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Sample records for test temperature temper

  1. Reversible temper brittleness on tensile tests at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de; Cabral, U.Q.

    1976-01-01

    Tensile tests were carried out on unnotched test pieces at room temperature and three strain rates: 2,5x10 -4 , 2,5x10 -3 and 1,0x10 -2 s -1 in a low alloy No-Cr-Mo steel to observe the variation in its mechanical properties with the occurrence of reversible temper brittleness. The brittle samples showed a sensitivity of 50 0 C in a 48 hour heat treatment at 500 0 C. The tests showed that at the strain rate of 2,5x10 -4 s -1 there are statistically significant differences between the elongations of the material in the brittle and the nonbrittle and regenerated states. A short review of reversible temper brittleness is given and a theory suggested for the mechanism [pt

  2. Effect of test temperature on the fatigue strength of the 12GN2MFAYu tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritskij, V.M.; Terent'ev, V.F.; Bobyleva, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The cyclic strength, variation of dislocation structure and fractography of specimen fractures were investigated depending on testing temperature. The specimens were tested at temperatures of 20, 350, 450, 550 deg C. The increase of testing temperature, according to the experimental data obtained, is accompanied by an insignificant reduction of fatigue strength. The testing temperature in the range from 350 to 550 deg C has a weak effect on the fatigue strength of the quenched and tempered steel. A change in the dislocation structure occurs under all tested temperatures in the 12 GN2MFAYu steel during fatigue. The intensity of the rearrangement of dislocation structure increases as the testing temperature increases to 550 deg C causing a decrease of the limited life-time at increased stress amplitudes

  3. Evidence of reversible temper brittleness in tension tests at several temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F.de.

    1976-01-01

    Tension tests were conduced at several temperatures and strain rates on a Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel to study the change in mechanical properties relationed with the embrittlement. The embrittled specimens had showed a susceptibily degree equal to 50 0 C after a thermal treatment of 48 hours at 500 0 C. Relevant differences were arised between several parameters, specially the elongation. Those differences depend upon the test temperature and the strain rate. It was sugested a model to the mechanism of temper brittleness and this model takes account the equilibrium segregation proposed by McLean and Northcott (1948) and the interation of interstitial atoms with the dislocations and other solute atoms [pt

  4. Development of small punch tests for ductile-brittle transition temperature measurement of temper embrittled Ni-Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, J.M.; Kameda, J.; Buck, O.

    1983-01-01

    Small punch tests were developed to determine the ductile-brittle transition temperature of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) steels having various degrees of temper embrittlement and various microstructures. It was found that the small punch test clearly shows the ductile-brittle transition behavior of the temper-embrittled steels. The measured values were compared with those obtained from Charpy impact and uniaxial tensile tests. The effects of punch tip shape, a notch, and the strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition behavior were examined. It was found that the combined use of a notch, high strain rates, and a small punch tip strongly affects the ductile-brittle transition behavior. Considerable variations in the data were observed when the small punch tests were performed on coarse-grained steels. Several factors controlling embrittlement measurements of steels are discussed in terms of brittle fracture mechanisms

  5. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomas, Grant A. [CSM; Speer, John G. [CSM; Matlock, David K. [CSM; Krauss, George [CSM

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  6. Efficient assignment of the temperature set for Parallel Tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidetti, M.; Rolando, V.; Tripiccione, R.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple algorithm able to identify a set of temperatures for a Parallel Tempering Monte Carlo simulation, that maximizes the probability that the configurations drift across all temperature values, from the coldest to the hottest ones, and vice versa. The proposed algorithm starts from data gathered from relatively short Monte Carlo simulations and is straightforward to implement. We assess its effectiveness on a test case simulation of an Edwards–Anderson spin glass on a lattice of 12 3 sites.

  7. Tempering of Low-Temperature Bainite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Mathew J.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Miller, Mike K.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2017-07-01

    Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and atom probe tomography have been used to identify the changes which occur during the tempering of a carbide-free bainitic steel transformed at 473 K (200 °C). Partitioning of solute between ferrite and thin-films of retained austenite was observed on tempering at 673 K (400 °C) for 30 minutes. After tempering at 673 K (400 °C) and 773 K (500 °C) for 30 minutes, cementite was observed in the form of nanometre scale precipitates. Proximity histograms showed that the partitioning of solutes other than silicon from the cementite was slight at 673 K (400 °C) and more obvious at 773 K (500 °C). In both cases, the nanometre scale carbides are greatly depleted in silicon.

  8. Influence of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of tempering temperature on structure and mechanical properties of bainite hardened cast steel: G21CrMoV4 – 6 (L21HMF and G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF. Investigated cast steels were taken out from internal frames of steam turbines serviced for long time at elevated temperatures. Tempering of the investigated cast steel was carried out within the temperature range of 690 ÷ 730 C (G21CrMoV4 – 6 and 700 ÷ 740 C (G17CrMoV5 – 10. After tempering the cast steels were characterized by a structure of tempered lower bainite with numerous precipitations of carbides. Performed research of mechanical properties has shown that high temperatures of tempering of bainitic structure do not cause decrease of mechanical properties beneath the required minimum.oo It has also been proved that high-temperature tempering (>720 oC ensures high impact energy at the 20% decrease of mechanical properties.

  9. DETERMINATION OF THE OPTIMAL TEMPERING TEMPERATURE IN HARD FACING OF THE FORGING DIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mutavdžić

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Here is analyzed selection of the optimal technology for heat treatment during the reparation of the damaged forging dies. Those tools are manufactured from alloyed tool steels for operation at elevated temperatures. Those steels are prone to self-hardening, so in reparatory hard-facing they must be preheated, additionally heated and tempered. During the tempering, in temperature interval 500-600°C, a secondary increase of hardness and decrease of impact toughness occurs, the so-called reversible tempering brittleness. Here is shown that it can be avoided by application of metallurgical and technological measures. Metallurgical measures assume adequate selection of steels. Since the considered steels are per se prone to tempering brittleness, we conducted experimental investigations to define the technological measures to avoid it. Tests on models were conducted: tempering from different temperatures, slow heating and cooling in still air. Hardness measurements showed that at 520°C, the secondary increase of hardness occurs, with drop of the impact toughness. Additional hard-facing tests included samples tempered at various regimes. Samples were prepared for mechanical and metallographic investigations. Results presented illustrate influence of additional heat treatment on structure, hardness and mechanical properties of the hard-faced layers. This enabled establishing the possibility of avoiding the tempering brittleness through technological measures.

  10. Determination of the optimal tempering temperature in hard facing of the forging dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mutavdžić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here is analyzed selection of the optimal technology for heat treatment during the reparation of the damaged forging dies. Those tools are manufactured from alloyed tool steels for operation at elevated temperatures. Those steels are prone to self-hardening, so in reparatory hard-facing they must be preheated, additionally heated and tempered. During the tempering, in temperature interval 500-600°C, a secondary increase of hardness and decrease of impact toughness occurs, the so-called reversible tempering brittleness. Here is shown that it can be avoided by application of metallurgical and technological measures. Metallurgical measures assume adequate selection of steels. Since the considered steels are per se prone to tempering brittleness, we conducted experimental investigations to define the technological measures to avoid it. Tests on models were conducted: tempering from different temperatures, slow heating and cooling in still air. Hardness measurements showed that at 520°C, the secondary increase of hardness occurs, with drop of the impact toughness. Additional hard-facing tests included samples tempered at various regimes. Samples were prepared for mechanical and metallographic investigations. Results presented illustrate influence of additional heat treatment on structure, hardness and mechanical properties of the hard-faced layers. This enabled establishing the possibility of avoiding the tempering brittleness through technological measures. 

  11. Stress relaxation in tempered glass caused by heat soak testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jens; Hilcken, Jonas; Aronen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Heat soak testing of tempered glass is a thermal process required after the tempering process itself to bring glasses of commercial soda-lime-silica-glass to failure that are contaminated with nickel sulphide inclusions, diameter 50 mm to 500 mm typically. Thus, the tests avoid a so-called "spont...... of commercial soda-lime-silica glass, it causes stress relaxation in tempered glass and the fracture pattern of the glass changes accordingly, especially thin glasses are affected. Based on the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Model, this paper comprises the theoretical background of the stress...

  12. Effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.W.; Han, L.Z.; Luo, X.M.; Liu, Q.D.; Gu, J.F., E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated after tempering at different temperatures ranging from 580 to 700 °C for 5 h. With increasing tempering temperature, the impact toughness, which is qualified by Charpy V-notch total absorbed energy, initially increases from 142 to 252 J, and then decreases to 47 J, with a maximum value at 650 °C, while the ultimate tensile strength varies in exactly the opposite direction. Comparing the microstructure and fracture surfaces of different specimens, the variations in toughness and strength with the tempering temperature were generally attributed to the softening of the bainitic ferrite, the agminated Fe{sub 3}C carbides that resulted from decomposition of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents, the precipitation of Mo{sub 2}C carbides, and the newly formed M/A constituents at the grain boundaries. Finally, the correlation between the impact toughness and the volume fraction of the M/A constituents was established, and the fracture mechanisms for the different tempering conditions are explained. - Highlights: • The dependence of the deterioration of impact toughness on tempering temperature has been analysed. • The instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test has been employed to study the fracture mechanism. • The influence of M/A constituents on different fracture mechanisms based on the hinge model has been demonstrated. • A correlation between the mechanical properties and the amount of M/A constituents has been established.

  13. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by High-Temperature Gas Nitriding Plus Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dongling; Li, Minsong; Ding, Hongzhen; Qiu, Wanqi; Luo, Chengping

    2018-02-01

    The low-alloy steel was nitrided in a pure NH3 gas atmosphere at 640 660 °C for 2 h, i.e., high-temperature gas nitriding (HTGN), followed by tempering at 225 °C, which can produce a high property surface coating without brittle compound (white) layer. The steel was also plasma nitriding for comparison. The composition, microstructure and microhardness of the nitrided and tempered specimens were examined, and their tribological behavior investigated. The results showed that the as-gas-nitrided layer consisted of a white layer composed of FeN0.095 phase (nitrided austenite) and a diffusional zone underneath the white layer. After tempering, the white layer was decomposed to a nano-sized (α-Fe + γ'-Fe4N + retained austenite) bainitic microstructure with a high hardness of 1150HV/25 g. Wear test results showed that the wear resistance and wear coefficient yielded by the complex HTGN plus tempering were considerably higher and lower, respectively, than those produced by the conventional plasma nitriding.

  14. An investigation on high temperature fatigue properties of tempered nuclear-grade deposited weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X. Y.; Zhu, P.; Yong, Q.; Liu, T. G.; Lu, Y. H.; Zhao, J. C.; Jiang, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2018-02-01

    Effect of tempering on low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviors of nuclear-grade deposited weld metal was investigated, and The LCF tests were performed at 350 °C with strain amplitudes ranging from 0.2% to 0.6%. The results showed that at a low strain amplitude, deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h had a high fatigue resistance due to high yield strength, while at a high strain amplitude, the one tempered for 24 h had a superior fatigue resistance due to high ductility. Deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h exhibited cyclic hardening at the tested strain amplitudes. Deposited weld metal tempered for 24 h exhibited cyclic hardening at a low strain amplitude but cyclic softening at a high strain amplitude. Existence and decomposition of martensite-austenite (M-A) islands as well as dislocations activities contributed to fatigue property discrepancy among the two tempered deposited weld metal.

  15. Effect of Tempering Temperature on the Microstructure and Properties of Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C Pressure Vessel Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-wen; Li, Chang-sheng; Peng, Huan; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2018-03-01

    To obtain the high-temperature strength and toughness of the medium-high-temperature-pressure steel, the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel subjected to three different tempering temperatures after being normalized were investigated. The results show that the microstructure of the sample, tempered in the range 675-725 °C for 50 min, did not change dramatically, yet the martensite/austenite constituents decomposed, and the bainite lath merged together and transformed into polygonal ferrite. At the same time, the precipitate size increased with an increase in tempering temperature. With the increase in the tempering temperature from 675 to 725 °C, the impact absorbed energy of the Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel at -40 °C increased from 257 to 325 J, and the high-temperature yield strength decreased; however, the high-temperature ultimate tensile strength tempered at 700 °C was outstanding (422-571 MPa) at different tested temperatures. The variations of the properties were attributed to the decomposition of M/A constituents and the coarsening of the precipitates. Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel normalized at 930 °C and tempered at 700 °C was found to have the best combination of ductility and strength.

  16. Temperature induced decoupling of enzymatic hydrolysis and carbon remineralization in long-term incubations of Arctic and temperate sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Steen, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    explored the temperature sensitivity of enzymatic hydrolysis and its connection to subsequent steps in anoxic organic carbon degradation in long-term incubations of sediments from the Arctic and the North Sea. These sediments were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 24 months at temperatures of 0, 10......, and 20 ºC. The short-term temperature response of the active microbial community was tested in temperature gradient block incubations. The temperature optimum of extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, as measured with a polysaccharide (chondroitin sulfate), differed between Arctic and temperate habitats...

  17. Effects of tempering temperature on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of high-strength low-alloy D6AC plasma arc welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Ming, E-mail: chunming@ntut.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chi-Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10673, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-31

    This study prepared high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) D6AC weldments using a plasma arc welding (PAW) process. The PAW weldments were then tempered at temperatures of 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C for 1000 min. Microstructural characteristics of the weld in as-welded HSLA-D6AC, tempered D6AC, and tensile-tested D6AC were observed via optical microscopy (OM). We also investigated the hardness, tensile strength, and V-notched tensile strength (NTS) of the tempered specimens using a Vickers hardness tester and a universal testing machine. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our results show that the mechanical properties and microstructural features of the HSLA weldments are strongly dependent on tempering temperature. An increase in tempering temperature led to a decrease in the hardness and tensile strength of the weldments but led to an increase in ductility. These effects can be attributed to the transformation of the microstructure and its effect on fracture characteristics. The specimens tempered at 300 °C and 450 °C failed in a ductile-brittle manner due to the presence of inter-lath austenite in the microstructure. After tempering at a higher temperature of 600 °C, martensite embrittlement did not occur, such that specimens failure was predominantly in a ductile manner. In the NTS specimens, an increase in tempering temperature led to a reduction in tensile strength due to notch embrittlement and the effects of grain boundary thickening and sliding. Our findings provide a valuable reference for the application of HSLA-D6AC steel in engineering and other fields.

  18. Reference of Temperature and Time during tempering process for non-stoichiometric FTO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. K.; Liang, B.; Zhao, M. J.; Gao, Y.; Zhang, F. C.; Zhao, H. L.

    2015-10-01

    In order to enhance the mechanical strength of Low-E glass, Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) films have to be tempered at high temperatures together with glass substrates. The effects of tempering temperature (600 °C ~ 720 °C) and time (150 s ~ 300 s) on the structural and electrical properties of FTO films were investigated. The results show all the films consist of non-stoichiometric, polycrystalline SnO2 without detectable amounts of fluoride. 700 °C and 260 s may be the critical tempering temperature and time, respectively. FTO films tempered at 700 °C for 260 s possesses the resistivity of 7.54 × 10-4 Ω•cm, the average transmittance in 400 ~ 800 nm of ~80%, and the calculated emissivity of 0.38. Hall mobility of FTO films tempered in this proper condition is mainly limited by the ionized impurity scattering. The value of [O]/[Sn] at the film surface is much higher than the stoichiometric value of 2.0 of pure crystalline SnO2.

  19. Proximate effects of temperature versus evolved intrinsic constraints for embryonic development times among temperate and tropical songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Riccardo; Martin, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    The relative importance of intrinsic constraints imposed by evolved physiological trade-offs versus the proximate effects of temperature for interspecific variation in embryonic development time remains unclear. Understanding this distinction is important because slow development due to evolved trade-offs can yield phenotypic benefits, whereas slow development from low temperature can yield costs. We experimentally increased embryonic temperature in free-living tropical and north temperate songbird species to test these alternatives. Warmer temperatures consistently shortened development time without costs to embryo mass or metabolism. However, proximate effects of temperature played an increasingly stronger role than intrinsic constraints for development time among species with colder natural incubation temperatures. Long development times of tropical birds have been thought to primarily reflect evolved physiological trade-offs that facilitate their greater longevity. In contrast, our results indicate a much stronger role of temperature in embryonic development time than currently thought.

  20. The responses of microbial temperature relationships to seasonal change and winter warming in a temperate grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgander, Johanna; Olsson, Pål Axel; Rousk, Johannes

    2018-01-18

    Microorganisms dominate the decomposition of organic matter and their activities are strongly influenced by temperature. As the carbon (C) flux from soil to the atmosphere due to microbial activity is substantial, understanding temperature relationships of microbial processes is critical. It has been shown that microbial temperature relationships in soil correlate with the climate, and microorganisms in field experiments become more warm-tolerant in response to chronic warming. It is also known that microbial temperature relationships reflect the seasons in aquatic ecosystems, but to date this has not been investigated in soil. Although climate change predictions suggest that temperatures will be mostly affected during winter in temperate ecosystems, no assessments exist of the responses of microbial temperature relationships to winter warming. We investigated the responses of the temperature relationships of bacterial growth, fungal growth, and respiration in a temperate grassland to seasonal change, and to 2 years' winter warming. The warming treatments increased winter soil temperatures by 5-6°C, corresponding to 3°C warming of the mean annual temperature. Microbial temperature relationships and temperature sensitivities (Q 10 ) could be accurately established, but did not respond to winter warming or to seasonal temperature change, despite significant shifts in the microbial community structure. The lack of response to winter warming that we demonstrate, and the strong response to chronic warming treatments previously shown, together suggest that it is the peak annual soil temperature that influences the microbial temperature relationships, and that temperatures during colder seasons will have little impact. Thus, mean annual temperatures are poor predictors for microbial temperature relationships. Instead, the intensity of summer heat-spells in temperate systems is likely to shape the microbial temperature relationships that govern the soil-atmosphere C

  1. Cold in the common garden: comparative low-temperature tolerance of boreal and temperate conifer foliage

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Richard Strimbeck; Trygve D. Kjellsen; Paul G. Schaberg; Paula F. Murakami

    2007-01-01

    Because they maintain green foliage throughout the winter season, evergreen conifers may face special physiological challenges in a warming world. We assessed the midwinter low-temperature (LT) tolerance of foliage from eight temperate and boreal species in each of the genera Abies, Picea, and Pinus growing in an arboretum in...

  2. Temperature dependence of UV radiation effects in Arctic and temperate isolates of three red macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.; Eggert, A.; Buma, A.G.J.; Breeman, Arno

    The temperature dependence of UV effects was studied for Arctic and temperate isolates of the red macrophytes Palmaria palmata, Coccotylus truncatus and Phycodrys rubens. The effects of daily repeated artificial ultraviolet B and A radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm, UVAR: 320-400 nm) treatments were

  3. Simulation of Temperature Field Distribution for Cutting the Temperated Glass by Ultraviolet Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B. J.; He, Y. C.; Dai, F.; Lin, X. C.

    2017-03-01

    The finite element software ANSYS was adopted to simulate the temperature field distribution for laser cutting tempered glass, and the influence of different process parameters, including laser power, glass thickness and cutting speed, on temperature field distribution was studied in detail. The results show that the laser power has a greater influence on temperature field distribution than other paremeters, and when the laser power gets to 60W, the highest temperature reaches 749°C, which is higher than the glass softening temperature. It reflects the material near the laser spot is melted and the molten slag is removed by the high-energy water beam quickly. Finally, through the water guided laser cutting tempered glass experiment the FEM theoretical analysis was verified.

  4. Variations in the microstructure and properties of Mn-Ti multiple-phase steel with high strength under different tempering temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazhao; Li, Xiaonan; Cui, Tianxie; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Yutian; Fu, Peimao

    2015-03-01

    There are few relevant researches on coils by tempering, and the variations of microstructure and properties of steel coil during the tempering process also remain unclear. By using thermo-mechanical control process(TMCP) technology, Mn-Ti typical HSLA steel coils with yield strength of 920 MPa are produced on the 2250 hot rolling production line. Then, the samples are taken from the coils and tempered at the temperatures of 220 °C, 350 °C, and 620 °C respectively. After tempering the strength, ductility and toughness of samples are tested, and meanwhile microstructures are investigated. Precipitates initially emerge inside the ferrite laths and the density of the dislocation drops. Then, the lath-shaped ferrites begin to gather, and the retained austenite films start to decompose. Finally, the retained austenite films are completely decomposed into coarse and short rod-shape precipitates composed of C and Ti compounds. The yield strength increases with increasing tempering temperature due to the pinning effect of the precipitates, and the dislocation density decreases. The yield strength is highest when the steel is tempered at 220 °C because of pinning of the precipitates to dislocations. The total elongation increases in all samples because of the development of ferrites during tempering. The tensile strength and impact absorbed energy decline because the effect of impeding crack propagation weakens as the retained austenite films completely decompose and the precipitates coarsen. This paper clarifies the influence of different tempering temperatures on phase transformation characteristics and process of Mn-Ti typical multiphase steels, as well as its resulting performance variation rules.

  5. Surface temperature retrieval in a temperate grassland with multiresolution sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, S. J.; Halthore, R. N.; Hall, F. G.; Markham, B. L.

    1995-12-01

    Radiometric surface temperatures retrieved at various spatial resolutions from aircraft and satellite measurements at the FIFE site in eastern Kansas were compared with near-surface temperature measurements to determine the accuracy of the retrieval techniques and consistency between the various sensors. Atmospheric characterizations based on local radiosonde profiles of temperature, pressure, and water vapor were used with the LOWTRAN-7 and MODTRAN atmospheric radiance models to correct measured thermal radiances of water and grassland targets for atmospheric attenuation. Comparison of retrieved surface temperatures from a helicopter-mounted modular multispectral radiometer (MMR) (˜5-m "pixel"), C-130 mounted thematic mapper simulator (TMS) (NS001, ˜20-m pixel), and the Landsat 5 thematic mapper (TM) (120-m pixel) was done. Differences between atmospherically corrected radiative temperatures and near-surface measurements ranged from less than 1°C to more than 8°C. Corrected temperatures from helicopter-MMR and NS001-TMS were in general agreement with near-surface infrared radiative thermometer (IRT) measurements collected from automated meteorological stations, with mean differences of 3.2°C and 1.7°C for grassland targets. Much better agreement (within 1°C) was found between the retrieved aircraft surface temperatures and near-surface measurements acquired with a hand-held mast equipped with a MMR and IRT. The NS001-TMS was also in good agreement with near-surface temperatures acquired over water targets. In contrast, the Landsat 5 TM systematically overestimated surface temperature in all cases. This result has been noted previously but not consistently. On the basis of the results reported here, surface measurements were used to provide a calibration of the TM thermal channel. Further evaluation of the in-flight radiometric calibration of the TM thermal channel is recommended.

  6. Effect of tempering temperature on microstructure and sliding wear property of laser quenched 4Cr13 steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, J.H.; Pei, Y.T.; Li, X.D.; Lei, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    4Cr13 martensite stainless steel was quenched by a CO2 laser and tempered for 2 h at different temperatures in the range 200 °C to 550 °C. The microstructure of treated layer was observed by SEM, XRD and TEM. Tempering leads to the decomposition of a large number of retained austenites in laser

  7. Microstructural characterisation of a P91 steel normalised and tempered at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado-Norena, C.; Danon, C.A.; Luppo, M.I.; Bruzzoni, P.

    2015-01-01

    9%Cr-1%Mo martensitic-ferritic steels are used in power plant components with operating temperatures of around 600 deg. C because of their good mechanical properties at high temperature as well as good oxidation resistance. These steels are generally used in the normalised and tempered condition. This treatment results in a structure of tempered lath martensite where the precipitates are distributed along the lath interfaces and within the martensite laths. The characterisation of these precipitates is of fundamental importance because of their relationship with the creep behaviour of these steels in service. In the present work, the different types of precipitates found in these steels have been studied on specimens in different metallurgical conditions. The techniques used in this investigation were X-ray diffraction with synchrotron light, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy. (authors)

  8. Plant nutrient mobilization in temperate heathland responds to elevated CO2, temperature and drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Temperate terrestrial ecosystems are currently exposed to increased atmospheric CO2 and progressive climatic changes with increased temperature and periodical drought. We here present results from a field experiment, where the effects of these three main climate change related factors...... decreased in response to drought. These complex changes in availability and release of nutrients from soil organic matter turnover and mineralization in response to elevated CO2 and climate change may influence the future plant carbon sequestration and species composition at temperate heathlands....... in Deschampsia soil, and microbial immobilization of N and P decreased in warmed Calluna soil. Warming tended to increase microbial N and P in Calluna but not in Deschampsia soil in fall, and more microbial C was accumulated under drought in Calluna soil. The effects of warming were often counteracted or erased...

  9. Effect of high temperature tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the modified 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Pasaribu, Rahmat Ramadhan; Sugandi, Moh. Tri; Sunardi

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the influence of high tempering temperature and holding time on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the recently modified 410 martensitic stainless steel. The modified steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The hardness and tensile strength of the steels decreased with increasing tempering temperature from 600 to 700 °C and with increasing holding time from 1 to 6 h. Based on microstructural images, it was observed the coarsening of lath martensite and of the metal carbides as well. However, a relatively high hardness and strength were still exibited by this steel after tempering at a such high temperature of 600-700 °C. The partition of Mo into the carbides identified by EDS analysis may correlate with this situation.

  10. Short-Term Effect of Feedstock and Pyrolysis Temperature on Biochar Characteristics, Soil and Crop Response in Temperate Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Victoria; Ruysschaert, Greet; Müller-Stöver, Dorette Sophie

    2014-01-01

    At present, there is limited understanding of how biochar application to soil could be beneficial to crop growth in temperate regions and which biochar types are most suitable. Biochar’s (two feedstocks: willow, pine; three pyrolysis temperatures: 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C) effect on nitrogen (N......) availability, N use efficiency and crop yield was studied in northwestern European soils using a combined approach of process-based and agronomic experiments. Biochar labile carbon (C) fractions were determined and a phytotoxicity test, sorption experiment, N incubation experiment and two pot trials were...... conducted. Generally, biochar caused decreased soil NO3−availability and N use efficiency, and reduced biomass yields compared to a control soil. Soil NO3−concentrations were more reduced in the willow compared to the pine biochar treatments and the reduction increased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures...

  11. Testing the correlation of fragmented pollen records of the middle and late Pleistocene temperate stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuneš, Petr; Odgaard, Bent Vad

    Quaternary temperate stages have long been described based on changing pollen abundances of various tree taxa in lacustrine sediments. Later, attempts have been made to assign such biostratigraphic units to distinct marine isotope stages (MIS). Existing continuous chronosequences from Southern...... records depends on site-to-site correlations. This comparison has often been performed on a visual basis, lacking clearly defined protocols and statements of underlying assumptions. Here I test the correlation of well and poorly known pollen records of the middle- and late-Pleistocene temperate stages...... from Northern-Central Europe and evaluate the usefulness of several numerical techniques. TWINSPAN analysis identifies groups of temperate stages based on presence/absence of their indicative taxa and may be useful for distinguishing between older and younger interglacials. Site-to-site sequence...

  12. Maximum temperature accounts for annual soil CO2 efflux in temperate forests of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Xu, Meili; Kang, Fengfeng; Jianxin Sun, Osbert

    2015-01-01

    It will help understand the representation legality of soil temperature to explore the correlations of soil respiration with variant properties of soil temperature. Soil temperature at 10 cm depth was hourly logged through twelve months. Basing on the measured soil temperature, soil respiration at different temporal scales were calculated using empirical functions for temperate forests. On monthly scale, soil respiration significantly correlated with maximum, minimum, mean and accumulated effective soil temperatures. Annual soil respiration varied from 409 g C m−2 in coniferous forest to 570 g C m−2 in mixed forest and to 692 g C m−2 in broadleaved forest, and was markedly explained by mean soil temperatures of the warmest day, July and summer, separately. These three soil temperatures reflected the maximum values on diurnal, monthly and annual scales. In accordance with their higher temperatures, summer soil respiration accounted for 51% of annual soil respiration across forest types, and broadleaved forest also had higher soil organic carbon content (SOC) and soil microbial biomass carbon content (SMBC), but a lower contribution of SMBC to SOC. This added proof to the findings that maximum soil temperature may accelerate the transformation of SOC to CO2-C via stimulating activities of soil microorganisms. PMID:26179467

  13. Effect of Temperature and Sheet Temper on Isothermal Solidification Kinetics in Clad Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal solidification (IS) is a phenomenon observed in clad aluminum brazing sheets, wherein the amount of liquid clad metal is reduced by penetration of the liquid clad into the core. The objective of the current investigation is to quantify the rate of IS through the use of a previously derived parameter, the Interface Rate Constant (IRC). The effect of peak temperature and initial sheet temper on IS kinetics were investigated. The results demonstrated that IS is due to the diffusion of silicon (Si) from the liquid clad layer into the solid core. Reduced amounts of liquid clad at long liquid duration times, a roughened sheet surface, and differences in resolidified clad layer morphology between sheet tempers were observed. Increased IS kinetics were predicted at higher temperatures by an IRC model as well as by experimentally determined IRC values; however, the magnitudes of these values are not in good agreement due to deficiencies in the model when applied to alloys. IS kinetics were found to be higher for sheets in the fully annealed condition when compared with work-hardened sheets, due to the influence of core grain boundaries providing high diffusivity pathways for Si diffusion, resulting in more rapid liquid clad penetration.

  14. Temperature responses of tropical to warm temperate Cladophora species in relation to their distribution in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge, M. L.; Breeman, A. M.; Kraak, S.; van den Hoek, C.

    1987-09-01

    The relationship between distribution boundaries and temperature responses of some North Atlantic Cladophora species (Chlorophyta) was experimentally examined under various regimes of temperature, light and daylength. Experimentally determined critical temperature intervals, in which survival, growth or reproduction was limited, were compared with annual temperature regimes (monthly means and extremes) at sites inside and outside distribution boundaries. The species tested belonged to two phytogeographic groups: (1) the tropical West Atlantic group ( C. submarina: isolate from Curaçao) and (2) the amphiatlantic tropical to warm temperate group ( C. prolifera: isolate from Corsica; C. coelothrix: isolates from Brittany and Curaçao; and C. laetevirens: isolates from deep and shallow water in Corsica and from Brittany). In accordance with distribution from tropical to warm temperate regions, each of the species grew well between 20 30°C and reproduction and growth were limited at and below 15°C. The upper survival limit in long days was <35°C in all species but high or maximum growth rates occurred at 30°C. C. prolifera, restricted to the tropical margins, had the most limited survival at 35°C. Experimental evidence suggests that C. submarina is restricted to the Caribbean and excluded from the more northerly American mainland and Gulf of Mexico coasts by sporadic low winter temperatures in the nearshore waters, when cold northerly weather penetrates far south every few years. Experimental evidence suggests that C. prolifera, C. coelothrix and C. laetevirens are restricted to their northern European boundaries by summer temperatures too low for sufficient growth and/or reproduction. Their progressively more northerly located boundaries were accounted for by differences in growth rates over the critical 10 15°C interval. C. prolifera and C. coelothrix are excluded or restricted in distribution on North Sea coasts by lethal winter temperatures, again differences

  15. Forests tend to cool the land surface in the temperate zone: An analysis of the mechanisms controlling radiometric surface temperature change in managed temperate ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoy, P. C.; Katul, G. G.; Juang, J.; Siqueira, M. B.; Novick, K. A.; Essery, R.; Dore, S.; Kolb, T. E.; Montes-Helu, M. C.; Scott, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation is an important control on the surface energy balance and thereby surface temperature. Boreal forests and arctic shrubs are thought to warm the land surface by absorbing more radiation than the vegetation they replace. The surface temperatures of tropical forests tend to be cooler than deforested landscapes due to enhanced evapotranspiration. The effects of reforestation on surface temperature change in the temperate zone is less-certain, but recent modeling efforts suggest forests have a global warming effect. We quantified the mechanisms driving radiometric surface changes following landcover changes using paired ecosystem case studies from the Ameriflux database with energy balance models of varying complexity. Results confirm previous findings that deciduous and coniferous forests in the southeastern U.S. are ca. 1 °C cooler than an adjacent field on an annual basis because aerodynamic/ecophysiological cooling of 2-3 °C outweighs an albedo-related warming of stand-replacing ponderosa pine fire was ca. 1 °C warmer than unburned stands because a 1.5 °C aerodynamic warming offset a slight surface cooling due to greater albedo and soil heat flux. An ecosystem dominated by mesquite shrub encroachment was nearly 2 °C warmer than a native grassland ecosystem as aerodynamic and albedo-related warming outweighed a small cooling effect due to changes in soil heat flux. The forested ecosystems in these case studies are documented to have higher carbon uptake than the non-forested systems. Results suggest that temperate forests tend to cool the land surface and suggest that previous model-based findings that forests warm the Earth’s surface globally should be reconsidered.Changes to radiometric surface temperature (K) following changes in vegetation using paired ecosystem case studies C4 grassland and shrub ecosystem surface temperatures were adjusted for differences in air temperature across sites.

  16. Seasonal variation in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2012-03-01

    Increasing soil temperature has the potential to alter the activity of the extracellular enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter (SOM) and ultimately the availability of N for primary production. Proteolytic enzymes depolymerize N from proteinaceous components of SOM into amino acids, and their activity is a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil N. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the soils of temperate forest tree species differ in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity over the growing season and the role of substrate limitation in regulating temperature sensitivity. Across species and sampling dates, proteolytic enzyme activity had relatively low sensitivity to temperature with a mean activation energy (Ea) of 33.5 kJ mol-1. Ea declined in white ash, American beech, and eastern hemlock soils across the growing season as soils warmed. By contrast, Eain sugar maple soil increased across the growing season. We used these data to develop a species-specific empirical model of proteolytic enzyme activity for the 2009 calendar year and studied the interactive effects of soil temperature (ambient or +5°C) and substrate limitation (ambient or elevated protein) on enzyme activity. Declines in substrate limitation had a larger single-factor effect on proteolytic enzyme activity than temperature, particularly in the spring. There was, however, a large synergistic effect of increasing temperature and substrate supply on proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results suggest limited increases in N availability with climate warming unless there is a parallel increase in the availability of protein substrates.

  17. Dynamics of low-temperature acclimation in temperate and boreal conifer foliage in a mild winter climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Richard Strimbeck; Trygve D. Kjellsen; Paul G. Schaberg; Paula F. Murakami

    2008-01-01

    To provide baseline data for physiological studies of extreme low-temperature (LT) tolerance in boreal conifers, we profiled LT stress responses, liquid nitrogen (LN2)-quench tolerance, and sugar concentrations in foliage of boreal-temperate species pairs in the genera Abies, Picea and Pinus, growing in an...

  18. Effect of Tempering Temperature and Time on the Corrosion Behaviour of 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels in Oxalic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ayo S. Afolabi; Johannes H. Potgieter; Ambali S. Abdulkareem; Nonhlanhla Fungura

    2011-01-01

    The effect of different tempering temperatures and heat treatment times on the corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels in oxalic acid was studied in this work using conventional weight loss and electrochemical measurements. Typical 304 and 316 stainless steel samples were tempered at 150oC, 250oC and 350oC after being austenized at 1050oC for 10 minutes. These samples were then immersed in 1.0M oxalic acid and their weight losses were measured at every five days for 30 days. The r...

  19. Species composition and forest structure explain the temperature sensitivity patterns of productivity in temperate forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Bohn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures due to climate change influence the wood production of forests. Observations show that some temperate forests increase their productivity, whereas others reduce their productivity. This study focuses on how species composition and forest structure properties influence the temperature sensitivity of aboveground wood production (AWP. It further investigates which forests will increase their productivity the most with rising temperatures. We described forest structure by leaf area index, forest height and tree height heterogeneity. Species composition was described by a functional diversity index (Rao's Q and a species distribution index (ΩAWP. ΩAWP quantified how well species are distributed over the different forest layers with regard to AWP. We analysed 370 170 forest stands generated with a forest gap model. These forest stands covered a wide range of possible forest types. For each stand, we estimated annual aboveground wood production and performed a climate sensitivity analysis based on 320 different climate time series (of 1-year length. The scenarios differed in mean annual temperature and annual temperature amplitude. Temperature sensitivity of wood production was quantified as the relative change in productivity resulting from a 1 °C rise in mean annual temperature or annual temperature amplitude. Increasing ΩAWP positively influenced both temperature sensitivity indices of forest, whereas forest height showed a bell-shaped relationship with both indices. Further, we found forests in each successional stage that are positively affected by temperature rise. For such forests, large ΩAWP values were important. In the case of young forests, low functional diversity and small tree height heterogeneity were associated with a positive effect of temperature on wood production. During later successional stages, higher species diversity and larger tree height heterogeneity were an advantage. To achieve such a

  20. Species composition and forest structure explain the temperature sensitivity patterns of productivity in temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Friedrich J.; May, Felix; Huth, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Rising temperatures due to climate change influence the wood production of forests. Observations show that some temperate forests increase their productivity, whereas others reduce their productivity. This study focuses on how species composition and forest structure properties influence the temperature sensitivity of aboveground wood production (AWP). It further investigates which forests will increase their productivity the most with rising temperatures. We described forest structure by leaf area index, forest height and tree height heterogeneity. Species composition was described by a functional diversity index (Rao's Q) and a species distribution index (ΩAWP). ΩAWP quantified how well species are distributed over the different forest layers with regard to AWP. We analysed 370 170 forest stands generated with a forest gap model. These forest stands covered a wide range of possible forest types. For each stand, we estimated annual aboveground wood production and performed a climate sensitivity analysis based on 320 different climate time series (of 1-year length). The scenarios differed in mean annual temperature and annual temperature amplitude. Temperature sensitivity of wood production was quantified as the relative change in productivity resulting from a 1 °C rise in mean annual temperature or annual temperature amplitude. Increasing ΩAWP positively influenced both temperature sensitivity indices of forest, whereas forest height showed a bell-shaped relationship with both indices. Further, we found forests in each successional stage that are positively affected by temperature rise. For such forests, large ΩAWP values were important. In the case of young forests, low functional diversity and small tree height heterogeneity were associated with a positive effect of temperature on wood production. During later successional stages, higher species diversity and larger tree height heterogeneity were an advantage. To achieve such a development, one could plant

  1. Microstructural, mechanical and tribological investigation of 30CrMnSiNi2A ultra-high strength steel under various tempering temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan Hafeez, Muhammad; Farooq, Ameeq

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the variation in microstructural, mechanical and tribological characteristics of 30CrMnSiNi2A ultra-high strength steel as a function of tempering temperatures. Steel was quenched at 880 °C and tempered at five different tempering temperatures ranging from 250 °C to 650 °C. Optical microscopy and pin on disc tribometer was used to evaluate the microstructural and wear properties. Results show that characteristics of 30CrMnSiNi2A are highly sensitive to tempering temperatures. Lathe and plate shaped martensite obtained by quenching transform first into ε-carbide, second cementite, third coarsened and spheroidized cementite and finally into recovered ferrite and austenite. Hardness, tensile and yield strengths decreased while elongation increased with tempering temperatures. On the other hand, wear rate first markedly decreased and then increased. Optimum amalgamation of characteristics was achieved at 350 °C.

  2. Dislocation polymorphism transformation of 6061-T651 aluminum alloy processed by laser shock processing: Effect of tempering at the elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X.D.; Ruan, L.; Yuan, S.Q.; Ren, N.F.; Zheng, L.M.; Zhan, Q.B.; Zhou, J.Z.; Yang, H.M.; Wang, Y.; Dai, F.Z.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of tempering on surface topography and dislocation configuration of 6061-T651 aluminum alloy by laser shock processing (LSP) were investigated at the elevated temperatures. Surface topography and surface roughness were tested by a Surfcom 130A-Monochrome surface rough-meter. Morphologies of precipitated phases were monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the dislocation configurations of samples after LSP were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results showed that LSP had a beneficial effect on micro-hardness at elevated temperature. There was a little change of the surface roughness as subjected to LSP. The main strengthening mechanism of micro-hardness was dislocation strengthening and fine grain strengthening, and precipitated phase strengthening was the main strengthening mechanism at elevated temperature. “Dislocation polymorphism transformation” (DPT) effect was affirmed at elevated temperature, and the elevated temperature was principal element for inducing the DPT effect of 6061-T651 aluminum alloy by LSP

  3. Reproductive output of a non-zooxanthellate temperate coral is unaffected by temperature along an extended latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Airi

    Full Text Available Global environmental change, in marine ecosystems, is associated with concurrent shifts in water temperature, circulation, stratification, and nutrient input, with potentially wide-ranging biological effects. Variations in seawater temperature might alter physiological functioning, reproductive efficiency, and demographic traits of marine organisms, leading to shifts in population size and abundance. Differences in temperature tolerances between organisms can identify individual and ecological characteristics, which make corals able to persist and adapt in a climate change context. Here we investigated the possible effect of temperature on the reproductive output of the solitary non-zooxanthellate temperate coral Leptopsammia pruvoti, along an 8° latitudinal gradient. Samples have been collected in six populations along the gradient and each polyp was examined using histological and cyto-histometric analyses. We coupled our results with previous studies on the growth, demography, and calcification of L. pruvoti along the same temperature gradient, and compared them with those of another sympatric zooxanthellate coral Balanophyllia europaea to understand which trophic strategy makes the coral more tolerant to increasing temperature. The non-zooxanthellate species seemed to be quite tolerant to temperature increases, probably due to the lack of the symbiosis with zooxanthellae. To our knowledge, this is the first field investigation of the relationship between reproductive output and temperature increase of a temperate asymbiotic coral, providing novel insights into the poorly studied non-zooxanthellate scleractinians.

  4. Reproductive output of a non-zooxanthellate temperate coral is unaffected by temperature along an extended latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airi, Valentina; Prantoni, Selena; Calegari, Marco; Lisini Baldi, Veronica; Gizzi, Francesca; Marchini, Chiara; Levy, Oren; Falini, Giuseppe; Dubinsky, Zvy; Goffredo, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Global environmental change, in marine ecosystems, is associated with concurrent shifts in water temperature, circulation, stratification, and nutrient input, with potentially wide-ranging biological effects. Variations in seawater temperature might alter physiological functioning, reproductive efficiency, and demographic traits of marine organisms, leading to shifts in population size and abundance. Differences in temperature tolerances between organisms can identify individual and ecological characteristics, which make corals able to persist and adapt in a climate change context. Here we investigated the possible effect of temperature on the reproductive output of the solitary non-zooxanthellate temperate coral Leptopsammia pruvoti, along an 8° latitudinal gradient. Samples have been collected in six populations along the gradient and each polyp was examined using histological and cyto-histometric analyses. We coupled our results with previous studies on the growth, demography, and calcification of L. pruvoti along the same temperature gradient, and compared them with those of another sympatric zooxanthellate coral Balanophyllia europaea to understand which trophic strategy makes the coral more tolerant to increasing temperature. The non-zooxanthellate species seemed to be quite tolerant to temperature increases, probably due to the lack of the symbiosis with zooxanthellae. To our knowledge, this is the first field investigation of the relationship between reproductive output and temperature increase of a temperate asymbiotic coral, providing novel insights into the poorly studied non-zooxanthellate scleractinians.

  5. Certification testing at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noss, P.W.; Ammerman, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Regulations governing the transport of radioactive materials require that most hypothetical accident condition tests or analyses consider the effects of the environmental temperature that most challenges package performance. For many packages, the most challenging temperature environment is the cold condition (-29 C according to U.S. regulations), primarily because the low temperature causes the highest free drop impact forces due to the higher strength of many energy-absorbing materials at this temperature. If it is decided to perform low temperature testing, it is only necessary that the relevant parts of the package have the required temperature prior to the drop. However, the details of performing a drop at low temperature can have a large influence on testing cost and technical effectiveness. The selection of the test site, the chamber and type of chilling equipment, instrumentation, and even the time of year are all important. Control of seemingly minor details such as the effect on internal pressure, placement of monitoring thermocouples, the thermal time constant of the test article, and icing of equipment are necessary to ensure a successful low temperature test. This paper will discuss these issues and offer suggestions based on recent experience

  6. Can Temperate-Water Immersion Effectively Reduce Rectal Temperature in Exertional Heat Stroke? A Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truxton, Tyler T; Miller, Kevin C

    2017-09-01

    Clinical Scenario: Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is a medical emergency which, if left untreated, can result in death. The standard of care for EHS patients includes confirmation of hyperthermia via rectal temperature (T rec ) and then immediate cold-water immersion (CWI). While CWI is the fastest way to reduce T rec , it may be difficult to lower and maintain water bath temperature in the recommended ranges (1.7°C-15°C [35°F-59°F]) because of limited access to ice and/or the bath being exposed to high ambient temperatures for long periods of time. Determining if T rec cooling rates are acceptable (ie, >0.08°C/min) when significantly hyperthermic humans are immersed in temperate water (ie, ≥20°C [68°F]) has applications for how EHS patients are treated in the field. Are T rec cooling rates acceptable (≥0.08°C/min) when significantly hyperthermic humans are immersed in temperate water? T rec cooling rates of hyperthermic humans immersed in temperate water (≥20°C [68°F]) ranged from 0.06°C/min to 0.19°C/min. The average T rec cooling rate for all examined studies was 0.11±0.06°C/min. Clinical Bottom Line: Temperature water immersion (TWI) provides acceptable (ie, >0.08°C/min) T rec cooling rates for hyperthermic humans post-exercise. However, CWI cooling rates are higher and should be used if feasible (eg, access to ice, shaded treatment areas). Strength of Recommendation: The majority of evidence (eg, Level 2 studies with PEDro scores ≥5) suggests TWI provides acceptable, though not ideal, T rec cooling. If possible, CWI should be used instead of TWI in EHS scenarios.

  7. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Dan; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C) quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm), microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm), and mineral fractions (MF, temperature and aggregate size significantly affected on SOM decomposition, with notable interactive effects (Ptemperature in the following order: MA>MF>bulk soil >MI(P classes (P temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  8. The interactive effects of temperature and moisture on nitrogen fixation in two temperate-arctic mosses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rousk, Kathrin; Pedersen, Pia Agerlund; Dyrnum, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    fixation in mosses under controlled conditions have rarely been investigated separately, rendering the interactive effects of the two climatic factors on N2 fixation unknown. Here, we tested the interactive effects of temperature and moisture on N2 fixation in the two most dominant moss species...

  9. A 1500-year reconstruction of annual mean temperature for temperate North America on decadal-to-multidecadal time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trouet, V; Diaz, H F; Wahl, E R; Viau, A E; Graham, R; Graham, N; Cook, E R

    2013-01-01

    We present two reconstructions of annual average temperature over temperate North America: a tree-ring based reconstruction at decadal resolution (1200–1980 CE) and a pollen-based reconstruction at 30 year resolution that extends back to 480 CE. We maximized reconstruction length by using long but low-resolution pollen records and applied a three-tier calibration scheme for this purpose. The tree-ring-based reconstruction was calibrated against instrumental annual average temperatures on annual and decadal scale, it was then reduced to a lower resolution, and was used as a calibration target for the pollen-based reconstruction. Before the late-19th to the early-21st century, there are three prominent low-frequency periods in our extended reconstruction starting at 480 CE, notably the Dark Ages cool period (about 500–700 CE) and Little Ice Age (about 1200–1900 CE), and the warmer medieval climate anomaly (MCA; about 750–1100 CE). The 9th and the 11th century are the warmest centuries and they constitute the core of the MCA in our reconstruction, a period characterized by centennial-scale aridity in the North American West. These two warm peaks are slightly warmer than the baseline period (1904–1980), but nevertheless much cooler than temperate North American temperatures during the early-21st century. (letter)

  10. Numerical investigation by finite element simulation of the bail punch test: application to tempered martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campitelli, E.; Spatig, P.; Bertsch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Over the years, the small ball punch test technique has been used to evaluate conventional tensile properties of a variety of materials. The development and use of this type of small specimen techniques is indispensable for an efficient use of the limited irradiation volume of the future fusion material intense neutron source. Up to now, empirical correlations between features of the load-displacement curves of the ball punch test and the mechanical properties, such as the yield stress or the ultimate tensile stress, are established on materials in the unirradiated condition. These correlations are believed to be applicable to irradiated materials and they have been very often used to estimate the irradiation hardening. However, it is well known that the overall constitutive behavior of the materials is generally affected by neutron irradiation. Therefore, there is a need to quantify the effect of the constitutive behavior on the correlations. In this paper, we employ a 3D non-linear finite element model for the ball punch test to address these effects of the irradiation-induced changes on the ball punch test curve. We apply first the model on the tempered martensitic steel EUROFER97 in the unirradiated condition with variations in the post-yield behavior, either in the low strain domain ( 10%). The effects on the ball punch test load deflection curve are outlined. Second, we study the effects of the irradiation hardening on the same constitutive behaviors as those used for the unirradiated condition. We show that that the usual correlations must be considered with great care on irradiated materials since strong variation on the strain-hardening may lead to erroneous estimation of the irradiation hardening. We also propose a novel approach to calibrate the yield stress to features of the ball punch test curve that decreases the uncertainty related to the post-yield behavior and that, as a consequence, makes the technique more

  11. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  12. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm, microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm, and mineral fractions (MF, MF>bulk soil >MI(P <0.05. The Q10 values were highest for MA, followed (in decreasing order by bulk soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (P<0.05 suggested that the CQT hypothesis is applicable to soil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P <0.0001, with the largest values occurring in MA (1101 μg g-1, followed by MF (976 μg g-1 and MI (879 μg g-1. These findings suggest that feedback from SOM decomposition in response to changing temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  13. Adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Yalcin, Yilmaz; Taktak, Suekrue

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, the wear and adhesion properties of BDI were investigated. → Boro-tempering process under several heat treatment conditions was examined. → Optical microscope, SEM and XRD analysis were carried out to investigate the microstructure. → It was observed that boro-tempering process improves micro-hardness and wear properties of ductile irons. -- Abstract: In this study, adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron (BDI) were investigated. Boro-tempering was carried out on two stage processes i.e. boronizing and tempering. At the first stage, ductile iron samples were boronized by using pack process at 900 o C for 1, 3, and 5 h and then, secondly tempered at 250, 300, 350, and 400 o C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of boro-tempered samples showed that FeB and Fe 2 B phases were found on the surface of the samples. The Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test was used to assess the adhesion of boride layer. Test result showed that adhesion decreased with increasing boriding time and increased with increasing tempering temperature. Dry sliding wear tests of these samples were performed against Al 2 O 3 ball at a constant sliding speed and loads of 5 and 10 N. Wear tests indicated that boro-tempering heat treatment increased wear resistance of ductile iron. In addition, it was found that while wear rate of boro-tempered samples decreased with increasing boriding time, there is no significant affect of tempering temperature on wear rate.

  14. Study on tempering behaviour of AISI 410 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Thomas Paul, V.; Panneerselvam, G.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2015-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels find extensive applications due to their optimum combination of strength, hardness and wear-resistance in tempered condition. However, this class of steels is susceptible to embrittlement during tempering if it is carried out in a specific temperature range resulting in significant reduction in toughness. Embrittlement of as-normalised AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel, subjected to tempering treatment in the temperature range of 673–923 K was studied using Charpy impact tests followed by metallurgical investigations using field emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Carbides precipitated during tempering were extracted by electrochemical dissolution of the matrix and identified by X-ray diffraction. Studies indicated that temper embrittlement is highest when the steel is tempered at 823 K. Mostly iron rich carbides are present in the steel subjected to tempering at low temperatures of around 723 K, whereas chromium rich carbides (M 23 C 6 ) dominate precipitation at high temperature tempering. The range 773–823 K is the transition temperature range for the precipitates, with both Fe 2 C and M 23 C 6 types of carbides coexisting in the material. The nucleation of Fe 2 C within the martensite lath, during low temperature tempering, has a definite role in the embrittlement of this steel. Embrittlement is not observed at high temperature tempering because of precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides, instead of Fe 2 C, preferentially along the lath and prior austenite boundaries. Segregation of S and P, which is widely reported as one of the causes for temper embrittlement, could not be detected in the material even through Auger electron spectroscopy studies. - Highlights: • Tempering behaviour of AISI 410 steel is studied within 673–923 K temperature range. • Temperature regime of maximum embrittlement is identified as 773–848 K. • Results show that type of carbide precipitation varies with

  15. Study on tempering behaviour of AISI 410 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Gopa, E-mail: gopa_mjs@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Thomas Paul, V. [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Dasgupta, Arup [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Martensitic stainless steels find extensive applications due to their optimum combination of strength, hardness and wear-resistance in tempered condition. However, this class of steels is susceptible to embrittlement during tempering if it is carried out in a specific temperature range resulting in significant reduction in toughness. Embrittlement of as-normalised AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel, subjected to tempering treatment in the temperature range of 673–923 K was studied using Charpy impact tests followed by metallurgical investigations using field emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Carbides precipitated during tempering were extracted by electrochemical dissolution of the matrix and identified by X-ray diffraction. Studies indicated that temper embrittlement is highest when the steel is tempered at 823 K. Mostly iron rich carbides are present in the steel subjected to tempering at low temperatures of around 723 K, whereas chromium rich carbides (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) dominate precipitation at high temperature tempering. The range 773–823 K is the transition temperature range for the precipitates, with both Fe{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} types of carbides coexisting in the material. The nucleation of Fe{sub 2}C within the martensite lath, during low temperature tempering, has a definite role in the embrittlement of this steel. Embrittlement is not observed at high temperature tempering because of precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, instead of Fe{sub 2}C, preferentially along the lath and prior austenite boundaries. Segregation of S and P, which is widely reported as one of the causes for temper embrittlement, could not be detected in the material even through Auger electron spectroscopy studies. - Highlights: • Tempering behaviour of AISI 410 steel is studied within 673–923 K temperature range. • Temperature regime of maximum embrittlement is identified as 773–848 K. • Results show that type of

  16. Effects of Tempering Temperature and Path on the Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of ASTM Gr.92 Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, C. H.; Baek, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, C. B.; Kim, Y. K.; Hong, S. I.

    2009-01-01

    SFR (Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor) is one of the prospective nuclear reactor for the next generation (Gen-IV) systems. The fuel claddings in the SFR are subject to a high fast nuclear irradiation and a high temperature. Fuel technology is a key aspect of an SFR system, with implications for reactor safety, reactor operations, fuel reprocessing technology, and overall system economics. ASTM Gr.92 steel has been considered as the one of the main candidate fuel cladding materials in the design of SFR in that it has higher thermal conductivity as well as dimensional stability under irradiation when compared as austenitic stainless steel. The changes in microstructure and heat-treatment varying M 23 C 6 , MX, M 2 X, and precipitation by ASTM Gr.92 steels to improve high temperature mechanical properties is the attention. According to several researchers, it plays an important role in the mechanical properties of precipitates V, Nb, Cr, C, N as a form of MX and M 2 X precipitates. These fine precipitates formed in the sub- grain by preventing the movement of dislocations in high-temperature mechanical properties will contribute effectively. This study investigated the effects of tempering temperature and heat-treatment path on microstructure and mechanical properties of ASTM Gr.92 steels

  17. The northern flying squirrel as an indicator species of temperate rain forest: test of an hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston P. Smith; Scott M. Gende; Jeffrey V. Nichols

    2005-01-01

    Management indicator species (MIS) often are selected because their life history and demographics are thought to reflect a suite of ecosystem conditions that are too difficult or costly to measure directly. The northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) has been proposed as an MIS of temperate rain forest of southeastern Alaska based on previous...

  18. Testing for functional convergence of temperate rainforest tree assemblages in Chile and New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusk, C.H.; Jimenez-Castillo, M.; Aragón, R.; Easdale, T.A.; Poorter, L.; Hinojosa, L.F.; Mason, N.W.H.W.H.

    2016-01-01

    An important tenet of biogeography and comparative ecology is that disjunct assemblages in similar physical environments are functionally more similar to each other than to assemblages from other environments. Temperate rainforests in South America, New Zealand and Australia share certain

  19. Use of the gapped bead-on-plate test to investigate hydrogen induced cracking of flux cored arc welds of a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang; Dunne, Druce; Davidson, Len

    2014-01-01

    Gapped bead-on-plate (G-BOP) testing of flux cored arc welds was conducted to assess the susceptibility to hydrogen induced cold cracking (HICC) of weld metal deposited on a high strength quenched and tempered steel. For preheat temperatures higher than 40°C, no weld metal cracking was observed using a shielding gas consisting of argon with 20% carbon dioxide. In contrast, the no-crack condition was not achieved for a shielding gas consisting of argon-5% carbon dioxide for preheat temperatures lower than 100°C. This extraordinary difference in weld metal HICC resistance indicates that, in general, the shielding gas mixture can exert a major influence on weld metal transverse cold cracking behaviour

  20. The likely impact of elevated [CO2], nitrogen deposition, increased temperature and management on carbon sequestration in temperate and boreal forest ecosystems: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riitta Hyvönen; Göran I. Ågren; Sune Linder; Tryggve Persson; M. Francesca Cotrufo; Alf Ekblad; Michael Freeman; Achim Grelle; Ivan A. Janssens; Paul G. Jarvis; Seppo Kellomäki; Anders Lindroth; Denis Loustau; Tomas Lundmark; Richard J. Norby; Ram Oren; Kim Pilegaard; Michael G. Ryan; Bjarni D. Sigurdsson; Monika Strömgren; Marcel van Oijen; Göran Wallin

    2007-01-01

    Temperate and boreal forest ecosystems contain a large part of the carbon stored on land, in the form of both biomass and soil organic matter. Increasing atmospheric [CO2], increasing temperature, elevated nitrogen deposition and intensified management will change this C store. Well documented single-factor responses of net primary production are: higher photosynthetic...

  1. Testing the plant pneumatic method to estimate xylem embolism resistance in stems of temperate trees

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ya; Lamarque, Laurent J.; Torres-Ruiz, José Manuel; Schuldt, Bernhard; Karimi, Zohreh; Li, Shan; Qin, De-Wen; Bittencourt, Paulo; Burlett, Régis; Cao, Kun-Fang; Delzon, Sylvain; Oliveira, Rafael; Pereira, Luciano; Jansen, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Methods to estimate xylem embolism resistance generally rely on hydraulic measurements, which can be far from straightforward. Recently, a pneumatic method based on air flow measurements of terminal branch ends was proposed to construct vulnerability curves by linking the amount of air extracted from a branch with the degree of embolism. We applied this novel technique for 10 temperate tree species, including six diffuse, two ring-porous and two gymnosperm species, and compared the pneumatic ...

  2. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki-Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise-induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold-sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty-eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold-sensitive (Cold-sensitive, n  = 7) and non-cold-sensitive (Control, n  = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then performed 30-min of moderate intensity cycling (50% peak oxygen uptake) followed by a 60-min recovery. Core and mean skin temperatures and cold sensation over the whole-body and extremities (fingers and toes) were assessed throughout. Resting core temperature was lower in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group (36.4 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.2°C). Core temperature increased to similar levels at end-exercise (~37.2°C) and gradually returned to near preexercise rest levels at the end of recovery (>36.6°C). Whole-body cold sensation was greater in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group during resting at a room temperature of 23.5°C only without a difference in mean skin temperature between groups. In contrast, cold sensation of the extremities was greater in the Cold-sensitive group prior to, during and following exercise albeit this was not paralleled by differences in mean extremity skin temperature. We show that young trained females who are sensitive to cold exhibit augmented whole-body cold sensation during rest under temperate ambient conditions. However, this response is diminished during and following exercise. In contrast, cold sensation of extremities is augmented during resting that persists during and following exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  3. Temperature buffer test. Dismantling operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite in the usual way, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a ring of sand. The test was dismantled and sampled during a period from the end of October 2009 to the end of April 2010, and this report describes this operation. Different types of samples have been obtained during this operation. A large number of diameter 50 mm bentonite cores have been taken for analysis of water content and density. Large pieces, so-called big sectors, have been taken for hydro-mechanical and chemical characterizations. Finally, there has been an interest to obtain different types of interface samples in which bentonite were in contact with sand, iron or concrete. One goal has been to investigate the retrievability of the upper heater, given the possibility to remove the surrounding sand shield, and a retrieval test has therefore been performed. The sand in the shield was first removed with an industrial vacuum cleaner after loosening the material through mechanical means (with hammer drill and core machine). A front loader was subsequently used for applying a sufficient lifting force to release the heater from the bentonite underneath. The experiment has been documented in different aspects: measurements of the coordinate (height or radius) of different interfaces (between bentonite blocks and between bentonite and sand); verification of sensor positions and retrieval of sensors for subsequent

  4. Temperature buffer test. Dismantling operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias

    2010-12-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite in the usual way, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a ring of sand. The test was dismantled and sampled during a period from the end of October 2009 to the end of April 2010, and this report describes this operation. Different types of samples have been obtained during this operation. A large number of diameter 50 mm bentonite cores have been taken for analysis of water content and density. Large pieces, so-called big sectors, have been taken for hydro-mechanical and chemical characterizations. Finally, there has been an interest to obtain different types of interface samples in which bentonite were in contact with sand, iron or concrete. One goal has been to investigate the retrievability of the upper heater, given the possibility to remove the surrounding sand shield, and a retrieval test has therefore been performed. The sand in the shield was first removed with an industrial vacuum cleaner after loosening the material through mechanical means (with hammer drill and core machine). A front loader was subsequently used for applying a sufficient lifting force to release the heater from the bentonite underneath. The experiment has been documented in different aspects: measurements of the coordinate (height or radius) of different interfaces (between bentonite blocks and between bentonite and sand); verification of sensor positions and retrieval of sensors for subsequent

  5. Temperature buffer test. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report is the final report and a summary of all work performed within the TBT project. The design and the installation of the different components are summarized: the depositions hole, the heating system, the bentonite blocks with emphasis on the initial density and water content in these, the filling of slots with sand or pellets, the retaining construction with the plug, lid and nine anchor cables, the artificial saturation system, and finally the instrumentation. An overview of the operational conditions is presented: the power output from heaters, which was 1,500 W (and also 1,600 W) from each heater during the first {approx}1,700 days, and then changed to 1,000 and 2,000 W, for the upper and lower heater respectively, during the last {approx}600 days. From the start, the bentonite was hydrated with a groundwater from a nearby bore-hole, but this groundwater was replaced with de-ionized water from day {approx}1,500, due to the high flow resistance of the injections points in the filter, which implied that a high filter pressure couldn't be sustained. The sand shield around the upper heater was hydrated from day {approx}1,500 to day {approx}1

  6. Temperature buffer test. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias

    2012-04-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report is the final report and a summary of all work performed within the TBT project. The design and the installation of the different components are summarized: the depositions hole, the heating system, the bentonite blocks with emphasis on the initial density and water content in these, the filling of slots with sand or pellets, the retaining construction with the plug, lid and nine anchor cables, the artificial saturation system, and finally the instrumentation. An overview of the operational conditions is presented: the power output from heaters, which was 1,500 W (and also 1,600 W) from each heater during the first ∼1,700 days, and then changed to 1,000 and 2,000 W, for the upper and lower heater respectively, during the last ∼600 days. From the start, the bentonite was hydrated with a groundwater from a nearby bore-hole, but this groundwater was replaced with de-ionized water from day ∼1,500, due to the high flow resistance of the injections points in the filter, which implied that a high filter pressure couldn't be sustained. The sand shield around the upper heater was hydrated from day ∼1,500 to day ∼1,800. The sensors data concerning

  7. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2, prolonged summer drought and temperature increase on N2O and CH4 fluxes in a temperate heathland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Mette Sustmann; Ambus, Per; Albert, Kristian Rost

    2011-01-01

    In temperate regions, climate change is predicted to increase annual mean temperature and intensify the duration and frequency of summer droughts, which together with elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, may affect the exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) between...... terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. We report results from the CLIMAITE experiment, where the effects of these three climate change parameters were investigated solely and in all combinations in a temperate heathland. Field measurements of N2O and CH4 fluxes took place 1–2 years after the climate...... change manipulations were initiated. The soil was generally a net sink for atmospheric CH4. Elevated temperature (T) increased the CH4 uptake by on average 10 μg C m−2 h−1, corresponding to a rise in the uptake rate of about 20%. However, during winter elevated CO2 (CO2) reduced the CH4 uptake, which...

  8. Modelling seasonal effects of temperature and precipitation on honey bee winter mortality in a temperate climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switanek, Matthew; Crailsheim, Karl; Truhetz, Heimo; Brodschneider, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Insect pollinators are essential to global food production. For this reason, it is alarming that honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations across the world have recently seen increased rates of mortality. These changes in colony mortality are often ascribed to one or more factors including parasites, diseases, pesticides, nutrition, habitat dynamics, weather and/or climate. However, the effect of climate on colony mortality has never been demonstrated. Therefore, in this study, we focus on longer-term weather conditions and/or climate's influence on honey bee winter mortality rates across Austria. Statistical correlations between monthly climate variables and winter mortality rates were investigated. Our results indicate that warmer and drier weather conditions in the preceding year were accompanied by increased winter mortality. We subsequently built a statistical model to predict colony mortality using temperature and precipitation data as predictors. Our model reduces the mean absolute error between predicted and observed colony mortalities by 9% and is statistically significant at the 99.9% confidence level. This is the first study to show clear evidence of a link between climate variability and honey bee winter mortality. Copyright © 2016 British Geological Survey, NERC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Temper Tantrums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nine Steps to More Effective Parenting How Can Parents Discipline Without Spanking? Delayed Speech or Language Development Talking to Your Child's Preschool Teacher Your Child's Habits Separation Anxiety Breath-Holding Spells Train Your Temper View ...

  10. The effects of boro-tempering heat treatment on microstructural properties of ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Yalcin, Yilmaz

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effects of boro-tempering heat treatment on microstructural properties of ductile iron were investigated. Test samples with dimensions of 10 x 10 x 55 mm were boronized at 900 o C for 1, 3 and 5 h and then tempered at four different temperatures (250, 300, 350 and 450 o C) for 1 h. Both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to reveal the microstructural details of coating and matrix of boro-tempered ductile iron. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the constituents of the coating layer. The boride layer formed on the surface of boro-tempered ductile cast iron is tooth shape form and consisted of FeB and Fe 2 B phases. The thickness of boride layer increases as the boronizing time increases and tempering temperature decreases. Tempering temperature is more effective than boronizing time on the matrix structure. Boro-tempering heat treatment reduces the formation of lower and upper ausferritic matrix temperature according to classical austempering. This causes formation of upper ausferritic matrix in the sample when tempered at 300 o C. This is in contrast to general case which is the formation of lower ausferritic matrix via austempering at this temperature.

  11. Effects of winter temperature and summer drought on net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a temperate peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Campbell, Claire; Dinsmore, Kerry; Drewer, Julia; Coyle, Mhairi; Anderson, Margaret; Skiba, Ute; Nemitz, Eiko; Billett, Michael; Sutton, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the most important global sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2); their ability to sequester C is a natural feedback mechanism controlled by climatic variables such as precipitation, temperature, length of growing season and period of snow cover. In the UK it has been predicted that peatlands could become a net source of carbon in response to climate change with climate models predicting a rise in global temperature of ca. 3oC between 1961-1990 and 2100. Land-atmosphere exchange of CO2in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variations, which have significant short- and long-term effects on carbon sink strength. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance (EC) at Auchencorth Moss (55° 47'32 N, 3° 14'35 W, 267 m a.s.l.), a temperate peatland in central Scotland, since 2002. Auchencorth Moss is a low-lying, ombrotrophic peatland situated ca. 20 km south-west of Edinburgh. Peat depth ranges from 5 m and the site has a mean annual precipitation of 1155 mm. The vegetation present within the flux measurement footprint comprises mixed grass species, heather and substantial areas of moss species (Sphagnum spp. and Polytrichum spp.). The EC system consists of a LiCOR 7000 closed-path infrared gas analyser for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and water vapour and of a Gill Windmaster Pro ultrasonic anemometer. Over the 10 year period, the site was a consistent yet variable sink of CO2 ranging from -34.1 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -69.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing seasons and mean winter air temperature explained 93% of the variability in summertime sink strength, indicating a phenological memory-effect. Plant development and productivity were stunted by colder winters causing a net reduction in the annual carbon sink strength of this peatland where autotrophic processes are thought to be

  12. Temperature reconstruction from dripwater hydrochemistry, speleothem fabric and speleothem δ13C: towards an integrated approach in temperate climate caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsato, Andrea; Frisia, Silvia; Johnston, Vanessa; Spötl, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Accurate reconstruction of past climate records from speleothem minerals requires a thorough understanding of both environmental and hydrologic conditions underpinning their formation. These conditions likely influenced how speleothems incorporate chemical signals that are used as climate proxies. Thus, a thorough investigation of environmental and hydrologic parameters is a pre-requisite to gain robust palaeoclimate reconstructions from stalagmites. Here, we present a systematic study of soil, dripwater and speleothems in temperate climate caves at different altitudes, which allowed the assessment of how mean annual air temperature in the infiltration area (MATinf) influences vegetation cover, soil pCO2 and, eventually, pCO2 of karst water and cave air. Our study demonstrates that for caves developed in pure carbonate rocks, the soil and aquifer pCO2 are directly related to the MATinf (Borsato et al., 2015). It is well known that soil and aquifer pCO2 control carbonate dissolution and the carbonate-carbonic acid system. By establishing a relationship between dripwater pCO2 and MATinf, we show that dripwater Ca content and calcite saturation state SIcc) are correlated with MATinf when unaffected by Prior Calcite Precipitation. In particular, dripwater saturation (SIcc = 0) is reached at a MATinf of 4.4°C in our study area. This MATinf delineates a ''speleothem limit", above which speleothems composed of sparitic calcite should not form (Borsato et al., 2016). In fact, sparitic calcite speleothems do not form, today, in caves with a MATinf well as calcite δ13C in speleothems that were not significantly influenced by kinetic fractionation. A linear correlation between calcite δ13C and MATinf was obtained for modern sparitic speleothems that formed at isotopic equilibrium (Johnston et al., 2013). The combination of these two approaches (present-day dripwater SIcc and calcite δ13C in sparitic speleothems) can be used to reconstruct the past MATinf for high

  13. The impact of temperature change on the activity and community composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria in arctic versus temperate marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2009-01-01

    Arctic regions may be particularly sensitive to climate warming and, consequently, rates of carbon mineralization in warming marine sediment may also be affected. Using long-term (24 months) incubation experiments at 0°C, 10°C and 20°C, the temperature response of metabolic activity and community...... composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria were studied in the permanently cold sediment of north-western Svalbard (Arctic Ocean) and compared with a temperate habitat with seasonally varying temperature (German Bight, North Sea). Short-term 35S-sulfate tracer incubations in a temperature-gradient block...... (between -3.5°C and +40°C) were used to assess variations in sulfate reduction rates during the course of the experiment. Warming of arctic sediment resulted in a gradual increase of the temperature optima (Topt) for sulfate reduction suggesting a positive selection of psychrotolerant/mesophilic sulfate...

  14. See laser testing at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anatolievich Novikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main problem for laser SEE testing at different temperatures is to determine correlation between laser pulse energy and LET. In the first approximation, LET values with the same laser pulse energy and different temperatures are directly proportional to the absorption coefficient of laser light in a semiconductor. Use of tabulated values could lead to errors and absorption coefficient should be determined for each sensitive volume of device under test (DUT. Temperature dependence of absorption coefficient could be determined using ionization response of DUT in power supply circuit under local laser irradiation. Using this approach a satisfactory correlation of ion and laser SEE test result was observed.

  15. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  16. 75 FR 55811 - Testing Method of Pressed and Toughened (Specially Tempered) Glassware

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... in contact with neighboring pieces), or graveled (presence of small cubes of approximately equal dimensions on all six sides) fragment yielded from the cut sample that is more than just a fugitive diced... Laboratory occasionally tests samples that break into several large pieces when subjected to the cutting test...

  17. Voltage, Temperature, Frequency Margin Test Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the tests is to establish the camera functionality when it is exposed to an extreme environment for prolonged periods, thus simulating the end of life performance. This environment covers temperature, input clock frequency and supply voltage variation......The purpose of the tests is to establish the camera functionality when it is exposed to an extreme environment for prolonged periods, thus simulating the end of life performance. This environment covers temperature, input clock frequency and supply voltage variation...

  18. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320–400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280–320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  19. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiew-Yen Wong

    Full Text Available Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR, have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237, temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248 and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001 environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm, PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm radiation (PAR + UV-A and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280-320 nm radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek and light harvesting efficiency (α were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k and repair (r rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  20. Connection Temperatures during the Mokrsko Fire Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chlouba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mokrsko fire test focused on the overall behaviour of the structure, which cannot be observed on the separate elements, and also on the temperature of connections with improved fire resistance. During the test, measurements were made of the temperature of the gas and of the elements, the overall and relative deformations, gas pressure, humidity, the radiation of the compartment to structural element and the external steel column, transport of the moisture through the walls, and also the climatic conditions. The results of the test show the differences between the behaviour of the element and the behaviour of the structure exposed to high temperatures during a fire. The collapse of the composite slab was reached. The results of the numerical simulations using the SAFIR program compared well with the measured temperature values in the structure and also in the connections. 

  1. Tempered fractional calculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzikar, Farzad, E-mail: sabzika2@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Meerschaert, Mark M., E-mail: mcubed@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Chen, Jinghua, E-mail: cjhdzdz@163.com [School of Sciences, Jimei University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361021 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  2. Tempered fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  3. Tempered fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series

  4. LOFT fuel rod surface temperature measurement testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, A.M.; Tolman, E.L.; Solbrig, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    Testing of the LOFT fuel rod cladding surface thermocouples has been performed to evaluate how accurately the LOFT thermocouples measure the cladding surface temperature during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) sequence and what effect, if any, the thermocouple would have on core performance. Extensive testing has been done to characterize the thermocouple design. Thermal cycling and corrosion testing of the thermocouple weld design have provided an expected lifetime of 6000 hours when exposed to reactor coolant conditions of 620 K and 15.9 MPa and to sixteen thermal cycles with an initial temperature of 480 K and peak temperatures ranging from 870 to 1200K. Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) tests have indicated a DNB penalty (5 to 28% lower) during steady state operation and negligible effects during LOCA blowdown caused by the LOFT fuel rod surface thermocouple arrangement. Experience with the thermocouple design in Power Burst Facility (PBF) and LOFT nonnuclear blowdown testing has been quite satisfactory. Tests discussed here were conducted using both stainless steel and zircaloy-clad electrically heated rod in the LOFT Test Support Facility (LTSF) blowdown simulation loop

  5. Short-term effects of increased temperature and lowered pH on a temperate grazer-seaweed interaction (Littorina obtusata/Ascophyllum nodosum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Patricia G.; Grilo, Tiago F.; Dionísio, Gisela; Aurélio, Maria; Lopes, Ana R.; Pereira, Ricardo; Pacheco, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2017-10-01

    There has been a significant increase in the literature regarding the effects of warming and acidification on the marine ecosystem. To our knowledge, there is very little information on the potential effects of both combined stressors on marine grazer-seaweed interactions. Here, we evaluated, for the first time several phenotypic responses (e.g periwinkle survival, condition index, consumption rates, seaweed photosynthetic activity and oxidative stress) of the temperate periwinkle Littorina obtusata (grazer) and the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (prey) to such climate change-related variables, for 15 days. Increased temperature (22 °C, pH 8.0) elicited a significant lethal effect on the periwinkle within a short-term period (mortality rate > 90%). Acidification condition (18 °C, pH 7.6) was the one that showed lower mortality rates (≈20%), reflected by lower impact on periwinkle fitness and consumption rates. Under a scenario of increased temperature and lowered pH the antioxidant defences of L. obtusata seemed to be supressed increasing the risk of peroxidative damage. The seaweed evidenced signs of cellular damage under such conditions. These results suggest that: i) lower pH per se seems to benefit the interaction between grazer and seaweed while, ii) a combined scenario of increased temperature and lowered pH may be negative for the interaction, due to the unbalance between periwinkle mortality rates and consumption rates. But most importantly, since grazing often plays an important role on structuring natural communities, such predator-prey disturbances can elicit cascading effects on the remaining community structure and functioning of the temperate rocky-shore ecosystems.

  6. High temperature high vacuum creep testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Creep is the term used to describe time-dependent plastic flow of metals under conditions of constant load or stress at constant high temperature. Creep has an important considerations for materials operating under stresses at high temperatures for long time such as cladding materials, pressure vessels, steam turbines, boilers,...etc. These two creep machines measures the creep of materials and alloys at high temperature under high vacuum at constant stress. By the two chart recorders attached to the system one could register time and temperature versus strain during the test . This report consists of three chapters, chapter I is the introduction, chapter II is the technical description of the creep machines while chapter III discuss some experimental data on the creep behaviour. Of helium implanted stainless steel. 13 fig., 3 tab

  7. Effects of three pesticides on the avoidance behavior of earthworms in laboratory tests performed under temperate and tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marcos; Römbke, Jörg; de Brito, Marcus Torres; Scheffczyk, Adam

    2008-05-01

    Little research has been performed on the impact of pesticides on earthworms under tropical conditions. Taking into consideration the often-limited resources in tropical countries, simple screening tests are needed. Therefore, it was investigated whether three pesticides relevant for the Brazilian Amazon (benomyl, carbendazim, lambda-cyhalothrin) affect the avoidance behavior of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The tests were performed for two days according to ISO guideline 17512 but were adapted to tropical conditions (i.e. test substrate, test organism and temperature). The results indicate that this test gives reproducible and reliable results. Toxicity values (NOEC, EC50) are lower than those determined in 14 day-acute mortality tests and are approximately in the same range such as those found in 56 day-chronic reproduction tests with the same earthworm species, which were performed in parallel. Therefore, the use of the earthworm avoidance tests is recommended as a screening tool for the risk assessment of pesticides.

  8. Projecting temperature-related years of life lost under different climate change scenarios in one temperate megacity, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixue; Li, Guoxing; Zeng, Qiang; Liang, Fengchao; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2018-02-01

    Temperature has been associated with population health, but few studies have projected the future temperature-related years of life lost attributable to climate change. To project future temperature-related disease burden in Tianjin, we selected years of life lost (YLL) as the dependent variable to explore YLL attributable to climate change. A generalized linear model (GLM) and distributed lag non-linear model were combined to assess the non-linear and delayed effects of temperature on the YLL of non-accidental mortality. Then, we calculated the YLL changes attributable to future climate scenarios in 2055 and 2090. The relationships of daily mean temperature with the YLL of non-accident mortality were basically U-shaped. Both the daily mean temperature increase on high-temperature days and its drop on low-temperature days caused an increase of YLL and non-accidental deaths. The temperature-related YLL will worsen if future climate change exceeds 2 °C. In addition, the adverse effects of extreme temperature on YLL occurred more quickly than that of the overall temperature. The impact of low temperature was greater than that of high temperature. Men were vulnerable to high temperature compared with women. This analysis highlights that the government should formulate environmental policies to reach the Paris Agreement goal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sea Surface Temperatures Mediated by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation Affect Birds Breeding in Temperate Coastal Rain Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Gaston

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the timing of breeding and juvenile/adult ratios among songbirds in temperate rain forests over four years on the Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands archipelago, British Columbia. In May 1998, air temperatures in Haida Gwaii were above average, whereas in 1999 they were the lowest in 20 yr: temperatures in the other two years were closer to normal, although 2001 was almost as cold as 1999. Temperatures closely followed the patterns of sea surface temperatures created by the 1997-1998 El Niño, i.e., warm, event and the subsequent strong La Niña, i.e., cool, event. Timing of breeding, as measured by the first capture of juveniles or by direct observations of hatching, varied by approximately 19 d between the earliest (1998 and latest (1999 years. In 1998, the proportion of juveniles among birds trapped increased steeply as soon as young birds began to appear. In other years, the rate of increase was slower. In 1999, the peak proportions of hatching-year individuals among the foliage-gleaning insectivores, i.e., the Orange-crowned Warbler (Vermivora celata, Townsend's Warbler (Dendroica townsendi, and the Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa, were lower than in other years, with almost no young Orange-crowned Warblers captured at all. The pattern of variation in the timing of breeding and in the proportion of hatching-year individuals trapped fitted the temperature data well, although rainfall may also have contributed. We concluded that changes mediated by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO in sea surface temperatures off northern British Columbia, through their effects on air temperatures, had a strong effect on the breeding of forest birds, to the point of causing nearly complete reproductive failure for one species in 1999. An intensification of the ENSO cycle could lead to more erratic reproduction for some species.

  10. Effects of temperature and melatonin on day-night expression patterns of arginine vasotocin and isotocin mRNA in the diencephalon of a temperate wrasse Halichoeres tenuispinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchekioua, Selma; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Takeuchi, Yuki; Lee, Young-Don; Takemura, Akihiro

    2018-06-01

    Most wrasses are protogynous species that swim to feed, reproduce during the daytime, and bury themselves under the sandy bottom at night. In temperate and subtropical wrasses, low temperature influences emergence from the sandy bottom in the morning, and induces a hibernation-like state in winter. We cloned and characterized the prohormone complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of arginine vasotocin (AVT) and isotocin (IT) in a temperate wrasse (Halichoeres tenuispinis) and examined the effects of day/night and temperature on their expression in the diencephalon, because these neurohypophysial peptides are related to the sex behavior of wrasses. The full-length cDNAs of pro-AVT and pro-IT were 938 base pairs (154 amino acids) and 759 base pairs (156 amino acids) in length, respectively. Both pro-peptides contained a signal sequence followed by the respective hormones and neurophysin connected by a Gly-Lys-Arg bridge. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that pro-AVT mRNA expression was specifically observed in the diencephalon, whereas pro-IT mRNA expression was seen in the whole brain. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA abundance of pro-AVT and pro-IT was higher at midday (zeitgeber time 6; ZT6) than at midnight (ZT18) under 12 h light and 12 h darkness (LD 12:12) conditions, but not under constant light. Intraperitoneal injection of melatonin decreased the mRNA abundance of pro-AVT, but not of pro-IT. When fish were reared under LD 12:12 conditions at 25, 20, and 15 °C, day high and night low mRNA expressions of pro-AVT and pro-IT were maintained. A field survey revealed seasonal variation in the number of swimming fish at observatory sites; many fish emerged from the sandy bottom in summer, but not in winter, suggesting a hibernation-like state under the sandy bottom under low temperature conditions. We conclude that the day-night fluctuation of pro-AVT and pro-IT mRNA abundance in the brain is not affected by temperature and

  11. The differential response of photosynthesis to high temperature for a boreal and temperate Populus species relates to differences in Rubisco activation and Rubisco activase properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozain, Moh'd I; Salvucci, Michael E; Fokar, Mohamed; Holaday, A Scott

    2010-01-01

    Significant inhibition of photosynthesis occurs at temperatures only a few degrees (temperature is a major factor limiting the geographic ranges of most plants, the aim of this study was to use two Populus species adapted to contrasting thermal environments for determining the factors that constrain photosynthetic assimilation (A) under moderate heat stress in tree species. Consistent with its native range in temperate regions, Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. exhibited a significantly higher temperature optimum for A than did Populus balsamifera L., a boreal species. The higher A exhibited by P. deltoides at 33-40 degrees C compared to that for P. balsamifera was associated with a higher activation state of Rubisco and correlated with a higher ATPase activity of Rubisco activase. The temperature response of minimal chlorophyll a fluorescence for darkened leaves was similar for both species and was not consistent with a thylakoid lipid phase change contributing to the decline in A in the range of 30-40 degrees C. Taken together, these data support the idea that the differences in the temperature response of A for the two Populus species could be attributed to the differences in the response of Rubisco activation and ultimately to the thermal properties of Rubisco activase. That the primary sequence of Rubisco activase differed between the species, especially in regions associated with ATPase activity and Rubisco recognition, indicates that the genotypic differences in Rubisco activase might underlie the differences in the heat sensitivity of Rubisco activase and photosynthesis at moderately high temperatures.

  12. Effects of three pesticides on the avoidance behavior of earthworms in laboratory tests performed under temperate and tropical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcos [Embrapa Amazonia Ocidental, Rod. AM-10, Km 28, 69.011-970 Manaus (Brazil); Roembke, Joerg [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, D-65439 Floersheim (Germany)], E-mail: j-roembke@ect.de; Torres de Brito, Marcus [CNPq - PIBIC/Embrapa, Rod. AM-10, Km 28, 69.011-970 Manaus (Brazil); Scheffczyk, Adam [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, D-65439 Floersheim (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Little research has been performed on the impact of pesticides on earthworms under tropical conditions. Taking into consideration the often-limited resources in tropical countries, simple screening tests are needed. Therefore, it was investigated whether three pesticides relevant for the Brazilian Amazon (benomyl, carbendazim, lambda-cyhalothrin) affect the avoidance behavior of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The tests were performed for two days according to ISO guideline 17512 but were adapted to tropical conditions (i.e. test substrate, test organism and temperature). The results indicate that this test gives reproducible and reliable results. Toxicity values (NOEC, EC50) are lower than those determined in 14 day-acute mortality tests and are approximately in the same range such as those found in 56 day-chronic reproduction tests with the same earthworm species, which were performed in parallel. Therefore, the use of the earthworm avoidance tests is recommended as a screening tool for the risk assessment of pesticides. - The earthworm avoidance test is a practical and sensitive screening method for assessing the effects of pesticides in tropical soils.

  13. Effects of three pesticides on the avoidance behavior of earthworms in laboratory tests performed under temperate and tropical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcos; Roembke, Joerg; Torres de Brito, Marcus; Scheffczyk, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Little research has been performed on the impact of pesticides on earthworms under tropical conditions. Taking into consideration the often-limited resources in tropical countries, simple screening tests are needed. Therefore, it was investigated whether three pesticides relevant for the Brazilian Amazon (benomyl, carbendazim, lambda-cyhalothrin) affect the avoidance behavior of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The tests were performed for two days according to ISO guideline 17512 but were adapted to tropical conditions (i.e. test substrate, test organism and temperature). The results indicate that this test gives reproducible and reliable results. Toxicity values (NOEC, EC50) are lower than those determined in 14 day-acute mortality tests and are approximately in the same range such as those found in 56 day-chronic reproduction tests with the same earthworm species, which were performed in parallel. Therefore, the use of the earthworm avoidance tests is recommended as a screening tool for the risk assessment of pesticides. - The earthworm avoidance test is a practical and sensitive screening method for assessing the effects of pesticides in tropical soils

  14. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  15. Optimization Of Nakazima Test At Elevated Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetta, A.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays hot forming of High Strength Steel is gaining the strict requirements of automotive producer: in fact deformation performed simultaneously with quenching assures a fully martensitic microstructure at room temperature and thus high strength properties that allow the thickness reduction of the body-in-white components. Basic aspects of hot stamping are still under investigation and supplementary achievements are expected for a successful application of sheet metal forming technologies at elevated temperatures. Among data needed to settle a numerical model of the process, information about material formability may help in better designing and optimizing hot stamping operations. In the first part of the work, a new experimental apparatus based on Nakazima concept is presented; process parameters are optimized in order to accurately replicate the thermo-mechanical conditions typical of the industrial process, paying particular attention to the thermal and microstructural evolution. On the other hand, as commercial FE codes require the implementation of Forming Limit Diagrams at constant temperature, numerical investigations have been performed in order to determine the proper testing conditions to obtain FLD at nearly constant temperature

  16. Significance of rate of work hardening in tempered martensite embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietikainen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The main explanations for tempered martensite embrittlement are based on the effects of impurities and cementite precipitation on the prior austenite grain boundaries. There are some studies where the rate of work hardening is proposed as a potential reason for the brittleness. One steel was studied by means of a specially developed precision torsional testing device. The test steel had a high Si and Ni content so ε carbide and Fe 3 C appear in quite different tempering temperature ranges. The M S temperature is low enough so that self tempering does not occur. With the testing device it was possible to obtain the true stress - true strain curves to very high deformations. The minimum toughness was always associated with the minimum of rate of work hardening. The change of deformed steel volume before the loss of mechanical stability is proposed as at least one reason for tempered martensite embrittlement. The reasons for the minimum of the rate of work hardening are considered. (orig.)

  17. Production of microalgal biomass, triacyl glycerols and polyunsaturated fatty acids under simulated north temperate light and temperature conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Laurentius

    2014-01-01

    been explored. This study analyses growth, biomass production, TAG content and PUFA quality of Navicula pelliculosa, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus dimorphus when grown under different temperatures (11, 15, 19°C) and light intensities (280 and 450 μmol photons m-2 s-1), corresponding to Danish...... PUFA profile at all the examined temperatures. C. vulgaris increases its growth rates and TAG percentage (up to ~ 18.3 % TAG on DW) but contain less unsaturated PUFA with increasing temperatures. The same behaviour is registered in S. dimorpus where the TAG percentage reaches an average of ~ 7.3 % TAG...... on DW. Both N. pelliculosa and C. vulgaris can be considered species of interest for their performances under low temperatures and could find application in different fields from nutraceuticals to biodiesel....

  18. A Modified Thermal Time Model Quantifying Germination Response to Temperature for C3 and C4 Species in Temperate Grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiang Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-based germination models are widely used to predict germination rate and germination timing of plants. However, comparison of model parameters between large numbers of species is rare. In this study, seeds of 27 species including 12 C4 and 15 C3 species were germinated at a range of constant temperatures from 5 °C to 40 °C. We used a modified thermal time model to calculate germination parameters at suboptimal temperatures. Generally, the optimal germination temperature was higher for C4 species than for C3 species. The thermal time constant for the 50% germination percentile was significantly higher for C3 than C4 species. The thermal time constant of perennials was significantly higher than that of annuals. However, differences in base temperatures were not significant between C3 and C4, or annuals and perennial species. The relationship between germination rate and seed mass depended on plant functional type and temperature, while the base temperature and thermal time constant of C3 and C4 species exhibited no significant relationship with seed mass. The results illustrate differences in germination characteristics between C3 and C4 species. Seed mass does not affect germination parameters, plant life cycle matters, however.

  19. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  20. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive...... media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells...... and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures...

  1. Test of high temperature fuel element, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Norio; Shiina, Yasuaki; Nekoya, Shin-ichi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Emori, Koichi

    1980-11-01

    Heat transfer experiment to measure the characteristics of a VHTR fuel in the same condition of the reactor core was carried out using HTGL (High Temperature Helium Gas Loop) and its test section. In this report, the details of the test section, related problems of construction and some typical results are described. The newly developed heater with graphite heat transfer surface was used as a simulated fuel element to determine the heat transfer characteristics. Following conclusions were obtained; (1) Reynolds number between turbulent and transitional region is about 2600. (2) Reynolds number between transitional and laminar region is about 4800. (3) The laminarization phenomena have not been observed and are hardly occurred in annular tubes comparing with round tube. (4) Measured Nusselt numbers agree to the established correlations in turbulent and laminar regions. (author)

  2. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold‐sensitive young trained females

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki‐Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P.; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise‐induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold‐sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty‐eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold‐sensitive (Cold‐sensitive, n = 7) and non‐cold‐sensitive (Control, n = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then...

  3. Effect of twice quenching and tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructures of SCRAM steel for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Xuesong; Yang Feng; Zou Xingrong [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Suo Jinping, E-mail: jpsuo@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The effect of twice quenching and tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructures of SCRAM steel was investigated. The results from tensile tests showed that whether twice quenching and tempering processes(1253 K/0.5 h/W.C(water cool) + 1033 K/2 h/A.C(air cool) + 1233 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1033 K/2 h/A.C named after 2Q and 2TI, and 1253 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1033 K/2 h/A.C + 1233 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1013 K/2 h/A.C named after 2Q and 2TII)increased strength of steel or not depended largely on the second tempering temperature compared to quenching and tempering process(1253 K/0.5 h/W.C + 1033 K/2 h/A.C named after 1Q and 1T). Charpy V-notch impact tests indicated that twice quenching and tempering processes reduced the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Microstructure inspection revealed that the prior austenitic grain size and martensite lath width were refined after twice quenching and tempering treatments. Precipitate growth was inhibited by a slight decrease of the second tempering temperature from 1033 to 1013 K. The finer average size of precipitates is considered to be the main possible reason for the higher strength and lower DBTT of 2Q and 2TII compared with 2Q and 2TI.

  4. Maximizing growth rate at low temperatures: RNA:DNA allocation strategies and life history traits of Arctic and temperate Daphnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geest, G.J.; Sachse, R.; Brehm, Michaela; Van Donk, E.; Hessen, D.O.

    2010-01-01

    Many short-lived or univoltine organisms at high latitudes and altitudes face the challenge to complete their life-cycle within a brief growing season. This means that they need to maintain a high growth rate at low temperatures, and one way of doing this is to allocate limiting resources like

  5. Soil respiration fluxes in a temperate mixed forest: seasonality and temperature sensitivities differ among microbial and root-rhizosphere respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehr, Nadine K; Buchmann, Nina

    2010-02-01

    Although soil respiration, a major CO(2) flux in terrestrial ecosystems, is known to be highly variable with time, the response of its component fluxes to temperature and phenology is less clear. Therefore, we partitioned soil respiration (SR) into microbial (MR) and root-rhizosphere respiration (RR) using small root exclusion treatments in a mixed mountain forest in Switzerland. In addition, fine root respiration (FRR) was determined with measurements of excised roots. RR and FRR were strongly related to each other (R(2) = 0.92, n = 7), with RR contributing about 46% and FRR about 32% to total SR. RR rates increased more strongly with temperature (Q(10) = 3.2) than MR rates (Q(10) = 2.3). Since the contribution of RR to SR was found to be higher during growing (50%) than during dormant periods (40%), we separated the 2-year data set into phenophases. During the growing period of 2007, the temperature sensitivity of RR (Q(10) = 2.5, R(2) = 0.62) was similar to that of MR (Q(10) = 2.2, R(2) = 0.57). However, during the dormant period of 2006/2007, RR was not related to soil temperature (R(2) = 0.44, n.s.), in contrast to MR (Q(10) = 7.2; R(2) = 0.92). To better understand the influence of plant activity on root respiration, we related RR and FRR rates to photosynthetic active radiation (both R(2) = 0.67, n = 7, P = 0.025), suggesting increased root respiration rates during times with high photosynthesis. During foliage green-up in spring 2008, i.e., from bud break to full leaf expansion, RR increased by a factor of 5, while soil temperature increased only by about 5 degrees C, leading to an extraordinary high Q(10) of 10.6; meanwhile, the contribution of RR to SR increased from 29 to 47%. This clearly shows that root respiration and its apparent temperature sensitivity highly depend on plant phenology and thus on canopy assimilation and carbon allocation belowground.

  6. Temperature Buffer Test. Final THM modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Malmberg, Daniel; Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan; Ledesma, Alberto; Jacinto, Abel

    2012-01-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the final THM modelling which was resumed subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main part of this work has been numerical modelling of the field test. Three different modelling teams have presented several model cases for different geometries and different degree of process complexity. Two different numerical codes, Code B right and Abaqus, have been used. The modelling performed by UPC-Cimne using Code B right, has been divided in three subtasks: i) analysis of the response observed in the lower part of the test, by inclusion of a number of considerations: (a) the use of the Barcelona Expansive Model for MX-80 bentonite; (b) updated parameters in the vapour diffusive flow term; (c) the use of a non-conventional water retention curve for MX-80 at high temperature; ii) assessment of a possible relation between the cracks observed in the bentonite blocks in the upper part of TBT, and the cycles of suction and stresses registered in that zone at the start of the experiment; and iii) analysis of the performance, observations and interpretation of the entire test. It was however not possible to carry out a full THM analysis until the end of the test due to

  7. Temperature Buffer Test. Final THM modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Malmberg, Daniel; Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Ledesma, Alberto; Jacinto, Abel [UPC, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the final THM modelling which was resumed subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main part of this work has been numerical modelling of the field test. Three different modelling teams have presented several model cases for different geometries and different degree of process complexity. Two different numerical codes, Code{sub B}right and Abaqus, have been used. The modelling performed by UPC-Cimne using Code{sub B}right, has been divided in three subtasks: i) analysis of the response observed in the lower part of the test, by inclusion of a number of considerations: (a) the use of the Barcelona Expansive Model for MX-80 bentonite; (b) updated parameters in the vapour diffusive flow term; (c) the use of a non-conventional water retention curve for MX-80 at high temperature; ii) assessment of a possible relation between the cracks observed in the bentonite blocks in the upper part of TBT, and the cycles of suction and stresses registered in that zone at the start of the experiment; and iii) analysis of the performance, observations and interpretation of the entire test. It was however not possible to carry out a full THM analysis until the end of the test due to

  8. Drift algae, an invasive snail and elevated temperature reduce ecological performance of a warm-temperate seagrass, through additive effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffle, H.; Wernberg, T.; Thomsen, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Seagrasses are under pressure from multiple concurrent threats, including rising temperatures, invasive species and nutrient-driven algal accumulations. We quantified the abundance of drift algae and the invasive snail Batillaria australis in 3 Halophila ovalis seagrass beds in the Swan River....... The survey showed that drift algae varied considerably between sites and sampling times, and sites experienced average loads of 0.4 to 0.8 kg fresh wt m(-2) and extreme loads up to 2.5 kg fresh wt m(-2). In contrast, invasive snails were constantly abundant at all sites at all collection times (mean...... reduced the length of the 2nd inter node. We found relatively few significant higher-order interactions, suggesting a dominance of additive effects of stress. We conclude that temperature, drift algae and invasive snails are already affecting the ecological performance of H. ovalis in Swan River...

  9. Hardness of H13 Tool Steel After Non-isothermal Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E.; Kohli, A.; Poirier, D. R.

    2018-04-01

    A direct method to calculate the tempering response of a tool steel (H13) that exhibits secondary hardening is presented. Based on the traditional method of presenting tempering response in terms of isothermal tempering, we show that the tempering response for a steel undergoing a non-isothermal tempering schedule can be predicted. Experiments comprised (1) isothermal tempering, (2) non-isothermal tempering pertaining to a relatively slow heating to process-temperature and (3) fast-heating cycles that are relevant to tempering by induction heating. After establishing the tempering response of the steel under simple isothermal conditions, the tempering response can be applied to non-isothermal tempering by using a numerical method to calculate the tempering parameter. Calculated results are verified by the experiments.

  10. Influence of Mo addition on the tempered properties of 13Cr martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Byong Ho; Ahn, Yong Sik

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of Mo addition on the mechanical properties of 13Cr-0.2C martensitic stainless steel, tensile test and Charpy V-notch test were performed after tempering at the temperature range of 200∼700 .deg. C following austenitizing at 1100 .deg. C. The yield strength and hardness of the steel were increased with the increase of Mo content at all tempering conditions, because Mo causes retardation of precipitation and coarsening of carbides and solid solution strengthening of matrix. Except 500 .deg. C of tempering temperature, the Charpy impact energy was significantly increased with Mo content and showed the highest value at 1.5 wt% addition. The increase of impact energy of the steel containing Mo is thought to be caused by δ-ferrite formed in the tempered martensitic matrix. At 500 .deg. C tempering, Charpy impact energy was decreased drastically due to temper embrittlement and it was not possible to prevent it even though Mo was added up to 1.5 wt%

  11. Impacts of elevated temperature on ant species, communities and ecological roles at two temperate forests in Eastern North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Robert [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Over the course of five years we have established a long-term array of warming chambers at Duke and Harvard Forest that simulate future conditions with regard to temperature. In these chambers, we have studied, ants, other animal taxa, fungi, bacteria and plants and their responses to the treatments. We have coupled these studies with lab experiments, large-scale observations, and models to contextualize our results. Finally, we have developed integrative models of the future distribution of species and their consequences as a result of warming in eastern North America and more generally.

  12. Role of tempering temperature on the hydrogen diffusion in a 34CrMo4 martensitic steel and the related embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moli-Sanchez, L.

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of the Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of high strength steels remains a major issue for the development of hydrogen (H) applications for the energy. A better understanding of the phenomena involved in the HE (role of the environment, the H-microstructure and H-plasticity interactions) is crucial in the 'H economy'. The aim of this study is to characterize the H behaviour in tempered martensitic steels (34CrMo 4 ). A particular interest was put on the determination of the microstructural defects (dislocations, interfaces, precipitates...) that control the H absorption, diffusion, desorption and trapping and the related HE sensibility. The combined use of electrochemical permeation technique and H isotopic tracers (deuterium and tritium) (TDS, SIMS and β-counting) allowed the characterization of the H behaviour in the microstructures. The kinetics of H absorption/desorption, related with trapping phenomena on microstructural defects, give access to the density of trapping sites and the occupancy ratio associated to each defects population. The comparison of mechanical tests (pre-hydrogenated and in situ hydrogenated tests) evidenced the major role of diffusible H in the HE mechanisms thanks to the H-plasticity interactions that promote the H segregation at some microstructural defects. A detailed analysis of the results allows to suggest some recommendations concerning the type of microstructure (dislocations densities, precipitates coherency...) to be favoured during the elaboration processes or heat treatments of martensitic steels in order to increase their HE resistance. (author) [fr

  13. Distributed temperature sensor testing in liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardi, Craig, E-mail: cgerardi@anl.gov; Bremer, Nathan; Lisowski, Darius; Lomperski, Stephen

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Distributed temperature sensors measured high-resolution liquid-sodium temperatures. • DTSs worked well up to 400 °C. • A single DTS simultaneously detected sodium level and temperature. - Abstract: Rayleigh-backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensors were immersed in sodium to obtain high-resolution liquid-sodium temperature measurements. Distributed temperature sensors (DTSs) functioned well up to 400 °C in a liquid sodium environment. The DTSs measured sodium column temperature and the temperature of a complex geometrical pattern that leveraged the flexibility of fiber optics. A single Ø 360 μm OD sensor registered dozens of temperatures along a length of over one meter at 100 Hz. We also demonstrated the capability to use a single DTS to simultaneously detect thermal interfaces (e.g. sodium level) and measure temperature.

  14. Distributed temperature sensor testing in liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardi, Craig; Bremer, Nathan; Lisowski, Darius; Lomperski, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Rayleigh-backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensors were immersed in sodium to obtain high-resolution liquid-sodium temperature measurements. Distributed temperature sensors (DTSs) functioned well up to 400°C in a liquid sodium environment. The DTSs measured sodium column temperature and the temperature of a complex geometrical pattern that leveraged the flexibility of fiber optics. A single Ø 360 lm OD sensor registered dozens of temperatures along a length of over one meter at 100 Hz. We also demonstrated the capability to use a single DTS to simultaneously detect thermal interfaces (e.g. sodium level) and measure temperature.

  15. Quantifying the effects of tempering on individual phase properties of DP980 steel with nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, G.; Zhang, F.; Ruimi, A.; Field, D. P.; Sun, X.

    2016-06-01

    We conduct a series of thermal and mechanical testing on a commercial dual phase (DP) 980 steel in order to quantify the effects of tempering on its individual phase properties. Tempering treatment is conducted at 250 °C and 400 °C for 60 minutes each. Ferrite and martensite grains are distinguished using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), and the martensite volume fractions (MVF) are determined based on the image quality (IQ) map. Multi-scale indentation tests combined with a newly developed inverse method are used to obtain the individual phase flow properties in each tempered DP980 sample. The results show that, i) tempering significantly reduces martensite yield strength, while it only slightly reduces the ferrite yield strength; ii) tempering temperature has a more significant influence on the work hardening exponent of ferrite than that of martensite; iii) the elastic modulus of martensite is consistently higher than that of ferrite. As a validation, a simple rule of mixtures is used to verify the above-predicted individual phase flow stresses with the experimentally obtained overall true stress vs. true strain curves. The methodology and the corresponding results shown in this study can help guide the selection of tempering parameters in optimizing the mechanical properties of DP steels for their intended applications.

  16. The Need for Temperance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Inge Tangen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores how temperance as a virtue relates to organizational leadership. The study begins with a short survey of classical Greek and Christian notions of temperance before proceeding to ex-plore temperance in relation to self-leadership, visionary and strategic leadership, and relational lead-ership. The final part of the article offers reflections on how temperance might be cultivated from a theological perspective. Temperance is understood not only as sound thinking but also as embodied self-control and active patience. On the level of self-leadership, it is argued that temperance enables the leader to establish forms of integrity that protect the leader’s self from chaos and destruction. Moreover, temperance may also nurture focused visionary leadership that accepts ethical limits and has an eye to the common good. The study also suggests that organizations should cultivate a culture of strategic discipline that is capable of realizing such visions. On the interpersonal level, temperance is viewed as critical in terms of enabling leaders to treat co-workers with respect and wisdom and han-dle conflict with consideration. Finally, is argued that that the cultivation of temperance is not a one-way street from the inside to the outside or a subordination of feelings to reason but rather a very complex process that includes interpersonal humility, finds vision in an encounter with the good, and yet remains a personal responsibility.

  17. Tekken testing to determine the preheating temperature on ASTM A514 GR B steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asta, Eduardo; Zalazar, Monica; Quesada, Hector

    2003-01-01

    The cold cracking test methods are used to determine the preheating temperature in order to avoid cracking in steel welding.In this work Tekken tests on high strength quenching and tempering (ASTM A514 GrB) structural steel with a thickness of 25 mm have been made.The welds were done using a FCAW process with gas shielding and basic low hydrogen cored wire E 110T5-K4.The welding parameters and joint design applied in this work are similar to the ones used on site production.The base metal, HAZ and weld metal microstructure have been evaluated by optical and SEM microscopy.Thermal cycles records of each welding have been made to relate preheat temperature with the cooling time on the range of 800-500 degC (t8/5) or 800-100degC (t8/1) and the evidence of crack or no crack condition.Finally, a preheat temperature of 150degC and the cooling time larger than 17 s improve a welding integrity without cracks

  18. Constant displacement rate testing at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepe, J.J.; Gonyea, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    A short time test has been developed which is capable of determining the long time notch sensitivity tendencies of CrMoV rotor forging materials. This test is based on Constant Displacement Rate (CDR) testing of a specific notch bar specimen at 1200 0 F at 2 mils/in/hour displacement rate. These data were correlated to conventional smooth and notch bar rupture behavior for a series of CrMoV materials with varying long time ductility tendencies. The purpose of this paper is to describe the details of this new test procedure and some of the relevant mechanics of material information generated during its development

  19. Accelerated Testing with Multiple Failure Modes under Several Temperature Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zongyue Yu; Zhiqian Ren; Junyong Tao; Xun Chen

    2014-01-01

    A complicated device may have multiple failure modes, and some of the failure modes are sensitive to low temperatures. To assess the reliability of a product with multiple failure modes, this paper presents an accelerated testing in which both of the high temperatures and the low temperatures are applied. Firstly, an acceleration model based on the Arrhenius model but accounting for the influence of both the high temperatures and low temperatures is proposed. Accordingly, an accelerated testi...

  20. Microstructure evolution during cyclic tests on EUROFER 97 at room temperature. TEM observation and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordana, M.F., E-mail: giordana@ifir-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisica Rosario, CONICET-UNR, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Giroux, P.-F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Alvarez-Armas, I. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario, CONICET-UNR, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Sauzay, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Armas, A. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario, CONICET-UNR, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Kruml, T. [CEITEC IPM, Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, Brno, 616 62 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low cycle fatigue test are carried out on EUROFER 97 at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EUROFER 97 shows a pronounced cyclic softening accompanied by microstructural changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cycling induces a decrement in dislocation density and subgrain growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple mean-field model based on crystalline plasticity is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean subgrain size evolution is predicted by modelling. - Abstract: The 9% Cr quenched and tempered reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel EUROFER 97 is one of the candidates for structural components of fusion reactors. Isothermal, plastic strain-controlled, low-cycle fatigue tests are performed. Tested at room temperature, this steel suffers a cyclic softening effect linked to microstructural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy, such as the decrease of dislocation density inside subgrains or the growth of subgrain size. From the assumed mechanisms of softening a simple mean-field model based on crystalline plasticity is proposed to predict these microstructure evolutions during cycling and monotonic deformation.

  1. Accelerated Testing with Multiple Failure Modes under Several Temperature Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyue Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A complicated device may have multiple failure modes, and some of the failure modes are sensitive to low temperatures. To assess the reliability of a product with multiple failure modes, this paper presents an accelerated testing in which both of the high temperatures and the low temperatures are applied. Firstly, an acceleration model based on the Arrhenius model but accounting for the influence of both the high temperatures and low temperatures is proposed. Accordingly, an accelerated testing plan including both the high temperatures and low temperatures is designed, and a statistical analysis method is developed. The reliability function of the product with multiple failure modes under variable working conditions is given by the proposed statistical analysis method. Finally, a numerical example is studied to illustrate the proposed accelerated testing. The results show that the proposed accelerated testing is rather efficient.

  2. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston

  3. Prediction of hardness in pieces of quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanzon, Rodolfo Carlos; Rodriguez, Augusto; Sanchez, Arlington Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes the first stage of a work plan to obtain a simple software, for predicting properties at certain points of a quenched and tempered piece. In this first stage, this prediction is limited to cylindrical pieces made with steels whose chemical composition is within a certain range. The methodology basically consists of obtaining , from experimental data, a mathematical tool able to predict the hardness value, for Jominy test piece ends made with this type of steel. This meant beginning with the analysis of the usual forms of theoretical calculation of Jominy curves of quenched samples, which resulted in a proposal to modify the Just equation. Two different mathematical methods were then developed, that could predict hardness values in tempered Jominy test pieces. One, based on the determination of polynomic equations, that reproduces the loss of hardness at points along the test piece, base on the quenching value and as a function of the tempering temperature. The other one, which uses the lineal multidimensional interpolation method, because of its ease of application, has been selected as the mathematical tool to use in the software under development. At this stage of the work, the relationship between the points on the piece and those on the Jominy test pieces is carried out by the Lamont method and the representative variable of the temperature/time combination for the tempering process itself, is obtained with software based on the Hollomon and Jaffe expression. Data is needed to define: a) chemical composition and grain size of the steel used, b) diameter of the piece, c) 'H G ' severity of the quenching medium d) temperature and time of the tempering. The work's second stage continued with the addition of hardness values measured in Jominy test pieces made with other steels. The chemical composition and grain size data of each steel introduced are converted by the software into one more variable, using the concept of ideal critical

  4. Negative response of photosynthesis to natural and projected high seawater temperatures estimated by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry in a temperate coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroselli, Erik; Falini, Giuseppe; Goffredo, Stefano; Dubinsky, Zvy; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Balanophyllia europaea is a shallow water solitary zooxanthellate coral, endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. Extensive field studies across a latitudinal temperature gradient highlight detrimental effects of rising temperatures on its growth, demography, and skeletal characteristics, suggesting that depression of photosynthesis at high temperatures might cause these negative effects. Here we test this hypothesis by analyzing, by means of pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry, the photosynthetic efficiency of B. europaea specimens exposed in aquaria to the annual range of temperatures experienced in the field (13, 18, and 28°C), and two extreme temperatures expected for 2100 as a consequence of global warming (29 and 32°C). The indicators of photosynthetic performance analyzed (maximum and effective quantum yield) showed that maximum efficiency was reached at 20.0-21.6°C, slightly higher than the annual mean temperature in the field (18°C). Photosynthetic efficiency decreased from 20.0 to 13°C and even more strongly from 21.6 to 32°C. An unusual form of bleaching was observed, with a maximum zooxanthellae density at 18°C that strongly decreased from 18 to 32°C. Chlorophyll a concentration per zooxanthellae cell showed an opposite trend as it was minimal at 18°C and increased from 18 to 32°C. Since the areal chlorophyll concentration is the product of the zooxanthellae density and its cellular content, these trends resulted in a homogeneous chlorophyll concentration per coral surface across temperature treatments. This confirms that B. europaea photosynthesis is progressively depressed at temperatures >21.6°C, supporting previous hypotheses raised by the studies on growth and demography of this species. This study also confirms the threats posed to this species by the ongoing seawater warming.

  5. Negative response of photosynthesis to natural and projected high seawater temperatures estimated by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry in a temperate coral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eCaroselli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Balanophyllia europaea is a shallow water solitary zooxanthellate coral, endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. Extensive field studies across a latitudinal temperature gradient highlight detrimental effects of rising temperatures on its growth, demography and skeletal characteristics, suggesting that depression of photosynthesis at high temperatures might cause these negative effects. Here we test this hypothesis by analyzing, by means of pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry, the photosynthetic efficiency of B. europaea specimens exposed in aquaria to the annual range of temperatures experienced in the field (13°C, 18°C, and 28°C, and two extreme temperatures expected for 2100 as a consequence of global warming (29°C and 32°C. The indicators of photosynthetic performance analyzed (maximum and effective quantum yield showed that maximum efficiency was reached at 20.0-21.6°C, slightly higher than the annual mean temperature in the field (18°C. Photosynthetic efficiency decreased from 20.0°C to 13°C and even more strongly from 21.6°C to 32°C. An unusual form of bleaching was observed, with a maximum zooxanthellae density at 18°C that strongly decreased from 18°C to 32°C. Chlorophyll a concentration per zooxanthellae cell showed an opposite trend as it was minimal at 18°C and increased from 18°C to 32°C. Since the areal chlorophyll concentration is the product of the zooxanthellae density and its cellular content, these trends resulted in a homogeneous chlorophyll concentration per coral surface across temperature treatments. This confirms that B. europaea photosynthesis is progressively depressed at temperatures >21.6°C, supporting previous hypotheses raised by the studies on growth and demography of this species. This study also confirms the threats posed to this species by the ongoing seawater warming.

  6. Containment test in area of high latitude and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jiantao; Ni Yongsheng; Jia Wutong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high latitude and low temperature on containment test are detailed analyzed from the view of design, equipment, construct and start-up, and the solution is put forward. The major problems resolved is as below: the effects of low temperature and high wind on defect inspection of the containment surface, the effects of test load on the affiliated equipment of containment in the condition of low temperature, and the effects of low temperature on the containment leak rate measurement. Application in Hongyanhe Unit 1 showed that the proposed scheme can effectively overcome the influence of adverse weather on the containment test. (authors)

  7. Tekken tests in a steel 'ASTM A 514 GR B' to determine the preheating temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, Hector Juan; Zalazar, Monica; Asta, Eduardo Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Cold fissure tests are used to determine the proper preheating temperature in order to prevent fissures during the steel welding process. Tekken tests were carried out on a quenched and tempered high resistance 25.4 mm thick steel (ASTM A514 Gr.B) used in structural applications. The welding was carried out using a FCAW semiautomatic process with gas protection and low hydrogen tubular electrode E110T5-K4. Similar parameters and splicing design were later applied in production. The microstructures of the base material and the welding were determined by optic and electron microscopy. The thermal cycles of the welding were recorded in order to relate the preheating temperature with the cooling time from 800 o C - 500 o C (t 8/5 ) and from 800 o C - 100 o C (tg/1) and the presence or not of fissures. Preheating at 150 o C and t 8/5 greater than 17 s was found to guarantee fissure free welding (CW)

  8. Evaluation test on stability of high temperature strain gage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Toshimi (Kyowa Electronic Instruments Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Ito, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro

    1983-08-01

    This report deals with the results on a stability test of high temperature strain gage which is utilized for development of the Stethoscope for OGL - 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Services (ab. SOCETS). The test has proved that the weldable strain gage (KHC - 20 - G5) exhibits excellent stability at 500/sup 0/C during 3000 to 4000 hours service and can be applied sufficiently to evaluate integrity of OGL - 1 high temperature pipings and others.

  9. Evaluation test on stability of high temperature strain gage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshimi; Ito, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro.

    1983-01-01

    This report deals with the results on a stability test of high temperature strain gage which is utilized for development of the Stethoscope for OGL - 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Services (ab. SOCETS). The test has proved that the weldable strain gage (KHC - 20 - G5) exhibits excellent stability at 500 0 C during 3000 to 4000 hours service and can be applied sufficiently to evaluate integrity of OGL - 1 high temperature pipings and others. (author)

  10. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F.; Brziak, P.; Lomozik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  11. Development and validation of predictive simulation model of multi-layer repair welding process by temper bead technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigetaka; Miyasaka, Fumikazu; Mochizuki, Masahito; Tanaka, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has recently been observed in the nickel base alloy weld metal of dissimilar pipe joint used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) . Temper bead technique has been developed as one of repair procedures against SCC applicable in case that post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is difficult to carry out. In this regard, however it is essential to pass the property and performance qualification test to confirm the effect of tempering on the mechanical properties at repair welds before temper bead technique is actually used in practice. Thus the appropriate welding procedure conditions in temper bead technique are determined on the basis of the property and performance qualification testing. It is necessary for certifying the structural soundness and reliability at repair welds but takes a lot of work and time in the present circumstances. Therefore it is desirable to establish the reasonable alternatives for qualifying the property and performance at repair welds. In this study, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation procedures were developed for predicting weld bead configuration and temperature distribution during multi-layer repair welding process by temper bead technique. In the developed simulation technique, characteristics of heat source in temper bead welding are calculated from weld heat input conditions through the arc plasma simulation and then weld bead configuration and temperature distribution during temper bead welding are calculated from characteristics of heat source obtained through the coupling analysis between bead surface shape and thermal conduction. The simulation results were compared with the experimental results under the same welding heat input conditions. As the results, the bead surface shape and temperature distribution, such as A cl lines, were in good agreement between simulation and experimental results. It was concluded that the developed simulation technique has the potential to become useful for

  12. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  13. Investigation of decomposition of solid solution of Ni-Cr-Fe 77/16/7 over-saturated in carbon during tempering at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffaut, Francois

    1966-01-01

    In its first part, this research thesis reports the investigation of the structure of the tempered Ni-Cr-Fe 77/16/7 alloy by using optical and electronic microscopy. The second part addresses the relationship between the structural status of the alloy and its electrochemical behaviour. The third part reports the investigation of the Portevin - Le Chatelier phenomenon in relationship with the decomposition of the solid solution. A last part addresses the investigation of a possible microstructure ordering of the Ni-Cr-Fe 77/16/7 alloy

  14. Quantifying the effects of tempering on individual phase properties of DP980 steel with nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, G. [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, F. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (United States); Ruimi, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, Doha (Qatar); Field, D.P. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (United States); Sun, X., E-mail: xin.sun@pnnl.gov [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Tempering treatment is conducted on a commercial dual phase (DP) 980 steel at 250 °C and 400 °C for 60 min each. Ferrite and martensite grains are distinguished using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), and the martensite volume fractions (MVF) are determined based on the image quality (IQ) map. Indentation tests combined with a newly developed inverse method are used to obtain the individual phase flow properties in each sample. The results show that, i) tempering significantly reduces martensite yield strength, while it slightly reduces the ferrite yield strength; ii) tempering temperature has a more significant influence on the work hardening exponent of ferrite than that of martensite. As a validation, a simple rule-of-mixtures is used to verify the above-predicted individual phase flow stresses with the experimentally obtained overall true stress vs. true strain curves.

  15. Testing program for concrete at temperatures to 8940K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Robinson, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    A test program was conducted to define the variations in mechanical properties of a limestone aggregate concrete and a lightweight insulating concrete exposed to elevated temperatures. Four test series were conducted: (1) unconfined compression; (2) shear; (3) rebar bond; and (4) sustained loading (creep). Tests results are presented

  16. A materials test system for static compression at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korellis, J. S.; Steinhaus, C. A.; Totten, J. J.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents modifications to our existing computer-controlled compression testing system to allow elevated temperature testing in an evacuated environment. We have adopted an 'inverse' design configuration where the evacuated test volume is located within the induction heating coil, eliminating the expense and minimizing the evacuation time of a much larger traditional vacuum chamber.

  17. On choice of tempered steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govorov, A.A.; Pan'shin, I.F.; Rakhmanov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a graphical method for choosing structural steels, a change in the propagation work of a crack and in the critical temperature of brittleness of 40, 40Kh, 40KhN, and 40KhNM steels, was examined depending on the hardness after hardening and tempering. A diagram enabling to choose the grade of steel for making an article of known dimensions according to the preset values of its mechanical properties has been plotted. The developed selection scheme takes into account the hardenability of steels and the influence of the hardness after thermal treatment on the cold-shortness of steel

  18. Seasonal patterns in reproductive success of temperate-breeding birds: Experimental tests of the date and quality hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriman, Vanessa B; Dawson, Russell D; Bortolotti, Lauren E; Clark, Robert G

    2017-04-01

    For organisms in seasonal environments, individuals that breed earlier in the season regularly attain higher fitness than their late-breeding counterparts. Two primary hypotheses have been proposed to explain these patterns: The quality hypothesis contends that early breeders are of better phenotypic quality or breed on higher quality territories, whereas the date hypothesis predicts that seasonally declining reproductive success is a response to a seasonal deterioration in environmental quality. In birds, food availability is thought to drive deteriorating environmental conditions, but few experimental studies have demonstrated its importance while also controlling for parental quality. We tested predictions of the date hypothesis in tree swallows ( Tachycineta bicolor ) over two breeding seasons and in two locations within their breeding range in Canada. Nests were paired by clutch initiation date to control for parental quality, and we delayed the hatching date of one nest within each pair. Subsequently, brood sizes were manipulated to mimic changes in per capita food abundance, and we examined the effects of manipulations, as well as indices of environmental and parental quality, on nestling quality, fledging success, and return rates. Reduced reproductive success of late-breeding individuals was causally related to a seasonal decline in environmental quality. Declining insect biomass and enlarged brood sizes resulted in nestlings that were lighter, in poorer body condition, structurally smaller, had shorter and slower growing flight feathers and were less likely to survive to fledge. Our results provide evidence for the importance of food resources in mediating seasonal declines in offspring quality and survival.

  19. Present status of high temperature engineering test and research, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors have excellent features such as the generation of high temperature close to 1000degC, very high inherent safety and high fuel burnup. By the advanced basic research under high temperature irradiation condition, the creation of various new technologies which become the momentum of future technical innovation can be expected. The construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) was decided in 1987, which aims at the thermal output of 30 MW and the coolant temperature at reactor exit of 950degC. The initial criticality is scheduled in 1998. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the high temperature engineering test and research, and plans the safety verifying test of the HTTR, the test of connecting heat utilization plants and so on. In this report, mainly the results obtained for one year from May, 1993 are summarized. The outline of the high temperature engineering test and development of the HTTR technologies are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Influence of thermal conditioning media on Charpy specimen test temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Swain, R.L.; Berggren, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test is used extensively for determining the toughness of structural materials. Research programs in many technologies concerned with structural integrity perform such testing to obtain Charpy energy vs temperature curves. American Society for Testing and Materials Method E 23 includes rather strict requirements regarding determination and control of specimen test temperature. It specifies minimum soaking times dependent on the use of liquids or gases as the medium for thermally conditioning the specimen. The method also requires that impact of the specimen occur within 5 s removal from the conditioning medium. It does not, however, provide guidance regarding choice of conditioning media. This investigation was primarily conducted to investigate the changes in specimen temperature which occur when water is used for thermal conditioning. A standard CVN impact specimen of low-alloy steel was instrumented with surface-mounted and embedded thermocouples. Dependent on the media used, the specimen was heated or cooled to selected temperatures in the range -100 to 100 degree C using cold nitrogen gas, heated air, acetone and dry ice, methanol and dry ice, heated oil, or heated water. After temperature stabilization, the specimen was removed from the conditioning medium while the temperatures were recorded four times per second from all thermocouples using a data acquisition system and a computer. The results show that evaporative cooling causes significant changes in the specimen temperatures when water is used for conditioning. Conditioning in the other media did not result in such significant changes. The results demonstrate that, even within the guidelines of E 23, significant test temperature changes can occur which may substantially affect the Charpy impact test results if water is used for temperature conditioning. 7 refs., 11 figs

  1. Cosmic-ray test and temperature effects of MRPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Qian; Li Yuanjing; Cheng Jianping; Wang Yi; Li Jin; Lai Yongfang; Li Qinghua; Tang Le

    2004-01-01

    A comic-ray test system has been built for testing the performance of MRPC modules. Some methods have been studied to improve the time resolution of the cosmic-ray test based on this testing system. The time resolutions of about 84 ps and 75 ps can be achieved for MRPC and its reference time, respectively. The temperature effects of MRPC have also been researched and some useful results are obtained. (author)

  2. The effect of tempering on mechanical properties of 50Mn18Cr4WN retaining ring material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, M.C.; Guo, C.H.; Zheng, Z.Z.; Ma, Z.M.

    1990-01-01

    50Mn18Cr4WN is a retaining ring steel. It is strengthened by solution heat treatment and cold working. The process produces high macro residual stress. The retaining ring must be tempered for stress-relief. When the ring is sleeved, it is heated too. If the retaining ring is tempered, are the mechanical properties of the retaining ring damaged? The problem is described in the article. The tempering of testing pieces was carried out at several temperatures: 350degC, 400degC, 450degC, 500degC and 650degC. The tempering time was 3h. The yield point, tensile strength, elongation and reduction of area were determined by means of the tensile test. In the results, for temperatures between 350degC and 450degC, the yield point, tensile strength, elongation and reduction of area did not change notably. A stress corrosion cracking test was also carried out in a 3%Ni 4 NO 3 , 36%Ca(NO 3 ) 2 aqueous solution. K 1scc values after tempering at 450degC and without tempering were measured. The results showed that the K 1scc after tempering at 450degC decreased notably. Micrographs show that carbo-nitride precipitated. The precipitated carbo-nitride particles increased in size at the grain boundaries. The precipitated carbonitride particles increased in number at slip lines. It is clear that the precipitated particles lead to the increase of micro-cells and the micro-cells aggravated the stress corrosion cracking process. (orig.)

  3. Junction temperature estimation for an advanced active power cycling test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jørgensen, S.

    2015-01-01

    estimation method using on-state VCE for an advanced active power cycling test is proposed. The concept of the advanced power cycling test is explained first. Afterwards the junction temperature estimation method using on-state VCE and current is presented. Further, the method to improve the accuracy...... of the maximum junction temperature estimation is also proposed. Finally, the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by experimental results.......On-state collector-emitter voltage (VCE) is a good indicator to determine the wear-out condition of power device modules. Further, it is a one of the Temperature Sensitive Electrical Parameters (TSEPs) and thus can be used for junction temperature estimation. In this paper, the junction temperature...

  4. Application of high precision temperature control technology in infrared testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Haiyuan; Cheng, Yong; Zhu, Mengzhen; Chu, Hua; Li, Wei

    2017-11-01

    In allusion to the demand of infrared system test, the principle of Infrared target simulator and the function of the temperature control are presented. The key technology of High precision temperature control is discussed, which include temperature gathering, PID control and power drive. The design scheme of temperature gathering is put forward. In order to reduce the measure error, discontinuously current and four-wire connection for the platinum thermal resistance are adopted. A 24-bits AD chip is used to improve the acquisition precision. Fuzzy PID controller is designed because of the large time constant and continuous disturbance of the environment temperature, which result in little overshoot, rapid response, high steady-state accuracy. Double power operational amplifiers are used to drive the TEC. Experiments show that the key performances such as temperature control precision and response speed meet the requirements.

  5. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  6. Effect of microstructure on the susceptibility of a 533 steel to temper embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoul, S.; Marini, B.; Pineau, A.

    1998-01-01

    In ferritic steels, brittle fracture usually occurs at low temperature by cleavage. However the segregation of impurities (P, As, Sn etc..) along prior γ grain boundaries can change the brittle fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular. In quenched and tempered steels, this segregation is associated with what is called the temper-embrittlement phenomenon. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of the as-quenched microstructure (lower bainite or martensite) on the susceptibility of a low alloy steel (A533 cl.1) to temper-embrittlement. Dilatometric tests were performed to determine the continous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram of the material and to measure the critical cooling rate (V c ) for a martensitic quench. Then subsized Charpy V-notched specimens were given various cooling rates from the austenitization temperature to obtain a wide range of as-quenched microstructures, including martensite and bainite. These specimens were subsequently given a heat treatment to develop temper embrittlement and tested to measure the V-notch fracture toughness at -50 C. The fracture surfaces were examined by SEM. It is shown that martensitic microstructures are more susceptible to intergranular embrittlement than bainitic microstructures. These observed microstructural influences are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  7. Effect of microstructure on the susceptibility of a 533 steel to temper embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raoul, S.; Marini, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees; Pineau, A. [CNRS, Evry (France). Centre de Materiaux

    1998-11-01

    In ferritic steels, brittle fracture usually occurs at low temperature by cleavage. However the segregation of impurities (P, As, Sn etc..) along prior {gamma} grain boundaries can change the brittle fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular. In quenched and tempered steels, this segregation is associated with what is called the temper-embrittlement phenomenon. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of the as-quenched microstructure (lower bainite or martensite) on the susceptibility of a low alloy steel (A533 cl.1) to temper-embrittlement. Dilatometric tests were performed to determine the continous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram of the material and to measure the critical cooling rate (V{sub c}) for a martensitic quench. Then subsized Charpy V-notched specimens were given various cooling rates from the austenitization temperature to obtain a wide range of as-quenched microstructures, including martensite and bainite. These specimens were subsequently given a heat treatment to develop temper embrittlement and tested to measure the V-notch fracture toughness at -50 C. The fracture surfaces were examined by SEM. It is shown that martensitic microstructures are more susceptible to intergranular embrittlement than bainitic microstructures. These observed microstructural influences are briefly discussed. (orig.) 11 refs.

  8. Temperature effect compensation for fast differential pressure decay testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yan; Tong, Xiaomeng; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the long temperature recovery period with differential pressure decay for leak detection, a novel method with temperature effect compensation is proposed to improve the testing efficiency without full stabilization of temperature. The mathematical model of conventional differential pressure decay testing is established to analyze the changes of temperature and pressure during the measuring period. Then the differential pressure is divided into two parts: the exponential part caused by temperature recovery and the linear part caused by leak. With prior information obtained from samples, parameters of the exponential part can be identified precisely, and the temperature effect will be compensated before it fully recovers. To verify the effect of the temperature compensated method, chambers with different volumes are tested under various pressures and the experiments show that the improved method is faster with satisfactory precision, and an accuracy less than 0.25 cc min −1  can be achieved when the compensation time is proportional to four times the theoretical thermal-time constant. (paper)

  9. Testing and evaluation of high temperature superconductor current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Anand; Puntambekar, Avinash; Manekar, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    National Institute for Inter-disciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Trivandrum (formerly Regional Research Laboratory) has accomplished a DAE-BRNS project with Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) as principal collaborator for the development of high temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads. These HTS current leads have self-field critical currents (Ic) ranging from 50 A to 1000 A at liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) temperature. These HTS are made out of silver sheathed Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO-2223), for direct application in superconducting (SC) systems involving transportation of high electric currents from power sources at room temperature to superconducting devices at cryogenic temperatures. RRCAT has participated in this project by testing and evaluation of these HTS current leads and carried out actual load trials. In this paper, we will describe the HTS testing setup, tests performed with their testing procedure and the test results. The testing of these HTS has been done with joint effort of Materials Advanced Accelerator Science and Cryogenics Div. and Superconducting Technology Lab (SCT Lab), Advanced Accelerator Module Development Div., using the test facility available at the SCT Lab. (author)

  10. Test plan for core sampling drill bit temperature monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    At WHC, one of the functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System division is sampling waste tanks to characterize their contents. The push-mode core sampling truck is currently used to take samples of liquid and sludge. Sampling of tanks containing hard salt cake is to be performed with the rotary-mode core sampling system, consisting of the core sample truck, mobile exhauster unit, and ancillary subsystems. When drilling through the salt cake material, friction and heat can be generated in the drill bit. Based upon tank safety reviews, it has been determined that the drill bit temperature must not exceed 180 C, due to the potential reactivity of tank contents at this temperature. Consequently, a drill bit temperature limit of 150 C was established for operation of the core sample truck to have an adequate margin of safety. Unpredictable factors, such as localized heating, cause this buffer to be so great. The most desirable safeguard against exceeding this threshold is bit temperature monitoring . This document describes the recommended plan for testing the prototype of a drill bit temperature monitor developed for core sampling by Sandia National Labs. The device will be tested at their facilities. This test plan documents the tests that Westinghouse Hanford Company considers necessary for effective testing of the system

  11. Corrosion test by low-temperature coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, S; Yamamoto, S

    1952-01-01

    Corrosive actions of various fractions of low-temperature coal tar against mild steel or Cr 13-steel were compared at their boiling states. Corrosions became severe when the boiling points exceeded 240/sup 0/. The acidic fractions were more corrosive. In all instances, corrosion was excessive at the beginning of immersion testing and then gradually became mild; boiling accelerated the corrosion. Cr 13-steel was corrosion-resistant to low-temperature coal-tar fractions.

  12. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1994-09-01

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  13. Electrolysis test of different composite membranes at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar

    temperatures, phosphoric acid (H3PO4)[1] and zirconium phosphate (ZrP)[2] were introduced. These composite membranes were tested in an electrolysis setup. A typical electrolysis test was performed at 130°C with a galvanostatic load. Polarization curves were recorded under stationary conditions. Testing...... night at 150°C in a zirconium phosphate saturated 85wt% phosphoric acid solution. Different thicknesses of membranes were tested and as expected, the performance increased when the thickness of the membranes decreased. Furthermore composite membranes only treated with phosphoric acid or only treated...

  14. SCC Initiation Testing of Alloy 600 in High Temperature Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etien, Robert A.; Richey, Edward; Morton, David S.; Eager, Julie

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation tests have been conducted on Alloy 600 at temperatures from 304 to 367°C. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load in hydrogenated environments. A reversing direct current electric potential drop (EPD) system was used for all of the tests to detect SCC initiation. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of stress (and strain), coolant hydrogen, and temperature on SCC initiation time. The thermal activation energy of SCC initiation was measured as 103 ± 18 kJ/mol in hydrogenated water, which is similar to the thermal activation energy for SCC growth. Results suggest that the fundamental mechanical parameter which controls SCC initiation is plastic strain not stress. SCC initiation was shown to have a different sensitivity than SCC growth to dissolved hydrogen level. Specifically, SCC initiation time appears to be relatively insensitive to hydrogen level in the nickel stability region.

  15. The high-temperature helium test facility (HHV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, G.; Weiskopf, H.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the high-temperature helium test facility (HHV). Construction of this plant was started in 1972 by Messrs. BBC, Mannheim, on behalf of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich. By the end of 1976, the construction work is in its last stage, so that the plant may start operation early in 1977. First of all, the cycle system and the arrangement of components are dealt with, followed by a discussion of individual components. Here, emphasis is laid on components typical for HHT systems, while conventional components are mentioned without further structural detail. The projected test programme for the HHV facility in phase IB of the HHT project is shortly dealt with. After this, the potential of this test facility with regard to the possible use of test components and to fluid- and thermodynamic boundary conditions is pointed out. With the unique potential the facility offers here, aspects of shortened service life at higher cycle temperatures do not remain disregarded. (orig./UA) [de

  16. Strain-tempering of low carbon martensite steel wire by rapid heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torisaka, Yasunori; Kihara, Junji

    1978-01-01

    In the production of prestressed concrete steel wires, a series of the cold drawing-patenting process are performed to improve the strength. In order to reduce cyclic process, the low carbon martensite steel wire which can be produced only by the process of hot rolling and direct quench has been investigated as strain-tempering material. When strain-tempering is performed on the low carbon martensite steel wire, stress relaxation (Re%) increases and mechanical properties such as total elongation, reduction of area, ultimate tensile strength and proof stress decrease remarkably by annealing. In order to shorten the heating time, the authors performed on the steel wire the strain-tempering with a heating time of 1.0 s using direct electrical resistance heating and examined the effects of rapid heating on the stress relaxation and the mechanical properties. Stress relaxation decreases without impairment of the mechanical properties up to a strain-tempering temperature of 573 K. Re(%) after 10.8 ks is 0% at the testing temperature 301 K, 0.49% at 363 K and 1.39% at 433 K. (auth.)

  17. Parallel continuous simulated tempering and its applications in large-scale molecular simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Tianwu; Yu, Linglin; Zhang, Chong [Applied Physics Program and Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Ma, Jianpeng, E-mail: jpma@bcm.tmc.edu [Applied Physics Program and Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, BCM-125, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    In this paper, we introduce a parallel continuous simulated tempering (PCST) method for enhanced sampling in studying large complex systems. It mainly inherits the continuous simulated tempering (CST) method in our previous studies [C. Zhang and J. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 194112 (2009); C. Zhang and J. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244101 (2010)], while adopts the spirit of parallel tempering (PT), or replica exchange method, by employing multiple copies with different temperature distributions. Differing from conventional PT methods, despite the large stride of total temperature range, the PCST method requires very few copies of simulations, typically 2–3 copies, yet it is still capable of maintaining a high rate of exchange between neighboring copies. Furthermore, in PCST method, the size of the system does not dramatically affect the number of copy needed because the exchange rate is independent of total potential energy, thus providing an enormous advantage over conventional PT methods in studying very large systems. The sampling efficiency of PCST was tested in two-dimensional Ising model, Lennard-Jones liquid and all-atom folding simulation of a small globular protein trp-cage in explicit solvent. The results demonstrate that the PCST method significantly improves sampling efficiency compared with other methods and it is particularly effective in simulating systems with long relaxation time or correlation time. We expect the PCST method to be a good alternative to parallel tempering methods in simulating large systems such as phase transition and dynamics of macromolecules in explicit solvent.

  18. Seismic test of high temperature piping for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobatake, Kiyokazu; Midoriyama, Shigeru; Ooka, Yuzi; Suzuki, Michiaki; Katsuki, Taketsugu

    1983-01-01

    Since the high temperature pipings for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor contain helium gas at 1000 deg C and 40 kgf/cm 2 , the double-walled pipe type consisting of the external pipe serving as the pressure boundary and the internal pipe with heat insulating structure was adopted. Accordingly, their aseismatic design is one of the important subjects. Recently, for the purpose of grasping the vibration characteristics of these high temperature pipings and obtaining the data required for the aseismatic design, two specimens, that is, a double-walled pipe model and a heat-insulating structure, were made, and the vibration test was carried out on them, using a 30 ton vibration table of Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. In the high temperature pipings of the primary cooling system for the multi-purpose, high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor, the external pipes of 32 B bore as the pressure boundary and the internal pipes of 26 B bore with internal heat insulation consisting of double layers of fiber and laminated metal insulators as the temperature boundary were adopted. The testing method and the results are reported. As the spring constant of spacers is larger and clearance is smaller, the earthquake wave response of double-walled pipes is smaller, and it is more advantageous. The aseismatic property of the heat insulation structure is sufficient. (Kako, I.)

  19. Gas temperature measurements in short duration turbomachinery test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattafesta, L. N.; Epstein, A. H.

    1988-07-01

    Thermocouple rakes for use in short-duration turbomachinery test facilities have been developed using very fine thermocouples. Geometry variations were parametrically tested and showed that bare quartz junction supports (76 microns in diameter) yielded superior performance, and were rugged enough to survive considerable impact damage. Using very low cost signal conditioning electronics, temperature accuracies of 0.3 percent were realized yielding turbine efficiency measurements at the 1-percent level. Ongoing work to improve this accuracy is described.

  20. Aquarius Reflector Surface Temperature Monitoring Test and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie; Lee, Siu-Chun; Becker, Ray

    2008-01-01

    The presentation addresses how to infer the front side temperatures for the Aquarius L-band reflector based upon backside measurement sites. Slides discussing the mission objectives and design details are at the same level found on typical project outreach websites and in conference papers respectively. The test discussion provides modest detail of an ordinary thermal balance test using mockup hardware. The photographs show an off-Lab vacuum chamber facility with no compromising details.

  1. Creep in rock salt with temperature. Testing methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, J.P.; Berest, P.

    1985-01-01

    The growing interest shown in the delayed behaviour of rocks at elevated temperature has led the Solid Mechanics Laboratory to develop specific equipment designed for creep tests. The design and dimensioning of these units offer the possibility of investigating a wide range of materials. The article describes the test facilities used (uni-axial and tri-axial creep units) and presents the experimental results obtained on samples of Bresse salt [fr

  2. Characteristic of retained austenite decomposition during tempering and its effect on impact toughness in SA508 Gr.3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Guanghua; Han, Lizhan; Li, Chuanwei; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng, E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Retained austenite(RA) usually presents in the quenched Nuclear Pressure-Vessel SA508 Gr.3 steel. In the present work, the characteristic of RA decomposition and its effect on the impact toughness were investigated by microstructure observation, dilatometric experiments and Charpy impact tests. The results show that the RA transformed into martensite and bainite during tempering at 230 °C and 400 °C respectively, while mixture of long rod carbides and ferrite formed at 650 °C. The long rod carbides formed from RA decomposition decrease the critical cleavage stress for initiation of micro-cracks, and deteriorate the impact toughness of the steel. Pre-tempering at a low temperature such as 230 °C or 400 °C leading to the decomposition of RA into martensite or baintie can eliminate the deterioration of the toughness caused by direct decomposition into long rod carbides. The absorbed energy indicate that pre-tempering at 400 °C can drive dramatically improvement in the toughness of the steel. - Highlights: • The products of RA decomposition were localization observed by SEM and TEM. • Decomposition characteristic of RA were revealed during tempering at different temperature. • Impact toughness was dramatically improved by pre-tempering treatment.

  3. Creep testing of nodular iron at ambient and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Aasa; Andersson-Oestling, Henrik C.M.; Seitisleam, Facredin; Wu, Rui; Sandstroem, Rolf (Swerea KIMAB AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The creep strain at room temperature, 100 and 125 deg C has been investigated for the ferritic nodular cast iron insert intended for use as the load-bearing part of canisters for long term disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The microstructure consisted of ferrite, graphite nodules of different sizes, compacted graphite and pearlite. Creep tests have been performed for up to 41,000 h. The specimens were cut out from material taken from two genuine inserts, I30 and I55. After creep testing, the specimens from the 100 deg C tests were hardness tested and a metallographic examination was performed. Creep strains at all temperatures appear to be logarithmic, and accumulation of creep strain diminishes with time. The time dependence of the creep strain is consistent to the W-model for primary creep. During the loading plastic strains up to 1% appeared. The maximum recorded creep strain after the loading phase was 0.025%. This makes the creep strains technically insignificant. Acoustic emission recordings during the loading of the room temperature tests showed no sounds or other evidence of microcracking during the loading phase. There is no evidence that the hardness or the graphite microstructure changed during the creep tests

  4. Operation performance investigation of ground-coupled heat-pump system for temperate region

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Man; Hongxing Yang; Jinggang Wang; Zhaohong Fang

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the operation performance of ground-coupled heat-pump (GCHP) system, an analytical simulation model of GCHP system on short time-step basis and a computer program based on this model to predict system operating parameters are developed in this study. Besides, detailed on-site experiments on GCHP test rig installed in a temperate region of China are carried out. The temperature distributions of borehole as well as ground around borehole at different depths are evaluated...

  5. [Temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization and β-glucosidase enzymekinetics in the northern temperate forests at different altitudes, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jin-juan; Li, Dan-dan; Zhang, Xin-yu; He, Nian-peng; Bu, Jin-feng; Wang, Qing; Sun, Xiao-min; Wen, Xue-fa

    2016-01-01

    Soil samples, which were collected from three typical forests, i.e., Betula ermanii forest, coniferous mixed broad-leaved forest, and Pinus koraiensis forest, at different altitudes along the southern slope of Laotuding Mountain of Changbai Mountain range in Liaoning Province of China, were incubated over a temperature gradient in laboratory. Soil organic carbon mineralization rates (Cmin), soil β-1,4-glucosidase (βG) kinetics and their temperature sensitivity (Q₁₀) were measured. The results showed that both altitude and temperature had significant effects on Cmin · Cmin increased with temperature and was highest in the B. ermanii forest. The temperature sensitivity of Cmin [Q₁₀(Cmin)] ranked in order of B. ermanii forest > P. koraiensis forest > coniferous mixed broad-leaved forest, but did not differ significantly among the three forests. Both the maximum activity (Vmax) and the Michaelis constant (Km) of the βG responded positively to temperature for all the forests. The temperature sensitivity of Vmax [Q₁₀(Vmax)] ranged from 1.78 to 1.90, and the temperature sensitivity of Km [Q₁₀(Km)] ranged from 1.79 to 2.00. The Q₁₀(Vmax)/Q10(Km) ratios were significantly greater in the B. ermanii soil than in the other two forest soils, suggesting that the βG kinetics-dependent impacts of the global warming or temperature increase on the decomposition of soil organic carbon were temperature sensitive for the forests at the higher altitudes.

  6. Installation for fatigue testing of materials at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushenkov, I.D.; Chernetskij, V.K.; Il'ichev, V.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    A new installation for mechanical fatigue tests of structural material samples is described, in which the possibility to conduct tests in the range of lower temperatures (4.2-300 K) is ensured. The installation permits to carry out fatigue tests using the method of axial loading of annular (up to 6 mm in diameter) and plane (up to 12 mm wide) samples during symmetric, asymmetric and pulsing loading cycles. It is shown that the installation suggested has quite extended operation possibilities and, coincidentally, it is characterized by design simplicity, compactness, comparatively low metal consumption and maintenance convenience

  7. LVDT Development for High Temperature Irradiation Test and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Ban, Chae Min; Choo, Kee Nam; Jun, Byung Hyuk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer) is used to measure the elongation and pressure of a nuclear fuel rod, or the creep and fatigue of the material during a reactor irradiation test. This device must be a radiation-resistant LVDT for use in a research reactor. Norway Halden has LVDTs for an irradiation test by the own development and commercialized. But Halden's LVDTs have limited the temperature of the use until to 350 .deg. C. So, KAERI has been developing a new LVDT for high temperature irradiation test. This paper describes the design of a LVDT, the fabrication process of a LVDT, and the result of the performance test. The designed LVDT uses thermocouple cable for coil wire material and one MI cable as signal cable. This LVDT for a high temperature irradiation test can be used until a maximum of 900 .deg. C. Welding is a very important factor for the fabrication of an LVDT. We are using a 150W fiber laser welding system that consists of a welding head, monitoring vision system and rotary index.

  8. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation of the Fermilab superconducting Tevatron accelerator is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics run at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed the author to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which have taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, the new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach this goal. New features are being added to the controls systems which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending

  9. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed us to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which has taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, our new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach our goal. New features are being added to the control system which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending

  10. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  11. Reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) consists of a control rod system and a reserve shutdown system. During normal operation, reactivity is controlled by the control rod system, which consists of 32 control rods (16 pairs) and 16 control rod drive mechanisms except for the case when the center control rods are removed to perform an irradiation test. In an unlikely event that the control rods fail to be inserted, reserve shutdown system is provided to insert pellets of neutron-absorbing material into the core. Alloy 800H is chosen for the metallic parts of the control rods. Because the maximum temperature of the control rods reaches about 900 deg. C at reactor scrams, structural design guideline and design material data on Alloy 800H are needed for the high temperature design. The design guideline for the HTTR control rod is based on ASME Code Case N-47-21. Design material data is also determined and shown in this paper. Observing the guideline, temperature and stress analysis were conducted; it can be confirmed that the target life of the control rods of 5 years can be achieved. Various tests conducted for the control rod system and the reserve shutdown system are also described

  12. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks

  13. The Impact of “Unseasonably” Warm Spring Temperatures on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in Melbourne, Australia: A City with a Temperate Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Loughnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of extreme temperatures on human health have been well described. However, the adverse health effects of warm weather that occurs outside the summer period have had little attention. We used daily anomalous AMI morbidity and daily anomalous temperature to determine the impact of “unseasonable” temperature on human health. The “unseasonably” warm weather was attributed to a slow moving high pressure system to the east of Melbourne. No morbidity displacement was noted during either of these periods suggesting that morbidity due to “unseasonable” temperatures is avoidable. An increase in warmer weather during the cooler months of spring may result in increased morbidity, and an alert system based on summer thresholds may not be appropriate for early season heat health warnings. A straightforward alert system based on calculating anomalous temperature from daily weather forecasts may reduce the public health impact of “unseasonably” warm weather.

  14. Pretest Calculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.S. Brodsky

    2002-01-01

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J · m -3 · K -1 ), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result

  15. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  16. Thermal characteristic test for saturated temperature type capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Motoji; Someya, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Ohuchi, Mitsuo; Harayama, Yasuo

    1989-08-01

    The Japan Material Testing Reactor Project is developing a new type capsule so-called 'Saturated Temperature Capsule', as a part of irradiation technique improvement program. This type capsule, in which the water is supplied and boiled, bases on the conception of keeping the coolant at the saturated temperature and facilitating the temperature setting of specimens heated by gamma-ray in reactor. However, out-pile test was planned, because there were few usable data for design and operation of the capsule into which the coolant was injected. A out-pile apparatus, simulated the capsule with electric heaters, was fabricated and experiments were carried out, to obtain data concerning design and operation for the capsule into which the water was injected. As a structure of simulated capsule, a type of downward coolant supply was adopted. The downward coolant tube type injectes the water in the bottom of capsule by tube through the upper flange. Major objects of experiences were to grasp thermal features under operation and to provide performances of capsule control equipment. Experimental results proved that the temperature of water within the capsule was easily varied by controlling supply water flow rate, and that the control equipment was operated stably and safety. (author)

  17. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  18. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  19. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  20. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  1. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research Establishment of The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power. Coolant of helium-gas circulates under the pressure of about 4Mpa, and the reactor inlet and outlet temperature are 395degC and 950degC (maximum), respectively coated particle fuel is used as fuel, and the HTTR core is composed of graphite prismatic blocks. The full power operation of 30MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2003 before the high temperature test operation of 950degC. (author)

  2. A comparison of PCB bioaccumulation factors between an arctic and a temperate marine food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, Anna; McLachlan, Michael S; Borgå, Katrine; Asplund, Lillemor; Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin; Polder, Anuschka; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2010-06-01

    To test how environmental conditions in the Arctic and the resulting ecological adaptations affect accumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the marine food web, bioaccumulation of four polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an arctic (Barents Sea 77 degrees N-82 degrees N) and a temperate marine (Baltic Sea 54 degrees N-62 degrees N) food web were compared. Three different trophic levels were studied (zooplankton, fish, and seal), representing the span from first-level consumer to top predator. Previously published high-quality data on PCB water concentrations in the two areas were used for calculation of bioaccumulation factors (BAF). BAF was calculated as the ratio of the PCB concentration in the organism ([PCB](org); pg/kg lipid) to the dissolved water concentration (C(w); pg/L). The BAF(Arctic):BAF(Temperate) ratios were above 1 for all four PCB congeners in zooplankton (6.4-13.8) and planktivorous fish (2.9-5.0)), whereas the ratios were below 1 in seal. The mean ratio between arctic and temperate BAFs for all trophic levels and congeners (BAF(Arcti):BAF(Temperate)) was 4.8. When the data were corrected for the seawater temperature difference between the two ecosystems, the ratio was 2.0. We conclude that bioaccumulation differences caused by ecological or physiological adaptations of organisms between the two ecosystems were well within a water concentration variability of 50%. Further, our data support the hypothesis that lower seawater temperature lead to a thermodynamically favoured passive partitioning to organic matrices and thus elevated ambient BAFs in the Arctic compared to the Baltic Sea. This would imply that bioaccumulation in the Arctic may be described in the same way as bioaccumulation in temperate regions, e.g. by the use of mechanistic models parameterised for the Arctic. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A comparison of PCB bioaccumulation factors between an arctic and a temperate marine food web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobek, Anna; McLachlan, Michael S.; Borga, Katrine; Asplund, Lillemor; Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin; Polder, Anuschka; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2010-01-01

    To test how environmental conditions in the Arctic and the resulting ecological adaptations affect accumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the marine food web, bioaccumulation of four polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an arctic (Barents Sea 77 o N-82 o N) and a temperate marine (Baltic Sea 54 o N-62 o N) food web were compared. Three different trophic levels were studied (zooplankton, fish, and seal), representing the span from first-level consumer to top predator. Previously published high-quality data on PCB water concentrations in the two areas were used for calculation of bioaccumulation factors (BAF). BAF was calculated as the ratio of the PCB concentration in the organism ([PCB] org ; pg/kg lipid) to the dissolved water concentration (C w ; pg/L). The BAF Arctic :BAF Temperate ratios were above 1 for all four PCB congeners in zooplankton (6.4-13.8) and planktivorous fish (2.9-5.0)), whereas the ratios were below 1 in seal. The mean ratio between arctic and temperate BAFs for all trophic levels and congeners (BAF Arcti :BAF Temperate ) was 4.8. When the data were corrected for the seawater temperature difference between the two ecosystems, the ratio was 2.0. We conclude that bioaccumulation differences caused by ecological or physiological adaptations of organisms between the two ecosystems were well within a water concentration variability of 50%. Further, our data support the hypothesis that lower seawater temperature lead to a thermodynamically favoured passive partitioning to organic matrices and thus elevated ambient BAFs in the Arctic compared to the Baltic Sea. This would imply that bioaccumulation in the Arctic may be described in the same way as bioaccumulation in temperate regions, e.g. by the use of mechanistic models parameterised for the Arctic.

  4. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T.

    1996-01-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000 degrees for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 μm. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10 -3 to 5 x 10 -1 /s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700 degrees C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10 -5 torr ( -3 Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system

  5. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  6. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    Oxyfuel firing and subsequent capture of CO2 is a way to reduce CO2 emissions from coal‐fired boilers. Literature is summarized highlighting results which may contribute to understanding of the corrosion processes in an oxyfuel boiler.Tests were conducted in a 500 kWth oxyfuel test facility...... constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...... to nickel alloys were exposed at set metal temperatures of 570 and 630 °C for 287 h. The specimens were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and X‐ray diffraction.The deposit on the probe contained predominantly CaSO4 and Fe2O3. Oxide thickness and depth of the precipitated...

  7. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 μm/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions

  8. Low temperature storage test phase 2 : identification of problem species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    The use of renewable fuels such as biodiesel, in motor vehicle fuels is expected to grow rapidly in North America as a result of governmental mandates. Biodiesel is a fuel component made from plant and animal feedstocks via a transesterification process. The fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) of biodiesel have cloud points that range from 5 degrees C to -15 degrees C. The poor low temperature performance of blends containing FAME must be understood in order to avoid operability issues. This paper presented the results of several testing programs conducted by researchers to investigate filter plugging in biodiesel fuels caused by high levels of saturated monoglycerides. The low temperature storage stability of 57 biodiesel fuels comprised of B5 and B20 made with canola methyl ester (CME), soybean methyl ester (SME), tallow methyl ester (TME) and palm methyl ester (PME) was investigated. Filter blocking tests were conducted to assess storage stability. Deposits from the blends were analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to identify the problem species. Results of the study confirmed the deleterious impact of saturated mono-glycerides in FAME on the low temperature operability of filters in fuel handling systems. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs. 9 appendices.

  9. Evolutionary adaptation of muscle power output to environmental temperature: force-velocity characteristics of skinned fibres isolated from antarctic, temperate and tropical marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, I A; Altringham, J D

    1985-09-01

    Single fast fibres were isolated from the myotomal muscles of icefish (Chaenocephalus aceratus Lönnberg, Antarctica), North Sea Cod (Gadus morhua L.) and Pacific Blue Marlin (Makaira nigricans Wakiya, Hawaii). Fibres were chemically skinned with the non-ionic detergent Brij-58. Maximum tensions (Po, kN m-2) developed at the characteristic body temperature of each species are 231 for icefish (-1 degree C), 187 for cod (8 degrees C) and 156 for marlin (20 degrees C). At 0 degree C Po is 7 times higher for fibres from the icefish than from the marlin. Fibres from icefish and cod failed to relax completely following activations at temperatures above approximately 12 degrees C. The resultant post-contraction force is associated with a proportional increase in stiffness, suggesting the formation of a population of Ca-insensitive cross bridges. At 10 degrees C there is little interspecific variation in unloaded contraction velocity (Vmax) among the three species. Vmax (muscle lengths s-1) at normal body temperatures are 0.9 for icefish (-1 degree C), 1.0 for cod (8 degrees C) and 3.4 for marlin (20 degrees C). The force-velocity (P-V) relationship becomes progressively more curved with increasing temperature for all three species. Maximum power output for the fast muscle fibres from the Antarctic species at -1 degree C is around 60% of that of the tropical fish at 20 degrees C. Evolutionary temperature compensation of muscle power output appears largely to involve differences in the ability of cross bridges to generate force.

  10. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  11. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  12. Projected Temperature-Related Years of Life Lost From Stroke Due To Global Warming in a Temperate Climate City, Asia: Disease Burden Caused by Future Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoxing; Guo, Qun; Liu, Yang; Li, Yixue; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2018-04-01

    Global warming has attracted worldwide attention. Numerous studies have indicated that stroke is associated with temperature; however, few studies are available on the projections of the burden of stroke attributable to future climate change. We aimed to investigate the future trends of stroke years of life lost (YLL) associated with global warming. We collected death records to examine YLL in Tianjin, China, from 2006 to 2011. We fitted a standard time-series Poisson regression model after controlling for trends, day of the week, relative humidity, and air pollution. We estimated temperature-YLL associations with a distributed lag nonlinear model. These models were then applied to the local climate projections to estimate temperature-related YLL in the 2050s and 2070s. We projected temperature-related YLL from stroke in Tianjin under 19 global-scale climate models and 3 different greenhouse gas emission scenarios. The results showed a slight decrease in YLL with percent decreases of 0.85%, 0.97%, and 1.02% in the 2050s and 0.94%, 1.02%, and 0.91% in the 2070s for the 3 scenarios, respectively. The increases in heat-related annual YLL and the decreases in cold-related YLL under the high emission scenario were the strongest. The monthly analysis showed that the most significant increase occurred in the summer months, particularly in August, with percent changes >150% in the 2050s and up to 300% in the 2070s. Future changes in climate are likely to lead to an increase in heat-related YLL, and this increase will not be offset by adaptation under both medium emission and high emission scenarios. Health protections from hot weather will become increasingly necessary, and measures to reduce cold effects will also remain important. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin - 12088

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, R.L.; Rinehart, D.E.; Brown, G.N.; Peterson, R.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing Cs-137. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50 deg. C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow at elevated temperature (45 deg., 50 deg., 55 deg., 60 deg., 65 deg., 75 deg. C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45 deg. C. Above 60 deg. C the resin appears to not load at all. It was observed that the resin disintegrated at 75 deg. C until not much was left and partially disintegrated at 65 deg. C, which caused the column to plug in both tests after ∼336 hours. The results indicate that WTP will lose resin loading capacity if the ion exchange process is performed above 25 deg. C, and the resin will disintegrate above 65 deg. C. Therefore, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures to perform the ion exchange process with this resin. PNNL and WTP are currently evaluating the operating limits of the resin in further detail. Aging in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} also caused the resin to lose capacity above 25 deg. C and to completely dissolve at 55 deg. C. Again, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures when eluting the resin with nitric acid in order to maintain resin loading capacity and avoid disintegration of the resin

  14. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  15. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing

  16. Sodium fire test at broad ranges of temperature and oxygen concentration. 4. Low temperature sodium spray fire tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Koji; Miyahara, Shinya

    2005-08-01

    Sodium spray fire tests at the initial sodium temperature of 250degC were conducted under the atmospheric conditions of air and 3% oxygen containing nitrogen to determine the sodium burning rate and the aerosol release fraction and compare them with the test results at the initial sodium temperature of 500degC in air atmosphere. In the tests, sodium was supplied using a commercial spray nozzle into a stainless steel vessel of 100 m 3 volume (SOLFA-2). The sodium burning rate was calculated from two independent methods: the consumption rate of oxygen in the vessel and the enthalpy change of vessel components during the test. The aerosol release fraction was determined from the comparison between the measured aerosol concentrations and the calculated ones by the ABC-INTG code. The main conclusions were as follows, (1) In air atmosphere, a) sodium droplets ignited instantaneously and the spray fire was observed, and b) the sodium burning rate was about 440 g-Na/s and the fraction of supplied sodium was about 70%. (2) In 3% oxygen containing nitrogen, a) ignition of sodium droplets was not observed, and b) the sodium burning rate was about 44 g-Na/s and the fraction of supplied sodium was less than 10%. (author)

  17. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  18. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented

  19. Temperature and pressure instrumentation in WWERs and their testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1998-01-01

    A description of WWER model V-213 reactors of second generation is presented and compared to analogous NPPs including description of temperature and pressure instrumentation which was tested at Paks NPP. From the experimental results it was concluded that measured response of in core neutron detector to bubbles strongly depends on the relative position of detector and point bubble injection. Neutron noise spectra show characteristic sink when the origin of bubbles is close to the detectors. Dependence of phase behaviour on the boiling conditions is included as well

  20. Standard Test Method for Normal Spectral Emittance at Elevated Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1972-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a highly accurate technique for measuring the normal spectral emittance of electrically conducting materials or materials with electrically conducting substrates, in the temperature range from 600 to 1400 K, and at wavelengths from 1 to 35 μm. 1.2 The test method requires expensive equipment and rather elaborate precautions, but produces data that are accurate to within a few percent. It is suitable for research laboratories where the highest precision and accuracy are desired, but is not recommended for routine production or acceptance testing. However, because of its high accuracy this test method can be used as a referee method to be applied to production and acceptance testing in cases of dispute. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this stan...

  1. Ambient temperature testing of the G-tunnel heated block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Board, M.P.; Hardin, E.L.; Voegele, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The G-Tunnel heated block experiment is being conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project (NNWSI). The purpose of the ambient temperature testing phase is to evaluate rock-mass mechanical properties of a block (≅8 m/sup 3/) under biaxial stress changes up to 7.5 MPa above an initialization in situ value of 3.1 MPa. Results indicate that the modulus of deformation ranges from 9.7 to 17.0 GPa and Poisson's ratio ranges from 0.21 to 0.33. In general, the higher values of the modulus and Poisson's ratio were influenced by fracture propagations parallel to the compressive stress field. Other measurements indicated that cross-hole compression (p) wave velocities and single fracture permeability values were relatively insensitive to stress changes above the in situ value

  2. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola; Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Linden, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  3. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Calibrated Cryogenic Sensors at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Junquera, T; Thermeau, J P; Casas-Cubillos, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the advancement of a program being carried out in view of selecting the cryogenic temperature sensors to be used in the LHC accelerator. About 10,000 sensors will be installed around the 26.6 km LHC ring, and most of them will be exposed to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. The following thermometric sensors : carbon resistors, thin films, and platinum resistors, have been exposed to high neutron fluences (>10$^15$ n/cm$^2$) at the ISN (Grenoble, France) Cryogenic Irradiation Test Facility. A cryostat is placed in a shielded irradiation vault where a 20 MeV deuteron beam hits a Be target, resulting in a well collimated and intense neutron beam. The cryostat, the on-line acquisition system, the temperature references and the main characteristics of the irradiation facility are described. The main interest of this set-up is its ability to monitor online the evolution of the sensors by comparing its readout with temperature references that are in principle insensitive to t...

  4. Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain

  5. Effect of Centrifuge Temperature on Routine Coagulation Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Hayrullah; Özdemir, Fatma; Köse, Elif

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of cooled and standard centrifuges on the results of coagulation tests to examine the effects of centrifugation temperature. Equal-volume blood samples from each patient were collected at the same time intervals and subjected to standard (25°C) and cooled centrifugation (2-4°C). Subsequently, the prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, and D-dimer values were determined in runs with the same lot numbers in the same coagulation device using the Dia-PT R (PT and INR), Dia-PTT-liquid (aPTT), Dia-FIB (fibrinogen), and Dia-D-dimer kits, respectively. The study enrolled 771 participants. The PT was significantly (p centrifuges were as follows: PT 10.30 versus 10.50 s; PT (INR) 1.04 versus 1.09 s; APTT 28.90 versus 29.40 s; fibrinogen 321.5 versus 322.1 mg/dL; and D-dimer 179.5 versus 168.7 µg FEU/mL. There were significant differences (p centrifuges. Centrifuge temperature can have a significant effect on the results of coagulation tests. However, broad and specific disease-based studies are needed. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Brittle fracture tests at low temperature for transport cask materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ito, Chihiro; Arai, Taku; Saegusa, Toshiari

    1993-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material were revised in 1985, and brittle fracture assessment at low temperature for transport packages are now required. This report discusses the applicability of the actual method for brittle fracture assessment of type-B transport cask materials used in JAPAN. The necessity of brittle fracture assessment at low temperature was estimated for each material of type-B transport casks used in Japan and the applicability was investigated. Dynamic fracture toughness values, K Id (J Id ), and RT NDT values of Low-Mn Carbon Steels, that are SA 350 Gr.LF1 Modify and SA 516 Gr.70 material which used in type-B transport cask body, were also obtained to check whether or not an easier and conventional test method, that prescribed in ASME CODE SECTION III, can be substituted for the dynamic fracture test method. And for bolt materials, which include 1.8Ni-0.8Cr-0.3Mo Carbon Steel and type 630 H Stainless Steel, toughness data were obtained for reference. (J.P.N.)

  7. Investigation of the Dominant Factors Influencing the ERA15 Temperature Increments at the Subtropical and Temperate Belts with a Focus over the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Hirsch-Eshkol

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A stepwise multi regression-based statistics was employed for prioritizing the influence of several factors, anthropogenic and/or natural, on the ERA15 temperature increments. The 5 factors that are defined as predictors are: topography, aerosol index (TOMS-AI, tropospheric vertical velocity along with two anthropogenic factors, population density and land use changes (Land Use Change Index (LUCI and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI trends. The seismic hazard assessment factor was also chosen as the “dummy variable” for validity. Special focus was given to the land use change factor, which was based on two different data sets; Human Impacts on Terrestrial Ecosystems (HITE data of historical land use/land cover data and of NDVI trends during 1982 and 1991. The increment analysis updates of temperature, increments analysis update (IAU (T, the predicted variable, was obtained from the ERA15 (1979–1993 reanalysis. The research consists of both spatial and vertical analyses, as well as the potential synergies of selected variables. The spatial geographic analysis is divided into three categories; (1 coarse region; (2 subregion analysis; and (c a “small cell” of 4° × 4° analysis covering the global domain. It is shown that the following three factors, topography, TOMS-AI and NDVI, are statistically significant (at the p < 0.05 level in the relationship with the IAU (T, which means that they are the most effective predictors of IAU (T, especially at the 700-hPa level during March–June. The 850-hPa level presents the weakest contribution to IAU (T, probably due to the contradicting influences of the various variables at this level. It was found that the land use effect, as expressed by the NDVI trends factor, shows a strong decrease with height and is one of the most influential near-surface factors over the East Mediterranean (EM, which explains up to 20% of the temperature increments in January at 700 hPa. Moreover

  8. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). (FY2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW of thermal power. The full power operation of 30 MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI (JAEA) received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. In fiscal 2005 year, periodical inspection and overhaul of reactivity control system were conducted, and safety demonstration tests were promoted. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2005. (author)

  9. Standard Test Method for Saltwater Pressure Immersion and Temperature Testing of Photovoltaic Modules for Marine Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand repeated immersion or splash exposure by seawater as might be encountered when installed in a marine environment, such as a floating aid-to-navigation. A combined environmental cycling exposure with modules repeatedly submerged in simulated saltwater at varying temperatures and under repetitive pressurization provides an accelerated basis for evaluation of aging effects of a marine environment on module materials and construction. 1.2 This test method defines photovoltaic module test specimens and requirements for positioning modules for test, references suitable methods for determining changes in electrical performance and characteristics, and specifies parameters which must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be ...

  10. development and testing of multi-level temperature probe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... resistant, adjustable multi-sensor temperature probe for underwater temperature measurement. It consists of three ... This results in a longitudinal change in water temperature as the .... Source: The Engineering Toolbox ...

  11. Method to Predict Tempering of Steels Under Non-isothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.; Kohli, A.

    2017-05-01

    A common way of representing the tempering responses of steels is with a "tempering parameter" that includes the effect of temperature and time on hardness after hardening. Such functions, usually in graphical form, are available for many steels and have been applied for isothermal tempering. In this article, we demonstrate that the method can be extended to non-isothermal conditions. Controlled heating experiments were done on three grades in order to verify the method.

  12. Operating experiences since rise-to-power test in high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shuji; Motegi, Toshihiro; Kawano, Shuichi; Kameyama, Yasuhiko; Sekita, Kenji; Kawasaki, Kozo

    2007-03-01

    The rise-to-power test of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was actually started in April 2000. The rated thermal power of 30MW and the rated reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850degC were achieved in the middle of Dec. 2001. After that, the reactor thermal power of 30MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC were achieved in the final rise-to-power test in April 2004. After receiving the operation licensing at 850degC, the safety demonstration tests have conducted to demonstrate inherent safety features of the HTGRs as well as to obtain the core and plant transient data for validation of safety analysis codes and for establishment of safety design and evaluation technologies. This paper summarizes the HTTR operating experiences for six years from start of the rise-to-power test that are categorized into (1) Operating experiences related to advanced gas-cooled reactor design, (2) Operating experiences for improvement of the performance, (3) Operating experiences due to fail of system and components. (author)

  13. Considerations in Execution of High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign is currently supporting a range of experimental efforts aimed at development and qualification of so-called ‘accident tolerant’ nuclear fuel forms. Numerous criteria have been developed by which proposed systems will be investigated; foremost among these will be their resistance to oxidation at high temperatures by steamdominated atmospheres. Experimental characterization of the various proposed systems is currently ongoing at numerous national laboratories as well as at industrial and university partners using a wide range of different laboratory equipment and techniques. This requires consideration of differences that may develop among test protocols due to both intrinsic (e.g. differences between experimental capabilities) and extrinsic (e.g. methodology of test execution) factors. These are essential to understand to provide confidence across institutions in the data collected if it is used to justify resources for further investigation. The focus of this document is to provide an initial discussion of factors that may play a role in governing the observed oxidation of a test sample. It will remain up to the principle investigator to judge whether a specific factor discussed is directly applicable to the system under investigation. The purpose of the specific experiment must also guide determination of whether a given factor requires careful consideration or not.

  14. Operation, test, research and development of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). FY2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power, constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan. The HTTR was attained at the full power operation of 30MW in December 2001 and achieved the 950degC of outlet coolant temperature at the outside the reactor pressure vessel in June 2004. To establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs, we have obtained demonstration test data necessary for several R and Ds, and accumulated operation and maintenance experience of HTGRs throughout the HTTR's operation such as rated power operations, safety demonstration tests and long-term high temperature operations, and so on. In fiscal year 2013, we started to prepare the application document of reactor installation license for the HTTR to prove conformity with the new research reactor's safety regulatory requirements taken effect from December 2013. We had been making effort to restart the HTTR which was stopped since the 2011 when the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (2011.3.11) occurred. This report summarizes activities and results of HTTR operation, maintenance, and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year 2013. (author)

  15. Operation, test, research and development of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). FY2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW of thermal power, constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan. The HTTR was attained at the full power operation of 30 MW in December 2001 and achieved the 950degC of coolant outlet temperature at outside of the reactor pressure vessel in June 2004. To establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs, we have obtained demonstration test data necessary for several R and Ds, and accumulated operation and maintenance experience of HTGRs throughout the HTTR's operation such as rated power operations, safety demonstration tests and long-term high temperature operations, and so on. In fiscal year 2014, we started to apply the application document of reactor installation license for the HTTR to prove conformity with the new research reactor's safety regulatory requirements taken effect from December 2013. We had been making effort to restart the HTTR which was stopped since the 2011 by the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. This report summarizes activities and results of HTTR operation, maintenance, and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year 2014. (author)

  16. submitter Experimental temperature measurements for the energy amplifier test

    CERN Document Server

    Calero, J; Gallego, E; Gálvez, J; García Tabares, L; González, E; Jaren, J; López, C; Lorente, A; Martínez Val, J M; Oropesa, J; Rubbia, C; Rubio, J A; Saldana, F; Tamarit, J; Vieira, S

    1996-01-01

    A uranium thermometer has been designed and built in order to make local power measurements in the First Energy Amplifier Test (FEAT). Due to the experimental conditions power measurements of tens to hundreds of nW were required, implying a sensitivity in the temperature change measurements of the order of 1 mK. A uranium thermometer accurate enough to match that sensitivity has been built. The thermometer is able to determine the absolute energetic gain obtained in a tiny subcritical uranium assembly exposed to a proton beam of kinetic energies between 600 MeV and 2.75 GeV. In addition, the thermometer measurements have provided information about the spatial power distribution and the shape of the neutron spallation cascade.

  17. Low cycle fatigue testing in flowing sodium at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flagella, P.N.; Kahrs, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes equipment developed to obtain low cycle strain-controlled fatigue data in flowing sodium at elevated temperatures. Operation and interaction of the major components of the system are discussed, including the calibration technique using remote strain measurement and control. Confirmation of in-air results using the special technique is demonstrated, with data presented for Type 316 stainless steel tested in high purity flowing sodium at 593 0 C. The fatigue life of the material in sodium is essentially the same as that obtained in air for delta epsilon/sub t/= 1 percent. On the other hand, sodium pre-exposure at 650 0 C for 5000 hours increased the fatigue life in-sodium by a factor of two, and sodium pre-exposure at 718 0 C for 5000 hours increased the fatigue life in-sodium by a factor of three

  18. Ratcheting tests on stainless steel 316 L at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousseran, Pierre; Lebey, Jacques; Roche, Roland; Corbel, P.

    1980-06-01

    An experimental study on progressive distortion (tension-torsion) of simple structures (thin tubes) has been undertaken at the CEA. Results of tests performed on 316 L steel at room temperature are reported in this paper. There are chiefly: - plastic iso-deformation curves in the field of the 2 loadings applied to the specimen, i.e. the constant primary loading P (tension) and the secondary loading ΔQ (cyclic torsion at controled deformation); - indications on the evolution of torque and of torsion plastic deformation, during the cycling; - a convenient rule for evaluation of the progressive distortion is proposed. It is based on the use of an effective stress Psub(eff), which is determined from the tensile characteristics of the material, of when creep occurs, from creep curves [fr

  19. Effect of Tempering and Baking on the Charpy Impact Energy of Hydrogen-Charged 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Lee, E. W.; Frazier, W. E.; Niji, K.; Battel, G.; Tran, A.; Iriarte, E.; Perez, O.; Ruiz, H.; Choi, T.; Stoyanov, P.; Ogren, J.; Alrashaid, J.; Es-Said, O. S.

    2015-01-01

    Tempered AISI 4340 steel was hydrogen charged and tested for impact energy. It was found that samples tempered above 468 °C (875 °F) and subjected to hydrogen charging exhibited lower impact energy values when compared to uncharged samples. No significant difference between charged and uncharged samples tempered below 468 °C (875 °F) was observed. Neither exposure nor bake time had any significant effect on impact energy within the tested ranges.

  20. Ultra low carbon bainitic (ULCB) steels after quenching and tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Kolan, C.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and Charpy V impact strength properties of new advanced ultra low carbon bainitic (ULBC) steels after water quenching and tempering (WQT) have been investigated. Their chemical compositions are given. The nine continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT) of the new ULCB steel grades have been established. The CCT diagrams for ULCB N i steels containing 9% Ni - grade 10N9 and 5% Ni - grade HN5MVNb are given. The comparison between CCT diagrams of 3.5%Ni + 1.5%Cu containing steels grade HSLA 100 and HN3MCu is shown. The effect of the increase in carbon and titanium contents in the chemical composition of ULCB M n steels 04G3Ti, 06G3Ti and 09G3Ti on the kinetics of phase transformations during continuous cooling is presented by the shifting CCT diagrams. The Charpy V impact strength and brittle fracture occurence curves are shown. The effect of tempering temperature on tensile properties of WQT HN3MCu steel is shown and Charpy V impact strength curves after different tempering conditions are shown. The optimum tempering temperatures region of HN3MCu steel for high Charpy V impact toughness at law temperatures - 80 o C(193 K) and -120 o C(153 K) is estimated. The effect of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of HN5MVNb steel is given. The low temperature impact Charpy V toughness of HN5MVNb steel is shown. The optimum range of tempering temperature during 1 hour for high toughness of WQT HN5MVNb steel is given. HN3MCu and HN5MVNb steels after WQT have high yield strength YS≥690 MPa and high Charpy V impact toughness KV≥80 J at -100 o C (173K) and KCV≥50 J/cm 2 at - 120 o C (153K) so they may be used for cryogenic applications

  1. Implementation of Moderator Circulation Test Temperature Measurement System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yeong Muk; Hong, Seok Boong; Kim, Min Seok; Choi, Hwa Rim [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Shin [Chungnam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Moderator Circulation Test(MCT) facility is 1/4 scale facility designed to reproduce the important characteristics of moderator circulation in a CANDU6 calandria under a range of operating conditions. MCT is an equipment with 380 acrylic pipes instead of the heater rods and a preliminary measurement of velocity field using PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) is performed under the iso-thermal test conditions. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started implementation of MCT Temperature Measurement System (TMS) using multiple infrared sensors. To control multiple infrared sensors, MCT TMS is implemented using National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The MCT TMS is implemented to measure sensor data of multiple infrared sensors using the LabVIEW. The 35 sensor pipes of MCT TMS are divided into 2 ports to meet the minimum measurement time of 0.2 seconds. The software of MCT TMS is designed using collection function and processing function. The MCT TMS has the function of monitoring the states of multiple infrared sensors. The GUI screen of MCT TMS is composed of sensor pipe categories for user.

  2. Implementation of Moderator Circulation Test Temperature Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yeong Muk; Hong, Seok Boong; Kim, Min Seok; Choi, Hwa Rim; Kim, Hyung Shin

    2016-01-01

    Moderator Circulation Test(MCT) facility is 1/4 scale facility designed to reproduce the important characteristics of moderator circulation in a CANDU6 calandria under a range of operating conditions. MCT is an equipment with 380 acrylic pipes instead of the heater rods and a preliminary measurement of velocity field using PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) is performed under the iso-thermal test conditions. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started implementation of MCT Temperature Measurement System (TMS) using multiple infrared sensors. To control multiple infrared sensors, MCT TMS is implemented using National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The MCT TMS is implemented to measure sensor data of multiple infrared sensors using the LabVIEW. The 35 sensor pipes of MCT TMS are divided into 2 ports to meet the minimum measurement time of 0.2 seconds. The software of MCT TMS is designed using collection function and processing function. The MCT TMS has the function of monitoring the states of multiple infrared sensors. The GUI screen of MCT TMS is composed of sensor pipe categories for user

  3. The effectiveness of common thermo-regulatory behaviours in a cool temperate grasshopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rebecca M B; McQuillan, Peter; Hughes, Lesley

    2015-08-01

    Behavioural thermoregulation has the potential to alleviate the short-term impacts of climate change on some small ectotherms, without the need for changes to species distributions or genetic adaptation. We illustrate this by measuring the effect of behaviour in a cool temperate species of grasshopper (Phaulacridium vittatum) over a range of spatial and temporal scales in laboratory and natural field experiments. Microhabitat selection at the site scale was tested in free-ranging grasshoppers and related to changing thermal quality over a daily period. Artificial warming experiments were then used to measure the temperature at which common thermoregulatory behaviours are initiated and the subsequent reductions in body temperature. Behavioural means such as timing of activity, choice of substrates with optimum surface temperatures, shade seeking and postural adjustments (e.g. stilting, vertical orientation) were found to be highly effective at maintaining preferred body temperature. The maximum voluntarily tolerated temperature (MVT) was determined to be 44°C±0.4°C, indicating the upper bounds of thermal flexibility in this species. Behavioural thermoregulation effectively enables small ectotherms to regulate exposure to changing environmental temperatures and utilize the spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments they occupy. Species such as the wingless grasshopper, although adapted to cool temperate conditions, are likely to be well equipped to respond successfully to coarse scale climate change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of double quenching and tempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel 5Cr steel processed by electro-slag casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Tao; Song, Chenghao; Zhang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) treatment as well as conventional high temperature quenching and tempering (CQT) treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of low carbon 5Cr martensitic as cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure changes were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characteristics of carbides precipitated during tempering were analyzed on both carbon extraction replica and thin foil samples by TEM. The mechanical performance was evaluated by Vickers hardness test, tensile test, and Charpy V-notch impact test at ambient temperature. The results of microstructure study indicated that DQT treatment led to a finer microstructure than that of CQT. The carbides of the tempered samples were identified as M 7 C 3 . The carbides along the prior austenite grain boundaries nucleated directly while those within the laths should be transformed from cementite which formed at the early tempering stage. Compared with CQT condition, yield strength slightly increased after DQT treatment, and impact toughness improved a lot. The strengthening mechanisms were analyzed and it was found that grain refining and precipitation strengthening were mainly responsible for the increase of strength. The superior toughness of DQT condition was attributed to the finer microstructure resulting in more frequent deflections of the cleavage crack and the smaller size of carbides along the prior austenite boundaries. EBSD analysis showed that both martensitic block and packet of low carbon 5Cr tempered martensitic steel could hinder crack propagation, while the latter was more effective

  5. Effect of double quenching and tempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel 5Cr steel processed by electro-slag casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: healygo@163.com; Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn; Zhou, Tao, E-mail: zhoutao130984@163.com; Song, Chenghao, E-mail: songchenghao28@126.com; Zhang, Kai, E-mail: zhangkai8901@126.com

    2014-12-01

    The effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) treatment as well as conventional high temperature quenching and tempering (CQT) treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of low carbon 5Cr martensitic as cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure changes were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characteristics of carbides precipitated during tempering were analyzed on both carbon extraction replica and thin foil samples by TEM. The mechanical performance was evaluated by Vickers hardness test, tensile test, and Charpy V-notch impact test at ambient temperature. The results of microstructure study indicated that DQT treatment led to a finer microstructure than that of CQT. The carbides of the tempered samples were identified as M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. The carbides along the prior austenite grain boundaries nucleated directly while those within the laths should be transformed from cementite which formed at the early tempering stage. Compared with CQT condition, yield strength slightly increased after DQT treatment, and impact toughness improved a lot. The strengthening mechanisms were analyzed and it was found that grain refining and precipitation strengthening were mainly responsible for the increase of strength. The superior toughness of DQT condition was attributed to the finer microstructure resulting in more frequent deflections of the cleavage crack and the smaller size of carbides along the prior austenite boundaries. EBSD analysis showed that both martensitic block and packet of low carbon 5Cr tempered martensitic steel could hinder crack propagation, while the latter was more effective.

  6. Data on test results of vessel cooling system of high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikusa, Akio; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2003-02-01

    High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is the first graphite-moderated helium gas cooled reactor in Japan. The rise-to-power test of the HTTR started on September 28, 1999 and thermal power of the HTTR reached its full power of 30 MW on December 7, 2001. Vessel Cooling System (VCS) of the HTTR is the first Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) applied for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors. The VCS cools the core indirectly through the reactor pressure vessel to keep core integrity during the loss of core flow accidents such as depressurization accident. Minimum heat removal of the VCS to satisfy its safety requirement is 0.3MW at 30 MW power operation. Through the performance test of the VCS in the rise-to-power test of the HTTR, it was confirmed that the VCS heat removal at 30 MW power operation was higher than 0.3 MW. This paper shows outline of the VCS and test results on the VCS performance. (author)

  7. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa [BandTech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Linden, Johan [Aabo Akademi, Aabo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  8. The development and testing of a computerised temperature control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Blignaut

    electric ovens require the average internal temperature at each thermostat setting ..... higher temperatures and are more porous and conse- quently less compact and .... by a combination of vis- cometry and electrical resistance oven heating.

  9. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  10. Temperature as a diagnostic for the drift scale test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W; Wagoner, J; Ballard, S

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for its feasibility as a potential deep geological repository of high-level nuclear waste. In a deep geological repository, the radioactive decay heat released from high-level nuclear waste will heat up the rock mass. The heat will mobilize pore water in the rock mass by evaporation, and even boiling, if the thermal load is great enough. The water vapor/steam will flow away from the heat source because of pressure and thermal gradients and the effects of buoyancy force. The vapor/steam may flow along fractures or highly permeable zones and condense into liquid water in the cooler regions. Gravity and fracture network will control the drainage of the condensed water. Some of the water may flow back toward the waste package and reevaporated. This thermal-hydrological (TH) process will affect the amount of water that may come into contact with the waste package. Water is the main concern for the integrity of the waste package and the waste form, and the potential transport of radioactive nuclides. Thermally driven chemical and mechanical processes may affect the TH process. The coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes need to be understood before the performance of a repository can be adequately predicted. DOE is conducting field thermal tests to provide data for validating the model of the coupled THMC processes. Therefore, understanding the processes revealed by a field thermal test is essential for the model validation. This paper presents examples that temperature measurement is an effective tool for understanding the TH process

  11. Tropical Malaysians and temperate Koreans exhibit significant differences in sweating sensitivity in response to iontophoretically administered acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Beom; Bae, Jun-Sang; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Yang, Hun-Mo; Min, Young-Ki

    2009-03-01

    Natives of the tropics are able to tolerate high ambient temperatures. This results from their long-term residence in hot and often humid tropical climates. This study was designed to compare the peripheral mechanisms of thermal sweating in tropical natives with that of their temperate counterparts. Fifty-five healthy male subjects including 20 native Koreans who live in the temperate Korean climate (Temperate-N) and 35 native tropical Malaysian men that have lived all of their lives in Malaysia (Tropical-N) were enrolled in this study after providing written informed consent to participate. Quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing after iontophoresis (2 mA for 5 min) with 10% acetylcholine (ACh) was used to determine directly activated (DIR) and axon reflex-mediated (AXR) sweating during ACh iontophoresis. The sweat rate, activated sweat gland density, sweat gland output per single gland activated, and oral and skin temperature changes were measured. The sweat onset time of AXR (nicotinic-receptor-mediated) was 56 s shorter in the Temperate-N than in the Tropical-N subjects ( P < 0.0001). The nicotinic-receptor-mediated sweating activity AXR (1), and the muscarinic-receptor-mediated sweating activity DIR, in terms of sweat volume, were 103% and 59% higher in the Temperate-N compared to the Tropical-N subjects ( P < 0.0001). The Temperate-N group also had a 17.8% ( P < 0.0001) higher active sweat gland density, 35.4% higher sweat output per gland, 0.24°C higher resting oral temperature, and 0.62°C higher resting forearm skin temperature compared to the Tropical-N subjects ( P < 0.01). ACh iontophoresis did not influence oral temperature, but increased skin temperature near where the ACh was administered, in both groups. These results suggest that suppressed thermal sweating in the Tropical-N subjects was, at least in part, due to suppressed sweat gland sensitivity to ACh through both recruitment of active sweat glands and the sweat gland output per each gland

  12. Technical operations procedure for assembly and emplacement of the soil temperature test--test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.P.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the plan for assembly, instrumentation, emplacement, and operational checkout of the soil temperature test assembly and dry well liner. The activities described cover all operations necessary to accomplish the receiving inspection, instrumentation and pre-construction handling of the dry well liner, plus all operations performed with the test article. Actual details of construction work are not covered by this procedure. Each part and/or section of this procedure is a separate function to be accomplished as required by the nature of the operation. The organization of the procedure is not intended to imply a special operational sequence or schedular requirement. Specific procedure operational sections include: receiving inspection; liner assembly operations; construction operations (by others); prepare shield plug; test article assembly and installation; and operational checkout

  13. Rapid Tempering of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI420: Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Khazaei, Bijan; Mollaahmadi, Akbar

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the effect of rapid tempering on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel has been investigated. At first, all test specimens were austenitized at 1050 °C for 1 h and tempered at 200 °C for 1 h. Then, the samples were rapidly reheated by a salt bath furnace in a temperature range from 300 to 1050 °C for 2 min and cooled in air. The tensile tests, impact, hardness and electrochemical corrosion were carried out on the reheated samples. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure and fracture surface. To investigate carbides, transmission electron microscopy and also scanning electron microscopy were used. X-ray diffraction was used for determination of the retained austenite. The results showed that the minimum properties such as the tensile strength, impact energy, hardness and corrosion resistance were obtained at reheating temperature of 700 °C. Semi-continuous carbides in the grain boundaries were seen in this temperature. Secondary hardening phenomenon was occurred at reheating temperature of 500 °C.

  14. Deterministic Modeling of the High Temperature Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortensi, J.; Cogliati, J.J.; Pope, M.A.; Ferrer, R.M.; Ougouag, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with the development of reactor physics analysis capability of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) project. In order to examine INL's current prismatic reactor deterministic analysis tools, the project is conducting a benchmark exercise based on modeling the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR). This exercise entails the development of a model for the initial criticality, a 19 column thin annular core, and the fully loaded core critical condition with 30 columns. Special emphasis is devoted to the annular core modeling, which shares more characteristics with the NGNP base design. The DRAGON code is used in this study because it offers significant ease and versatility in modeling prismatic designs. Despite some geometric limitations, the code performs quite well compared to other lattice physics codes. DRAGON can generate transport solutions via collision probability (CP), method of characteristics (MOC), and discrete ordinates (Sn). A fine group cross section library based on the SHEM 281 energy structure is used in the DRAGON calculations. HEXPEDITE is the hexagonal z full core solver used in this study and is based on the Green's Function solution of the transverse integrated equations. In addition, two Monte Carlo (MC) based codes, MCNP5 and PSG2/SERPENT, provide benchmarking capability for the DRAGON and the nodal diffusion solver codes. The results from this study show a consistent bias of 2-3% for the core multiplication factor. This systematic error has also been observed in other HTTR benchmark efforts and is well documented in the literature. The ENDF/B VII graphite and U235 cross sections appear to be the main source of the error. The isothermal temperature coefficients calculated with the fully loaded core configuration agree well with other benchmark participants but are 40% higher than the experimental values. This discrepancy with the measurement stems from the fact that during the experiments the control

  15. Evaluation test of high temperature strain gages used in a stethoscope for OGL-1 components in an elevated temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshimi; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki; Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    The stethoscope for OGL-1 components in a elevated temperature service (SOCETS) is a measuring system of evaluation integrity of structures for high temperature pipings during operations of Japan Material Testing Reactor. This paper is described about the results on fundamental performance on high temperature strain gages. From their test results that have been based on correlation of temperature-timestrain factors, it became clear that two weldable strain gages and a capacitance strain gage were available for strain measurements of OGL-1 components. (author)

  16. Evaluation test of high temperature strain gages used in a stethoscope for OGL-1 components in an elevated temperature service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Toshimi (Kyowa Electronic Inst. Co. Ltd. (Japan)); Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki; Toshiaki

    1982-08-01

    The stethoscope for OGL-1 components in a elevated temperature service (SOCETS) is a measuring system of evaluation integrity of structures for high temperature pipings during operations of Japan Material Testing Reactor. This paper is described about the results on fundamental performance on high temperature strain gages. From their test results that have been based on correlation of temperature-timestrain factors, it became clear that two weldable strain gages and a capacitance strain gage were available for strain measurements of OGL-1 components.

  17. High temperature mechanical tests performed on doped fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P.; Sladkoff, M.

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO 2 doped with metallic oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO 2 with a standard microstructure. All the specimens are made from a single batch of UO 2 powder. Tests with constant applied strain rate of 20μm.min -1 show that Cr 2 O 3 additions cause a decrease in the flow stress of about 15 MPa compared with the reference material. When reduced in hydrogen at 1500 deg. C the specimens present a peak stress close to the flow stress of the pure UO 2 . Measurements of creep rates are made at 1500 deg. C at applied stresses varying from 20 to 70 MPa. Cr 2 O 3 additions increase the creep-rate, up to several orders of magnitude-change from the pure material to a doped one. All the doped materials exhibit power-law creep with exponents in the range of 4.9 to 6.3. The activation energy varies from 466 to 451 kJ/mol depending on the dopant concentration. The creep of the undoped material is divided into three regimes of deformation depending on stress. At low stresses the strain rate shows a second power dependence on stress. At high stress levels a higher stress dependence is observed. The creep power-law breaks down and an exponential law holds true at higher stresses. The activation energies are found to be 410 and 560 kJ/mol in the low- and high-stress regions respectively. The former value is in good agreement with the grain boundary diffusion energy in stoichiometric polycrystalline uranium dioxide and the latter corresponds to that found for self-diffusion energy of uranium. Creep behaviours are discussed in terms of deformation mechanisms. (author)

  18. Study of the effects of austenitizing and tempering heat treatments on the alloy HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmon, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential use of the ferritic alloy Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr - 1 Mo) as an alternative to stainless steels used in high-neutron-fluence environments. The neutron radiation influences embrittlement where the impact-energy versus test-temperature curve is seen displaced to the right. As a result, commercially effective solutioning and tempering processes are needed to suppress this effect in the pre-irradiated condition. The effects of austenitizing treatments on the impact energy of HT-9 were identified. 18 figures, 6 tables

  19. Studying on tempering transformation and internal friction for low carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weijuan, E-mail: liweijuan826@163.com; Cai, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Junwei; Zhao, Shengshi; Shao, Peiying

    2017-01-02

    The changes of microstructure during the process of tempering transformation were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction and internal friction (IF) for low carbon bainite steel. The yield strength of the steel was tested after tempering transformation. The results showed that the microstructures of the experimental steel in rolled state were composed of lath bainite and granular bainite with a little Mo{sub 2}C and NbC precipitates. The lath width of bainite increased continuously with the tempering time. More cell structures with different orientations were formed in bainite laths. Furthermore, poly-gonization gradually began in some laths. The microstructure of granular bainite increased and was coarsened when it devoured the lath bainite continuously. The dislocation density of the bainitic ferrite decreased continuously as Mo{sub 2}C and NbC precipitations were further increasing. The peak value of Snoek decreased continuously in internal friction-temperature spectrum. The peak value of SKK at the surface decreased at first and then increased. The peak value of SKK at the center decreased firstly and then had little change. Besides, the yield strength of the steel increased firstly and then decreased.

  20. Studying on tempering transformation and internal friction for low carbon bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weijuan; Cai, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Junwei; Zhao, Shengshi; Shao, Peiying

    2017-01-01

    The changes of microstructure during the process of tempering transformation were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction and internal friction (IF) for low carbon bainite steel. The yield strength of the steel was tested after tempering transformation. The results showed that the microstructures of the experimental steel in rolled state were composed of lath bainite and granular bainite with a little Mo 2 C and NbC precipitates. The lath width of bainite increased continuously with the tempering time. More cell structures with different orientations were formed in bainite laths. Furthermore, poly-gonization gradually began in some laths. The microstructure of granular bainite increased and was coarsened when it devoured the lath bainite continuously. The dislocation density of the bainitic ferrite decreased continuously as Mo 2 C and NbC precipitations were further increasing. The peak value of Snoek decreased continuously in internal friction-temperature spectrum. The peak value of SKK at the surface decreased at first and then increased. The peak value of SKK at the center decreased firstly and then had little change. Besides, the yield strength of the steel increased firstly and then decreased.

  1. Modelling Vulnerability and Range Shifts in Ant Communities Responding to Future Global Warming in Temperate Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae-Sung; Li, Fengqing; Kim, Sung-Soo; Chun, Jung Hwa; Park, Young-Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is likely leading to species' distributional shifts, resulting in changes in local community compositions and diversity patterns. In this study, we applied species distribution models to evaluate the potential impacts of temperature increase on ant communities in Korean temperate forests, by testing hypotheses that 1) the risk of extinction of forest ant species would increase over time, and 2) the changes in species distribution ranges could drive upward movements of ant communities and further alter patterns of species richness. We sampled ant communities at 335 evenly distributed sites across South Korea and modelled the future distribution range for each species using generalized additive models. To account for spatial autocorrelation, autocovariate regressions were conducted prior to generalized additive models. Among 29 common ant species, 12 species were estimated to shrink their suitable geographic areas, whereas five species would benefit from future global warming. Species richness was highest at low altitudes in the current period, and it was projected to be highest at the mid-altitudes in the 2080s, resulting in an upward movement of 4.9 m yr-1. This altered the altitudinal pattern of species richness from a monotonic-decrease curve (common in temperate regions) to a bell-shaped curve (common in tropical regions). Overall, ant communities in temperate forests are vulnerable to the on-going global warming and their altitudinal movements are similar to other faunal communities.

  2. Standard test methods for elevated temperature tension tests of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedure and equipment for the determination of tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, and reduction of area of metallic materials at elevated temperatures. 1.2 Determination of modulus of elasticity and proportional limit are not included. 1.3 Tension tests under conditions of rapid heating or rapid strain rates are not included. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Investigation on tempering of granular bainite in an offshore platform steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yanlei; Jia, Tao; Zhang, Xiangjun [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, P.O. Box 105, No. 11, Lane 3, Wenhua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Zhenyu, E-mail: zyliu@mail.neu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, P.O. Box 105, No. 11, Lane 3, Wenhua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968-0521 (United States)

    2015-02-25

    Granular bainite, where M-A constituents dispersed in bainitic ferrite matrix usually presents at the half thickness region in thermo-mechanically processed heavy gauge offshore platform steel. In the present work, the decomposition of M-A constituents during tempering at 600 °C was firstly revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, which primarily involves the precipitation of cementite, recovery and recrystallization of highly dislocated ferrite matrix. Then, the effect of tempering on mechanical properties was investigated by tempering at different temperature for 60 min. Results indicated that, at tempering temperature of 500–600 °C, large quantity of micro-alloying carbides precipitated and partially compensated the loss of strength mainly due to the decomposition of M-A constituents. Compared with the as-rolled state, the decomposition of M-A constituents and softening of bainitic ferrite matrix after tempering have resulted in higher density of microvoids and substantial plastic deformation before impact failure.

  4. Effect of climate change on temperate forest ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brolsma, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    In temperate climates groundwater can have a strong effect on vegetation, because it can influence the spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture and therefore water and oxygen stress of vegetation. Current IPCC climate projections based on CO2 emission scenarios show a global temperature rise

  5. Temperature of loose coated particles in irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1975-04-01

    An analysis is presented of the temperature of a monolayer bed of loose High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) type fissioning fuel particles in an annular cavity. Both conduction and radiant heat transfer are taken into account, and the effect of particle contact with the annular cavity surfaces is evaluated. Charts are included for the determination of the maximum surface temperature of the particle coating for any size particle or power generation rate in a fuel bed of this type. The charts are intended for the design and evaluation of irradiation experiments on loose beds of coated fuel particles of the type used in HTGRs. Included in an Appendix is a method for estimating the temperature of a particle in circular hole. (U.S.)

  6. Evaluation of thermal network correction program using test temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, T.; Fink, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation process to determine the accuracy of a computer program for thermal network correction is discussed. The evaluation is required since factors such as inaccuracies of temperatures, insufficient number of temperature points over a specified time period, lack of one-to-one correlation between temperature sensor and nodal locations, and incomplete temperature measurements are not present in the computer-generated information. The mathematical models used in the evaluation are those that describe a physical system composed of both a conventional and a heat pipe platform. A description of the models used, the results of the evaluation of the thermal network correction, and input instructions for the thermal network correction program are presented.

  7. Standard test method for electrochemical critical pitting temperature testing of stainless steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for the evaluation of the resistance of stainless steel and related alloys to pitting corrosion based on the concept of the determination of a potential independent critical pitting temperature (CPT). 1.2 This test methods applies to wrought and cast products including but not restricted to plate, sheet, tubing, bar, forgings, and welds, (see Note 1). Note 1—Examples of CPT measurements on sheet, plate, tubing, and welded specimens for various stainless steels can be found in Ref (1). See the research reports (Section 14). 1.3 The standard parameters recommended in this test method are suitable for characterizing the CPT of austenitic stainless steels and other related alloys with a corrosion resistance ranging from that corresponding to solution annealed UNS S31600 (Type 316 stainless steel) to solution annealed UNS S31254 (6 % Mo stainless steel). 1.4 This test method may be extended to stainless steels and other alloys related to stainless steel that have a CPT...

  8. Rise-to-power test in High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. Test progress and summary of test results up to 30 MW of reactor thermal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Shimakawa, Satoshi

    2002-08-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is a graphite moderated and gas cooled reactor with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850degC/950degC. Rise-to-power test in the HTTR was performed from April 23rd to June 6th in 2000 as phase 1 test up to 10 MW in the rated operation mode, from January 29th to March 1st in 2001 as phase 2 test up to 20 MW in the rated operation mode and from April 14th to June 8th in 2001 as phase 3 test up to 20 MW in the high temperature test the mechanism of the reactor outlet coolant temperature becomes 850degC at 30 MW in the rated operation mode and 950degC in the high temperature test operation mode. Phase 4 rise-to-power test to achieve the thermal reactor power of 30 MW started on October 23rd in 2001. On December 7th in 2001 it was confirmed that the thermal reactor power and the reactor outlet coolant temperature reached to 30 MW and 850degC respectively in the single loaded operation mode in which only the primary pressurized water cooler is operating. Phase 4 test was performed until March 6th in 2002. JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) obtained the certificate of the pre-operation test from MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture Sports Science and Technology) after all the pre-operation tests by MEXT were passed successfully with the reactor transient test at an abnormal event as a final pre-operation test. From the test results of the rise-up-power test up to 30 MW in the rated operation mode, performance of the reactor and cooling system were confirmed, and it was also confirmed that an operation of reactor facility can be performed safely. Some problems to be solved were found through the tests. By solving them, the reactor operation with the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC will be achievable. (author)

  9. High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability testing device and leaching test of simulated high-level waste glass at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senoo, Muneaki; Banba, Tsunetaka; Tashiro, Shingo; Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio

    1979-11-01

    A High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability Testing Device (HIPSOL) was developed to evaluate long-period stability of high-level waste (HLW) solids. For simulated HLW solids, temperature dependency of the leachability was investigated at higher temperatures from 100 0 C to 300 0 C at 80 atm. Leachabilities of cesium and sodium at 295 0 C were 20 and 7 times higher than at 100 0 C, respectively. In the repository, the temperatures around solidified products may be hundred 0 C. It is essential to test them at such elevated temperatures. HIPSOL is also usable for accelerated test to evaluate long-period leaching behavior of HLW products. (author)

  10. The northern limit of corals of the genus Acropora in temperate zones is determined by their resilience to cold bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Agostini, Sylvain; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yuyama, Ikuko

    2015-12-18

    The distribution of corals in Japan covers a wide range of latitudes, encompassing tropical to temperate zones. However, coral communities in temperate zones contain only a small subset of species. Among the parameters that determine the distribution of corals, temperature plays an important role. We tested the resilience to cold stress of three coral species belonging to the genus Acropora in incubation experiments. Acropora pruinosa, which is the northernmost of the three species, bleached at 13 °C, but recovered once temperatures were increased. The two other species, A. hyacinthus and A. solitaryensis, which has a more southerly range than A. pruinosa, died rapidly after bleaching at 13 °C. The physiological effects of cold bleaching on the corals included decreased rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification, similar to the physiological effects observed with bleaching due to high temperature stress. Contrasting hot bleaching, no increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed, suggesting that reactive oxygen species play a less important role in bleaching under cold stress. These results confirmed the importance of resilience to cold stress in determining the distribution and northern limits of coral species, as cold events causing coral bleaching and high mortality occur regularly in temperate zones.

  11. Radiation processing of temperate fruits of Kashmir valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Peerzada R.; Meena, Raghuveer S.; Dar, Mohd A.; Wani, Ali M.

    2011-01-01

    Kashmir valley is famous for its temperate horticulture. Main temperate fruits grown commercially in the valley include apple, pear, peach, plum, cherry, strawberry and apricot. These fruits being perishable and susceptible to microbial spoilage, have a short shelf-life. The short shelf-life in an impediment in their transportation and marketing and results in huge losses. Study was carried out at NRL, Srinagar to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the keeping quality of most of these fruits. The effect of gamma irradiation alone and in combination with other techniques like controlled low temperature storage, edible polysaccharide coating and calcium chloride treatment was studied in detail. The results revealed that there is a great potential for the use of radiation in extending the storage life of most of the temperate fruits produced in the valley of Kashmir. (author)

  12. Effects of the carbides precipitation on the hydrogen diffusion in a low carbon steel quenched and tempered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luppo, M.I.; Ovejero Garcia, J.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusivity through steels at room temperature has been known to deviate considerably from the expected Arrhenius relation. This deviation is due to the attractive interactions between dissolved hydrogen and trapping sites (imperfections in the steel lattice). In a previous work it was shown that the apparent diffusion coefficients attain a minimum value in a fresh martensite and diffusivity increases in the same material tempered at 453 k during six hours. In order to explain this difference, the variation of hydrogen trapping sites with the tempering time, at the mentioned temperature, was studied by means of hydrogen permeation tests. Carbides precipitation was followed by means of the extraction replica technique using transmission electron microscopy. The hydrogen diffusivity obtained by the hydrogen permeation tests attained a minimum value in the quenched specimens and increased with increasing tempering time up to reach a constant value between three and six hours. This change in the hydrogen diffusivity was attributed to the trapping sites decrease promoted by carbides precipitation and their precipitation kinetics was described by an Avrami equation. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs

  13. Technology for Elevated Temperature Tests of Structural Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for full-field measurement of surface temperature and in-plane strain using a single grid imaging technique was demonstrated on a sample subjected to thermally-induced strain. The technique is based on digital imaging of a sample marked by an alternating line array of La2O2S:Eu(+3) thermographic phosphor and chromium illuminated by a UV lamp. Digital images of this array in unstrained and strained states were processed using a modified spin filter. Normal strain distribution was determined by combining unstrained and strained grid images using a single grid digital moire technique. Temperature distribution was determined by ratioing images of phosphor intensity at two wavelengths. Combined strain and temperature measurements demonstrated on the thermally heated sample were DELTA-epsilon = +/- 250 microepsilon and DELTA-T = +/- 5 K respectively with a spatial resolution of 0.8 mm.

  14. First Temperate Exoplanet Sized Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Combining observations from the CoRoT satellite and the ESO HARPS instrument, astronomers have discovered the first "normal" exoplanet that can be studied in great detail. Designated Corot-9b, the planet regularly passes in front of a star similar to the Sun located 1500 light-years away from Earth towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake). "This is a normal, temperate exoplanet just like dozens we already know, but this is the first whose properties we can study in depth," says Claire Moutou, who is part of the international team of 60 astronomers that made the discovery. "It is bound to become a Rosetta stone in exoplanet research." "Corot-9b is the first exoplanet that really does resemble planets in our solar system," adds lead author Hans Deeg. "It has the size of Jupiter and an orbit similar to that of Mercury." "Like our own giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, the planet is mostly made of hydrogen and helium," says team member Tristan Guillot, "and it may contain up to 20 Earth masses of other elements, including water and rock at high temperatures and pressures." Corot-9b passes in front of its host star every 95 days, as seen from Earth [1]. This "transit" lasts for about 8 hours, and provides astronomers with much additional information on the planet. This is fortunate as the gas giant shares many features with the majority of exoplanets discovered so far [2]. "Our analysis has provided more information on Corot-9b than for other exoplanets of the same type," says co-author Didier Queloz. "It may open up a new field of research to understand the atmospheres of moderate- and low-temperature planets, and in particular a completely new window in our understanding of low-temperature chemistry." More than 400 exoplanets have been discovered so far, 70 of them through the transit method. Corot-9b is special in that its distance from its host star is about ten times larger than that of any planet previously discovered by this method. And unlike all such

  15. Reflood behavior at low initial clad temperature in Slab Core Test Facility Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Sobajima, Makoto; Abe, Yutaka; Iwamura, Takamichi; Ohnuki, Akira; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1990-07-01

    In order to study the reflood behavior with low initial clad temperature, a reflood test was performed using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) with initial clad temperature of 573 K. The test conditions of the test are identical with those of SCTF base case test S2-SH1 (initial clad temperature 1073 K) except the initial clad temperature. Through the comparison of results from these two tests, the following conclusions were obtained. (1) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low differential pressures through the primary loops due to smaller steam generation in the core. (2) The low initial clad temperature caused the accumulated mass in the core to be increased and the accumulated mass in the downcomer to be decreased in the period of the lower plenum injection with accumulator (before 50s). In the later period of the cold leg injection with LPCI (after 100s), the water accumulation rates in the core and the downcomer were almost the same between both tests. (3) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the increase of the core inlet mass flow rate in the lower plenum injection period. However, the core inlet mass flow rate was almost the same regardless of the initial clad temperature in the later period of the cold leg injection period. (4) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low turnaround temperature, high temperature rise and fast bottom quench front propagation. (5) In the region apart from the quench front, low initial clad temperature resulted in the lower heat transfer. In the region near the quench front, almost the same heat transfer coefficient was observed between both tests. (6) No flow oscillation with a long period was observed in the SCTF test with low initial clad temperature of 573 K, while it was remarkable in the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) test which was performed with the same initial clad temperature. (J.P.N.)

  16. Effect of tempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, F.C., E-mail: zfc@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Equipment and Technology of Cold Strip Rolling, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang, X.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Lv, B. [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wu, K.M. [International Research Institute for Steel Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-16

    The effect of tempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon bainitic steel has been investigated through optical microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. A nano-level microstructure containing plate-like bainitic ferrite and film-like retained austenite is obtained by isothermal transformation at Ms+10 °C followed by tempering within 240–450 °C. Results show that the sample tempered at 340 °C occupies the optimal balance of strength and toughness by maintaining a certain level of plasticity; samples tempered at 320 °C and 360 °C with low and high yield ratio come second. The microstructure of the steel is not sensitive to tempering temperatures before 360 °C. When the temperature is increased to 450 °C, the significantly coarsened bainitic ferrite plate and the occurrence of a small quantity of carbide precipitation account for its low toughness. The amount of retained austenite increases with the tempering temperature before 400 °C, followed by decreasing with further increase in the temperature. This behavior is related to the competition between retained austenite further transforming into bainite and decomposing into carbide during tempering.

  17. The Potential of Self-Tempered Martensite and Bainite in Improving the Fatigue Strength of Thermomechanically Processed Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupp Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to a two-stage hardening and tempering process, the definition of optimized cooling routes after hot working of low-alloy Cr steel allows the adjustments of high-strength microstructures with a sufficient degree of ductility at the same time without any additional heat-treatment. While compressed air cooling after hot forging of micro-alloyed steel grades leads to the formation of lower bainite with finedispersed cementite platelets, quenching by water spray down to the martensite start temperature results in the formation of martensite, that is self-tempered during the subsequent slow-cooling in air. The precipitation of nano-sized cementite precipitates result in superior mechanical properties with respect to impact and tensile testing. Cyclic deformation and crack propagation tests being carried out using resonance testing (100Hz and ultrasonic fatigue testing (20kHz systems revealed a pronounced increase in fatigue strength by about 150MPa of the self-tempered martensite condition as compared to the bainitic modification. For the latter one, a steady decrease of the fatigue strength is observed rather than the existence of a real fatigue limit.

  18. Evolutionary and ecological differentiation in the pantropical to warm-temperate seaweed Digenea simplex (Rhodophyta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pakker, H; Klerk, H; vanCampen, JH; Olsen, JL; Breeman, AM

    Genetic differentiation among geographic isolates of the pantropical to warm-temperate red alga Digenea simplex (Wulfen) C. Agardh was investigated using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, crossing studies, and temperature tolerances experiments. Eleven isolates representing

  19. Performance Testing of a High Temperature Linear Alternator for Stirling Convertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metscher, Jonathan F.; Geng, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted performance testing of a high temperature linear alternator (HTLA) in support of Stirling power convertor development for potential future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). The high temperature linear alternator is a modified version of that used in Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and is capable of operation at temperatures up to 200 deg. Increasing the temperature capability of the linear alternator could expand the mission set of future Stirling RPS designs. High temperature Neodymium-Iron-Boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets were selected for the HTLA application, and were fully characterized and tested prior to use. Higher temperature epoxy for alternator assembly was also selected and tested for thermal stability and strength. A characterization test was performed on the HTLA to measure its performance at various amplitudes, loads, and temperatures. HTLA endurance testing at 200 deg is currently underway.

  20. Low-Cost Wireless Temperature Measurement: Design, Manufacture, and Testing of a PCB-Based Wireless Passive Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Yang, Yong; Hong, Yingping; Liang, Ting; Yao, Zong; Chen, Xiaoyong; Xiong, Jijun

    2018-02-10

    Low-cost wireless temperature measurement has significant value in the food industry, logistics, agriculture, portable medical equipment, intelligent wireless health monitoring, and many areas in everyday life. A wireless passive temperature sensor based on PCB (Printed Circuit Board) materials is reported in this paper. The advantages of the sensor include simple mechanical structure, convenient processing, low-cost, and easiness in integration. The temperature-sensitive structure of the sensor is a dielectric-loaded resonant cavity, consisting of the PCB substrate. The sensitive structure also integrates a patch antenna for the transmission of temperature signals. The temperature sensing mechanism of the sensor is the dielectric constant of the PCB substrate changes with temperature, which causes the resonant frequency variation of the resonator. Then the temperature can be measured by detecting the changes in the sensor's working frequency. The PCB-based wireless passive temperature sensor prototype is prepared through theoretical design, parameter analysis, software simulation, and experimental testing. The high- and low-temperature sensing performance of the sensor is tested, respectively. The resonant frequency decreases from 2.434 GHz to 2.379 GHz as the temperature increases from -40 °C to 125 °C. The fitting curve proves that the experimental data have good linearity. Three repetitive tests proved that the sensor possess well repeatability. The average sensitivity is 347.45 KHz / ℃ from repetitive measurements conducted three times. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the PCB-based wireless passive sensor, which provides a low-cost temperature sensing solution for everyday life, modern agriculture, thriving intelligent health devices, and so on, and also enriches PCB product lines and applications.

  1. Tempered stable laws as random walk limits

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarty, Arijit; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    Stable laws can be tempered by modifying the L\\'evy measure to cool the probability of large jumps. Tempered stable laws retain their signature power law behavior at infinity, and infinite divisibility. This paper develops random walk models that converge to a tempered stable law under a triangular array scheme. Since tempered stable laws and processes are useful in statistical physics, these random walk models can provide a basic physical model for the underlying physical phenomena.

  2. Time - Temperature Relationships of Test Head Fired and Backfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence S. Davis; Robert E. Martin

    1960-01-01

    Time-temperature relations were measured during the course of a preliminary investigation of the thermal characteristics of forest fires. Observations on 5 head fires and 5 backfires in 8-year-old gallberry-palmetto roughs on the Alapaha Experimental Range near Tifton, Georgia, are the basis for this report.

  3. Gap-closing test structures for temperature budget determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Erik Jouwert; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the extension of a method for determining the temperature budget of the process side of silicon substrates and chips, employing silicide formation reactions. In this work, silicon-on-insulator type substrates are used instead of bulk silicon wafers. By an appropriate choice of the layer

  4. 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    This work demonstrates the operation of a 30 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. This prototype stack has been developed at the Institute of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, as a proof-of-concept for a low pressure cathode air cooled HTPEM stack. The membranes used are Celtec...

  5. Novel development of the micro-tensile test at elevated temperature using a test structure with integrated micro-heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, W. C.; Kropelnicki, P.; Soe, Oak; Ling, J. H. L.; Randles, A. B.; Hum, A. J. W.; Tsai, J. M. L.; Tay, A. A. O.; Leong, K. C.; Tan, C. S.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the novel development of a micro-tensile testing method that allows testing at elevated temperatures. Instead of using a furnace, a titanium/platinum thin film micro-heater was fabricated on a conventional dog-bone-shaped test structure to heat up its gauge section locally. An infrared (IR) camera with 5 µm resolution was employed to verify the temperature uniformity across the gauge section of the test structure. With this micro-heater-integrated test structure, micro-tensile tests can be performed at elevated temperatures using any conventional tensile testing system without any major modification to the system. In this study, the tensile test of the single crystal silicon (SCS) thin film with (1 0 0) surface orientation and tensile direction was performed at room temperature and elevated temperatures, up to 300 °C. Experimental results for Young's modulus as a function of temperature are presented. A micro-sized SCS film showed a low dependence of mechanical properties on temperature up to 300 °C.

  6. Influence of tempering on mechanical properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Han, C. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Cho, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce long-lived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as primary candidate material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). RAFM steels developed so far (e.g., EUROFER 97 and F82H) meet the requirement for structural application in the ITER. However, if such alloys are used in the DEMO or commercial fusion reactor is still unclear, as the reactors are designed to operate under much severe conditions (i.e., higher outlet coolant temperature and neutron fluences). Such harsh operating conditions lead to development of RAFM steels with better creep and irradiation resistances. Mechanical properties of RAFM steels are strongly affected by microstructural features including the distribution, size and type of precipitates, dislocation density and grain size. For a given composition, such microstructural characteristics are determined mainly by thermo-mechanical process employed to fabricate the final product, and accordingly a final heat treatment, i.e., tempering is the key step to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work, we investigated mechanical properties of the RAFM steels with a particular attention being paid to effects of tempering on impact and creep properties

  7. High temperature helium test rig with prestressed concrete pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidl, H.

    1975-10-01

    The report gives a short description of the joint project prestressed concrete vessel-helium test station as there is the building up of the concrete structure, the system of instrumentation, the data processing, the development of the helium components as well as the testing programs. (author)

  8. Lay out, test verification and in orbit performance of HELIOS a temperature control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, W.

    1975-01-01

    HELIOS temperature control system is described. The main design features and the impact of interactions between experiment, spacecraft system, and temperature control system requirements on the design are discussed. The major limitations of the thermal design regarding a closer sun approach are given and related to test experience and performance data obtained in orbit. Finally the validity of the test results achieved with prototype and flight spacecraft is evaluated by comparison between test data, orbit temperature predictions and flight data.

  9. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glanville, P. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Rowley, P. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Schroeder, D. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Brand, L. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and, in some cases, return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential.

  10. Possibilities for using higher-tensile, water quenched and tempered AlSiMn fine-grained structural steel for reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, F.

    1976-01-01

    On water quenching and tempering of weldable AlSiMn structural steels, particularly the grain refining process is made use of, i.e. that measure with the poorest influence on the weldability of steel. Precipitation hardening due to water quenching is, on subsequent tempering, set off to a large extent by means of precipitation resp. coagulation of iron carbides. Minimum yield points up to 580 N/mm 2 and, simultaneously, good viscosity can be obtained by means of water quenching from austeritic temperature and tempering between 550 0 C and 650 0 C, depending on tempering temperatures and sheet thickness. In the paper at hand, results are given, obtained from tests and experience with the steel Aldur 50/65 (the first figure indicates minimum yield points, the second one minimum tensile strength on sheet thickness up to 30 mm). These results are assumed to be essential, also in connection with the construction and working conditions of nuclear power plants. (orig./RW) [de

  11. Development Of Test Rig System For Calibration Of Temperature Sensing Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Muhammad Dawood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A test rig is described, for the measurement of temperature and resistance parameters of a Temperature Sensing Fabric (TSF for calibration purpose. The equipment incorporated a temperature-controlled hotplate, two copper plates, eight thermocouples, a temperature data-logger and a four-wire high-resolution resistance measuring multimeter. The copper plates were positioned above and below the TSF and in physical contact with its surfaces, so that a uniform thermal environment might be provided. The temperature of TSF was estimated by the measurement of temperature profiles of the two copper plates. Temperature-resistance graphs were created for all the tests, which were carried out over the range of 20 to 50°C, and they showed that the temperature and resistance values were not only repeatable but also reproducible, with only minor variations. The comparative analysis between the temperature-resistance test data and the temperature-resistance reference profile showed that the error in estimation of temperature of the sensing element was less than ±0.2°C. It was also found that the rig not only provided a stable and homogenous thermal environment but also offered the capability of accurately measuring the temperature and resistance parameters. The Temperature Sensing Fabric is suitable for integration into garments for continuous measurement of human body temperature in clinical and non-clinical settings.

  12. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  13. High temperature compression tests performed on doped fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duguay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, CEA Grenoble (France); Fantozzi, G. [INSA Lyon - GEMPPM, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-12-31

    The use of additives of corundum structure M{sub 2}O{sub 3} (M=Cr, Al) is an effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO{sub 2} doped with these oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO{sub 2} with a standard microstructure. Such doped fuels are expected to exhibit enhanced plasticity. Their use would therefore reduce the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and thus improve the performances of the nuclear fuel. (orig.) 5 refs.

  14. High temperature compression tests performed on doped fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P.; Fantozzi, G.

    1997-01-01

    The use of additives of corundum structure M 2 O 3 (M=Cr, Al) is an effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO 2 doped with these oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO 2 with a standard microstructure. Such doped fuels are expected to exhibit enhanced plasticity. Their use would therefore reduce the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and thus improve the performances of the nuclear fuel. (orig.)

  15. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

  16. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  17. FaceSheet Push-off Tests to Determine Composite Sandwich Toughness at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Herring, Helen M.

    2001-01-01

    A new novel test method, associated analysis, and experimental procedures are developed to investigate the toughness of the facesheet-to-core interface of a sandwich material at cryogenic temperatures. The test method is designed to simulate the failure mode associated with facesheet debonding from high levels of gas pressure in the sandwich core. The effects of specimen orientation are considered, and the results of toughness measurements are presented. Comparisons are made between room and liquid nitrogen (-196 C) test temperatures. It was determined that the test method is insensitive to specimen facesheet orientation and strain energy release rate increases with a decrease in the test temperature.

  18. High temperature superconductivity: Concept, preparation and testing of high Tc superconductor compounds, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, Wafik

    1992-06-01

    Many studies have been carried out on high temperature superconductors with transition temperature above that of the liquid nitrogen. In this scientific study the concept and the mechanism of this phenomena are discussed, in addition the examples of preparation and testing of high temperature superconductors compounds are shown. Also the most important applications in industry are explained. (author). 15 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs

  19. Different processes lead to similar patterns: a test of codivergence and the role of sea level and climate changes in shaping a southern temperate freshwater assemblage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barber Brian R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how freshwater assemblages have been formed and maintained is a fundamental goal in evolutionary and ecological disciplines. Here we use a historical approach to test the hypothesis of codivergence in three clades of the Chilean freshwater species assemblage. Molecular studies of freshwater crabs (Aegla: Aeglidae: Anomura and catfish (Trichomycterus arealatus: Trichomycteridae: Teleostei exhibited similar levels of genetic divergences of mitochondrial lineages between species of crabs and phylogroups of the catfish, suggesting a shared evolutionary history among the three clades in this species assemblage. Results A phylogeny was constructed for Trichomycterus areolatus under the following best-fit molecular models of evolution GTR + I + R, HKY + I, and HKY for cytochrome b, growth hormone, and rag 1 respectively. A GTR + I + R model provided the best fit for both 28S and mitochondrial loci and was used to construct both Aegla phylogenies. Three different diversification models were observed and the three groups arose during different time periods, from 2.25 to 5.05 million years ago (Ma. Cladogenesis within Trichomycterus areolatus was initiated roughly 2.25 Ma (Late Pliocene - Early Pleistocene some 1.7 - 2.8 million years after the basal divergences observed in both Aegla clades. These results reject the hypothesis of codivergence. Conclusions The similar genetic distances between terminal sister-lineages observed in these select taxa from the freshwater Chilean species assemblage were formed by different processes occurring over the last ~5.0 Ma. Dramatic changes in historic sea levels documented in the region appear to have independently shaped the evolutionary history of each group. Our study illustrates the important role that history plays in shaping a species assemblage and argues against assuming similar patterns equal a shared evolutionary history.

  20. Evaluation of Integrated High Temperature Component Testing Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Soto; David Duncan; Vincent Tonc

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a large-scale component test capability to support the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and their adaptation to commercial applications that advance U.S. energy economy, reliability, and security and reduce carbon emissions.

  1. Recent developments in small punch testing: Applications at elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dymáček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 86, DEC (2016), s. 25-33 ISSN 0167-8442 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Small punch test * Creep rupture * Stress relaxation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.659, year: 2016

  2. Research on fabrication technology for thin film solar cells for practical use. Research on low-cost fabrication technology for large-area modules (Over-layered TCO on tempered glass for solar cell); Usumaku taiyo denchi seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kenkyu. Daimenseki module no tei cost seizo gijutsu (kyoka class fukugo tomei doden kiban seizo no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuta, M [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the study results on the fabrication technology of over-layered TCO on tempered glass in fiscal 1994. (1) On the fabrication technology of heat-resistant over-layered TCO, thermal deformation of TCO substrates was studied by both experiment and numerical computation. The thermal deformation increased with carrier concentration. As the observation result on change in lattice strain of heated TCO films by high-temperature X-ray diffraction, lattice strain was largely affected by thermal expansion. (2) On development of the low-temperature heat treatment method of TCO films, a technological prospect was obtained for fabrication of low-resistance TCO films by heat treatment without strength deterioration of tempered TCO substrates. (3) On development of cost reduction technology, the large-area CVD equipment was devised on the basis of the inline tempering method which tempers substrate glass by air cooling after formation of SnO2 film as fabrication method of tempered TCO. The TCO substrate tempered by air cooling could endure the drop test of 227g and 1.5m. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections

  4. Temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of commercially pure titanium by the compression test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su Min; Seo, Song Won; Park, Kyoung Joon; Min, Oak Key

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a Commercially Pure Titanium (CP-Ti) is investigated at high temperature Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) compression test with high strain-rate. Tests are performed over a temperature range from room temperature to 1000 .deg. C with interval of 200 deg. C and a strain-rate range of 1900∼2000/sec. The true flow stress-true strain relations depending on temperature are achieved in these tests. For construction of constitutive equation from the true flow stress-true strain relation, parameters for the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is determined. And the modified Johnson-Cook equation is used for investigation of behavior of flow stress in vicinity of recrystallization temperature. The modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is more suitable in expressing the dynamic behavior of a CP-Ti at high temperature, i.e. about recrystallization temperature

  5. Design, Qualification and Integration Testing of the High-Temperature Resistance Temperature Device for Stirling Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jack; Hill, Dennis H.; Elisii, Remo; White, Jonathan R.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), developed from 2006 to 2013 under the joint sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to provide a high-efficiency power system for future deep space missions, employed Sunpower Incorporated's Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) with operating temperature up to 840 C. High-temperature operation was made possible by advanced heater head materials developed to increase reliability and thermal-to-mechanical conversion efficiency. During a mission, it is desirable to monitor the Stirling hot-end temperature as a measure of convertor health status and assist in making appropriate operating parameter adjustments to maintain the desired hot-end temperature as the radioisotope fuel decays. To facilitate these operations, a Resistance Temperature Device (RTD) that is capable of high-temperature, continuous long-life service was designed, developed and qualified for use in the ASRG. A thermal bridge was also implemented to reduce the RTD temperature exposure while still allowing an accurate projection of the ASC hot-end temperature. NASA integrated two flight-design RTDs on the ASCs and assembled into the high-fidelity Engineering Unit, the ASRG EU2, at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for extended operation and system characterization. This paper presents the design implementation and qualification of the RTD, and its performance characteristics and calibration in the ASRG EU2 testing.

  6. Mechanical Tensile Testing of Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bryan L.; Martinez, Raul M.; Shirron, Peter; Tuttle, Jim; Galassi, Nicholas M.; Mcguinness, Daniel S.; Puckett, David; Francis, John J.; Flom, Yury

    2011-01-01

    Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thennal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

  7. Method for independent strain and temperature measurement in polymeric tensile test specimen using embedded FBG sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    to calculate independently the strain and temperature are presented in the article, together with a measurement resolution study. This multi-parameter measurement method was applied to an epoxy tensile specimen, tested in a unidirectional tensile test machine with a temperature controlled cabinet. A full......A novel method to obtain independent strain and temperature measurements using embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) in polymeric tensile test specimens is presented in this paper. The FBG strain and temperature cross-sensitivity was decoupled using two single mode FBG sensors, which were embedded...... of temperature, from 40 C to -10 C. The consistency of the expected theoretical results with the calibration procedure and the experimental validation shows that this proposed method is applicable to measure accurate strain and temperature in polymers during static or fatigue tensile testing. Two different...

  8. Temperature dependence of magnetic descriptors of Magnetic Adaptive Testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Takagi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2010), s. 509-512 ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1323; GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * magnetic hysteresis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.052, year: 2010

  9. Some tests of flat plate photovoltaic module cell temperatures in simulated field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.; Rathod, M. S.; Paslaski, J.

    1981-01-01

    The nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules is an important characteristic. Typically, the power output of a PV module decreases 0.5% per deg C rise in cell temperature. Several tests were run with artificial sun and wind to study the parametric dependencies of cell temperature on wind speed and direction and ambient temperature. It was found that the cell temperature is extremely sensitive to wind speed, moderately so to wind direction and rather insensitive to ambient temperature. Several suggestions are made to obtain data more typical of field conditions.

  10. Some new fatigue tests in high temperature water and liquid sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Kanasaki, Hiroshi; Kondo, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Tadayoshi.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue strength of structural materials for PWR or FBR plants, fatigue test data must be obtained in an environment of simulated primary and secondary water for PWR or of high temperature liquid sodium for FBR. Generally, such tests make it necessary to prepare expensive facilities, so when large amount of fatigue data are required, it is necessary to rationalize and simplify the fatigue tests while maintaining high accuracy. At the Takasago Research Development Center, efforts to rationalize facilities and maintain accuracy in fatigue tests have been made by developing new test methods and improving conventional techniques. This paper introduces a new method of low cycle fatigue test in high temperature water, techniques for automatic measurement of crack initiation and propagation in high temperature water environment and a multiple type fatigue testing machine for high temperature liquid sodium. (author)

  11. Effect of microalloying elements on microstructure and properties of quenched and tempered constructional steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingshen; Huang, Leqing; Di, Guobiao; Wang, Yanfeng; Yang, Yongda; Ma, Changwen

    2017-09-01

    The effects of microalloying elements Nb, V and Ti on microstructure and properties of quenched and tempered steel were studied. Results showed that the addition of microalloying elements led to the formation of bainite and increased strength, while the austenization and ferrite transformation temperature was barely affected, i.e. 10°C. Microalloying elements shortened the incubation time for bainite transformation by refinement of austenite grain, and decreased the hardenability by forming carbides and therefore reducing the carbon content of super-cooled austenite. Either of them promoted the bainite transformation. The better tempering stability was ascribed to the as hot-rolled bainite microstructure and secondary carbide precipitation during tempering.

  12. On the tempered martensite embrittlement in AISI 4140 low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, F.A. (Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Catholic Univ., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)); Pereira, L.C.; Gatts, C. (Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Federal Univ., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)); Graca, M.L. (Materials Div., Technical Aerospace Center, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil))

    1991-02-01

    In the present investigation the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) technique was used to determine local carbon and phosphorus concentrations on the fracture surfaces of as-quenched and quenched-and-tempered (at 350deg C) AISI 4140 steel specimens austenitized at low and high temperatures. The AES results were rationalized to conclude that, although carbide growth as well as phosphorus segregation are expected to contribute to tempered martensite embrittlement, carbide precipitation on prior austenite grain boundaries during tempering is seen to be the microstructural change directly responsible for the occurrence of the referred embrittlement phenomenon. (orig.).

  13. Wear behavior of tempered and borided tool steels under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haidary, T. J.; Faleh, M. N.

    2000-01-01

    . Tool steel 61CrV5, 50 NiCr13 and X1000Cr MoV51 were used in the first stage of this investigation. They have been treated as follows: boriding, boriding and tempering and hardening and tempering. The wear tests were conducted under fixed conditions (150 N/mm 2 , 0.48m/sec) with and without lubricant. The wear rate and coefficient of friction of 61Cr Si V5 steel have been studied in the second stage hoping to find the influence of working conditions on these parameters and then to compare these results with the case of hardening and tempering which is the usual case in the actual working field. The study gives a good indication about the improvement achieved in boriding and tempering cases (∼ 30%) as compared with hardening tempering cases in dry sliding conditions -∼5% with lubricating ones. (authors). 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 table

  14. Solar cell contact pull strength as a function of pull-test temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, R. K.; Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four types of solar cell contacts were given pull-strength tests at temperatures between -173 and +165 C. Contacts tested were: (1) solder-coated titanium-silver contacts on n-p cells, (2) palladium-containing titanium-silver contacts on n-p cells, (3) titanium-silver contacts on 0.2-mm-thick n-p cells, and (4) solder-coated electroless-nickel-plated contacts on p-n cells. Maximum pull strength was demonstrated at temperatures significantly below the air mass zero cell equilibrium temperature of +60 C. At the lowest temperatures, the chief failure mechanism was silicon fracture along crystallographic planes; at the highest temperatures, it was loss of solder strength. In the intermediate temperatures, many failure mechanisms operated. Pull-strength tests give a good indication of the suitability of solar cell contact systems for space use. Procedures used to maximize the validity of the results are described.

  15. Numerical examination of temperature control in helium-cooled high flux test module of IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Shinji; Yokomine, Takehiko; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2007-01-01

    For long term irradiation of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), test specimens are needed to retain constant temperature to avoid change of its irradiation characteristics. The constant temperatures control is one of the most challenging issues for the IFMIF test facilities. We have proposed a new concept of test module which is capable of precisely measuring temperature, keeping uniform temperature with enhanced cooling performance. In the system according to the new design, cooling performances and temperature distributions of specimens were examined numerically under diverse conditions. Some transient behaviors corresponding to the prescribed temperature control mode were perseveringly simulated. It was confirmed that the thermal characteristics of the new design satisfied the severe requirement of IFMIF

  16. Measures ensuring safety of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    JAERI has conducted research and development of an HTGR type reactor since 1969 under the project of the multi-purpose high-temperate gas-cooled experimental reactor, whose design was changed to the HTTR in 1985. The reactor license was granted by the Government in 1990 and the construction started next year. Various functions and performances have been tested since 1996 and the initial criticality achieved in 1998. This document consists of six chapters, describing safety matters examined in several development phases. The first chapter deals with succession of the multi-purpose experimental reactor technology and its exchange between JAERI and domestic industries. Chapter 2 reviews new technical findings after the licensing which were reflected to the current safety assessment. These technical items are given in the table form of extensive pages. Chapter 3 and 4 describe the performance tests and the criticality access, respectively. Chapter 5 and 6 deal with the detection of fuel failures and helium gas leaks, respectively. (H.Y.)

  17. The high temperature out-of-pile test of LVDT for elongation measurement of fuel pellet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J. M.; Kim, B. K.; Jo, M. S.; Joo, K. N.; Park, S. J.; Gang, Y. H.; Kim, Y. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    As a part of the development of instrumentation technologies for the nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO(High-flux Advanced Nuclear Application Reactor), the elongation measurement technique of the fuel pellet is being developed using LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer). The well qualified out-of-pile test were needed to understand the LVDT's detail characteristics at high temperature for the detail design of the fuel irradiation instrumented capsule, because LVDT is very sensitive to variation of temperature. Therefore, the high temperature out-of-pile test system for fuel pellet elongation was developed, and this test was performed under the temperature condition between room temperature and 300 .deg. C with increasing the elongation from 0 to 5 mm. The LVDT's high temperature characteristics and temperature sensitivity of LVDT were analyzed through this experiment. Based on the result of this test, the method for the application of LVDT and elongation detector at high temperature was introduced. It is known that the results will be used to predict accurately the elongation of fuel pellet during irradiation test.

  18. Effect of Thermal Aging and Test Temperatures on Fracture Toughness of SS 316(N) Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, B. Shashank; Babu, M. Nani; Shanthi, G.; Moitra, A.; Sasikala, G.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of thermal aging and test temperatures on fracture toughness (J 0.2) of SS 316(N) weld material has been studied based on J-R curve evaluations. The aging of the welds was carried out at temperatures 370, 475 and 550 °C and for durations varying from 1000 to 20,000 h. The fracture toughness (J-R curve) tests were carried out at 380 and 550 °C for specimens after all aging conditions, including as-weld condition. The initiation fracture toughness (J 0.2) of the SS 316(N) weld material has shown degradation after 20,000-h aging durations and is reflected in all the test temperatures and aging temperatures. The fracture toughness after different aging conditions and test temperatures, including as-weld condition, was higher than the minimum specified value for this class of welds.

  19. In Situ Elevated Temperature Testing of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Les; Pan, Zhu; Tao, Zhong; van Riessen, Arie

    2016-01-01

    In situ elevated temperature investigations using fly ash based geopolymers filled with alumina aggregate were undertaken. Compressive strength and short term creep tests were carried out to determine the onset temperature of viscous flow. Fire testing using the standard cellulose curve was performed. Applying a load to the specimen as the temperature increased reduced the temperature at which viscous flow occurred (compared to test methods with no applied stress). Compressive strength increased at the elevated temperature and is attributed to viscous flow and sintering forming a more compact microstructure. The addition of alumina aggregate and reduction of water content reduced the thermal conductivity. This led to the earlier onset and shorter dehydration plateau duration times. However, crack formation was reduced and is attributed to smaller thermal gradients across the fire test specimen. PMID:28773568

  20. In Situ Elevated Temperature Testing of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Vickers

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In situ elevated temperature investigations using fly ash based geopolymers filled with alumina aggregate were undertaken. Compressive strength and short term creep tests were carried out to determine the onset temperature of viscous flow. Fire testing using the standard cellulose curve was performed. Applying a load to the specimen as the temperature increased reduced the temperature at which viscous flow occurred (compared to test methods with no applied stress. Compressive strength increased at the elevated temperature and is attributed to viscous flow and sintering forming a more compact microstructure. The addition of alumina aggregate and reduction of water content reduced the thermal conductivity. This led to the earlier onset and shorter dehydration plateau duration times. However, crack formation was reduced and is attributed to smaller thermal gradients across the fire test specimen.

  1. Calculation of fuel element temperature TRIGA 2000 reactor in sipping test tubes using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmi KA

    2013-01-01

    It has been calculated the fuel element temperature in the sipping test of Bandung TRIGA 2000 reactor. The calculation needs to be done to ascertain that the fuel element temperatures are below or at the limit of the allowable temperature fuel elements during reactor operation. ensuring that the implementation of the test by using this device, the temperature is still within safety limits. The calculation is done by making a model sipping test tubes containing a fuel element surrounded by 9 fuel elements. according to the position sipping test tubes in the reactor core. by using Gambit. Dimensional model adapted to the dimensions of the tube and the fuel element in the reactor core of Bandung TRIGA 2000 reactor. Sipping test Operation for each fuel element performed for 30 minutes at 300 kW power. Calculations were performed using CFD software and as input adjusted parameters of TRIGA 2000 reactor. Simulations carried out on the operation of the 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 210 minutes. The calculation result shows that the temperature of the fuel in tubes sipping test of 236.06 °C, while the temperature of the wall is 87.58 °C. The maximum temperature in the fuel center of TRIGA 2000 reactor in normal operation is 650 °C. and the boiling is not allowed in the reactor. So it can be concluded that the operation of the sipping test device are is very safe because the fuel center temperature is below the temperature limits the allowable fuel under normal operating conditions as well as the fuel element wall temperature is below the boiling temperature of water. (author)

  2. Time-dependent temper embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel: Correlation between microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during tempering at 650 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuanwei; Han, Lizhan; Yan, Guanghua; Liu, Qingdong; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng, E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    The microstructural evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel and its effect on the mechanical properties during tempering at 650 °C were studied to reveal the time-dependent toughness and temper embrittlement. The results show that the toughening of the material should be attributed to the decomposition of the martensite/austenite constituents and uniform distribution of carbides. When the tempering duration was 5 h, the strength of the investigated steel decreased to strike a balance with the material impact toughness that reached a plateau. As the tempering duration was further increased, the material strength was slightly reduced but the material impact toughness deteriorated drastically. This time-dependent temper embrittlement is different from traditional temper embrittlement, and it can be partly attributed to the softening of the matrix and the broadening of the ferrite laths. Moreover, the dimensions and distribution of the grain carbides are the most important factors of the impact toughness. - Highlights: • The fracture mechanism of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under impact load was investigated. • The Charpy V-notch impact test and the hinge model were employed for the study. • Grain boundary carbides play a key role in the impact toughness and fracture toughness. • The dependence of the deterioration of impact toughness on tempering time was analyzed for the first time.

  3. Development of two tier test to assess conceptual understanding in heat and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarti; Cari; Suparmi; Sunarno, Widha; Istiyono, Edi

    2017-01-01

    Heat and temperature is a concept that has been learnt from primary school to undergraduate levels. One problem about heat and temperature is that they are presented abstractly, theoretical concept. A student conceptual frameworks develop from their daily experiences. The purpose of this research was to develop a two-tier test of heat and temperature concept and measure conceptual understanding of heat and temperature of the student. This study consist of two method is qualitative and quantitative method. The two-tier test was developed using procedures defined by Borg and Gall. The two-tier test consisted of 20 question and was tested for 137 students for collecting data. The result of the study showed that the two-tier test was effective in determining the students’ conceptual understanding and also it might be used as an alternative for assessment and evaluation of students’ achievement

  4. Nondestructive testing on graphite structures for high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kambe, Mamoru; Tsuji, Nobumasa.

    1994-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic (for internal defects) and eddy current testing (for surface defects) were investigated on the structures of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphite for the HTTR. The equipment were developed in order to detect the specific configuration of graphite blocks and the testing conditions were defined as the practical testing methods. The established testing methods are being used for the acceptance tests of graphite structures in the HTTR. (author)

  5. Microstructural parameters and yielding in a quenched and tempered Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, Kari

    1979-01-01

    In this work the plastic deformation behaviour of a Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel is studied at ambient and low temperatures. To produce a wide range of microstructures, different austenitizing, quenching and tempering treatments are performed. The microstructures, including grain and dislocation structures as well as carbides, are evaluated. A qualitative model is proposed for the martensitic and bainitic transformations explaining the morphology and crystallography of the transformation products. Based on microstructural observations of undeformed and deformed materials, as well as the tensile test results, the role of various obstacles to dislocation motion in plastic deformation is evaluated. Finally the strength increment, its temperature dependence and the effect due to combinations of various obstacles are analyzed. The results are intended to serve as basis for further fracture behaviour analyses. (author)

  6. SOFC regulation at constant temperature: Experimental test and data regression study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Cinti, G.; Ottaviano, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SOFC operating temperature impacts strongly on its performance and lifetime. • Experimental tests were carried out varying electric load and feeding mixture gas. • Three different anodic inlet gases were tested maintaining constant temperature. • Cathodic air flow rate was used to maintain constant its operating temperature. • Regression law was defined from experimental data to regulate the air flow rate. - Abstract: The operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC) is an important parameter to be controlled, which impacts the SOFC performance and its lifetime. Rapid temperature change implies a significant temperature differences between the surface and the mean body leading to a state of thermal shock. Thermal shock and thermal cycling introduce stress in a material due to temperature differences between the surface and the interior, or between different regions of the cell. In this context, in order to determine a control law that permit to maintain constant the fuel cell temperature varying the electrical load and the infeed fuel mixture, an experimental activity were carried out on a planar SOFC short stack to analyse stack temperature. Specifically, three different anodic inlet gas compositions were tested: pure hydrogen, reformed natural gas with steam to carbon ratio equal to 2 and 2.5. By processing the obtained results, a regression law was defined to regulate the air flow rate to be provided to the fuel cell to maintain constant its operating temperature varying its operating conditions.

  7. Testing the effects of temperature and humidity on printed passive UHF RFID tags on paper substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnea Merilampi, Sari; Virkki, Johanna; Ukkonen, Leena; Sydänheimo, Lauri

    2014-05-01

    This article is an interesting substrate material for environmental-friendly printable electronics. In this study, screen-printed RFID tags on paper substrate are examined. Their reliability was tested with low temperature, high temperature, slow temperature cycling, high temperature and high humidity and water dipping test. Environmental stresses affect the tag antenna impedance, losses and radiation characteristics due to their impact on the ink film and paper substrate. Low temperature, temperature cycling and high humidity did not have a radical effect on the measured parameters: threshold power, backscattered signal power or read range of the tags. However, the frequency response and the losses of the tags were slightly affected. Exposure to high temperature was found to even improve the tag performance due to the positive effect of high temperature on the ink film. The combined high humidity and high temperature had the most severe effect on the tag performance. The threshold power increased, backscattered power decreased and the read range was shortened. On the whole, the results showed that field use of these tags in high, low and changing temperature conditions and high humidity conditions is possible. Use of these tags in combined high-humidity and high-temperature conditions should be carefully considered.

  8. Apparatus and test method for characterizing the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Shan; Zhang, De-Pin

    2017-05-01

    In order to evaluate the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials such as fabrics treated with phase change material microcapsules, a new apparatus was developed. The apparatus and the test method can measure the heat flux, temperature, and displacement signals during the dynamic contact and then quickly give an evaluation for the temperature regulating properties by simulating the dynamic heat transfer and temperature regulating process when the materials contact the body skin. A series of indices including the psychosensory intensity, regulating capability index, and relative regulating index were defined to characterize the temperature regulating properties. The measurement principle, the evaluation criteria and grading method, the experimental setup and the test results discussion, and the gage capability analysis of the apparatus are presented. The new apparatus provides a method for the objective measurement and evaluation of the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials.

  9. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  10. Study on explosion field temperature testing system based on wireless data transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinling; Sun Yunqiang

    2011-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the transient temperature value produced by explosive blasting may provide the basis for distinguishing the types of the explosive, the power contrast of the explosive and the performance evaluation in the weapons research process. To solve the problems of the Universal Test System emplaced inconveniently and the stored testing system need to be recycled, it has designed the explosion field application in wireless sensor system of temperature measurement. The system based on PIC16F877A micro controller, CPLD complex programmable logic devices and nRF24L01 wireless transmission chip sensor. The system adopts the Tungsten-Rhenium Thermocouple as the temperature sensor, DS600 temperature sensor for cold temperature compensation. This system has arrangement convenient, high-speed data acquisition, trigger and working parameters of adjustable characteristics, has been successfully applied in a test system. (authors)

  11. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  12. Tempering of Mn and Mn-Si-V dual-phase steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speich, G. R.; Schwoeble, A. J.; Huffman, G. P.

    1983-06-01

    Changes in the yield behavior, strength, and ductility of a Mn and a Mn-Si-V d11Al-phase (ferrite-martensite) steel were investigated after tempering one hour at 200 to 600 °C. The change in yield behavior was complex in both steels with the yield strength first increasing and then decreasing as the tempering temperature was increased. This complex behavior is attributed to a combination of factors including carbon segregation to dislocations, a return of discontinuous yielding, and the relief of resid11Al stresses. In contrast, the tensile strength decreased continuously as the tempering temperature was increased in a manner that could be predicted from the change in hardness of the martensite phase using a simple composite strengthening model. The initial tensile ductility (total elongation) of the Mn-Si-V steel was much greater than that of the Mn steel. However, upon tempering up to 400 °C, the ductility of the Mn-Si-V decreased whereas that of the Mn steel increased. As a result, both steels had similar ductilities after tempering at 400 °C or higher temperatures. These results are attributed to the larger amounts of retained austenite in the Mn-Si-V steel (9 pct) compared to the Mn steel (3 pct) and its contribution to tensile ductility by transforming to martensite during plastic straining. Upon tempering at 400 °C, the retained austenite decomposes to bainite and its contribution to tensile ductility is eliminated.

  13. Evaluation of Asphalt Mixture Low-Temperature Performance in Bending Beam Creep Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczola, Marek; Jaczewski, Mariusz; Rys, Dawid; Jaskula, Piotr; Szydlowski, Cezary

    2018-01-10

    Low-temperature cracking is one of the most common road pavement distress types in Poland. While bitumen performance can be evaluated in detail using bending beam rheometer (BBR) or dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) tests, none of the normalized test methods gives a comprehensive representation of low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures. This article presents the Bending Beam Creep test performed at temperatures from -20 °C to +10 °C in order to evaluate the low-temperature performance of asphalt mixtures. Both validation of the method and its utilization for the assessment of eight types of wearing courses commonly used in Poland were described. The performed test indicated that the source of bitumen and its production process (and not necessarily only bitumen penetration) had a significant impact on the low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures, comparable to the impact of binder modification (neat, polymer-modified, highly modified) and the aggregate skeleton used in the mixture (Stone Mastic Asphalt (SMA) vs. Asphalt Concrete (AC)). Obtained Bending Beam Creep test results were compared with the BBR bitumen test. Regression analysis confirmed that performing solely bitumen tests is insufficient for comprehensive low-temperature performance analysis.

  14. Development of a remote controlled fatigue testing apparatus at elevated temperature in controlled environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, Masao; Mimura, Hideaki; Ishii, Toshimitsu

    1996-02-01

    The fatigue characteristics of reactor structural materials at high temperature are necessary to be evaluated for ensuring the safety of the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Especially, the high temperature test data on safety research such as low cycle fatigue property and crack propagation property for reactor pressure vessel material are important for the development of the HTTR. Responding to these needs, a remote controlled type fatigue testing machine has been developed and installed in a hot cell of JMTR Hot Laboratory to get the fatigue data of irradiated materials. The machine was developed modifying a commercially available electro-hydraulic servo type fatigue testing machine to withstand radiation and be remotely operated, and mainly consists of a testing machine frame, environment chamber, extensometer, actuator and vacuum exhaust system. It has been confirmed that the machine has good performance to obtain low cycle fatigue data through many demonstration tests on unirradiated and irradiated specimens. (author)

  15. Are all temperate lakes eutrophying in a warmer world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltsev, A.; Creed, I. F.

    2017-12-01

    Freshwater lakes are at risk of eutrophication due to climate change and intensification of human activities on the planet. In relatively undisturbed areas of the temperate forest biome, lakes are "sentinels" of the effects of rising temperatures. We hypothesise that rising temperatures are driving a shift from nutrient-poor oligotrophic states to nutrient-rich eutrophic states. To test this hypothesis, we examined a time series of satellite based chlorophyll-a (a proxy of algal biomass) of 12,000+ lakes over 30 years in the Canadian portion of the Laurentian Great Lakes basin. From the time series, non-stationary trends (detected by Mann-Kendall analysis) and stationary cycles (revealed through Morlet wavelet analysis) were removed, and the standard deviation (SD) of the remaining residuals was used as an indicator of lake stability. Four classes of lake stability were identified: (1) stable (SD is consistently low); (2) destabilizing (SD increases over time); (3) unstable (SD is consistently high); and (4) stabilizing lakes (SD decreases over time). Stable lakes were either oligotrophic or eutrophic indicating the presence of two stable states in the region. Destabilizing lakes were shifting from oligotrophic to lakes with a higher trophic status (indicating eutrophication), unstable lakes were mostly mesotrophic, and stabilizing lakes were shifting from eutrophic to the lakes with lower trophic status (indicating oligotrophication). In contrast to common expectations, while many lakes (2142) were shifting from oligotrophic to eutrophic states, more lakes (3199) were showing the opposite trend and shifting from eutrophic to oligotrophic states. This finding reveals a complexity of lake responses to rising temperatures and the need to improve understanding of why some lakes shift while others do not. Future work is focused on exploring the interactive effects of global, regional, and local drivers of lake trophic states.

  16. Study on the effect of testing machine rigidity on strength and ductility temperature dependences obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krashchenko, V.P.; Statsenko, V.E.; Rudnitskij, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation procedures are described for rigidity of testing machines and mechanical properties of tantalum and nickel in the temperature range 293-1873K. Temperature dependences are presented for strength characteristics of the investigated materials obtained with the use of installations of different rigidity. Dependence analysis is carried out and recommendations are given as to the characteristics application

  17. Temperature measurements from a horizontal heater test in G-Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wunan; Ramirez, A.L.; Watwood, D.

    1991-10-01

    A horizontal heater test was conducted in G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, to study the hydrothermal response of the rock mass due to a thermal loading. The results of the temperature measurements are reported here. The measured temperatures agree well with a scoping calculation that was performed using a model which investigates the transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in fractured porous media. Our results indicate that the temperature field might be affected by the initial moisture content of the rock, the fractures in the rock, the distance from the free surface of the alcove wall, and the temperature distribution on the heater surface. Higher initial moisture content, higher fracture density, and cooling from the alcove wall tend to decrease the measured temperature. The temperature on top of the horizontal heater can was about 30 degrees C greater than at the bottom throughout most of the heating phase, causing the rock temperatures above the heater to be greater than those below. Along a radius from the center of the heater, the heating created a dry zone, followed by a boiling zone and condensation zone. Gravity drainage of the condensed water in the condensation zone had a strong effect on the boiling process in the test region. The temperatures below and to the side of the heater indicated a region receiving liquid drainage from an overlying region of condensation. We verified that a thermocouple in a thin-wall tubing measures the same temperature as one grouted in a borehole

  18. A simple test procedure for evaluating low temperature crack resistance of asphalt concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The current means of evaluating the low temperature cracking resistance of HMA relies on extensive test : methods that require assumptions about material behaviors and the use of complicated loading equipment. The purpose : of this study was to devel...

  19. Accelerated life testing and temperature dependence of device characteristics in GaAs CHFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, M.; Leon, R.; Vu, D. T.; Okuno, J.; Johnson, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated life testing of GaAs complementary heterojunction field effect transistors (CHFET) was carried out. Temperature dependence of single and synchronous rectifier CHFET device characteristics were also obtained.

  20. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted

  1. Investigation of the loss of forced cooling test by using the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Goto, Minoru; Tochio, Daisuke

    2007-09-01

    The three gas circulators trip test and the vessel cooling system stop test as the safety demonstration test by using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are under planning to demonstrate inherent safety features of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. All three gas circulators to circulate the helium gas as the coolant are stopped to simulate the loss of forced cooling in the three gas circulators trip test. The stop of the vessel cooling system located outside the reactor pressure vessel to remove the residual heat of the reactor core follows the stop of all three gas circulators in the vessel cooling system stop test. The analysis of the reactor transient for such tests and abnormal events postulated during the test was performed. From the result of analysis, it was confirmed that the three gas circulators trip test and the vessel cooling system stop test can be performed within the region of the normal operation in the HTTR and the safety of the reactor facility is ensured even if the abnormal events would occur. (author)

  2. The temperature control and water quality regulation for steam generator secondary side hydrostatic test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Bo; Liu Dongyong

    2014-01-01

    The secondary side hydrostatic test for the steam generator of M310 unit is to verify the pressure tightness of steam generator secondary side tube sheet and related systems. As for the importance of the steam generator, the water temperature and water quality of hydrostatic test has strict requirements. The discussion on the water temperature control and water quality regulation for the secondary loop hydrostatic test of Fuqing Unit 1 contribute greatly to the guiding work for the preparation of the steam generator pressure test for M310 unit. (authors)

  3. Design and testing of high temperature micro-ORC test stand using Siloxane as working fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Uusitalo, Antti; Honkatukia, Juha

    2017-03-01

    Organic Rankine Cycle is a mature technology for many applications e.g. biomass power plants, waste heat recovery and geothermal power for larger power capacity. Recently more attention is paid on an ORC utilizing high temperature heat with relatively low power. One of the attractive applications of such ORCs would be utilization of waste heat of exhaust gas of combustion engines in stationary and mobile applications. In this paper, a design procedure of the ORC process is described and discussed. The analysis of the major components of the process, namely the evaporator, recuperator, and turbogenerator is done. Also preliminary experimental results of an ORC process utilizing high temperature exhaust gas heat and using siloxane MDM as a working fluid are presented and discussed. The turbine type utilized in the turbogenerator is a radial inflow turbine and the turbogenerator consists of the turbine, the electric motor and the feed pump. Based on the results, it was identified that the studied system is capable to generate electricity from the waste heat of exhaust gases and it is shown that high molecular weight and high critical temperature fluids as the working fluids can be utilized in high-temperature small-scale ORC applications. 5.1 kW of electric power was generated by the turbogenerator.

  4. Ultra-sonic testing for brittle-ductile transition temperature of ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomakuchi, Michiyoshi

    1979-01-01

    The ultra-sonic testing for the brittle-ductile transition temperature, the USTB test for short, of ferritic steels is proposed in the present paper. And also the application of the USTB test into the nuclear pressure vessel surveillance is discussed. The USTB test is based upon the experimental results in the present work that the ultrasonic pressure attenuation coefficient of a ferritic steel has the evident transition property with its temperature due to the nature from which the brittle-ductile fracture transition property of the steel come and for four ferritic steels the upper boundary temperatute of the region in which the transition of the attenuation coefficient of a steel takes place is 4 to 5 0 C higher than the sub(D)T sub(E), i.e. the transition temperature of the fracture absorption energy of the steel by the DWTT test. The USTB test estimates the crack arrest temperature which is defined to be the fracture transition elastic temperature by the upper boundary temperature. (author)

  5. Effect of Temperature on the Toughness of Locally Manufactured Low Alloy Steel SUP9 Used for Manufacturing Leaf Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ishaque Abro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on locally manufactured low alloy steel grade SUP9 most frequently used in making leaf springs for automobiles was studied. While for determination of toughness and hardness Charpy impact testing machine and Rockwell hardness tester were used. The cryogenic test temperatures were achieved by soaking the samples in liquid nitrogen and temperature was measured using digital thermometer capable of reading the temperature from -40-200oC. Hardening, tempering and austempering treatments were conducted using muffle furnace and salt bath furnace. After heat treatment samples were quenched in oil. The results of present work confirmed that toughness and hardness are inversely related with each other and are highly dependent on the type of heat treatment employed. Highest toughness was measured after austempering at 450oC. Effect of test temperature revealed that toughness of the samples increased significantly with decreasing temperature. DBTT (Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature of the austempered samples was observed at -10oC, whereas, that of tempered samples could not be determined. Based on the test results authors wish to recommend the 600oC tempering temperature in place of 450oC where normally tempering is practiced in Alwin industry Karachi during manufacturing of leaf spring.

  6. Behavior of quenched and tempered steels under high strain rate compression loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.W.; Seifert, K.; Abdel-Malek, S.

    1997-01-01

    Two quenched and tempered steels were tested under compression loading at strain rates of ε = 2.10 2 s -1 and ε = 2.10 3 s -1 . By applying the thermal activation theory, the flow stress at very high strain rates of 10 5 to 10 6 s -1 is derived from low temperature and high strain rate tests. Dynamic true stress - true strain behaviour presents, that stress increases with increasing strain until a maximum, then it decreases. Because of the adiabatic process under dynamic loading the maximum flow stress will occur at a lower strain if the strain rate is increased. Considering strain rate, strain hardening, strain rate hardening and strain softening, a constitutive equation with different additive terms is successfully used to describe the behaviour of material under dynamic compression loading. Results are compared with other models of constitutive equations. (orig.)

  7. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  8. HTR 500: Final report of the project '' uniaxial creep tests at controlled temperature''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The report presents the results of creep trials with HTR-concrete, which were carried out in the scope of development of prestressed concrete - reactor pressure vessels at the ETH Lausanne Institute for Steel and Prestressed Concrete. With temperature, an increase of creep and shrinkage was observed, a lesser dependence on exhaustion and type of concrete. The point in time of reaching the final value is not dependent on temperature for creep, but is for shrinkage. The modulus of elasticity depends on the temperature pre-treatment, but only insignificantly on the test temperature. figs., tabs

  9. In-situ heater test in sedimentary soft rocks under high temperature (Phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka; Hirano, Kouhei; Tani, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Various researches have been conducted on high level radioactive waste geological disposal in sedimentary soft rocks. It's noted that the long-term mechanical behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperatures or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, in-situ heater test was conducted in an underground cavern at a depth of 50 meters for the purpose of improving thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled analysis code. This report presents the test result demonstrating the changes of temperature and strain distributions with time at the elevated temperature of the heater up to 40 degrees Celsius. (author)

  10. Investigation of the self tempering effect of martensite by means of atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Self-tempering effects can be observed in steels with relatively high martensite start temperatures. After the formation of the first martensitic laths, carbon is able to diffuse in these laths during cooling, which can be attributed to sufficiently high temperatures. This effect cannot be observed in laths formed at lower temperatures. In steels containing up to 0.2 m.-% carbon, up to 90 % of the carbon atoms in the martensite segregate to dislocations during quenching. Due to its atomic resolution and sensitivity with respect to light elements, atom probe tomography is very well suited for the investigation of this phenomenon. In this study, the self-tempering effect in a quenched and tempered steel 42CrMo4 with a martensite start temperature of 310 C is investigated by means of atom probe tomography.

  11. Control rod position and temperature coefficients in HTTR power-rise tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kokusen, Sigeru

    2001-03-01

    Power-rise tests of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been carried out aiming to achieve 100% power. So far, 50% of power operation and many tests have been carried out. In the HTTR, temperature change in core is so large to achieve the outlet coolant temperature of 950degC. To improve the calculation accuracy of the HTTR reactor physics characteristics, control rod positions at criticality and temperature coefficients were measured at each step to achieve 50% power level. The calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo code and diffusion theory with temperature distributions in the core obtained by reciprocal calculation of thermo-hydraulic code and diffusion theory. Control rod positions and temperature coefficients were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo method. The test results were compared to calculation results. The control rod positions at criticality showed good agreement with calculation results by Monte Carlo method with error of 50 mm. The control position at criticality at 100% was predicted around 2900mm. Temperature coefficients showed good agreement with calculation results by diffusion theory. The improvement of calculation will be carried out comparing the measured results up to 100% power level. (author)

  12. Study on cord/rubber interface at elevated temperatures by H-pull test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M.; Afshar, F.; Mohammadi, N.; Pourmahdian, S.

    2005-08-01

    Cords are used as reinforcing materials in rubber compounds. To increase cord/rubber interfacial adhesion, they are coated by an adhesive (usually based on resorcinol-formaldehyde-latex). These composites are used in many sectors such as tire and belt industries. Cord/rubber adhesion strength is an important aspect to determine the durability of system. Due to temperature increase during running tires, the adhesion energy becomes different from initial one. To study cord/rubber interface at elevated temperatures, H-adhesion test method was used. H-pull test is a simple method for adhesion evaluation at ambient temperature, so it is usually used for material quality control. In this research, cord/rubber systems were vulcanized at different temperatures and H-adhesion of samples were evaluated at elevated temperatures. Also cord/rubber interface was studied by ATR analyze to determine interfacial interactions kind.

  13. Benefits of Considering More than Temperature Acceleration for GaN HEMT Life Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Coutu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to investigate the validity of Arrhenius accelerated-life testing when applied to gallium nitride (GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT lifetime assessments, where the standard assumption is that only critical stressor is temperature, which is derived from operating power, device channel-case, thermal resistance, and baseplate temperature. We found that power or temperature alone could not explain difference in observed degradation, and that accelerated life tests employed by industry can benefit by considering the impact of accelerating factors besides temperature. Specifically, we found that the voltage used to reach a desired power dissipation is important, and also that temperature acceleration alone or voltage alone (without much power dissipation is insufficient to assess lifetime at operating conditions.

  14. Simulation tests for temperature mixing in a core bottom model of the HTR-module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, G.; Wehrlein, R.

    1992-01-01

    Interatom and Siemens are developing a helium-cooled Modular High Temperature Reactor. Under nominal operating conditions temperature differences of up to 120deg C will occur in the 700deg C hot helium flow leaving the core. In addition, cold gas leakages into the hot gas header can produce even higher temperature differences in the coolant flow. At the outlet of the reactor only a very low temperature difference of maximum ± 15deg C is allowed in order to avoid damages at the heat exchanging components due to alternating thermal loads. Since it is not possible to calculate the complex flow behaviour, experimental investigations of the temperature mixing in the core bottom had to be carried out in order to guarantee the necessary reduction of temperature differences in the helium. The presented air simulation tests in a 1:2.9 scaled plexiglas model of the core bottom showed an extremely high mixing rate of the hot gas header and the hot gas duct of the reactor. The temperature mixing of the simulated coolant flow as well as the leakage flows was larger than 95%. Transfered to reactor conditions this means a temperature difference of only ± 3deg C for the main flow at a quite resonable pressure drop. For the cold gas leakages temperature differences in the hot gas up to 400deg C proved to be permissible. The results of the simulation experiments in the Aerodynamic Test Facility of Interatom permitted to design a shorter bottom reflector of the core. (orig.)

  15. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Atsushi, E-mail: shimizu.atsushi35@jaea.go.jp [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kawamoto, Taiki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Tochio, Daisuke [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Saito, Kenji; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Honma, Fumitaka; Furusawa, Takayuki; Saikusa, Akio [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Takada, Shoji [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Shinozaki, Masayuki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established.

  16. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Atsushi; Kawamoto, Taiki; Tochio, Daisuke; Saito, Kenji; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Honma, Fumitaka; Furusawa, Takayuki; Saikusa, Akio; Takada, Shoji; Shinozaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established

  17. Effect of tempering on microstructure and tensile properties of niobium modified martensitic 9Cr heat resistant steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, A., E-mail: anupmetal@gmail.com; Bandyopadhay, T.K.

    2015-01-03

    The effect of tempering on the microstructure of niobium modified 8.8 wt% chromium steel has been evaluated. Steel has been prepared using the conventional melting and casting route. Homogenization and forging is done at 1100 °C. Dilatometric study shows that the Ac{sub 1}, Ac{sub 3} and M{sub s} temperatures are 800, 855, and 131 °C, respectively. Initial cast and forged microstructures consist of martensite/ferrite. The samples are subsequently tempered at 500–800 °C for various intervals of time (1–5 h). The microstructure of the tempered sample is analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) is used to identify the precipitate. Nanometer-sized precipitates (50–200 nm) are observed after tempering at 700 °C for 1 h. Niobium rich MC type carbide precipitates and chromium rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type precipitates are observed after tempering at 700 °C. Tensile strength decreases with increasing tempering temperature. Maximum tensile strength of 920 MPa is observed after tempering at 700 °C and maximum elongation of ∼11% is observed after tempering at 750 °C.

  18. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY1999-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850/950 degC is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which uses coated fuel particle, graphite for core components, and helium gas for primary coolant. The HTTR, which locates at the south-west area of 50,000 m{sup 2} in the Oarai Research Establishment, had been constructed since 1991 before accomplishing the first criticality on November 10, 1998. Rise to power tests of the HTTR started in September, 1999 and the rated thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850 degC was attained in December 2001. JAERI received the certificate of pre-operation test, that is, the commissioning license for the HTTR in March 2002. This report summarizes operation, tests, maintenance, radiation control, and construction of components and facilities for the HTTR as well as R and Ds on HTGRs from FY1999 to 2001. (author)

  19. Fuel temperature prediction during high burnup HTGR fuel irradiation test. US-JAERI irradiation test for HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku; Acharya, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the preirradiation thermal analysis of the HRB-22 capsule designed for an irradiation test in a removable beryllium position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor(HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This test is being carried out under Annex 2 of the Arrangement between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on Cooperation in Research and Development regarding High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. The fuel used in the test is an advanced type. The advanced fuel was designed aiming at burnup of about 10%FIMA(% fissions per initial metallic atom) which was higher than that of the first charge fuel for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) and was produced in Japan. CACA-2, a heavy isotope and fission product concentration calculational code for experimental irradiation capsules, was used to determine time-dependent fission power for the fuel compacts. The Heat Engineering and Transfer in Nine Geometries(HEATING) code was used to solve the steady-state heat conduction problem. The diameters of the graphite fuel body, which contains the fuel compacts, and of the primary pressure vessel were determined such that the requirements of running the fuel compacts at an average temperature less than 1250degC and of not exceeding a maximum fuel temperature of 1350degC were met throughout the four cycles of irradiation. The detail design of the capsule was carried out based on this analysis. (author)

  20. Comprehensive study of temperature anomalies on of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear test site territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, S.B.; Lukashenko, S.N.; Dmitropavlenko, V.N.; Ajdarkhanov, A.O.; Duchkov, A.D.; Kazantsev, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    In 1997 by the space images data in the Semipalatinsk test site area a mysterious anomaly thermal zone with square about 20 thousand sq. km. with soil temperature 10-15 degrees above than on the adjacent areas was found. The results of 1996-1999 observation confirm the presence of steady temperature anomalies. A number of scientists are suggesting that the increased temperature zones are related with conducted nuclear tests. These temperature anomalies related with objects of nuclear explosions conduction and its have limited distribution the spatially attached to nuclear explosions cavities. Anomalies are the sequent of residual manifestation of long-time geothermal activity in the underground nuclear explosions epicenters. In 2001 in the frameworks of joint program 'Comprehensive study of thermal anomalies on the territory of the former Semipalatinsk test site' the direct measurements of soils on the five sections which were selected by the results of space images

  1. The tempered polymerization of human neuroserpin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosina Noto

    Full Text Available Neuroserpin, a member of the serpin protein superfamily, is an inhibitor of proteolytic activity that is involved in pathologies such as ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, and Familial Encephalopathy with Neuroserpin Inclusion Bodies (FENIB. The latter belongs to a class of conformational diseases, known as serpinopathies, which are related to the aberrant polymerization of serpin mutants. Neuroserpin is known to polymerize, even in its wild type form, under thermal stress. Here, we study the mechanism of neuroserpin polymerization over a wide range of temperatures by different techniques. Our experiments show how the onset of polymerization is dependent on the formation of an intermediate monomeric conformer, which then associates with a native monomer to yield a dimeric species. After the formation of small polymers, the aggregation proceeds via monomer addition as well as polymer-polymer association. No further secondary mechanism takes place up to very high temperatures, thus resulting in the formation of neuroserpin linear polymeric chains. Most interesting, the overall aggregation is tuned by the co-occurrence of monomer inactivation (i.e. the formation of latent neuroserpin and by a mechanism of fragmentation. The polymerization kinetics exhibit a unique modulation of the average mass and size of polymers, which might suggest synchronization among the different processes involved. Thus, fragmentation would control and temper the aggregation process, instead of enhancing it, as typically observed (e.g. for amyloid fibrillation.

  2. Ice nucleation onto Arizona test dust at cirrus temperatures: effect of temperature and aerosol size on onset relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z A; Abbatt, J P D

    2010-01-21

    The University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (UT-CFDC) was used to study ice formation onto monodisperse Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. The onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(i)) was measured as a function of temperature in the range 251-223 K for 100 nm ATD particles. It was found that for 0.1% of the particles to freeze, water saturation was required at all temperatures except 223 K where particles activated at RH(i) below water saturation. At this temperature, where deposition mode freezing is occurring, we find that the larger the particle size, the lower the onset RH(i). We also demonstrate that the total number of particles present may influence the onset RH(i) observed. The surface area for ice activation, aerosol size, and temperature must all be considered when reporting onset values of ice formation onto ATD mineral dust particles. In addition, we calculate nucleation rates and contact angles of ice germs with ATD aerosols which indicate that there exists a range of active sites on the surface with different efficiencies for activating ice formation.

  3. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  4. Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James B. Kesseli

    2006-08-01

    This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

  5. Thermal biology of the sub-polar-temperate estuarine crab Hemigrapsus crenulatus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Varunidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumillaf, Juan P; Blanc, Johnny; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Díaz, Fernando; Re, Denisse; Chimal, María E; Vásquez, Jorge; Rosas, Carlos

    2016-02-15

    Optimum temperatures can be measured through aerobic scope, preferred temperatures or growth. A complete thermal window, including optimum, transition (Pejus) and critical temperatures (CT), can be described if preferred temperatures and CT are defined. The crustacean Hemigrapsus crenulatus was used as a model species to evaluate the effect of acclimation temperature on: (i) thermal preference and width of thermal window, (ii) respiratory metabolism, and (iii) haemolymph proteins. Dependant on acclimation temperature, preferred temperature was between 11.8°C and 25.2°C while CT was found between a minimum of 2.7°C (CTmin) and a maximum of 35.9°C (CTmax). These data and data from tropical and temperate crustaceans were compared to examine the association between environmental temperature and thermal tolerance. Temperate species have a CTmax limit around 35°C that corresponded with the low CTmax limit of tropical species (34-36°C). Tropical species showed a CTmin limit around 9°C similar to the maximum CTmin of temperate species (5-6°C). The maximum CTmin of deep sea species that occur in cold environments (2.5°C) matched the low CTmin values (3.2°C) of temperate species. Results also indicate that the energy required to activate the enzyme complex (Ei) involved in respiratory metabolism of ectotherms changes along the latitudinal gradient of temperature. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Thermal biology of the sub-polar–temperate estuarine crab Hemigrapsus crenulatus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Varunidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumillaf, Juan P.; Blanc, Johnny; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Díaz, Fernando; Re, Denisse; Chimal, María E.; Vásquez, Jorge; Rosas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Optimum temperatures can be measured through aerobic scope, preferred temperatures or growth. A complete thermal window, including optimum, transition (Pejus) and critical temperatures (CT), can be described if preferred temperatures and CT are defined. The crustacean Hemigrapsus crenulatus was used as a model species to evaluate the effect of acclimation temperature on: (i) thermal preference and width of thermal window, (ii) respiratory metabolism, and (iii) haemolymph proteins. Dependant on acclimation temperature, preferred temperature was between 11.8°C and 25.2°C while CT was found between a minimum of 2.7°C (CTmin) and a maximum of 35.9°C (CTmax). These data and data from tropical and temperate crustaceans were compared to examine the association between environmental temperature and thermal tolerance. Temperate species have a CTmax limit around 35°C that corresponded with the low CTmax limit of tropical species (34–36°C). Tropical species showed a CTmin limit around 9°C similar to the maximum CTmin of temperate species (5–6°C). The maximum CTmin of deep sea species that occur in cold environments (2.5°C) matched the low CTmin values (3.2°C) of temperate species. Results also indicate that the energy required to activate the enzyme complex (Ei) involved in respiratory metabolism of ectotherms changes along the latitudinal gradient of temperature. PMID:26879464

  7. Thermal biology of the sub-polar–temperate estuarine crab Hemigrapsus crenulatus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Varunidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Cumillaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimum temperatures can be measured through aerobic scope, preferred temperatures or growth. A complete thermal window, including optimum, transition (Pejus and critical temperatures (CT, can be described if preferred temperatures and CT are defined. The crustacean Hemigrapsus crenulatus was used as a model species to evaluate the effect of acclimation temperature on: (i thermal preference and width of thermal window, (ii respiratory metabolism, and (iii haemolymph proteins. Dependant on acclimation temperature, preferred temperature was between 11.8°C and 25.2°C while CT was found between a minimum of 2.7°C (CTmin and a maximum of 35.9°C (CTmax. These data and data from tropical and temperate crustaceans were compared to examine the association between environmental temperature and thermal tolerance. Temperate species have a CTmax limit around 35°C that corresponded with the low CTmax limit of tropical species (34–36°C. Tropical species showed a CTmin limit around 9°C similar to the maximum CTmin of temperate species (5–6°C. The maximum CTmin of deep sea species that occur in cold environments (2.5°C matched the low CTmin values (3.2°C of temperate species. Results also indicate that the energy required to activate the enzyme complex (Ei involved in respiratory metabolism of ectotherms changes along the latitudinal gradient of temperature.

  8. Tests of ball bearing used in high-temperature and high-purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Chengmu; Hao Shouxin.

    1987-01-01

    According to the particular conditions and the operation environments in high-temperature and high-purity water, the test content and the measurement instrumentation for the ball bearing were defined. Through various tests, operational performances of the bearing have preliminarily been understood. It provided some useful information for the engineering application of the bearing

  9. High temperature tensile testing of modified 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation with high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.; Maloy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the effect of tensile test temperatures ranging from 50 to 600 deg. C on the tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel after high energy proton irradiation at about 35-67 deg. C to doses from 1 to 3 dpa and 9 dpa. For the specimens irradiated to doses between 1 and 3 dpa, it was observed that the yield strength and ultimate strength decreased monotonically as a function of tensile test temperature, whereas the uniform elongation (UE) remained at approximately 1% for tensile test temperatures up to 250 deg. C and then increased for tensile test temperatures up to and including 500 deg. C. At 600 deg. C, the UE was observed to be less than the values at 400 and 500 deg. C. UE of the irradiated material tensile tested at 400-600 deg. C was observed to be greater than the values for the unirradiated material at the same temperatures. Tensile tests on the 9 dpa specimens followed similar trends

  10. High temperature, high pressure gas loop - the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.; Sanders, J.P.; Young, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    The high-pressure, high-temperature, gas-circulating Component Flow Test Loop located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was designed and constructed utilizing Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The quality assurance program for operating and testing is also based on applicable ASME standards. Power to a total of 5 MW is available to the test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger rated at 4.4 MW serves as heat sink. The three gas-bearing, completely enclosed gas circulators provide a maximum flow of 0.47 m 3 /s at pressures to 10.7 MPa. The control system allows for fast transients in pressure, power, temperature, and flow; it also supports prolonged unattended steady-state operation. The data acquisition system can access and process 10,000 data points per second. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor components are being tested

  11. Testing program for determining the mechanical properties of concrete to temperatures of 6210C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.; Robinson, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    Concrete temperatures in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) in excess of normal code limits can result from postulated large sodium spills in equipment cells. Elevated temperature concrete property data which may have application for providing a basis for the design and evaluation of such postulated accident conditions is limited. Data thus needed to be developed commensurate with LMFBR plant applications for critical physical and mechanical concrete properties under prototypic thermal accident conditions. A test program was conducted to define the variations in physical and mechanical properties of a limestone aggregate concrete and a lightweight insulating concrete exposed to elevated temperatures. Five test series were conducted: unconfined compression, shear, rebar bond, sustained loading (creep), and thermal properties. Testing procedures for determining the mechanical properties of concrete from ambient to 621 0 C (1150 0 F) are described. Ther thermal properties tests are discussed in a separate paper which is also being presented at this conference

  12. Cyclic performance tests of Sn/MWCNT composite lithium ion battery anodes at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocoglu, U., E-mail: utocoglu@sakarya.edu.tr; Cevher, O.; Akbulut, H. [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Esentepe Campus 54187 (Turkey)

    2016-04-21

    In this study tin-multi walled carbon nanotube (Sn-MWCNT) lithium ion battery anodes were produced and their electrochemical galvanostatic charge/discharge tests were conducted at various (25 °C, 35 °C, 50 °C) temperatures to determine the cyclic behaviors of anode at different temperatures. Anodes were produced via vacuum filtration and DC magnetron sputtering technique. Tin was sputtered onto buckypapers to form composite structure of anodes. SEM analysis was conducted to determine morphology of buckypapers and Sn-MWCNT composite anodes. Structural and phase analyses were conducted via X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy technique. CR2016 coin cells were assembled for electrochemical tests. Cyclic voltammetry test were carried out to determine the reversibility of reactions between anodes and reference electrode between 0.01-2.0 V potential window. Galvanostatic charge/discharge tests were performed to determine cycle performance of anodes at different temperatures.

  13. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, H.S. [University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J., E-mail: mjp54@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Avettand-Fènoël, M-N. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET) UMR CNRS 8207, Université, Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve D' ASCQ (France); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition.

  14. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, H.S.; Peet, M.J.; Avettand-Fènoël, M-N.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    2014-01-01

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition

  15. Basic data for surveillance test on core support graphite structures for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Ishihara, Masahiro; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2007-02-01

    Both of the visual inspection by a TV camera and the measurement of material properties by surveillance test on core support graphite structures are planned for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm their structural integrity and characteristics. The surveillance test is aimed to investigate the change of material properties by aging effects such as fast neutron irradiation and oxidation. The obtained data will be used not only for evaluating the structural integrity of the core support graphite structures of the HTTR but also for design of advanced Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) discussed at generation IV international forum. This report describes the initial material properties of surveillance specimens before installation and installed position of surveillance specimens in the HTTR. (author)

  16. Performance test of ex-core high temperature and high pressure water loop test equipment (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hiroko; Uehara, Toshiaki; Takeuchi, Tomoaki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Jinichi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency, we started research and development so as to monitor the situations in the Nuclear Plant Facilities during a severe accident, such as a radiation-resistant monitoring camera, a radiation-resistant transmission system for conveying the in-core information, and a heat-resistant signal cable. As a part of developments of the heat-resistant signal cable, we prepared ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment, which can simulate the conditions of BWRs and PWRs, for evaluating reliability and properties of sheath materials of the cable. This equipment consists of autoclave, water conditioning tank, high-pressure metering pump, preheater, heat exchanger and water purification equipment, etc. This report describes the basic design and the performance test results of ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment. (author)

  17. High-Temperature Test of 800HT Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger in HELP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Soo; Hong, Sung-Deok; Kim, Min Hwan; Shim, Jaesool

    2014-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed high-temperature Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHE) for a Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor and operated a very high temperature Helium Experimental LooP (HELP) to verify the performance of the high temperature heat exchanger at the component level environment. PCHE is one of the candidates for the intermediate heat exchanger in a VHTR, because its design temperature and pressure are larger than any other compact heat exchanger types. High temperature PCHEs in HELP consist of an alloy617 PCHE and an 800HT PCHE. This study presents the high temperature test of an 800HT PCHE in HELP. The experimental data include the pressure drops, the overall heat transfer coefficients, and the surface temperature distributions under various operating conditions. The experimental data are compared with the thermo-hydraulic analysis from COMSOL. In addition, the single channel tests are performed to quantify the friction factor under normal nitrogen and helium inlet conditions. (author)

  18. An experimental platform for triaxial high-pressure/high-temperature testing of rocks using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Guenther; Lapene, Alexandre; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    2018-04-01

    A conventional high-pressure/high-temperature experimental apparatus for combined geomechanical and flow-through testing of rocks is not X-ray compatible. Additionally, current X-ray transparent systems for computed tomography (CT) of cm-sized samples are limited to design temperatures below 180 °C. We describe a novel, high-temperature (>400 °C), high-pressure (>2000 psi/>13.8 MPa confining, >10 000 psi/>68.9 MPa vertical load) triaxial core holder suitable for X-ray CT scanning. The new triaxial system permits time-lapse imaging to capture the role of effective stress on fluid distribution and porous medium mechanics. System capabilities are demonstrated using ultimate compressive strength (UCS) tests of Castlegate sandstone. In this case, flooding the porous medium with a radio-opaque gas such as krypton before and after the UCS test improves the discrimination of rock features such as fractures. The results of high-temperature tests are also presented. A Uintah Basin sample of immature oil shale is heated from room temperature to 459 °C under uniaxial compression. The sample contains kerogen that pyrolyzes as temperature rises, releasing hydrocarbons. Imaging reveals the formation of stress bands as well as the evolution and connectivity of the fracture network within the sample as a function of time.

  19. Solar cooker effect test and temperature field simulation of radio telescope subreflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Deshen; Wang, Huajie; Qian, Hongliang; Zhang, Gang; Shen, Shizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar cooker effect test of a telescope subreflector is conducted for the first time. • The cause and temperature distribution regularities are analyzed contrastively. • Simulation methods are proposed using light beam segmentation and tracking methods. • The validity of simulation methods is evaluated using the test results. - Abstract: The solar cooker effect can cause a local high temperature of the subreflector and can directly affect the working performance of the radio telescope. To study the daily temperature field and solar cooker effect of a subreflector, experimental studies are carried out with a 3-m-diameter radio telescope model for the first time. Initially, the solar temperature distribution rules, especially the solar cooker effect, are summarized according to the field test results under the most unfavorable conditions. Then, a numerical simulation for the solar temperature field of the subreflector is studied by light beam segmentation and tracking methods. Finally, the validity of the simulation methods is evaluated using the test results. The experimental studies prove that the solar cooker effect really exists and should not be overlooked. In addition, simulation methods for the subreflector temperature field proposed in this paper are effective. The research methods and conclusions can provide valuable references for thermal design, monitoring and control of similar high-precision radio telescopes.

  20. Test-bench for characterization of steady state magnetic sensors parameters in wide temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovařík, Karel; Ďuran, Ivan; Sentkerestiová, Jana; Šesták, David

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Prepared test bench for calibration of steady state magnetic sensors. •Test-bench design optimized for calibration up to 300 °C. •Test-bench is remotely controllable and allows long term measurements. •Construction allows easy manipulation with even irradiated samples. -- Abstract: Magnetic sensors in ITER tokamak and in other future fusion devices will face an environment with temperature often elevated well above 200 °C. Dedicated test benches are needed to allow characterization of performance of magnetic sensors at such elevated temperatures. This contribution describes realization of test bench for calibration of steady state magnetic sensors based on Hall effect. The core of the set-up is the coil providing DC calibration magnetic field. Optimization of coils design to ensure its compatibility with elevated temperature up to 300 °C is described. Optimized coil was manufactured, and calibrated both at room temperature and at temperature of 250 °C. Measured calibration magnetic field of the coil biased by a 30 A commercial laboratory power supplies is 224 mT. The coil is supplemented by PID regulated air cooling system for fine control of sensors temperature during measurements. Data acquisition system is composed from PC A/D converter boards with resolution below 1 μV. The key parameters of the test bench are remotely controllable and the system allows long term continuous measurements including tests of irradiated samples. The performance of the test bench is demonstrated on recent measurements with metal Hall sensors based on thin copper sensing layers

  1. A Study on the High Temperature Irradiation Test Possibility for the HANARO Outer Core Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Cho, M. S.; Choo, K. N.; Shin, Y. T.; Sohn, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G

    2008-01-15

    1. Information on the neutron flux levels and the gamma heat of the concerned test holes, which have been produced from a series of nuclear analysis and tests performed at KAERI since 1993, were collected and analyzed to develop the nuclear data for the concerned test holes of HANARO and to develop the new design concepts of a capsule for the high temperature irradiation devices. 2. From the literature survey and analysis about the system design characteristics of the new concepts of irradiation devices in the ATR and MIT reactor, U.S. and the JHR reactor, France, which are helpful in understanding the key issues for the on-going R and D programmes related to a SFR and a VHTR, the most important parameters for the design of high temperature irradiation devices are identified as the neutron spectrum, the heat generation density, the fuel and cladding temperature, and the coolant chemistry. 3. From the thermal analysis of a capsule by using a finite element program ANSYS, high temperature test possibility at the OR and IP holes of HANARO was investigated based on the data collected from a literature survey. The OR holes are recommended for the tests of the SFR and VHTR nuclear materials. The IP holes could be applicable for an intermediate temperature irradiation of the SWR and LMR materials. 4. A thermal analysis for the development of a capsule with a new configuration was also performed. The size of the center hole, which is located at the thermal media of a capsule, did not cause specimen temperature changes. The temperature differences are found to be less than 2%. The introduction of an additional gap in the thermal media was able to contribute to an increase in the specimen temperature by up to 27-90 %.

  2. AXAF-I Low Intensity-Low Temperature (LILT) Testing of the Development Verification Test (DVT) Solar Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Doug; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The planned orbit of the AXAF-I spacecraft will subject the spacecraft to both short, less than 30 minutes for solar and less than 2 hours for lunar, and long earth eclipses and lunar eclipses with combined conjunctive duration of up to 3 to 4 hours. Lack of proper Electrical Power System (EPS) conditioning prior to eclipse may cause loss of mission. To avoid this problem, for short eclipses, it is necessary to off-point the solar array prior to or at the beginning of the eclipse to reduce the battery state of charge (SOC). This yields less overcharge during the high charge currents at sun entry. For long lunar eclipses, solar array pointing and load scheduling must be tailored for the profile of the eclipse. The battery SOC, loads, and solar array current-voltage (I-V) must be known or predictable to maintain the bus voltage within acceptable range. To address engineering concerns about the electrical performance of the AXAF-I solar array under Low Intensity and Low Temperature (LILT) conditions, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers undertook special testing of the AXAF-I Development Verification Test (DVT) solar panel in September-November 1997. In the test the DVT test panel was installed in a thermal vacuum chamber with a large view window with a mechanical "flapper door". The DVT test panel was "flash" tested with a Large Area Pulse Solar Simulator (LAPSS) at various fractional sun intensities and panel (solar cell) temperatures. The testing was unique with regards to the large size of the test article and type of testing performed. The test setup, results, and lessons learned from the testing will be presented.

  3. New temperable solar coatings: Tempsol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryont, Hulya

    2001-11-01

    This paper deals with the large area deposition and coating properties of the thermo-stable (temperable/bendable) solar coating material, CuO, and some new optical coating systems comprising CuO films for architectural and automotive/transportation applications. The CuO solar coating is combined with other coating layers, for example, an anti-reflection film, a reflection film, a coloration coating layer, etc., which are also thermo-stable. The film systems are developed at the research laboratory by D.C. Magnetron reactive sputtering process. The new developed technologies then transferred to the production line. Product performances are compared before and after heat treatment of the coating systems. Performance tables and other physical properties, including optical parameters, mechanical and environmental stability, storage properties, etc., are also presented for this new product series.

  4. Elevated-Temperature Tests Under Static and Aerodynamic Conditions on Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Joseph M.; Johnson, Aldie E., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Stainless-steel honeycomb-core sandwich panels which differed primarily in skin thicknesses were tested at elevated temperatures under static and aerodynamic conditions. The results of these tests were evaluated to determine the insulating effectiveness and structural integrity of the panels. The static radiant-heating tests were performed in front of a quartz-tube radiant heater at panel skin temperatures up to 1,5000 F. The aerodynamic tests were made in a Mach 1.4 heated blowdown wind tunnel. The tunnel temperature was augmented by additional heat supplied by a radiant heater which raised the panel surface temperature above 8000 F during air flow. Static radiant-heating tests of 2 minutes duration showed that all the panels protected the load-carrying structure about equally well. Thin-skin panels showed an advantage for this short-time test over thick-skin panels from a standpoint of weight against insulation. Permanent inelastic strains in the form of local buckles over each cell of the honeycomb core caused an increase in surface roughness. During the aero- dynamic tests all of the panels survived with little or no damage, and panel flutter did not occur.

  5. 3D thermography for improving temperature measurements in thermal vacuum testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. W.; Simpson, R.; Parian, J. A.; Cozzani, A.; Casarosa, G.; Sablerolle, S.; Ertel, H.

    2017-09-01

    The application of thermography to thermal vacuum (TV) testing of spacecrafts is becoming a vital additional tool in the mapping of structures during thermal cycles and thermal balance (TB) testing. Many of the customers at the European Space Agency (ESA) test centre, European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), The Netherlands, now make use of a thermal camera during TB-TV campaigns. This complements the use of embedded thermocouples on the structure, providing the prospect of monitoring temperatures at high resolution and high frequency. For simple flat structures with a well-defined emissivity, it is possible to determine the surface temperatures with reasonable confidence. However, for most real spacecraft and sub-systems, the complexity of the structure's shape and its test environment creates inter-reflections from external structures. This and the additional complication of angular and spectral variations of the spacecraft surface emissivity make the interpretation of the radiation detected by a thermal camera more difficult in terms of determining a validated temperature with high confidence and well-defined uncertainty. One solution to this problem is: to map the geometry of the test specimen and thermal test environment; to model the surface temperatures and emissivity variations of the structures and materials; and to use this model to correct the apparent temperatures recorded by the thermal camera. This approach has been used by a team from NPL (National Physical Laboratory), Psi-tran, and PhotoCore, working with ESA, to develop a 3D thermography system to provide a means to validate thermal camera temperatures, based on a combination of thermal imaging photogrammetry and ray-tracing scene modeling. The system has been tested at ESTEC in ambient conditions with a dummy spacecraft structure containing a representative set of surface temperatures, shapes, and spacecraft materials, and with hot external sources and a high power lamp as a sun

  6. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna, E-mail: malgrad@gmail.com; Woods, Brian G., E-mail: brian.woods@oregonstate.edu

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  7. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna; Woods, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  8. The effects of the insecticide lambda-Cyhalothrin on the earthworm Eisenia fetida under experimental conditions of tropical and temperate regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcos; Scheffczyk, Adam; Garcia, Terezinha; Roembke, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Plant Protection Products can affect soil organisms and thus might have negative impacts on soil functions. Little research has been performed on their impact on tropical soils. Therefore, the effects of the insecticide lambda-Cyhalothrin on earthworms were evaluated in acute and chronic laboratory tests modified for tropical conditions, i.e. at selected temperatures (20 and 28 o C) and with two strains (temperate and tropical) of the compost worm Eisenia fetida. The insecticide was spiked in two natural soils, in OECD artificial soil and a newly developed tropical artificial soil. The effects of lambda-Cyhalothrin did rarely vary in the same soil at tropical (LC50: 68.5-229 mg a.i./kg dry weight (DW); EC50: 54.2-60.2 mg a.i./kg DW) and temperate (LC50: 99.8-140 mg a.i./kg DW; EC50: 37.4-44.5 mg a.i./kg DW) temperatures. In tests with tropical soils and high temperature, effect values differed by up to a factor of ten. - Research highlights: → In one soil, effects of lambda-Cyhalothrin did not vary much at two temperatures. → In tropical soils at high temperature, effects differed by up to a factor of ten. → In the tropics, effects of pesticides can be higher or lower as in temperate regions. - The effects of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin on earthworms did not differ considerably when performed in the same soil under different temperatures, but LC/EC 50 values varied by a factor of ten between OECD and tropical artificial soil.

  9. The effects of the insecticide lambda-Cyhalothrin on the earthworm Eisenia fetida under experimental conditions of tropical and temperate regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcos [Embrapa Amazonia Ocidental, Rod. AM-10, Km 28, 69.011-970 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Scheffczyk, Adam [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, D-65439 Floersheim (Germany); Garcia, Terezinha [Embrapa Amazonia Ocidental, Rod. AM-10, Km 28, 69.011-970 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Roembke, Joerg, E-mail: j-roembke@ect.d [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, D-65439 Floersheim (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Plant Protection Products can affect soil organisms and thus might have negative impacts on soil functions. Little research has been performed on their impact on tropical soils. Therefore, the effects of the insecticide lambda-Cyhalothrin on earthworms were evaluated in acute and chronic laboratory tests modified for tropical conditions, i.e. at selected temperatures (20 and 28 {sup o}C) and with two strains (temperate and tropical) of the compost worm Eisenia fetida. The insecticide was spiked in two natural soils, in OECD artificial soil and a newly developed tropical artificial soil. The effects of lambda-Cyhalothrin did rarely vary in the same soil at tropical (LC50: 68.5-229 mg a.i./kg dry weight (DW); EC50: 54.2-60.2 mg a.i./kg DW) and temperate (LC50: 99.8-140 mg a.i./kg DW; EC50: 37.4-44.5 mg a.i./kg DW) temperatures. In tests with tropical soils and high temperature, effect values differed by up to a factor of ten. - Research highlights: In one soil, effects of lambda-Cyhalothrin did not vary much at two temperatures. In tropical soils at high temperature, effects differed by up to a factor of ten. In the tropics, effects of pesticides can be higher or lower as in temperate regions. - The effects of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin on earthworms did not differ considerably when performed in the same soil under different temperatures, but LC/EC{sub 50} values varied by a factor of ten between OECD and tropical artificial soil.

  10. Test plan for long-term, low-temperature oxidation of spent fuel, Series 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary studies indicated the need for more spent fuel oxidation data in order to determine the probable behavior of spent fuel in a tuff repository. Long-term, low-temperature testing was recommended in a comprehensive technical approach to: (1) confirm the findings of the short-term thermogravimetric analyses scoping experiments; (2) evaluate the effects of variables such as burnup, atmospheric moisture and fuel type on the oxidation rate; and (3) extend the oxidation data base ot representative repository temperatures and better define the temperature dependence of the operative oxidation mechanisms. This document presents the Series 1 test plan to study, on a large number of samples, the effects of atmospheric moisture and temperature on oxidation rate and phase formation. Tests will run for up to two years, use characterized fragmented, and pulverized fuel samples, cover a temperature range of 110 0 C to 175 0 C and be conducted with an atmospheric moisture content rangeing from 0 C to approx. 80 0 C dew point. After testing, the samples will be examined and made available for leaching testing

  11. A new thermal conductivity probe for high temperature tests for the characterization of molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Pistacchio, S.

    2018-05-01

    A new thermal conductivity probe for high temperature (HT-TCP) has been built and tested. Its design and construction procedure are adapted from the ambient temperature thermal conductivity probe (AT-TCP) due to good performance of the latter device. The construction procedure and the preliminary tests are accurately described. The probe contains a Pt wire as a heater and a type K thermocouple (TC) as a temperature sensor, and its size is so small (0.6 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length) as to guarantee a length to diameter ratio of about 100. Calibration tests with glycerol for temperatures between 0 °C and 60 °C have shown good agreement with literature data, within 3%. Preliminary tests were also carried on a ternary molten salt for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) (18% in mass of NaNO3, 52% KNO3, and 30% LiNO3) at 120 °C and 150 °C. Obtained results are within λ range of the Hitec® salt (53% KNO3, 7% NaNO3, 40% NaNO2). Unfortunately, at the higher temperature tested (200 °C), the viscosity of the salt highly decreases, and free convection starts, making the measurements unreliable.

  12. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Hensley, W.K.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.; Panisko, F.E.; Hartwell, J.K.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes and presents data from a severe fuel damage test that was conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test, designated FLHT-5, was the fourth in a series of full-length high-temperature (FLHT) tests on light-water reactor fuel. The tests were designed and performed by staff from the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The test operation and test results are described in this report. The fuel bundle in the FLHT-5 experiment included 10 unirradiated full-length pressurized-water reactor (PWR) rods, 1 irradiated PWR rod and 1 dummy gamma thermometer. The fuel rods were subjected to a very low coolant flow while operating at low fission power. This caused coolant boilaway, rod dryout and overheating to temperatures above 2600 K, severe fuel rod damage, hydrogen generation, and fission product release. The test assembly and its effluent path were extensively instrumented to record temperatures, pressures, flow rates, hydrogen evolution, and fission product release during the boilaway/heatup transient. Post-test gamma scanning of the upper plenum indicated significant iodine and cesium release and deposition. Both stack gas activity and on-line gamma spectrometer data indicated significant (∼50%) release of noble fission gases. Post-test visual examination of one side of the fuel bundle revealed no massive relocation and flow blockage; however, rundown of molten cladding was evident

  13. Playing by the rules? Phenotypic adaptation to temperate environments in an American marsupial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Ryan J.; Wayne, Robert K.

    2018-01-01

    Phenotypic variation along environmental gradients can provide evidence suggesting local adaptation has shaped observed morphological disparities. These differences, in traits such as body and extremity size, as well as skin and coat pigmentation, may affect the overall fitness of individuals in their environments. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is a marsupial that shows phenotypic variation across its range, one that has recently expanded into temperate environments. It is unknown, however, whether the variation observed in the species fits adaptive ecogeographic patterns, or if phenotypic change is associated with any environmental factors. Using phenotypic measurements of over 300 museum specimens of Virginia opossum, collected throughout its distribution range, we applied regression analysis to determine if phenotypes change along a latitudinal gradient. Then, using predictors from remote-sensing databases and a random forest algorithm, we tested environmental models to find the most important variables driving the phenotypic variation. We found that despite the recent expansion into temperate environments, the phenotypic variation in the Virginia opossum follows a latitudinal gradient fitting three adaptive ecogeographic patterns codified under Bergmann’s, Allen’s and Gloger’s rules. Temperature seasonality was an important predictor of body size variation, with larger opossums occurring at high latitudes with more seasonal environments. Annual mean temperature predicted important variation in extremity size, with smaller extremities found in northern populations. Finally, we found that precipitation and temperature seasonality as well as low temperatures were strong environmental predictors of skin and coat pigmentation variation; darker opossums are distributed at low latitudes in warmer environments with higher precipitation seasonality. These results indicate that the adaptive mechanisms underlying the variation in body size, extremity

  14. Playing by the rules? Phenotypic adaptation to temperate environments in an American marsupial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio F. Nigenda-Morales

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variation along environmental gradients can provide evidence suggesting local adaptation has shaped observed morphological disparities. These differences, in traits such as body and extremity size, as well as skin and coat pigmentation, may affect the overall fitness of individuals in their environments. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana is a marsupial that shows phenotypic variation across its range, one that has recently expanded into temperate environments. It is unknown, however, whether the variation observed in the species fits adaptive ecogeographic patterns, or if phenotypic change is associated with any environmental factors. Using phenotypic measurements of over 300 museum specimens of Virginia opossum, collected throughout its distribution range, we applied regression analysis to determine if phenotypes change along a latitudinal gradient. Then, using predictors from remote-sensing databases and a random forest algorithm, we tested environmental models to find the most important variables driving the phenotypic variation. We found that despite the recent expansion into temperate environments, the phenotypic variation in the Virginia opossum follows a latitudinal gradient fitting three adaptive ecogeographic patterns codified under Bergmann’s, Allen’s and Gloger’s rules. Temperature seasonality was an important predictor of body size variation, with larger opossums occurring at high latitudes with more seasonal environments. Annual mean temperature predicted important variation in extremity size, with smaller extremities found in northern populations. Finally, we found that precipitation and temperature seasonality as well as low temperatures were strong environmental predictors of skin and coat pigmentation variation; darker opossums are distributed at low latitudes in warmer environments with higher precipitation seasonality. These results indicate that the adaptive mechanisms underlying the variation in

  15. Test Results of Selected Commercial DC/DC Converters under Cryogenic Temperatures - A Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    DC/DC converters are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management and distribution, signal conditioning, and motor control. Design of DC/DC converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance, simplify design, and reduce development and launch costs. In this work, the performance of nine COTS modular, low-tomedium power DC/DC converters was investigated under cryogenic temperatures. The converters were evaluated in terms of their output regulation, efficiency, and input and output currents. At a given temperature, these properties were obtained at various input voltages and at different load levels. A summary on the performance of the tested converters was given. More comprehensive testing and in-depth analysis of performance under long-term exposure to extreme temperatures are deemed necessary to establish the suitability of these and other devices for use in the harsh environment of space exploration missions.

  16. Data on loss of off-site electric power simulation tests of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2002-07-01

    The high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR), the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, achieved the first full power of 30 MW on December 7 in 2001. In the rise-to-power test of the HTTR, simulation tests on loss of off-site electric power from 15 and 30 MW operations were carried out by manual shutdown of off-site electric power. Because helium circulators and water pumps coasted down immediately after the loss of off-site electric power, flow rates of helium and water decreased to the scram points. To shut down the reactor safely, the subcriticality should be kept by the insertion of control rods and the auxiliary cooling system should cool the core continuously avoiding excessive cold shock to core graphite components. About 50 s later from the loss of off-site electric power, the auxiliary cooling system started up by supplying electricity from emergency power feeders. Temperature of hot plenum block among core graphite structures decreased continuously after the startup of the auxiliary cooling system. This report describes sequences of dynamic components and transient behaviors of the reactor and its cooling system during the simulation tests from 15 and 30 MW operations. (author)

  17. The possibility of tribopair lifetime extending by welding of quenched and tempered stainless steel with quenched and tempered carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of tribocorrosion wear, extending of parts lifetime could be achieved by using stainless steel,which is hardened to sufficiently high hardness. In the tribosystem bolt/ bushing shell/link plate of the bucket elevator transporter conveyor machine, the previously quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steel for bolts is hardened at ≈47 HRC and welded with the quenched and tempered high yield carbon steel for bolts. Additional material, based on Cr-Ni-Mo (18/8/6 is used. The microstructure and hardness of welded samples are tested. On the tensile tester, resistance of the welded joint is tested with a simulated experiment. Dimensional control of worn tribosystem elements was performed after six months of service.

  18. Effects of salinity and water temperature on the ecological performance of Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejrup, Lars Brammer; Pedersen, Morten Foldager

    2008-01-01

    We tested the effects of salinity and water temperature on the ecological performance of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in culture-experiments to identify levels that could potentially limit survival and growth and, thus, the spatial distribution of eelgrass in temperate estuaries. The experiments ...

  19. Low-temperature plasticity of olivine revisited with in situ TEM nanomechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrissi, Hosni; Bollinger, Caroline; Boioli, Francesca; Schryvers, Dominique; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The rheology of the lithospheric mantle is fundamental to understanding how mantle convection couples with plate tectonics. However, olivine rheology at lithospheric conditions is still poorly understood because experiments are difficult in this temperature range where rocks and mineral become very brittle. We combine techniques of quantitative in situ tensile testing in a transmission electron microscope and numerical modeling of dislocation dynamics to constrain the low-temperature rheology of olivine. We find that the intrinsic ductility of olivine at low temperature is significantly lower than previously reported values, which were obtained under strain-hardened conditions. Using this method, we can anchor rheological laws determined at higher temperature and can provide a better constraint on intermediate temperatures relevant for the lithosphere. More generally, we demonstrate the possibility of characterizing the mechanical properties of specimens, which can be available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles only.

  20. Visualization of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation and fracture in SCM 440 steel with different tempering conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horikawa, Keitaro, E-mail: horikawa@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Ando, Nobuaki; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Urushihara, Wataru [Surface Design and Corrosion Research Section, Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe 651-2271 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We visualize emission sites of hydrogen atoms on the microstructures during deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen atoms are emitted from slip lines and inclusions when deformed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the sequence of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen evolution amount will increase if the steels with high strength are tested. - Abstract: In the present study, the hydrogen gas evolution behavior was investigated in SCM 440 steel by using a hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and a testing machine equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in a ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) atmosphere. SCM 440 steels prepared by varying the tempering temperature over the range 200-700 Degree-Sign C were evaluated in order to elucidate the relationship between the hydrogen gas evolution and the tempered microstructures in the deformation. Cathodic hydrogen charging was carried out with a current density of 100 A/m{sup 2} for 1 h at room temperature. For comparison, a tensile specimen was prepared without hydrogen charging. The HMT showed that silver particles, which are indicative of the hydrogen emission sites, were present mainly in the matrix as well as on the slip lines after the deformation. It is believed that the silver particles on the slip lines represent the effect of hydrogen transportation due to mobile dislocations. In addition, accumulation of silver particles around non-metallic inclusions such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also identified. This tendency was observed for different tempering conditions. From the relationship between the stress-strain curves and the hydrogen evolution, determined by using QMS under a UHV atmosphere, it was found that the hydrogen gas evolution behavior varied with the deformation stage.

  1. Visualization of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation and fracture in SCM 440 steel with different tempering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Keitaro; Ando, Nobuaki; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Urushihara, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We visualize emission sites of hydrogen atoms on the microstructures during deformation. ► Hydrogen atoms are emitted from slip lines and inclusions when deformed. ► We show the sequence of hydrogen gas evolution during deformation. ► Hydrogen evolution amount will increase if the steels with high strength are tested. - Abstract: In the present study, the hydrogen gas evolution behavior was investigated in SCM 440 steel by using a hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and a testing machine equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in a ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) atmosphere. SCM 440 steels prepared by varying the tempering temperature over the range 200–700 °C were evaluated in order to elucidate the relationship between the hydrogen gas evolution and the tempered microstructures in the deformation. Cathodic hydrogen charging was carried out with a current density of 100 A/m 2 for 1 h at room temperature. For comparison, a tensile specimen was prepared without hydrogen charging. The HMT showed that silver particles, which are indicative of the hydrogen emission sites, were present mainly in the matrix as well as on the slip lines after the deformation. It is believed that the silver particles on the slip lines represent the effect of hydrogen transportation due to mobile dislocations. In addition, accumulation of silver particles around non-metallic inclusions such as Al 2 O 3 was also identified. This tendency was observed for different tempering conditions. From the relationship between the stress–strain curves and the hydrogen evolution, determined by using QMS under a UHV atmosphere, it was found that the hydrogen gas evolution behavior varied with the deformation stage.

  2. Enhancing the Accuracy of Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing through Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Jones

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the advantages and enhanced accuracy thermography provides to high temperature mechanical testing. This technique is not only used to monitor, but also to control test specimen temperatures where the infra-red technique enables accurate non-invasive control of rapid thermal cycling for non-metallic materials. Isothermal and dynamic waveforms are employed over a 200–800 °C temperature range to pre-oxidised and coated specimens to assess the capability of the technique. This application shows thermography to be accurate to within ±2 °C of thermocouples, a standardised measurement technique. This work demonstrates the superior visibility of test temperatures previously unobtainable by conventional thermocouples or even more modern pyrometers that thermography can deliver. As a result, the speed and accuracy of thermal profiling, thermal gradient measurements and cold/hot spot identification using the technique has increased significantly to the point where temperature can now be controlled by averaging over a specified area. The increased visibility of specimen temperatures has revealed additional unknown effects such as thermocouple shadowing, preferential crack tip heating within an induction coil, and, fundamental response time of individual measurement techniques which are investigated further.

  3. Space monitoring of temperature regime of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site: 10 years of observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spivak, L.F.; Arkhipkin, O.P.; Vitkovskaya, I.S.; Batyrbaeva, M.Zh.; Sagatdinova, G.N.

    2006-01-01

    A brief description of the results of temperature anomaly routine research by specialists from Space Research Institute of Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan, revealed in 1997 within Semipalatinsk Test Site in the process of remote sounding of Kazakhstani territory, is given. Results of map analysis for snow cover, day and night temperatures and vegetation (during vegetation season) for the period since 1997 till 2006 testify a hypothesis on natural temperature anomaly, though there is a number of questions to be answered for further complex investigation. (author)

  4. Research program of the high temperature engineering test reactor for upgrading the HTGR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Tachibana, Yukio; Takeda, Takeshi; Saikusa, Akio; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    1997-07-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is a graphite-moderated and helium-cooled reactor with an outlet power of 30 MW and outlet coolant temperature of 950degC, and its first criticality will be attained at the end of 1997. In the HTTR, researches establishing and upgrading the technology basis necessary for an HTGR and innovative basic researches for a high temperature engineering will be conducted. A research program of the HTTR for upgrading the technology basis for the HTGR was determined considering realization of future generation commercial HTGRs. This paper describes a research program of the HTTR. (author)

  5. Results of radiation tests at cryogenic temperature on some selected organic materials for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the near future, particle accelerators and detectors as well as fusion reactors will operate at cryogenic temperatures. At temperatures as low as 2 K, the organic materials used for the insulation of the superconducting magnets and cables will be exposed to high radiation levels. In this work, a representative selection of organic materials comprising insulating films, cable insulations and epoxy-type-impregnated resins were exposed to neutron and gamma radiation of nuclear reactors, both at ambient and cryogenic temperatures, and were subsequently mechanically tested. The results show that the radiation degradation is never worse in a cryogenic fluid than it is in usual ambient conditions. (author)

  6. High Temperature Testing with Sapphire Fiber White-Light Michelson Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A.; Pedrazzani, J.; May, R.; Murphy, K.; Tran, T.; Coate, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the design of new aerospace materials, developmental testing is conducted to characterize the behavior of the material under severe environmental conditions of high stress, temperature, and vibration. But to test these materials under extreme conditions requires sensors that can perform in harsh environments. Current sensors can only monitor high temperature test samples using long throw instrumentation, but this is inherently less accurate than a surface mounted sensor, and provides no means for fabrication process monitoring. A promising alternative is the use of sapphire optical fiber sensors. Sapphire is an incredibly rugged material, being extremely hard (9 mhos), chemically inert, and having a melting temperature (over 2000 C). Additionally, there is a extensive background of optical fiber sensors upon which to draw for sapphire sensor configurations.

  7. Forming limit diagram of aluminum AA6063 tubes at high temperatures by bulge tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Naeini, Hassan Moslemi; Liaghat, Gholamhossein; Tafti, Rooholla Azizi; Rahmani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    A free bulge test and ductile fracture criteria were used to obtain the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of aluminum alloy AA6063 tubes at high temperatures. Ductile fracture criteria were calibrated using the results of uniaxial tension tests at various elevated temperatures and different strain rates through adjusting the Zener-Holloman parameter. High temperature free bulge test of tubes was simulated in finite element software Abaqus, and tube bursting was predicted using ductile fracture criteria under different loading paths. FLDs which were obtained from finite element simulation were compared to experimental results to select the most accurate criterion for prediction of forming limit diagram. According to the results, all studied ductile fracture criteria predict similarly when forming condition is close to the uniaxial tension, while Ayada criterion predicts the FLD at 473 K and 573 K very well.

  8. Forming limit diagram of aluminum AA6063 tubes at high temperatures by bulge tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Naeini, Hassan Moslemi; Liaghat, Gholamhossein [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafti, Rooholla Azizi [Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmani, Farzad [Kar Higher Education Institute, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A free bulge test and ductile fracture criteria were used to obtain the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of aluminum alloy AA6063 tubes at high temperatures. Ductile fracture criteria were calibrated using the results of uniaxial tension tests at various elevated temperatures and different strain rates through adjusting the Zener-Holloman parameter. High temperature free bulge test of tubes was simulated in finite element software Abaqus, and tube bursting was predicted using ductile fracture criteria under different loading paths. FLDs which were obtained from finite element simulation were compared to experimental results to select the most accurate criterion for prediction of forming limit diagram. According to the results, all studied ductile fracture criteria predict similarly when forming condition is close to the uniaxial tension, while Ayada criterion predicts the FLD at 473 K and 573 K very well.

  9. Programmed temperature control of capsule in irradiation test with personal computer at JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H.; Uramoto, T.; Fukushima, M.; Obata, M.; Suzuki, S.; Nakazaki, C.; Tanaka, I.

    1992-01-01

    The capsule irradiation facility is one of various equipments employed at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The capsule facility has been used in irradiation tests of both nuclear fuels and materials. The capsule to be irradiated consists of the specimen, the outer tube and inner tube with a annular space between them. The temperature of the specimen is controlled by varying the degree of pressure (below the atmospheric pressure) of He gas in the annular space (vacuum-controlled). Beside this, in another system the temperature of the specimen is controlled with electric heaters mounted around the specimen (heater-controlled). The use of personal computer in the capsule facility has led to the development of a versatile temperature control system at the JMTR. Features of this newly-developed temperature control system lie in the following: the temperature control mode for a operation period can be preset prior to the operation; and the vacuum-controlled irradiation facility can be used in cooperation with the heater-controlled. The introduction of personal computer has brought in automatic heat-up and cool-down operations of the capsule, setting aside the hand-operated jobs which had been conducted by the operators. As a result of this, the various requirements seeking a higher accuracy and efficiency in the irradiation can be met by fully exploiting the capabilities incorporated into the facility which allow the cyclic or delicate changes in the temperature. This paper deals with a capsule temperature control system with personal computer. (author)

  10. Influence of hydrogen and test temperature on mechanical properties of vanadium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoloff, N.S.; Ashok, S.; Xiao, P.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen on fatigue life of niobium and vanadium is described. In tests carried out under stress control conditions on unnotched material hydrogen extends fatigue life of both metals. However, in stress controlled tests on notched bars and in strain control tests on unnotched bars hydrogen is detrimental to fatigue life. Hydrided alloys are much more sensitive to notches than are the unalloyed metals. Frequency effects on fatigue life also are much more severe in hydrided alloys, lower frequency leading to shorter life. The results of delayed failure, creep tests and elevated temperature fatigue tests also are reported. Niobium and vanadium reveal reduced fatigue lives at elevated temperatures for tests carried out in vacuum. The results of limited hold time and low frequency tests on strain controlled fatigue life also are reported. Increasing hold time increases fatigue life of niobium in the range 450 to 650 0 C. Fractographic features change from striations in unalloyed metals to cleavage in the hydrided alloys tested at room temperature

  11. Identification student’s misconception of heat and temperature using three-tier diagnostic test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliyanah; Putri, H. N. P. A.; Rohmawati, L.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a Three-Tier Diagnostic Test (TTDT) to identify the student's misconception of heat and temperature. Stages of development include: analysis, planning, design, development, evaluation and revise. The results of this study show that (1) the quality of the three-tier type diagnostic test instrument developed has been expressed well with the following details: (a) Internal validity of 88.19% belonging to the valid category. (b) External validity of empirical construct validity test using Pearson Product Moment obtained 0.43 is classified and result of empirical construct validity test obtained false positives 6.1% and false negatives 5.9% then the instrument was valid. (c) Test reliability by using Cronbach’s Alpha of 0.98 which means acceptable. (d) The 80% difficulty level test is quite difficult. (2) Student misconceptions on the temperature of heat and displacement materials based on the II test the highest (84%), the lowest (21%), and the non-misconceptions (7%). (3) The highest cause of misconception among students is associative thinking (22%) and the lowest is caused by incomplete or incomplete reasoning (11%). Three-Tier Diagnostic Test (TTDT) could identify the student's misconception of heat and temperature.

  12. How to correct the ambient temperature influence on the thermal response test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borinaga-Treviño, Roque; Norambuena-Contreras, Jose; Castro-Fresno, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Due to global warming and to the increasing energy demand, it is necessary to improve energy efficiency on buildings. In this context, Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps (GCHP) have proved to be the most efficient heating and cooling system. The main parameters to define a ground heat exchanger are obtained via an in situ test called Thermal Response Test (TRT). However, ambient air influence on this test is remarkable due to the exposition of the testing machine, and even the ground undisturbed temperature varies with the ambient temperature oscillations. Therefore, despite the fact that the influence of ambient conditions on the TRT results is an important topic in order to define a ground heat exchanger, there is yet a limited literature on new theoretical methods to correct the ambient temperature influence on the predicted ground thermal conductivity measured via TRT. This paper presents a new methodology to analyse and mitigate the influence of the ambient conditions on the TRT results, with the main advantage that it is not necessary to know its physical origin previously. The method is focused on reducing the mean fluid temperature oscillations caused by the ambient temperature, by analysing the influence of the chosen time interval to fit the data to the infinite line source theory formulae that finally predicts the ground thermal conductivity. With these purpose, results of two different TRTs were analysed, each of them with a different equipment and ambient exposition. Results using the proposed method showed that thermal conductivity oscillations were reduced in both tests. For the first test, the uncertainty associated to the chosen time interval for the estimation was diminished by 33%, reducing significantly its predicted value and thus avoiding the future installation possible under-designing. However, because of the equipment insulation improvements and the smoother ambient temperature variations, the method obtained similar results for the predicted

  13. Heat removal performance of auxiliary cooling system for the high temperature engineering test reactor during scrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Takenaka, Satsuki

    2003-01-01

    The auxiliary cooling system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is employed for heat removal as an engineered safety feature when the reactor scrams in an accident when forced circulation can cool the core. The HTTR is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan with reactor outlet gas temperature of 950 degree sign C and thermal power of 30 MW. The auxiliary cooling system should cool the core continuously avoiding excessive cold shock to core graphite components and water boiling of itself. Simulation tests on manual trip from 9 MW operation and on loss of off-site electric power from 15 MW operation were carried out in the rise-to-power test up to 20 MW of the HTTR. Heat removal characteristics of the auxiliary cooling system were examined by the tests. Empirical correlations of overall heat transfer coefficients were acquired for a helium/water heat exchanger and air cooler for the auxiliary cooling system. Temperatures of fluids in the auxiliary cooling system were predicted on a scram event from 30 MW operation at 950 degree sign C of the reactor outlet coolant temperature. Under the predicted helium condition of the auxiliary cooling system, integrity of fuel blocks among the core graphite components was investigated by stress analysis. Evaluation results showed that overcooling to the core graphite components and boiling of water in the auxiliary cooling system should be prevented where open area condition of louvers in the air cooler is the full open

  14. Testing of a Microfluidic Sampling System for High Temperature Electrochemical MC&A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nichols, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-11-27

    This report describes the preliminary validation of a high-temperature microfluidic chip system for sampling of electrochemical process salt. Electroanalytical and spectroscopic techniques are attractive candidates for improvement through high-throughput sample analysis via miniaturization. Further, microfluidic chip systems are amenable to micro-scale chemical processing such as rapid, automated sample purification to improve sensor performance. The microfluidic chip was tested to determine the feasibility of the system for high temperature applications and conditions under which microfluidic systems can be used to generate salt droplets at process temperature to support development of material balance and control systems in a used fuel treatment facility. In FY13, the project focused on testing a quartz microchip device with molten salts at near process temperatures. The equipment was installed in glove box and tested up to 400°C using commercial thermal transfer fluids as the carrier phase. Preliminary tests were carried out with a low-melting halide salt to initially characterize the properties of this novel liquid-liquid system and to investigate the operating regimes for inducing droplet flow within candidate carrier fluids. Initial results show that the concept is viable for high temperature sampling but further development is required to optimize the system to operate with process relevant molten salts.

  15. Planetesimal Formation in the Warm, Inner Disk: Experiments with Tempered Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beule, Caroline; Landers, Joachim; Salamon, Soma; Wende, Heiko; Wurm, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard.wurm@uni-due.de [Faculty of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2017-03-01

    It is an open question how elevated temperatures in the inner parts of protoplanetary disks influence the formation of planetesimals. We approach this problem here by studying the tensile strength of granular beds with dust samples tempered at different temperatures. We find via laboratory experiments that tempering at increasing temperatures is correlated with an increase in cohesive forces. We studied dust samples of palagonite (JSC Mars-1a) which were tempered for up to 200 hr at temperatures between 600 and 1200 K, and measured the relative tensile strengths of highly porous dust layers once the samples cooled to room temperature. Tempering increases the tensile strength from 800 K upwards. This change is accompanied by mineral transformations, the formation of iron oxide crystallites as analyzed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, changes in the number size distribution, and the morphology of the surface visible as cracks in larger grains. These results suggest a difference in the collisional evolution toward larger bodies with increasing temperature as collisional growth is fundamentally based on cohesion. While high temperatures might also increase sticking (not studied here), compositional evolution will already enhance the cohesion and the possibility of growing larger aggregates on the way toward planetesimals. This might lead to a preferred in situ formation of inner planets and explain the observed presence of dense inner planetary systems.

  16. Metrology to enable high temperature erosion testing - A new european initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, A.T.; Gee, M.G.; Clausen, Sønnik

    2014-01-01

    is required. However, limitations in current measurement capability within this form of test prevent the advancement. A new European initiative, METROSION, on the development of high temperature solid particle erosion testing has a primary aim to develop this metrological framework. Several key parameters...... have been identified for measurement and control; these include temperature (of the sample, gas and particles), flow rate, size and shape of the erodent, angle of incidence of the particle stream and nozzle design. This paper outlines the aims and objectives of this new initiative. With a particular...

  17. Large Plankton Enhance Heterotrophy Under Experimental Warming in a Temperate Coastal Ecosystem

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2017-12-15

    Microbes are key players in oceanic carbon fluxes. Temperate ecosystems are seasonally variable and thus suitable for testing the effect of warming on microbial carbon fluxes at contrasting oceanographic conditions. In four experiments conducted in February, April, August and October 2013 in coastal NE Atlantic waters, we monitored microbial plankton stocks and daily rates of primary production, bacterial heterotrophic production and respiration at in situ temperature and at 2 and 4°C over ambient values during 4-day incubations. Ambient total primary production (TPP) exceeded total community respiration (< 200 µm, TR) in winter and fall but not in spring and summer. The bacterial contribution to ecosystem carbon fluxes was low, with bacterial production representing on average 6.9 ± 3.2% of TPP and bacterial respiration (between 0.8 and 0.2 µm) contributing on average 35 ± 7% to TR. Warming did not result in a uniform increase in the variables considered, and most significant effects were found only for the 4°C increase. In the summer and fall experiments, under warm and nutrient-deficient conditions, the net TPP/TR ratio decreased by 39 and 34% in the 4°C treatment, mainly due to the increase in respiration of large organisms rather than bacteria. Our results indicate that the interaction of temperature and substrate availability in determining microbial carbon fluxes has a strong seasonal component in temperate planktonic ecosystems, with temperature having a more pronounced effect and generating a shift toward net heterotrophy under more oligotrophic conditions as found in summer and early fall.

  18. Standard Test Method for Testing Polymeric Seal Materials for Geothermal and/or High Temperature Service Under Sealing Stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the initial evaluation of (screening) polymeric materials for seals under static sealing stress and at elevated temperatures. 1.2 This test method applies to geothermal service only if used in conjunction with Test Method E 1068. 1.3 The test fluid is distilled water. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Liquid oxygen liquid acquisition device bubble point tests with high pressure lox at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurns, J. M.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    When transferring propellant in space, it is most efficient to transfer single phase liquid from a propellant tank to an engine. In earth's gravity field or under acceleration, propellant transfer is fairly simple. However, in low gravity, withdrawing single-phase fluid becomes a challenge. A variety of propellant management devices (PMDs) are used to ensure single-phase flow. One type of PMD, a liquid acquisition device (LAD) takes advantage of capillary flow and surface tension to acquire liquid. The present work reports on testing with liquid oxygen (LOX) at elevated pressures (and thus temperatures) (maximum pressure 1724 kPa and maximum temperature 122 K) as part of NASA's continuing cryogenic LAD development program. These tests evaluate LAD performance for LOX stored in higher pressure vessels that may be used in propellant systems using pressure fed engines. Test data shows a significant drop in LAD bubble point values at higher liquid temperatures, consistent with lower liquid surface tension at those temperatures. Test data also indicates that there are no first order effects of helium solubility in LOX on LAD bubble point prediction. Test results here extend the range of data for LOX fluid conditions, and provide insight into factors affecting predicting LAD bubble point pressures.

  20. Study on elastic-plastic fracture toughness test in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Structural integrity of internal components in light water reactors is important for the safety of operation and service lifetime. Fracture toughness is important parameter for structural integrity assessment of nuclear power plant. In general, fracture toughness of materials which compose the components in light water reactor is obtained with fracture toughness tests in air although some components are subjected to high temperature water because of the difficulty of fracture toughness test in high temperature water. However, the effects of high temperature water and hydrogen on fracture behavior of the structural materials in nuclear power plant such as low alloy steel, cast austenitic stainless steel, and Ni base alloy are concerned recently. In this study, elastic-plastic fracture toughness test of low alloy steel in simulated BWR water environment was studied. Fracture toughness test in high temperature water with original clip gage and normalization data reduction technique was established. The difference of fracture toughness J_Q tested in air between using elastic unload compliance method and normalization data reduction technique was also discussed. As a result, obtained value with normalization data reduction technique tended to be higher than the value with elastic unload compliance. (author)

  1. EC static high-temperature leach test. Summary report of an European Community interlaboratory round robin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koennecke, R.; Kirsch, J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an interlaboratory static high-temperature leach test conducted by the Commission of the European Communities in 1983 over a period of 9 months are compiled and statistically evaluated. A total of 12 laboratories - 10 from Member States of the EC and one from Finland and the USA - provided information concerning the test method and the analytical test results in the frame of a round robin test (RRT). All together these laboratories tested 366 waste from specimens of the borosilicate glass UK 209 containing simulated high-level radioactive waste. Leach tests were performed on the basis of the ''Document on the EC static high-temperature leach test method'' in autoclaves at leaching temperatures of 90 0 C, 110 0 C, 150 0 C, and 190 0 C over time periods of 3,7,14,28 and 56 days using dionized water as leachant. The resulting leachates were analysed for the elemental concentrations of Si,B,Sr,Nd and Cs by all laboratories and for the concentrations of the optional elements Na, Al,Ce,Mo,Cr,Fe,Li,Mg and Zn by some of the participating laboratories. Additionally, the F content of the blank leachates was analysed by all laboratories

  2. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage

  3. Analysis of mechanical properties of steel 1045 plasma nitriding: with and without tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, N.T.B.; Passos, M.L.M. dos; Riani, J.C.; Recco, A.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of tempering during the nitriding of AISI 1045 steel. The objective was to evaluate the possibility of eliminating this phase, with the nitriding properties remaining unaltered. For this, three parameter samples were compared: quenched, tempered and nitrided for 2h; quenching and nitrided for 2h and quenching and nitrided for 4h. The analysis techniques used for characterizing the samples before and after nitriding were optical microscopy, hardness Rockwell C (HRC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that phase γ is the most favorable of all parameters tested. The hardness assays showed that samples with different initial hardness (with and without tempering) and even nitriding time showed similar mechanical properties. This fact suggests that the tempering process occurred parallel to the nitriding process. (author)

  4. The Effect of Tempering on Strength Properties and Seed Coat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of tempering on seed coat adhesion strength and mechanical strength of sorghum and millet grain kernels was investigated at different tempering durations. Tempering reduced the kernel breaking strength and had significant effect on seed coat adhesion strength. Tempering the grain for 60 minutes at ambient ...

  5. THORS: a high-temperature sodium test facility rated at 2.0 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnadt, P.A.; Anderson, A.H.; Clapp, N.E.; Montgomery, B.H.; Collins, C.W.; Stulting, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Thermal--Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility at Oak Ridge Naitonal Laboratory (ORNL) is a high-temperature sodium test facility operated for the United States Breeder Reactor Safety Program. The facility is primarily used for testing large simulated Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel subassemblies. The facility has recently been upgraded to provide a 2.0-MW test bundle power input and heat removal capability. A new test section, which will be capable of operating at 980 0 C and which will accommodate a 217-pin bundle, has also been added. A 61-pin bundle is currently under test in the facility. A description of the test facility is presented, along with a brief summary of the 8-year operating history of this safety-related test facility

  6. Radiation tests at cryogenic temperature on selected organic materials for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Szeless, B.; Tavlet, M.

    1997-01-01

    Future multi-TeV particle accelerators like the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will use superconducting magnets in which organic materials will be exposed to high radiation levels at temperatures as low as 2 K. A representative selection of organic materials comprising insulating films, cable insulations, epoxy resins and composites were exposed to neutron and gamma radiation of a nuclear reactor. Depending on the type of materials, the integrated radiation doses varied between 180 kGy and 155 MGy. During irradiation, the samples were kept close to the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen, i.e. at 80 K, and thereafter stored in liquid nitrogen and transferred at the same temperature into the testing device for measurement of tensile and flexural strength. Tests were carried out on the same materials at similar dose rates at room temperature, and the results are compared with the ones obtained at cryogenic temperature. They show that within the selected dose range, a number of organic materials are suitable for use in radiation fields of the LHC at cryogenic temperature

  7. Definition of the linearity loss of the surface temperature in static tensile tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Risitano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Static tensile tests on material for mechanical constructions have pointed out the linearity loss of the surface temperature with the application of load. This phenomenon is due to the heat generation caused by the local microplasticizations which carry the material to deviate from its completely thermoelastic behavior,. The identification of the static load which determines the loss of linearity of the temperature under stress, becomes extremely important to define a first dynamic characterization of the material. The temperature variations that can be recorded during the static test are often very limited (a few tenths of degree for every 100 MPa in steels and they require the use of special sensors able to measure very low temperature variations. The experience acquired in such analysis highlighted that, dealing with highly accurate sensors or with particular materials, the identification of the first linearity loss (often by eye in the temperature curves, can be influenced by the sensibility of the investigator himself and can lead to incorrect estimates. The aim of this work is to validate the above mentioned observations on different steels, by applying the autocorrelation function to the data collected during the application of a static load. This, in order to make the results of the thermal analysis free from the sensitivity of the operator and to make the results as objective as possible, for defining the closest time of the linearity loss in the temperature-time function.

  8. Results of radiation tests at cryogenic temperature on some selected organic materials for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Szeless, B.; Tavlet, M.; Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    Future multi-TeV particle accelerators like the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will use superconducting magnets where organic materials will be exposed to high radiation levels at temperatures as low as 2 K. A representative selection of organic materials comprising insulating films, cable insulations, and epoxy-type impregnated resins were exposed to neutron and gamma radiation of a nuclear reactor. Depending on the type of materials, the integrated radiation doses varied between 180 kGy and 155 MGy. During irradiation, the samples were kept close to the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen i.e. ∼ 80 K and thereafter stored in liquid nitrogen and transferred at the same temperature into the testing device for measurement of tensile and flexural strength. Tests were carried out on the same materials at similar dose rates at room temperature, and the results were compared with those obtained at cryogenic temperature. They show that, within the selected dose range, a number of organic materials are suitable for use in the radiation field of the LHC at cryogenic temperature. (orig.)

  9. High temperature and dynamic testing of AHSS for an analytical description of the adiabatic cutting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S.; Schmitz, F.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the automotive industry, advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are widely used as sheet part components to reduce weight, even though this leads to several challenges. The demand for high-quality shear cutting surfaces that do not require reworking can be fulfilled by adiabatic shear cutting: High strain rates and local temperatures lead to the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASB). While this process is well suited to produce AHSS parts with excellent cutting surface quality, a fundamental understanding of the process is still missing today. In this study, compression tests in a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar with an initial strain rate of 1000 s-1 were performed in a temperature range between 200 °C and 1000 °C. The experimental results show that high strength steels with nearly the same mechanical properties at RT may possess a considerably different behavior at higher temperatures. The resulting microstructures after testing at different temperatures were analyzed by optical microscopy. The thermo-mechanical material behavior was then considered in an analytical model. To predict the local temperature increase that occurs during the adiabatic blanking process, experimentally determined flow curves were used. Furthermore, the influence of temperature evolution with respect to phase transformation is discussed. This study contributes to a more complete understanding of the relevant microstructural and thermo-mechanical mechanisms leading to the evolution of ASB during cutting of AHSS.

  10. Some problems on materials tests in high temperature hydrogen base gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Fujitsuka, Masakazu; Yoshida, Heitaro; Watanabe, Ryoji

    1980-01-01

    Some problems have been examined on materials tests (creep rupture tests and corrosion tests) in high temperature mixture gas of hydrogen (80%H 2 + 15%CO + 5%CO 2 ) simulating the reducing gas for direct steel making. H 2 , CO, CO 2 and CH 4 in the reducing gas interact with each other at elevated temperature and produce water vapor (H 2 O) and carbon (soot). Carbon deposited on the walls of retorts and the water condensed at pipings of the lower temperature gas outlet causes blocking of gas flow. The gas reactions have been found to be catalyzed by the retort walls, and appropriate selection of the materials for retorts has been found to mitigate the problems caused by water condensation and carbon deposition. Quartz has been recognized to be one of the most promising materials for minimizing the gas reactions. And ceramic coating, namely, BN (born nitride) on the heat resistant superalloy, MO-RE II, has reduced the amounts of water vapor and deposited carbon (sooting) produced by gas reactions and has kept dew points of outlet gas below room temperature. The well known emf (thermo-electromotive force) deterioration of Alumel-Chromel thermocouples in the reducing gases at elevated temperatures has been also found to be prevented by the ceramic (BN) coating. (author)

  11. Long-term storage life of light source modules by temperature cycling accelerated life test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Ningning; Tan Manqing; Li Ping; Jiao Jian; Guo Xiaofeng; Guo Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Light source modules are the most crucial and fragile devices that affect the life and reliability of the interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG). While the light emitting chips were stable in most cases, the module packaging proved to be less satisfactory. In long-term storage or the working environment, the ambient temperature changes constantly and thus the packaging and coupling performance of light source modules are more likely to degrade slowly due to different materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion in the bonding interface. A constant temperature accelerated life test cannot evaluate the impact of temperature variation on the performance of a module package, so the temperature cycling accelerated life test was studied. The main failure mechanism affecting light source modules is package failure due to solder fatigue failure including a fiber coupling shift, loss of cooling efficiency and thermal resistor degradation, so the Norris-Landzberg model was used to model solder fatigue life and determine the activation energy related to solder fatigue failure mechanism. By analyzing the test data, activation energy was determined and then the mean life of light source modules in different storage environments with a continuously changing temperature was simulated, which has provided direct reference data for the storage life prediction of IFOG. (semiconductor devices)

  12. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  13. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  14. High temperature testing of TRUPACT-I materials: Kevlar, honeycomb, rigid polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, M.L.

    1985-12-01

    When the Transuranic Package Transporter Model-I (TRUPACT-I) failed to afford sufficient containment after a 35-minute JP-4 fueled open-pool fire, component tests were conducted, in conjunction with analyses, to guide and assess the redesign of TRUPACT-I. Since materials which change phase or combust are difficult to numerically analyze, the component tests determined the behavior of these materials in TRUPACT-I. The component tests approximated the behavior of Kevlar (registered trademark of DuPont), metal honeycomb, and rigid polyurethane foam, as they appear in TRUPACT-I, in an open-pool fire environment. Six series of tests were performed at Sandia's Radiant Heat Facility and one test at the wind-shielded fire test facility (LAARC Chimney). Each test facility was controlled to yield temperatures or heat fluxes equivalent to those measured in the TRUPACT-I, Unit 0, open-pool fire. This extensive series of component tests (34 runs total) provided information on the high-temperature behavior of unique materials which was not previously available or otherwise attainable. The component tests were a timely and cost-effective means of providing the data for the TRUPACT-I redesign

  15. Degradation of Solar Array Components in a Combined UV/VUV High Temperature Test Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nömayr Christel

    2017-01-01

    A design verification test under UV/VUV conditions of sun exposed materials and technologies on component level is presented which forms part of the overall verification and qualification of the solar array design of the MTM and MPO. The test concentrates on the self-contamination aspects and the resulting performance losses of the solar array under high intensity and elevated temperature environment representative for the photovoltaic assembly (PVA.

  16. Data Acquisition for Low-Temperature Geothermal Well Tests and Long-Term Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P J

    1992-03-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

  17. Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.

    1992-09-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

  18. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  19. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  20. Comparisons of invasive plants in southern Africa originating from southern temperate, northern temperate and tropical regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Henderson

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A subset of invasive alien plant species in southern Africa was analysed in terms of their history of introduction, rate of spread, countries/region of origin, taxonomy, growth forms, cultivated uses, weed status and current distribution in southern Africa, and comparisons made of those originating from south of the tropic of Capricorn, north of the tropic of Cancer and from the tropics. The subset of 233 species, belonging to 58 families, includes all important declared species and some potentially important species. Almost as many species originate from temperate regions (112 as from the tropics (121. Most southern temperate species came from Australia (28/36, most tropical species from tropical America (92/121 and most northern temperate species from Europe (including the Mediterranean and Asia (58/76. Transformers account for 33% of  all species. More transformers are of tropical origin (36 than of northern temperate (24 and southern temperate origin (18. However. 50% of southern temperate species are transformers, compared to 32% of northern temperate and 29% of tropical species. Southern temperate transformer species are mainly woody trees and shrubs that were established on a grand scale as silvicultural crops, barriers (hedges, windbreaks and screens and cover/binders. Most aquatics, herbs, climbers and succulent shrubs an. trom the tropics. Ornamentals are the single largest category of plants from all three regions, the tropics having contributed twice as many species as temperate regions.

  1. Tensile testing and damage analysis of woven glass-cloth/epoxy laminates at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, S.; Shindo, Y.; Horiguchi, K.

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the tensile properties of SL-ES30 glass-cloth/epoxy laminates for superconducting magnets in fusion energy systems, tensile tests were examined both experimentally and analytically. The tensile tests were conducted in accordance with JIS K 7054 at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The general specimen geometry was a rectangular dog-bone shape with constant gage length, but with each specimen size having a different specimen width. The experimental finding provides the data for analytical modeling. The model utilizes two damage variables which are determined from experimental data. A finite element method coupled with damage was adopted for the extensional analysis. The effects of temperature, specimen geometry and gripping method on the tensile properties are examined

  2. Limitations of predicting in vivo biostability of multiphase polyurethane elastomers using temperature-accelerated degradation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padsalgikar, Ajay; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Genevieve; Touchet, Tyler; Iacob, Ciprian; Mellin, Lisa; Norlin-Weissenrieder, Anna; Runt, James

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane biostability has been the subject of intense research since the failure of polyether polyurethane pacemaker leads in the 1980s. Accelerated in vitro testing has been used to isolate degradation mechanisms and predict clinical performance of biomaterials. However, validation that in vitro methods reproduce in vivo degradation is critical to the selection of appropriate tests. High temperature has been proposed as a method to accelerate degradation. However, correlation of such data to in vivo performance is poor for polyurethanes due to the impact of temperature on microstructure. In this study, we characterize the lack of correlation between hydrolytic degradation predicted using a high temperature aging model of a polydimethylsiloxane-based polyurethane and its in vivo performance. Most notably, the predicted molecular weight and tensile property changes from the accelerated aging study did not correlate with clinical explants subjected to human biological stresses in real time through 5 years. Further, DMTA, ATR-FTIR, and SAXS experiments on samples aged for 2 weeks in PBS indicated greater phase separation in samples aged at 85°C compared to those aged at 37°C and unaged controls. These results confirm that microstructural changes occur at high temperatures that do not occur at in vivo temperatures. In addition, water absorption studies demonstrated that water saturation levels increased significantly with temperature. This study highlights that the multiphase morphology of polyurethane precludes the use of temperature accelerated biodegradation for the prediction of clinical performance and provides critical information in designing appropriate in vitro tests for this class of materials. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  4. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  5. Development of Three-Tier Heat, Temperature and Internal Energy Diagnostic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Deniz; Gulbas, Etna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Misconceptions are major obstacles to learning physics, and the concepts of heat and temperature are some of the common misconceptions that are encountered in daily life. Therefore, it is important to develop valid and reliable tools to determine students' misconceptions about basic thermodynamics concepts. Three-tier tests are…

  6. Design and safety consideration in the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiuki; Sudo, Yukio; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru

    1990-01-01

    The budget for construction of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was recently committed by the Government in Japan. The HTTR is a test reactor with thermal output of 30 MW and reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C at high temperature test operation. The HTTR plant uses a pin-in-block design core and will be used as an experience leading to high temperature applications. Several major important safety considerations are adopted in the design of the HTTR. These are as follows: 1) A coated particle fuel must not be failed during a normal reactor operation and an anticipated operational occurrence; 2) Two independent and diverse reactor shut-down systems are provided in order to shut down the reactor safely and reliably in any condition; 3) Back-up reactor cooling systems which are safety ones are provided in order to remove residual heat of reactor in any condition; 4) Multiple barriers and countermeasures are provided to contain fission products such as a containment, pressure gradient between the primary and secondary cooling circuit and so on, though coated particle fuels contain fission products with high reliability; 5) The functions of materials used in the primary cooling circuit are separated to be pressure-resisting and heat-resisting in order to resolve material problems and maintain high reliability. The detailed design of the HTTR was completed with extensive accumulation of material data and component tests. (author)

  7. High Temperature Test Facility Preliminary RELAP5-3D Input Model Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A RELAP5-3D input model is being developed for the High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University. The current model is described in detail. Further refinements will be made to the model as final as-built drawings are released and when system characterization data are available for benchmarking the input model.

  8. Design of project management system for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yan; Xu Yuanhui

    1998-01-01

    A framework of project management information system (MIS) for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor is introduced. Based on it, the design of nuclear project management information system and project monitoring system (PMS) are given. Additionally, a new method of developing MIS and Decision Support System (DSS) has been tried

  9. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  10. Thermomechanical Processing of Fe-6.9Al-2Cr-0.88C Steel: Intercritical Annealing Followed by Quench Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, Ahmed Ismail Zaky; Mohamed, Masoud Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A hot forged Fe-0.88 pct C-6.9 pct Al steel was intercritically annealed at temperatures in the range of 1173 K to 1283 K (900 °C to 1010 °C), and subsequently tempered at 623 K (350 °C) to enhance the mechanical properties by microstructure modification. Room temperature compression tests were carried out to evaluate the influence of the intercritical annealing temperature on the mechanical properties. A substructure was present in the microstructure after each intercritical annealing treatment. The substructure was absent after annealing at 1263 K (990 °C) and higher temperatures. Over-aging occurred when the annealing temperature was increased to 1283 K (1010 °C). A remarkable increase in strength and ductility was achieved after annealing at 1263 K (990 °C).

  11. Standard test method for conducting drop-weight test to determine nil-ductility transition temperature of ferritic steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature of ferritic steels, 5/8 in. (15.9 mm) and thicker. 1.2 This test method may be used whenever the inquiry, contract, order, or specification states that the steels are subject to fracture toughness requirements as determined by the drop-weight test. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Endemic shrubs in temperate arid and semiarid regions of northern China and their potentials for rangeland restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jianmin; Yang, Hongxiao; Lu, Qi; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-06-03

    Some endemic shrubs in arid and semiarid ecosystems are in danger of extinction, and yet they can play useful roles in maintaining or restoring these ecosystems, thus practical efforts are needed to conserve them. The shrubs Amygdalus pedunculata Pall., Amygdalus mongolica (Maxim.) Ricker and Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim. ex Kom.) Cheng f. are endemic species in arid and semiarid regions of northern China, where rangeland desertification is pronounced due to chronic overgrazing. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that these endemic shrubs have developed adaptations to arid and semiarid environments and could play critical roles as nurse species to initiate the process of rangeland recovery. Based on careful vegetation surveys, we analysed the niches of these species in relation to precipitation, temperature and habitats. All sampling plots were categorized by these endemics and sorted by the non-metric multidimensional scaling method. Species ratios of each life form and species co-occurrence rates with the endemics were also evaluated. Annual average temperature and annual precipitation were found to be the key factors determining vegetation diversity and distributions. Amygdalus pedunculata prefers low hills and sandy land in temperate semiarid regions. Amygdalus mongolica prefers gravel deserts of temperate semiarid regions. Ammopiptanthus mongolicus prefers sandy land of temperate arid regions. Communities of A. pedunculata have the highest diversity and the largest ratios of long-lived grass species, whereas those of A. mongolicus have the lowest diversity but the largest ratios of shrub species. Communities of A. mongolica are a transition between the first two community types. These findings demonstrate that our focal endemic shrubs have evolved adaptations to arid and semiarid conditions, thus they can be nurse plants to stabilize sand ground for vegetation restoration. We suggest that land managers begin using these shrub species to restore

  13. Comparison of the segregation behavior between tempered martensite and tempered bainite in Ni-Cr-Mo high strength low alloy RPV steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Hyung Jun; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel has an superior fracture toughness and strength, compared to commercial Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy RPV steel SA508 Gr.3. Higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels could be obtained by adding Ni and Cr. So several were performed on researches on SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a RPV application. The operation temperature and term of a reactor pressure vessel is more than 300 .deg. C and over 40 years. Therefore, in order to apply the SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a reactor pressure vessel, the resistance of thermal embrittlement in the high temperature range including temper embrittlement is required. S. Raoul reported that the susceptibility to temper embrittlement was increasing a function of the cooling rate in SA533 steel, which suggests the martensitic microstructures resulting from increased cooling rates are more susceptible to temper embrittlement. However, this result has not been proved yet. So the comparison of temper embrittlement behavior was made between martensitic microstructure and bainitic microstructure with a viewpoint of boundary features in SA508 Gr.4N, which have mixture of tempered bainite/martensite. We have compared temper embrittlement behaviors of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel with changing volume fraction of martensite. The mechanical properties of these low alloy steels were evaluated after a long-term heat treatment. Then, the the segregated boundaries were observed and segregation behavior was analyzed by AES. In order to compare the misorientation distributions of model alloys, grain boundary structures were measured with EBSD

  14. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Chen, Xiang [ORNL

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  15. Resistance temperature sensor aging degradation identification using LCSR (Loop Current Step Response) test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Roberto Carlos dos; Goncalves, Iraci Martine Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Most critical process temperatures in nuclear power plants are measured using RTD (Resistance Temperature Detector) and thermocouples. In a PWR (Pressure Water Reactor) plant, the primary coolant temperature and feedwater temperature are measured using RTDs, and the temperature of the water that exits the reactor core is measured using thermocouples. These thermocouples are mainly used for temperature monitoring purposes and are therefore not generally subject to very stringent requirements for accuracy and response-time performance. In contrast, primary coolant RTDs typically feed the plant's control and safety systems and must, therefore, be very accurate and have good dynamic performance. The response time of RTDs and thermocouples has been characterized by a single parameter called the Plunge Time Constant. This is defined as the time it takes the sensor output to achieve 63.2 percent of its final value after a step change in temperature is impressed on its surface. This step change is typically achieved by suddenly immersing the sensor in a rotating tank of water, called Plunge Test. In nuclear reactors, however, plunge testing is inconvenient because the sensor must be removed from the reactor coolant piping and taken to a laboratory for testing. Nuclear reactor service conditions of 150 bar and 300°C are difficult to reproduce in the laboratory. Therefore, all laboratory tests are performed at much milder conditions, and the results are extrapolated to service conditions. This leads to significant errors in the measurement of sensor response times and an insitu test method called LCSR - Loop Current Step Response test was developed in the mid-1970s to measure remotely the response time of RTDs. In the LCSR method, the sensing element is heated by an electric current; the current causes Joule heating in the sensor and results in a temperature transient inside the sensor. The temperature transient in the element is recorded, and from this transient, the

  16. Effect of quenching and tempering process on sulfide stress cracking susceptibility in API-5CT-C110 casing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M.; Wang, C.H.; Dai, Y.C.; Li, X.; Cao, G.H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072 (China); Russell, A.M. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory of the U.S.D.O.E., and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2300 (United States); Liu, Y.H.; Dong, X.M. [Tube & Pipe Department, Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd, Shanghai 201900 (China); Zhang, Z.H., E-mail: zhzhang@baosteel.com [Tube & Pipe Department, Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd, Shanghai 201900 (China)

    2017-03-14

    Three quenching and tempering processes performed on API-5CT-C110 casing steel produced tempered martensite structures and similar mechanical properties but distinct sulfide stress cracking (SSC) behavior as evaluated by Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) testing. An as-quenched specimen tempered at 690 °C for two hours showed superior SSC behavior compared to another specimen tempered at 715 °C for one hour. The latter contained a larger fraction of low-angle boundaries (LABs) and higher values of kernel average misorientation (KAM) than those in the former. Moreover, one more quenching and tempering on the former specimen would produce better SSC resistance with a decrease in the fraction of LABs and the values of KAM. Since dislocations trap hydrogen more strongly than grain boundaries, the specimen with higher KAM values, as well as higher dislocation density, would trap more hydrogen atoms and lead to greater SSC.

  17. Cavity temperature and flow characteristics in a gas-core test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putre, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A test reactor concept for conducting basic studies on a fissioning uranium plasma and for testing various gas-core reactor concepts is analyzed. The test reactor consists of a conventional fuel-element region surrounding a 61-cm-(2-ft-) diameter cavity region which contains the plasma experiment. The fuel elements provide the neutron flux for the cavity region. The design operating conditions include 60-MW reactor power, 2.7-MW cavity power, 200-atm cavity pressure, and an average uranium plasma temperature of 15,000 K. The analytical results are given for cavity radiant heat transfer, hydrogen transpiration cooling, and uranium wire or powder injection.

  18. A Rigorous Temperature-Dependent Stochastic Modelling and Testing for MEMS-Based Inertial Sensor Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiros Pagiatakis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine the effect of changing the temperature points on MEMS-based inertial sensor random error. We collect static data under different temperature points using a MEMS-based inertial sensor mounted inside a thermal chamber. Rigorous stochastic models, namely Autoregressive-based Gauss-Markov (AR-based GM models are developed to describe the random error behaviour. The proposed AR-based GM model is initially applied to short stationary inertial data to develop the stochastic model parameters (correlation times. It is shown that the stochastic model parameters of a MEMS-based inertial unit, namely the ADIS16364, are temperature dependent. In addition, field kinematic test data collected at about 17 °C are used to test the performance of the stochastic models at different temperature points in the filtering stage using Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF. It is shown that the stochastic model developed at 20 °C provides a more accurate inertial navigation solution than the ones obtained from the stochastic models developed at −40 °C, −20 °C, 0 °C, +40 °C, and +60 °C. The temperature dependence of the stochastic model is significant and should be considered at all times to obtain optimal navigation solution for MEMS-based INS/GPS integration.

  19. A Rigorous Temperature-Dependent Stochastic Modelling and Testing for MEMS-Based Inertial Sensor Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diasty, Mohammed; Pagiatakis, Spiros

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of changing the temperature points on MEMS-based inertial sensor random error. We collect static data under different temperature points using a MEMS-based inertial sensor mounted inside a thermal chamber. Rigorous stochastic models, namely Autoregressive-based Gauss-Markov (AR-based GM) models are developed to describe the random error behaviour. The proposed AR-based GM model is initially applied to short stationary inertial data to develop the stochastic model parameters (correlation times). It is shown that the stochastic model parameters of a MEMS-based inertial unit, namely the ADIS16364, are temperature dependent. In addition, field kinematic test data collected at about 17 °C are used to test the performance of the stochastic models at different temperature points in the filtering stage using Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). It is shown that the stochastic model developed at 20 °C provides a more accurate inertial navigation solution than the ones obtained from the stochastic models developed at -40 °C, -20 °C, 0 °C, +40 °C, and +60 °C. The temperature dependence of the stochastic model is significant and should be considered at all times to obtain optimal navigation solution for MEMS-based INS/GPS integration.

  20. Results of the LIRES Round Robin test on high temperature reference electrodes for LWR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.W. [SCK.CEN, Nuclear Research Centre Belgium, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Nagy, G. [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia KFKI Atomenergia Kutatointezet, AEKI, Konkoly Thege ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Feron, D. [CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Navas, M. [CIEMAT, Edificio 30, Dpto. Fision Nuclear, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid, (Spain); Bogaerts, W. [KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 31, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Karnik, D. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Dorsch, T. [Framatone ANP, Inc., Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Molander, A. [Studsvik AB SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Maekelae, K. [Materials and Structural Integrity, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Kemistintie 3, P.O. Box 1704, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    A European sponsored research project has been started on 1 October 2000 to develop high temperature reference electrodes that can be used for in-core electrochemical measurements in Light Water Reactors (LWR's). This LIRES-project (Development of Light Water Reactor Reference Electrodes) consists of 9 partners (SCK-CEN, AEKI, CEA, CIEMAT, KU Leuven, NRI Rez, Framatone ANP, Studsvik Nuclear and VTT) and will last for four years. The main objective of this LIRES project is to develop a reference electrode, which is robust enough to be used inside a LWR. Emphasize is put on the radiation hardness of both the mechanical design of the electrode as the proper functioning of the electrode. A four steps development trajectory is foreseen: (1) To set a testing standard for a Round Robin, (2) To develop different reference electrodes, (3) To perform a Round Robin test of these reference electrodes followed by selection of the best reference electrode(s), (4) To perform irradiation tests under appropriate LWR conditions in a Material Test Reactor (MTR). Four different high temperature reference electrodes have been developed and are being tested in a Round Robin test. These electrodes are: A Ceramic Membrane Electrode (CME), a Rhodium electrode, an external Ag/AgCl electrode and a Palladium electrode. The presentation will focus on the results obtained with the Round Robin test. (authors)

  1. Compressive fatigue tests on a unidirectional glass/polyester composite at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, E.L.; El-Marazki, L.O.; Young, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    The fatigue testing of a unidirectional glass-reinforced polyester composite at cryogenic temperatures to simulate the cyclic compressive loads of the magnet support struts in a superconductive magnetic energy storage unit is reported. Right circular cylindrical specimens were tested at 77, 4.2 K and room temperature at different stress levels using a 1-Hz haversine waveform imposed upon a constant baseload in a load-controlled closed-loop electrohydraulic test machine. Two failure modes, uniform mushrooming near one end and a 45 deg fracture line through the middle of the specimen, are observed, with no systematic difference in fatigue life between the modes. Fatigue lives obtained at 77 and 4.2 K are found to be similar, with fatigue failure at 100,000 cycles occurring at stress levels of 70 and 75% of the ultimate compressive strengths of specimens at room temperature and 77 K, respectively. The room temperature fatigue lives of the glass/polyester specimens are found to be intermediate between those reported for glass/epoxy composites with different glass contents costing over twice as much

  2. Reflooding Experiment on BETA Test Loop: The Effects of Inlet Temperature on the Rewetting Velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul H; Anhar R Antariksawan; Edy Sumarno; Kiswanta; Giarno; Joko P; Ismu Handoyo

    2003-01-01

    Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) on Nuclear Reactor Plant is an important topic because this condition is a severe accident that can be postulated. The phenomenon of LOCA on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) can be divided in three stages, e.g.: blowdown, refill and reflood. In the view of Emergency Coolant System evaluation, the reflood is the most important stage. In this stage, an injection of emergency water coolant must be done in a way that the core can be flooded and the overheating can be avoid. The experiment of rewetting on BETA Test Loop had been conducted. The experiment using one heated rod of the test section to study effects of inlet temperature on the wetting velocity. Results of the series of experiments on 2,5 lt/min flow rate and variable of temperature : 28 o C, 38 o C, 50 o C, 58 o C it was noticed that for 58 o C inlet temperature of test section and 572 o C rod temperature the rewetting phenomenon has been observed. The time of refill was 32.81 sec and time of rewetting was 42.87 sec. (author)

  3. Substrates and temperatures for the germination test of Chorisia glaziovii (O. Kuntze seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Sales Guedes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The species Chorisia glaziovii O. Kuntze is native to the northeast of Brazil, belongs to Bombacaceae family and has diversified uses in folk medicine, recovery of degraded areas and upholstery industry. The present work was realizated with the objective to determine the substrate type and temperature for conduction of germination tests with C. glaziovii seeds. The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Analysis of Seeds (CCA - UFPB, Areia City, Northeast of Brazil, in design completely randomized with the treatments distributed in outline factorial 4 x 4 (temperatures of 25, 30, 35 and 20-30°C and substrate towel paper, among blotting paper, between sand and between vermiculite. The following parameters were analyzed: germination percentage, first count germination, germination speed index, and length of seedlings. The temperature of 35°C was shown inadequate for conduction of germination and vigor tests of seeds of C. glaziovii, independently of the used substrates. It is recommended for conduction of the germination and vigor tests of the seeds of C. glaziovii the substrate between sand or towel paper, in the temperatures of 25 and 20-30°C.

  4. Psychophysics of a nociceptive test in the mouse: ambient temperature as a key factor for variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanne Pincedé

    Full Text Available The mouse is increasingly used in biomedical research, notably in behavioral neurosciences for the development of tests or models of pain. Our goal was to provide the scientific community with an outstanding tool that allows the determination of psychophysical descriptors of a nociceptive reaction, which are inaccessible with conventional methods: namely the true threshold, true latency, conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers that trigger the response and latency of the central decision-making process.Basically, the procedures involved heating of the tail with a CO(2 laser, recording of tail temperature with an infrared camera and stopping the heating when the animal reacted. The method is based mainly on the measurement of three observable variables, namely the initial temperature, the heating rate and the temperature reached at the actual moment of the reaction following random variations in noxious radiant heat. The initial temperature of the tail, which itself depends on the ambient temperature, very markedly influenced the behavioral threshold, the behavioral latency and the conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers but not the latency of the central decision-making.We have validated a psychophysical approach to nociceptive reactions for the mouse, which has already been described for rats and Humans. It enables the determination of four variables, which contribute to the overall latency of the response. The usefulness of such an approach was demonstrated by providing new fundamental findings regarding the influence of ambient temperature on nociceptive processes. We conclude by challenging the validity of using as "pain index" the reaction time of a behavioral response to an increasing heat stimulus and emphasize the need for a very careful control of the ambient temperature, as a prevailing environmental source of variation, during any behavioral testing of mice.

  5. A broadband variable-temperature test system for complex permittivity measurements of solid and powder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, En; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Chengyong; Zheng, Hu; Guo, Gaofeng

    2018-02-01

    A microwave test system to measure the complex permittivity of solid and powder materials as a function of temperature has been developed. The system is based on a TM0n0 multi-mode cylindrical cavity with a slotting structure, which provides purer test modes compared to a traditional cavity. To ensure the safety, effectiveness, and longevity, heating and testing are carried out separately and the sample can move between two functional areas through an Alundum tube. Induction heating and a pneumatic platform are employed to, respectively, shorten the heating and cooling time of the sample. The single trigger function of the vector network analyzer is added to test software to suppress the drift of the resonance peak during testing. Complex permittivity is calculated by the rigorous field theoretical solution considering multilayer media loading. The variation of the cavity equivalent radius caused by the sample insertion holes is discussed in detail, and its influence to the test result is analyzed. The calibration method for the complex permittivity of the Alundum tube and quartz vial (for loading powder sample), which vary with the temperature, is given. The feasibility of the system has been verified by measuring different samples in a wide range of relative permittivity and loss tangent, and variable-temperature test results of fused quartz and SiO2 powder up to 1500 °C are compared with published data. The results indicate that the presented system is reliable and accurate. The stability of the system is verified by repeated and long-term tests, and error analysis is presented to estimate the error incurred due to the uncertainties in different error sources.

  6. The Kinetics of Phase Transformations During Tempering in Laser Melted High Chromium Cast Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. Y.; Wang, Y.; Han, B.

    2012-06-01

    The precipitation of secondary carbides in the laser melted high chromium cast steels during tempering at 300-650 °C for 2 h in air furnace was characterized and the present phases was identified, by using transmission electron microscopy. Laser melted high chromium cast steel consists of austenitic dendrites and interdendritic M23C6 carbides. The austenite has such a strong tempering stability that it remains unchanged at temperature below 400 °C and the secondary hardening phenomenon starts from 450 °C to the maximum value of 672 HV at 560 °C. After tempering at 450 °C fine M23C6 carbides precipitate from the supersaturated austenite preferentially. In addition, the dislocation lines and slip bands still exist inside the austenite. While tempering at temperature below 560 °C, the secondary hardening simultaneously results from the martensite phase transformation and the precipitation of carbides as well as dislocation strengthening within a refined microstructure. Moreover, the formation of the ferrite matrix and large quality of coarse lamellar M3C carbides when the samples were tempered at 650 °C contributes to the decrease of hardness.

  7. Very High Temperature Test of Alloy617 Compact Heat Exchanger in Helium Experimental Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Soo; Park, Byung-Ha; Kim, Eung-Seon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The Intermediate Heat eXchanger (IHX) is a key-challenged high temperature component which determines the efficiency and the economy of VHTR system. Heat generated in the VHTR fuel block is transferred from the VHTR to the intermediate loop through IHX. In the present, the shell-helical tube heat exchanger is generally used as IHX of the helium cooled reactor. Recently, a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) is one of the candidates for the IHX in a VHTR because its operation temperature and pressure are larger than any other compact heat exchanger types. These test results show that there is no problem in operation of HELP at the very high temperature experimental condition and the alloy617 compact heat exchanger can be operated in the very high temperature condition above 850℃. In the future, the high temperature structural analysis will be studied to estimate the thermal stress during transient and thermal shock condition. The conditions and evaluation standard for the alloy 617 diffusion bonding will be minutely studied to fabricate the large-scale PCHE for the high temperature condition.

  8. Testing and Modeling Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic (UHTC) Materials For Hypersonic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    Ridge, D. G. Fletcher, C. O. Asma , O. Chazot, and J. Thömel, “Oxidation of ZrB2-SiC Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites in Dissociated Air...Fletcher, C. O. Asma , “Characterization of ZrB2-SiC Ceramics Tested by Plasma Stream Oxidation,” poster, 32 th International Conference...Fahrenholtz, W.G., Hilmas, G.E., Zhu, S.M., Ridge, J., Fletcher, D.G., Asma , C.O., and Thomel, J., "Oxidation of ZrB2-SiC Ultrahigh-Temperature

  9. Summary report on technical experiences from high-temperature helium turbomachinery testing in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    In Germany a comprehensive research and development program was initiated in 1968 for a Brayton (closed) cycle power conversion system. The program was for ultimate use with a high temperature, helium cooled nuclear reactor heat source (the HHT project) for electricity generation using helium as the working fluid. The program continued until 1982 in international cooperation with the United States and Switzerland. This document describes the designs and reports the results of testing activities that addressed the development of turbines, compressors, hot gas ducts, materials, heat exchangers and other equipment items for use with a helium working fluid at high temperatures. 67 refs, 34 figs, tabs

  10. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  11. A Novel Methods for Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Tool Steels with Post-Tempering Cryogenic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Sola

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic treatments are usually carried out immediately after quenching, but their use can be extended to post tempering in order to improve their fracture toughness. This research paper focuses on the influence of post-tempering cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of tempered AISI M2, AISI D2, and X105CrCoMo18 steels. The aforementioned steels have been analysed after tempering and tempering + cryogenic treatment with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction for residual stress measurements, and micro- and nano-indentation to determine Young’s modulus and plasticity factor measurement. Besides the improvement of toughness, a further aim of the present work is the investigation of the pertinence of a novel technique for characterizing the fracture toughness via scratch experiments on cryogenically-treated steels. Results show that the application of post-tempering cryogenic treatment on AISI M2, AISI D2, and X105CrCoMo18 steels induce precipitation of fine and homogeneously dispersed sub-micrometric carbides which do not alter hardness and Young’s modulus values, but reduce residual stresses and increase fracture toughness. Finally, scratch test proved to be an alternative simple technique to determine the fracture toughness of cryogenically treated steels.

  12. Fledgling survival increases with development time and adult survival across north and south temperate zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Penn; Martin, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Slow life histories are characterized by high adult survival and few offspring, which are thought to allow increased investment per offspring to increase juvenile survival. Consistent with this pattern, south temperate zone birds are commonly longer-lived and have fewer young than north temperate zone species. However, comparative analyses of juvenile survival, including during the first few weeks of the post-fledging period when most juvenile mortality occurs, are largely lacking. We combined our measurements of fledgling survival for eight passerines in South Africa with estimates from published studies of 57 north and south temperate zone songbird species to test three predictions: (1) fledgling survival increases with length of development time in the nest; (2) fledgling survival increases with adult survival and reduced brood size controlled for development time; and (3) south temperate zone species, with their higher adult survival and smaller brood sizes, exhibit higher fledgling survival than north temperate zone species controlled for development time. We found that fledgling survival was higher among south temperate zone species and generally increased with development time and adult survival within and between latitudinal regions. Clutch size did not explain additional variation, but was confounded with adult survival. Given the importance of age-specific mortality to life history evolution, understanding the causes of these geographical patterns of mortality is important.

  13. Time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Stress relaxation tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Guo-Yong; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Dai, L.H.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, stress relaxation tests, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted on coarse-grained (cg), nanograined (ng), and nanotwinned (nt) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C, and 75 °C. The comprehensive investigations provide sufficient information for the building-up of a formula to describe the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation and clarify the relationship among the strain rate sensitivity parameter, stress exponent, and activation volume. The typically experimental curves of logarithmic plastic strain rate versus stress exhibited a three staged relaxation process from a linear high stress relaxation region to a subsequent nonlinear stress relaxation region and finally to a linear low stress relaxation region, which only showed-up at the test temperatures higher than 22 °C, 22 °C, and 30 °C, respectively, in the tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens. The values of stress exponent, stress-independent activation energy, and activation volume were determined from the experimental data in the two linear regions. The determined activation parameters, HRTEM images, and MD simulations consistently suggest that dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is predominant in all tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens in the initial linear high stress relaxation region at the five relaxation temperatures, whereas in the linear low stress relaxation region, the grain boundary (GB) diffusion-associated deformation is dominant in the ng- and cg-Cu specimens, while twin boundary (TB) migration, i.e., twinning and detwinning with parallel partial dislocations, governs the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in the nt-Cu specimens.

  14. Present status and prospects of high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1995-01-01

    It is essentially important in Japan, which has limited amount of natural resources, to make efforts to obtain more reliable and stable energy supply by extended use of nuclear energy including high temperature heat from nuclear reactors. Hence, efforts are to be continuously devoted to establish and upgrade High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technologies and to make much of research resources accumulated so far. It is also expected that making basic researches at high temperature using HTGR will contribute to innovative basic research in future. Then, the construction of High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is an HTGR with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950degC at the reactor outlet, was decided by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) in 1987 and is now under way by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality in 1998 to be followed after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building and its containment vessel have been nearly completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel, an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and core support structures, have been manufactured at their factories and delivered to the Oarai Research Establishment of the JAERI for their installation in the middle of 1994. Fuel fabrication will be started as well. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. The IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on Design and Evaluation of Heat Utilization Systems for the HTTR, such as steam reforming of methane and thermochemical water splitting for hydrogen production, was launched successfully in January 1994. Some heat utilization system is planned to be connected to the HTTR and demonstrated at the former stage of the second core. At present, steam-reforming of methane is the first candidate. The JAERI also plans to conduct material

  15. Effect of temper and hydrogen embrittlement on mechanical properties of 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades – Application to Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) issues. Part II: Vintage reactors and MPT determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillot, Sylvain; Chauvy, Cédric; Corre, Stéphanie; Coudreuse, Lionel; Gingell, Andrew; Héritier, Déborah; Toussaint, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Standard and Vanadium-alloyed 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades (EN 10028-2 12CrMo9-10/ASTM A387 gr. 22 and 13CrMoV9-10/ASTM A542 tp. D) are commonly used for the fabrication of heavy pressure vessels for applications in petroleum refining plants. These reactors are made of heavy plates, forged shells, forged nozzles and fittings. They are subjected to thermal cycles (stop and go) and to severe service conditions (high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures). A primary concern for end-users is the definition of the Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) of the equipment. This temperature is the lowest temperature at which the vessel can be repressurized after shutdown and insures no risk of brittle failure of the containment body. The MPT is defined by fracture mechanics and/or CVN approaches and calculations. This second part of the paper presents the methodology of MPT determination and the particular case of vintage reactors. MPT determination methodology is explained by using a virtual pressure vessel representative of vessels found in petroleum refineries. A special focus is also set on the evolution of embedded defects

  16. Effect of temper and hydrogen embrittlement on mechanical properties of 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades – Application to Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) issues. Part I: General considerations and materials' properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillot, Sylvain; Chauvy, Cédric; Corre, Stéphanie; Coudreuse, Lionel; Gingell, Andrew; Héritier, Déborah; Toussaint, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Standard and Vanadium-alloyed 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades (EN 10028-2 12CrMo9-10/ASTM A387 gr. 22 and 13CrMoV9-10/ASTM A542 tp. D) are commonly used for the fabrication of heavy pressure vessels for applications in petroleum refining plants. These reactors are made of heavy plates, forged shells, forged nozzles and fittings. They are subjected to thermal cycles (stop and go) and to severe service conditions (high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures). A primary concern for end-users is the definition of the Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) of the equipment. This temperature is the lowest temperature at which the vessel can be repressurized after shutdown and insures no risk of brittle failure of the containment body. The MPT is defined by fracture mechanics and/or CVN approaches and calculations. This first part of the paper presents the impact of thermal aging and exposure to hydrogen on materials' mechanical properties and consequently on the value of MPT

  17. Evaluation of conversion relationships for impression creep test at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, T.H.; Sun, W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper contains some results related to the evaluation of the conversion relationships between impression creep test data and conventional uniaxial creep test date, for determining the secondary creep properties at elevated temperature. Some important aspects, including conversion factors, specimen dimensions, typical test results and validity of the test technique etc are briefly reviewed. The method used to determine the conversion factors is based on a reference stress approach using the results of finite element (FE) analyses; this is described in the paper. The conversion factors (reference parameters) obtained from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) FE analyses are compared and the effects of specimen geometry, on the conversion relationships, are assessed. The recommendations on the use of these conversion factors, in practical impression creep testing, are given. Proposals for future exploitation of the technique are addressed.

  18. Analysis of in-core coolant temperatures of FFTF instrumented fuels tests at full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoth, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Two full size highly instrumented fuel assemblies were inserted into the core of the Fast Flux Test Facility in December of 1979. The major objectives of these instrumented tests are to provide verification of the FFTF core conditions and to characterize temperature patterns within FFTF driver fuel assemblies. A review is presented of the results obtained during the power ascents and during irradiation at a constant reactor power of 400 MWt. The results obtained from these instrumented tests verify the conservative nature of the design methods used to establish core conditions in FFTF. The success of these tests also demonstrates the ability to design, fabricate, install and irradiate complex, instrumented fuel tests in FFTF using commercially procured components

  19. Standard Test Methods for Photovoltaic Modules in Cyclic Temperature and Humidity Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods provide procedures for stressing photovoltaic modules in simulated temperature and humidity environments. Environmental testing is used to simulate aging of module materials on an accelerated basis. 1.2 Three individual environmental test procedures are defined by these test methods: a thermal cycling procedure, a humidity-freeze cycling procedure, and an extended duration damp heat procedure. Electrical biasing is utilized during the thermal cycling procedure to simulate stresses that are known to occur in field-deployed modules. 1.3 These test methods define mounting methods for modules undergoing environmental testing, and specify parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.4 These test methods do not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of these test methods. 1.5 Any of the individual environmental tests may be performed singly, or may be combined into a test sequence with other environmental or non-envir...

  20. Test Plan for Long-Term Operation of a Ten-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-01-01

    This document defines a test plan for a long-term (2500 Hour) test of a ten-cell high-temperature electrolysis stack to be performed at INL during FY09 under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This test was originally planned for FY08, but was removed from our work scope as a result of the severe budget cuts in the FY08 NHI Program. The purpose of this test is to evaluate stack performance degradation over a relatively long time period and to attempt to identify some of the degradation mechanisms via post-test examination. This test will be performed using a planar ten-cell Ceramatec stack, with each cell having dimensions of 10 cm x 10 cm. The specific makeup of the stack will be based on the results of a series of shorter duration ten-cell stack tests being performed during FY08, funded by NGNP. This series of tests was aimed at evaluating stack performance with different interconnect materials and coatings and with or without brazed edge rails. The best performing stack from the FY08 series, in which five different interconnect/coating/edge rail combinations were tested, will be selected for the FY09 long-term test described herein

  1. State of art report for high temperature wear test of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Hu; Lee, Jae Seon; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In

    2000-03-01

    Wear resistance properties of machine elements has been more critical in view of its significant effect on life extension, economics and material saving because it has been recognized that nearly 80 percent of damages of mechanical elements in the friction pairs are due to the material loss by wear. And wear properties have direct influence on the life of a machine in a great extend under extremely severe operating condition. Therefore highly improved wear properties of machine elements operating in such circumstances is heavily required. The purpose of this report is to survey current technology for high temperature wear test in order to establish the test plan for the life evaluation of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing materials. Friction and wear test will be done under high pressure (170 MPa) and high temperature (350 degree C) with water as lubricant to simulate the operating condition of the nuclear power reactor. Because pump type for MCP is selected as the caned motor pump which needs no mechanical sealing, the rotating shaft on which bearing is fully submerged by main coolant with high temperature. So MCP bearing operates without additional lubricant. CEDM is adopted as the ball-screw type with fine controllability. So the driving part is designed as the immersed-in type by main coolant. Therefore the anti-wear and reliability of driving parts are much consequent to guarantee the lifetime and the safety of the whole system. Tribometer adapted to high temperature and pressure circumstance is needed to execute bearing material testing. Test parameters are material, sliding speed, sliding distance and applied load. In order to identify the wear mechanism, optical microscope and surface roughness testers are required. The result of this report will provide an elementary data to develop bearing materials and to estimate bearing lifetime for the bearings of MCP and CEDM in SMART. (author)

  2. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A., E-mail: paul.demkowicz@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Laug, David V.; Scates, Dawn M.; Reber, Edward L.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Walter, John B.; Harp, Jason M. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Morris, Robert N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A system has been developed for safety testing of irradiated coated particle fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FACS system is designed to facilitate remote operation in a shielded hot cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System will measure release of fission gases and condensable fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuel performance can be evaluated at temperatures as high as 2000 Degree-Sign C in flowing helium. - Abstract: The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 Degree-Sign C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated

  3. High Temperature Test Possibility at the HANARO Out-core Region through a Thermal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young-Hwan; Choi, Myung-Hwan; Cho, Man-Soon; Choo, Kee-Nam; Kim, Bong-Goo

    2007-01-01

    The development of an advanced reactor system such as a next generation nuclear plant and other generation IV systems require new fuels, claddings, and structural materials. To characterize the performance of these new materials, it is necessary for us to have a leading-edge technology to satisfy the specific test requirements such as the conditions of high neutron exposures and high operating temperatures. Thus, nuclear data on HANARO's vertical test holes have been gathered and reviewed to evaluate the usability of the test holes located at the out-core zone of HANARO. In 2007, neutron flux levels of the concerned test holes and the gamma heat of the specimens and two different specimen holder materials of Al and Mo at the concerned test hole were obtained to enhance the utilization of the HANARO reactor and to develop new design concepts for high temperature irradiation tests. Based on the data, a series of thermal analyses was implemented to provide a reasonable demonstration and guidance on limitations or application

  4. Investigation of water content in primary upper shield of high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Mogi, Haruyoshi; Itahashi, Shuuji; Kitami, Toshiyuki; Akutu, Youichi; Fuchita, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Toru; Moriya, Masahiro

    1999-09-01

    A primary upper shield of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is composed of concrete (grout) which is packed into iron frames. The main function of the primary upper shield is to attenuate neutron and gamma ray from the core, that leads to satisfy dose equivalent rate limit of operating floor and stand-pipe room. Water content in the concrete is one of the most important things because it strongly affects neutron-shielding ability. Then, we carried out out-of-pile experiments to investigate relationship between temperature and water content in the concrete. Based on the experimental results, a hydrolysis-diffusion model was developed to investigate water release behavior from the concrete. The model showed that water content used for shielding design in the primary upper shield of the HTTR will be maintained if temperature during operating life is under 110degC. (author)

  5. The influences of deformation velocity and temperature on localized deformation of zircaloy-4 in tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boratto, F.J.M.

    1973-01-01

    A new parameter to describe the necking stability in zircaloy-4 during tensile tests is introduced. The parameter is defined as: s = ∂Ln (dσ/dε)/∂Ln ((1/L)dL/dt) for constant temperature, deformation and history. Measures of stress strain rate sensitivity n, reduction of the area at fracture, and deformation profiles of tensile fracture, are done. A complete description of the curve of non-uniform deformation variation with the temperature, is presented. The results are compared with existing data for pure commercially titanium. The influence of strain rate and history on s and n parameters, in the temperature range from 100-700 0 C). (author) [pt

  6. Can temperate insects take the heat? A case study of the physiological and behavioural responses in a common ant, Iridomyrmex purpureus (Formicidae), with potential climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Nigel R; Hart, Robert A; Jung, Myung-Pyo; Hemmings, Zac; Terblanche, John S

    2013-09-01

    Insects in temperate regions are predicted to be at low risk of climate change relative to tropical species. However, these assumptions have generally been poorly examined in all regions, and such forecasting fails to account for microclimatic variation and behavioural optimisation. Here, we test how a population of the dominant ant species, Iridomyrmex purpureus, from temperate Australia responds to thermal stress. We show that ants regularly forage for short periods (minutes) at soil temperatures well above their upper thermal limits (upper lethal temperature = 45.8 ± 1.3°C; CT(max) = 46.1°C) determined over slightly longer periods (hours) and do not show any signs of a classic thermal performance curve in voluntary locomotion across soil surface temperatures of 18.6-57°C (equating to a body temperature of 24.5-43.1°C). Although ants were present all year round, and dynamically altered several aspects of their thermal biology to cope with low temperatures and seasonal variation, temperature-dependence of running speed remained invariant and ants were unable to elevate high temperature tolerance using plastic responses. Measurements of microclimate temperature were higher than ant body temperatures during the hottest part of the day, but exhibited a stronger relationship with each other than air temperatures from the closest weather station. Generally close associations of ant activity and performance with microclimatic conditions, possibly to maximise foraging times, suggest I. purpureus displays highly opportunistic thermal responses and readily adjusts behaviour to cope with high trail temperatures. Increasing frequency or duration of high temperatures is therefore likely to result in an immediate reduction in foraging efficiency. In summary, these results suggest that (1) soil-dwelling temperate insect populations may be at higher risks of thermal stress with increased frequency or duration of high temperatures resulting from climate change than

  7. Temperature Trend Detection in Upper Indus Basin by Using Mann-Kendall Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateeq Ur Rauf

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Global warming and Climate change are commonly acknowledged as the most noteworthy environmental quandary the world is undergoing today. Contemporary studies have revealed that the Earth’s surface air temperature has augmented by 0.6°C – 0.8°C in the course of the 20th century, together with alterations in the hydrological cycle. This study focuses on detecting trends in seasonal temperature for the five selected stations in the Upper Indus Basin. The Mann-Kendall test was run at 5% significance level on time series data for each of the five stations during the time period, 1985 to 2014. The Standard Test Statistic (Zs indicates the presence of trend and whether it is increasing or decreasing. The analysis showed an increasing trend in mean monthly temperature at Astore, Gilgit and Gupiz in March and a decreasing trend for Astore, Drosh, Gilgit and Skardu in September. Gilgit and Gupiz showed unexpected increasing trend in October. This study concludes that the temperature starts increasing in March and stays elevated till the month of June and starts rising again in October thus resulting in expansion of summer season and prolonged glacial melting.

  8. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry Development for In-situ Measurement in High-Temperature Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Test Facility, HTTF, at Oregon State University (OSU) is an integral-effect test facility designed to model the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event. It also has the ability to conduct limited investigations into the progression of a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event in addition to phenomena occurring during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied with in-situ velocity field measurements. Experimental measurements of velocity are critical to provide proper boundary conditions to validate CFD codes, as well as developing correlations for system level codes, such as RELAP5 (http://www4vip.inl.gov/relap5/). Such data will be the first acquired in the HTTF and will introduce a diagnostic with numerous other applications to the field of nuclear thermal hydraulics. A laser-based optical diagnostic under development at The George Washington University (GWU) is presented; the technique is demonstrated with velocity data obtained in ambient temperature air, and adaptation to high-pressure, high-temperature flow is discussed.

  9. Predicting decadal trends and transient responses of radiocarbon storage and fluxes in a temperate forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Representing the response of soil carbon dynamics to global environmental change requires the incorporation of multiple tools in the development of predictive models. An important tool to construct and test models is the incorporation of bomb radiocarbon in soil organic matter during the past decades. In this manuscript, we combined radiocarbon data and a previously developed empirical model to explore decade-scale soil carbon dynamics in a temperate forest ecosystem at the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA. We evaluated the contribution of different soil C fractions to both total soil CO2 efflux and microbially respired C. We tested the performance of the model based on measurable soil organic matter fractions against a decade of radiocarbon measurements. The model was then challenged with radiocarbon measurements from a warming and N addition experiment to test multiple hypotheses about the different response of soil C fractions to the experimental manipulations. Our results showed that the empirical model satisfactorily predicts the trends of radiocarbon in litter, density fractions, and respired CO2 observed over a decade in the soils not subjected to manipulation. However, the model, modified with prescribed relationships for temperature and decomposition rates, predicted most but not all the observations from the field experiment where soil temperatures and nitrogen levels were increased, suggesting that a larger degree of complexity and mechanistic relations need to be added to the model to predict short-term responses and transient dynamics.

  10. Temperature buffer test. Installation of buffer, heaters and instruments in the deposition hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Barcena, Ignacio; Garcia-Sineriz, Jose Luis [Aitemin, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    During 2003 the Temperature Buffer Test was installed in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Temperature, water pressure, relative humidity, total pressure and displacements etc. are measured in numerous points in the test. Most of the cables from the transducers are led in the deposition hole through slots in the rock surface of the deposition hole in watertight tubes to the data collection system in a container placed in the tunnel close to the deposition hole. This report describes the work with the installations of the buffer, heaters, and instruments and yields a description of the final location of all instruments. The report also contains a description of the materials that were installed and the densities yielded after placement.

  11. Evaluation of Candidate Linear Variable Displacement Transducers for High Temperature Irradiations in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.; Daw, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to promote nuclear science and technology in the U.S. Given this designation, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A fundamental component of the ATR NSUF program is to develop in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation experiments. Dimensional change is a key parameter that must be monitored during irradiation of new materials being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, dimensional changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the ATR and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data (i.e., only characterizing the end state when samples are removed from the reactor) and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable displacement transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDT vendor designs were identified for consideration - a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 C. Initial evaluation efforts include collecting calibration data as a function of temperature, long duration testing of LVDT response while held at high temperature, and the assessment of changes

  12. Planning of the in-situ creep test in sedimentary soft rocks under high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Nozomu; Yoshikawa, Kazuo; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka; Tani, Kazuo; Takeda, Kayo

    2007-01-01

    Research has been conducted on underground facilities for energy storage and waste disposal in sedimentary soft rocks. One of the research topics is that the long-term mechanical behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperatures or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long-term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as influenced by changes in the external environment. This report presents the plan of field creep test for the purpose to establish the evaluation method of long-term stability of caverns in soft rocks. A series of field creep test is performed to study the influence of high temperature in an underground facility at a depth of 50 meters. (author)

  13. Temperature buffer test. Installation of buffer, heaters and instruments in the deposition hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Aakesson, Mattias; Barcena, Ignacio; Garcia-Sineriz, Jose Luis

    2010-12-01

    During 2003 the Temperature Buffer Test was installed in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Temperature, water pressure, relative humidity, total pressure and displacements etc. are measured in numerous points in the test. Most of the cables from the transducers are led in the deposition hole through slots in the rock surface of the deposition hole in watertight tubes to the data collection system in a container placed in the tunnel close to the deposition hole. This report describes the work with the installations of the buffer, heaters, and instruments and yields a description of the final location of all instruments. The report also contains a description of the materials that were installed and the densities yielded after placement

  14. Thermal Stability Test of Sugar Alcohols as Phase Change Materials for Medium Temperature Energy Storage Application

    OpenAIRE

    Solé, Aran; Neumann, Hannah; Niedermaier, Sophia; Cabeza, Luisa F.; Palomo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Sugar alcohols are potential phase change materials candidates as they present high phase change enthalpy values, are non-toxic and low cost products. Three promising sugar-alcohols were selected: D-mannitol, myo-inositol and dulcitol under high melting enthalpy and temperature criterion. Thermal cycling tests were performed to study its cycling stability which can be determining when selecting the suitable phase change material. D-mannitol and dulcitol present poor thermal stability...

  15. Change of notch impact strength depending on radiation dose and test temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bednarik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper has been determine the effect of radiation crosslinking on the notch impact strength of polyamides filled with fiberglass. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 66 and 132 kGy were compared and on the test temperature (23–150 °C.

  16. Electrical conductivity testing of corn seeds as influenced by temperature and period of storage

    OpenAIRE

    Fessel,Simone Aparecida; Vieira,Roberval Daiton; Cruz,Mara Cristina Pessoa da; Paula,Rinaldo Cesar de; Panobianco,Maristela

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of temperature (10, 20, 30, 20/10 and 30/10ºC) and period of storage on electrical conductivity (EC) in four seed lots of corn (Zea mays L.), as well as the mineral composition of the soaking solution. EC test determines indirectly the integrity of seed membrane systems, and is used for the assessment of seed vigor, because this test detects the seed deterioration process since its early phase. The research comprised determinations o...

  17. Finite Element Implementation of a Glass Tempering Model in Three Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2010-01-01

    The present paper develops and validates a 3D model for the simulation of glass tempering. It is assembled from well-known models of temperature dependent viscoelasticity and structural relaxation and predicts both transient and steady-state stresses in complex 3D glass geometries. The theory and...

  18. Influence of tempering on mechanical strains in Mo2Si films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscheile, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    Amorphous or crystalline MoSi 2 films on (111) silicon wafers, deposited by DC triode sputtering, showed compressive stress. Tensile stress was found in the same films formed by dual electron beam evaporation. By isochronous tempering in the temperature range of 300 to 1270 K the compressive stress of the sputtered films was converted into tensile stress

  19. Power Cycling Test Method for Reliability Assessment of Power Device Modules in Respect to Temperature Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Ui-Min; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jørgensen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Power cycling test is one of the important tasks to investigate the reliability performance of power device modules in respect to temperature stress. From this, it is able to predict the lifetime of a component in power converters. In this paper, representative power cycling test circuits......, measurement circuits of wear-out failure indicators as well as measurement strategies for different power cycling test circuits are discussed in order to provide the current state of knowledge of this topic by organizing and evaluating current literature. In the first section of this paper, the structure...... of a conventional power device module and its related wear-out failure mechanisms with degradation indicators are discussed. Then, representative power cycling test circuits are introduced. Furthermore, on-state collector-emitter voltage (VCE ON) and forward voltage (VF) measurement circuits for wear-out condition...

  20. Material characterization of Inconel 718 from free bulging test at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Joon Tae; Yoon, Jong Hoon; Lee, Ho Sung [Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Sung Kie [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Macroscopic superplastic behavior of metallic or non metallic materials is usually represented by the strain rate sensitivity, and it can be determined by tensile tests in uniaxial stress state and bulging tests in multi axial stress state, which is the actual hot forming process. And macroscopic behavior of Non SPF grade materials could be described in a similar way as that of superplastic materials, including strain hardening, cavity and so on. In this study, the material characterization of non SPF grade Inconel 718 has been carried out to determine the material parameters for flow stress throughout free bulging test under constant temperature. The measured height of bulged plate during the test was used for estimation of strain rate sensitivity, strain hardening index and cavity volume fraction with the help of numerical analysis. The bulged height obtained from the simulation showed good agreement with the experimental findings. The effects of strain hardening and cavity volume fraction factor for flow stress were also compared.

  1. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, R.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. Pre and post test metallurgical analyses were conducted on the Hastelloy-X structures and reference specimens. The results gave evidence of aging in the form of noticeable changes in room temperature tensile and reduction in area parameters. The Hastelloy-X welds exhibited greater changes in properties due to thermal aging. The antifriction coating (Cr 3 C 2 ) performed well without spallation or excessive wear. (orig.)

  2. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tettamanti, S. [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R. [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1998-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  3. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tettamanti, S [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1999-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  4. Development of Temperature Control Solutions for Non-Instrumented Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests (NINAAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Pardy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification tests (NINAAT are a novel paradigm in portable molecular diagnostics. They offer the high detection accuracy characteristic of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT in a self-contained device, without the need for any external instrumentation. These Point-of-Care tests typically employ a Lab-on-a-Chip for liquid handling functionality, and perform isothermal nucleic acid amplification protocols that require low power but high accuracy temperature control in a single well-defined temperature range. We propose temperature control solutions based on commercially available heating elements capable of meeting these challenges, as well as demonstrate the process by which such elements can be fitted to a NINAAT system. Self-regulated and thermostat-controlled resistive heating elements were evaluated through experimental characterization as well as thermal analysis using the finite element method (FEM. We demonstrate that the proposed solutions can support various NAAT protocols, as well as demonstrate an optimal solution for the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP protocol. Furthermore, we present an Arduino-compatible open-source thermostat developed for NINAAT applications.

  5. Present status of high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1994-01-01

    The 30MWt HTTR is a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950degC at the reactor outlet. The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality to be followed in 1998 after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building (underground part) and its containment vessel have been almost completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and graphite core structures, are now manufacturing at their factories at the target of their installation starting in 1994. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as an innovative basic research after attaining rated power and coolant temperature. Innovative basic researches are now in great request. The paper describes major features of HTTR, present status of its construction and research and test using HTTR. (author)

  6. Present status of High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1993-01-01

    The 30MWt HTTR is a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950 deg C at the reactor outlet. The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality to be followed in 1998 after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building (underground part) and its containment vessel have been almost completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and graphite core structures, are now manufacturing at their factories at the target of their installation starting in 1994. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as an innovative basic research after attaining rated power and coolant temperature. Innovative basic researches are now in great request. The paper describes major features of HTTR, present status of its construction and research and test plan using HTTR. (author)

  7. 40 CFR 86.129-94 - Road load power, test weight, inertia weight class determination, and fuel temperature profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Road load power, test weight, inertia... Procedures § 86.129-94 Road load power, test weight, inertia weight class determination, and fuel temperature... duty trucks 1,2,3 Test weightbasis 4,5 Test equivalent test weight(pounds) Inertia weight class(pounds...

  8. Reproductive toxicity of bisphenol A and cadmium in Potamopyrgus antipodarum and modulation of bisphenol A effects by different test temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieratowicz, Agnes; Stange, Daniela; Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Oehlmann, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    An OECD initiative for the development of mollusc-based toxicity tests for endocrine disrupters and other chemicals has recommended three test species with respective test designs for further standardisation. Preparing a subsequent pre-validation study we performed a reproduction test with Potamopyrgus antipodarum, determining the concentration range of the selected test substances, bisphenol A (BPA) and cadmium (Cd). At 16 deg. C, the recommended test temperature, the number of embryos in the brood pouch was increased by BPA and decreased by Cd (NOEC: 20 μg BPA/L and 1 μg Cd/L). Coinstantaneous BPA tests at 7 deg. C and 25 deg. C demonstrated a temperature dependency of the response, resulting in lower NOECs (5 μg/L respectively). As expected, reproduction in control groups significantly varied depending on temperature. Additional observations of the brood stock showed seasonal fluctuations in reproduction under constant laboratory conditions. The recommended temperature range and test conditions have to be further investigated. - Highlights: → We performed a reproduction test with the mollusc Potamopyrgus antipodarum. → We defined the test substance concentration range for a pre-validation study. → The bisphenol A effect (increased reproduction) depends on the test temperature. → Reproduction of control groups significantly varies depending on temperature. → The brood stock shows seasonal fluctuations in reproduction at constant conditions. - A reproduction test with Potamopyrgus antipodarum with 2 substances for subsequent pre-validation is presented and bisphenol A effects show a temperature dependency.

  9. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the H