates that both support and motivation influence transfer. To date, however, it is not yet clear if social support influences transfer of training directly, or if this influence is mediated by motivation to…

  7. How Can Students' Academic Performance in Statistics Be Improved? Testing the Influence of Social and Temporal-Self Comparison Feedback in a Web-Based Training Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaval, Marine; Michinov, Nicolas; Le Bohec, Olivier; Le Hénaff, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how social or temporal-self comparison feedback, delivered in real-time in a web-based training environment, could influence the academic performance of students in a statistics examination. First-year psychology students were given the opportunity to train for a statistics examination during a semester by…

  8. Responsividade do teste do degrau de seis minutos a um programa de treinamento físico em pacientes com DPOC Responsiveness of the six-minute step test to a physical training program in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilla Tays Marrara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a responsividade do teste do degrau de seis minutos (TD6 a um programa de treinamento físico (PTF aeróbio e verificar a eficácia do PTF quanto às variáveis ergoespirométricas no TD6, assim como ao desempenho físico, sensação de dispneia e SpO2 no TD6 e no teste de caminhada de seis minutos (TC6 em pacientes com DPOC. MÉTODOS: Estudo controlado, prospectivo e randomizado com pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de DPOC que apresentassem relação VEF1/CVF OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the responsiveness of the six-minute step test (6MST to an aerobic physical training program (PTP and to determine the efficacy of the PTP regarding spirometric variables during the 6MST, as well as physical performance, sensation of dyspnea, and SpO2 during the 6MST and the six-minute walk test (6MWT, in patients with COPD. METHODS: This was a controlled, prospective randomized study involving patients clinically diagnosed with COPD, with an FEV1/FVC ratio < 70%, and having been clinically stable in the last two months. The patients were randomized to undergo a PTP on a treadmill, three times a week, for six weeks (PTP group or not (control group. Histories were taken from all of the patients, who received regular respiratory therapy during the study period, undergoing physical examination and spirometry before and after bronchodilator use; incremental symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing; the 6MST; and the 6MWT. RESULTS: Of the 36 patients that completed the study, 21 and 15 were in the PTP and control groups, respectively. In the PTP group, there was a significant increase in the number of steps climbed during the 6MST and in the six-minute walk distance (in m and % of predicted, as well as a significant decrease in the sensation of dyspnea during the 6MWT. CONCLUSIONS: The 6MST showed responsiveness to the PTP. However, the 6MWT appears to be more responsive to the PTP proposed.

  9. Online Workplace Training in Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie K. Haley

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to explore and describe the relationships between preference for online training and traditional face-to-face training. Included were variables of race, gender, age, education, experience of library employees, training providers, training locations, and institutional professional development policies, etc. in the library context. The author used a bivariate test, KruskalWallis test and Mann-Whitney U test to examine the relationship between preference for online training and related variables.

  10. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  11. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  12. Language training: French training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    General and professional french coursesThe next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144.

  13. The Effects of a Periodized vs. Traditional Military Training Program on 2-Mile Run Performance During the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Brandon L; Heishman, Aaron D; Campbell, Jay A

    2017-07-31

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an experimental versus traditional military run training on 2-mile run ability in Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) cadets. Fifty college-aged cadets were randomly placed into two groups and trained for four weeks with either an experimental running program (EXP, n=22) comprised of RPE intensity-specific, energy system based intervals or with traditional military running program (TRA, n=28) utilizing a crossover study design. A 2-mile run assessment was performed just prior to the start, at the end of the first 4 weeks, and again after the second 4 weeks of training following crossover. The EXP program significantly decreased 2-mile run times (961.3s ± 155.8s to 943.4 ± 140.2s, P=0.012, baseline to post 1) while the TRA group experienced a significant increase in run times (901.0 ± 79.2s vs. 913.9 ± 82.9s) over the same training period. There was a moderate effect size (d = 0.61, P=0.07) for the experimental run program to "reverse" the adverse effects of the traditional program within the 4-week training period (post 1 to post 2) following treatment crossover. Thus, for short-term training of military personnel, RPE intensity specific running program comprised of aerobic and anaerobic system development can enhance 2-mile run performance superior of a traditional program while reducing training volume (60 min per session vs. 43.2 min per session, respectively). Future research should extend the training period to determine efficacy of this training approach for long term improvement of aerobic capacity and possible reduction of musculoskeletal injury.

  14. Does Negotiation Training Improve Negotiators' Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElShenawy, Eman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper's objective is to test the main effect of negotiation training-level on acquiring negotiation skills. Training level refers to the time a trainee spends in a negotiation training course receiving the standard style and methods of training. Negotiation skills are manifested through trainees' performance after receiving training.…

  15. Providing initial transthoracic echocardiography training for anesthesiologists: simulator training is not inferior to live training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrich, Thomas; Seethala, Raghu R; Olenchock, Benjamin A; Mizuguchi, Annette K; Rivero, Jose M; Beutler, Sascha S; Fox, John A; Liu, Xiaoxia; Frendl, Gyorgy

    2014-02-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is finding increased use in anesthesia and critical care. Efficient options for training anesthesiologists should be explored. Simulator mannequins allow for training of manual acquisition and image recognition skills and may be suitable due to ease of scheduling. The authors tested the hypothesis that training with a simulator would not be inferior to training using a live volunteer. Prospective, randomized trial. University hospital. Forty-six anesthesia residents, fellows, and faculty. After preparation with a written and video tutorial, study subjects received 80 minutes of TTE training using either a simulator or live volunteer. Practical and written tests were completed before and after training to assess improvement in manual image acquisition skills and theoretic knowledge. The written test was repeated 4 weeks later. Performance in the practical image-acquisition test improved significantly after training using both the live volunteer and the simulator, improving by 4.0 and 4.3 points out of 15, respectively. Simulator training was found not to be inferior to live training, with a mean difference of -0.30 points and 95% confidence intervals that did not cross the predefined non-inferiority margin. Performance in the written retention test also improved significantly immediately after training for both groups but declined similarly upon repeat testing 4 weeks later. When providing initial TTE training to anesthesiologists, training using a simulator was not inferior to using live volunteers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparing for the American Board of Surgery Flexible Endoscopy Curriculum: Development of multi-institutional proficiency-based training standards and pilot testing of a simulation-based mastery learning curriculum for the Endoscopy Training System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Brenton R; Placek, Sarah B; Gardner, Aimee K; Korndorffer, James R; Wagner, Mercy D; Pearl, Jonathan P; Ritter, E Matthew

    2017-09-20

    The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery (FES) exam is required for American Board of Surgery certification. The purpose of this study was to develop performance standards for a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum for the FES performance exam using the Endoscopy Training System (ETS). Experienced endoscopists from multiple institutions and specialties performed each ETS task (scope manipulation (SM), tool targeting (TT), retroflexion (RF), loop management (LM), and mucosal inspection (MI)) with scores used to develop performance standards for a SBML training curriculum. Trainees completed the curriculum to determine feasibility, and effect on FES performance. Task specific training standards were determined (SM-121sec, TT-243sec, RF-159sec, LM-261sec, MI-180-480sec, 7 polyps). Trainees required 29.5 ± 3.7 training trials over 2.75 ± 0.5 training sessions to complete the SBML curriculum. Despite high baseline FES performance, scores improved (pre 73.4 ± 7, post 78.1 ± 5.2; effect size = 0.76, p > 0.1), but this was not statistically discernable. This SBML curriculum was feasible and improved FES scores in a group of high performers. This curriculum should be applied to novice endoscopists to determine effectiveness for FES exam preparation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 411. Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis), Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick K. [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 411, Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis). CAU 411 is located on the Nevada Test and Training Range and consists of a single corrective action site (CAS), NAFR-23-01, Pu Contaminated Soil. There is sufficient information and historical documentation from previous investigations and the 1996 interim corrective action to recommend closure of CAU 411 using the SAFER process. Based on existing data, the presumed corrective action for CAU 411 is clean closure. However, additional data will be obtained during a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information, and to determine whether the CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. This SAFER Plan provides the methodology to gather the necessary information for closing the CAU. The results of the field investigation will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 20, 2014, by representatives of NDEP, the U.S. Air Force (USAF), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine whether CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 411; Collect environmental samples from designated target populations to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information; If COCs are no longer present, establish clean closure as the corrective action; If COCs are present, the extent of contamination will be defined and further corrective actions

  18. How does wearable robotic exoskeleton affect overground walking performance measured with the 10-m and six-minute walk tests after a basic locomotor training in healthy individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Dany H; Cunha, Jérémie Da; Boyer-Delestre, Mael; Bosquet, Laurent; Duclos, Cyril

    2017-10-01

    It is still unknown to what extent overground walking with a WRE is equivalent to natural overground walking without a WRE. Hence, the interpretability of the 10-m (10MWT) and six-minute (6MWT) walk tests during overground walking with a WRE against reference values collected during natural overground walking without a WRE is challenging. This study aimed to 1) compare walking performance across three different overground walking conditions: natural walking without a WRE, walking with a WRE providing minimal assistance (active walking), and walking with a WRE proving complete assistance (passive walking) and 2) assess the association and the agreement between the 10MWT and the 6MWT during passive and active walking with a WRE. Seventeen healthy individuals who underwent basic locomotor training with a WRE performed the 10MWT (preferred and maximal speeds) and the 6MWT under the three conditions. For the 10MWT, the speed progressively and significantly decreased from natural walking without a WRE (preferred: 1.40±0.18m/s; maximal: 2.16±0.19m/s), to active walking with a WRE (preferred: 0.48±0.10m/s; maximal: 0.61±0.14m/s), and to passive walking with a WRE (preferred: 0.38±0.09m/s; maximal: 0.42±0.10m/s). For the 6MWT, total distances decreased from walking without a WRE (609±53.9m), to active walking with a WRE (196.6±42.6m), and to passive walking with a WRE (144.3±33.3m). The 10MWT and 6MWT provide distinct information and can't be used interchangeably to document speed only during active walking with the WRE. Speed and distance drastically decrease during active and, even more so, passive walking with the WRE in comparison to walking without a WRE. Selection of walking tests should depend on the level of assistance provided by the WRE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. How to measure training effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Leslie

    1986-01-01

    Assessing training for effectiveness and value, this book covers the entire process from selecting and planning a training event, to validating and testing its outcome. This new, up-to-date edition includes details of the competence standards from the Training and Development

  20. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages:   http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registratio...

  1. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langua...

  2. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  3. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    La prochaine session se déroulera du 04 octobre 2004 au 11 février 2005 (interruption de 3 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web : http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants ...

  4. Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... big difference between strength training, powerlifting, and competitive bodybuilding! Strength training uses resistance methods like free weights, ... a person can lift at one time. Competitive bodybuilding involves evaluating muscle definition and symmetry, as well ...

  5. Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2012-04-01

    Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks

  6. Managing the training process in bodybuilding

    OpenAIRE

    Netík, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Anotation Title: Managing the training process in bodybuilding This thesis describes the sport of bodybuilding and its training process. It also describes aspects of managing the training process and based on own research determines what impact the training process is applied to changes in the state of training and performance. There is also considering the impact of specific training methods and intensification. In the research of this thesis, we used different testing methods. We performed ...

  7. Selection for postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnamperuma, Gominda G

    2010-12-01

    Selection for an educational programme requires meticulous planning and the adoption of sound educational principles to decide on how and what should be assessed. This article provides a step-wise guide for developing a selection process for postgraduate specialty training, based on the best practice in the literature. The literature on selecting applicants for educational programmes was reviewed to categorise the selection methods according to their purpose, and their relative strengths and weaknesses. A step-wise guide that encapsulated the best practice for designing a selection process for postgraduate specialty training was then developed. The steps of developing a selection process for postgraduate specialty training are: determining the competencies required for the training programme; selecting the competencies that can be assessed at selection; identifying content for selection; blueprinting; choice of selection tests; development of test material; piloting; and implementation and evaluation of the selection process. There are robust tests to assess applicants' knowledge at the lower two levels of Miller's pyramid. Scenario-based testing holds promise for assessing at 'shows-how' level. Assessing at 'does' level during selection is difficult, but not impossible. There is no one test that can be used to select an applicant for a postgraduate training programme. Rather a battery of tests that assesses all the competencies, sampled according to a blueprint, should be used. The eight-step guide proposed in this article provides an educationally sound and defensible procedure to develop a selection process. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  8. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants per class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people ...

  9. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people w...

  10. A Comparison of Pre-Test Means from Oil Field Workers Having Available Manuals and Those Lacking Manuals before Announced Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Franco

    A study assessed the validity of the hypothesis that offshore drilling personnel would independently study important material if they knew that they would eventually receive formal training on the topic covered in the material. Eighty-one crew members on an offshore drilling rig were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Those in…

  11. An Evaluation of Research Training: The Testing, Research, and Data Processing Unit of the University Counseling Center. Research Report #5-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chalmer E.; Sedlacek, William E.

    The relative contributions of a research assistantship experience to graduate training programs in counseling psychology and student personnel were evaluated. The following areas were assessed: (1) the extent to which research competencies are enhanced among former research assistants; (2) the extent to which attitudes toward research are enhanced…

  12. Efficiency of twice weekly concurrent training in trained elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rodrigo; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Izquierdo, Mikel; Conceição, Matheus; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Radaelli, Régis; Wilhelm, Eurico; Bottaro, Martim; Ribeiro, Jorge Pinto; Umpierre, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    This study compared the effects of different weekly training frequencies on the cardiovascular and neuromuscular adaptations induced by concurrent training in previously trained elderly. After 20weeks of combined strength and endurance training, twenty-four healthy elderly men (65±4 years) were randomly placed into two frequency training groups: strength and endurance training performed twice a week (SE2, n=12); or, strength and endurance training performed three times per week (SE3, n=12). The interventions lasted 10 weeks and each group performed identical exercise intensity and volume per session. Before and after the exercise training, one maximum repetition test (1RM), isometric peak torque (PT), maximal surface electromyographic activity (EMG), as well as muscle thickness (MT) were examined. Additionally, peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)), maximum aerobic workload (W(max)), first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2) were evaluated. There were significant increases in upper and lower-body 1RM, MT, VO(2peak), VT1 and VT2, with no differences between groups. There were no changes after training in maximal EMG and isometric peak torque. W(max) was improved only in SE3. After 10 weeks of training, twice weekly combined strength and endurance training leads to similar neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptations as three times per week, demonstrating the efficiency of lower frequency of concurrent training in previously trained elderly men. © 2013.

  13. Virtual Training of the Myosignal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlaak, Bernhard; Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K; Bongers, Raoul M

    2015-01-01

    To investigate which of three virtual training methods produces the largest learning effects on discrete and continuous myocontrol. The secondary objective was to examine the relation between myocontrol and manual motor control tests. A cohort analytic study. University laboratory. 3 groups of 12 able-bodied participants (N = 36). Participants trained the control over their myosignals on 3 consecutive days. Training was done with either myosignal feedback on a computer screen, a virtual myoelectric prosthetic hand or a computer game. Participants performed 2 myocontrol tests and 2 manual motor control tests before the first and after the last training session. They were asked to open and close a virtual prosthetic hand on 3 different velocities as a discrete myocontrol test and followed a line with their myosignals for 30 seconds as a continuous myocontrol test. The motor control tests were a pegboard and grip-force test. Discrete myocontrol test: mean velocities. Continuous myocontrol test: error and error SD. Pegboard test: time to complete. Grip-force test: produced forces. No differences in learning effects on myocontrol were found for the different virtual training methods. Discrete myocontrol ability did not significantly improve as a result of training. Continuous myocontrol ability improved significantly as a result of training, both on average control and variability. All correlations between the motor control and myocontrol test outcome measures were below .50. Three different virtual training methods showed comparable results when learning myocontrol. Continuous myocontrol was improved by training while discrete myocontrol was not. Myocontrol ability could not be predicted by the manual motor control tests.

  14. Virtual Training of the Myosignal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Terlaak

    Full Text Available To investigate which of three virtual training methods produces the largest learning effects on discrete and continuous myocontrol. The secondary objective was to examine the relation between myocontrol and manual motor control tests.A cohort analytic study.University laboratory.3 groups of 12 able-bodied participants (N = 36.Participants trained the control over their myosignals on 3 consecutive days. Training was done with either myosignal feedback on a computer screen, a virtual myoelectric prosthetic hand or a computer game. Participants performed 2 myocontrol tests and 2 manual motor control tests before the first and after the last training session. They were asked to open and close a virtual prosthetic hand on 3 different velocities as a discrete myocontrol test and followed a line with their myosignals for 30 seconds as a continuous myocontrol test. The motor control tests were a pegboard and grip-force test.Discrete myocontrol test: mean velocities. Continuous myocontrol test: error and error SD. Pegboard test: time to complete. Grip-force test: produced forces.No differences in learning effects on myocontrol were found for the different virtual training methods. Discrete myocontrol ability did not significantly improve as a result of training. Continuous myocontrol ability improved significantly as a result of training, both on average control and variability. All correlations between the motor control and myocontrol test outcome measures were below .50.Three different virtual training methods showed comparable results when learning myocontrol. Continuous myocontrol was improved by training while discrete myocontrol was not. Myocontrol ability could not be predicted by the manual motor control tests.

  15. Hardwood Lumber Edger and Trimmer Training System

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Eugene M. Wengert; Philip A. Araman; Powsiri Klinkhachorn

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computerized hardwood lumber edger and trimming training system. The purpose of the training system is to help edger and trimmer operators and sawmill managers better understand how hardwood lumber grade, surface measure, and price interact to affect lumber value. The training system can be used both as a training tool and as a testing tool. As a...

  16. A Pilot Study to Test the Efficacy of Psychologically Based Physical Therapy Training for Treating Deployed U.S. Sailors and Marines with Musculoskeletal Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    experience of pain. 2011 May;91(5):700-11. Main, C. J., & George, S. Z. (2011). Psychologically informed practice for management of low back pain: future ...15 Years of Explaining Pain-The Past, Present and Future . The Journal of Pain. Overmeer, T., Boersma, K., Denison, E., & Linton, S. J. (2011). Does...Bennell, K. L. (2013). A physiotherapist -delivered, combined exercise and pain coping skills training intervention for individuals with knee

  17. Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weston M, et al. Effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) on fitness in adults: A meta-analysis ... 2014;44:1005. Gillen JB, et al. Is high-intensity interval training a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve health ...

  18. ENGLISH TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch PLACES AVAILABLE Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who need to improve their professional writing (administrative, scientific, technical). Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their sp...

  19. Training induced cortical plasticity compared between three tongue training paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different training types and secondary to test gender differences on the training-related cortical plasticity induced by three different tongue training paradigms: 1. Therapeutic tongue exercises (TTE), 2. Playing computer games...... with the tongue using Tongue Drive System (TDS) and 3. Tongue-protrusion task (TPT). Forty-eight participants were randomized into 3 groups with 1 h of TTE, TDS, or TPT. Stimulus–response curves of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and motor cortex mapping for tongue muscles and first dorsal interosseous (FDI......) (control) were established using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at three time-points: (1) before tongue training, (2) immediately after training, (3) 1 h after training. Subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain and fatigue were evaluated on 0-10 numerical rating scales (NRS) after training...

  20. Interactive Karyotyping Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kotwaliwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide use of newer techniques in genetic diagnostics, there remains a need for technologists to learn human chromosome morphology, identify abnormal metaphases and report clinical abnormalities. Global short age of cytogenetic trainers and a time consuming training process makes Karyotyping training difficult. We have developed a web based interactive Karyotyping training tool, KaryoTutor©, that allows technologists to learn karyotyping in an interactive environment and aids the trainer in the training process. KaryoTutor©provides visual clues for identifying abnormal chromosomes, provides instant test scores and includes a reference library of ideograms,sample chromosome images and reference materials. Trainees are able to recursively work on a case till a satisfactory result is achieved,with KaryoTutor providing interactive inputs.Additionally, trainers can assign cases and monitor trainee progress using audit trail management and other administrative features.

  1. Testing the impact of a social skill training versus waiting list control group for the reduction of disruptive behaviors and stress among preschool children in child care: the study protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Sylvana M; Larose, Marie-Pier; Geoffroy, Marie Claude; Laurin, Julie; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E; Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle

    2017-08-07

    Most preschoolers growing up in western industrialized countries receive child care services (CCS) during the day, while their parents are at work. Meta-analytic data suggest that CCS represent a stressful experience for preschoolers. This may be because preschoolers have not yet developed the social skills necessary to cope with the new and rapidly fluctuating social contexts of CCS. We tested the effectiveness of a child care-based social skill training program aiming to improve children's social behaviors and reduce the stress they experience. We used a cluster randomized control trial (cRCT) to compare children's social behaviors and stress levels in pre- and post-intervention according to whether they received a social skill training intervention or not. Nineteen (n = 19) public CCS (n = 362, 3-years-old preschoolers) of underprivileged neighborhoods (Montreal, Canada) were randomized to one of two conditions: 1) social skills training (n = 10 CCS); or 2) waiting list control group (n = 9 CCS). Educators in the intervention group conducted bi-weekly social skills training sessions over a period of 8 months. The intervention covered four topics: making social contacts, problem solving, emotional self-regulation, as well as emotional expression and recognition. Main outcome measures included preschoolers' disruptive (e.g. aggression, opposition, conflicts) and prosocial behaviors (e.g. sharing toys, helping another child), and stress levels assessed by salivary cortisol sampling at pre and post intervention assessments. Educators' practices will be tested as potential mediators of the expected changes in behaviors and neuroendocrine stress. To our knowledge, this is the first cRCT to test the effectiveness of a child care based social skill training program on the reduction of disruptive behaviors and levels of stress. Significant challenges include the degree of adherence to the intervention protocol as well educators and preschoolers' turnover

  2. Training Attestations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2004-01-01

    In the past, paper Training Attestations were printed during the first quarter of a New Year for Staff Members having followed courses and seminars the previous year in the context of CERN's official Training Programmes.  The attestations were sent to Divisional Training Officers (DTO's) for distribution to all Staff Members concerned within their Division. In practise many Staff Members did not find this paper useful, however some expressed a wish to be able to have access to a self-service facility in case of need. This change was discussed by the Joint Training Board (JTB) and with the DTO's during 2003 and was supported. As a consequence, following a collaboration between HR-PMD and IT-AIS, from 2004 onwards paper Training Attestations will no longer be printed and distributed as before. Those requiring a list of training followed in the past can now obtain their attestation directly from the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application for all training followed since 1997. https://hrt.cern...

  3. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for peop...

  4. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for people wi...

  5. Conceptualization and Pilot Testing of a Core Competency-Based Training Workshop in Suicide Risk Assessment and Management: Notes From the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Bryson, Claire N; Eichorst, Morgam K; Keyes, Lee N; Ridge, Brittany E

    2017-03-01

    As professional psychology training programs and continuing education have moved toward competency based approaches, it has become equally important to develop uniform, evidence-based approaches for suicide risk assessment and management. The present article presents a workshop curriculum based on established core competencies in suicide risk assessment and management. Drawing on theories suicide risk formation, the workshop features an integration of didactic, process, and experiential components. We present pilot data from 2 small group workshops (n = 17): 1 from a clinical psychology doctoral program and 1 from a university counseling center. Workshop participation yielded increases in (a) the ability to recognize appropriate clinician responses to suicidal client statements, (b) self-perceptions of general capacity to interface with suicidal patients and mastery of the 10 core competencies, (c) factual knowledge concerning suicide risk assessment and management, and (d) the self-rated ability to assess and manage a suicidal patient. We discuss statistical and generalizability limitations as well as implications for future modification, implementation, and provision of this training method. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cognitive Load in Mastoidectomy Skills Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Mikkelsen, Peter Trier; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    aims to compare CL in traditional cadaveric dissection training and virtual reality (VR) simulation training of mastoidectomy. DESIGN: A prospective, crossover study. Participants performed cadaveric dissection before VR simulation of the procedure or vice versa. CL was estimated by secondary......-task reaction time testing at baseline and during the procedure in both training modalities. SETTING: The national Danish temporal bone course. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 40 novice otorhinolaryngology residents. RESULTS: Reaction time was increased by 20% in VR simulation training and 55% in cadaveric dissection...... training of mastoidectomy compared with baseline measurements. Traditional dissection training increased CL significantly more than VR simulation training (p

  7. Supervisor training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus on the experi......This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus...... on the experience of an integrated supervisor training programme offered in Aalborg, Denmark in 2009/2010. In this programme general issues of professional supervision and the application of artistic media as a core element in the supervisory process were Integrated. It is the hope of the author that this article...... will inspire other music therapists to develop supervisor training programmes for professional music therapists and also to undertake further research into professional supervision....

  8. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 8 May to 30 June (or 7 July) 2006. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 10 April to 19 June 2006. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 24 hours Price: 528 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  9. Defense Workforce Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    acquire new and Functional context approach different skills to job skils training H-2 team work. This decentralization requires more competency from...categories based on their content: "Basic Literacy and General Education covers topics in general education, including all basic verbal and mathematical... literacy skills, preparation for education in specific subject areas, preparation for educational certification tests, learning skills (especially

  10. A Pilot Training Program and Evaluation of Training for an Area Agency on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wendy; Campbell, Richard

    A preliminary training and evaluation program was initiated by the Houston Area Agency on Aging. Several pilot training programs were tested, and information was gathered on the current and desired training status of personnel in service-providing agencies. Inspection of obective and subjective reports suggests that future training programs should…

  11. Endurance Training - Science and Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and cellular level. Coaches should not be put off by this, as the work is well written and presented in a logical manner. These chapters are essential to the understanding of an athlete's response to endurance training. Chapter 18 covers physiological testing and adaptation to endurance training. It was great to read a chapter ...

  12. SC Magnet (re)training

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; Catalan-Lasheras, N

    2009-01-01

    We will give an overview of the training of all the LHC superconducting magnets based on the experience acquired diring the hardware commissioning. Using this information and the data relative to the test of individual magnets during manufacturing, we will give a view on the expected requirements for the training at 5 and 7 TeV.

  13. Effects of Group Training Based on the Health Belief Model on Knowledge and Behavior Regarding the Pap Smear Test in Iranian Women: a Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobeiri, Fatemeh; Javad, Masoumeh Taravati; Parsa, Parisa; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2016-01-01

    The Pap smear test is recommended for early diagnosis of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to assess knowledge and behavior regarding the Pap smear test based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) in women referred to premarital counseling classes, Hamadan, Iran. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 330 women, who were allocated randomly to two case and control groups (n=165). Two educational session classes were performed in the case group. Two stages in before and after intervention groups were evaluated. Analysis of data was performed by SPSS/16.0, using t-test, x2, and McNemar's test. P-values education about cervical cancer on changing women's beliefs about cervical screening.

  14. The Utility of Testing Noncognitive Aptitudes as Additional Predictors of Graduation from U.S. Air Force Air Traffic Controller Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Psychology and Applied Human Factors. 2015; 5(2):93-103. 14. ABSTRACT The present study examined the utility of testing noncognitive aptitudes...of emotional self-awareness, self-actualization, reality testing, stress tolerance, happiness , and approach to problem solving best differentiated...tolerance, happiness , and approach to problem solving best differentiated graduates from nongraduates. The results of the study suggest such areas of

  15. All aboard the Safety Train(ing)!

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    Would you like to influence CERN’s safety courses? Do you want to help build better training courses? If your answer is yes to one or both of these questions: now is the time! The Safety Training section is looking for volunteers from the whole CERN community to test new courses before they go online for all members of the personnel.    The Safety Training section is redesigning the CERN e-learning package in order to adopt a more educational approach and to make the courses a more enjoyable experience. The section is now calling for volunteers. “We know we can do much more with testers’ help and feedback,” explains Christoph Balle, Safety Training section leader. “By having the end users actively involved in the process, we’ll achieve our goal of communicating safety in the best possible way. As the volunteers will play an active role in the development of the courses, they will be providing a service to the whole community.&am...

  16. Training attentional control in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay-Brandt, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated benefits for older adults from training attentional control using a variable priority strategy, but the construct validity of the training task and the degree to which benefits of training transfer to other contexts are unclear. The goal of this study was to characterize baseline performance on the training task in a sample of 105 healthy older adults and to test for transfer of training in a subset (n = 21). Training gains after 5 days and extent of transfer was compared to another subset (n = 20) that served as a control group. Baseline performance on the training task was characterized by a two-factor model of working memory and processing speed. Processing speed correlated with the training task. Training gains in speed and accuracy were reliable and robust (ps <.001, η2 = .57 to .90). Transfer to an analogous task was observed (ps <.05, η2 = .10 to .17). The beneficial effect of training did not translate to improved performance on related measures of processing speed. This study highlights the robust effect of training and transfer to a similar context using a variable priority training task. Although processing speed is an important aspect of the training task, training benefit is either related to an untested aspect of the training task or transfer of training is limited to the training context. PMID:21728889

  17. THE APPROACHING TRAIN DETECTION ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Bibikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with detection algorithm for rail vibroacoustic waves caused by approaching train on the background of increased noise. The urgency of algorithm development for train detection in view of increased rail noise, when railway lines are close to roads or road intersections is justified. The algorithm is based on the method of weak signals detection in a noisy environment. The information statistics ultimate expression is adjusted. We present the results of algorithm research and testing of the train approach alarm device that implements the proposed algorithm. The algorithm is prepared for upgrading the train approach alarm device “Signalizator-P".

  18. Simulator training for endobronchial ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is very operator dependent and has a long learning curve. Simulation-based training might shorten the learning curve, and an assessment tool with solid validity evidence could ensure basic competency before unsupervised......-trained novices and apprenticeship-trained novices failing the test, respectively; pultrasound assessment tool could be used to provide reliable and valid assessment of competence in EBUS-TBNA, and act as an aid in certification. Virtual-reality simulator training was shown to be more...

  19. Impact of whole-body electromyostimulation on body composition in elderly women at risk for sarcopenia: the Training and ElectroStimulation Trial (TEST-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Bebenek, Michael; Engelke, Klaus; von Stengel, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Most studies have confirmed the positive impact of resistance training on muscle mass and functional capacity in aging adults. However, due to physical limitation or a simple aversion against regular exercise, the majority of elderly subjects do not reach the exercise doses recommended for impacting strength or muscle mass. This led us to evaluate the effect of whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS), a novel, time-efficient and smooth training technology, on body composition with special regard to sarcopenia. Seventy-six lean, non-sportive women (75 ± 4 years) were randomly assigned to either a WB-EMS group (WB-EMS, n = 38) that performed 18 min of WB-EMS (bipolar, 85 Hz) 3 sessions in 14 days (1.5 sessions/week) or a semi-active control group (aCG, n = 38). Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and maximum strength was evaluated using isometric techniques for trunk and legs. After 54 weeks of intervention, significant inter-group differences were determined for appendicular skeletal muscle mass (WB-EMS, 0.4 ± 2.2 % vs. aCG, -1.5 ± 3.1 %; p = 0.009), lean body mass (WB-EMS, 0.8 ± 1.8 % vs. aCG, -0.8 ± 2.7 %; p = 0.008) and maximum isometric strength (leg extensors, 9.8 ± 12.9 % vs. 0.2 ± 10.4 %; p = 0.003; trunk extensors, 10.1 ± 12.7 vs. -1.6 ± 8.6 %; p = 0.001). Although borderline significant for abdominal fat mass (WB-EMS, -2.9 ± 8.3 vs. aCG, 1.5 ± 10.7 %; p = 0.069), differences did not reach statistically significant levels for body fat parameters. Considering the clinical effectiveness for impacting sarcopenia and the good acceptance of this technology by this non-sportive cohort of elderly women, we conclude that for elderly subjects unable or unwilling to perform dynamic strength exercises, electromyostimulation may be a less off-putting alternative to maintain lean body mass and strength.

  20. Testing the effectivity of the mixed virtual reality training Into D'mentia for informal caregivers of people with dementia: protocol for a longitudinal, quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jütten, Linda Helena; Mark, Ruth Elaine; Maria Janssen, Ben Wilhelmus Jacobus; Rietsema, Jan; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Sitskoorn, Margriet Maria

    2017-08-21

    Informal caregivers for people with dementia (hereafter: caregivers) often feel (over)burdened by the care for a loved one with dementia, and this can have various deleterious effects on both caregivers and patients. Support for caregivers is urgently needed, and for this reason, a dementia simulator (Into D'mentia) was developed in which caregivers experience what it is like to have dementia. The simulator attempts to heighten caregivers' empathy and understanding for the patient and, in turn, diminish their own caregiver burden. The current study evaluates whether the simulator is effective on a number of outcomes. A longitudinal, quasi-experimental study is ongoing in the Netherlands. We aim to recruit 142 caregivers in total divided over two groups: 71 caregivers in the intervention group and 71 caregivers in the control group. All participants will complete interviews and questionnaires at four time points: at baseline, 1 week, 2.5 months and 15 months after the training. The primary outcomes include empathy, caregiver burden, caregiver's sense of competence, social reliance, anxiety, depression and caregivers' subjective and objective health. This study is being carried out in agreement with the Declaration of Helsinki, and the protocol has been approved by the local ethics committees. This study is registered with The Netherlands National Trial Register (NNTR5856). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Cross-Curricular Competencies of Student Teachers: A Selection Model Based on Assessment Centre Admission Tests and Study Success after the First Year of Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Christine; Schuler, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in assessing teachers' cross-curricular competencies as a result of reforms in teacher education in Switzerland. At Zurich University of Teacher Education, future students who do not have formal qualifications are required to pass several examinations and a test, which is known as an "assessment…

  2. French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place: from 13 October to 19 December 2003. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Language Training Françoise Benz Tel.73127 language.training@cern.ch

  3. Diabetes Learning in Virtual Environments: Testing the Efficacy of Self-Management Training and Support in Virtual Environments (Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Melkus, Gail D; Pan, Wei; Lewinski, Allison A; Johnson, Constance M

    2015-01-01

    the reach of self-management training and support.

  4. Effect of Traditional Aerobic Exercises Versus Sprint Interval Training on Pulmonary Function Tests In Young Sedentary Males: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled M., Badaam; A., Munibuddin; S.T., Khan; S.P., Choudhari; R., Doiphode

    2013-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is now a global non-communicable disease. Current recommendations from American College of Sports Medicine, American Heart Association and UK medical officers for physical activity are difficult to implement, due to time constraints and hence, they have less compliance. Purpose: To compare Sprint Interval Training (SIT) and traditional aerobic exercise (AE) with respect to changes in Vital capacity (VC), Maximum Voluntary Ventilation (MVV) and Physical Fitness Index (PFI) in young sedentary males. Study Design: This was a randomised, controlled trial. Methods: Fourteen young, sedentary, healthy males who were aged 18-25 years were randomly allocated to SIT group and AE group for 3 weeks. SIT group exercised at high intensity for 10 minutes a day, three days a week. AE group exercised at moderate intensity for 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Results: Improvement in FVC (litres) in AE group was 0.31 ± 0.11 and that in SIT group was 0.48 ± 0.17. The improvement in MVV (litres) in AE Group was 21.5 ± 11.6 and that in SIT group was 27.77 ± 7.03. Thus, SIT showed a better improvement in primary outcome i.e. FVC and MVV, although difference in improvement was statistically not significant (p= 0.09 and 0.29 respectively). Secondary outcome i.e. PFI improved by 5.57 ± 1.71% in AE group and by 10.28 ± 3.03% in SIT group. The difference in improvement was statistically significant (p= 0.003). Conclusions: SIT can be suggested as a time efficient option for improving cardiorespiratory fitness and hence, it can be used as a health promotion strategy. PMID:24179890

  5. Entrepreneurship training in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Leila Kæmsgaard Pagh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Due to the very high youth unemployment in Northern Ghana, there is a huge need for enterprising skills among young people. A natural focus in recent years has therefore been entrepreneurship training, focusing on training young Ghanaians to start-up businesses. Unfortunately, the young...... is that adding a focus on the young entrepreneur’s means, attitude and enterprising behaviour skills to the existing focus on starting up businesses, will increase the value of the Entrepreneurship training and support the overcoming of constraints. The paper build on a design-based research project...... in collaboration with the local NGO YEfL. Based on relevant theory, a qualitative field research in Northern Ghana and a quantitative baseline survey a new Entrepreneurship Model has been designed. The new model was tested in autumn 2016 at three Entrepreneurship boot camps in Northern Ghana. The study has...

  6. Training SVMs without offset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwart, Ingo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, Clint [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We develop, analyze, and test a training algorithm for support vector machine cla.'>sifiers without offset. Key features of this algorithm are a new stopping criterion and a set of working set selection strategies that, although inexpensive, do not lead to substantially more iterations than the optimal working set selection strategy. For these working set strategies, we establish convergence rates that coincide with the best known rates for SYMs with offset. We further conduct various experiments that investigate both the run time behavior and the performed iterations of the new training algorithm. It turns out, that the new algorithm needs less iterations and run-time than standard training algorithms for SYMs with offset.

  7. Crystal identification of synovial fluid aspiration by polarized light microscopy. An online test suggesting that our traditional rheumatologic competence needs renewed attention and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, D; Neogi, T; Taylor, W J; Dalbeth, N; Jansen, T L

    2017-03-01

    Testing a reading exercise for identification of several typical crystal such as the negatively birefringent needle-shaped crystals that are under polarized light microscopy is the gold standard for diagnosing gout. The objective of this study was to assess current performance of crystal identification by professionals involved in examining synovial fluid in routine care. Rheumatologists, trainees, lab technicians, and other physicians with an interest in crystal arthritis completed an online test. The test consisted of 30 images: 8 monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, 5 calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), 4 cholesterol, 2 depot methylprednisolone, 2 calcium oxalate, 2 rice bodies, 1 hydroxyapatite, 1 liquid lipid, 1 fibrin, 1 Charcot-Leyden, and 5 different artifacts. Of the 22 non-MSU slides, a subset of 8 was pre-designated that were thought to be clinically important to be identified as non-MSU. The primary outcome was defined as the correct identification of all eight MSU slides plus the identification of all eight pre-defined non-MSU slides as non-MSU. The online test was completed by 110 participants. The primary outcome was achieved by 39%. Correct identification of all MSU images was achieved by 81%, correct identification of all 8 pre-defined non-MSU, CPP images, and all 22 non-MSU images as non-MSU by 68, 68, and 23%, respectively. MSU crystals were well identified, but incorrect identification of non-MSU crystals occurred frequently. This study suggests that there is room for improvement regarding crystal identification of particularly CPP and other non-MSU crystals even in this highly motivated group.

  8. Usability Testing of Guided Internet-based Parent Training for Challenging Behavior in Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (Strongest Families FASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundert, Amos S; Huguet, Anna; Green, Courtney R; Hewitt, Amy J; Mushquash, Christopher J; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Sourander, Andre; Caughey, Heather; Lingley-Pottie, Patricia; McGrath, Patrick J; Reynolds, James N

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet the need for accessible interventions and support for families affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), we have developed an Internet-based, distance intervention for caregivers of children with FASD between the ages of four and twelve, called Strongest Families™ FASD. To evaluate the usability of the Strongest Families FASD program content and website in terms of learnability, efficiency and acceptability. A remote usability testing approach was conducted in two iterative cycles of participants. Synchronous online usability testing sessions were conducted, followed by asynchronous testing. A total of 18 participants were included, comprised of both health care professionals with expertise in FASD and caregivers of children with FASD. The data collected in each cycle was examined for commonalities and results were used to inform changes to the website and content after each cycle. Participants rated the website as appealing and relatively easy and fast to use. Nevertheless, several usability problems were identified such as difficulty navigating between sections of content on the website, displaying too much content per page, and the relevance and appropriateness of the content as it related to FASD. The identification of usability problems was an important step in refining the Strongest Families FASD program before its effectiveness is evaluated in a randomized controlled trial.

  9. High Acceptability of HIV Self-Testing among Technical Vocational Education and Training College Students in Gauteng and North West Province: What Are the Implications for the Scale Up in South Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgatle, Mathildah Mpata; Madiba, Sphiwe

    2017-01-01

    Although HIV self-testing (HIVST) is globally accepted as an important complement to existing HIV testing approaches, South Africa has lagged behind in its adoption. As a result, data on the acceptability and uptake of HIVST testing is limited. The study investigated the acceptability of HIVST among students in Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in two provinces in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect data among 3,662 students recruited from 13 TVET colleges. The mean age of the students was 21.9 years. The majority (80.9%) were sexually active; while 66.1% reported that they had one sexual partner, and 33.9% had two or more sexual partners in the past year, and66.5% used condoms during the last sexual act. Three-quarters tested for HIV in the past year but less than half knew about HIVST prior to the survey. The acceptability of HIVST was high; about three-quarters showed a willingness to purchase a self-test kit and a majority would self-test with partners. Acceptability of HIVST was associated with being sexually active (OR = 1.73, p = 0.02, confidence interval (CI): 1.08-2.75), having ever been tested for HIV (OR = 1.74, p = 0.001, CI: 1.26-2.38), and having multiple sexual partners (OR = 0.61, p = 0.01, CI: 0.42-0.88). Three-quarters would confirm test results at a local health facility. In terms of counselling, telephone hotlines were acceptable to only 39.9%, and less than half felt that test-kit leaflets would provide sufficient information to self-test. The high acceptability of HIVST among the students calls for extensive planning and preparation for the scaling up of HIVST in South Africa. In addition, campaigns similar to those conducted to promote HIV counselling and testing (HCT) should be considered to educate communities about HIVST.

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  11. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a goo...

  12. Language Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain the...

  13. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowl...

  14. Bullet Train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagan, Patricia A.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge Universe is a conglomerate that includes an assortment of training companies, a chain of child-care centers, a knowledge-management consulting business, and an educational toy maker. KU's mission includes building human capital from birth to post-retirement, providing lifelong learning opportunities, and helping businesses use the power…

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study for Microsoft applications :12.2.2004 (morning) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 ...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 26.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Pa...

  17. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) : 28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 – Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to PSpice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 12 – 14.11.03 (3 days) ACCESS ...

  18. Technical Training: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW hands-on (E) 16.3...

  19. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  20. Treinamento aeróbio em natação melhora a resposta de parâmetros metabólicos de ratos durante teste de esforço Aerobic swimming training improves metabolic parameters response during exertion test in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silveira Freitas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Foram investigados os efeitos do treinamento aeróbio em natação com baixa intensidade sobre as respostas do lactato e da glicose sanguíneos de ratos durante teste de esforço. Ratos Wistar adultos foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos: sedentário (n = 6 e treinado (n = 6. Todos receberam água e ração ad libitum e foram mantidos em ambiente com temperatura de 22 ± 2ºC e ciclo claro/escuro de 12 horas. O grupo treinado foi submetido a um programa de natação contínua sem sobrecarga, 30 min/dia, cinco dias/semana, por seis semanas. Três dias após a última sessão de treino, as concentrações sanguíneas de lactato e glicose foram medidas em três momentos durante dois testes de esforço de 20 minutos (repouso, 10 min e 20 min, sendo um sem carga e outro com carga (5% do peso corporal, separados por dois dias. Observou-se correlação inversa entre lactato e glicose durante o exercício (ρ = - 0,74; P 0,05. Conclui-se que o treinamento aeróbio em natação aplicado foi capaz de alterar as respostas do lactato e glicose sanguíneos de ratos durante os testes de esforço.The effects of low intensity aerobic swimming training on blood lactate and glucose responses in rats were investigated during exertion test. Twelve adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: sedentary (n= 6 and trained (n= 6. All animals received water and food ad libitum and were kept in a room with temperature of 22 ± 2ºC and dark/light cycle of 12 hours. Animals from trained group were submitted to a swimming training protocol of 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. Sedentary animals did not exercise. Three days after the last training session all animals were submitted to two 20-minute swimming tests with 48 hour-interval, being one unloaded and the other with a load of 5 % of body weight. Blood lactate and glucose were measured at rest, 10 min and 20 min of exercise. Negative correlation between blood lactate and glucose levels

  1. Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-08-29

    A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

  2. Training and licensing requirements for blasters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippincott, S.L. [Explosives Educational Services, Inc., Granbury, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A number of Federal and State agencies require formal training for blasters. Federal agencies often specify the need for initial training involving all job responsibilities as well as periodic refresher training to assure adherence to current operating procedures. Failure to provide and document such training can result in substantial penalties. State governments vary regarding blaster training and licensing requirements. Many states issue licenses if applicants pay a fee and swear not to be a felon or a drug user. Other states require a written test, which may or may not specify prior formal training. Training and licensing requirements may vary depending on where the blaster works; i.e., construction, metal, non-metal or coal mining. For example, a state may require a written test for blasting in Surface Coal and have no requirements for other explosive consuming industries. This paper will identify and discuss the various regulatory agencies involved in formulating and enforcing blaster training and licensing requirements.

  3. Effects of a "test in-train out" walking program versus supervised standard rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients: a feasibility and pilot randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoni, Anna M; Cavazza, Stefano; Ferraresi, Giovanni; Grassi, Guido; Felisatti, Michele; Lamberti, Nicola; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    The loss of normal ambulatory function after stroke, besides causing disability, leads to progressive deconditioning and exposes patients to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and recurrent stroke. Conventional rehabilitation is mainly limited to the subacute period after stroke. Effective, safe and sustainable interventions for patients and healthcare system, including the long-term, should be identified. To verify the feasibility, safety and preliminary efficacy of an original home-based rehabilitation model compared to a standard supervised program in chronic hemiplegic stroke survivors. Pilot, two-arm, parallel group, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Community-dwelling poststroke patient/Hospital. Twelve chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (age=66.5±11.9 years, males, N.=9). Participants were randomly assigned for a 10-week period to a structured home-based exercise program (N.=6) and a standard supervised group-setting program (N.=6). The feasibility outcomes included adherence to interventions, retention rate and safety. Satisfaction was also evaluated by the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. Efficacy was assessed by the 6-minute walk test, Timed Up and Go and Stair Climb tests. The impact on Quality-of-life was estimated using the physical activity domain of the Short Form-36 questionnaire. Operators' time consuming was also calculated. Adherence was 91% in the home-based exercise group and 92% in the standard supervised group. The retention rate was 100%, with no adverse events reported and high satisfaction scores for both interventions. 6-minute walk test and physical activity domain significantly increased in both groups (P=0.03). Timed Up and Go improved in both groups, significantly for the home-based exercise group (P=0.03) while Stair Climb remained stable. Time required to operators to implement the home-based exercise program was 15 hours vs. 30 hours for the standard supervised one. In a sample of hemiplegic chronic stroke patients

  4. Use of general physical training and special physical training in the annual cycle of training university students who train in sports sections swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Dorofeeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to justify ratio means general physical training and special physical trainingin the annual cycle of training university students who train in sports sections swimming. Material and Methods: the study involved students G. S. Skovoroda HNPU aged 16–17 years, who were involved in the sport of swimming section. In the paper we used the following methods: analysis of scientific and methodological literature, teaching observations, educational testing, pedagogical experiment; methods of mathematical statistics. Results: by volume of training loads and improved ratio means general physical training and special physical training at different stages of the annual cycle of training university students who train in sports sections swimming. Conclusions: rational relationship means general and special physical training allows you to find the most effective ways of improving the process of preparing students fins and helps to improve the absolute athletic performance.

  5. Effect of 6 Weeks of Resistance Training and Boldenone Supplementation on 5-alpha Reductase and Aromatase Gene Expression in Testes Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sadeghi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Using anabolic androgenic steroids by athletes has significant side effects on sex hormones and the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks of resistance exercise and Boldenone supplements on the expression of 5-alpha reductase and aromatase genes of the testis tissue in Wistar rats. Material & Methods: In this experimental study, thirty 12-week old male Wistar rats with the average weight of 195.00±7.94 grams were divided randomly into 5 groups; control, sham, Boldenone supplements (2mg per each kilogram of body weight, resistance exercise and Boldenone exercise. Resistance exercise program was 5 sessions of climbing the ladder each week (3 sets of 5 repeats for 6 weeks that was started by 50% of one maximum repetition and reached 100% at the end. The level of 5-alpha reductase and aromatase genes expression were measured after the anesthesia and the removal of the testes tissue in the samples. Data was analyzed by paired T, ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests by using SPSS 22 software. Findings: The average weight of all groups’ mice were significantly increased in week 6 comparing to the first week (p=0.0001. There was significant increasing in 5-alpha-reductase expression in Boldenone and Boldenone exercise than the control group and also in the Boldenone exercise than resistance exercise group after the intervention. There was significant increasing in aromatase gene expression in resistance exercise and Boldenone exercise groups than the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Boldenone supplement along with 6 weeks of resistance exercise increases the levels of 5-alpha reductase and aromatase genes expression in testis tissue of Wistar rats.

  6. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours. Price: 660 CHF. For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144.

  7. Sports Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Practitioners of martial arts have long seen a need for a precise method of measuring the power of a karate kick or a boxer's punch in training and competition. Impax sensor is a piezoelectric film less than one thousandth of an inch thick, yet extremely durable. They give out a voltage impulse when struck, the greater the force of impact, the higher the voltage. The impulse is transmitted to a compact electronics package where voltage is translated into a force-pounds reading shown on a digital display. Impax, manufactured by Impulse Technology, Inc. is used by martial arts instructors, practitioners, U.S. Olympic Committee Training Center, football blocking sleds, and boxers as well as police defensive tactics, providing a means of evaluating the performance of recruits.

  8. Is Marathon Training Harder than the Ironman Training? An ECO-method Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Moreno-Pérez, Diego; Cardona, Claudia A; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Muñoz, Iker; Sellés, Sergio; Cejuela, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the absolute and relative training load of the Marathon (42k) and the Ironman (IM) training in recreational trained athletes. Methods: Fifteen Marathoners and Fifteen Triathletes participated in the study. Their performance level was the same relative to the sex's absolute winner at the race. No differences were presented neither in age, nor in body weight, height, BMI, running VO 2max max, or endurance training experience ( p > 0.05). They all trained systematically for their respective event (IM or 42k). Daily training load was recorded in a training log, and the last 16 weeks were compared. Before this, gas exchange and lactate metabolic tests were conducted in order to set individual training zones. The Objective Load Scale (ECOs) training load quantification method was applied. Differences between IM and 42k athletes' outcomes were assessed using Student's test and significance level was set at p Training Weekly Avg Time (IM 12.9 h ± 2.6 vs. 42k 5.2 ± 0.9), and Average Weekly ECOs (IM 834 ± 171 vs. 42k 526 ± 118) were significantly higher in IM ( p Training Load and Training Time was superior for 42k runners when comparing ECOs (IM 65.8 ± 11.8 vs. 42k 99.3 ± 6.8) ( p training time or load vs. Competition Time were superior for 42k ( p Training Time/Race Time: IM 1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 1.7 ± 0.5), (ECOs Training Load/Race Time: IM 1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 2.9 ± 1.0). Conclusions: In spite of IM athletes' superior training time and total or weekly training load, when comparing the ratios between training load and training time, and training time or training load vs. competition time, the preparation of a 42k showed to be harder.

  9. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    Permanence A "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier - French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne - English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00   New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF, DALF). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link:  English courses French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  10. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    PermanenceA "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00 New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF and BULATS). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link: http://English courses http://French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  11. Selection, Training and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    implications speaking for an even 3.1. HUMAN RESOURCES AND more perfectly balanced vestibulo-visual system. CONSTRAINTS New dimensions in testing of the...most Neck training, Altitudetehamber, PBG, Gas nixtures, Trampoline , important in flying. In years to come we will have a Statoergometer, Raling...the lungs by To be able to move in 3 dimensions unlike the abdominal upward displacement during G. PBG situation on ground, the pilot in his AC has to

  12. Conceptualizing Emotions Along the Dimensions of Valence, Arousal, and Communicative Frequency – Implications for Social-Cognitive Tests and Training Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepach, Robert; Kliemann, Dorit; Grüneisen, Sebastian; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Dziobek, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Emotion words are mostly characterized along the classic dimensions of arousal and valence. In the current study we sought to complement this characterization by investigating the frequency of emotions in human everyday communication, which may be crucial information for designing new diagnostic or intervention tools to test and improve emotion recognition. Methods: One hundred healthy German individuals were asked to indicate the valence and arousal of 62 emotion words in a questionnaire. Importantly, participants were additionally asked to indicate the frequency with which they experience each emotion themselves and observe it in others. Results: Positive emotions were judged to occur more often than negative emotions in everyday life. The more negatively valenced emotions were rated to be observed more often in others than experienced in one-self. On the other hand more positively valenced emotions were experienced more often in one-self than they were observed in others. Finally, increasing age was associated with a decrease in the frequency of observing an emotion in other people. Limitations: Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain if the findings also apply to other cultural and language contexts. Conclusion: These results imply a greater frequency of positive emotions than negative emotions in everyday communication. The finding of such a bias toward positive emotions can guide the selection of emotion words for implementation in socio-emotional intervention tools. Such a selection may represent an effective means for improving social-cognitive functioning in people with respective impairments. PMID:22022317

  13. 49 CFR 236.588 - Periodic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic test. 236.588 Section 236.588..., Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Inspection and Tests; Locomotive § 236.588 Periodic test. Except as provided in § 236.586, periodic test of the automatic train stop, train control, or cab signal apparatus...

  14. Training-Load-Guided vs Standardized Endurance Training in Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Moritz; Botella, Javier; Karavirta, Laura; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2017-03-01

    To compare the effects of a standardized endurance-training program with individualized endurance training modified based on the cumulative training load provided by the Polar training-load feature. After 12 wk of similar training, 24 recreationally endurance-trained men were matched to a training-load-guided (TL, n = 10) or standardized (ST, n = 14) group and continued training for 12 wk. In TL, training sessions were individually chosen daily based on an estimated cumulative training load, whereas in ST the training was standardized with 4-6 sessions/wk. Endurance performance (shortest 1000-m running time during an incremental field test of 6 × 1000 m) and heart-rate variability (HRV) were measured every 4 wk, and maximal oxygen consumption (VO 2 max) was measured during an incremental treadmill test every 12 wk. During weeks 1-12, similar changes in VO 2 max and 1000-m time were observed in TL (+7% ± 4%, P = .004 and -6% ± 4%, P = .069) and ST (+5% ± 7%, P = .019 and -8% ± 5%, P training volume and frequency were observed. HRV remained statistically unaltered in both groups. The main finding was that training performed according to the cumulative training load led to improvements in endurance performance similar to those with standardized endurance training in recreational endurance runners.

  15. Computer aided training system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midkiff, G.N. (Advanced Technology Engineering Systems, Inc., Savannah, GA (US))

    1987-01-01

    The first three phases of Training System Development (TSD) -- job and task analysis, curriculum design, and training material development -- are time consuming and labor intensive. The use of personal computers with a combination of commercial and custom-designed software resulted in a significant reduction in the man-hours required to complete these phases for a Health Physics Technician Training Program at a nuclear power station. This paper reports that each step in the training program project involved the use of personal computers: job survey data were compiled with a statistical package, task analysis was performed with custom software designed to interface with a commercial database management program. Job Performance Measures (tests) were generated by a custom program from data in the task analysis database, and training materials were drafted, edited, and produced using commercial word processing software.

  16. Training Effectiveness of the Inertial Training and Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naczk Mariusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of inertial training with different external loads using a new original device - the Inertial Training and Measurement System (ITMS. Forty-six physical education male students were tested. The participants were randomly divided into three training groups and a control group (C group. The training groups performed inertial training with three different loads three times weekly for four weeks. The T0 group used only the mass of the ITMS flywheel (19.4 kg, the T5 and T10 groups had an additional 5 and 10 kg on the flywheel, respectively. Each training session included three exercise sets involving the shoulder joint adductors. Before and after training, the maximal torque and power were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer during adduction of the shoulder joint. Simultaneously, the electromyography activity of the pectoralis major muscle was recorded. Results of the study indicate that ITMS training induced a significant increase in maximal muscle torque in the T0, T5, T10 groups (15.5%, 13.0%, and 14.0%, respectively. Moreover, ITMS training caused a significant increase in power in the T0, T5, T10 groups (16.6%, 19.5%, and 14.5%, respectively. The percentage changes in torque and power did not significantly differ between training groups. Electromyography activity of the pectoralis major muscle increased only in the T0 group after four weeks of training. Using the ITMS device in specific workouts allowed for an increase of shoulder joint adductors torque and power in physical education students.

  17. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  18. Specificity of Cardiovascular Endurance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Calberth B., Jr.; Johnson, James H.

    This study determined the specificity of cardiovascular endurance training on a bicycle ergometer. Eighteen male subjects were tested on a heart rate response test of 150 beats per minute on a bicycle ergometer at the pace of 50 revolutions per minute (rpm) and at 160 beats per minute at 60 and 80 rpm, with the resistance equal to the force of…

  19. Recruitment and Apprenticeship Training

    OpenAIRE

    Mohrenweiser, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The paper assesses non-training firm’s potential for free-riding on the training efforts of firms that train apprentices. In order to assess potential free-riding, the paper analyses whether training or non-training firms are more likely to recruit apprenticeship graduates that have been trained elsewhere. Firms without apprenticeships are less likely to hire apprenticeship graduates trained elsewhere than training firms. If these firms do hire apprenticeship graduates, they hire a smaller pr...

  20. Do Reported Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Subsequent Higher Cognitive Performances Remain if Tested against an Instructed Self-Myofascial Release Training Control Group? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Oberste

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence suggests positive effects of acute aerobic exercise (AAE on subsequent higher cognitive functions in healthy young adults. These effects are widely understood as a result of the ongoing physiological adaptation processes induced by the preceding AAE. However, designs of published studies do not control for placebo, Hawthorne and subject expectancy effects. Therefore, these studies do not, at a high degree of validity, allow attributing effects of AEE on subsequent cognitive performance to exercise induced physical arousal. In the present study, we applied a randomized controlled blinded experiment to provide robust evidence for a physiological basis of exercise induced cognitive facilitation. Beyond that, the dose response relationship between AAE`s intensity and subsequent cognitive performances as well as a potentially mediating role of peripheral lactate in AAE induced cognitive facilitation was investigated. The 121 healthy young subjects who participated in this study were assigned randomly into 3 exercise groups and a self-myofascial release training control group. Exercise groups comprised a low, moderate and high intensity condition in which participants cycled on an ergometer at a heart rate corresponding to 45-50%, 65-70% and 85-90% of their individual maximum heart rate, respectively, for 35 minutes. Participants assigned to the control group completed a 35 minute instructed self-massage intervention using a foam roll. Before and after treatment, participants completed computer based versions of the Stroop task and the Trail Making Test as well as a free recall task. None of the applied exercise regimes exerted a significant effect on participants`performance at any of the applied cognitive testing procedure if compared to self-myofascial release training control group. Post hoc power analyses revealed no effect in the population of f = .2 or larger at a risk of type II error (β ≤.183 for all measured

  1. Do Reported Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Subsequent Higher Cognitive Performances Remain if Tested against an Instructed Self-Myofascial Release Training Control Group? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberste, Max; Bloch, Wilhelm; Hübner, Sven T; Zimmer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests positive effects of acute aerobic exercise (AAE) on subsequent higher cognitive functions in healthy young adults. These effects are widely understood as a result of the ongoing physiological adaptation processes induced by the preceding AAE. However, designs of published studies do not control for placebo, Hawthorne and subject expectancy effects. Therefore, these studies do not, at a high degree of validity, allow attributing effects of AEE on subsequent cognitive performance to exercise induced physical arousal. In the present study, we applied a randomized controlled blinded experiment to provide robust evidence for a physiological basis of exercise induced cognitive facilitation. Beyond that, the dose response relationship between AAE`s intensity and subsequent cognitive performances as well as a potentially mediating role of peripheral lactate in AAE induced cognitive facilitation was investigated. The 121 healthy young subjects who participated in this study were assigned randomly into 3 exercise groups and a self-myofascial release training control group. Exercise groups comprised a low, moderate and high intensity condition in which participants cycled on an ergometer at a heart rate corresponding to 45-50%, 65-70% and 85-90% of their individual maximum heart rate, respectively, for 35 minutes. Participants assigned to the control group completed a 35 minute instructed self-massage intervention using a foam roll. Before and after treatment, participants completed computer based versions of the Stroop task and the Trail Making Test as well as a free recall task. None of the applied exercise regimes exerted a significant effect on participants`performance at any of the applied cognitive testing procedure if compared to self-myofascial release training control group. Post hoc power analyses revealed no effect in the population of f = .2 or larger at a risk of type II error (β) ≤.183 for all measured variables. Our

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  3. Media Training

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  4. TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 15 May 14:00 to 16:00 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 Testing Embedded Software and Systems Ian Smith / SEVEN LAYER COMMUNICATIONS LTD, Edinburgh, Scotland The growing use of embedded processors has resulted in considerable challenges for software and system developers, to ensure that the products they produce function as required, without error. The increasing complexity of these products, and the systems they operate in, adds to the difficulty in testing these products effectively. These challenges will apply to the development of equipment and software for use on the LHC project. This seminar is aimed at anyone involved in the development and/or in the verification of embedded hardware, software or systems at CERN. It will provide an introduction to testing embedded products, and some insights into ways to address the growing complexity of modern embedded products. It will also show some of the methods Seven Layer Communications Ltd. have applied in developing effective test fac...

  5. Take-Home Training in Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinggaard, Ebbe

    2017-04-01

    When laparoscopy was first introduced, skills were primarily taught using the apprenticeship model. A limitation of this method when compared to open surgery, was that it requires more time to practise and more frequent learning opportunities in clinical practice. The unique set of skills required in laparoscopy highlighted the need for new training methods that reduce the need for supervision and do not put the patient at risk. Simulation training was developed to meet this need. The overall purpose of this thesis was to explore simulation-based laparoscopic training at home. The thesis consists of five papers: a review, a validation study, a study of methodology, a randomised controlled trial and a mixed-methods study. Our aims were to review the current knowledge on training off-site, to develop and explore validity for a training and assessment system, to investigate the effect of take-home training in a simulation-based laparoscopic training programme, and to explore the use of take-home training. The first paper in this thesis is a scoping review. The aim of the review was to explore the current knowledge on off-site laparoscopic skills training. We found that off-site training was feasible but that changes were required in order for it to become an effective method of training. Furthermore, the select-ed instructional design varied and training programmes were designed using a variety of educational theories. Based on our findings, we recommended that courses and training curricula should follow established education theories such as proficiency-based learning and deliberate practice. Principles of directed self-regulated learning could be used to improve off-site laparoscopic training programmes. In the second study, we set out to develop and explore validity evidence of the TABLT test. The TABLT test was developed for basic laparoscopic skills training in a cross-specialty curriculum. We found validity evidence to support the TABLT test as a summative test

  6. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-p...

  7. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, rol...

  8. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in Engl...

  9. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of...

  10. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: ...

  11. Allowing New Opportunities in Advanced Laparoscopy Training Using a Full High-Definition Training Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achurra, Pablo; Lagos, Antonia; Avila, Ruben; Tejos, Rodrigo; Buckel, Erwin; Alvarado, Juan; Boza, Camilo; Jarufe, Nicolas; Varas, Julian

    2017-02-01

    Simulated laparoscopy training is limited by its low-quality image. A high-definition (HD) laparoscopic training box was developed under the present necessity of simulating advanced surgery. To describe and test a new HD laparoscopic training box for advanced simulation training. We describe the features and image quality of the new training box. The simulator was tested and then evaluated by a group of 76 expert surgeons using a 4-item questionnaire. To assess the effectiveness of training using this simulation box, 15 general surgery residents were trained to perform a laparoscopic jejuno-jejunostomy in a validated simulation program. They were assessed with objective rating scales before and after the training program, and their results were compared with that of experts. The training box was assembled using high-density fiberglass shaped as an insufflated abdomen. It has an adapted full-HD camera with a LED-based illumination system. A manually self-regulated monopod attached to the camera enables training without assistance. Of the expert surgeons who answered the questionnaire, 91% said that the simulation box had a high-quality image and that it was very similar to real laparoscopy. All residents trained improved their rating scores significantly when comparing their initial versus final assessment ( P .2). This novel laparoscopic training box presents a high-resolution image and allows training different types of advanced laparoscopic procedures. The simulator box was positively assessed by experts and demonstrated to be effective for laparoscopy training in resident surgeons.

  12. A new tool to measure training load in soccer training and match play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebelo, A; Brito, J; Seabra, A

    2012-01-01

    An accurate evaluation of training load is paramount for the planning and periodization of training. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between a new method to monitor training load in soccer (Visual Analogic Scale training load; VAS-TL), and two established heart rate......-based methods (TRIMP and Edwards' method). 51 soccer players (age 15.6±0.3 years) answered 2 questions to assess perceived exertion and fatigue (VAS1-TL, and VAS2-TL) after training sessions and official matches. Performance in the Yo-Yo tests, VAS scores and heart rate of training sessions and matches...

  13. 14 CFR 121.402 - Training program: Special rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... subpart to provide flight training, testing, and checking under contract or other arrangement to those... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Special rules. 121.402... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Training Program § 121.402 Training program: Special...

  14. Music training and emotion comprehension in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Mankarious, Monika

    2012-10-01

    Children and adults with music training score higher on tests of intellectual ability than their peers without training, but it is unclear whether music lessons are associated with social or emotional functioning. We examined whether music training in childhood is predictive of understanding emotions. We administered the Test of Emotion Comprehension (TEC) and a brief IQ test to musically trained and untrained 7- and 8-year-olds. Musically trained children scored higher on IQ and on the TEC even after accounting for demographic variables. Group differences in TEC scores disappeared, however, when IQ scores were held constant. These findings suggest that nonmusical associations with music training are limited to measures of intellectual ability and their correlates.

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  16. English training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  17. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  18. Aerobic training in myotonia congenita

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Løkken, Nicoline; Vissing, John

    2017-01-01

    % of maximal capacity for 11 ± 1 weeks. Fitness was evaluated by maximal oxygen uptake. The level of myotonia was assessed by the Myotonia Behavior Scale, 14 step stair test, timed up and go test, and hand and eye closure-open tests. RESULTS: Training increased fitness by 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1...... that muscle damage did not occur. Improved fitness, however, did not change myotonic symptoms in this small cohort. Muscle Nerve 56: 696-699, 2017....

  19. Explosives mimic for testing, training, and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, John G.; Durban, Matthew M.; Gash, Alexander E.; Grapes, Michael D.; Kelley, Ryan S.; Sullivan, Kyle T.

    2018-02-13

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is used to make mimics for explosives. The process uses mixtures of explosives and matrices commonly used in AM. The explosives are formulated into a mixture with the matrix and printed using AM techniques and equipment. The explosive concentrations are kept less than 10% by wt. of the mixture to conform to requirements of shipping and handling.

  20. Adaptations to speed endurance training in highly trained soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Fiorenza, Matteo; Lund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study examined whether a period of additional speed endurance training would improve intense intermittent exercise performance in highly trained soccer players during the season and whether the training changed aerobic metabolism and the level of oxidative enzymes in type I...... and II muscle fibers. METHODS: During the last nine weeks of the season, thirteen semi-professional soccer players performed additional speed endurance training sessions consisting of 2-3 sets of 8 - 10 repetitions of 30 m sprints with 10 s of passive recovery (SET). Before and after SET, subjects......-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (YYIRT-1) was performed and a muscle biopsy was obtained at rest. RESULTS: YYIRT-1 performance was 11.6±6.4% (mean±SD) better (2803±330 vs. 3127±383 m, P

  1. Molecular adaptations to concurrent training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, E O; Tricoli, V; Roschel, H; Brum, P C; Bacurau, A V N; Ferreira, J C B; Aoki, M S; Neves-Jr, M; Aihara, A Y; da Rocha Correa Fernandes, A; Ugrinowitsch, C

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the chronic effects of concurrent training (CT) on morphological and molecular adaptations. 37 men (age=23.7±5.5 year) were divided into 4 groups: interval (IT), strength (ST) and concurrent (CT) training and a control group (C) and underwent 8 weeks of training. Maximum strength (1RM) and muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) were evaluated before and after training. Muscle samples were obtained before the training program and 48 h after the last training session. VO2max improved in 5±0.95% and 15±1.3% (pre- to post-test) in groups CT and IT, respectively, when compared to C. Time to exhaustion (TE) improved from pre- to post-test when compared to C (CT=6.1±0.58%; IT=8.3±0.88%; ST=3.2±0.66%). 1RM increased from pre-to post-test only in ST and CT groups (ST=18.5±3.16%; CT=17.6±3.01%). Similarly, ST and CT groups increased quadriceps CSA from pre-to post-test (6.2±1.4%; 7.8±1.66%). The p70S6K1 total protein content increased after CT. The ST group showed increased Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 (45.0±3.3%) whereas AMPK phosphorylation at Thr172 increased only in IT group, (100±17.6%). In summary, our data suggest that despite the differences in molecular adaptations between training regimens, CT did not blunt muscle strength and hypertrophy increments when compared with ST. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. The ALICE analysis train system

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In the ALICE experiment hundreds of users are analyzing big datasets on a Grid system. High throughput and short turn-around times are achieved by a centralized system called the LEGO trains. This system combines analysis from different users in so-called analysis trains which are then executed within the same Grid jobs thereby reducing the number of times the data needs to be read from the storage systems. The centralized trains improve the performance, the usability for users and the bookkeeping in comparison to single user analysis. The train system builds upon the already existing ALICE tools, i.e. the analysis framework as well as the Grid submission and monitoring infrastructure. The entry point to the train system is a web interface which is used to configure the analysis and the desired datasets as well as to test and submit the train. Several measures have been implemented to reduce the time a train needs to finish and to increase the CPU efficiency.

  3. New Radiation Protection training room

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    From now on, the theory and practical components of the Radiation Protection training, developed by the RP Group and offered by the HSE Unit’s Safety Training team to people working in a Controlled Radiation Area, will take place in a dedicated teaching room, designed specifically for this kind of training.   The new room is in the Safety Training Centre on the Prévessin site and has been open since 16 October. It has an adjoining workshop that, like the room itself, can accommodate up to 12 people. It is also equipped with an interactive board as well as instruments and detectors to test for ionising radiation. This room is located near the recently inaugurated LHC tunnel mock-up where practical training exercises can be carried out in conditions almost identical to those in the real tunnel. To consult the safety training catalogue and/or sign up for Radiation Protection training, please go to: https://cta.cern.ch For further information, please contact the Safety Trainin...

  4. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs.

  5. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  6. THE 2002 DIG TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L.

    The Detector Interface Group organized this year a training program, divided in two sessions, for people wishing to learn how to use and customize the modern DAQ prototype used for test beam and laboratory data acquisition by several groups in ATLAS. This Data Acquisition prototype is an evolution of the DAQ/EF-1 prototype where some parts have been evolving for exploitation at the test beam first (Tilecal starting in 2000, Muon MDT in 2001 and Pixel in 2002) and later for laboratory tests (LAr starting in 2000, Muons MDT and TGC in 2001). The training sessions have been organized with the idea of building a detector data acquisition to read data from a detector crate and send the data over the Read Out Link to the remaining part of the DAQ. The first session took place last April 18th-19th. It was organized with some presentations and many hand-on exercises to learn how to build a DAQ configuration database and a controller to configure, control and steer the DAQ at the level of a hypothetic detector cra...

  7. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Regulation of Genetic Tests Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions ...

  8. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next ses...

  9. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or...

  10. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 M...

  11. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Feb...

  12. Language Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Febr...

  13. The Effects of High Intensity Interval Training vs Steady State Training on Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Carl; Farland, Courtney V; Guidotti, Flavia; Harbin, Michelle; Roberts, Brianna; Schuette, Jeff; Tuuri, Andrew; Doberstein, Scott T; Porcari, John P

    2015-12-01

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has become an increasingly popular form of exercise due to its potentially large effects on exercise capacity and small time requirement. This study compared the effects of two HIIT protocols vs steady-state training on aerobic and anaerobic capacity following 8-weeks of training. Fifty-five untrained college-aged subjects were randomly assigned to three training groups (3x weekly). Steady-state (n = 19) exercised (cycle ergometer) 20 minutes at 90% of ventilatory threshold (VT). Tabata (n = 21) completed eight intervals of 20s at 170% VO2max/10s rest. Meyer (n = 15) completed 13 sets of 30s (20 min) @ 100% PVO2 max/ 60s recovery, average PO = 90% VT. Each subject did 24 training sessions during 8 weeks. There were significant (p training group, as well as significant increases in peak (+8, + 9 and +5%) & mean (+4, +7 and +6%) power during Wingate testing, but no significant differences between groups. Measures of the enjoyment of the training program indicated that the Tabata protocol was significantly less enjoyable (p training in sedentary young adults. Key pointsSteady state training equivalent to HIIT in untrained studentsMild interval training presents very similar physiologic challenge compared to steady state trainingHIIT (particularly very high intensity variants were less enjoyable than steady state or mild interval trainingEnjoyment of training decreases across the course of an 8 week experimental training program.

  14. The effect of plyometric training program on young volleyball players in their usual training period

    OpenAIRE

    Vassil, Karin; Bazanov, Boriss

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the efficiency of composed plyometric training program on youth volleyball players force capabilities in their usual training period. The plyometric training program was applied during 16 week period where was attended twenty-one 12-19 years old youth volleyball players. Twelve of them were female and nine male volleyball players. There were three control testings. All subjects participated in following tests: standing long jump, depth leap long jump,...

  15. Comparison of three respirator user training methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, Philip; Boumis, Robert J; Su, Jing; Barrett, Sarah; Alongi, Gabriela

    2013-12-01

    This study addresses methods for training respirator users, particularly when occupational health professionals are not immediately available. A randomized trial compared three training methods-printed brochure, video, and computer-based training-for two respirator types (filtering facepiece and a dual-cartridge half facemask). Quantitative fit testing (PortaCount) measured the effectiveness of training. The study included 226 subjects. For both respirator types, video was significantly superior to either print or computer-based training methods. Conclusions were consistent, whether determined by average fit factor (analysis of variance), log-transformed fit factors, or the number of users in the lowest quartile of achieved fit. Video training for proper respirator use can be effective when direct training from an occupational health professional is unavailable. These methods are particularly relevant to "rapid rollout" situations, such as natural disasters, epidemics, or bioterrorism concerns.

  16. Improved Classification of Mammograms Following Idealized Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Adam N.; Love, Bradley C.

    2014-01-01

    People often make decisions by stochastically retrieving a small set of relevant memories. This limited retrieval implies that human performance can be improved by training on idealized category distributions (Giguère & Love, 2013). Here, we evaluate whether the benefits of idealized training extend to categorization of real-world stimuli, namely classifying mammograms as normal or tumorous. Participants in the idealized condition were trained exclusively on items that, according to a norming study, were relatively unambiguous. Participants in the actual condition were trained on a representative range of items. Despite being exclusively trained on easy items, idealized-condition participants were more accurate than those in the actual condition when tested on a range of item types. However, idealized participants experienced difficulties when test items were very dissimilar from training cases. The benefits of idealization, attributable to reducing noise arising from cognitive limitations in memory retrieval, suggest ways to improve real-world decision making. PMID:24955325

  17. Lactate Kinetics After Intermittent and Continuous Exercise Training

    OpenAIRE

    Gharbi, Adnene; Chamari, Karim; Kallel, Amjad; Ahmaidi, Saîd; Tabka, Zouhair; Abdelkarim, Zbidi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, the effects of continuous and intermittent exercise training on lactate kinetic parameters and maximal aerobic speed (MAS) using field tests. Twenty-four male sport students were equally divided into continuous (CT) and intermittent (IT) physically trained groups. Another six participants acted as non-trained controls (CG). The trained participants practiced 6-days per week for 6 weeks. Before and after training, all participants completed an increment...

  18. Ergonomics and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Geoff

    1974-01-01

    The relationship of ergonomics (the study of man in relation to his working environment) and training is examined in the context of physical stress, training time required, man-machine systems, skill and job performance analysis, and training effectiveness. (AG)

  19. Optimization of genomic selection training populations with a genetic algorithm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akdemir, Deniz; Sanchez, Julio I; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    ...) for a given set of individuals (test set) based on a training set of individuals. We used this reliability measure with a genetic algorithm scheme to find an optimized training set from a larger set of candidate individuals...

  20. Dynamic training devices in CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, J.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot training effectiveness and flying safety of a seasonal tour flight company are described. The change from single pilot to two pilot operated twin otters is examined. The use of the ATC 810 training device, its possibilities and training capacity is outlined. Problem areas which may arise, emergency system and pilot/passenger interaction are analyzed.

  1. Olfactory training in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Haehner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Decrease of olfactory function in Parkinson's disease (PD is a well-investigated fact. Studies indicate that pharmacological treatment of PD fails to restore olfactory function in PD patients. The aim of this investigation was whether patients with PD would benefit from "training" with odors in terms of an improvement of their general olfactory function. It has been hypothesized that olfactory training should produce both an improved sensitivity towards the odors used in the training process and an overall increase of olfactory function. METHODS: We recruited 70 subjects with PD and olfactory loss into this single-center, prospective, controlled non-blinded study. Thirty-five patients were assigned to the olfactory training group and 35 subjects to the control group (no training. Olfactory training was performed over a period of 12 weeks while patients exposed themselves twice daily to four odors (phenyl ethyl alcohol: rose, eucalyptol: eucalyptus, citronellal: lemon, and eugenol: cloves. Olfactory testing was performed before and after training using the "Sniffin' Sticks" (thresholds for phenyl ethyl alcohol, tests for odor discrimination, and odor identification in addition to threshold tests for the odors used in the training process. RESULTS: Compared to baseline, trained PD patients experienced a significant increase in their olfactory function, which was observed for the Sniffin' Sticks test score and for thresholds for the odors used in the training process. Olfactory function was unchanged in PD patients who did not perform olfactory training. CONCLUSION: The present results indicate that olfactory training may increase olfactory sensitivity in PD patients.

  2. [Development and Effects of Assertiveness Training applying Dongsasub Training for Nursing Students in Clinical Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsuk

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to develop assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training for junior nursing students, and to verify effectiveness of the training on assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. The study design was a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design. Participants were 63 nursing students in clinical training (31 students in the experimental group and 32 students in the control group). The assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training consisted of four sessions. Outcome variables included assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Fisher's exact test and independent samples t-test with SPSS/WIN 21.0. Scores of assertiveness behavior (t=-2.49, p=.015), self-esteem (t=-4.80, ptraining applying Dongsasub training can be used as a nursing intervention to lower clinical practice stress and improve the clinical competence of nursing students.

  3. Could Slackline Training Complement the FIFA 11+ Programme Regarding Training of Neuromuscular Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Tobias; Kiefer, Julian; Werner, Inge; Federolf, Peter A

    2017-09-01

    The current study compared changes in neuromuscular control between slackline training and the stabilization training elements of the FIFA 11+ programme. Twenty-five students in 2 groups performed a 12-unit training programme. The slackline training group (n = 13) exclusively trained with a slackline. The stabilization training group (n = 12) practised exercises as described in the second part of the FIFA 11+ programme. Improvements in balance were assessed using three tests for dynamic, quasi-static, and perturbed postural control: the star excursion balance test (SEBT), the closed-eye single-leg stance, and the MFT S3-Check. Both groups significantly improved the stability and sensorimotor index of the MFT S3-Check (p FIFA 11+ warm-up programme. If compliance with the FIFA 11+ programme is declining, then slacklining might offer an alternative approach to reach the training goals of improved sensorimotor control.

  4. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  5. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  6. Privacy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recognizing that training and awareness are critical to protecting agency Personally Identifiable Information (PII), the EPA is developing online training for privacy contacts in its programs and regions.

  7. Optimization of training load among weightlifters during pre-basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Orlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : develop and experimentally based methods of individualization of the training process weightlifters during pre-basic training for groups of first year students. Material : The study involved 20 weightlifters aged 12-13 years. To assess the level of special physical preparation of athletes were used control tests which are recommended curriculum in weightlifting. Results : Appropriateness optimize training load of athletes in the group of first year students in the preparatory and competitive period. Recommends the following training load: number of workouts in a week microcycle - 5; the ratio of general and special physical training is 55: 45%. Necessary to exclude training loads in classical exercises with intensity of 90%, 90%, and not to use the various drafts. Conclusions : It was found that the optimization of the training load weightlifters during pre-basic training, can significantly improve the competitive outcome athletes improve the technique of classical exercises, raise special physical preparedness and reduce injuries.

  8. Training young horses to social separation: Effect of a companion horse on training efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, E.; Christensen, Janne Winther; Keeling, LJ

    2011-01-01

    when horses were trained in pairs (P2) compared to when the same horses were subsequently trained alone (P1). Conclusions and potential relevance: It may not be efficient to habituate naive young horses to social separation initially with a partner as these horses appear to have to relearn being......, and heart rate is lower when the horse is subsequently trained alone, compared to control horses trained individually from the start. Methods: Young mares (n = 32), kept in groups of 4 were exposed to social separation: 2 horses of the group were trained singly (S1, n = 16) and the remaining 2 horses (n...... = 16) were trained first with a companion (P2) and then alone (P1). The training comprised 3 steps whereby distance from the group was gradually increased. The final learning criterion was met when a horse fed calmly alone inside a test arena (Step 3). Horses that were trained in a pair had to succeed...

  9. An assessment of individualized technical ear training for audio production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungyoung

    2015-07-01

    An individualized technical ear training method is compared to a non-individualized method. The efficacy of the individualized method is assessed using a standardized test conducted before and after the training period. Participants who received individualized training improved better than the control group on the test. Results indicate the importance of individualized training for acquisition of spectrum-identification and spectrum-matching skills. Individualized training, therefore, should be implemented by default into technical ear training programs used in audio production industry and education.

  10. Effects of high intensity training and continuous endurance training on aerobic capacity and body composition in recreationally active runners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hottenrott, Kuno; Ludyga, Sebastian; Schulze, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    ... (high-intensity-training vs. continuous endurance training) on aerobic power and body composition in recreationally active men and women and to test whether or not participants were able to complete a half marathon after the intervention period...

  11. Virtual Training of the Myosignal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terlaak, Bernhard; Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate which of three virtual training methods produces the largest learning effects on discrete and continuous myocontrol. The secondary objective was to examine the relation between myocontrol and manual motor control tests. Design A cohort analytic study. Setting University

  12. Nonconsecutive- versus consecutive-day high-intensity interval training in cyclists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gross, Micah; Swensen, Thomas; King, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    ...), and 5-km time trial (TT5k) performance in trained cyclists. Fifteen trained cyclists completed a TT5k and an incremental test to exhaustion for VO2peak and PPOa determination before and after training...

  13. Research on artistic gymnastics training guidance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Sun, Xianzhong

    2017-04-01

    Rhythmic gymnastics training guidance model, taking into consideration the features of artistic gymnastics training, is put forward to help gymnasts identify their deficiencies and unskilled technical movements and improve their training effects. The model is built on the foundation of both physical quality indicator model and artistic gymnastics training indicator model. Physical quality indicator model composed of bodily factor, flexibility-strength factor and speed-dexterity factor delivers an objective evaluation with reference to basic sport testing data. Training indicator model, based on physical fitness indicator, helps analyze the technical movements, through which the impact from each bodily factor on technical movements is revealed. AG training guidance model, in further combination with actual training data and in comparison with the data shown in the training indicator model, helps identify the problems in trainings, and thus improve the training effect. These three models when in combined use and in comparison with historical model data can check and verify the improvement in training effect over a certain period of time.

  14. Sensorimotor training alters action understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catmur, Caroline; Thompson, Emma L; Bairaktari, Orianna; Lind, Frida; Bird, Geoffrey

    2017-11-02

    The discovery of 'mirror' neurons stimulated intense interest in the role of motor processes in social interaction. A popular assumption is that observation-related motor activation, exemplified by mirror neurons' matching properties, evolved to subserve the 'understanding' of others' actions. Alternatively, such motor activation may result from sensorimotor learning. Sensorimotor training alters observation-related motor activation, but studies demonstrating training-dependent changes in motor activation have not addressed the functional role of such activation. We therefore tested whether sensorimotor learning alters action understanding. Participants completed an action understanding task, judging the weight of boxes lifted by another person, before and after 'counter-mirror' sensorimotor training. During this training they lifted heavy boxes while observing light boxes being lifted, and vice-versa. Compared to a control group, this training significantly reduced participants' action understanding ability. Performance on a duration judgement task was unaffected by training. These data suggest the ability to understand others' actions results from sensorimotor learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CATTS: Computer-Aided Training in Troubleshooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Suzanne

    The Rand Corporation's Programmer-Oriented Graphics Operation (POGO) was used in the design, implementation and testing of a computer-assisted instruction course to train airmen in malfunction diagnosis--CATTS (Computer Aided Training in Troubleshooting). The design of the course attempted to reduce the problems of computer graphics for both…

  16. Spatial Training Improves Children's Mathematics Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Ling; Mix, Kelly S.

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether mental rotation training improved math performance in 6- to 8-year-olds. Children were pretested on a range of number and math skills. Then one group received a single session of mental rotation training using an object completion task that had previously improved spatial ability in children this age (Ehrlich, Levine, &…

  17. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    General & Professional French courses The next General & Professional French course will start on 4 May. These collective courses aim to bring participants who have at least level A1 to higher levels (up to C2). The workload of each course is 60 hours and consists of a combination of face-to-face sessions (40 hours) with personal work (20 hours) following a specially designed programme. A final progress test takes place at the end of the term. If you have not followed a French course in January please sign up for a placement test! French courses for beginners The aim of this course is to give some basic skills to beginners in order to be able to communicate in simple daily life situations in both social and professional life. These courses can start at any time during the year, as soon as a group of beginners has been identified. Participants can apply for a semi-intensive (10-week courses with 6 hours of classes per week) course and choose between different schedules (morning-lunch time &...

  18. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to learn a language, there is no excuse any more.    You can attend one of our English or French courses and you can practise the language with a tandem partner!   General & Professional French courses The next General & Professional French course will start on 26 January. These collective courses aim to bring participants who have at least level A1 to higher levels (up to C2). Each level consists of a combination of face-to-face sessions (40 hours) with personal work (20 hours) following a specially designed programme. A final progress test takes place at the end of the term. Please note that it is mandatory to take the placement test. Please sign up here. French courses for beginners The aim of this course is to give some basic skills to beginners in order to communicate in simple everyday situations in both social and professional life. These courses can start at any time during the year, as soon as a group of beg...

  19. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    General and Professional French courses The next General and Professional French course will start on 4 May. These collective courses aim to bring participants who have at least level A1 to higher levels (up to C2). The workload of each course is 60 hours and consists of a specially designed programme combining face-to-face sessions (40 hours) and indipendent study (20 hours). A final progress test takes place at the end of the term. If you did not take a French course in January, please sign up for a placement test! French courses for beginners The aim of this course is to give some basic skills to beginners in order to be able to communicate in simple daily life situations in both social and professional life. These courses can start at any time during the year, as soon as a group of beginners has been identified. Participants can apply for a semi-intensive course (10-weeks with 6 hours of classes per week) and choose between different timetables (morning-lunch time – late afternoon). If ...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1507 - How will MMS measure training results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... how effective the training was. (c) Employee or contract personnel testing. MMS or its authorized... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How will MMS measure training results? 250.1507... Training § 250.1507 How will MMS measure training results? MMS may periodically assess your training...