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Sample records for test site radiological

  1. Radiological Situation at the Bomb Test Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of radiological situation at the selected bomb test sites is presented. The report is based on the reports and measurements performed by IAEA while the author was a head of its Physics-Chemistry-Instrumentation Laboratory. Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll (USA testing ground), Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls (French testing ground) and Semipalatinsk (SSSR testing ground) have been discussed in some details. (author)

  2. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  3. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, 'NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  4. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

    2009-10-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.; Riedhauser, S.R.

    1999-01-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys

  6. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. The NTS is located in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas. It is a remote facility that covers approximately 3,500 square kilometers (1,375 square miles) of land. The dimensions of the NTS vary from 46 to 56 kilometers (28 to 35 miles) in width (eastern to western border) and from 64 to 88 kilometers (40 to 55 miles) in length (northern to southern border). The NTS is surrounded to the west, north, and east by additional thousands of acres of land withdrawn from the public domain for use as a protected wildlife range and as a military gunnery range. These public exclusion areas comprise the Nellis Air Force Range complex, previously designated as the Nellis Air Force Base Bombing and Gunnery Range, and the Tonopah Test Range. These two areas provide a buffer zone between the test areas and public lands administered by the Federal Bureau of Land

  7. In situ radiological characterization to support a test excavation at a liquid waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keele, B.D.; Bauer, R.G.; Blewett, G.R.; Troyer, G.L.

    1994-05-01

    An in situ radiological detection system was developed to support a small test excavation at a liquid waste disposal site at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Instrumentation, calibration and comparisons to samples are discussed

  8. Present radiological situation at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegar, P.

    1996-01-01

    The corroboration of environmental contamination levels obtained by independent equipment and measurements of the team was generally good, the best being with recent Russian and Kazakh data using gamma dose rate measurements. Acceptable corroboration was observed for gamma emitting radionuclides in food and environmental samples. The preliminary results on plutonium levels in soil samples from contaminated sites in the polygon showed values comparable with the data reported by Russian scientists.The major sites selected for field work by the team were the settlements around the polygon of Kainar(population of about 10,000) in the south, Sharzhal (2000) and Karaul (5000) in the east, and Dolon (2000 just north of the Irtysh. Akzhar, within the polygon just south of the river, was used as a reference site. Inside the polygon the efforts were concentrated in the Lake Balapan area including the semipermanent farm around Ground Zero, and a selection of sampling sites along the plume paths of atmospheric and above ground explosions. The operations carried out in the field included: gamma dose rate measurements; in situ gamma spectrometry; and the collection of samples of grass, meat, milk, offal, vegetables and soil, as well as biological indicators such as animal bones, mushrooms and moss. The levels of contamination in the soil at the locations specified are shown. The contamination by ' S r in milk, drinking water and the lake water was also measured, together with results for 137 Cs in meat. The external gamma dose rates in settlements and in the polygon, excluding the Lake Balapan and Ground Zero areas, were around 0.1 uGy per hour, against rates of up to 40 uGy per hour around Lake Balapan and Ground Zero. The dose assessment included consideration of all relevant pathways, of which the most important were external gamma exposure from material on or in the ground, inhalation of material resuspended from the ground and consumption of contaminated foods. These

  9. Radiological effluents released from nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests at the Nevada Test Site 1959 through 1969: Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 25 and Area 26, about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, from July 1959 through September 1969. This document presents a brief history of the nuclear rocket engine tests, information on the off-site radiological monitoring, and descriptions of the tests.

  10. Radiological analysis of materials sampled on the old nuclear test site of In Ekker (Algeria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    After having recalled the context of the French nuclear test campaign in Algeria between 1961 and 1966, this document reports and comments radiological measurements performed on the site of In Ekker, and also results of analysis performed in laboratory (contamination by cesium 137, americium 241, plutonium); recommendations are given

  11. Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures

  12. Methodological aspects of creating a radiological 'passport' of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubasov, Yu.V.; Smagulov, S.G.; Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.

    2002-01-01

    During its existence, 456 nuclear tests were carried out at the Semipalatinsk Test Site - 30 at the ground surface, 86 in the atmosphere and 340 underground. Radioactive fallout from ground surface tests is responsible for the present radiation conditions within the 'Test Field'. The radiation situation in the Degelen Mountains is caused by 209 underground tests carried out in local tunnels. Within the former Test Site there are three large and several small zones to which general access is prohibited for public health reasons: the 'Test Field', the Degelen Mountains, lake Shagan, the rim of the lake, and the adjacent land to the north. The information and characteristics, which have to be included in radiological passport of the former Semipalatinsk Test Site, are discussed along with general information about the Semipalatinsk site, its administrative status, the population distribution throughout the territory, all the economic activities taking place within the territory, the zones and structures representing a radiation hazard, and radiohydrogeological conditions of the test site and the adjacent regions, biogenic conditions (topography, soil, vegetation), wildlife, fauna monitoring, etc. (author)

  13. Challenges in defining a radiologic and hydrologic source term for underground nuclear test centers, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.

    1995-06-01

    The compilation of a radionuclide inventory for long-lived radioactive contaminants residual from nuclear testing provides a partial measure of the radiologic source term at the Nevada Test Site. The radiologic source term also includes potentially mobile short-lived radionuclides excluded from the inventory. The radiologic source term for tritium is known with accuracy and is equivalent to the hydrologic source term within the saturated zone. Definition of the total hydrologic source term for fission and activation products that have high activities for decades following underground testing involves knowledge and assumptions which are presently unavailable. Systematic investigation of the behavior of fission products, activation products and actinides under saturated or Partially saturated conditions is imperative to define a representative total hydrologic source term. This is particularly important given the heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides within testing centers. Data quality objectives which emphasize a combination of measurements and credible estimates of the hydrologic source term are a priority for near-field investigations at the Nevada Test Site

  14. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2009-01-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man

  15. Radiological effluent and onsite area monitoring report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1986-December 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1986 through December 1986. It presents results and evaluations of radioactivity measurements in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates. It establishes relevant correlations between the data recorded and DOE concentration guides (CG's). External gamma exposure levels and radioactivity in air and water on the Nevada Test Site were low compared to DOE guidelines. The highest average gross beta concentration in air was 0.005% of the DOE concentration guide (CG). The highest average Pu-239 concentration was 7.7% of the standard. The highest average tritium concentration was 0.39% of the standard. Kr-85 concentrations increased slightly from CY-1985 to CY-1986. Xe-133 remained nondetectable with some exceptions. The highest average gross beta concentration in potable water remained within the applicable standard for drinking water. The highest average Pu-239 concentration from contaminated waters was 0.0005% of the concentration guide. The highest average tritium concentration in noncontaminated water was 6% of the level for drinking water required by the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulation. The amounts of tritium-bearing effluent released to contaminated waste ponds was calculated and reported to DOE Headquarters. Gamma radiation measurements were roughly the same in CY-1986 relative to the previous year. All surveillance results from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) indicate that no detectable releases of radioactive materials occurred in that network in 1986. 29 refs., 14 figs., 23 tabs

  16. Radiological effluent and onsite area monitoring report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1985 through December 1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.A.

    1986-09-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1985 through December 1985. The results and evaluations of measurements of radioactivity in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates are presented. Relevancy to DOE concentration guides (CG'S) is established. This report was formerly titled ''Environmental Surveillance Report for the Nevada Test Site.''

  17. Summary of data concerning radiological contamination at well PM-2, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.M.; Locke, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of water from well Pahute Mesa No. 2 (PM-2), on Pahute Mesa in the extreme northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, indicated tritium concentrations above background levels in August 1993. A coordinated investigation of the tritium occurrence in well PM-2 was undertaken by the Hydrologic Resources Management Program of the US Department of Energy. Geologic and hydrologic properties of the hydrogeologic units were characterized using existing information. Soil around the well and water quality in the well were characterized during the investigation. The purpose of this report is to present existing information and results from a coordinated investigation of tritium occurrence. The objectives of the overall investigation include: (1) determination of the type and concentration of contamination; (2) identification of the source and mechanism of contamination; (3) estimation of the extent of radiological contamination; (4) initiation of appropriate monitoring of the contamination; and (5) reporting of investigation results. Compiled and tabulated data of the area are presented. The report also includes characterization of geology, soil, hydrology, and water quality data

  18. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures

  19. Analysis of the Variability of Classified and Unclassified Radiological Source term Inventories in the Frenchman Flat Area, Nevada test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Zavarin, M.

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that unclassified source terms used in the reactive transport modeling investigations at NTS CAUs should be based on yield-weighted source terms calculated using the average source term from Bowen et al. (2001) and the unclassified announced yields reported in DOE/NV-209. This unclassified inventory is likely to be used in unclassified contaminant boundary calculations and is, thus, relevant to compare to the classified inventory. They have examined the classified radionuclide inventory produced by 10 underground nuclear tests conducted in the Frenchman Flat (FF) area of the Nevada Test Site. The goals were to (1) evaluate the variability in classified radiological source terms among the 10 tests and (2) compare that variability and inventory uncertainties to an average unclassified inventory (e.g. Bowen 2001). To evaluate source term variability among the 10 tests, radiological inventories were compared on two relative scales: geometric mean and yield-weighted geometric mean. Furthermore, radiological inventories were either decay corrected to a common date (9/23/1992) or the time zero (t 0 ) of each test. Thus, a total of four data sets were produced. The date of 9/23/1992 was chosen based on the date of the last underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site

  20. An aerial radiological survey of Areas 16 and 30, Nevada Test Site: Date of survey: June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluitt, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The survey period was from 1 June to 16 June 1983, during which airborne measurements were obtained over Areas 16 and 30. The data were used to generate exposure rate, cobalt-60, and cesium-137 spatial distribution maps. The aerial survey results are expressed as exposure rate, cesium-137, and cobalt-60 isopleth contours, superimposed on NTS maps. 12 refs., 16 figs

  1. Joint NRC/EPA Sewage Sludge Radiological Survey: Survey Design & Test Site Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report contains the results of a radiological survey of nine publicly POTWs around the country, which was commissioned by the Sewage Sludge Subcommittee, to determine whether and to what extent radionuclides concentrate in sewage treatment wastes.

  2. Radiological assessment of long-term effects at the Semipalatinsk test site. NATO-Semipalatinsk Project 1995/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Hille, R.; Bouisset, P.; Calmet, D.; Kluson, J.; Smagulov, S.; Sysebaev, A.

    1996-12-01

    To determine the long-term consequences of atmospheric atomic bomb tests for the population in the surroundings of the former nuclear weapons test site near Semipalatinsk, studies were performed by international cooperation between Kazakh, French, Czech and German institutions at two measuring locations (Moistik, Maisk) in Kazakhstan. Moistik is a village close to Dolon and downwind of the first atomic bomb explosion on August 29, 1947. Maisk is close to Kurchatov and not too far from ground zero. With financial support from NATO, nine experts from Europe went on a field mission to Kazakhstan in September 1995 to assess, together with Kazakh scientists, the radiological situation as far as external doses, environmental contamination and body burden of man are concerned. The results show that surface contamination from nuclear weapons tests has in the meantime decayed to a large extent. External doses largely correspond to the natural background. The remaining incorporation of longer-lived radionuclides is also slight and in 1995 merely led to an annual dose of less than 1% of the natural radiation exposure for 137 Cs and 90 Sr. The question of a dose contribution by the possible incorporation of 239 Pu remains open. Life in the villages of Maisk and Moistik does not currently involve any radiological threat to the inhabitants. However, dose reconstruction for the older inhabitants directly affected by aboveground atomic weapons tests remains difficult. (orig.)

  3. The Semipalatinsk nuclear test site: a first assessment of the radiological situation and the test-related radiation doses in the surrounding territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, B I; Abylkassimova, Z N; Apsalikov, K N

    1997-09-01

    As a result of atmospheric nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk test site 'Polygon', adjacent territories were contaminated by radionuclide fallout. The population of some districts in the Semipalatinsk oblast were exposed to elevated levels of radiation. Contamination and exposure mostly resulted from early atmospheric tests. The radiological situation of the Semipalatinsk oblast is described. Effective dose estimates due to external and internal exposure attributable to the 1949 and 1953 tests in villages near the Polygon range from 70 mSv to 4470 mSv.

  4. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Nevada Test Site - Area 10 Corrective Action Unit 367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A series of aerial radiological surveys were conducted over the Sedan, Uncle, and Ess ground zero areas in Area 10. The surveys were performed in November 2009 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the ground zeros. Gross Counts, inferred exposure rates, man-made activity, and Americium-241 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed areas. In addition, spectral products are included that identify Cesium-137, Americium-241 and Cobalt-60 as the primary radionuclides present within the survey area.

  5. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  6. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  7. Aerial radiological survey of Areas 18 and 20 Nevada Test Site. Date of survey: October-November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1985-11-01

    Radiological surveys were conducted over Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the period 10 October through 13 November 1980. Separate surveys of the two areas were conducted simultaneously using arrays of NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals mounted on Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm BO-105 and Hughes H-500 helicopters. Exposure rate contour maps due to total terrestrial gamma ray activity were produced for both areas. The most frequently occurring range of exposure rates was 17 to 25 μR/h for both Areas 18 and 20; the total range varied from 12 to 2000 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic contribution of 6 μR/h. An isocount rate contour map showing the distribution of count rates measured in the spectral window sensitive to cesium-137 was produced to show the extent of man-made contaminants in Area 18. In a similar manner, an isocount rate contour map showing the distribution of count rates measured in a spectral window sensitive to cobalt-60 was used to show the extent of man-made contaminants in Area 20. The extent of man-made contamination from the effluents of the various events in both areas shows patterns indicative of the prevailing winds during and after the events. Except for the presence of low levels of cesium-137 activity in the eastern half of Area 18, all contaminants can be correlated with the effluents of the various events. In Area 18, cesium-137 activity appears to be spread over about 30 to 40 percent of the eastern half; it does not appear to be directly associated with the events in this area. The distribution and level of background radiation in the two areas are consistent with those measured during previous surveys

  8. Radiological analysis of materials sampled on the old nuclear test site of In Ekker (Algeria); Analyses radiologiques de materiaux preleves sur l'ancien site d'essais nucleaires d'In Ekker (Algerie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2010-02-11

    After having recalled the context of the French nuclear test campaign in Algeria between 1961 and 1966, this document reports and comments radiological measurements performed on the site of In Ekker, and also results of analysis performed in laboratory (contamination by cesium 137, americium 241, plutonium); recommendations are given

  9. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vic [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally

  10. Shielding in biomedical radiology site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamini, C.; Berardi, P.; Fabbri, E.

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of a proposed project of radiation protection for diagnostic radiology room may present some difficulties but in practice must be applied operational considerations that make some projects difficult if you must pursue the objectives of the principle of optimization applied to technical problems, dosimetric, economic and social

  11. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Nevada Test Site - Areas 18 and 20 Corrective Action Unit 372

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A series of aerial radiological surveys were conducted over the Little Feller I and II ground zero areas in Area 18 and the Palanquin and Cabriolet ground zero areas in Area 20. The surveys were performed in October and November 2009 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the ground zeros. Gross Counts, inferred exposure rates, man-made activity, and Americium-241 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed areas.

  12. Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

  13. Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products

  14. Radiological criteria for underground nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, J.S.; Brownlee, R.R.; Costa, C.F.; Mueller, H.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    The radiological criteria for the conduct of nuclear tests have undergone many revisions with the current criteria being 0.17 rad for uncontrolled populations and 0.5 rad for controllable populations. Their effect upon operations at the Nevada Test Site and the current off-site protective plans are reviewed for areas surrounding the Site. The few accidental releases that have occurred are used to establish estimates of probability of release and of hazard to the population. These are then put into context by comparing statistical data on other accidents and cataclysms. The guidelines established by DOE Manual Chapter MC-0524 have never been exceeded during the entire underground nuclear test program. The probability of real hazard to off-site populations appears to be sufficiently low as not to cause undue concern to the citizenry

  15. Radiological criteria for underground nuclear tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, J.S.; Brownlee, R.R.; Costa, C.F.; Mueller, H.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    The radiological criteria for the conduct of nuclear tests have undergone many revisions with the current criteria being 0.17 rad for uncontrolled populations and 0.5 rad for controllable populations. Their effect upon operations at the Nevada Test Site and the current off-site protective plans are reviewed for areas surrounding the Site. The few accidental releases that have occurred are used to establish estimates of probability of release and of hazard to the population. These are then put into context by comparing statistical data on other accidents and cataclysms. The guidelines established by DOE Manual Chapter MC-0524 have never been exceeded during the entire underground nuclear test program. The probability of real hazard to off-site populations appears to be sufficiently low as not to cause undue concern to the citizenry.

  16. Site identification: environmental and radiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Radiological and environmental considerations are recognized as being of utmost importance in planning, siting, licensing, operating, and decommissioning a high-level nuclear waste repository. In such a complex undertaking, it is important to identify the major concerns anticipated to arise in all of these phases in order to address them as early as possible in the program. Three representative activities/studies are summarized which will identify some of the important radiological and environmental considerations which must be addressed through this prolonged sequence of events and will indicate how these considerations are being addressed. It should be emphasized that these are only three of many which could have been chosen. The three key activities/studies are: (1) the NWTS Program criteria for identifying repository sites, (2) the generic guide for preparing environmental evaluations for deep drilling and (3) a preliminary environmental assessment for disposal of mined rock during excavation of a repository

  17. Off-site response for radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, J.S.; Oakes, T.W.; Hubbard, H.M.; Hibbitts, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental radiological surveillance under emergency conditions at off-site locations is one of the advisory functions provided by DOE within the ORO jurisdiction. The Department of Environmental Management of ORNL has been requested to provide sampling and analytical assistance at such emergency response activities. We have assembled and identified specific individuals and equipment to provide a rapid response force to perform field measurements for environmental radioactivity releases as a consequence of nuclear accidents. Survey teams for sample collection and field measurements are provided along with analytical assistance to operate the radioactivity measuring equipment in the DOE emergency van

  18. Radiological risk assessment of a radioactively contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    A limited-scope preliminary assessment of radiological risk has been conducted at a radioactively contaminated site under current site use conditions and based on the available preliminary radiological characterization data for the site. The assessment provides useful input to the remedial action planning for the site. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  19. Development and maintenance of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Vargo, G.J.; Clark, D.L.

    1993-04-01

    In June 1992 the US Department of Energy (DOE) issued DOE N5480.6, Radiological Control, which set forth DOE's Radiological Control Program and established the framework for its implementation at sites nationwide. Accompanying the Order was the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE RCM), which provided the detailed requirements for the program. The Order also mandated Field Office issuance of site-specific radiological control manuals by December 1, 1992. This paper presents the approach taken to develop, review, approve, implement, and subsequently maintain the site-specific manual for the DOE Richland Field Office (RL) at Hanford Site

  20. Radiological characterization and challenges at decommissioning sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Scott

    2002-01-01

    Scott Moore described the dose-based radiological characterisation process used in the USA, and four current characterisation issues faced there. His paper emphasized the importance of characterisation to control decommissioning hazards and costs: The License Termination Rule (LTR), Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20, provides the dose-based criteria that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) uses as the basis for regulating cleanup at material and reactor sites. The LTR permits the release of sites for unrestricted use, if the radioactivity that is distinguishable from background results in a total effective dose equivalent to an average member of a critical group that does not exceed 0.25 milli-Sievert per year (mSv/yr) (25 milli-rem/year) and the residual radioactivity has been reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Additionally, the LTR establishes criteria for license termination with restrictions on future land use, which allow for a dose to the critical group of 0.25 mSv/yr (25 milli-rem/year) with restrictions in place, and 1 mSv/yr (100 milli-rem/year) if the restrictions fail. In certain circumstances as outlined in Subpart E, a dose as high as 5 mSv/yr (500 milli-rem/year) is permitted if restrictions fail. Following issuance of the dose-based LTR in 1997, NRC staff developed the Standard Review Plan for Decommissioning Plans (NUREG-1727). NUREG-1727 is a guidance document that describes the methods that NRC has determined are acceptable for implementing the LTR and other decommissioning regulations. While NUREG-1727 is focused on the review of decommissioning plans for nuclear material sites, it provides general guidance that in many cases is applicable to reactor sites (e.g., review criteria for dose-modeling and radiological surveys). In addition to NUREG-1727, staff developed the Standard Review Plan for Evaluating Nuclear Power Reactor License Termination Plans (NUREG-1700) as specific guidance for reactor decommissioning. NUREG

  1. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decontamination options at the NUWAZX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to a radiological accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used to conduct the decontamination analysis. The program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  2. SA Journal of Radiology: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home · Journals · SA Journal of Radiology · About · Log In · Register · Advanced Search · By Author · By Title. Issues. Current Issue · Archives · Open Journal Systems · Help. ISSN: 2078-6778. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  3. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-01-01

    The ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' was prepared by Bechtel Nevada (BN) to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2004''. It was produced this year to provide a more cost-effective and wider distribution of a hardcopy summary of the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' to interested DOE stakeholders

  4. Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses

  5. Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W. L., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

  6. Enviromental sampling at remote sites based on radiological screening assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.; Wenz, G.; Oxenberg, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring (ERM) data from remote sites on the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, were used to estimate doses to humans and terrestrial mammals from residual radiation deposited during testing of components containing depleted uranium (DU) and thorium (Th). ERM data were used with the DOE code RESRAD and a simple steady-state pathway code to estimate the potential adverse effects from DU and Th to workers in the contaminated zones, to hunters consuming animals from the contaminated zones, and to terrestrial mammals that inhabit the contaminated zones. Assessments of zones contaminated with DU and Th and DU alone were conducted. Radiological doses from Th and DU in soils were largest with a maximum of about 3.5 mrem y -1 in humans and maximum of about 0.1 mrad d -1 in deer. Dose estimates from DU alone in soils were significantly less with a maximum of about 1 mrem y -1 in humans and about 0.04 mrad d -1 in deer. The results of the dose estimates suggest strongly that environmental sampling in these affected areas can be infrequent and still provide adequate assessments of radiological doses to workers, hunters, and terrestrial mammals

  7. Work plan for the radiological survey for the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This work plan establishes the methods and requirements for performing a radiological survey at the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee (DWI 1630 Site) in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The radiological survey will identify the radiological contamination level of the equipment and debris stored at the DWI 1630 Site. The data generated from the survey activities will support the decisions for characterization of the equipment/debris and aid in subsequent disposition and waste handling. The survey activities to be performed under this work plan include an equipment radiological survey, a walkover survey, and an immunoassay testing for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This work plan includes a quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) project plan, a health and safety (H ampersand S) plan, and a waste management plan

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts

  9. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts.

  10. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003 was prepared by Bechtel Nevada to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy and the information needs of the public. This report is meant to be useful to members of the public, public officials, regulators, and Nevada Test Site contractors. The Executive Summary strives to present in a concise format the purpose of the document, the NTS mission and major programs, a summary of radiological releases and doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, and an overview of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Management System. The Executive Summary, combined with the following Compliance Summary, are written to meet all the objectives of the report and to be stand-alone sections for those who choose not to read the entire document.

  11. Test objects for evaluating the performance of radiological imaging systems. Leeds radiological test objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, A.R.; Clarke, O.F.; Haywood, J.M.; Parker, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    A range of test objects has been developed to assess the imaging performance of conventional and digital radiological imaging systems. These test objects have arisen as a result of involvement in both the laboratory evaluation of radiological imaging systems and the routine maintenance of such equipment in a large diagnostic radiology department. The philosophy behind the design and application of the test objects is briefly described. Particular attention is paid to the advantages of using the threshold-contrast detail-detectability technique to assess overall imaging performance. The great importance of ensuring optimum imaging performance prior to clinical acceptance is stressed. A strategy for implementing the test objects in a clinical department is present. The diagnostic information content of the clinical images which result measures the success of the quality control procedure adopted. (author)

  12. Radiological risk assessment for radioactive contamination at landfill site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    A limited-scope preliminary assessment of radiological risk has been conducted for a landfill site where radioactive residues resulting from past uranium ore processing operations are present. Potential radiation doses to an individual under different scenarios have been predicted using the RESRAD computer code. The assessment provides useful input to the remedial action planning for the site that is currently underway. 7 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a post-exercise analysis of decontamination options for the NUWAX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of NUWAX-83 was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to an accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program, called DECON, was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and used to conduct the decontamination analysis in November 1983. DECON was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: 1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; 2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; 3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; 4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; 5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and 6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  14. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2007. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This report meets these objectives for the NTS and three offsite Nevada facilities mentioned in this report.

  15. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2007. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This report meets these objectives for the NTS and three offsite Nevada facilities mentioned in this report

  16. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 2, Core/site practical training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides a description of the guidelines, qualification in radiological instrumentation, qualification in radiological protection, and qualification in emergency preparedness for radiological control technicians

  17. Compilation of historical radiological data collected in the vicinity of the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, P.L.; Louderbough, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The Radiological Baseline Program (RBP) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been implemented to characterize the radiological conditions at the site prior to receipt of radioactive wastes. Because southeastern New Mexico was the site of an underground nuclear test in 1961, various sampling programs have intermittently monitored background and elevated radiation levels in the vicinity of the WIPP. In addition, radiological characterization of the site region was performed during the 1970's in support of the WIPP Environmental Impact Statement. The historical data are drawn primarily from monitoring activities of the US Public Health Service (PHS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Geological Survey (USGS) and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA). Information on air and water quality, meat, milk, biota and vegetation is included in the report. This survey is intended to provide a source of reference for historical data on radiological conditions in the vicinity of the WIPP site prior to the establishment of a systematic Radiological Baseline Program. 31 refs., 1 fig

  18. Radiological/toxicological sabotage assessments at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.D.; Pascal, M.D.; Richardson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the methods being employed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform graded assessments of radiological and toxicological sabotage vulnerability at Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. These assessments are conducted to ensure that effective measures are in place to prevent, mitigate, and respond to a potential sabotage event which may cause an airborne release of radiological/toxicological material, causing an adverse effect on the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. Department of Energy (DOE) Notice 5630.3A, open-quotes Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,close quotes and the associated April 1993 DOE-Headquarters guidance provide the requirements and outline an eight-step process for hazardous material evaluation. The process requires the integration of information from a variety of disciplines, including safety, safeguards and security, and emergency preparedness. This paper summarizes WSRC's approach towards implementation of the DOE requirements, and explains the inter-relationships between the Radiological and Toxicological Assessments developed using this process, and facility Hazard Assessment Reports (HAs), Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), and Facility Vulnerability Assessments (VAs)

  19. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  20. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-10-01

    The ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' was prepared by Bechtel Nevada (BN) to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2004''. It was produced this year to provide a more cost-effective and wider distribution of a hardcopy summary of the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' to interested DOE stakeholders.

  1. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Dochat, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    During the summer of 1996, the Topographical Mapping System (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote-Viewing System (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and ICERVS was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, and reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention

  2. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gary A.; Dochat, G. R.

    1997-09-01

    During the summer of 1996, the topographical mapping system (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the interactive computer-enhanced remote-viewing system (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and the ICERVS was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention.

  3. Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, Marco; Pugliese, Mariagabriella

    2003-01-01

    During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 μSv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity

  4. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training lesson plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides lesson plans for training radiological control technicians. Covered here is basic radiological documentation, counting errors, dosimetry, environmental monitoring, and radiation instruments

  5. SITE GENERATED RADIOLOGICAL WASTE HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. C. Khamankar

    2000-06-20

    The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System handles radioactive waste products that are generated at the geologic repository operations area. The waste is collected, treated if required, packaged for shipment, and shipped to a disposal site. Waste streams include low-level waste (LLW) in solid and liquid forms, as-well-as mixed waste that contains hazardous and radioactive constituents. Liquid LLW is segregated into two streams, non-recyclable and recyclable. The non-recyclable stream may contain detergents or other non-hazardous cleaning agents and is packaged for shipment. The recyclable stream is treated to recycle a large portion of the water while the remaining concentrated waste is packaged for shipment; this greatly reduces the volume of waste requiring disposal. There will be no liquid LLW discharge. Solid LLW consists of wet solids such as ion exchange resins and filter cartridges, as-well-as dry active waste such as tools, protective clothing, and poly bags. Solids will be sorted, volume reduced, and packaged for shipment. The generation of mixed waste at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) is not planned; however, if it does come into existence, it will be collected and packaged for disposal at its point of occurrence, temporarily staged, then shipped to government-approved off-site facilities for disposal. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System has equipment located in both the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) and in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). All types of liquid and solid LLW are processed in the WTB, while wet solid waste from the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is packaged where received in the WHB. There is no installed hardware for mixed waste. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System receives waste from locations where water is used for decontamination functions. In most cases the water is piped back to the WTB for processing. The WTB and WHB provide staging areas for storing and shipping LLW

  6. SITE GENERATED RADIOLOGICAL WASTE HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. C. Khamankar

    2000-01-01

    The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System handles radioactive waste products that are generated at the geologic repository operations area. The waste is collected, treated if required, packaged for shipment, and shipped to a disposal site. Waste streams include low-level waste (LLW) in solid and liquid forms, as-well-as mixed waste that contains hazardous and radioactive constituents. Liquid LLW is segregated into two streams, non-recyclable and recyclable. The non-recyclable stream may contain detergents or other non-hazardous cleaning agents and is packaged for shipment. The recyclable stream is treated to recycle a large portion of the water while the remaining concentrated waste is packaged for shipment; this greatly reduces the volume of waste requiring disposal. There will be no liquid LLW discharge. Solid LLW consists of wet solids such as ion exchange resins and filter cartridges, as-well-as dry active waste such as tools, protective clothing, and poly bags. Solids will be sorted, volume reduced, and packaged for shipment. The generation of mixed waste at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) is not planned; however, if it does come into existence, it will be collected and packaged for disposal at its point of occurrence, temporarily staged, then shipped to government-approved off-site facilities for disposal. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System has equipment located in both the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) and in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). All types of liquid and solid LLW are processed in the WTB, while wet solid waste from the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is packaged where received in the WHB. There is no installed hardware for mixed waste. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System receives waste from locations where water is used for decontamination functions. In most cases the water is piped back to the WTB for processing. The WTB and WHB provide staging areas for storing and shipping LLW

  7. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  8. Radiological reference base line establishment around CENM site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhoukhi, T.; Dehbi, N.; Amechmachi, N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: As for any installation presenting risks for its surrounding, CENM (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Maamora) that accommodates TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor and related laboratories is subjected to a statutory requirement stipulating that the CNESTEN (Centre National De L'Energie Des Sciences Et Des Techniques Nucleaires) that is in charge the operating of CENM must define its own environmental monitoring program assuring that the nuclear installation is in appropriateness with its environment. In this frame , since 1996 the team of USE (Unite Surveillance de L'Environnement) is conducting periodic work consisting in in-situ measurement of ambient gamma rays and collect of environmental samples and their preparation for adequate analysis form required for each radioactive measurement system. This first step of the environmental monitoring program allows establishing the radiological base line on the CENM's site. This base line is necessary to inform on the present radiological state in order to detect any change of this state consequently to the operating of the reactor or the arrival of abnormal radioactive panache from any source.

  9. Computer-Based Testing: Test Site Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gerald A.

    Computer-based testing places great burdens on all involved parties to ensure test security. A task analysis of test site security might identify the areas of protecting the test, protecting the data, and protecting the environment as essential issues in test security. Protecting the test involves transmission of the examinations, identifying the…

  10. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs) are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1A, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NTSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2009 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL)-Nellis. It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  11. Comprehensive engineering and radiological survey of the Bochvar VNIINM site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhanov, M.S.; Belousov, S.V.; Grishin, E.Zh.; Kotov, A.L.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Savin, S.K.; Sukhanov, L.P.; Chernikov, M.A.; Utrobin, D.V.

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive engineering and radiological survey (CERS) of Bochvar VNIINM war performed in 2010-2012. During the performance of the survey, radiometric measurements were taken to determine the total activity of α-emitting radionuclides in the air of work rooms, gas releases and in the environment, α- and β-emitting radionuclides in the air of work rooms, air releases from the site, waste waters, samples of snow, soil and vegetation, and in process oils. As a result of the work, experience was obtained in performing CERS of buildings and territory, standardized CERS programmes were developed, essential information was collected about radioactive contamination of both buildings and territory of the Bochvar VNIINM [ru

  12. Open-field test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoda, Koichi; Shinozuka, Takashi

    1995-06-01

    An open-field test site with measurement equipment, a turn table, antenna positioners, and measurement auxiliary equipment was remodelled at the CRL north-site. This paper introduces the configuration, specifications and characteristics of this new open-field test site. Measured 3-m and 10-m site attenuations are in good agreement with theoretical values, and this means that this site is suitable for using 3-m and 10-m method EMI/EMC measurements. The site is expected to be effective for antenna measurement, antenna calibration, and studies on EMI/EMC measurement methods.

  13. Some issues on radiological consequences analysis in site selection for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqiu; Yue Huiguo

    2006-01-01

    The three considerations, Site safety and environmental protection and emergency preparedness, are the focus of attention in the evaluation of the suitability of a site for nuclear power station. This paper summarized the basic regulatory requirements for the siting of nuclear power station, described the existing problems on radiological consequences analyses during the siting stage and discussed the is- sues that need to concern in the reviewing of the radiological consequences analyses in the siting appraisal stage. (authors)

  14. SP-100 Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, C.M.; Mahaffey, M.K.; Miller, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    Preparatory activities are well under way at Hanford to convert the 309 Containment Building and its associated service wing to a 2.5 MWt nuclear test facility for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) test. Preliminary design is complete, encompassing facility modifications, a secondary heat transport system, a large vacuum system to enclose the high temperature reactor, a test assembly cell and handling system, control and data processing systems, and safety and auxiliary systems. The design makes extensive use of existing equipment to minimize technical risk and cost. Refurbishment of this equipment is 75% complete. The facility has been cleared of obstructing equipment from its earlier reactor test. Current activities are focusing on definitive design and preparation of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) aimed at procurement and construction approvals and schedules to achieve reactor criticality by January 1992. 6 refs

  15. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  16. Population dose near the Semipalatinsk test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille, R; Hill, P; Bouisset, P; Calmet, D; Kluson, J; Seisebaev, A; Smagulov, S

    1998-10-01

    To determine the consequences of atmospheric atomic bomb tests for the population in the surroundings of the former nuclear weapons test site near Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan, a pilot study was performed by an international cooperation between Kazakh, French, Czech and German institutions at two villages, Mostik and Maisk. Together with Kazakh scientists, eight experts from Europe carried out a field mission in September 1995 to assess, within the framework of a NATO supported project, the radiological situation as far as external doses, environmental contamination and body burden of man were concerned. A summary of the results obtained is presented. The actual radiological situation near the test site is characterized by fallout contaminations. Cs was found in upper soil layers in concentrations similar to those of the global fallout. Also Sr, Am and Co were observed. The resulting present dose to the population is low. Mean external doses from soil contamination for Maisk and Mostik (0.60-0.63 mSv/year) presently correspond to mean external doses in normal environments. Mean values of the annual internal doses observed in these two villages are below 2 microSv/year for 90Sr. For other radionuclides the internal doses are also negligible.

  17. Population dose near the Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Hill, P.; Kluson, J.; Seisebaev, A.; Smagulov, S.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the consequences of atmospheric atomic bomb tests for the population in the surroundings of the former nuclear weapons test site near Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan, a pilot study was performed by an international cooperation between Kazakh, French, Czech and German institutions at two villages, Mostik and Maisk. Together with Kazakh scientists, eight experts from Europe carried out a field mission in September 1995 to assess, within the framework of a NATO supported project, the radiological situation as far as external doses, environmental contamination and body burden of man were concerned. A summary of the results obtained is presented. The actual radiological situation near the test site is characterized by fallout contaminations. Cs was found in upper soil layers in concentrations similar to those of the global fallout. Also Sr, Am and Co were observed. The resulting present dose to the population is low. Mean external doses from soil contamination for Maisk and Mostik (0.60-0.63 mSv/ year) presently correspond to mean external doses in normal environments. Mean values of the annual internal doses observed in these two villages are below 2 μSv/year for 90 Sr. For other radionuclides the internal doses are also negligible. (orig.)

  18. Underground Nuclear Testing Program, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    The Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) continues to conduct an underground nuclear testing program which includes tests for nuclear weapons development and other tests for development of nuclear explosives and methods for their application for peaceful uses. ERDA also continues to provide nuclear explosive and test site support for nuclear effects tests sponsored by the Department of Defense. This Supplement extends the Environmental Statement (WASH-1526) to cover all underground nuclear tests and preparations for tests of one megaton (1 MT) or less at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during Fiscal Year 1976. The test activities covered include numerous continuing programs, both nuclear and non-nuclear, which can best be conducted in a remote area. However, if nuclear excavation tests or tests of yields above 1 MT or tests away from NTS should be planned, these will be covered by separate environmental statements

  19. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  20. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wruble, D T; McDowell, E M [eds.

    1990-11-01

    Prior to 1989 annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the offsite radiological surveillance program conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with this 1989 annual Site environmental report for the NTS, these two documents are being combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection program conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear activities at the Site. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental releases and meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimate calculations. 57 refs., 52 figs., 65 tabs.

  1. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  2. Radiological testing of products containing radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.W.; Knight, A.

    1980-01-01

    Consumer products containing radioactive substances are tested by NRPB to determine how much radioactive material is likely to be released from a product if it is misused or accidentally damaged. Such testing is briefly described with particular reference to ionisation chamber smoke detectors, liquid crystal display watches illuminated with gaseous tritium light sources and anti-static brushes containing polonium-210 in the form of ceramic microspheres. (U.K.)

  3. Improving Site-Specific Radiological Performance Assessments - 13431

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauxe, John; Black, Paul; Catlett, Kate; Lee, Robert; Perona, Ralph; Stockton, Tom; Sully, Mike

    2013-01-01

    An improved approach is presented for conducting complete and defensible radiological site-specific performance assessments (PAs) to support radioactive waste disposal decisions. The basic tenets of PA were initiated some thirty years ago, focusing on geologic disposals and evaluating compliance with regulations. Some of these regulations were inherently probabilistic (i.e., addressing uncertainty in a quantitative fashion), such as the containment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, Chap. 191.13 [1]. Methods of analysis were developed to meet those requirements, but at their core early PAs used 'conservative' parameter values and modeling approaches. This limited the utility of such PAs to compliance evaluation, and did little to inform decisions about optimizing disposal, closure and long-term monitoring and maintenance, or, in general, maintaining doses 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). This basic approach to PA development in the United States was employed essentially unchanged through the end of the 20. century, principally by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Performance assessments developed in support of private radioactive waste disposal operations, regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its agreement states, were typically not as sophisticated. Discussion of new approaches to PA is timely, since at the time of this writing, the DOE is in the midst of revising its Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management [2], and the NRC is revising 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste [3]. Over the previous decade, theoretical developments and improved computational technology have provided the foundation for integrating decision analysis (DA) concepts and objective-focused thinking, plus a Bayesian approach to

  4. Improving Site-Specific Radiological Performance Assessments - 13431

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauxe, John; Black, Paul; Catlett, Kate; Lee, Robert; Perona, Ralph; Stockton, Tom; Sully, Mike [Neptune and Company, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An improved approach is presented for conducting complete and defensible radiological site-specific performance assessments (PAs) to support radioactive waste disposal decisions. The basic tenets of PA were initiated some thirty years ago, focusing on geologic disposals and evaluating compliance with regulations. Some of these regulations were inherently probabilistic (i.e., addressing uncertainty in a quantitative fashion), such as the containment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, Chap. 191.13 [1]. Methods of analysis were developed to meet those requirements, but at their core early PAs used 'conservative' parameter values and modeling approaches. This limited the utility of such PAs to compliance evaluation, and did little to inform decisions about optimizing disposal, closure and long-term monitoring and maintenance, or, in general, maintaining doses 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). This basic approach to PA development in the United States was employed essentially unchanged through the end of the 20. century, principally by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Performance assessments developed in support of private radioactive waste disposal operations, regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its agreement states, were typically not as sophisticated. Discussion of new approaches to PA is timely, since at the time of this writing, the DOE is in the midst of revising its Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management [2], and the NRC is revising 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste [3]. Over the previous decade, theoretical developments and improved computational technology have provided the foundation for integrating decision analysis (DA) concepts and objective-focused thinking, plus

  5. Preliminary radiological readings on the old uraniferous mining site of Rophin (Puy-de-Dome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    After a presentation of the site, of the objectives, limits and methodology of the measurement campaign, this document reports and comments the radiological measurements performed by the CRIIRAD on the old uranium mining site of Rophin and its surroundings (gamma radiation). It comments measurements performed 1 meter above the ground and on soils, and anomalies clearly related to past industrial activities. It comments the results of a radiological analysis performed on released waters (uranium 238, radon 222), and on sediments and soils

  6. Nevada Test Site closure program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenk, D.P.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use

  7. Public transparency Web sites for radiology practices: prevalence of price, clinical quality, and service quality information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Doshi, Ankur M

    2016-01-01

    To assess information regarding radiology practices on public transparency Web sites. Eight Web sites comparing radiology centers' price and quality were identified. Web site content was assessed. Six of eight Web sites reported examination prices. Other reported information included hours of operation (4/8), patient satisfaction (2/8), American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation (3/8), on-site radiologists (2/8), as well as parking, accessibility, waiting area amenities, same/next-day reports, mammography follow-up rates, examination appropriateness, radiation dose, fellowship-trained radiologists, and advanced technologies (1/8 each). Transparency Web sites had a preponderance of price (and to a lesser extent service quality) information, risking fostering price-based competition at the expense of clinical quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 [Public Law (PL) 95-6041]. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. The remedial action at the processing site will be conducted to remove the tailings and contaminated materials to meet the EPA bulk soil cleanup standards for surface and subsurface soils. The site areas disturbed by remedial action excavation will be either contoured or backfilled with radiologically uncontaminated soil and contoured to restore the site. The final contours will produce a final surface grade that will create positive drainage from the site

  9. Conversion of Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepnin, Yu. S.

    1997-01-01

    The conversion of the former defense enterprises of STS (Semipalatinsk Test Sate) started under very difficult conditions, when not only research and production activity, but all social life of Kurchatov city were conversed which was caused by a fast curtailment and restationing of Russian military units from the test site. A real risk of a complete destruction of the whole research and production structure of the city existed. From this point of view, the decision of the Republic of Kazakhstan Government to create the National Nuclear Center on the base of the test site research enterprises was actual and timely. During 1993, three research institutes of NNC RK - Institute of Atomic Energy, Institute of Geophysics Research and Institute of Radiation Safety and Environment were established. This decision, under conditions of the Ussr disintegration and liquidation of the test site military divisions, allowed to preserve the qualified personnel, to provide and follow-up the operation of nuclear dangerous facilities, to develop and start the realization of the full scale conversion program.At present time, directions and structure of basic research work in NNC RK are as follows: - liquidation of nuclear explosions consequences; - liquidation of technological infrastructure used for preparation and conduction of nuclear weapon testing; - creation of technology, equipment and places for acceptance and storage of radioactive wastes; - working out of atomic energy development conception in Kazakhstan; - study of reactor core melt behavior under severe accidents in NPP; - development of methods and means of nuclear testing detection, continuous monitoring of nuclear explosions; - experimental work on a study of structure materials behavior of ITER thermonuclear reactor; - creation of industries requiring a lage implementation of science

  10. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. Section 108 of Public Law 95-604 states that the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall ''select and perform remedial actions at the designated processing sites and disposal sites in accordance with the general standards'' prescribed by the EPA. Regulations governing the required remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites were promulgated by the EPA in 1983 and are contained in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993), Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. This document describes the radiological and physical parameters for the remedial action of the soil

  11. Radiological surveillance of Remedial Action activities at the processing site, Falls City, Texas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological surveillance of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site in Falls City, Texas. This surveillance was conducted March 22--26, 1993. No findings were identified during the surveillance. Three site-specific observations and three programmatic observations are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the surveillance is that the radiological aspects of the Falls City, Texas, remedial action program are performed adequately. However, some of the observations identify that there is potential for improving certain aspects of the occupational radiological air sampling, ensuring analytical data quality, and in communicating with the DOE and TAC on the ore sampling methods. The TAC has also received and is currently reviewing the RAC's responses regarding the observations identified during the radiological surveillance performed October 29--30, 1992

  12. A web-based test of residents' skills in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlay, K.; Norman, G.R.; Keane, D.R.; Stolberg, H.

    2006-01-01

    To develop an objective, Web-based tool for evaluating residents' knowledge of diagnostic radiology. We developed and tested a Web-based evaluation tool (the Diagnostic Radiology Skills Test) that consists of 3 tests, one in each of 3 domains of diagnostic radiology: chest, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal imaging. Each test comprises 30 cases representing a range of difficulty in the domain, including normal states, normal variants, typical cases of common diagnoses, and cases with more subtle findings. Cases are presented with a long menu of domain-specific possible diagnoses (response options), each coded for diagnostic appropriateness. Our subjects were 21 residents in postgraduate year (PGY) 2 to 5 and 11 experts in diagnostic radiology. Subjects accessed the tool via a Web site on our Web server. Residents test results were compared for reliability and validity across domain, case, and training level. In addition, results were correlated with commonly used established and objective evaluation tools. The tool demonstrated consistent monotonic improvement in performance with training level. It showed acceptable reliability in discriminating between residents at different performance levels, both within and across training levels (r = 0.53 within level and 0.69 across levels). Test results also had concurrent validity against the American College of Radiology In-Training Examination, a widely accepted objective assessment tool (r = 0.65, P < 0.01), and 2 Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) focusing on diagnostic skills (r = 0.78 and r 0.69, P < 0.01, respectively). Our study demonstrates the feasibility of a Web-based, standardized, objective assessment method for evaluating residents' performance. (author)

  13. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  14. The protection of on-site personnel in the event of a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, M.; Simister, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board (NPRB) is responsible in the UK for advising Government and other responsible bodies on the principles for responding to radiological emergencies. NRPB has published appropriate advice on the off-site protection of the public and on the protection of workers involved in taking mitigating actions to reduce the exposure of others. This paper puts forward a suggested framework for the protection of on-site personnel in the event of a radiological emergency which might include a criticality accident. This framework both dovetails with existing planning for the protection of members of the public off-site, and also takes account of specific differences between the situations on and off-site. (author)

  15. Radiological operating experience at FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, W.L.; Prevo, P.R.

    1986-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility has been in operation for approximately five years, including about one thousand days of full power operation of the Fast Test Reactor. During that time the collective dose equivalents received by operating personnel have been about two orders of magnitude lower than those typically received at commercial light water reactors. No major contamination problems have been encountered in operating and maintaining the plant, and release of radioactive gas to the environment has been minimal and well below acceptable limits. All shields have performed satisfactorily. Experience to date indicates an apparent radiological superiority of liquid metal reactor systems over current light water plants

  16. The radiological testing of consumer products 1976-1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, B.T.; Dixon, D.W.

    1979-02-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board's source testing laboratory has been operational since 1976. In the intervening period the types of consumer product which have received most attention have been ionisation chamber smoke detectors and liquid crystal digital watches containing gaseous tritium light sources; the results obtained on these two types of device are the main subject of this report. The report also traces the development of the practical appraisal of these devices by the Board and describes the part played by the test results in the evolution of national and international standards. (author)

  17. Radiological environmental monitoring around the mining sites in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, Eduardo E.; Gomez, Juan C.; Palacios, Miguel A.

    2004-01-01

    The uranium mining industry began its development in Argentina in the fifties. Since then, several installations have operated as uranium underground mining until late seventies, when that mines were closed. Since then, open pit exploitation has been used. Milling facilities were installed in the mining areas or close to them. The environmental radiological surveillance and the impact assessment presented in this work are referred to the uranium ore mining and milling plants Tonco, in Salta province; Pichinan, in Chubut province; San Rafael and Malargue, in Mendoza province; Los Gigantes, in Cordoba province; La Estela, in San Luis province and Los Colorados in La Rioja province. The environmental radiological surveillance programme results carried out from the beginning of the operations are presented and include uranium and radium concentrations in surface waters and sediments. The results obtained in waters upstream and downstream the uranium mining complexes are compared and no significant differences were observed. Moreover, taking into consideration the critical exposition pathways of the population living in the area, no significant levels of exposition were observed. (author)

  18. An aerial radiological survey of the Salmon Site and surrounding area, Lamar County, Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the former Atomic Energy Commission Test Site at the Salmon Site and surrounding area between April 20 and May 1, 1992. The Salmon Site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma-ray environment of the Salmon Site and adjacent lands. A contour map showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on a rectified aerial photograph of the area. The exposure rates within the area are between 5 and 8 μR/h. The reported exposure rates include a cosmic-ray contribution estimated to be 3.7 μR/h. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and in situ measurements, taken with a pressurized ion chamber and a high-purity germanium detector, were obtained at 4 locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of and are in agreement with the aerial data

  19. Automated radiological monitoring at a Russian Ministry of Defence Naval Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Pomerville, J.; Gavrilov, S.; Kisselev, V.; Daniylan, V.; Belikov, A.; Egorkin, A.; Sokolovski, Y.; Endregard, M.; Krosshavn, M.; Sundling, C.V.; Yokstad, H.

    2001-01-01

    The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel

  20. An integrated system for conducting radiological surveys of contaminated sites - 16312

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, Jay P.; Rogers, Donna M.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated detection system that has been developed to conduct radiological surveys of sites suspected of contamination of materials such as depleted uranium. This system utilizes cerium activated lanthanum bromide and thallium activated sodium iodide gamma detectors and can be easily adapted to include units for detecting neutrons. The detection system includes software controlling the collection of radiological spectra and GPS data. Two different platforms are described for conducting surveys, a modified zero turn radius (ZTR) mower and a three-wheeled cart that is manually pushed. The detection system software controlling data collection has components that facilitate completing a grid-less survey on user specified spacings. Another package confirms that all data quality activities (calibrations, etc.) are conducted prior to beginning the survey and also reviews data to identify areas that have been missed for which data quality falls below user designated parameters. Advanced digital signal processing algorithms are used to enhance the interpretation of spectra for conducting background subtractions and for mapping. Data from radiation detection instruments and GPS antennae are merged and made compatible with mapping using Geosoft Oasis montaj software. A summary of system performance during field-testing is included in the paper. This includes survey rate, detection limits, duty cycle, supporting ancillary equipment/material, and manpower requirements. The rate of false positives and false negatives is discussed with the benefits of surveys conducted using synergetic detection systems such as electromagnetic induction imaging. (authors)

  1. Radiological tests versus pathological diagnostics: Complimentary or antagonistic relationship? The experience of a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Arafah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early detection of breast cancer plays a pivotal role in the outcome of the disease. Diagnostic modalities encompass radiological and pathological findings. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the results of these two modalities in a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: From a total of 180 patients, 203 ultrasound-guided breast core needle biopsies (US-CNBs were included in this study over a period of a year (May 2015 - May 2016. All clinical parameters, the site of the biopsy, the size of the needle, the radiological findings, the pathological diagnoses as well as all available follow-up data were reviewed. The concordance between the radiological and pathological results was studied and a statistical analysis conforms to the Pearson Chi-square test was applied. Results: The majority of our patients were above 40 years of age. A strong and statistically significant association was noted between radiological findings and histopathological results (Pearson's Chi-square test = 186.28, P ≤ 0.0001 with only four discordant cases (1.97%. This discrepancy was not statistically associated with age, site of biopsy, needle size, or number of cores obtained (P = 0.621, P = 0.584, P = 0.786, and P = 0.478, respectively. Conclusions: US-CNB is an accurate method in the diagnosis of breast lesions. Radiological and pathological correlation is of utmost importance in relation to patient's care and to reduce false rates. Follow-up of concordant benign lesions is essential. In addition, the importance of a multidisciplinary breast conference during which input from all teams caring for the patient is strongly emphasized.

  2. Radiological Worker II Training, Course 20301 (Live), Course 12909 (Test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jimmy D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Radiological worker training is the basic building block for any additional radiological training you may receive. Upon completing radiological worker training, you will have the basic knowledge needed to work safely, using proper radiological practices, in areas where radiological hazards exist. You will also have a better understanding of the hazards and responsibilities associated with radiological work to help prevent the carelessness that can occur when working continually with or around radioactive material. This course does not qualify you for any specific radiological work. You may be required to take additional training at individual facilities to address facility- and job-specific hazards and procedures.

  3. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 and Site Description (Volume 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2006 produced to be a more cost-effective means of distributing information contained in the NTSER to interested DOE stakeholders.

  4. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 and Site Description (Volume 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2006 produced to be a more cost-effective means of distributing information contained in the NTSER to interested DOE stakeholders

  5. Buffer mass test - Site documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to compile test site data that are assumed to be of importance for the interpretation of the Buffer Mass Test. Since this test mainly concerns water uptake and migration processes in the integrated rock/backfill system and the development of temperature fields in this system, the work has been focused on the constitution and hydrology of the rock. The major constitutional rock feature of interest for the BMT is the frequency and distribution of joints and fractures. The development of models for water uptake into the highly compacted bentonite in the heater holes requires a very detailed fracture survey. The present investigation shows that two of the holes (no. 1 and 2) are located in richly fractured rock, while the others are located in fracture-poor to moderately fractured rock. The hydrological conditions of the rock in the BMT area are characterized by water pressures of as much as 100 m water head at a few meters distance from the test site. The average hydraulic conductivity of the rock that confines the BMT tunnel has been estimated at about 10 -10 m/s by Lawrence Laboratory. The actual distribution of the water that enters the tunnel has been estimated by observing the successive moistening after having switched off the ventilation, and this has offered basis of predicting the rate and uniformity of the water uptake in the tunnel backfill. As to the heater holes the detailed fracture patterns and various inflow measurements have yielded a similar basis. The report also gives major data on the rock temperature, gas conditions, mineralogy, rock mechanics, and groundwater chemistry for BMT purposes. (author)

  6. Radiological survey following decontamination activities near the TA-45 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, T.; Buhl, T.; Romero, R.; Salazar, J.

    1983-07-01

    Three areas at the site of a former radioactive liquid waste treatment plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory were decontaminated during 1982 by Bechtel Corporation, with health physics support provided by Eberline Instrument Corporation, under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Before decontamination, there were above-background concentrations of gross alpha, gross beta, 238 Pu, 239 240 Pu, 241 Am, 90 Sr, and 137 Cs in the surface soils. These combined concentrations were above operational decontamination guidelines for surface soil contamination. After cleanup operations, radionuclide concentrations in surface soils at all three sites were within decontamination guidelines

  7. Mobile radiological monitoring around Nuclear Power Plant site at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.S.; Saindane, S.S.; Sharma, R.; Suri, M.M.K.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Rao, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Real time mobile radiological monitoring around nuclear facilities is required for establishing background radiation dose rate data and to detect any increase in the radiation level which is attributable to the atmospheric releases from Nuclear facilities. Mobile radiation survey using mobile monitoring systems was carried out in the Emergency Planning Zone around Tarapur Atomic Power station during plant operation, taking the wind direction also into consideration. For identifying the potential difficulties during an emergency scenario and to understand the variation of the measured values several systems/instruments were used simultaneously for mapping the dose rates. As demonstrated during this monitoring programme, 40mm x 40mm NaI(Tl) detector based Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System (PMGSS) which is attached with a GPS can acquire and store large amount of gamma spectra tagged with positional coordinates and can enhance the capacity of decision makers during any accidental situation. The average of dose rates measured from various locations around Tarapur Atomic Power Station is 70 - 80 nGy.h -1 . The higher dose rate in the range of 110-125 nGy.h -1 measured at one of the location is due to higher concentration of natural radioactivity mainly by 40 K which was confirmed by the gamma spectrometric measurement. (author)

  8. Fruit and vegetable radioactivity survey, Nevada Test Site environs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, V.E.; Vandervort, J.C.

    1978-04-01

    During the 1974 growing season, the Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory-Las Vegas, of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, collected samples of fruits and vegetables grown in the off-site area surrounding the Nevada Test Site. The objective was to estimate the potential radiological dose to off-site residents from consumption of locally grown foodstuffs. Irrigation water and soil were collected from the gardens and orchards sampled. Soil concentrations of cesium-137 and plutonium-239 reflected the effects of close-in fallout from nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site. The only radionuclide measured in fruit and vegetable samples which might be related to such fallout was strontium-90, for which the first year estimated dose to bone marrow of an adult with an assumed rate of consumption of the food would be 0.14 millirad

  9. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2010-05-25

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. Radiological emissions at the PNNL Site result from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site would meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor and estimate offsite air emissions of radioactive materials. The result is a program that monitors the impact to the public from the PNNL Site.

  10. Results of the radiological survey at the former Heppenstall Company site, 4620 Hatfield Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Quillen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used to process radioactive materials under contract with the department's predecessor agencies. During 1955 the former Heppenstall Company site in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was used by an Atomic Energy Commission contractor to process approximately 100,000 lbs of normal uranium metal. Because of insufficient records to document cleanup procedures and to verify the radiological condition of this site, DOE requested a survey. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the site of the former Heppenstall Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in July of 1989. The survey included a surface gamma scan of the warehouse, collection of indoor soil and dust samples and one outdoor sample, and measurement of direct and transferable alpha and beta-gamma activity. Results of this radiological assessment indicate no detection of radiation levels or radionuclide concentrations above DOE guidelines. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Atomic test site (south Australia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godman, N.A.; Cousins, Jim; Hamilton, Archie.

    1993-01-01

    The debate, which lasted about half an hour, is reported verbatin. It was prompted by the campaign by the Maralinga people of South Australia to have their traditional lands restored to them. Between 1953 and 1957 the United Kingdom government carried out of atomic tests and several hundred minor trials on the lands. A clean-up programme had taken place in 1967 but further decontamination was needed before the area is safe for traditional aboriginal life and culture. A small area will remain contaminated with plutonium for thousands of years. The cost and who would pay, the Australian or UK government was being negotiated. The UK government's position was that the site is remote, the health risk is slight and the clean-up operation of 1967 was acknowledged as satisfactory by the Australian government. (UK)

  12. Regulatory Aspects for Site Selection for Radiological and Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirag, N.M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to check in one of the considerations necessary for any new nuclear facility. A previous study that was conducted using a questionnaire reported that general admission to the public, aesthetic considerations, and characteristics associated with the site are able to adequately accept the existence of new nuclear facilities. The findings of this research revealed that public involvement in the process of site selection and in the design of nuclear power plants, an understanding of their point of view is an important aspect of a participatory approach. An important factor for any new nuclear program is to improve confidence in the energy choices in the future. A survey was conducted on 1304 adults to, to get the main goal. The study concluded showed that the prevalence of culture of safety reflected on the public acceptance of the site, especially if it takes into account the aesthetic and environmental considerations.

  13. Finding and evaluating potential radiological problems in the vicinity of uranium milling sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Yates, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been performing radiological surveys at former uranium and thorium milling and processing sites since 1975. Tailings at inactive milling sites usually have a low frequency of human occupancy but continuously generate 222 Rn into the atmosphere. Thus, independent 222 Rn surveys are conducted at the inactive mill sites and their environs by the Mound Facility. Measurements of airborne 222 Rn and 222 Rn flux are made on the sites to define the tailings source term. Concurrently with these measurements, an ambient 222 Rn monitoring network is established off-site and a meteorological station is established at or near the mill site. Unfortunately, tailings are not always confined to the milling site. Radioactivity can migrate to areas outside of site boundaries by wind and water erosion, groundwater transport, spillage of incoming ore, and removal of tailings or other material for private purposes. In order to identify and assess off-site radioactivity on properties in the vicinity of milling sites, a combination of aerial and ground-level radiological monitoring techniques are used. The ground mobile gamma-ray scan is conducted using a vehicle equipped with sensitive gamma-ray detectors. The detectors are shielded so that gamma radiation input is viewed through only one side of the vehicle. This system is capable of precisely locating properties which have anomalously high gamma radiation levels caused by the presence of tailings. Subsequently, these properties are identified as candidate vicinity properties and are scheduled for radiological surveys subject to the property owner's consent. The comprehensive radiological surveys conducted at these vicinity properties determine the amount, type, and location of tailings materials

  14. Measurement techniques for radiological characterization of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    1996-09-18

    Once the decision is taken to characterize a contaminated site, appropriate measurement techniques must be selected. The choice will depend on the available information, on the nature and extent of the contamination, as well as on available resources (staff and budget). Some techniques are described on the basis of examples of characterization projects (e.g. Olen area in Belgium).

  15. Radiological impact of 2016 operations at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minter, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, G. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2016 Savannah River Site (SRS) air and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios, such as the consumption of wildlife or goat milk.

  16. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2016 Meteorological, Radiological, and Wind Transported Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vicken [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if wind blowing across the Clean Slate sites is transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites.

  17. 75 FR 384 - Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-N-0576] Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  18. A radiological disadvantage for siting a repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegler, P.

    1996-01-01

    At Yucca mountain, the disposal of large amounts of U-238, U-234, and Pu-238 will result in a long term build-up of Rn-222. In time, because of erosion, the repository horizon will move closer to the surface and large amounts of Rn-222 gas will be able to leak into the atmosphere. The area surrounding Yucca Mountain will become a site of high radioactive background. Sullivan and Pescatore have brought the issue to the attention of the DOE

  19. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site

  20. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  1. Assessment of radiological consequences of routine releases in a site with various nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucinio, Elena Albeira Guirado

    2003-01-01

    This work evaluates the radiological consequences of a nuclear site with a complex of fuel enrichment, conversion, reconversion facilities and a nuclear reactor. A methodology recommended by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) is used and implemented in the PC-CREAM computer code. This code is composed of six linked modules, which describe the transfer of radionuclides to the environment, the pathways on which people may be exposed to radiation, and the radiological consequences. Radiation doses to a selected population are evaluated taking into account atmospheric and aquatic releases. (author)

  2. 2016 Annual Inspection and Radiological Survey Results for the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site, July 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Brian [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report presents the findings of the annual inspection and radiological survey of the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site (site). The decommissioned nuclear power demonstration facility was inspected and surveyed on April 15, 2016. The site, located on the east bank of the Great Miami River in Piqua, Ohio, was in fair physical condition. There is no requirement for a follow-up inspection, partly because City of Piqua (City) personnel participated in a March 2016 meeting to address reoccurring safety concerns. Radiological survey results from 104 locations revealed no removable contamination. One direct beta activity reading in a floor drain on the 56-foot level (1674 disintegrations per minute [dpm]/100 square centimeters [cm2]) exceeded the minimum detectable activity (MDA). Beta activity has been detected in the past at this floor drain. The reading was well below the action level of 5000 dpm/100 cm2.

  3. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.C.; Graf, J.M.; Dewart, J.M.; Buhl, T.E.; Wenzel, W.J.; Walker, L.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This guide was prepared to provide the experienced safety analyst with accident analysis guidance in greater detail than is possible in Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The guide addresses analysis of postulated serious accidents considered in the siting and selection of major design features of DOE nuclear facilities. Its scope has been limited to radiological accidents at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The analysis steps addressed in the guide lead to evaluation of radiological dose to exposed persons for comparison with siting guideline doses. Other possible consequences considered are environmental contamination, population dose, and public health effects. Choices of models and parameters leading to estimation of source terms, release fractions, reduction and removal factors, dispersion and dose factors are discussed. Although requirements for risk analysis have not been established, risk estimates are finding increased use in siting of major nuclear facilities, and are discussed in the guide. 3 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-01-01

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program

  5. Results of the radiological survey at the former ore storage site, Palmerton, Pennsylvania (PP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Quillen, J.L.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the former ore storage site in Palmerton, Pennsylvania, is part of the FUSRAP effort and was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1988. In 1953 and 1954 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established an ore stockpile on the property of the New Jersey Zinc Corporation in Palmerton, Pennsylvania. Approximately 57 truckloads of ore (about 360 tons) were stored at this site and remained there until 1973, when the AEC initiated a clean-up program. The 1988 ORNL radiological survey included a gamma scan at the ground surface, gamma measurements at discrete locations at the surface and at 1 m above the surface, gamma logging of 80 auger holes, and collection of 161 surface and subsurface soil samples. Of these 161 soil samples, 98% were below DOE guidelines for 226 Ra concentration in soil. Interpretation of the data suggests small, isolated spots of residual ore. The data indicate that it is highly unlikely that an individual living or working on this site could receive a radiation dose approaching the 100 mrem annual limit. However, it is suggested that DOE evaluate potential exposures at this site to ensure compliance with their policy that all exposures to radiation are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 4 refs., 88 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Support for external validity of radiological anatomy tests using volumetric images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J.; van der Gijp, Anouk; van der Schaaf, Marieke F.; Huige, Josephine C B M; Vincken, Koen L.; Mol, Christian P.; Bleys, Ronald L A W; ten Cate, Olle T.; van Schaik, Jan P J

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: Radiology practice has become increasingly based on volumetric images (VIs), but tests in medical education still mainly involve two-dimensional (2D) images. We created a novel, digital, VI test and hypothesized that scores on this test would better reflect radiological

  7. Support for external validity of radiological anatomy tests using volumetric images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravesloot, Cecile J.; van der Gijp, Anouk; van der Schaaf, Marieke F; Huige, Josephine C B M; Vincken, Koen L; Mol, Christian P; Bleys, Ronald L A W; ten Cate, Olle T; van Schaik, JPJ

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Radiology practice has become increasingly based on volumetric images (VIs), but tests in medical education still mainly involve two-dimensional (2D) images. We created a novel, digital, VI test and hypothesized that scores on this test would better reflect radiological

  8. Ship Systems Survivability Test Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Area for testing survivability of shipboard systems to include electrical, communications, and fire suppression. Multipurpose test range for supporting gun firing,...

  9. Radioactive contamination of former Semipalatinsk test site area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'ev, O.I.; Akhmetov, M.A.; Ptitskaya, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear weapon infrastructure elimination activities and related surveys of radioactive contamination are virtually accomplished at the Semipalatinsk test site (STS). The radioecological surveys accompanied closure of tunnels which were used for underground nuclear testing at Degelen technical field and elimination of intercontinental ballistic missile silo launchers at Balapan technical field. At the same time a ground-based route survey was carried out at the Experimental Field where aboveground tests were conducted and a ground-based area survey was performed in the south of the test site where there are permanent and temporary inhabited settlements. People dwelling these settlements are mainly farmers. The paper presents basic results of radiological work conducted in the course of elimination activities. (author)

  10. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  11. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal

  12. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Efficacy of rock doves at the Hanford site, Washington, as radiological indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houser, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    Site faithfulness and general movement patterns of five rock dove (Columba livia) flocks were estimated in order to evaluate their efficacy as radiological indicators on the Hanford Site. Of 367 individually marked birds, 311 were resighted or recaptured at least once during onsite and offsite monitoring. Average site faithfulness for all flocks from resightings was 87.1% and was not significantly different than a hypothesized 90% site faithful distribution. Average site faithfulness from pooled resightings and recaptures was 91.3%, which was also not significantly different than a 90% distribution. Since Hanford rock doves exhibit site faithfulness and can be easily monitored, I conclude that they can be used as radiological indicators. I found 107 birds at 21 different locations during offsite surveys in agricultural areas adjacent to the Hanford Site. Mean movement distances from capture areas to offsite locations for each of the five flocks were significantly different. Mean movement distances from capture areas to offsite locations for each flock were highly correlated with closest possible distances for each flock. Mean movement directions from capture areas to offsite locations for each flock were significantly different than random movement patterns for each flock.

  14. Efficacy of rock doves at the Hanford site, Washington, as radiological indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houser, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    Site faithfulness and general movement patterns of five rock dove (Columba livia) flocks were estimated in order to evaluate their efficacy as radiological indicators on the Hanford Site. Of 367 individually marked birds, 311 were resighted or recaptured at least once during onsite and offsite monitoring. Average site faithfulness for all flocks from resightings was 87.1% and was not significantly different than a hypothesized 90% site faithful distribution. Average site faithfulness from pooled resightings and recaptures was 91.3%, which was also not significantly different than a 90% distribution. Since Hanford rock doves exhibit site faithfulness and can be easily monitored, I conclude that they can be used as radiological indicators. I found 107 birds at 21 different locations during offsite surveys in agricultural areas adjacent to the Hanford Site. Mean movement distances from capture areas to offsite locations for each of the five flocks were significantly different. Mean movement distances from capture areas to offsite locations for each flock were highly correlated with closest possible distances for each flock. Mean movement directions from capture areas to offsite locations for each flock were significantly different than random movement patterns for each flock

  15. Monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercat, C.; Brun, F.; Florens, P.; Petit, J.; Garnier, F.; Devin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Set up at the beginning of the site's operations, in 1962, the monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin has evolved over time to meet more specifically the multiple objectives of environmental monitoring: to prove the respect of the commitments required by the authorities, to be able to detect a dysfunction in the observed levels, to enable the assessment of impacts of industrial activities, to ensure the balance between environmental quality and the use made by the local population and to inform the public of the radiological state of the environment. Thousands of data were acquired on the radioactivity of all environmental compartments as well as on the functioning of local ecosystems. Today, the Network of Environmental Monitoring of AREVA Tricastin goes beyond the requirements of routine monitoring to provide innovative solutions for monitoring the radioactivity (especially for uranium) in the environment. (author)

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs

  17. Finding and evaluating potential radiological problems in the vicinity of uranium milling sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Yates, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    Tailings at inactive milling sites usually have a low frequency of human occupancy but continuously generate 222 Rn into the atmosphere. Measurements of airborne 222 Rn and 222 Rn flux are made on the sites to define the tailings source term. Concurrently with these measurements, an ambient 222 Rn monitoring network is established off-site and a meteolrololgical station is established at or near the mill site. Radioactivity can migrate to areas outside of site boundaries by wind and water erosion, groundwater transport, spillage of incoming purposes. In order to identify and assess off-site radioactivity on properties in the vicinity of milling sites, a combination of aerial and ground-level radiological monitoring techniques are used. The ground mobile gamma-ray scan is conducted using a vehicle equipped with sensitive gamma-ray detectors. The detectors are shielded so that gamma radiation input is viewed through only one side of the vehicle. This system is capable of precisely locating properties which have anomalously high gamma radiation levels caused by the presence of tailings. Subsequently, these properties are identified as candidate vicinity properties and are scheduled for radiological surveys subject to the property owner's consent. The comprehensive radiological surveys conducted at these vicinity properties determine the amount, type, and location of tailings materials. Structures on a vicinity property are carefully surveyed to determine the presence or absence of construction-related uses of tailings. If structural uses of tailings are found, air samples are analyzed for 222 Rn progeny, short-term continuous 222 Rn monitoring is instituted, and 222 Rn flux rate from tailings are estimated. If warranted, long-term 222 Rn and progeny measurements are made

  18. Baseline radiological monitoring at proposed uranium prospecting site at Rohil Sikar, Rajasthan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jha, V.N.; Sahoo, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Once economically viable grades of uranium deposits are proposed for mining and processing by the industry radiological baseline studies are required for future comparison during operational phases. The information collected during such studies serve as connecting feature between regulatory compliance and technical information. Present paper summarizes the results of baseline monitoring of atmospheric 222 Rn and gamma level in the area at prospecting mining, milling and waste disposal sites of Rohil Rajasthan

  19. Implementation of the International Code of Practice on Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology (TRS 457): Review of Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the IAEA published Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 457). This publication recommends procedures for calibration and dosimetric measurement for the attainment of standardized dosimetry. It also addresses requirements both in standards dosimetry laboratories, especially Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), and in clinical centres for radiology, as found in most hospitals. The implementation of TRS No. 457 decreases the uncertainty in the dosimetry of diagnostic radiology beams and provides Member States with a unified and consistent framework for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology, which previously did not exist. A coordinated research project (CRP E2.10.06) was established in order to provide practical guidance to professionals at SSDLs and to clinical medical physicists on the implementation of TRS No. 457. This includes the calibration of radiological dosimetry instrumentation, the dissemination of calibration coefficients to clinical centres and the establishment of dosimetric measurement processes in clinical settings. The main goals of the CRP were to: Test the procedures recommended in TRS No. 457 for calibration of radiation detectors in different types of diagnostic beams and measuring instruments for varying diagnostic X ray modalities; Test the clinical dosimetry procedures, including the use of phantoms and patient dose surveys; Report on the practical implementation of TRS No. 457 at both SSDLs and hospital sites. Testing of TRS No. 457 was performed by a group of medical physicists from hospitals and SSDLs from various institutions worldwide

  20. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site Grand Junction, Colorado: Audit date, August 9--11, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site in Grand Junction, Colorado. Jim Hylko and Bill James of the TAC conducted this audit August 9 through 11, 1993. Bob Cornish and Frank Bosiljevec represented the US Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents one programmatic finding, eleven site-specific observations, one good practice, and four programmatic observations

  1. Radiological impact of surface water and sediment near uranium mining sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, K; Stojanovska, Z; Badulin, V; Kunovska, B; Yovcheva, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the radiological impact of surface water and sediment around uranium mining sites 20 years after their closing. The areas under observations are 31 former classical underground uranium mining and exploratory sites in Bulgaria, named as objects. The extraction and processing of uranium ores in the Republic of Bulgaria were ended in 1992. To assess the radiological impact of radionuclides field expeditions were performed to sample water and bottom sediment. The migration of uranium through surface water was examined as one of the major pathways for contamination spread. The range of uranium concentration in water flowing from the mining sites was from 0.012 to 6.8 mgU l(-1) with a geometric mean of 0.192 mgU l(-1). The uranium concentrations in water downstream the mining sites were approximately 3 times higher than the background value (upstream). The concentrations of Unat, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (232)Th in the sediment of downstream river were higher than those upstream by 3.4, 2.6, 2, and 1.7 times, respectively. The distribution coefficient of uranium reflects its high mobility in most of the sites. In order to evaluate the impact on people as well as site prioritization for more detailed assessment and water management, screening dose assessments were done.

  2. Grimsel Test Site: heat test, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneefuss, J.; Glaess, F.; Gommlich, G.; Schmidt, M.

    1989-05-01

    The Swiss concept for the storage of radioactive waste consists in placing it in compact, dense rock formations. An experiment 'Heat Test' carried out by the 'Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung' in Nagra's Grimsel rock laboratory simulated the heat production of stored radioactive waste. The aim was to evaluate processes for the demonstration of the suitability of a final repository for heat-producing radioactive waste in cristalline rock, to investigate the thermic, mechanic and hydraulic reactions to an artificial heat source, and to develop corresponding calculating models. The duration of the tests was about 3 years. In this report the measured thermic, mechanic and hydraulic reactions are documented and discussed in detail. A simple, rotation symmetrical FEM-model was used for the preparatory and experiment-accompanying modelling of the thermomechanical conditions in the heat test. The test showed that suitable measuring methods for the surveillance of the geomechanics of a final repository are available and that the reactions of the crystalline host rock to the heat source remain locally limited and can be modelled with relatively small effort. 29 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs

  3. Experience and improved techniques in radiological environmental monitoring at major DOE low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    A summary of routine radiological environmental surveillance programs conducted at major active US Department of Energy (DOE) solid low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites is provided. The DOE disposal sites at which monitoring programs were reviewed include those located at Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Plant (SRP). The review is limited to activities conducted for the purpose of monitoring disposal site performance. Areas of environmental monitoring reviewed include air monitoring for particulates and gases, monitoring of surface water runoff, surface water bodies, ground water, monitoring of surface soils and the vadose zone, and monitoring of ambient penetrating radiation. Routine environmental surveillance is conducted at major LLW disposal sites at various levels of effort for specific environmental media. In summary, all sites implement a routine monitoring program for penetrating radiation. Four sites (INEL, NTS, LANL, and SRP) monitor particulates in air specifically at LLW disposal sites. Hanford monitors particulates at LLW sites in conjunction with monitoring of other site operations. Particulates are monitored on a reservationwide network at ORNL. Gases are monitored specifically at active LLW sites operated at NTS, LANL, and SRP. Ground water is monitored specifically at LLW sites at INEL, LANL, and SRP, in conjunction with other operations at Hanford, and as part of a reservationwide program at NTS and ORNL. Surface water is monitored at INEL, LANL, and SRP LLW sites. Surface soil is sampled and analyzed on a routine basis at INEL and LANL. Routine monitoring of the vadose zone is conducted at the INEL and SRP. Techniques and equipment in use are described and other aspects of environmental monitoring programs, such as quality assurance and data base management, are reviewed

  4. Controlled Archaeological Test Site (CATS) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CATS facility is at the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), Champaign, IL. This 1-acre test site includes a variety of subsurface features carefully...

  5. Radiological control FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The 1995 Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) brings year planning and execution year planning into a single document. The plan presented consists of the following four major sections: Overview and Introduction - Health physics has been renamed Radiological Control (RadCon) with the role of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation resulting from the DOE Hanford Site Operations; Cost Baselines which contains cost, technical and schedule baselines; Execution Year work Plan - cost summaries and detailed descriptions of the work to be done; Appendix - including brief description of other project activities directly coupled to RadCon

  6. Radiological control FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The 1995 Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) brings year planning and execution year planning into a single document. The plan presented consists of the following four major sections: Overview and Introduction - Health physics has been renamed Radiological Control (RadCon) with the role of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation resulting from the DOE Hanford Site Operations; Cost Baselines which contains cost, technical and schedule baselines; Execution Year work Plan - cost summaries and detailed descriptions of the work to be done; Appendix - including brief description of other project activities directly coupled to RadCon.

  7. Radiological dispersal device outdoor simulation test: Cesium chloride particle characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Don, E-mail: lee.sangdon@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Snyder, Emily G.; Willis, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Fischer, Robert; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Viani, Brian [Simbol Mining Corp., Pleasanton, CA 94566 (United States); Drake, John [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); MacKinney, John [U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Particles were generated from the detonation of simulated radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) using non-radioactive CsCl powder and explosive C4. The physical and chemical properties of the resulting particles were characterized. Two RDD simulation tests were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: one of the simulated RDDs was positioned 1 m above a steel plate and the other was partially buried in soil. Particles were collected with filters at a distance of 150 m from the origin of the RDD device, and particle mass concentrations were monitored to identify the particle plume intensity using real time particle samplers. Particles collected on filters were analyzed via computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (CCSEM/EDX) to determine their size distribution, morphology, and chemical constituents. This analysis showed that particles generated by the detonation of explosives can be associated with other materials (e.g., soil) that are in close proximity to the RDD device and that the morphology and chemical makeup of the particles change depending on the interactions of the RDD device with the surrounding materials.

  8. Radiological dispersal device outdoor simulation test: Cesium chloride particle characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Don; Snyder, Emily G.; Willis, Robert; Fischer, Robert; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Sutton, Mark; Viani, Brian; Drake, John; MacKinney, John

    2010-01-01

    Particles were generated from the detonation of simulated radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) using non-radioactive CsCl powder and explosive C4. The physical and chemical properties of the resulting particles were characterized. Two RDD simulation tests were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: one of the simulated RDDs was positioned 1 m above a steel plate and the other was partially buried in soil. Particles were collected with filters at a distance of 150 m from the origin of the RDD device, and particle mass concentrations were monitored to identify the particle plume intensity using real time particle samplers. Particles collected on filters were analyzed via computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (CCSEM/EDX) to determine their size distribution, morphology, and chemical constituents. This analysis showed that particles generated by the detonation of explosives can be associated with other materials (e.g., soil) that are in close proximity to the RDD device and that the morphology and chemical makeup of the particles change depending on the interactions of the RDD device with the surrounding materials.

  9. Colloid research for the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, E.A.

    1992-05-01

    Research is needed to understand the role of particulates in the migration of radionuclides away from the sites of nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. The process of testing itself may produce a reservoir of particles to serve as vectors for the transport of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater. Exploratory experiments indicate the presence of numerous particulates in the vicinity of the Cambric test but a much lower loading in a nearby well that has been pumped continuously for 15 years. Recent groundwater colloid research is briefly reviewed to identify sampling and characterization methods that may be applicable at the Nevada Test Site

  10. Radiologic findings after fundoplication compared with a pH reflux test and symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.; Linkoeping Univ.; Linkoeping Univ.

    1986-01-01

    In a follow-up after fundoplication, 61 patients underwent a double contrast examination of the stomach and a radiologic examination to detect any gastro-oesophageal reflux. The radiologic findings were compared with pH reflux test and symptoms. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was found in 7 patients at radiologic examination. None of these patients had an adequate fundoplication at a double contrast examination of the stomach and all had symptoms indicating reflux. Recurrence of gastro-oesophageal reflux may be shown at the radiologic examination and predicted by the morphologic appearances at the double contrast examination. (orig.)

  11. Radiologic findings after fundoplication compared with a pH reflux test and symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.

    In a follow-up after fundoplication, 61 patients underwent a double contrast examination of the stomach and a radiologic examination to detect any gastro-oesophageal reflux. The radiologic findings were compared with pH reflux test and symptoms. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was found in 7 patients at radiologic examination. None of these patients had an adequate fundoplication at a double contrast examination of the stomach and all had symptoms indicating reflux. Recurrence of gastro-oesophageal reflux may be shown at the radiologic examination and predicted by the morphologic appearances at the double contrast examination.

  12. Analysis of operation TEAPOT nuclear test ZUCCHINI radiological and meterological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, V.E.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the ZUCCHINI nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1986 fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix

  13. Analysis of Operation Plumbbob nuclear test: BOLTZMANN radiological and meteorological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steadman, C.R. Jr.; Kennedy, N.C.; Quinn, V.E.

    1983-09-01

    This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the BOLTZMANN nuclear test of Operation PLUMBBOB. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of converting aerial radiological data to equivalent ground-level values and of estimating fallout arrival times are presented. The meteorological situation on D-day is described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analyses with analyses in the late 1950's is presented. The appendices contain tabulated radiological data used in the fallout analyses, and contain discussions of the BOLTZMANN hot spot contention and of the enhanced activity at Portola, California

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the southwest drainage basin area of the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1994-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 106-square-mile area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), formerly the Savannah River Plant. The survey was conducted from August 24 through September 8, 1988, to collect baseline radiological data over the area. Both natural and man-made gamma emitting radionuclides were detected in the area. The detected man-made sources were confined to creeks, branches, and SRS facilities in the surveyed area and were a result of SRS operations. Naturally-occurring radiation levels were consistent with those levels detected in adjacent areas during previous surveys. The annual dose levels were within the range of levels found throughout the United States

  15. An aerial radiological survey of L Lake and Steel Creek, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a portion of the Savannah River Site along the Steel Creek Corridor during the period of July 16--31, 1986. Similar surveys of this area were performed in 1974, 1979, 1982, 1983, and 1985. This survey was flown with the same survey parameters and coverage as the 1985 survey to obtain measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation. These radiological measurements were used to determine if there had been any changes in concentration, spatial distribution, or estimated equivalent annual dose (mrem/yr) of the natural terrestrial background or man-made contaminants detected during the 1985 survey and earlier. The 1986 data are presented as isodose rate contour maps with overlays of corresponding 1985 survey data

  16. Operation Aqueduct: Onsite radiological safety report for announced nuclear tests, October 1989--September 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, G.M.; Jacklin, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    Aqueduct was the name assigned to the series of underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. This report includes those experiments publicly announced. Remote radiation measurements were taken during and after each nuclear event by a telemetry system. Reynolds Electrical ampersand Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) Health Protection Department (HPD) Radiation Protection Technicians (RPTS) with portable radiation detection instruments surveyed reentry routes into ground zeros (GZ) before other planned entries were made. Continuous surveillance was provided while personnel were in radiation areas and appropriate precautions were taken to protect persons from unnecessary exposure to radiation and toxic gases. Protective clothing and equipment were issued as needed. Complete radiological safety and industrial hygiene (IH) coverage was provided during drilling and mineback operations. Telemetered and portable radiation detector measurements are listed. Detection instrumentation used is described and specific operational procedures are defined

  17. Operation fusileer onsite radiological safety report for announced nuclear tests, October 1983-September 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, O.W.; Eubank, B.F.

    1985-08-01

    Fusileer was the name assigned to the series of underground nuclear experiments conducted at the Nevada Test Site from October 1, 1983 through September 30, 1984. This report is limited to announced nuclear tests. Remote radiation measurements were taken during and after each nuclear experiment by a telemetry system. Monitors with portable radiation detection instruments surveyed reentry routes into ground zeros before other planned entries were made. Continuous surveillance was provided while personnel were in radiation areas and appropriate precautions were taken to protect persons from unnecessary exposure to radiation and toxic gases. Protective clothing and equipment were issued as needed. Complete radiological safety and industrial hygiene coverage was provided during drilling and mineback operations. Telemetered and portable radiation detector measurements are listed. Detection instrumentation used is described and specific operational procedures are defined

  18. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-01-01

    This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report

  19. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-10-01

    This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  20. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the former Watertown arsenal property, Site 34 and Site 41, Watertown, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    During the MED/AEC era, work involving radioactive materials was conducted at various sites within the arsenal complex. Building 34 housed a uranium machine shop, and a portion of Building 41 contained a foundry that was used for uranium work. Information provided by site personnel indicated that only depleted uranium was used in these buildings. Results of radiological analyses of contaminated material found at these sites indicated depleted uranium with uranium-236. Both buildings have been razed. The remnants still in place consist of the concrete floor slabs, access drives, and underground utility service trenches. This area is currently under the control of the Watertown Redevelopment Authority of Watertown, Massachusetts. During the period from June 25 through July 1, 1981, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Occupational Health and Safety Division (OHS) Radiological Survey Group (RSG), conducted a radiological survey of Building Sites 34 and 41 at the direction of the US Department of Energy. Significant levels of contamination were found at 33 locations on the pad of Site 34 and in 5 out of 15 soild corings from the perimeter of the pad. No contamination was found on the pad of Site 41; however, two-thirds of this pad was covered with soil up to 4 ft thick. One of the 14 soil corings taken adjacent to the pad of Site 41 had elevated levels of uranium. Levels of contamination in excess of criteria, as identified in ANSI 13.12 and NRC Guidelines, were found at this site. The analyses of the samples from the sewer access points also revealed uranium and radium-226 anomalies. Therefore, according to NRC guidelines dated July 1982, it must be concluded that they are contaminated

  1. Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs

  2. Foods Found in the Wild Around Nuclear Sites: An Evaluation of Radiological Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Wilkins, B.T.; Hammond, D.J.; Davidson, M.F.; Richmond, S.; Brooker, S.

    2001-01-01

    Habit surveys were carried out around four licensed nuclear sites to identify people who collect foodstuffs from the wild (so-called 'free foods'). In total, around 800 collectors were readily identified, most of whom collected more than one free food. The data indicated that estimates of higher than average doses could reasonably be based on the three foodstuffs of most importance. Foods were selected for further study on the basis of either the number of collectors or the amount consumed. The radionuclides of interest were identified using published information on the discharges from each site. The resultant average and higher than average doses were estimated using the site-specific habit data. For all sites, doses from the consumption of free foods were low and of no radiological importance. Assessments based solely on data for cultivated foods would not therefore have underestimated radiological impact significantly. However, given the wide utilisation of free foods found in this study, for rigorous assessments it would be prudent to take account of the consumption of foods from the wild. (author)

  3. Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs.

  4. Plutonium Particle Migration in the Shallow Vadose Zone: The Nevada Test Site as an Analog Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. R.; Smith, D. K.

    2004-12-01

    The upper meter of the vadose zone in desert environments is the horizon where wastes have been released and human exposure is determined through dermal, inhalation, and food uptake pathways. This region is also characterized by numerous coupled processes that determine contaminant transport, including precipitation infiltration, evapotranspiration, daily and annual temperature cycling, dust resuspension, animal burrowing, and geochemical weathering reactions. While there is considerable interest in colloidal transport of minerals, pathogenic organisms, and contaminants in the vadose zone, there are limited field sites where the actual occurrence of contaminant migration can be quantified over the appropriate spatial and temporal scales of interest. At the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site, there have been numerous releases of radionuclides since the 1950's that have become field-scale tracer tests. One series of tests was the four safety shots conducted in an alluvial valley of Area 11 in the 1950's. These experiments tested the ability of nuclear materials to survive chemical explosions without initiating fission reactions. Four above-ground tests were conducted and they released plutonium and uranium on the desert valley floor with only one of the tests undergoing some fission. Shortly after the tests, the sites were surveyed for radionuclide distribution on the land surface using aerial surveys and with depth. Additional studies were conducted in the 1970's to better understand the fate of plutonium in the desert that included studies of depth distribution and dust resuspension. More recently, plutonium particle distribution in the soil profile was detected using autoradiography. The results to date demonstrate the vertical migration of plutonium particles to depths in excess of 30 cm in this arid vadose zone. While plutonium migration at the Nevada Test Site has been and continues to be a concern, these field experiments have become analog sites for the

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action

  6. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2015 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve

    2016-01-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). The operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Radionuclide assessment of airborne particulates in 2015 found the gross alpha and gross beta values of dust collected from the filters at the monitoring stations are consistent with background conditions. The meteorological and particle monitoring indicate that conditions for wind-borne contaminant movement exist at the Clean Slate sites and that, although the transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil by suspension has not been detected, movement by saltation is occurring.

  7. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2015 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolich, George [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Shadel, Craig [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Chapman, Jenny [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; McCurdy, Greg [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Etyemezian, Vicken [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Miller, Julianne J. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Mizell, Steve [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    2016-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). The operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Radionuclide assessment of airborne particulates in 2015 found the gross alpha and gross beta values of dust collected from the filters at the monitoring stations are consistent with background conditions. The meteorological and particle monitoring indicate that conditions for wind-borne contaminant movement exist at the Clean Slate sites and that, although the transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil by suspension has not been detected, movement by saltation is occurring.

  8. European network on the determination of site end points for radiologically contaminated land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Peter; Lennon, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Nexia Solutions are currently running a small European network entitled 'European Network on the Determination of Site End Points for Radiologically Contaminated Land (ENDSEP)'. Other network members include NRG (Netherlands), UKAEA (UK), CEA (France), SOGIN (Italy), Wismut (Germany), Saxon State Agency of Environment and Geology (Germany). The network is focused on the technical and socio-economical issues associated with the determination of end points for sites potentially, or actually, impacted by radiological contamination. Such issues will cover: - Those associated with the run up to establishing a site end point; - Those associated with verifying that the end points have been met; and Those associated with post closure. The network's current high level objectives can be summarized as follows: Share experience and best practice in the key issues running up to determining site end points; Gain a better understanding of the potential effects of recent and forthcoming EU legislation; Assess consistency between approaches; Highlight potential gaps within the remit of site end point determination and management; and - Consider the formulation of research projects with a view to sharing time and expense. The programme of work revolves around the following key tasks: - Share information, experience and existing good practice. - Look to determine sustainable approaches to contaminated land site end point management. - Through site visits, gain first hand experience of determining an appropriate end point strategy, and identifying and resolving end point issues. Highlight the key data gaps and consider the development of programmes to either close out these gaps or to build confidence in the approaches taken. Production of position papers on each technical are a highlighting how different countries approach/resolve a specific problem. (authors)

  9. Mobile laboratories: An innovative and efficient solution for radiological characterization of sites under or after decommissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudeau, V; Daniel, B; Dubot, D

    2017-04-21

    During the operation and the decommissioning of a nuclear site the operator must assure the protection of the workers and the environment. It must furthermore identify and classify the various wastes, while optimizing the associated costs. At all stages of the decommissioning radiological measurements are performed to determine the initial situation, to monitor the demolition and clean-up, and to verify the final situation. Radiochemical analysis is crucial for the radiological evaluation process to optimize the clean-up operations and to the respect limits defined with the authorities. Even though these types of analysis are omnipresent in activities such as the exploitation, the monitoring, and the cleaning up of nuclear plants, some nuclear sites do not have their own radiochemical analysis laboratory. Mobile facilities can overcome this lack when nuclear facilities are dismantled, when contaminated sites are cleaned-up, or in a post-accident situation. The current operations for the characterization of radiological soils of CEA nuclear facilities, lead to a large increase of radiochemical analysis. To manage this high throughput of samples in a timely manner, the CEA has developed a new mobile laboratory for the clean-up of its soils, called SMaRT (Shelter for Monitoring and nucleAR chemisTry). This laboratory is dedicated to the preparation and the radiochemical analysis (alpha, beta, and gamma) of potentially contaminated samples. In this framework, CEA and Eichrom laboratories has signed a partnership agreement to extend the analytical capacities and bring on site optimized and validated methods for different problematic. Gamma-emitting radionuclides can usually be measured in situ as little or no sample preparation is required. Alpha and beta-emitting radionuclides are a different matter. Analytical chemistry laboratory facilities are required. Mobile and transportable laboratories equipped with the necessary tools can provide all that is needed. The main

  10. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  11. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-01-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal

  12. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station

  13. Double tracks test site characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER)

  14. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2012-11-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1

  15. Nevada Test Site fallout in the area of Enterprise, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krey, P.W.; Hardy, E.P.; Heit, M.

    1980-04-01

    The analysis of a sediment core from the Enterprise reservoir in southwestern Utah has provided a record of fallout in the area dating to 1945. Assming that all the 137 Cs fallout that occurred at Enterprise reservoir between 1951 and 1957 came exclusively from the Nevada tests, an upper limit of the integrated deposit from this source is 18 mCi/km 2 of 137 Cs decay corrected to 1979 out of a total of 101 measured in 1979. The maximum infinity dose from the external radiation caused by this Nevada Test Site fallout is estimated to be 1700 mrad. This maximum dose is only a factor of two higher than the cumulative estimated dose in Enterprise derived from the radiological surveys conducted after each test. This indicates that the region around Enterprise reservoir did not experience an intrusion of fallout from NTS greatly in excess of what had been deduced from the post-shot external radiation surveys

  16. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikoloch, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vicken [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  17. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  18. Radiological findings of the chondroblastomas on the atypical sites of the skeleton system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang He; Yao Weiwu; Yang Shixun; Li Minghua; Cheng Yingsheng; Zhang Huizhen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the radiological findings of the chondroblastomas on the atypical sites of the skeleton system. Methods: We collected the total image data of 13 patients who were pathologically confirmed the chondroblastomas on the atypical sites of the bone system from the department of orthopedics in shanghai No. 6 hospital since 1991. Among all the patients, 11 eases were male and others were female. The range of age was 10-50 years and the average age of the patients was 26.2 years old. A retrospective analysis of radiological signs from different diagnostic imaging modalities was made. Results: X-ray examination was underdone on all case. On the plain X-ray films, all cases were lyric lesions. The radiolucent lesions were seen in 10 cases, mixed density in 3 cases. 10 cases manifested expansible contour. Eleven cases were performed computed tomography (CT) examination. On CT, there were visible calcification in 8 cases, sclerotic margin in 10 cases, internal septation in 4 cases. Soft masses could be seen in 3 cases. Magnetic resonance examination (MRI) was done on 5 cases. On T 1 weighted images (T 1 WI) , the lesion was hypo and intermediate intense signal and heterogeneous hyperintense signal on T 2 weighed images (T 2 WI). The fluid-fluid level and solid-fluid level were seen on 3 cases. On one post-contrast examination, the moderate enhancement was seen on the solid portion of the tumor and however, the obvious enhancement on the septation within the lesion. Conclusion: The radiological findings of the chondroblastomas on the atypical sites of the bone system were not suggestive. However, it could display some particular signs of the chondroid tumors such as calcification, septation, etc. To effectively apply the different imaging modalities can be helpful to make a right diagnosis before the operation. (authors)

  19. A cross-site vascular radiology on-call service: the Manchester experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashleigh, R.J.; Butterfield, J.S.; Asquith, J.; Chalmers, N.; Murphy, G.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A cross-site vascular radiology on-call service was established 5 years ago to cover two vascular centres in Manchester. We aimed to review the service. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective audit of out-of hours referrals and procedures over a three month period (March-May 2003) was undertaken. RESULTS: There were 52 incidents in 49 patients (mean 4 calls per week). Nine involved telephone advice only, the remainder (82%) required a procedure. Angiography was performed on 88% of patients and therapeutic radiological intervention on 50%. 71% of calls occurred at a weekend. 50% of the calls were from vascular surgery and 50% from other sources. The consultant vascular radiologist was present for 93% of procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The workload suggests that a vascular radiology on call service is justified in Manchester. There have been no major problems with its implementation and operation. This is a consultant led service, with very few cases being devolved to a specialist registrar (SpR)

  20. Non-destructive in situ measurement of radiological distributions in Hanford Site waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyer, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of radiological materials in defense nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site is being used to indicate material distributions. Both safety assessment and future processing challenges are dependent on knowledge of the distribution kinds, and quantities of various key components. Data from CdTe and neutron detector measurements are shown and correlated with physical sampling and laboratory results. The multiple assay approach is shown to increase the confidence about the material distributions. As a result, costs of physical sampling and destructive analyses can be controlled while not severely limiting the uncertainty of results

  1. American College of Radiology Accreditation Program for mammographic screening sites: Physical evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, R.E.; Haus, A.G.; Hubbard, L.B.; Lasky, H.J.; McCrohan, J.; McLelland, R.; Rothenberg, L.N.; Tanner, R.L.; Zinninger, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The American College of Radiology has initiated a program for the accreditation of mammographic screening sites, which includes evaluation by mail of image quality and average glandular breast dose. Image quality is evaluated by use of a specially designed phantom (a modified RMI 152D Mammographic Phantom) containing simulated microcalcifications, fibrils and masses. Average glandular dose to a simulated 4.5-cm-thick (50% glandular, 50% fat) compressed breast is evaluated by thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of entrance exposure and half value layer. Standards for acceptable image quality and patient doses are presented and preliminary results of the accreditation program are discussed

  2. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos

  3. Operation Grenadier. Onsite radiological safety report for announced nuclear tests, October 1984-September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, O.W.; Eubank, B.F.

    1986-09-01

    Grenadier was the name assigned to the series of underground nuclear experiments conducted at the Nevada Test Site from October 1, 1984 through September 30, 1985. This report includes those experiments publicly announced. Remote radiation measurements were taken during and after each nuclear experiment by a telemetry system. Monitors with portable radiation detection instruments surveyed reentry routes into ground zeros before other planned entries were made. Continuous surveillance was provided while personnel were in radiation areas and appropriate precautions were taken to protect persons from unnecessary exposure to radiation and toxic gases. Protective clothing and equipment were issued as needed. Complete radiological safety and industrial hygiene coverage was provided during drilling and mineback operations. Telemetered and portable radiation detector measurements are listed. Detection instrumentation used is described and specific operational procedures are defined

  4. Perspectives of investigation and development of Semipalatinsk Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Lukashenko, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Since the Semipalatinsk Test Site has been stopped and up until now, National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan (NNC RK) in cooperation with other specialist from Kazakhstan and international scientific community have accumulated large scope of information about current radiological situation at Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) and adjacent territories. There were revealed all important spots of radioactive contamination, identified main pathways and mechanisms for present and potential proliferation of radioactive substances. Obtained data assure us that present-day SNTS provides no negative impact on population on adjacent to the Site territories excluding people in the water basin of the river Shagan. Compliance with regulatory requirements and special rules for SNTS territory assures radiation safety at commercial activities on the Site. At the same time, the radiological situation does not remain stable; there were revealed the processes of radionuclide migration what requires regular monitoring of radiological situation at SNTS. Taking into account the scale of the Site and the variety of tests performed there, the information available about SNTS can not be completely exhaustive but enables us to propose a scientifically grounded plan for further research and practical measures aimed at remediation and reclamation of lands. implementation of such measures should return up to 80% of the lands to commercial use. SNTS is one of the world largest nuclear test sites with decisive contribution to creation and development of nuclear weapon. To considerable extent, these were works at SNTS which established nuclear parity between the superpowers one of the crucial factors in the history of human civilization in the 20 century. Also taking into account the interest to SNTS paid by international organizations, it is reasonable to initiate a procedure and recognize SNTS as a landmark including it in the UNESCO List of Cultural and Nature

  5. Post-Remediation Radiological Dose Assessment, Linde Site, Tonawanda, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, Sunita [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Durham, Lisa A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    A post-remediation radiological dose assessment was conducted for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Linde Site by using the measured residual concentrations of the radionuclides of concern following the completion of the soils remedial action. The site’s FUSRAP-related contaminants of concern (COCs) are radionuclides associated with uranium processing activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) in support of the Nation’s early atomic energy and weapons program and include radium-226 (Ra-226), thorium-230 (Th-230), and total uranium (Utotal). Remedial actions to address Linde Site soils and structures were conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision for the Linde Site, Tonawanda, New York (ROD) (USACE 2000a). In the ROD, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) determined that the cleanup standards found in Title 40, Part 192 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 192), the standards for cleanup of uranium mill sites designated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) standards for decommissioning of licensed uranium and thorium mills, found in 10 CFR Part 40, Appendix A, Criterion 6(6), are Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for cleanup of MED-related contamination at the Linde Site. The major elements of this remedy will involve excavation of the soils with COCs above soil cleanup levels and placement of clean materials to meet the other criteria of 40 CFR Part 192.

  6. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009, Attachment A: Site Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  8. Description of radiological problems at inactive uranium mill sites and formerly utilized MED/AEC sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.G.; Dickson, H.W.

    1979-02-01

    During the early years of development of the nuclear program in the United States, more than a hundred sites were used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and/or its uranium suppliers. Many of these sites are no longer used for such activities, but in many cases, the real estate remains contaminated with radioactivity and can be a potential source of exposure to members of the general public. In addition, 22 inactive uranium mill tailings sites exist in the western part of the United States. Radioactive contamination conditions range from slight contamination on the surfaces of buildings and equipment to extensive contamination of the subsoil. The Department of Energy is conducting a program to assure that adequate precautions are taken in the management of these properties to provide the cost-effective protection of public health while permitting further use of land and other resources. Several issues which should be considered in the development of an effective policy for long-term management of such properties are identified

  9. Description of radiological problems at inactive uranium mill sites and formerly utilized MED/AEC sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, D.G.; Dickson, H.W.

    1979-02-01

    During the early years of development of the nuclear program in the United States, more than a hundred sites were used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and/or its uranium suppliers. Many of these sites are no longer used for such activities, but in many cases, the real estate remains contaminated with radioactivity and can be a potential source of exposure to members of the general public. In addition, 22 inactive uranium mill tailings sites exist in the western part of the United States. Radioactive contamination conditions range from slight contamination on the surfaces of buildings and equipment to extensive contamination of the subsoil. The Department of Energy is conducting a program to assure that adequate precautions are taken in the management of these properties to provide the cost-effective protection of public health while permitting further use of land and other resources. Several issues which should be considered in the development of an effective policy for long-term management of such properties are identified.

  10. Use of the Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols Manual (MARLAP) for site cleanup activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, J.

    1999-01-01

    MARLAP is being developed as a multi-agency guidance manual for project managers and radioanalytical laboratories. The document uses a performance based approach and will provide guidance and a framework to assure that laboratory radioanalytical data meets the specific project or program needs and requirements. MARLAP supports a wide range of data collection activities including site characterization and compliance demonstration activities. Current participants include: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Department of Energy (DOE), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), US Department of Defense (DoD), US National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST), US Geologic Survey (USGS), US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Commonwealth of Kentucky, and the State of California. MARLAP is the radioanalytical laboratory counterpart to the Multi-Agency Radiological Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARLAP is currently in a preliminary draft stage. (author)

  11. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at the Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a radiological survey performed at the Spook site in Converse County, Wyoming, in June 1976, are presented. The mill at this site was located a short distance from the open-pit mine where the ore was obtained and where part of the tailings was dumped into the mine. Several piles of overburden or low-grade ore in the vicinity were included in the measurements of above-ground gamma exposure rate. The average exposure rate over these piles varied from 14 μR/hr, the average background exposure rate for the area, to 140 μR/hr. The average exposure rate for the tailings and former mill area was 220 μR/hr. Movement of tailings particles down dry washes was evident. The calculated concentration of 226 Ra in ten holes as a function of depth is presented graphically

  12. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, C.L.

    1994-09-01

    As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms

  13. Environmental surveillance report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1981 through December 1981)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoggins, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1981 through December 1981. The results and evaluations of measurements of radioactivity in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates are presented. Relevancy to DOE concentration guides (CG'S) is established

  14. Environmental surveillance report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1980-December 1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoggins, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented for the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1980 through December 1980. The results and evaluations of measurements of radioactivity in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates are presented. Relevancy to DOE concentration guides (CG'S) is established

  15. Interdisciplinary hydrogeologic site characterization at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, W.L.; Wagoner, J.L.; Drellack, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site was established in 1950 as a continental area for testing nuclear devices. Hydrogeologic investigations began in earnest with the US Geological Survey mapping much of the area from 1960 to 1965. Since 1963, all nuclear detonations have been underground. Most tests are conducted in vertical shafts, but a small percentage are conducted in tunnels. The majority of detonation points are above the water table, primarily in volcanic rocks, but sometimes in alluvium. Hydrogeologic investigations began in earnest with the US Geological Survey's mapping of much of the NTS region from 1960 to 1965. Following the BANEBERRY test in December 1970, which produced an accidental release of radioactivity to the atmosphere, the US Department of Energy (then the Atomic Energy Commission) established the Containment Evaluation Panel (CEP). Results of interdisciplinary hydrogeologic investigations for each test location are included in a Containment Prospectus which is thoroughly reviewed by the CEP

  16. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.; Graf, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    DOE Office of Nuclear Safety has sponsored preparation of a guidance document to aid field offices and contractors in their analyses of consequences of postulated major accidents. The guide addresses the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.1A, Chapter V, and 6430.1, including the general requirement that DOE nuclear facilities be sited, designed, and operated in accordance with standards, codes, and guides consistent with those applied to comparable licensed nuclear facilities. The guide includes both philosophical and technical information in the areas of: siting guidelines doses applied to an offsite reference person; consideration also given to an onsite reference person; physical parameters, models, and assumptions to be applied when calculating doses for comparison to siting criteria; and potential accident consequences other than radiological dose to a reference person which might affect siting and major design features of the facility, such as environmental contamination, population dose, and associated public health effects. Recommendations and/or clarifications are provided where this could be done without adding new requirements. In this regard, the guide is considered a valuable aid to the safety analyst, especially where requirements have been subject to inconsistent interpretation or where analysis methods are in transition, such as use of dose model (ICRP 2 or ICRP 30) or use of probabilistic methods of risk analysis in the siting and design of nuclear facilities

  17. History of creation of Semipalatinsk test nuclear site. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In 1949 August USSR's Government adopted decision about creation of nuclear site with conditional name Uchebnyj polygon 2. For its building was chosen territory in 140 km from Semipalatinsk city. Semipalatinsk test site consists of the land of three regions: Semipalatinsk, Pavlodar, Karaganda and it occupies 18,500 km 2 of fertile land, rich with minerals. Now this territory was alienated from national using. Polygon was complex object and it incorporated three main zones: Opytnoe Pole, zone of radiation safety, site Sh. Opytnoe Pole was equipped by special constructions ensuring nuclear test conducting, its observing and registration of physical measurements and occupied 2,300 km 2 . Around of the Opytnoe Pole is situated zone of radiation safety with area 45 thousand ha. Site Sh was situated in 14 km from center of Opytnoe Pole and it was intended for distribution of individual protection devices, dosimeters and for conducting of dis-activation and sanitary works. History of the site creation is connected with building of Kurchatov city. In dozen and hundred of kilometers from Kurchatov city there were top secret objects: site Balapan with total area 100,000 ha intended for conducting of nuclear tests in wells with threshold capacity 100-200 kt. Here simultaneously with main problems on the site the military-applied works were conducted on mechanics, physics of combustion, simulation of Earthquakes and determination of seismic stability of buildings and constructions. Research site Degelen with total area 33,100 ha which has been used for underground testing of nuclear charges with small capacity. Site 10 one of large research technical complex on which two reactor units were installed. Main tasks of the complex were as follows: high-temperature fuel materials testing, conducting of fundamental researches in field of physics of fissile products, thermal physics and gas hydrodynamics. On site M a laboratory base for radiochemical, radiological and chemical

  18. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  19. Radiological protection tests for products which can lead to exposure of the public to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.; Wrixon, A.D.; Wilkins, B.T.

    1976-07-01

    Testing plays an important role in deciding whether products which irradiate the general public are acceptable from a radiological protection point of view. This report discusses the role which testing should play in decision-making and develops a systematic approach to the testing of products. As an example of this approach, a proposed test programme for ionisation chamber smoke detectors is described. The use of test results as a basis for design specifications and performance requirements in the development of radiological protection standards for products is discussed. A description of the relevant standards is included. (author)

  20. Preliminary site characterization radiological monitoring plan for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, Yucca Mountain Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The activities described in this plan occur in the early phases of site characterization. This document presents the Preliminary Site Characterization Radiological Monitoring Plan (PSCRMP) for collecting and evaluating data in support of the NNWSI Project. The PSCRMP defines and identifies control procedures for the monitoring activities. The PSCRMP activity will utilize integrating radon monitoring devices, a continuous radon monitor, and a particulate air sampler. These instruments will be used to establish the baseline radioactivity and/or radioactivity released due to early site characterization activities. The sections that follow provide a general project description, the specifics of the monitoring program, and the practices that will be employed to ensure the validity of the collected data by integrating quality assurance into all activities. Section 2 of this document describes the regulatory base of this document. Section 3 describes the site characterization activities which may lead to release of radioactivity. Section 4 provides a description of the potential sources of radioactivity that site characterization could generate. Section 5 summarizes the sampling and monitoring methodology, which will be used to monitor the potential sources of radioactivity. The network of sampling and monitoring equipment is described in Section 6, and Section 7 summarizes the systems operation activities. The data reporting activities are described in Section 8. Finally, a description of the Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) activities is provided in Section 9. Appendix A contains a summary of the procedures to be used in this program, and Appendix B contains technical specification on equipment and services. 20 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  1. An evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions of West Lake on the Hanford site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.; Price, K.L.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1991-03-01

    West Lake and its immediate surrounding basin represent a unique habitat that is dominated by highly saline water and soil. The basin offers a valuable research site for studies of a rare and complex wetland area in the desert. This report is an evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions at West Lake and describes how ground water influences site properties. The scope of this evaluation consisted of a sampling program in 1989 and a review of data from the perspective of assessing the impact of Hanford Site operations on the physical, chemical, and ecological conditions of West Lake and its surrounding basin. The water level in West Lake fluctuates in relation to changes in the water table. The connection between West Lake and ground water is also supported by the presence of {sup 3}H and {sup 99}Tc in the ground water and in the lake. There are relatively high concentrations of uranium in West Lake; the highest concentrations are found in the northernmost isolated pool. Analyses of water, sediment, vegetation, and soil indicate possible shifts of isotropic ratios that indicate a reduction of {sup 235}U. Uranium-236 was not detected in West Lake water; its presence would indicate neutron-activated {sup 235}U from fuel reprocessing at Hanford. Trace metals are found at elevated concentrations in West Lake. Arsenic, chromium, copper, and zinc were found at levels in excess of US Environmental Protection Agency water quality criteria. Levels of radiological and chemical contamination in the West Lake basin are relatively low. Concentrations of fission isotopes exceed those that could be explained by atmospheric fallout, but fall short of action levels for active waste management areas. 31 refs., 8 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. An evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions of West Lake on the Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, T.M.; Price, K.L.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1991-03-01

    West Lake and its immediate surrounding basin represent a unique habitat that is dominated by highly saline water and soil. The basin offers a valuable research site for studies of a rare and complex wetland area in the desert. This report is an evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions at West Lake and describes how ground water influences site properties. The scope of this evaluation consisted of a sampling program in 1989 and a review of data from the perspective of assessing the impact of Hanford Site operations on the physical, chemical, and ecological conditions of West Lake and its surrounding basin. The water level in West Lake fluctuates in relation to changes in the water table. The connection between West Lake and ground water is also supported by the presence of 3 H and 99 Tc in the ground water and in the lake. There are relatively high concentrations of uranium in West Lake; the highest concentrations are found in the northernmost isolated pool. Analyses of water, sediment, vegetation, and soil indicate possible shifts of isotropic ratios that indicate a reduction of 235 U. Uranium-236 was not detected in West Lake water; its presence would indicate neutron-activated 235 U from fuel reprocessing at Hanford. Trace metals are found at elevated concentrations in West Lake. Arsenic, chromium, copper, and zinc were found at levels in excess of US Environmental Protection Agency water quality criteria. Levels of radiological and chemical contamination in the West Lake basin are relatively low. Concentrations of fission isotopes exceed those that could be explained by atmospheric fallout, but fall short of action levels for active waste management areas. 31 refs., 8 figs., 18 tabs

  3. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  4. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  5. Radiological safety evaluation for a Waste Transfer Facility at Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ades, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the radiological safety evaluation performed for a Waste Transfer Facility (WTF) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This facility transfers liquid radioactive waste between various waste processing facilities and waste storage facilities. The WTF includes functional components such as the diversion box and the pump pits, waste transfer lines, and the outside yard service piping and electrical services. The WSRC methodology is used to evaluate the consequences of postulated accidents that result in the release of radioactive material. Such accidents include transfer line breaks, underground liquid pathway release, fire in pump tank cells and HEPA filters, accidents due to natural phenomena, and externally induced events. Chemical hazards accidents are not considered. The analysis results indicate that the calculated mean onsite and offsite radiological consequences are bounded by the corresponding WSRC dose limits for each accident considered. Moreover, the results show that the maximum onsite and offsite doses calculated for the WTF are lower than the maximum doses determined for the whole radioactive waste facility where the WTF is located

  6. Radiological assessment of surface water quality around proposed uranium mining site in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S K; Lenka, P; Gothankar, S; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D; Khating, D T

    2009-06-01

    The gross alpha and gross beta activities were estimated for radiological assessment of surface water quality around the proposed uranium mining site Kylleng Pyndengsohiong Mawthabah (Domiasiat), West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya situated in a high rainfall area (12,000mm) in India. 189 Surface water samples were collected over different seasons of the year from nine different locations covering around 100km(2). Gross beta activities were found to vary from 144 to 361mBq/L which is much below the prescribed WHO limit of 1000mBq/L for drinking water. Gross alpha activities varied from 61 to 127mBq/L. These values are much below the reported gross alpha values by other countries. In about 7% of the samples the alpha activities remain exceeded the WHO guideline limit of 100mBq/L. Surface water samples collected during the summer season of the year show higher activity whereas low activity was found from samples collected during monsoon season. Results show that all water sources are acceptable as drinking water for human consumption from the radiological point of view, the higher gross alpha concentrations in a few locations remains so only for short duration during the summer season.

  7. Radiological site assessment at sun rose claim utilizing ScanPlot{sup SM} technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, H., E-mail: heath.downey@amecfw.com [Amec Foster Wheeler, Portland, ME (United States)

    2015-07-01

    ScanPlot{sup SM} gamma spectroscopy land survey system was utilized for the overland survey of uranium at the Sun Rose Claim in the Northwest Territories. The Sun Rose Claim is a former uranium exploration site and previous investigations had identified uranium ore and waste rock. ScanPlot{sup SM} radiological scan surveys were performed utilizing a backpack system. ScanPlot{sup SM} platform utilized spectroscopy grade sodium iodide detectors configured for optimal spatial coverage and radiation detection. Survey locations were recorded using an on-board global positioning system (GPS). The radiological spectral data from the radiation detectors is automatically logged and linked with the GPS coordinates to an on-board computer to create isocontour figures using a color scale to represent radioactivity levels. The advantage of utilizing the ScanPlot{sup SM} system for this assessment is that the nature and extent of uranium is provided without having to collect and assay a large number of samples. (author)

  8. Radiological assessment of surface water quality around proposed uranium mining site in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, S.K.; Lenka, P.; Gothankar, S.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.; Khating, D.T.

    2009-01-01

    The gross alpha and gross beta activities were estimated for radiological assessment of surface water quality around the proposed uranium mining site Kylleng Pyndengsohiong Mawthabah (Domiasiat), West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya situated in a high rainfall area (12,000 mm) in India. 189 Surface water samples were collected over different seasons of the year from nine different locations covering around 100 km 2 . Gross beta activities were found to vary from 144 to 361 mBq/L which is much below the prescribed WHO limit of 1000 mBq/L for drinking water. Gross alpha activities varied from 61 to 127 mBq/L. These values are much below the reported gross alpha values by other countries. In about 7% of the samples the alpha activities remain exceeded the WHO guideline limit of 100 mBq/L. Surface water samples collected during the summer season of the year show higher activity whereas low activity was found from samples collected during monsoon season. Results show that all water sources are acceptable as drinking water for human consumption from the radiological point of view, the higher gross alpha concentrations in a few locations remains so only for short duration during the summer season.

  9. Feasibility, cost and safety of some rehabilitation options for the Maralinga test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vande Putte, D.; Tufton, E.P.S.; Myall, M.

    1992-01-01

    The need to rehabilitate the former nuclear test site at Maralinga has required the development of safe and cost-effective clean-up measures. Options have been investigated, which include fencing-off parts of the site, removing surface soil, mixing surface soil and stabilising the contents of debris pits. The results of the study can be used in selecting the most suitable options or combination of options necessary to achieve a given radiological end-point. (author)

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 537: Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 537 is identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 as Waste Sites. CAU 537 is located in Areas 3 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-23-06, Bucket; Yellow Tagged Bags; and CAS 19-19-01, Trash Pit. CAU 537 closure activities were conducted in April 2007 according to the FFACO and Revision 3 of the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2003). At CAS 03-23-06, closure activities included removal and disposal of a 15-foot (ft) by 15-ft by 8-ft tall wooden shed containing wood and metal debris and a 5-gallon plastic bucket containing deteriorated plastic bags with yellow radioactive contamination tape. The debris was transported to the Area 9 U10c Landfill for disposal after being screened for radiological contamination according to the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). At CAS 19-19-01, closure activities included segregation, removal, and disposal of non-friable, non-regulated asbestos-containing material (ACM) and construction debris. The ACM was determined to be non-friable by waste characterization samples collected prior to closure activities. The ACM was removed and double-bagged by licensed, trained asbestos workers and transported to the Area 9 U10c Landfill for disposal. Construction debris was transported in end-dump trucks to the Area 9 U10c Landfill for disposal. Closure activities generated sanitary waste/construction debris and ACM. Waste generated during closure activities was appropriately managed and disposed. Waste characterization sample results are included as Appendix A of this report, and waste disposition documentation is included as Appendix B of this report. Copies of the Sectored Housekeeping Site Closure

  11. Mixed waste characterization and certification at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, T.A.; Dodge, R.L.; Fitzsimmons, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was recently granted interim status by the state of Nevada to receive mixed waste. The RCRA Part B permit application has been revised and submitted to the state. Preliminary indications are that the permit will be granted. In conjunction with revision of the Part B permit application, pertinent DOE guidelines governing waste acceptance criteria and waste characterization were also revised. The guidelines balance the need for full characterization of hazardous constituents with ALARA precepts. Because it is not always feasible to obtain a full chemical analysis without undue or unnecessary radiological exposure of personnel, process knowledge is considered an acceptable method of waste characterization. A balance of administrative controls and verification procedures, as well as careful documentation and high standards of quality assurance, are essential to the characterization and certification program developed for the NTS

  12. Mixed waste characterization and certification at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, T.A.; Dodge, R.L.; Fitzsimmons, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Project (RWMP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was recently granted interim status by the state of Nevada to receive mixed waste (MW). The RCRA Part B permit application has been revised and submitted to the state. Preliminary indications are that the permit will be granted. In conjunction with revision of the Part B Permit application, pertinent DOE guidelines governing waste acceptance criteria (WAC) and waste characterization were also revised. The guidelines balance the need for full characterization of hazardous constituents with as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) precepts. Because it is not always feasible to obtain a full chemical analysis without undue or unnecessary radiological exposure of personnel, process knowledge is considered an acceptable method of waste characterization. A balance of administrative controls and verification procedures, as well as careful documentation and high standards of quality assurance, are essential to the characterization and certification program developed for the NTS

  13. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Murphy

    2008-01-01

    In the past, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site has been performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation Department. Calibration and performance tests on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor were performed but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor because it had never been put into service. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no program in place to test them quarterly. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) Manager at the time decided that the program needed to be strengthened and MC and A took over performance testing of all SNM portal monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with creating a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, writing procedures, troubleshooting/repairing, validating the process, control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and running the program

  14. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Yonehara, Hidenori [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [eds.

    2000-12-01

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  15. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Toshimitsu

    2000-12-01

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area. Central Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site was conducted in December 1993. An interim report was issued. That report described survey procedures and presented terrestrial exposure rate and wide-area-averaged plutonium isopleth plots. This letter report presents additional plutonium plots and some ''rule-of-thumb'' calculations which should help the reader to properly interpret the data presented. Attached to this report are three isopleth plots produced from the Double Track data. No one processing method provides all the answers regarding a particular surveyed area. Where peak values are most important, isopleth number-sign 1, created from the original unsmoothed data, is the presentation of choice. Isopleth number-sign 2, from smoothed data, is superior for the detection of areas of widespread low-level contamination. Isopleth number-sign 3, also smoothed data, satisfied a particular early mission goal but is not as useful for cleanup operations as the other two

  17. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  18. Geologic structure of Semipalatinsk test site territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergaliev, G.Kh.; Myasnikov, A.K.; Nikitina, O.I.; Sergeeva, L.V.

    2000-01-01

    This article gives a short description of the territory of Semipalatinsk test site. Poor knowledge of the region is noted, and it tells us about new data on stratigraphy and geology of Paleozoic layers, obtained after termination of underground nuclear explosions. The paper contains a list a questions on stratigraphy, structural, tectonic and geologic formation of the territory, that require additional study. (author)

  19. Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.; Jobst, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway's opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date

  20. Radiological survey results for the Peek Street site properties, Schenectady, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    The Peek Street Industrial Facility, located at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1955. A variety of operations using radioactive materials were conducted at the site, but the main activities were to design an intermediate breeder reactor and to develop a chemical process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent reactor fuel. Nonradioactive beryllium metal was machined on the site for breeder reactor application. The 4.5-acre site was decommissioned and released in October 1955. A radiological survey was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in November 1989. The survey included scan and grid point measurements of direct radiation levels outdoors on the five properties and inside the factory building, and radionuclide analysis of samples collected from each property. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples from each property and in dust, debris, and structural materials from inside the factory building. Auger holes were logged to assess location and extent of possible subsurface residual soil radioactivity. Radionuclide concentrations were deter-mined in both indoor and outdoor water samples and in selected samples of vegetation. The presence of fixed and transferable surface residual radioactivity was investigated inside the factory building and on discarded materials outdoors on the property. High-volume air samples as well as additional selected indoor and outdoor soil samples were analyzed to determine levels of elemental beryllium

  1. Finding a criterion for site evaluation by weighting radiological, meteorological and demographic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doury, A.; Gerard, R.

    1975-01-01

    The general problem of compatibility between given installations and their site, as well as more specific problems such as those associated with decisions to be taken in regard to demographic equilibrium in the environment, logically involve finding quantitative or at any rate semiquantitative criteria that will enable selection to be made under the least subjective conditions possible. Since the air is frequently the principal primary vector of effluents, especially in the case of an accident, atmospheric discharges are considered first separately. As the task is to find a ''site security index'' integrating the meteorological and demographic data with radiological data relating to the potential sources and the consequences of contamination, the authors first consider the possibility of using the man.rem concept, which has the advantage of possessing the dimension of a collective dose. In view of the objections that have been raised, particularly in connection with the controversy over the existence of a threshold for the dose-equivalent effect relation, a number of other practices are described and discussed. The conclusions are complex and subject to revision. Several definitions of site security indices can be identified and, pending the final decision stage, actually put into use, in conjunction with specific maps or graphs serving to reveal potentially important features which might be obscured by excessive integrations or summations

  2. The atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa (French Polynesia). The nuclear testings. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.

    2007-01-01

    This report provides a review of the radiological measures implemented during the thirty year period of French nuclear tests in Polynesian atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. It presents full details of the practices deployed throughout these tests, including, in particular, aspects concerning radiological protection for the population and the environment. It contains all the scientific results and measurements of radioactivity performed during this period, providing concrete facts that can be used to assess the consequences these tests have had on the personnel involved, the population and the environment. (author)

  3. Challenges in radiological impact assessment studies at new sites for nuclear facilities and its safety review and assessment for siting consent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee Roy, Susmita; Roshan, A.D.; Bishnoi, L.R.

    2018-01-01

    One of the basic requirement of site evaluation for a Nuclear Facility (NF) is radiological impact assessment (RIA). This involves evaluation of transportation of radioactive materials discharged from a nuclear facility under normal operational or accidental conditions, through different compartments of environment viz. air, land and water, and finally assessment of its consequences. Amongst others, site characteristics and the site related parameters play major role in evaluation of impact of postulated releases from NPPs. Doses to public from both external and internal exposures are computed to assess potential consequences of a radiological release and acceptability of the site-plant pair is established based on the outcome of this assessment. A comprehensive study of the site characteristics including meteorology, hydrology, hydro-geology and demography of the region along with details of land and water use, bioaccumulation, transfer to and from the environmental matrices is required for accomplishing satisfactory RIA

  4. Nuclear test at Semipalatinsk test site and their environmental impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logachev, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper present classification of nuclear tests conducted at the Semipalatinsk test site by tier radiation hazards. The Institute of Biophysics of the Russian Ministry of Health established a data base the archival data on radiation situation parameters and compiled an album of radioactive plum footprints. The paper states that external and internal exposure doses received by population lived in the test vicinity can sufficiently reliably assesses using archival data. (author)

  5. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  6. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  7. Physical and Radiological Characterisation of Measuring Sites Within The Croatian Gamma Dose Rate Early Warning Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cindro, M.; Stepisnik, M.; Pinezic, D.; Sinka, D.; Skanata, D.

    2016-01-01

    The work described in this paper was done within the EU funded project 'Upgrading the systems for the on- and off-line monitoring of radioactivity in the environment in Croatia in regular and emergency situations'. The existing system of early warning in case of nuclear accident in Croatia (SPUNN), managed by the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety, includes 33 stations for measuring ambient gamma dose rate (GDR). The aim of the project was to determine appropriate correction factors that will allow the results from this network to be used not only for timely warning in case of nuclear accident but also in routine environmental monitoring to determine the background radiation. Additionally, in the case of fresh deposition due to radioactive contamination, the corrected values are better suited to be used as an input for support systems for decision making in the case of emergency (such as RODOS), as well as for international data exchange (EURDEP) or automatic interpolation and mapping of radiological data (INTAMAP). The response of the individual probes to natural or accidental radiation mostly depends on the geometry or topography, surrounding buildings, vegetation (trees) and the type of soil beneath the detector. In the case of measuring the dose rate, objects such as buildings act as a shield against gamma radiation and limit the field of vision of the detector. If we want to have representative values that can be compared with other measuring sites, it is clear that we need to define standard conditions that each location has to meet. This is true not only for the probes within the same network, but can also be applied more broadly, at the international level, since data exchange mechanisms for GDR data already exist across Europe. The response of each probe is not determined only by the physical features, it is also important to understand the radiological characteristics of the site. Radiological characterization was performed through

  8. New software tool for dynamic radiological characterisation and monitoring in nuclear sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoeke, Istvan; Louka, Michael N.; Mark, Niels K.; Bryntesen, Tom R.; Bratteli, Joachim; Edvardsen, Svein T.; Gustavsen, Morten A.; Toppe, Aleksander L.; Johnsen, Terje; Rindahl, Grete

    2012-01-01

    The Halden Reactor Project (HRP) is a jointly sponsored international cooperation, under the aegis of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency. Extensive and valuable guidance and tools, connected to safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities, has been elaborated throughout the years within the frame of this programme. The HRP has particularly high level results in virtual-reality based tools for real-time areal and personal monitoring. The techniques, developed earlier, are now being supplemented to enhance the planning and monitoring capabilities, and support general radiological characterisation connected to nuclear sites and facilities. Due to the complexity and abundance of the input information required, software tools, dedicated to the radiological characterization of contaminated materials, buildings, land and groundwater, are applied to review, evaluate and visualize the data. Characterisation of the radiation situation in a realistic environment can be very complex, and efficient visualisation of the data to the user is not straight forward. The monitoring and planning tools elaborated in the frame of the HRP feature very sophisticated three-dimensional (3D) high definition visualisation and user interfaces to promote easy interpretation of the input data. The visualisation tools permit dynamic visualisation of radiation fields in virtual or augmented reality by various techniques and real-time personal monitoring of humanoid models. In addition new techniques are being elaborated to visualise the 3D distribution of activities in structures and materials. The dosimetric algorithms, feeding information to the visualisation and user interface of these planning tools, include deterministic radiation transport techniques suitable for fast photon dose estimates, in case physical and radio- and spectrometric characteristics of the gamma sources are known. The basic deterministic model, implemented in earlier

  9. IRSN's monitoring strategy for former uranium mining sites: regional radiological report approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audrey, L.L.; Marie-Odile, G.; Damien, T. [Institut de radioportection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN (France)

    2014-07-01

    Radiological monitoring of the environment in France was one of the basic missions assigned to the IRSN upon its creation. It is performed regularly through measurement and sampling networks across France, particularly around nuclear facilities. To supplement this system and increase its effectiveness and utility, IRSN recently began issuing regional baseline reference states using radiological reporting. Application of this reporting is currently underway in regions where uranium was mined. The Dordogne river basin is one of twenty basins impacted by uranium mining. Covering some twenty sites, it was selected by IRSN for its initial mining reporting. The objective is to gain detailed knowledge of the distribution of natural radioactivity related to the presence of uranium and its radioactive decay products, including radium, in mining areas and the river basin in general. This knowledge will supplement data already available as part of AREVA's regulatory site reporting, and provide access to a baseline reference state for radioactivity in the environment at local and regional levels. Since the impact of former uranium mining sites is basically tied to water circulation, sampling projects are designed based on the drainage system. Samples are taken of water, sediment and biological indicators such as fish and aquatic plants. Samples are then analysed to determine uranium, radium and polonium concentration. An initial sampling campaign took place in October 2012. It involved an initial contact with local organisations (Regional Directorate for the Environment, Town and Country Planning and Housing (DREAL), local information and oversight committee (Clis), regional public watershed board (EPIDOR), water agencies, mayors, hunting clubs, fishing federation, farmers, etc.). It will be supplemented by a second sampling campaign in late spring 2013 designed to take into account any local issues, including those associated with local water usage (irrigation, livestock

  10. Results of the preliminary radiological survey at the former Diamond Magnesium Company site, Luckey, Ohio (DML001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-02-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. One such site is the former Diamond Magnesium Company facility in Luckey, Ohio. The preliminary radiological survey discussed in this report was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in December 1988. The former Diamond Magnesium Company site in Luckey, Ohio, was used as a magnesium reduction plant during World War 2. It was closed in 1945 and reopened in 1949 as a beryllium production facility, operated by Brush Wellman for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The preliminary radiological survey included: a surface gamma scan of part of the property outdoors, collection of surface and subsurface soil samples, and collection of water samples. Laboratory analysis of soil samples showed concentrations of 226 Ra in excess of applicable DOE guidelines. A follow-up, detailed survey is recommended. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Hydrogeologic investigations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, W.L.; Trudeau, D.A.; Drellack, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site was established in 1950 as a continental area for testing nuclear devices and, since 1963, all nuclear detonations there have been underground. Most tests are conducted in vertical shafts with a small percentage conducted in tunnels. The majority of detonation points are above the water table, primarily in volcanic rocks or alluvium. In the testing areas the water table is 450--700 m below the surface. Pre- and post- event geologic investigations are conducted for each test location and long-term studies assess the impact of underground testing on a more regional scale. Studies in progress have not identified any impact on the regional ground water system from testing, but some local effects have been recognized. In some areas where several large tests have been conducted below the water table, water levels hundreds of meters above the regional water table have been measured and radioactivity has been discovered associated with fractures in a few holes. Flow-through and straddle packer testing has revealed unexpectedly high hydraulic pressures at depth. Recently, a multiple completion monitoring well installed to study three zones has confirmed the existence of a significant upward hydraulic gradient. These observations of local pressurization and fracture flow are being further explored to determine the influence of underground nuclear testing on the regional hydrogeologic system

  12. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R.

    1995-01-31

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

  13. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios

  14. An overview of background environmental radiological surveillance around Kudankulam nuclear power project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.P.; Vijayakumar, B.; George, Thomas; Rajan, P.S.; Rana, B.K.; Kumar, M.; Hegde, A.G.; Chougaonkar, M.P.

    2005-01-01

    A modern Environmental Survey Laboratory (ESL) equipped with state-of-art nuclear counting, chemical and ecological equipment's has been set up at Kudankulam at the very beginning of construction activities to carry out pre operational and baseline radioactivity measurements. Construction activities for the two VVER type 1000 MWe reactors at the site are progressing ahead of schedule and the first unit is slated to be critical in the year 2007. This paper presents the results of environmental radiological surveillance carried out for the last one year in Kudankulam environs. General radiation background in the area varies in the range of 0.1 - 0.7 μGy/h and elevated levels as high as 20 μGy/h are noticed in beach areas. The major contribution to the background radiation in high background areas comes from 232 Th and its daughter products. The concentrations of 40 K are of normal order and comparable to other NPP sites and normal background areas. The concentrations of fallout nuclides are very low and are at global fallout levels. (author)

  15. Extension of academic pediatric radiology to the community setting: experience in two sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecklund, K.; Share, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Children are better served by radiologists and technical personnel trained in the care of pediatric patients. However, a variety of obstacles may limit the access of children to dedicated pediatric imaging facilities. Objective. We designed and implemented two models for providing community-based imaging by academic pediatric radiologists. Materials and methods. The first site was an outpatient clinic staffed by physicians from the university-affiliated children's hospital. Imaging services included radiography, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound. The second site was a full-service community hospital radiology department staffed by a group practice, with pediatric imaging covered by the children's hospital radiologists. Facility, equipment, and protocol modifications were required to maintain quality standards. Success of these models was determined by volume statistics, referring physician/patient satisfaction surveys, and quality-assurance (QA) programs. Results. The outpatient satellite had a 48 % increase in total examinations from the first year to the second year and 87 % the third year. Pediatric examinations in the community hospital increased over 1000 % the first 7 months. Referring physicians reported increased diagnostic information and patient satisfaction compared to previous service. QA efforts revealed improved image quality when pediatric radiologists were present, but some continuing difficulties off-hours. Conclusion. We successfully implemented pediatric imaging programs in previously underserved communities. This resulted in increased pediatric radiologist supervision and interpretation of examinations performed on children and improved referring physician and patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  16. Extension of academic pediatric radiology to the community setting: experience in two sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecklund, K.; Share, J.C. [Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-01-01

    Background. Children are better served by radiologists and technical personnel trained in the care of pediatric patients. However, a variety of obstacles may limit the access of children to dedicated pediatric imaging facilities. Objective. We designed and implemented two models for providing community-based imaging by academic pediatric radiologists. Materials and methods. The first site was an outpatient clinic staffed by physicians from the university-affiliated children's hospital. Imaging services included radiography, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound. The second site was a full-service community hospital radiology department staffed by a group practice, with pediatric imaging covered by the children's hospital radiologists. Facility, equipment, and protocol modifications were required to maintain quality standards. Success of these models was determined by volume statistics, referring physician/patient satisfaction surveys, and quality-assurance (QA) programs. Results. The outpatient satellite had a 48 % increase in total examinations from the first year to the second year and 87 % the third year. Pediatric examinations in the community hospital increased over 1000 % the first 7 months. Referring physicians reported increased diagnostic information and patient satisfaction compared to previous service. QA efforts revealed improved image quality when pediatric radiologists were present, but some continuing difficulties off-hours. Conclusion. We successfully implemented pediatric imaging programs in previously underserved communities. This resulted in increased pediatric radiologist supervision and interpretation of examinations performed on children and improved referring physician and patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  17. Estimating risk at a Superfund site contaminated with radiological and chemical wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temeshy, A.; Liedle, J.M.; Sims, L.M.; Efird, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the method and results for estimating carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic effects at a Superfund site that is radiologically and chemically contaminated. Risk to receptors from disposal of waste in soil and resulting contamination of groundwater, air, surface water, and sediment is quantified. Specific risk assessment components which are addressed are the exposure assessment, toxicity assessment, and the resulting risk characterization. In the exposure assessment, potential exposure pathways are identified using waste disposal inventory information for soil and modeled information for other media. Models are used to calculate future radionuclide concentrations in groundwater, soil, surface water and air. Chemical exposure concentrations are quantified using site characterization data. Models are used to determine concentrations of chemicals in surface water and in air. Toxicity parameters used to quantify the dose-response relationship associated with the carcinogenic contaminants are slope factors and with noncarcinogenic contaminants are reference doses. In the risk characterization step, results from the exposure assessment and toxicity assessment are summarized and integrated into quantitative risk estimates for carcinogens and hazard induces for noncarcinogens. Calculated risks for carcinogenic contaminants are compared with EPA's target risk range. At WAG 6, the risk from radionuclides and chemicals for an on-WAG homesteader exceeds EPA's target risk range. Hazard indices are compared to unity for noncarcinogenic contaminants. At WAG 6, the total pathway hazard index for the on-WAG homesteader exceeds unity

  18. An automated radiological survey method for performing site remediation and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handy, R.G.; Bolch, W.E.; Harder, G.F.; Tolaymat, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable, computer-based method of performing environmental monitoring and assessment for site remediation and decommissioning has been developed. The integrated system has been developed to provide for survey time reductions and real-time data analysis. The technique utilizes a notebook 486 computer with the necessary hardware and software components that makes it possible to be used in an almost unlimited number of environmental monitoring and assessment scenarios. The results from a pilot, open-quotes hide-and-seekclose quotes gamma survey and an actual alpha decontamination survey were elucidated. It was found that a open-quotes hide-and-seekclose quotes survey could come up with timely and accurate conclusions about the position of the source. The use of the automated system in a Th-232 alpha survey resulted in a reduction in the standard time necessary to do a radiological survey. In addition, the ability to analyze the data on-site allowed for identification and location of areas which needed further decontamination. Finally, a discussion on possible future improvements and field conclusions was made

  19. Radiological protection guidelines for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The need for a definitive basis for radiological guidelines and criteria for FUSRAP became apparent by 1981 and led ORO to sponsor a joint ANL/BNI/LANL/ORO effort under the chairmanship of Wayne Hansen (LANL) that resulted in a final FUSRAP radiological guidelines document in March 1983. A separate effort to develop guidelines for remedial action criteria for SFMP was in progress at PNL. The need to coordinate both efforts with impending revisions of DOE Radiological Protection Standards and impending new developments in EPA and NRC Radiological Protection Standards led to convening of the first DOE Workshop on Remedial Action Criteria in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in February 1984, followed by a second workshop in June 1984 at ANL. The major decisions were to base the criteria on dosimetry models and basic limits currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, to emphasize the development and use of site-specific rather than generic guidelines and criteria for residual radionuclide concentrations in the ground, and to prepare a manual to accompany the guidelines that would present procedures and tables for deriving site-specific soil guidelines and criteria for the remedial action programs. A joint ANL/LANL/ORNL/PNL effort to prepare a definitive set of guidelines and a manual has been initiated. The scope, status, and current plans for this effort, and some of the key issues, are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  20. Radiological protection guidelines for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and remote Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a definitive basis for radiological guidelines and criteria for FUSRAP became apparent by 1981 and led ORO to sponsor a joint ANL/BNI/LANL/ORO effort under the chairmanship of Wayne Hansen (LANL) that resulted in a final FUSRAP radiological guidelines document in March 1983. A separate effort to develop guidelines for remedial action criteria for SFMP was in progress at PNL. The need to coordinate both efforts with impending revisions of DOE Radiological Protection Standards and impending new developments in EPA and NRC Radiological Protection Standards led to convening of the first DOE Workshop on Remedial Action Criteria in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in February 1984, followed by a second workshop in June 1984 at ANL. The major decisions were to base the criteria on dosimetry models and basic limits currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, to emphasize the development and use of site-specific rather than generic guidelines and criteria for residual radionuclide concentrations in the ground, and to prepare a manual to accompany the guidelines that would present procedures and tables for deriving site-specific soil guidelines and criteria for the remedial action programs. A joint ANL/LANL/ORNL/PNL effort to prepare a definitive set of guidelines and a manual has been initiated. The scope, status, and current plans for this effort, and some of the key issues, are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  1. Radiological Programs- Ambient Radon at the Yucca Mountain Site (SCPB:NA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRW

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the ambient radon monitoring activities conducted by the Radiological/Environmental Field Programs Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M and O), Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office. Overall, outdoor radon concentrations measured at the Yucca Mountain site were within the range of those reported for other areas in Nevada and the continental United States. Though there was some evidence of trends with time at some monitoring sites, regional atmospheric radon concentrations to date, do not appear to have changed significantly since the inception of site characterization activities. A preliminary dose assessment yielded an estimated annual effective dose equivalent of 134 mrem based on a continuous exposure to the average ambient radon concentration measured at the Yucca Mountain site. Concentrations were measured using two types of systems, passive electret ion chambers (EIC) and continuous radon monitors (CRM). The EICs produced time-averaged radon concentration data and the CRMs were used to study radon fluctuations over time. Between 1991 and 1995, the mean radon concentration at the site, as measured by EICs placed one meter above ground level, was 0.32 ± 0.15 pCi L -1 . Radon concentrations varied between monitoring locations and between years. Station NF38, located near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), exhibited the highest overall average radon concentration at 0.55 pCi L -1 (1992 to 1995). Concentrations appear to cycle diurnally, generally peaking in the early morning hours and being lowest in the afternoon. The data also suggested that radon concentrations may fluctuate seasonally. The work accomplished between 1991 and 1995, established radon levels in the general area surrounding Yucca Mountain. It is recommended that further work focus directly on those locations that have the greatest potential for influencing ambient radon levels

  2. Surface radiological investigations at the 0816 Site, Waste Area Grouping 13, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiner, P.F.; Uziel, M.S.

    1994-12-01

    A surface radiological investigation was conducted intermittently from July through September 1994 at the 0816 site, located within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 13. The survey was performed by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of ORNL Site Environmental Restoration Program Facility Management. The purpose of the survey was to ascertain and document the surface radiological condition of the site subsequent to remedial action activities completed in May 1994. The survey was designed to determine whether any residual surface sod contamination in excess of 120 pCi/g 137 Cs (Specified by the Interim Record of Decision) remained at the site

  3. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Programs conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this tenth combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations

  4. Nevada Test Site Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Grossman, R.F.

    2000-10-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring programs conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this eleventh combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations.

  5. Nevada Test Site Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Grossman, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring programs conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this eleventh combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations

  6. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1999-10-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Programs conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this tenth combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations.

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NTS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NTS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  8. Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1979-06-01

    Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs

  9. Sustainable land use planning at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Ridgway, R.B.; Baumann, P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The UK Department for International Development (DFID) has recently agreed to support a project to develop a participatory sustainable land use plan for areas affected by nuclear weapons testing at Semipalatinsk. This three year project is expected to be initiated in April 2001 and will form one component of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Semipalatinsk Rehabilitation Programme. The project will be undertaken by a combination of Kazakh organizations working with UK consultants and will meet its overall aim through the following main activities: Development of institutional capacity in data management and analysis; Provision of information and education on environmental contamination, hazards and risks; Development of a participatory land use planning process and piloting of the process in specific areas and communities around the test site; Integration of mineral resource extraction in the land planning process with a focus- on water resource and environmental protection and participatory approaches to resolving land use conflicts; Development of legislative tools to permit the implementation of environmental management of resource exploitation. The project will make use of both modern satellite-based imagery and more traditional methods to determine the potential for different land uses within the test site. The results obtained will be incorporated with additional information on land use. radiological and hydrological conditions at the test site through a geographical information system (GIS) provided by the project. The GIS will form the core component for collation and distribution of information on options available for use of different areas of the test site and its vicinity. A participatory rural appraisal, using tried and tested techniques, will identify local interest groups in land use planning and identify the details of their stake in the process. The groups will include owners-herders, employee-herders, and subsistence

  10. Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Verst, S.P.; Albin, C.L.; Patton, G.W.; Blanton, M.L.; Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.; Antonio, E.J.

    1998-09-01

    Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at the Hanford Site's retired 100-N Area reactor. Environmental samples were collected and analyzed for radiological contaminants ( 3 H, 90 Sr, and gamma/ emitters), with both the WDOH and SESP analyzing a portion of the samples. Samples of river water, sediment, riverbank springs, periphyton, milfoil, flying insects, clam shells, and reed canary grass were collected. External exposure rates were also measured for the near-shore environment in the vicinity of the 100-N Area. In addition, samples were collected at background locations above Vernita Bridge

  11. Guidelines for radiological performance assessment of DOE low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, M.J.; Otis, M.D.

    1988-07-01

    This document provides guidance for conducting radiological performance assessments of Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The guidance is specifically intended to provide the fundamental approach necessary to meet the performance assessment requirements. The document is written for LLW facility operators or other personnel who will manage the performance assessment task. The document is meant to provide guidance for conducting performance assessments in a generally consistent manner at all DOE LLW disposal facilities. The guidance includes a summary of performance objectives to be met by LLW disposal facilities (these objectives are derived from current DOE and other applicable federal regulatory guidelines); specific criteria for an adequate performance assessment and from which a minimum set of required calculations may be determined; recommendations of methods for screening critical components of the analysis system so that these components can be addressed in detail; recommendations for the selection of existing models and the development of site-specific models; recommendations of techniques for comparison of assessment results with performance objectives; and a summary of reporting requirements

  12. Rehabilitation of nuclear test site at Maralinga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, P.

    1997-01-01

    A program to rehabilitate contaminated areas at the Maralinga Nuclear Test Range in South Australia is being undertaken by the Australian Department of Primary Industries and Energy (DPIE). A major part of the program is directed at reducing the risk presented by the contaminated debris buried at Taranaki, Maralinga's most heavily contaminated site. The rehabilitation program is using the insitu vitrification technology developed for the US Department of Energy. The program is now in its third phase, involving the construction of the full-scale treatment plant. This will be completed later this year. The fourth and last phase will involve the treatment of the Taranaki pits. This will commence in 1998. Tests carried out so far indicated that the normalized leach rates for all oxides in the vitrified product were less than 0.1g/m 2 . ills

  13. Nevada test site water-supply wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, D.; Donithan, D.; Seaber, P.

    1996-05-01

    A total of 15 water-supply wells are currently being used at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of this report is to bring together the information gleaned from investigations of these water-supply wells. This report should serve as a reference on well construction and completion, static water levels, lithologic and hydrologic characteristics of aquifers penetrated, and general water quality of water-supply wells at the NTS. Possible sources for contamination of the water-supply wells are also evaluated. Existing wells and underground nuclear tests conducted near (within 25 meters (m)) or below the water table within 2 kilometers (km) of a water-supply were located and their hydrogeologic relationship to the water-supply well determined

  14. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 (as amended February 2008)). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. (1) CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; (2) CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); (3) CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; (4) CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; (5) CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; (6) CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; (7) CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; (8) CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; (9) CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; (10) CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; (11) CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; (12) CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; (13) CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; (14) CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and (15) CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107. CAU 107 closure activities will consist of verifying that the current postings required under Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835 are in place and implementing use restrictions (URs) at two sites, CAS 03-23-29 and CAS 18-23-02. The current radiological postings combined with the URs are adequate administrative controls to limit site access and worker dose

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison

  16. Implementation of a DOD ELAP Conforming Quality System at a FUSRAP Site Field Temporary Radiological Screening Laboratory - 13500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, M.S.; McElheny, G.; Houston, L.M.; Masset, M.R.; Spector, H.L.

    2013-01-01

    A case study is presented on specific program elements that supported the transition of a temporary field radiological screening lab to an accredited operation capable of meeting client quality objectives for definitive results data. The temporary field lab is located at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Linde Site in Tonawanda, NY. The site is undergoing remediation under the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, with Cabrera Services Inc. as the remediation contractor and operator of the on-site lab. Analysis methods employed in the on-site lab include gross counting of alpha and beta particle activity on swipes and air filters and gamma spectroscopy of soils and other solid samples. A discussion of key program elements and lessons learned may help other organizations considering pursuit of accreditation for on-site screening laboratories. (authors)

  17. GES [Ground Engineering System] test site preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, C.M.; Mahaffey, M.K.; Miller, W.C.; Schade, A.R.; Toyoda, K.G.

    1987-10-01

    Activities are under way at Hanford to convert the 309 containment building and its associated service wing to a nuclear test facility for the Ground Engineering System (GES) test. Conceptual design is about 80% complete, encompassing facility modifications, a secondary heat transport system, a large vacuum system, a test article cell and handing system, control and data handling systems, and safety andl auxiliary systems. The design makes extensive use of existing equipment to minimize technical risk and cost. Refurbishment of this equipment is 25% complete. Cleanout of some 1000 m 3 of equipment from the earlier reactor test in the facility is 85% complete. An Environmental Assessment was prepared and revised to incorporate Department of Energy (DOE) comments. It is now in the DOE approval chain, where a Finding of No Significant Impact is expected. During the next year, definite design will be well advanced, long-lead procurements will be initiated, construction planning will be completed, an operator training plan will be prepared, and the site (preliminary) safety analysis report will be drafted

  18. Bureau of radiological health compliance testing procedures for cabinet S-ray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.A.; Sprau, D.

    1976-01-01

    A manual has been developed by the Bureau of Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration to establish procedures for the routine field testing of cabinet x-ray systems to determine compliance with the Federal Performance Standard for Cabinet X-Ray Systems, 21 CFR 1020.40. The manual provides specific instructions for testing each model of cabinet x-ray system. Results from the inspection are recorded on a data from which is designed to permit automatic data processing

  19. Radiological risk from consuming fish and wildlife to Native Americans on the Hanford Site (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delistraty, Damon, E-mail: DDEL461@ecy.wa.gov [Washington State Department of Ecology, N. 4601 Monroe, Spokane, WA 99205-1295 (United States); Verst, Scott Van [Washington State Department of Health, Olympia, WA (United States); Rochette, Elizabeth A. [Washington State Department of Ecology, Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Historical operations at the Hanford Site (Washington State, USA) have released a wide array of non-radionuclide and radionuclide contaminants into the environment. As a result of stakeholder concerns, Native American exposure scenarios have been integrated into Hanford risk assessments. Because its contribution to radiological risk to Native Americans is culturally and geographically specific but quantitatively uncertain, a fish and wildlife ingestion pathway was examined in this study. Adult consumption rates were derived from 20 Native American scenarios (based on 12 studies) at Hanford, and tissue concentrations of key radionuclides in fish, game birds, and game mammals were compiled from the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) database for a recent time interval (1995-2007) during the post-operational period. It was assumed that skeletal muscle comprised 90% of intake, while other tissues accounted for the remainder. Acknowledging data gaps, median concentrations of eight radionuclides (i.e., Co-60, Cs-137, Sr-90, Tc-99, U-234, U-238, Pu-238, and Pu-239/240) in skeletal muscle and other tissues were below 0.01 and 1 pCi/g wet wt, respectively. These radionuclide concentrations were not significantly different (Bonferroni P>0.05) on and off the Hanford Site. Despite no observed difference between onsite and offsite tissue concentrations, radiation dose and risk were calculated for the fish and wildlife ingestion pathway using onsite data. With median consumption rates and radionuclide tissue concentrations, skeletal muscle provided 42% of the dose, while other tissues (primarily bone and carcass) accounted for 58%. In terms of biota, fish ingestion was the largest contributor to dose (64%). Among radionuclides, Sr-90 was dominant, accounting for 47% of the dose. At median intake and radionuclide levels, estimated annual dose (0.36 mrem/yr) was below a dose limit of 15 mrem/yr recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA

  20. Formerly utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the Pennsylvania Railroad Landfill Site, Burrell Township, Pennsylvnia. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    A radiological survey was conducted at the Pennsylvania Railroad Landfill Site in Burrell Township, Pennsylvania. In 1956 and 1957, approximately 11,600 tons of radioactive material was dumped at this site and was apparently scattered over an area of loss than 10 acres. The survey included measurement of the following: external gamma radiation at 1 m above the surface and at the surface throughout the site; beta--gamma dose rates at 1 cm from the surface throughout the site; concentrations of 226 Ra and 238 U in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, and 238 U in subsurface water on the site and in surface water on and near the site; and the extent of atmospheric transport of 222 Rn and progeny from the site. The general location of the residues transported to the site, except possibly small, scattered quantities of materials, was determined from the survey. In some areas on the site, beta--gamma dose rates of 1 cm from the surface were above pertinent guidelines.Analyses of sediment from water samples taken from drainage areas near the site indicate that some radioactive material is being carried from the site by surface run-off. Results of this survey indicate that there is no significant atmospheric transport of 222 Rn from the site

  1. Feasibility study to combine the evaluation of radiological and chemical-toxicological effects of old contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Proehl, G.

    1997-01-01

    The uranium mining regions of the German Federal States Saxony, Thuringia and Saxony-Anhalt are contaminated by radionuclides and by chemical substances. For both, ionizing radiations and chemicals, concepts and models exists to assess possible health effects for the population living in such areas. However, these assessment models were developed independently for both kinds of contaminants. Therefore, the 9 th Conference of the State Ministers for Environmental Protection have claimed that for the evaluation of contaminated sites the radiological and chemical contaminants should be integrated into a joint assessment. This feasibility study describes the state of the art of the concepts and models used for the evaluation of radiological and chemical contaminants. The similarities and differences of these evaluation methods are identified and discussed. Suggestions are made for an integrated assessment to standardize the evaluation of sites contaminated by radionuclides or chemicals. (orig.) [de

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River Site TNX facility and surrounding area, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 3.8-square-kilometer (1.5-square-mile) area, centered on the Savannah River Site (SRS) TNX facility. The survey was flown on July 25, 1986, prior to the Steel Creek Corridor survey. Radiological measurements were used to determine the extent of man-made radionuclides in the TNX area. This survey area had been covered during previous site surveys of the Savannah River Floodplain. Higher than typical levels of thorium-232 daughters were detected in the survey area just west of the TNX facility. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of this and other SRS areas. 5 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  3. An assessment of the radiological impact of sea-dumping at the North East Atlantic dump site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delow, C.E.; Mobbs, S.F.; Hill, M.D.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes the models and methodology developed for the assessment of the radiological impact of disposal of low and intermediate level waste on the seabed. The development of the waste package model and the combined model of radionuclide dispersion and interactions with sediments in the world's ocean is outlined. This integrated set of models was used for the radiological assessment of sea dumping at the North-East Atlantic site, which formed part of the recent NEA review of the continued suitability of this site. The predicted radiation doses to man are presented, together with the results of the analysis of the sensitivity of the annual individual doses to critical groups to variations in model parameters. (author)

  4. Prospective radiological dose assessment. Amersham plc (Amersham site) variation application December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allott, R.

    2001-01-01

    Amersham plc (previously Nycomed-Amersham plc) submitted an application to the Environment Agency in December 1998 for a variation to their radioactive waste discharge authorisations granted under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993. The application requested a reduction in the discharge limits for certain radionuclides and no change for the remaining radionuclides. Amersham plc undertook a further review of their discharge requirements and submitted a new assessment for revised limits in January 2001. This report provides an assessment of the radiological implications of discharges at these revised limits requested by Amersham plc and the limits proposed by the Agency. It has been prepared by the National Compliance Assessment Service at the request of Thames Region to support their determination of the application. Four candidate critical groups were identified who could be exposed to discharges from the Amersham site: 1) Sewage workers at the Maple Lodge sewage works who might be exposed to external radiation from discharges contained within sewage and inadvertently inhale or ingest sewage. 2) Anglers on the Grand Union Canal who eat a small proportion of their annual catch of freshwater fish, who drink water abstracted solely from the River Colne and eat vegetables irrigated by water from the canal. 3) Persons living closest to site who eat locally produced food. 4) Dog walkers living near to site who eat locally produced food. For continuous discharges at the Agency's proposed annual limits, the highest dose of 160 μSv/y is predicted to be received by infants who live closest to the site and eat locally produced food. Therefore, this has been identified as the critical group. Children and adults living at the same location and eating locally produced food receive doses of 140 μSv/y and 130 μSv/y respectively. The critical group dose is less than the source constraint of 300 μSv/y. The dose is dominated by direct radiation from the site (110 μSv/y) and the

  5. Monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin; Suivi de l'impact radiologique environnemental des activites du site AREVA du Tricastin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercat, C.; Brun, F.; Florens, P.; Petit, J. [AREVA NC Pierrelatte, Direction surete environnement du site du Tricastin, 26 (France); Garnier, F. [EURODIF Production, Direction qualite securite surete environnement, 26 (France); Devin, P. [AREVA NC Pierrelatte, Direction surete, sante, securite, environnement, 26 (France)

    2010-06-15

    Set up at the beginning of the site's operations, in 1962, the monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin has evolved over time to meet more specifically the multiple objectives of environmental monitoring: to prove the respect of the commitments required by the authorities, to be able to detect a dysfunction in the observed levels, to enable the assessment of impacts of industrial activities, to ensure the balance between environmental quality and the use made by the local population and to inform the public of the radiological state of the environment. Thousands of data were acquired on the radioactivity of all environmental compartments as well as on the functioning of local ecosystems. Today, the Network of Environmental Monitoring of AREVA Tricastin goes beyond the requirements of routine monitoring to provide innovative solutions for monitoring the radioactivity (especially for uranium) in the environment. (author)

  6. Report on the pre-operational environmental radiological and micrometeorological studies around Kaiga Atomic Power Project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the results of preoperational environmental radiological and micro- meteorological studies carried out during the year 1992, 1993, 1995, 1998 and 1999. Baseline radioactivity levels in Kaiga environment originating from 137 Cs, 90 Sr and natural radionuclides are given. Micro-meteorological data includes that from SODAR, tower and surface instruments. The data is compared with that observed at other NPP Sites in the country. (author)

  7. Radiological Assessment for the Removal of Legacy BPA Power Lines that Cross the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millsap, William J.; Brush, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses some radiological field monitoring and assessment methods used to assess the components of an old electrical power transmission line that ran across the Hanford Site between the production reactors area (100 Area) and the chemical processing area (200 Area). This task was complicated by the presence of radon daughters -- both beta and alpha emitters -- residing on the surfaces, particularly on the surfaces of weathered metals and metals that had been electrically-charged. In many cases, these activities were high compared to the DOE Surface Contamination Guidelines, which were used as guides for the assessment. These methods included the use of the Toulmin model of argument, represented using Toulmin diagrams, to represent the combined force of several strands of evidences, rather than a single measurement of activity, to demonstrate beyond a reasonable doubt that no or very little Hanford activity was present and mixed with the natural activity. A number of forms of evidence were used: the overall chance of Hanford contamination; measurements of removable activity, beta and alpha; 1-minute scaler counts of total surface activity, beta and alpha, using 'background makers'; the beta activity to alpha activity ratios; measured contamination on nearby components; NaI gamma spectral measurements to compare uncontaminated and potentially-contaminated spectra, as well as measurements for the sentinel radionuclides, Am- 241 and Cs-137 on conducting wire; comparative statistical analyses; and in-situ measurements of alpha spectra on conducting wire showing that the alpha activity was natural Po-210, as well as to compare uncontaminated and potentially-contaminated spectra

  8. Radiological Assessment for the Removal of Legacy BPA Power Lines that Cross the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millsap, William J.; Brush, Daniel J.

    2013-11-13

    This paper discusses some radiological field monitoring and assessment methods used to assess the components of an old electrical power transmission line that ran across the Hanford Site between the production reactors area (100 Area) and the chemical processing area (200 Area). This task was complicated by the presence of radon daughters -- both beta and alpha emitters -- residing on the surfaces, particularly on the surfaces of weathered metals and metals that had been electrically-charged. In many cases, these activities were high compared to the DOE Surface Contamination Guidelines, which were used as guides for the assessment. These methods included the use of the Toulmin model of argument, represented using Toulmin diagrams, to represent the combined force of several strands of evidences, rather than a single measurement of activity, to demonstrate beyond a reasonable doubt that no or very little Hanford activity was present and mixed with the natural activity. A number of forms of evidence were used: the overall chance of Hanford contamination; measurements of removable activity, beta and alpha; 1-minute scaler counts of total surface activity, beta and alpha, using "background makers"; the beta activity to alpha activity ratios; measured contamination on nearby components; NaI gamma spectral measurements to compare uncontaminated and potentially-contaminated spectra, as well as measurements for the sentinel radionuclides, Am- 241 and Cs-137 on conducting wire; comparative statistical analyses; and in-situ measurements of alpha spectra on conducting wire showing that the alpha activity was natural Po-210, as well as to compare uncontaminated and potentially-contaminated spectra.

  9. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document

  10. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

  11. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  12. Radiological walkover survey at the site of the world's first nuclear reactor using the NAVSTAR global positioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.; Barry, C.; Efird, C.

    1994-01-01

    A radiological walkover survey was conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) in the spring of 1994 at Site A, the site of the world's first nuclear reactor pilot plant facility. The objective of this survey was to provide comprehensive information regarding surface radiation levels to support identification and documentation of unknown contaminated areas and selection of future sample locations, and provide information for health and safety coverage during field investigations. The technique used represented a new application integrating the radiation measuring instrumentation with the global positioning system (GPS) in real-time differential mode. The integrated mapping and radiation survey system (MARSS) developed by J.S. Bland Associates, Inc. (JSB) simultaneously recorded direct radiation, exposure rate, and position data. Site A is in the Palos Forest Preserve, about 20 miles southwest of downtown Chicago, Illinois. The topography of the site is relatively flat (usually less than 5 % grade), with a maximum grade of 10%. Prior to the survey, the site was staked on 100-ft. centers and roughly 75% of the site was cleared of dense vegetation including trees less than 6 in. in diameter. The survey covered approximately 2 acres each day, including background determinations, source checks, calibrations, and downloading of integrated position data and radiological measurements

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting

  14. Population distribution around the Nevada Test Site, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Coogan, J.S.

    1984-08-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory (EMSL-LV) conducts an offsite radiological safety program outside the boundaries of the Nevada Test Site. As part of this program, the EMSL-LV maintains a comprehensive and current listing of all rural offsite residents and dairy animals within the controllable sectors (areas where the EMSL-LV could implement protective or remedial actions that would assure public safety). This report was produced to give a brief overview of the population distribution and information on the activities within the controllable sectors. Obviously the numbers of people in a sector change dependent upon the season of the year, and such diverse information as the price of minerals which relates to the opening and closing of mining operations. Currently, the controllable sectors out to 200 kilometers from the Control Point on the NTS are considered to be the entire northeast, north-northeast, north, north-northwest, west-northwest sectors and portions of the east and east-northeast sectors. The west-southwest and south-southwest sections are considered controllable out to 40 to 80 kilometers. No major population centers or dairy farms lie within these sectors. 7 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  15. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  16. Resettlement of Bikini Atoll U.S. Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.; Stoker, A.C.; Hamilton, T.F.

    1999-01-01

    The US conducted a nuclear testing program at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands from 1946 through 1958. Several atolls, including Bikini, were contaminated as a result of the nuclear detonations. Since 1974 the authors have conducted an extensive research and monitoring program to determine the radiological conditions at the atolls, identify the critical radionuclides and pathways, estimate the radiological dose to current or resettling populations, and develop remedial measures to reduce the dose to atoll populations. This paper describes exposure pathways and radionuclides; composition of atoll soils; radionuclide transport and dose estimates; remedial measures; and reduction in dose from a combined option

  17. Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. The use of computer decision-making support systems to justify address rehabilitation of the Semipalatinsk test site area

    OpenAIRE

    Viktoria V. Zaets; Alexey V. Panov

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the development of a range of optimal protective measures for remediation of the territory of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. The computer system for decision-making support, ReSCA, was employed for the estimations. Costs and radiological effectiveness of countermeasures were evaluated.

  19. The use of computer decision-making support systems to justify address rehabilitation of the Semipalatinsk test site area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria V. Zaets

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the development of a range of optimal protective measures for remediation of the territory of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. The computer system for decision-making support, ReSCA, was employed for the estimations. Costs and radiological effectiveness of countermeasures were evaluated.

  20. Testing the ecological site group concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2016 “Ecological Sites for Landscape Management” special issue of Rangelands recommended an update to our thinking of Ecological Sites, suggesting that in our desire to make Ecological Sites more quantitative, we abandoned consideration of Ecological Sites’ spatial context. In response, Ecologic...

  1. BCLDP site environmental report for calendar year 1997 on radiological and nonradiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, J.

    1998-01-01

    Battelle Memorial Institute currently maintains its retired nuclear research facilities in a surveillance and maintenance (S and M) mode and continues decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities. The activities are referred to as the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP). Operations reference in this report are performed in support of S and M and D and D activities. The majority of this report is devoted to discussion of the West Jefferson facility, because the source term at this facility is larger than the source term at Battelle's King Avenue site. The contamination found at the King Avenue site consists of small amounts of residual radioactive material in solid form, which has become embedded or captured in nearby surfaces such as walls, floors, ceilings, drains, laboratory equipment, and soils. By the end of calendar year (CY) 1997, most remediation activities were completed at the King Avenue site. The contamination found at the West Jefferson site is the result of research and development activities with irradiated materials. During CY 1997, multiple tests at the West Jefferson Nuclear Sciences Area found no isotopes present above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for air releases or for liquid discharges to Big Darby Creek. Data obtained from downstream sampling locations were statistically indistinguishable from background levels

  2. Using SAFRAN Software to Assess Radiological Hazards from Dismantling of Tammuz-2 Reactor Core at Al-tuwaitha Nuclear Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed Gatea, Mezher; Ahmed, Anwar A.; jundee kadhum, Saad; Ali, Hasan Mohammed; Hussein Muheisn, Abbas

    2018-05-01

    The Safety Assessment Framework (SAFRAN) software has implemented here for radiological safety analysis; to verify that the dose acceptance criteria and safety goals are met with a high degree of confidence for dismantling of Tammuz-2 reactor core at Al-tuwaitha nuclear site. The activities characterizing, dismantling and packaging were practiced to manage the generated radioactive waste. Dose to the worker was considered an endpoint-scenario while dose to the public has neglected due to that Tammuz-2 facility is located in a restricted zone and 30m berm surrounded Al-tuwaitha site. Safety assessment for dismantling worker endpoint-scenario based on maximum external dose at component position level in the reactor pool and internal dose via airborne activity while, for characterizing and packaging worker endpoints scenarios have been done via external dose only because no evidence for airborne radioactivity hazards outside the reactor pool. The in-situ measurements approved that reactor core components are radiologically activated by Co-60 radioisotope. SAFRAN results showed that the maximum received dose for workers are (1.85, 0.64 and 1.3mSv/y) for activities dismantling, characterizing and packaging of reactor core components respectively. Hence, the radiological hazards remain below the low level hazard and within the acceptable annual dose for workers in radiation field

  3. Results of the radiological and beryllium verification survey at the Peek Street Site, Schenectady, New York (SY001V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.; Carrier, R.F.; Allred, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent verification radiological and non-radioactive beryllium survey at the Peek Street site, located at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York. The purpose of the survey, conducted during 1993 and continuing through January 1994, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any beryllium concentrations or radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the structure, and the collection of soil, dust and debris samples and smears for radionuclide and beryllium analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological and beryllium measurements on the property were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on all data collected, the industrial property at 425 Peek Street and the adjacent state-owned bike path in Schenectady, New York, conforms to all applicable radiological and non-radioactive beryllium guidelines established for this site by DOE and approved by the State of New York

  4. A study on the food consumption rates for off-site radiological dose assessment around Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gab Bock; Chung, Yang Geun

    2008-01-01

    The internal dose by food consumption mostly accounts for radiological dose of public around Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). But, food consumption rates applied to off-site dose calculation in Korea which are the result of field investigation around Kori NPP by the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) in 1988, are not able to reflect the latest dietary characteristics of Korean. The food consumption rates to be used for radiological dose assessment in Korea are based on the maximum individual of US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) Regulatory Guide 1.109. However, the representative individual of the critical group is considered in the recent ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) recommendation and European nations' practice. Therefore, the study on the re-establishment of the food consumption rates for individual around nuclear power plant sites in Korea was carried out to reflect on the recent change of the Korean dietary characteristics and to apply the representative individual of critical group to domestic regulations. The ministry of Health and Welfare Affairs has investigated the food and nutrition of nations every 3 years based on the Law of National Health Improvement. The statistical data such as mean, standard deviation, various percentile values about food consumption rates to be used for the representative individual of the critical group were analyzed by using the raw data of the national food consumption survey in 2001∼2002. Also, the food consumption rates for maximum individual are re-estimated

  5. Environmental assessment for double tracks test site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), with appropriate approvals from the U.S. Air Force (USAF), proposes to conduct environmental restoration operations at the Double Tracks test site located on the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in Nye County, Nevada. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the potential environmental consequences of four alternative actions for conducting the restoration operation and of the no action alternative. The EA also identifies mitigation measures, where appropriate, designed to protect natural and cultural resources and reduce impacts to human health and safety. The environmental restoration operation at the Double Tracks test site would serve two primary objectives. First, the proposed work would evaluate the effectiveness of future restoration operations involving contamination over larger areas. The project would implement remediation technology options and evaluate how these technologies could be applied to the larger areas of contaminated soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), and the NAFR. Second, the remediation would provide for the removal of plutonium contamination down to or below a predetermined level which would require cleanup of 1 hectare (ha) (2.5 acres), for the most likely case, or up to 3.0 ha (7.4 acres) of contaminated soil, for the upper bounding case

  6. Interpreting Results from the Standardized UXO Test Sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    May, Michael; Tuley, Michael

    2007-01-01

    ...) and the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESCTP) to complete a detailed analysis of the results of testing carried out at the Standardized Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) Test Sites...

  7. Radiation exposures from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, G M

    1958-12-01

    A summary of the pertinent data on radiation exposures from nuclear tests in Nevada is presented. The data are presented in categories of external ..gamma.. radiation, activity concentrations in air, and activity concentrations in water. Methods used to estimate exposure and to evaluate data are described. The data are tabulated. The maximum external exposure was 7 to 8 r for 15 persons involved. In terms of relatively large populations, the average exposure for the 1,000,000 people living nearest the site was at the rate of 1/2 r/30 yr. The highest concentration of fallout activity in the air was about 1.3 ..mu..c/m/sup 3/ averaged over the 30 hr that the activity was present in significant quantities. The highest concentration of fallout activity in a potential drinking water supply was about 1.4 x 10/sup -/ ..mu..c/me extrapolated to D + 3 days. Evaluation of these data is given.

  8. Nevada Test Site Site Treatment Plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Treatment Plans (STPS) are required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy (DOE) or stores mixed waste, defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. On April 6, 1993, DOE published a Federal Register notice (58 FR 17875) describing its proposed process for developing the STPs in three phases including a Conceptual, a Draft, and a Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). All of the DOE Nevada Operations Office STP iterations have been developed with the state of Nevada's input. The options and schedules reflect a ''bottoms-up'' approach and have been evaluated for impacts on other DOE sites, as well as impacts to the overall DOE program. Changes may have occurred in the preferred option and associated schedules between the PSTP, which was submitted to the state of Nevada and US Environmental Protection Agency April 1995, and the Final STP (hereafter referred to as the STP) as treatment evaluations progressed. The STP includes changes that have occurred since the submittal of the PSTP as a result of state-to-state and DOE-to-state discussions

  9. Preparation, Conduct and Evaluation of Exercises to Test Preparedness for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical tool for the preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part the functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning the methodologies, techniques and available results of research on such emergencies. To ensure effective response to radiation emergencies when needed, provisions should be made for regular training of emergency response personnel. As stated in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Safety Requirements, Safety Standard Series No. GS-R-2), 'The operator and the response organizations shall make arrangements for the selection of personnel and training to ensure that the personnel have the requisite knowledge, skills, abilities, equipment, procedures and other arrangements to perform their assigned response functions'. A further requirement is that 'Exercise programmes shall be conducted to ensure that all specified functions required to be performed for emergency response and all organizational interfaces for facilities in threat category I, II or III and the national level programmes for threat category IV or V are tested at suitable intervals'. In 2004 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(48)/RES/10 encouraged Member States to 'implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency'. This document is published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. It was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, the exercise structure, terms and scenarios must be

  10. Nevada Test Site, site treatment plan 1999 annual update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFC Act) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFC Act Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996, and revised June 15, 1998. The FFC Act CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP

  11. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  12. The use of Leeds Test Objects in the assessment of the performance of radiological imaging systems: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Over the preceding decade the Leeds Radiological Imaging Group have developed a range of test objects with which to assess the performance of radiological imaging systems. The types of imaging equipment which can be assessed include X-ray image intensifier television systems, small-format 100mm/105mm fluorography systems and radiographic screen-film combinations. We have recently extended our interest to the evaluation of digital radiological imaging equipment including digital subtraction fluorography and digital (greyscale) radiographic imaging systems. These test objects were initially developed for the purpose of evaluating imaging performance under laboratory conditions but they have also proved useful under field (clinical) conditions. (author)

  13. Cleanup Summary Report for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Fiscal Year 2007, Task 6.7, U12u-Tunnel (Legacy Site), Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This letter serves as notice of completion for cleanup of the U12u-Tunnel (Legacy Site) as specified in the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Fiscal Year 2007 Statement of Work, Task 6.7. The U12u-Tunnel Legacy Site is located near the intersection of the U12u-Tunnel access road and the U12n-Tunnel access road in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (see Figure 1). The site encompasses 1.2 acres and was used to store miscellaneous mining equipment and materials that were used to support DTRA testing in Area 12. Field activities commenced February 11, 2008, and were completed February 20, 2008. Radiological surveys were performed on a drill jumbo and all material stored at the site. The drill jumbo was relocated to U12p-Tunnel portal and consolidated with other critical mining equipment for future use or storage. Ten truck loads of solid waste (53 tons) were shipped to the Nevada Test Site, Area 9 U10c Sanitary Landfill for disposal. No hazardous or radiological waste was generated at this site

  14. Radiological characteristics and radiation protection requirements in the remediation of uranium mining and milling sites in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, L.; Szerbin, P.; Lendvai, Z.; Csoevari, M.; Benkovics, I.; Varhegyi, A.

    2002-01-01

    After more than 35 years of operation the uranium mining and milling facilities located near the city of Pecs in the south of Hungary were finally shut down by the end of 1997. Appropriate strategies and complex plans have been prepared for the implementation of remedial action. The main principle involved in the planning of site restoration work is the application of a step-by-step approach, taking into account local conditions in the given area to the maximum extent possible. As every site considered for restoration has its own particular specifications, different solutions are, in effect, needed for each individual mining and milling site. Due to the lack of approved national regulations, a written authorisation must be obtained in relation to specific issues affecting remedial action. The radiological requirements affecting both the reuse and restoration of affected areas call for the establishment of radiation limits. (orig.)

  15. Structural geology report: Spent Fuel Test - Climax Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.; Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    We performed underground mapping and core logging in the Climax Stock, a granitic intrusive at the Nevada Test Site, as part of a major field test to determine the feasibility of using granitic or crystalline rock for the underground storage of spent fuel from a nuclear reactor. This mapping and logging identified more than 2500 fractures, over 1500 of which were described in enough detail to allow statistical analyses and orientation studies to be performed. We identified eight joint sets, three major shear sets, and a fault zone within the Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) portion of the Stock. Joint sets identified within the SFT-C and elsewhere in the Stock correlated well. The orientations of joint sets identified by other investigators were consistent with our findings, indicating that the joint sets are persistent and have a relatively uniform orientation throughout a major portion of the Stock. The one joint set not seen elsewhere in the Stock is healed and the wall rock is altered, implying that healed joints were not included in the mapping criteria used by other investigators. The shear sets were distinguished from the joint sets by virtue of crushed minerals, continuous clay infilling, and other evidences of shearing, and from faults by the lack of offsetting. Previous investigators working mainly in the Pile Driver Drifts identified two of the shear sets. The third set, being nearly parallel to these Drifts had not been identified previously. The fault zone identified at the far (Receiving Room) end of the project is oriented approximately N45 0 E-75 0 SE, similar to both the Boundary and Shaft Station Faults. We have, therefore, concluded that the Receiving Room Fault is one of a series of normal faults that occur within the Climax Stock and that are possibly related, in both age and genesis, to the Boundary Fault. 52 refs., 26 figs., 11 tabs

  16. Scenarios of radiological impacts in the long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste disposal at the Vector Site located in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybalka, N.; Mykolaichuk, O. [State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Alekseeva, Z.; Kondratiev, S.; Nikolaev, E. [State Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    In Ukraine, at the Vector site in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, it is planned to dispose of large amounts of radioactive wastes, including those of Chernobyl origin, containing transuranium elements. The paper analyzes the main possible scenarios of radiological impacts of the Vector site for a long-term period after expiration of its active administrative control taking into account location of the Vector site in the exclusion zone. In the paper, assessment of total activities that can be disposed of on site is demonstrated, based on non-exceeding of admissible radiological impacts. (orig.)

  17. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Hungary - first experiences in acceptance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubszky, T.; Pellet, S.; Ballay, L.; Talian, L.; Giczi, F.

    2003-01-01

    It is a general experience that optimum imaging with minimum patient doses, moreover, the safe operation and long life of X-ray equipment can be assured by regular measurement of technical parameters and checking of their constancy (routine performance testing) only. These tests are generally known as quality control, while together with the so-called corrective actions and its management it is called (physical-technical) quality assurance (QA). In the European Union, Directive 97/43/EURATOM about radiation protection of patients requires - among others - the good practice of (physical-technical) quality assurance. In Hungary, Decree No. 31/2001. (X.3.) of the Minister of Health harmonizes all of its requirements. Acceptance testing of new diagnostic X-ray equipment is assigned to NPHC-NRIRR. QA has been a daily practice in radiation therapy and nuclear medicine for a long time. A National Patient Dose Assessment Programme has also successfully run since 1989. We had, however, only few preliminaries in QA in diagnostic radiology in the second half of the eighties. Nowadays there are running QA programmes in some hospitals and mammography centres. he testing activity of our institute is independent from manufacturers, it is run within the frame of an accredited testing laboratory, using calibrated measuring instruments and based on valid international standards. So the started way of implementing QA in diagnostic radiology needs a lot of further efforts, adapting experiences of other countries, and also some financial help to reach an acceptable level in the EU. (authors)

  18. Multiple Site Damage in Flat Panel Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shrage, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    This report aimed to experimentally verify analytical models that predict the residual strength of representative aircraft structures, such as wide panels, that are subjected to Multiple Site Damage (MSD...

  19. Leaching studies of low-level waste as input to radiological assessment at the Drigg disposal site, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulton, J.; Rushbrook, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    Over the period of operation of the low-level waste disposal site at Drigg in Cumbria, several radiological assessments have been carried out. This paper discusses data requirements for such an assessment and in particular describes a project to measure the leaching behaviour of wastes. This project, jointly set up by the staff of BNFL and Environmental Safety Centre at Harwell, began in 1985. The objectives were to determine the processes operating within the waste disposal trenches at Drigg and conditions affecting them. The paper describes the installation and operation of the first of a series of lysimeters designed to simulate conditions in current trenches. (author)

  20. Radiological pathways analysis for spent solvents from the boiler chemical cleaning at the Pickering Nuclear Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, N.C.; Eslami, Z.; Hodgins, S.; Beaman, T.; Von Svoboda, S.; Marczak, J.

    2006-01-01

    Spent solvents are generated as a result of Boiler Chemical Cleanings (BCC) at CANDU reactor sites. These solutions contain small amount of radioactivity from a number of different sources including: Cut tubes - short sections of boiler tubes are infrequently removed from the boilers for a detailed characterization. These tubes are typically only plugged at the tubesheet allowing the primary side deposits to be exposed to BCC solvents. Tube leaks - primary to secondary side leaks also occur infrequently as a result of tube degradation. Radioactivity from the leaking fluid can consequently be deposited in the sludge on the secondary side of the tubes. Diffusion of tritium - during normal operation of the reactor units, tritium slowly diffuses from the heavy water in the primary heat-transfer system to the light-water coolant on the secondary side. Some of this tritium is retained in the secondary side deposits. The Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) would like the flexibility to have several options for handling the spent solvent waste and associated rinse water from BCC. To this end, a radiological pathways analysis was undertaken to determine dose consequences associated with each option. Sample results from this study are included in this paper. The pathways analysis is used in this study to calculate dose to hypothetical receptors including individuals such as truck drivers, incinerator workers, residue (ash) handlers, residents who live near the landfill, inadvertent intruders into the landfill after closure and residents who live near the outfall. This dose is compared to a de minimis dose. A de minimis dose or dose rate represents a level of risk, which is generally accepted as being of no significance. Shipments of spent solvents and rinse water with corresponding doses below de minimis can be sent to conventional (i.e., non-radioactive) landfills for incineration and disposal as the radioactive dose associated with them is much less than natural

  1. Modified TCLP test for evaluating the leachability of site-specific wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pier, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) has developed a site-specific test to assess the leachability of wastes that will be placed in its on-site disposal cell. This test is modelled after the TCLP, but examines an expanded list of parameters and uses an extraction solution that is representative of conditions that are expected to exist in the disposal facility. Following the same logic that guided development of TCLP protocols, the WSSRAP developed concentration guidelines for non-TCLP parameters that were contaminants of concern in its wastes. Response actions, specific to the WSSRAP cell and wastes, were also developed to address constituents that failed to meet these guides. From 1955 to 1966, the US Atomic Energy Commission operated a uranium feed materials plant on this site. Nitroaromatic, and later, radiological wastes were disposed of in the quarry from 1945 until 1970. This paper describes testing to determine whether contaminant concentrations in leachates derived from the major waste-types that will be placed in its on-site disposal cell conform with the Department of Energy's (DOE) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy. Although the WSSRAP will continue to use the TCLP test to determine if any waste is classified RCRA-hazardous, the site-specific test described in this paper will be used to further assess whether leachate from any waste-type has the potential to adversely impact groundwater

  2. The environmental restoration in the management of radiological accidents with off site consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, C.; Montero, M.; Moraleda, M.; Diaz, J.; Claver, F.; Valles, O.; Rodriguez, N.; Gutierrez, J.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological accidents are among the potential cases of environmental contamination that could have consequences on the health of the population. These accidents, associated with an increase in the level of radiological exposure surpassing the natural background, have been investigated in greater depth than other conventional accidents. This investigation has included the evaluation of their probability, magnitude and consequences in order to establish safety norms. Nevertheless, the social perception of this type of risk appears to be disproportionately high. The development of a comprehensible and adequate standardized system for the evaluation of the radiological risk and the applicability of corrective actions to reduce this type of risk at local level, will undoubtedly contribute to increase the public confidence in the advised options for the restoration of environments contaminated with the long lived radionuclides. This system should consider the local specificity of each contaminated place, and take into account the associated unwanted consequences for each option. This paper presents the first results of a system to help the decision makers in the quantitative evaluation of the radiological risk produced by long lived radionuclides Cs 137, Cs 134 and Sr 90 spread over urban, agricultural and semi-natural environments and the applicable options to reduce it. The evaluation of these applicable options is made considering the reduction of dose that can be reached, the monetary costs and the significant associated secondary effects if there are any. All these factors are integrated for a time period depending on the half-life of the contaminants and on their strength and distribution on the scenario when intervention is being planned. (authors)

  3. Field testing a soil site field guide for Allegheny hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.B. Jones

    1991-01-01

    A site quality evaluation decision model, developed for Allegheny hardwoods on the non-glaciated Allegheny Plateau of Pennsylvania and New York, was field tested by International Paper (IP) foresters and the author, on sites within the region of derivation and on glaciated sites north and west of the Wisconsin drift line. Results from the field testing are presented...

  4. Supplementary radiological measurements at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site, 1976--1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.L.; Montgomery, D.M.; Kolde, H.E.; Gels, G.L.

    1978-09-01

    Evaporator effluents were investigated further to better define quantities of radionuclides discharged to the atmosphere and improve decontamination factors assigned to the principal radionuclides observed in the evaporator feed: 3 H, 14 C, 60 Co, 137 Cs, 238 Pu, and 239 Pu. On-site measurements included soil sample profiles taken to a maximum depth of 3.5 m from the trench area and from within the main washes east and south of the site. These measurements provided additional information on the near-surface lateral movement of radioactivity. Radiochemical analysis of a test-well sample showed that all measurable radioactivity was associated with the sediment in the well and the highest specific radioactivity was associated with the smaller particles (< 5 μm). Milk and vegetables were again sampled from a number of nearby farms. As previously reported, tritium was the only radionuclide measured in these foods above ambient levels, although concentrations were less than in similar samples collected during the earlier study. 4 figures, 17 tables

  5. Geochemical and radiological characterization of soils from former radium processing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, E R

    1984-02-01

    Soil samples were collected from former radium processing sites in Denver, CO, and East Orange, NJ. Particle-size separations and radiochemical analyses of selected samples showed that while the greatest contents of both 226Ra and U were generally found in the finest (less than 45 micron) fraction, the pattern was not always of progressive increase in radionuclide content with decreasing particle size. Leaching tests on these samples showed a large portion of the 226Ra and U to be soluble in dilute hydrochloric acid. Radon-emanation coefficients measured for bulk samples of contaminated soil were about 20%. Recovery of residual uranium and vanadium, as an adjunct to any remedial action program, appears unlikely due to economic considerations.

  6. Preliminary radiological readings on the old uraniferous mining site of Rophin (Puy-de-Dome); Releves radiologiques preliminaires sur l'ancien site minier uranifere de Rophin (Puy de Dome)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2012-05-02

    After a presentation of the site, of the objectives, limits and methodology of the measurement campaign, this document reports and comments the radiological measurements performed by the CRIIRAD on the old uranium mining site of Rophin and its surroundings (gamma radiation). It comments measurements performed 1 meter above the ground and on soils, and anomalies clearly related to past industrial activities. It comments the results of a radiological analysis performed on released waters (uranium 238, radon 222), and on sediments and soils

  7. Occupational safety and health textbook for radiological personnel employed in structural material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, J.

    1981-01-01

    The comprehensive textbook for X-ray and radiological testing personnel includes requirements and rules of occupational safety and health on the basis of Hungarian and international (mainly German) literature. In the chapter Fundamentals, X-ray and radioactive radiations, their measurements and biological effects, doses etc are described. In the chapter Occupational safety and health, the jobs representing radiation hazards are listed and safety regulations for them are reported. Finally, information for prevention and first aid is presented. Control questions are added to each part. The Appendix contains safety standards and regulations, information on legal aspects of safety and radiation protection as well as recommendations. (Sz.J.)

  8. Low cost phantom for computed radiology; Objeto de teste de baixo custo para radiologia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travassos, Paulo Cesar B.; Magalhaes, Luis Alexandre G., E-mail: pctravassos@ufrj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IBRGA/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Augusto, Fernando M.; Sant' Yves, Thalis L.A.; Goncalves, Elicardo A.S. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Botelho, Marina A. [Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    This article presents the results obtained from a low cost phantom, used to analyze Computed Radiology (CR) equipment. The phantom was constructed to test a few parameters related to image quality, as described in [1-9]. Materials which can be easily purchased were used in the construction of the phantom, with total cost of approximately U$100.00. A bar pattern was placed only to verify the efficacy of the grids in the spatial resolution determination, and was not included in the budget because the data was acquired from the grids. (author)

  9. Interim report on flash floods, Area 5 - Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Examination of the presently available data indicates that consideration must be given to the possibility of flash floods when siting waste management facilities in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site. 6 figures, 7 tables

  10. Optimizing Travel Time to Outpatient Interventional Radiology Procedures in a Multi-Site Hospital System Using a Google Maps Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob E; Morel-Ovalle, Louis; Boas, Franz E; Ziv, Etay; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Deipolyi, Amy; Mohabir, Heeralall R; Erinjeri, Joseph P

    2018-02-20

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a custom Google Maps application can optimize site selection when scheduling outpatient interventional radiology (IR) procedures within a multi-site hospital system. The Google Maps for Business Application Programming Interface (API) was used to develop an internal web application that uses real-time traffic data to determine estimated travel time (ETT; minutes) and estimated travel distance (ETD; miles) from a patient's home to each a nearby IR facility in our hospital system. Hypothetical patient home addresses based on the 33 cities comprising our institution's catchment area were used to determine the optimal IR site for hypothetical patients traveling from each city based on real-time traffic conditions. For 10/33 (30%) cities, there was discordance between the optimal IR site based on ETT and the optimal IR site based on ETD at non-rush hour time or rush hour time. By choosing to travel to an IR site based on ETT rather than ETD, patients from discordant cities were predicted to save an average of 7.29 min during non-rush hour (p = 0.03), and 28.80 min during rush hour (p travel time when more than one location providing IR procedures is available within the same hospital system.

  11. Testing Pearl Model In Three European Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouraoui, F.; Bidoglio, G.

    The Plant Protection Product Directive (91/414/EEC) stresses the need of validated models to calculate predicted environmental concentrations. The use of models has become an unavoidable step before pesticide registration. In this context, European Commission, and in particular DGVI, set up a FOrum for the Co-ordination of pes- ticide fate models and their USe (FOCUS). In a complementary effort, DG research supported the APECOP project, with one of its objective being the validation and im- provement of existing pesticide fate models. The main topic of research presented here is the validation of the PEARL model for different sites in Europe. The PEARL model, actually used in the Dutch pesticide registration procedure, was validated in three well- instrumented sites: Vredepeel (the Netherlands), Brimstone (UK), and Lanna (Swe- den). A step-wise procedure was used for the validation of the PEARL model. First the water transport module was calibrated, and then the solute transport module, using tracer measurements keeping unchanged the water transport parameters. The Vrede- peel site is characterised by a sandy soil. Fourteen months of measurements were used for the calibration. Two pesticides were applied on the site: bentazone and etho- prophos. PEARL predictions were very satisfactory for both soil moisture content, and pesticide concentration in the soil profile. The Brimstone site is characterised by a cracking clay soil. The calibration was conducted on a time series measurement of 7 years. The validation consisted in comparing predictions and measurement of soil moisture at different soil depths, and in comparing the predicted and measured con- centration of isoproturon in the drainage water. The results, even if in good agreement with the measuremens, highlighted the limitation of the model when the preferential flow becomes a dominant process. PEARL did not reproduce well soil moisture pro- file during summer months, and also under-predicted the arrival of

  12. Radiological guidelines for application to DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. [FUSRAP sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-03-01

    The US Department of Energy has implemented a program to evaluate and, where necessary, take action to protect the public from contamination at sites that were used in the past to process and/or store radioactive materials for the former US Army Corps of Engineers Manhattan Engineer District or the US Atomic Energy Commission. The program is identified as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This document describes methods considered appropriate for the evaluation of health effects that might possible be caused by radioactive contamination at FUSRAP sites. This assessment methodology is applied to a typical site for the purposeof deriving guidelines for the cleanup of contaminated soil. Additional guidance is provided for planning site-specific remedial action that is consistent with the overall objectives of FUSRAP.

  13. Safety Assessment Document for the Spent Reactor Fuel Geologic Storage Test in the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Spent Fuel Geologic Storage Test in the Climax Granite Stock is to evaluate the response of a granitic rock mass to the underground storage of encapsulated spent reactor fuel in a geometry that simulates a module of a large-scale geologic repository. This document reports an assessment of the safety of conducting this test. Descriptions are provided of the geography, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology of the Climax Site; the effects of postulated natural phenomena and other activities at the nevada Test Site on the safety of the test; and the design and operation of the test facility and associated equipment. Evaluations are made of both the radiological and nonradiological impacts of normal operations, abnormal operations, and postulated accidents. It is concluded that conduct of the spent fuel test at the Climax Site will not result in any undue risk to the public, property, environment, or site employees

  14. Radio-ecological characterization and radiological assessment in support of regulatory supervision of legacy sites in northwest Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, M K; Kiselev, M; Shandala, N K

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory cooperation program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective has been the enhancement of safety culture and includes a special focus on regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites. The initial project outputs included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous situations and activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision. In turn, this has led to the development of new and updated norms and standards, and related regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at legacy sites. This paper presents the experience gained within the above program with regard to radio-ecological characterization of Sites of Temporary Storage for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha in the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia. Such characterization is necessary to support assessments of the current radiological situation and to support prospective assessments of its evolution. Both types of assessments contribute to regulatory supervision of the sites. Accordingly, they include assessments to support development of regulatory standards and guidance concerning: control of radiation exposures to workers during remediation operations; emergency preparedness and response; planned radionuclide releases to the environment; development of site restoration plans, and waste treatment and disposal. Examples of characterization work are presented which relate to terrestrial and marine environments at Andreeva Bay. The use of this data in assessments is illustrated by means of the visualization and assessment tool (DATAMAP) developed as part of the regulatory cooperation program, specifically to help control radiation exposure in operations and to support

  15. Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRIGMON, ROBINL.

    2004-06-07

    In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may

  16. A mobile radiological laboratory for rapid response to off-site radiation emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoch, D. S.; Sharma, R. C.; Mehta, D. J.; Raj, V. Venkat [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2002-07-01

    A mobile radiological laboratory (MRL) has been designed and developed primarily for providing a rapid response to radiation emergencies arising as a consequence of nuclear and/or radiological accidents. It is equipped specifically to monitor the environment and provide quick assessment of radiological hazards to the population living within a radius of 30 km around a nuclear facility. In this paper, various design features of an Indian MRL together with the details of installed equipment are presented. The MRL has been designed for a continuous outdoor operation of about two weeks. It is built on a 10.70 m long air suspension Bus Chassis and has four sections : Driver's Cabin, Main Counting Laboratory, Whole Body Monitor and Rear section housing general utilities. The electric power is provided by two diesel generators during field operation and by 230 V AC mains supply at headquarters and wherever possible. The equipment installed in the MRL includes : Alpha, beta and gamma counting systems and low and high volume air samplers for the assessment of radioactive contents in the samples of air, water, soil and vegetation; environment dose rate meters and a variety of survey meters for evaluating any potential increase in radiation levels; personal dosimeters to control external radiation exposure; personal protective equipment for avoiding skin and clothing contamination; a chair type of whole body monitor for the assessment of internal radioactive contamination of the human body, in particular, thyroidal uptake of radioiodine; an automatic weather station for recording continuously the meteorological parameters and a satellite based global positioning system to continuously track and display the geographical location of the MRL. The calibrations of the installed equipment are presently in progress. Preliminary results obtained for the methods needed for rapid detection of gamma emitters in the environment and human body, namely, in situ gamma spectrometry and

  17. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

  18. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  19. Assessment of the radiological impact of gamma and radon dose rates at former U mining sites in Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lespukh, E.; Stegnar, P.; Yunusov, M.; Tilloboev, H.; Zyazev, G.; Kayukov, P.; Hosseini, A.; Strømman, G.; Salbu, B.

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to gamma radiation, radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) was carried out at former uranium (U) mining and processing sites in Taboshar and at Digmai in Tajikistan. Gamma dose rate measurements were made using various field instruments. 222 Rn/ 220 Rn measurements were carried out with field instruments for instantaneous measurements and then discriminative 222 Rn/ 220 Rn solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were used for longer representative measurements. The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time in different outdoor and indoor public and residential environments at the selected U legacy sites. The results showed that gamma, 222 Rn and 220 Rn doses were in general low, which consequently implies a low to relatively low radiological risk. The radiation doses deriving from external radiation (gamma dose rate), indoor 222 Rn and 220 Rn with their short-lived progenies did not exceed national or international standards. At none of the sites investigated did the average individual annual effective doses exceed 10 mSv, the recommended threshold value for the general public. A radiation hazard could be associated with exceptional situations, such as elevated exposures to ionizing radiation at the Digmai tailings site and/or in industrial facilities, where gamma and 222 Rn/ 220 Rn dose rates could reach values of several 10 mSv/a. Current doses of ionizing radiation do not represent a hazard to the health of the resident public, with the exception of some specific situations. These issues should be adequately addressed to further reduce needless exposure of the resident public to ionizing radiation

  20. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Repackaging at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Sanza, E.F.; Pyles, G.; Ciucci, J.; Arnold, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the activities required to modify a facility and the process of characterizing, repackaging, and preparing for shipment the Nevada Test Site's (NTS) legacy transuranic (TRU) waste in 58 oversize boxes (OSB). The waste, generated at other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and shipped to the NTS between 1974 and 1990, requires size-reduction for off-site shipment and disposal. The waste processing approach was tailored to reduce the volume of TRU waste by employing decontamination and non-destructive assay. As a result, the low-level waste (LLW) generated by this process was packaged, with minimal size reduction, in large sea-land containers for disposal at the NTS Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The remaining TRU waste was repackaged and sent to the Idaho National Laboratory Consolidation Site for additional characterization in preparation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the NTS Management and Operating (M and O) contractor, NSTec, successfully partnered to modify and upgrade an existing facility, the Visual Examination and Repackaging Building (VERB). The VERB modifications, including a new ventilation system and modified containment structure, required an approved Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis prior to project procurement and construction. Upgrade of the VERB from a radiological facility to a Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility required new rigor in the design and construction areas and was executed on an aggressive schedule. The facility Documented Safety Analysis required that OSBs be vented prior to introduction into the VERB. Box venting was safely completed after developing and implementing two types of custom venting systems for the heavy gauge box construction. A remotely operated punching process was used on boxes with wall thickness of up to 3.05 mm (0.120 in) to insert aluminum

  1. Radio-ecological characterization and radiological assessment in support of regulatory supervision of legacy sites in northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, M.K.; Kiselev, M.; Shandala, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory cooperation program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective has been the enhancement of safety culture and includes a special focus on regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites. The initial project outputs included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous situations and activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision. In turn, this has led to the development of new and updated norms and standards, and related regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at legacy sites. This paper presents the experience gained within the above program with regard to radio-ecological characterization of Sites of Temporary Storage for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha in the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia. Such characterization is necessary to support assessments of the current radiological situation and to support prospective assessments of its evolution. Both types of assessments contribute to regulatory supervision of the sites. Accordingly, they include assessments to support development of regulatory standards and guidance concerning: control of radiation exposures to workers during remediation operations; emergency preparedness and response; planned radionuclide releases to the environment; development of site restoration plans, and waste treatment and disposal. Examples of characterization work are presented which relate to terrestrial and marine environments at Andreeva Bay. The use of this data in assessments is illustrated by means of the visualization and assessment tool (DATAMAP) developed as part of the regulatory cooperation program, specifically to help control radiation exposure in operations and to support

  2. Assessment of diffusion tensor image quality across sites and vendors using the American College of Radiology head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyue J; Seo, Youngseob; Babcock, Evelyn; Huang, Hao; Bluml, Stefan; Wisnowski, Jessica; Holshouser, Barbara; Panigrahy, Ashok; Shaw, Dennis W W; Altman, Nolan; McColl, Roderick W; Rollins, Nancy K

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of assessing quality of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) from multiple sites and vendors using American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. Participating sites (Siemens (n = 2), GE (n= 2), and Philips (n = 4)) reached consensus on parameters for DTI and used the widely available ACR phantom. Tensor data were processed at one site. B0 and eddy current distortions were assessed using grid line displacement on phantom Slice 5; signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured at the center and periphery of the b = 0 image; fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed using phantom Slice 7. Variations of acquisition parameters and deviations from specified sequence parameters were recorded. Nonlinear grid line distortion was higher with linear shimming and could be corrected using the 2nd order shimming. Following image registration, eddy current distortion was consistently smaller than acquisi-tion voxel size. SNR was consistently higher in the image periphery than center by a factor of 1.3-2.0. ROI-based FA ranged from 0.007 to 0.024. ROI-based MD ranged from 1.90 × 10-3 to 2.33 × 10-3 mm2/s (median = 2.04 × 10-3 mm2/s). Two sites had image void artifacts. The ACR phantom can be used to compare key qual-ity measures of diffusion images acquired from multiple vendors at multiple sites.

  3. Investigation of possible methods for equipment self-tests in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Idris, H. H. E.; Jansen, J. T. M.

    2005-01-01

    Quality control in digital radiology can be time-consuming. Equipment self-tests may significantly decrease staff workload. The two most essential parameters for radiology systems are image quality and patient dose. Concerning patient dose, information on the dose-area product (DAP) values generally forms the basis for assessment of patient dose. DAP-values can be measured using a transmission ionisation chamber or calculated from equipment settings. In the present study, various image quality parameters were derived using a contrast-detail (C-D) phantom. The investigation included a computer-aided assessment of C-D images, which produced various parameters, and also parameters based upon scoring by human observers. In addition, another parameter was calculated from modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements. The automatically calculated parameters showed good correlation with human readings, although the number of X-ray systems studied is still limited. We propose a combined evaluation of DAP and automatically calculated C-D or MTF parameters for equipment self-tests. (authors)

  4. Uranium mining and milling sites in Argentina: environmental radiological monitoring (1980-1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, A.M.; Gomez, J.C.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental radiological monitoring in the vicinity of uranium mining and milling plants in Argentina is performed on a routine basis, in order to assess the possibility of significant environmental contamination due to uranium mill wastes and mill tailings of plants still operating or those where the exploitation have concluded. Dissolved natural uranium and 226 Ra concentrations in surface waters are measured in samples taken from rivers near the mills, according to a special monitoring plan set up for each facility. In addition, 222 Rn emanation rates from ore tailings are measured at times. In this paper the environmental radiological monitoring program results obtained for the 1980-1994 period are shown. From the data analyses it can be concluded that there are not significant differences for the concentrations of the radionuclides of interest, between the surface water samples taken from river location above and below the plants discharge points. Besides, no significant exposure results for the population living in the surrounding areas due to the uranium mining and milling plants operation or their wastes. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs

  5. Feedback on the radiological management of a urban site contaminated with tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leprieur, F.; Pierrard, O. [Institut de radioportection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN (France)

    2014-07-01

    of tritium measurements obtained at the end of each campaign. Feedback: This unusual incident, classified as level 2 on the INES scale, led to activate the IRSN technical crisis Center to handle referrals and manage relationships with the CEA and the authorities. He also mobilized many teams of the institute to manage in parallel both health and environmental aspects. Capacity for mobilization of the IRSN has been tested in situ during the first days following the discovery of the contamination. Following this event, the IRSN has improved its equipment able to measure tritium directly in laboratories trucks at low level. If this technical response seemed necessary in the early hours, feedback has demonstrate that it was also important to be available to answer local authorities and the public without trivializing this event despite its negligible health impact. The psycho-social dimension of the incident and its consequences for residents in 2013 still require a presence of IRSN on the field. Finally, the involvement of stakeholders and the public information was one of the main lessons related to the management of a contaminated urban site. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey [SM Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2012-02-26

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program: Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    CAU 107, ''Low Impact Soil Sites'', consists of 15 CASs in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the NTS. The closure alternatives included No Further Action and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. This CR provides a summary of completed closure activities. ROTC Justification: The FFACO UR as published in the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2009) states that the UR for CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky), was implemented for assumed radioactive contamination that could cause a dose greater that 25 millirems per year. This document further clarifies that this was based on particulate releases of radionuclides identified in Radiological Effluents Released from U.S. Continental Tests, 1961 through 1992 (DOE/NV, 1996). The radionuclides listed in this document are krypton (Kr)-85, Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, rubidium (Rb)-87, strontium (Sr)-89, Sr-91, yttrium (Y)-91, iodine (I)-131, I-132, I-133, I-134, I-135, xeon (Xe)-133, Xe-135, Xe-138, cesium (Cs)-135, Cs-138, barium (Ba)-139, and Ba-140.

  8. Radiological investigations at the 'Taiga' nuclear explosion site: Site description and in situ measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramzaev, V., E-mail: V.Ramzaev@mail.ru [Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira str. 8, 197101 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Repin, V.; Medvedev, A.; Khramtsov, E.; Timofeeva, M.; Yakovlev, V. [Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira str. 8, 197101 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    In the summer of 2009, we performed a field survey of the 'Taiga' peaceful underground nuclear explosion site, the Perm region, Russia (61.30{sup o} N, 56.60{sup o} E). The explosion was carried out by the USSR in 1971. This paper provides an extended summary of the available published data on the 'Taiga' experiment. A detailed description of the site is illustrated by original aerial and ground-level photos. A large artificial lake (700 m long and 350 m wide) currently occupies the central area of the experimental site. The ground lip surrounding the lake is covered by a newly grown mixed forest. In situ measurements, performed in August 2009, revealed elevated levels of the {gamma}-ray dose rate in air on the banks of the lake 'Taiga'. Two hot spots were detected on the eastern bank of the lake. The excess of the {gamma}-ray radiation is attributable to the man-made radionuclides {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs. The current external {gamma}-ray dose rate to a human from the contaminations associated with the 'Taiga' experiment was between 9 and 70 {mu}Sv per week. Periodic monitoring the site is recommended. - Highlights: > We studied a radiation anomaly at the 'Taiga' underground nuclear explosion site. > The anomaly currently has an area of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. > The excess of {gamma}-ray radiation at the site is mainly attributable to {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs. > The external effective dose may currently exceed the negligible value of 10 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}.

  9. Application of an internet web-site of medical images in tele-radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weizhong; Wang Hua; Xie Jingxia; Wang Songzhang; Li Xiangdong; Qian Min; Cao Huixia

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To build and Internet web-site of medical images for tele-education and tele-consultation. Methods: Collecting medical images of cases that fulfilled diagnostic standards for teaching and were pathologically proved. The images were digitized using digital camera and scanner. Frontpage 98, Homesite 2.5 and text editors were used for programming. Results: The web site encompasses many useful cases and was update every week. With smart and friendly interface, easy used navigation, the site runs reliably in TCP/IP environment. The site's URL is http://imager.163.net. At present, the site has received about 100 visits per week. Conclusion: The well-designed and programmed internet web site of medical images would be easily acceptable and is going to play an important role in tele-education and tele-consultation

  10. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  11. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  12. Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System siren testing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, L.B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effective coverage of the proposed upgrades to the existing Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System (HSEAS). The upgrades are to enhance the existing HSEAS along the Columbia River from the Vernita Bridge to the White Bluffs Boat Launch as well as install a new alerting system in the 400 Area on the Hanford Site. Five siren sites along the Columbia River and two sites in the 400 Area were tested to determine the site locations that will provide the desired coverage

  13. HIV/AIDS testing sites and locator services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The HIV Testing Sites & Care Services Locator is a first-of-its-kind, location-based search tool that allows you to search for testing services, housing...

  14. Quality control test solutions for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and health physics with PTW equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froescher, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In 1922 PTW-Freiburg was founded to produce and market a revolutionary new electromechanical component for measuring very small electrical charges. Today PTW is the specialist and one of the global market leaders for manufacturing and supplying high-quality products in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy and health physics. The quality control of X-ray images is influenced by a number of parameters. To maintain a consistent performance of X-ray installations, quality checks have to be conducted regularly. PTW offers a variety of diagnostic test tools for different X-ray devices, and therefore to reduce patient exposure and costs for X-ray departments. PTW's 'Code of Practice' defines in an easy and compact way how to perform quality control measurements on different diagnostic X-ray installations. The necessary equipment for measuring main parameters as well as acceptable limits are mentioned accordingly. The 'Code of Practice' bases on actual standards.

  15. Assessment of the Nevada Test Site as a Site for Distributed Resource Testing and Project Plan: March 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horgan, S.; Iannucci, J.; Whitaker, C.; Cibulka, L.; Erdman, W.

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a location for performing dedicated, in-depth testing of distributed resources (DR) integrated with the electric distribution system. In this large scale testing, it is desired to operate multiple DRs and loads in an actual operating environment, in a series of controlled tests to concentrate on issues of interest to the DR community. This report includes an inventory of existing facilities at NTS, an assessment of site attributes in relation to DR testing requirements, and an evaluation of the feasibility and cost of upgrades to the site that would make it a fully qualified DR testing facility.

  16. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Harshaw Chemical Company, Cleveland, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    During the MED/AEC era, the Harshaw Chemical Company processed large quantities of normal uranium to produce both oxide and fluoride compounds. This work was done under contract to MED and its successor, AEC. Records indicated that at the time the AEC contract was terminated, the facility was decontaminated by Harshaw and released from AEC control in 1960. However, a search of AEC records indicated that documentation was insufficient to determine whether the decontamination work was adequate by current guidelines. Hence, a radiological assessment of the site ws initiated in 1976. The entire grounds and all buildings were surveyed using surface survey instruments to detect surface contamination and radiation detectors to determine general radiation levels. Extensive surface contamination was found throughout the site. While the major contamination was found in Plant C, significant levels of contamination also were found in 16 other buildings and at 32 exterior locations. The contaminating material seemed to be normal uranium exclusively. Air samples were taken at numerous indoor locations throughout the site, but no elevated levels of radon were detected. This was as expected since normal uranium has been separated from radium and hence radon levels are very low. Several soil samples were taken from around the site. Analyses of these samples indicated extensive soil contamination, as well as suspected contamination of the river bed in the vicinity of the plant outfall. Scheduled subsurface investigation of the site, as well as of the river bed and sewer system, have not been conducted. Levels of contamination at this site are significantly above guidelines for release of the site for unrestricted use. 57 figures, 7 tables

  17. Buildings radiological characterization report for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes radiological characterization data on the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant (WSCP) buildings gathered as part of five previous investigations, and provides a consistent will be used to support future feasibility studies which will determine the best available technologies for ultimate disposition of the buildings and associated equipment. At present no structure or piece of equipment can be released from the WSCP for unrestricted use without further radiation measurements being performed. A final group of equipment and building components contains surface radioactivity levels in excess of DOE guidelines; this group, usually found in buildings housing uranium and/or thorium processing equipment, will require decontamination and comprehensive scanning in order to be considered for unrestricted use release. 9 refs., 44 tabs

  18. New method for presenting off-site radiological monitoring data during emergency preparedness exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Hickey, E.E.; Jamison, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    As scenarios for exercises become more complicated and flexible to challenge emergency response personnel, improved means of presenting data must be developed to meet this need. To provide maximum realism and free play during an exercise, staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have recently devised a simple method of presenting realistic radiological field monitoring information for a range of possible releases. The method utilizes only two pieces of paper. The first is a map of the offsite area showing the shape of the plume for the duration of the exercise. The second is a semi-log graph containing curves relating exposure rate and iodine concentration to downwind distance and time. Several techniques are used to maximize the information on the graph

  19. Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) considers underground nuclear detonations with yields of one megaton or less, along with the preparations necessary for such detonations. The testing activities considered also include other continuing and intermittent activities, both nuclear and nonnuclear, which can best be conducted in the remote and controlled area of the Nevada Test Site. These activities are listed, with emphasis on weapons testing programs which do not remain static

  20. Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) considers underground nuclear detonations with yields of one megaton or less, along with the preparations necessary for such detonations. The testing activities considered also include other continuing and intermittent activities, both nuclear and nonnuclear, which can best be conducted in the remote and controlled area of the Nevada Test Site. These activities are listed, with emphasis on weapons testing programs which do not remain static.

  1. Semipalatinsk nuclear test site: History of building and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergazina, G.M.; Balmukhanov, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    A vast materials on history of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site creation and it building and function are presented. Authors with big reliability report one page of Kazakhstan's history. In steppe on naked place thousands of soldiers and officers, construct and military specialists have built the nuclear site on which during 40 years were conducting nuclear tests . Prolonged chronic radiation on population living near by site results to tragedy which is confessed by General Assembly of United Nations. In the book aspects of test site conversion and rehabilitation of injured population are considered. The book consists of introduction, three chapters and conclusion. The book is intended to wide circle of readers. (author)

  2. On-site cell field test support program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  3. Social problems on Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepnin, Yu.S.; Zhdanov, N.A.; Tumenova, B.N.

    2000-01-01

    In the report main stages of National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan activity in the field of scientific information obtain about consequences of conducted nuclear tests, radioecological and medical and biological researches, restoration of natural environment and people's health in Republic of Kazakhstan are reflected. Chronicle and results of joint works within frameworks of international programs in these field are given as well. Analysis of up-to-date social problems of population of the region is carried out

  4. A comparison of four aerial radiological surveys of Par Pond and the surrounding area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1993-09-01

    A series of gamma radiation surveys was conducted over Par Pond at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in August 1993, October 1991, and August 1992 as part of an effort to monitor the radiological changes around Par Pond as its water level was lowered. The results of an April 1989 survey, which was about one-half the area of those surveys listed above, were used as baseline data for the comparison. Gamma energy spectrum analysis revealed that the only man-made gamma ray emitter detected during the four surveys in the Par Pond area was cesium-137. The comparisons revealed that: (1) significant change in the radiological environment occurred along the Par Pond shoreline as the water levels were lowered, (2) the activity in Lower Three Runs Creek varied slightly as the level/flow rate changed during the pumping process, (3) minor changes occurred in areas adjacent to the Par Pond, and (4) little or no change occurred between surveys in the spatial distribution or kind of sources detected. All changes were directly related to the moisture variations (Par Pond water lowering, rainfall, waterway flow rates) between the survey periods. The distribution, kind, and activity of sources detected beyond the pond bed were consistent between surveys. 60 figs., 14 tabs

  5. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report Supporting Radiological Air Surveillance Monitoring for the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Thomas Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report documents the Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site ambient air surveillance program. The development of the DQOs was based on the seven-step process recommended “for systematic planning to generate performance and acceptance criteria for collecting environmental data” (EPA 2006). The process helped to determine the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to meet current regulatory requirements and to follow U.S. Department of Energy guidance for environmental surveillance air monitoring design. It also considered the current air monitoring program that has existed at INL Site since the 1950s. The development of the DQOs involved the application of the atmospheric dispersion model CALPUFF to identify likely contamination dispersion patterns at and around the INL Site using site-specific meteorological data. Model simulations were used to quantitatively assess the probable frequency of detection of airborne radionuclides released by INL Site facilities using existing and proposed air monitors.

  6. Radiological guidelines for application to DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The US Department of Energy has implemented a program to evaluate and, where necessary, take action to protect the public from contamination at sites that were used in the past to process and/or store radioactive materials for the former US Army Corps of Engineers Manhattan Engineer District or the US Atomic Energy Commission. The program is identified as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This document describes methods considered appropriate for the evaluation of health effects that might possible be caused by radioactive contamination at FUSRAP sites. This assessment methodology is applied to a typical site for the purposeof deriving guidelines for the cleanup of contaminated soil. Additional guidance is provided for planning site-specific remedial action that is consistent with the overall objectives of FUSRAP

  7. The Road Side Unit for the A270 Test Site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, I.; Driessen, B.J.F.; Heijligers, B.M.R.; Netten, B.D.; Schackmann, P.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design and implementation of the Road Side Unit for the A270 Test Site is presented. It consists of a sensor platform and V2I communication platform with full coverage of the test site. A service platform enables applications to make use of these facilities. The RSU will be used both for the

  8. Methods of Usability Testing in Libraries Web Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Fawzy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A Study about libraries' web sites evaluation, that is the Usability, the study talking about methods of usability testing and define it, and its important in web sites evaluation, then details the methods of usability: questionnaire, core groups, testing experimental model, cards arrangement, and composed evaluation.

  9. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  10. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological

  12. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS)

  13. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  14. Inappropriateness of cardiovascular radiological imaging testing; a tertiary care referral center study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Carpeggiani

    Full Text Available AIMS: Radiological inappropriateness in medical imaging leads to loss of resources and accumulation of avoidable population cancer risk. Aim of the study was to audit the appropriateness rate of different cardiac radiological examinations. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With a retrospective, observational study we reviewed clinical records of 818 consecutive patients (67 ± 12 years, 75% males admitted from January 1-May 31, 2010 to the National Research Council - Tuscany Region Gabriele Monasterio Foundation cardiology division. A total of 940 procedures were audited: 250 chest x-rays (CXR; 240 coronary computed tomographies (CCT; 250 coronary angiographies (CA; 200 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI. For each test, indications were rated on the basis of guidelines class of recommendation and level of evidence: definitely appropriate (A, including class I, appropriate, and class IIa, probably appropriate, uncertain (U, class IIb, probably inappropriate, or inappropriate (I, class III, definitely inappropriate. Appropriateness was suboptimal for all tests: CXR (A = 48%, U = 10%, I = 42%; CCT (A = 58%, U = 24%, I = 18%; CA (A = 45%, U = 25%, I = 30%; PCI (A = 63%, U = 15%, I = 22%. Top reasons for inappropriateness were: routine on hospital admission (70% of inappropriate CXR; first line application in asymptomatic low-risk patients (42% of CCT or in patients with unchanged clinical status post-revascularization (20% of CA; PCI in patients either asymptomatic or with miscellaneous symptoms and without inducible ischemia on non-invasive testing (36% of inappropriate PCI. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Public healthcare system--with universal access paid for with public money--is haemorrhaging significant resources and accumulating avoidable long-term cancer risk with inappropriate cardiovascular imaging prevention.

  15. Site descriptions for preliminary radiological assessments of low-level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, W.E.; Jones, C.H.; Sumerling, T.J.; Ashton, J.

    1988-07-01

    The environmental contexts of four sites, previously under investigation by UK Nirex Ltd. as potential locations for low-level waste disposal facilities, are described. Information on geographical setting, climate, surface hydrology, land use, agriculture, fisheries, geology and hydrogeology is presented. The geological and hydrogeological data are interpreted with the support of deterministic modelling of groundwater conditions. The routes by which radionuclides may migrate from the site are identified and reduced to 1D statistical descriptions suitable for use in probabilistic risk assessments. Additional data required to improve the assessment of the performance of the site are identified. (author)

  16. Ecological risk assessment for radiological and chemical contaminants at a site with historical contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, N.C.; Janes, A.; Peters, R.

    2010-01-01

    An Ecological Risk Assessment was carried out for a uranium conversion facility in Ontario, located on a site with a history of contamination. The ERA assessed risk to aquatic and terrestrial biota from exposure to radionuclides and non-radionuclides in soil and groundwater associated with the site. The results indicated no undue risk to aquatic biota from radionuclides. Small potential risks were identified for terrestrial biota at limited locations associated with this industrial site. Recommendations are provided for follow-up risk-informed activities. (author)

  17. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Appendix D, Addenda D1--D7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation foe the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Project Office, in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. the objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on-pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra-226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  18. Assessment of the natural radioactivity and its radiological hazards in prospective ore deposit sites in Southwestern Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ifeoluwa, O.P.; Obed, R.O. I.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of the natural radioactivity was conducted in three Southwestern states, Ekiti, Kogi and Kwara in Nigeria spanning over approximately a 9,000 km 2 on earmarked prospective ore deposits sites where thirty six (36) top soil samples were collected then taken to the laboratory for analysis so as to determine and deduce its radiological hazards and health implication prior to exploitation/exploration. The samples collected at 36 locations, mainly undisturbed and virgin lands could determine the annual effective dose (mSv.y -1 ) and the average absorbed dose (nGy/h) for a person living in the rural community along the axis and this was found to be approximately 0.114 mSvy -1 and 93.60±14.4 nGyh -1 respectively. Other health indices are drawn up in the tables found below.

  19. Radiological survey of the former Baker Brothers, Inc. site, 2551--2555 Harleau Place, Toledo, Ohio (BTO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at the REMS, Inc., and the Doug Beet Company, 2551-2555 Harleau Place, Toledo, Ohio (BTO001) in 1988. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U, as a result of work contracted to the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). The survey included gamma scans; directly measured alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; transferable contamination levels; and soil, dust, debris, and air sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey and sampling covered accessible portions of the exterior ground surface, roof, and interiors of buildings. Results of the surveys demonstrated four general areas having radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria for 238 U outdoors and as surface contamination on shelves in one building

  20. An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area, Central Nevada. Date of survey: December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site was conducted in December 1993. An interim report described survey procedures and presented terrestrial exposure rate and wide-area-averaged plutonium isopleth plots. This letter report presents additional plutonium plots and some rule-of-thumb calculations which should help the reader to properly interpret the data presented. Attached to this report are three isopleth plots produced from the Double Track data. No one processing method provides all the answers regarding a particular surveyed area. Where peak vales are most important, a figure created from the original unsmoothed data is the presentation of choice. A figure from smoothed data is superior for the detection of areas of widespread low-level contamination. A figure , also smoothed data, satisfied a particular early mission goal but is not as useful for cleanup operations as the other two. This last figure is presented for historical completeness only

  1. Tritium activities in selected wells on the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, B.F.

    1993-05-01

    Literature and data were reviewed related to radionuclides in groundwater on and near the Nevada Test Site. No elevated tritium activities have been reported outside of the major testing regions of the Nevada Test Site. Three wells were identified as having water with above-background (>50 pCi/l) tritium activities: UE-15d Water Well; USGS Water Well A; and USGS Test Well B Ex. Although none of these wells have tritium activities greater than the Nevada State Drinking Water standard (20,000 pCi/l), their time-series tritium trends may be indicative to potential on-site radionuclide migration

  2. Clinical and radiological evidence of the recurrence of reversible pegvisomant-related lipohypertrophy at the new site of injection in two women with acromegaly: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochira Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pegvisomant-related lipohypertrophy may revert when changing the site of injection, but the lipohypertrophy may recur at the new site of injection. The strength of evidence, however, is weak and comes from information obtained from physical examination only. Case presentation We studied two Caucasian women with acromegaly, aged 51 and 71 years, with pegvisomant-related lipohypertrophy. Our two patients were evaluated at baseline, when the site of pegvisomant injection was the periumbilical abdominal region, and then four months after switching the injection site from the abdomen to both thighs. Both physical examination and radiological studies (magnetic resonance imaging and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry demonstrated that the abdominal lipohypertrophy progressively reverted in both patients after switching the site of injection to the thighs. However, lipohypertrophy reappeared at the new site of injection. The radiological outcome confirmed the reversibility of pegvisomant-related lipohypertrophy and strengthened the body of evidence on this issue. Conclusion In clinical practice, physical examination of the injection site or sites leads to an early detection of lipohypertrophy during pegvisomant treatment. Radiological procedures may be of help to confirm subcutaneous fat changes and for a precise monitoring of fat redistribution. Patients should get appropriate information about lipohypertrophy before starting pegvisomant treatment since the rotation of the site of injection may prevent lipohypertrophy.

  3. Environmental radioactivity and mitigation of radiological impact at legacy uranium sites in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium legacy sites in the country contain large amounts of milling tailings, mining waste, old infrastructures and acid mine drainage with high radioactivity concentrations. Radioactivity surveillance of these sites has been maintained for many years and institutional control kept beyond cessation of Portuguese uranium mining in 2001. A research programme (2003-2006) requested by the government to assess environmental contamination and public health risks in these regions advised implementing environmental remediation measures. A national programme was approved for remediation of abandoned mine sites, including radioactive and non-radioactive mines, that started in 2005 and since has completed significant remediation works in several old uranium mines. One amongst these sites, the Urgeiriça mine and milling site, was re-engineered, tailings were covered, the mine was closed, the area of mine and milling facilities cleaned, and an automated contaminated water treatment plant installed. Environmental radioactivity surveys carried out in this region showed reduced ambient radiation doses, lower radon concentrations in surface air, return to background radioactivity in surface air aerosols, and decrease of radionuclide concentrations in the river receiving water discharges from the mine site, resulting in a reduced radiation exposure to members of the public. Other legacy uranium mines without milling tailings, were mainly remediated for landscape engineering and the adopted solutions included, for example, preservation of non-contaminated ponds for public leisure. Although not completed yet in many sites, the remediation works implemented contributed already to a significant abatement of radiation exposure allowing for safer implementation of activities, such as agriculture and cattle grazing, in the surroundings of legacy sites. Environmental remediation and abatement of radiation exposure contributed to revitalize socio-economic activities of the region and

  4. Penetration Testing Model for Web sites Hosted in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Dzul Aiman Aslan; Mohamad Safuan Sulaiman; Siti Nurbahyah Hamdan; Saaidi Ismail; Mohd Fauzi Haris; Norzalina Nasiruddin; Raja Murzaferi Mokhtar

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Malaysia web sites has been very crucial in providing important and useful information and services to the clients as well as the users worldwide. Furthermore, a web site is important as it reflects the organisation image. To ensure the integrity of the content of web site, a study has been made and a penetration testing model has been implemented to test the security of several web sites hosted at Nuclear Malaysia for malicious attempts. This study will explain how the security was tested in the detailed condition and measured. The result determined the security level and the vulnerability of several web sites. This result is important for improving and hardening the security of web sites in Nuclear Malaysia. (author)

  5. Tools for DIY site-testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Federico; Rondanelli, Roberto; Abarca, Accel; Diaz, Marcos; Querel, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Our group has designed, sourced and constructed a radiosonde/ground-station pair using inexpensive opensource hardware. Based on the Arduino platform, the easy to build radiosonde allows the atmospheric science community to test and deploy instrumentation packages that can be fully customized to their individual sensing requirements. This sensing/transmitter package has been successfully deployed on a tethered-balloon, a weather balloon, a UAV airplane, and is currently being integrated into a UAV quadcopter and a student-built rocket. In this paper, the system, field measurements and potential applications will be described. As will the science drivers of having full control and open access to a measurement system in an age when commercial solutions have become popular but are restrictive in terms of proprietary sensor specifications, "black-box" calibration operations or data handling routines, etc. The ability to modify and experiment with both the hardware and software tools is an essential part of the scientific process. Without an understanding of the intrinsic biases or limitations in your instruments and system, it becomes difficult to improve them or advance the knowledge in any given field.

  6. Malignant tumors and Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmukhanov, S.B.; Gusev, B.I.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.N.

    1998-01-01

    Mutational biological effect of ionizing irradiation initiates and promotes neoplastic process (cancer or leukemia) as well as genetic defects in further generations. It is well-known that the far-off irradiation effects, caused by deoxyribonucleic acid mutation, take place for adulterers when irradiation dose is within 20 c Sv and for foetus when it is 1.0 c Sv. According to information obtained by a number of researches, irradiation dose of within 0.5-0.9 c Sv, and even 0.1 c Sv, cannot be considered to be safe in regards to their capabilities to cause formation of malignant tumors. Number of people, being effected by the ionizing irradiation during 40 years of nuclear weapon testiness conduction (more than 600), comes to about 3 mill., half of which are Kazakstan people. In addition, more than 500 different areas in Semipalatinsk region, which have different level of radiation contamination. The excess malignant tumor sick rate, caused by irradiation effect, was studied for two groups of population that were being continuously examined since 1960. The exposure external irradiation dose was from 80 to 274 c Sv for the main population group (10 thousands). The testing group of population (11 thousands) was effected by the irradiation dose of 7-10 c Sv

  7. Influence of radiological emphysema on lung function test in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodlet, Aline; Maury, Gisèle; Jamart, Jacques; Dahlqvist, Caroline

    2013-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is one of the most frequent interstitial lung disease. Emphysema can be associated with IPF as described in the «Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema» syndrome. The primary endpoint of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the impact of the association of IPF and emphysema on lung function tests parameters (FVC, TLC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and DLCO). The secondary endpoint was to assess the impact of the associated radiological emphysema on lung function parameters used in the du Bois prognostic score recently developed by Ron du Bois et al. We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 98 patients with lung fibrosis who were followed in our University Hospital with access to pharmacological studies and lung transplantation from 1981 to 2011. Fifty six patients were considered for analysis. The collected data included gender, age, smoking history and respiratory hospitalizations. We also analysed their pulmonary functional parameters along with radiological characteristics, in particular the presence of emphysema which was assessed on thoracic high resolution CT scan. The du Bois score was retrospectively calculated from these data. TLC and FVC at diagnosis were significantly higher in the IPF-E group compared to the IPF group (respectively 86.6 ± 17.2% pv versus 72.0 ± 15.0% pv; p: 0.004 and 86.8 ± 18.4% pv versus 72.6 ± 20.6% pv; p: 0.020). The [Formula: see text] used in the calculation of the du Bois prognostic score was significantly higher in the IPF-E group. By cons, [Formula: see text] was not statistically different between the two groups. Radiological emphysema associated with IPF had an impact on pulmonary function tests. Despite this difference, the du Bois score was not statistically different between these two groups. Nevertheless, after one year of follow up, the patients with emphysema were in a subclass with a lower mortality rate than those without emphysema. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  8. Radiological considerations of the reactor cover gas processing system at the FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevo, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    Radiological and environmental protection experience associated with the reactor cover gas processing system at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been excellent. Personnel radiation exposures received from operating and maintaining the reactor cover gas processing system have been very low, the system has remained free of radioactive particulate contamination through the first seven operating cycles (cesium contamination was detected at the end of Cycle 8A), and releases of radioactivity to the environment have been very low, well below environmental standards. This report discusses these three aspects of fast reactor cover gas purification over the first eight operating cycles of the FFTF (a duration of a little more than four years, from April 1982 through July 1986)

  9. Radiological criteria and methods for remediation of contaminated former mining sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biesold, H.; Thielen, H.; Weiss, D.

    2001-01-01

    Mining and ore processing have a long history in the New States of Germany, Saxony, Thuringia and Saxony-Anhalt. The ores were often mineralized with uranium and therefore the residues are a radiological hazard to man and environment. Immediately after World War II the Soviet Union started to develop its nuclear capability by mining uranium ores in the occupied zone of East Germany. At the beginning the exploitation was concentrated on former underground mines of silver and other non ferrous ores. Afterwards, new uranium deposits were explored in Saxony and eastern Thuringia. Numerous waste rock piles and tailings ponds of considerable size resulted from these mining activities. Uranium production reached some 220,000 t between 1946 and 1990. After the reunification in 1990, production was finished for economic and other reasons. The German Federal Government was faced with one of the largest ecological, social and economic challenges. In this report an overview is given on kind and amount of the mining residues, the radiation protection criteria, models and data bases used for risk assessment and dose calculation are explained and remediation methods are described. (authors)

  10. Radiological criteria and methods for remediation of contaminated former mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesold, H.; Thielen, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Cologne (Germany); Weiss, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Mining and ore processing have a long history in the New States of Germany, Saxony, Thuringia and Saxony-Anhalt. The ores were often mineralized with uranium and therefore the residues are a radiological hazard to man and environment. Immediately after World War II the Soviet Union started to develop its nuclear capability by mining uranium ores in the occupied zone of East Germany. At the beginning the exploitation was concentrated on former underground mines of silver and other non ferrous ores. Afterwards, new uranium deposits were explored in Saxony and eastern Thuringia. Numerous waste rock piles and tailings ponds of considerable size resulted from these mining activities. Uranium production reached some 220,000 t between 1946 and 1990. After the reunification in 1990, production was finished for economic and other reasons. The German Federal Government was faced with one of the largest ecological, social and economic challenges. In this report an overview is given on kind and amount of the mining residues, the radiation protection criteria, models and data bases used for risk assessment and dose calculation are explained and remediation methods are described. (authors)

  11. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good

  12. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ''Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988'', and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases

  13. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  14. Site environmental report for Calendar Year 1994 on radiological and nonradiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Battelle Memorial Institute's nuclear research facilities are currently being maintained in a surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) mode with continual decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities being conducted under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract W-7405-ENG-92. These activities are referred to under the Contract as the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP). Operations referenced in this report are performed in support of S ampersand M and D ampersand D activities. Battelle's King Avenue facility is not considered in this report to the extent that the West Jefferson facility is. The source term at the King Avenue site is a small fraction of the source term at the West Jefferson site. Off site levels of radionuclides that could be attributed to the west Jefferson and King Avenue nuclear operations wereindistinguishable from background levels at specific locations where air, water, and direct radiation measurements were performed. Environmental monitoring continued to demonstrate compliance by Battelle with federal, state and local regulations. Routine, nonradiological activities performed include monitoring liquid effluents and monitoring the ground water system for the West Jefferson North site. Samples of various environmental media including air, water, grass, fish, field and garden crops, sediment and soil were collected from the region surrounding the two sites and analyzed

  15. Radiological criteria for the remediation of sites for spent fuel and radioactive waste storage in the Russian Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandala, N K; Sneve, M K; Titov, A V; Smith, G M; Novikova, N Ya; Romanov, V V; Seregin, V A

    2008-12-01

    In the 1960s, two technical bases of the Northern Fleet were created in Northwest Russia, at Andreeva Bay in the Kola Peninsula and Gremikha village on the coast of the Barents Sea. They maintained nuclear submarines, performing receipt and storage of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, and are now designated sites of temporary storage (STSs). An analysis of the radiation situation at these sites demonstrates that substantial long-term remediation work will be required after the removal of the waste and spent nuclear fuel. Regulatory guidance is under development to support this work. Having in mind modern approaches to guaranteeing radiation safety, the primary regulatory focus is on a justification of dose constraints for determining acceptable residual contamination which might lead to exposure to workers and the public. For these sites, four principal options for remediation have been considered-renovation, conversion, conservation and liquidation. This paper describes a system of recommended dose constraints and derived control levels formulated for each option. The unconditional guarantee of long-term radioecological protection provides the basis for criteria development. Non-exceedance of these dose constraints and control levels implies compliance with radiological protection objectives related to the residual contamination. Dose reduction below proposed dose constraint values must also be carried out according to the optimisation principle. The developed criteria relate to the condition of the facilities and the STS areas after the termination of remediation activities. The proposed criteria for renovation, conversion, conservation and liquidation are entirely within the dose limits adopted in Russia for the management of man-made radiation sources, and are consistent with ICRP recommendations and national practice in other countries. The proposed criteria for STS remediation and new industrial (non-radiation-hazardous) facilities and buildings on

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting 238 U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected 241 Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area

  17. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

    2012-12-27

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

  18. Reconnaissance radiological characterization for the White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espegren, M.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Smith, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report is the result of field work performed at the former White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California. The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program tasked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group in Grand Junction, Colo., with this project. The objective was to determine whether or not radioisotopes possibly associated with past Department of Defense (DOD) operations were present and within accepted background levels. The radiation survey was accomplished by performing three independent radiation surveys, both outdoors and indoors, and random soil sampling. Initially, the site was land surveyed to develop a grid block system. A background radiation investigation was performed out in the San Pedro area

  19. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS

  20. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

  1. CNN's evaluation of the radiological monitoring special programs at the sites of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lareyne, O.; Marugan Tovar, I.; Martinez Moreno, M.; Sanz Alduan, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, occurred in the Spanish plants various events related to the existence on the sites of the Spanish nuclear facilities or areas dotted with radioactive contamination outside the buildings, events that were reported to the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) in accordance with the provisions of the regulation, as a result of the analysis of those events, the CSN issued in July 2008, a complementary technique INSTRUCTIONAL requiring the implementation of environmental monitoring programs in outdoor areas within sites nuclear tacilities. First, the CSN nuclear facilities referred to the programs and methodologies intended to perform such monitoring, and, in late 2009, reports of program results.

  2. The Department of Energy Nevada Test Site Remote Area Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, L.D.; Hart, O.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Remote Area Monitoring System was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for DOE test directors at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to verify radiological conditions are safe after a nuclear test. In the unlikely event of a venting as a result of a nuclear test, this system provides radiological and meteorological data to Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) computers where mesoscale models are used to predict downwind exposure rates. The system uses a combination of hardwired radiation sensors and satellite based data acquisition units with their own radiation sensors to measure exposure rates in remote areas of the NTS. The satellite based data acquisition units are available as small, Portable Remote Area Monitors (RAMs) for rapid deployment, and larger, Semipermanent RAMs that can have meteorological towers. The satellite based stations measure exposure rates and transmit measurements to the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) where they are relayed to Direct Readout Ground Stations (DRGS) at the NTS and Los Alamos. Computers process the data and display results in the NTS Operations Coordination Center. Los Alamos computers and NTS computers are linked together through a wide area network, providing remote redundant system capability. Recently, LANL, expanded the system to take radiological and meteorological measurements in communities in the western United States. The system was also expanded to acquire data from Remote Automatic Weather Stations (RAWS) that transmit through GOES. The addition of Portable and Semipermanent RAMs to the system has vastly expanded monitoring capabilities at NTS and can be used to take measurements anywhere in this hemisphere

  3. Final report on the radiological surveys of designated DX firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    CHEMRAD was contracted by Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform USRADS reg-sign (UltraSonic Ranging And Data System) radiation scanning surveys at designated DX Sites at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary purpose of these scanning surveys was to identify the presence of Depleted Uranium (D-38) resulting from activities at the DX Firing Sites. This effort was conducted to update the most recent surveys of these areas. This current effort was initiated with site orientation on August 12, 1996. Surveys were completed in the field on September 4, 1996. This Executive Summary briefly presents the major findings of this work. The detail survey results are presented in the balance of this report and are organized by Technical Area and Site number in section 2. This organization is not in chronological order. USRADS and the related survey methods are described in section 3. Quality Control issues are addressed in section 4. Surveys were conducted with an array of radiation detectors either mounted on a backpack frame for man-carried use (Manual mode) or on a tricycle cart (RadCart mode). The array included radiation detectors for gamma and beta surface near surface contamination as well as dose rate at 1 meter above grade. The radiation detectors were interfaced directly to an USRADS 2100 Data Pack

  4. Hanford tank initiative test facility site selection study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staehr, T.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) project is developing equipment for the removal of hard heel waste from the Hanford Site underground single-shell waste storage tanks. The HTI equipment will initially be installed in the 241-C-106 tank where its operation will be demonstrated. This study evaluates existing Hanford Site facilities and other sites for functional testing of the HTI equipment before it is installed into the 241-C-106 tank

  5. Calculating the radiological parameters used in non-human biota dose assessment tools using ERICA Tool and site-specific data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotiropoulou, Maria [INRASTES, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory, Athens (Greece); Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki (Greece); Florou, Heleny [INRASTES, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory, Athens (Greece); Kitis, Georgios [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2017-11-15

    The substantial complexity in ecosystem-radionuclide interactions is difficult to be represented in terms of radiological doses. Thus, radiological dose assessment tools use typical exposure situations for generalized organisms and ecosystems. In the present study, site-specific data and radioactivity measurements of terrestrial organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) are provided. The retrieved data are used in combination with the ERICA Assessment Tool for calculation of radiological parameters. The process of radionuclide transfer within ecosystem components is represented using concentration ratios (CRs), while for the calculation of dose rates the dose conversion coefficient (DCC) methodology is applied. Comparative assessments are performed between the generic and assessment-specific radiological parameters and between the resulting dose rates. Significant differences were observed between CRs calculated in this study and those reported in the literature for cesium and thorium, which can easily be explained. On the other hand, CRs calculated for radium are in very good agreement with those reported in the literature. The DCCs exhibited some small differences between the reference and the assessment-specific organism due to mass differences. The differences were observed for internal and external dose rates, but they were less pronounced for total dose rates which are typically used in the assessment of radiological impact. The results of the current work can serve as a basis for further studies of the radiological parameters in environments that have not been studied yet. (orig.)

  6. Neptunium Transport Behavior in the Vicinity of Underground Nuclear Tests at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P; Tinnacher, R M; Zavarin, M; Williams, R W; Kersting, A B

    2010-12-03

    We used short lived {sup 239}Np as a yield tracer and state of the art magnetic sector ICP-MS to measure ultra low levels of {sup 237}Np in a number of 'hot wells' at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The results indicate that {sup 237}Np concentrations at the Almendro, Cambric, Dalhart, Cheshire and Chancellor sites, are in the range of 3 x 10{sup -5} to 7 x 10{sup -2} pCi/L and well below the MCL for alpha emitting radionuclides (15 pCi/L) (EPA, 2009). Thus, while Np transport is believed to occur at the NNSS, activities are expected to be well below the regulatory limits for alpha-emitting radionuclides. We also compared {sup 237}Np concentration data to other radionuclides, including tritium, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and plutonium, to evaluate the relative {sup 237}Np transport behavior. Based on isotope ratios relative to published unclassified Radiologic Source Terms (Bowen et al., 1999) and taking into consideration radionuclide distribution between melt glass, rubble and groundwater (IAEA, 1998), {sup 237}Np appears to be substantially less mobile than tritium and other non-sorbing radionuclides, as expected. However, this analysis also suggests that {sup 237}Np mobility is surprisingly similar to that of plutonium. The similar transport behavior of Np and Pu can be explained by one of two possibilities: (1) Np(IV) and Pu(IV) oxidation states dominate under mildly reducing NNSS groundwater conditions resulting in similar transport behavior or (2) apparent Np transport is the result of transport of its parent {sup 241}Pu and {sup 241}Am isotopes and subsequent decay to {sup 237}Np. Finally, measured {sup 237}Np concentrations were compared to recent Hydrologic Source Term (HST) models. The 237Np data collected from three wells in Frenchman Flat (RNM-1, RNM-2S, and UE-5n) are in good agreement with recent HST transport model predictions (Carle et al., 2005). The agreement

  7. Database on radioecological situation in Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkebaev, T.Eh.; Kislitsin, S.B.; Lopuga, A.D.; Kuketaev, A.T.; Kikkarin, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakstan is to define radioecological situation in details, conduct a continuous monitoring and eliminate consequences of nuclear explosions at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Investigations of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area contamination by radioactive substances and vindication activity are the reasons for development of computer database on radioecological situation of the test site area, which will allow arranging and processing the available and entering information about the radioecological situation, assessing the effect of different testing factors on the environment and health of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area population.The described conception of database on radioecological situation of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area cannot be considered as the final one. As new information arrives, structure and content of the database is updated and optimized. New capabilities and structural elements may be provided if new aspects in Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area contamination study (air environment study, radionuclides migration) arise

  8. Semipalatinsk test site: 10 years after shutting down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.

    2001-01-01

    The paper consists the historical materials and chronology of events on the Semipalatinsk test site before and after it shutdown. The main part of the paper is focused on the activity on the former nuclear site after it shutdown. The first of all activity is related with coming into being and development of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan

  9. Usability Testing in a Library Web Site Redesign Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for an intuitive library information gateway to meet users' information needs and describes the process involved in redesigning a library Web site based on experiences at Roger Williams University. Explains usability testing methods that were used to discover how users were interacting with the Web site interface. (Author/LRW)

  10. Facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear power plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear power plant introduces risks of injury or accidents that could also result in the exposure of personnel to radiation or radioactive materials. It is important in such an event to have adequate first aid and medical facilities, supplies, equipment, transportation capabilities and trained personnel available to provide necessary care. This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those overexposed to penetrating radiation or contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides. Recommendations cover facilities, supplies, equipment and the extent of care on-site, where first aid and initial care may be provided, and off-site at a local hospital, where further medical and surgical care may be provided. Additional recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. A brief discussion of specialized care is provided in an appendix

  11. Grid site testing for ATLAS with HammerCloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmsheuser, J; Hönig, F; Legger, F; LLamas, R Medrano; Sciacca, F G; Ster, D van der

    2014-01-01

    With the exponential growth of LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data in 2012, distributed computing has become the established way to analyze collider data. The ATLAS grid infrastructure includes more than 130 sites worldwide, ranging from large national computing centers to smaller university clusters. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling virtual organisations (VO) and site-administrators to run validation tests of the site and software infrastructure in an automated or on-demand manner. The HammerCloud infrastructure has been constantly improved to support the addition of new test workflows. These new workflows comprise e.g. tests of the ATLAS nightly build system, ATLAS Monte Carlo production system, XRootD federation (FAX) and new site stress test workflows. We report on the development, optimization and results of the various components in the HammerCloud framework.

  12. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronald B. Jackson

    2007-01-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Clean Closure/No Further Action, Closure in Place, or Closure in Progress

  13. Grid Site Testing for ATLAS with HammerCloud

    CERN Document Server

    Elmsheuser, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Legger, F; Medrano LLamas, R; Sciacca, G; van der Ster, D

    2014-01-01

    With the exponential growth of LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data in 2012, distributed computing has become the established way to analyze collider data. The ATLAS grid infrastructure includes more than 130 sites worldwide, ranging from large national computing centers to smaller university clusters. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling VO- and site-administrators to run validation tests of the site and software infrastructure in an automated or on-demand manner. The HammerCloud infrastructure has been constantly improved to support the addition of new test work-flows. These new work-flows comprise e.g. tests of the ATLAS nightly build system, ATLAS MC production system, XRootD federation FAX and new site stress test work-flows. We report on the development, optimization and results of the various components in the HammerCloud framework.

  14. Grid Site Testing for ATLAS with HammerCloud

    CERN Document Server

    Elmsheuser, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Legger, F; Medrano LLamas, R; Sciacca, G; van der Ster, D

    2013-01-01

    With the exponential growth of LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data in 2012, distributed computing has become the established way to analyze collider data. The ATLAS grid infrastructure includes more than 130 sites worldwide, ranging from large national computing centers to smaller university clusters. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling VO- and site-administrators to run validation tests of the site and software infrastructure in an automated or on-demand manner. The HammerCloud infrastructure has been constantly improved to support the addition of new test work-flows. These new work-flows comprise e.g. tests of the ATLAS nightly build system, ATLAS MC production system, XRootD federation FAX and new site stress test work-flows. We report on the development, optimization and results of the various components in the HammerCloud framework.

  15. New data on the Paleozoic of the Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergaliev, G.Kh.; Myasnikov, A.K.; Nikitin, I.F.; Polyanskij, N.V.; Sergeeva, L.V.; Sergieva, M.N.; Sal'menova, L.T.; Utegulov, M.T.; Tsaj, D.T.; Shuzhanov, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    The latest data on Paleozoic of the Semipalatinsk test site acquired as result of the stratigraphic and pale ontological investigation which have been conducted for the first time after 46-year interval in geological studies are presented. (author)

  16. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Low Impact Soil Sites' and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Closure activities were conducted from February through April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996; as amended February 2008) and Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 107 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2009). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized.

  17. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the former Watertown Arsenal property GSA site Watertown, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    The complete radiological survey of all the buildings located on the GSA site revealed no contamination. However, significant contamination was found on the site grounds. A total of approximately 6 m 2 of surface area exhibited elevated radiation levels. The area of contamination is centered around Section I (the burn area) and spreads out from this point. The contamination includes the subsurface, descending to the water table at the 6-ft level in some places. The contamination is primarily reprocessed depleted uranium. The ambient radiation level in the vicinity of the contamination as measured with a pressurized ionization chamber is significantly above background levels (up to 18 μR/h). As expected, no significant levels of radon contamination were found in any of the air samples. These levels of contamination of exceed the criteria as defined in ANSI 13.12 and the NRC Guidelines. The ambient radiation levels (up to 18 μR/h) are not in excess of criteria as defined in Appendix 6

  18. Radiological risk assessment for Al-Twuaitha nuclear site in Iraq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Obaidy, Abdul Hameed M.J. [Environmental Research Center, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Mohammed, Bashair A.R. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad (Iraq); Al Sharaa, Hisham M.J. [Geomatic Engineering Division, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the contamination level of U, 137Cs, 60Co, 40K and 90Sr from different soil samples of the destroyed nuclear reactor at Al-Tuwaitha site south of Baghdad investigated and four contaminated spots identified. The obtained values of the 40K in soil samples are within normal concentration values and close to the environmental levels. The skewness coefficient for the U series,137Cs and 60Co distribution indicates asymmetric distribution tailing slightly towards higher concentration. However, the activity of U series, 137Cs, 60Co and 90Sr in the soil samples exhibit higher variability and above the regulated environmental levels.

  19. Nuclear Materials Management for the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesse C. Schreiber

    2007-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has transitioned from its historical role of weapons testing to a broader role that is focused on being a solution to multiple National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) challenges and opportunities with nuclear materials for the nation. NTS is supporting other NNSA sites challenged with safe nuclear materials storage and disposition. NNSA, with site involvement, is currently transforming the nuclear stockpile and supporting infrastructure to meet the 2030 vision. Efforts are under way to make the production complex smaller, more consolidated, and more modern. With respect to the nuclear material stockpile, the NNSA sites are currently reducing the complex nuclear material inventory through dispositioning and consolidating nuclear material. This includes moving material from other sites to NTS. State-of-the-art nuclear material management and control practices at NTS are essential for NTS to ensure that these new activities are accomplished in a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible manner. NTS is aggressively addressing this challenge

  20. Off-site environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States Nuclear Test areas, Calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, R.G.; Fontana, C.A.; Grossman, R.F.; Black, S.C.; Dye, R.E.; Smith, D.D.; Thome', D.J.; Mullen, A.A.

    1987-05-01

    The principal activity at the NTS is testing of nuclear devices, though other related projects are also conducted. The principal activities of the Off-Site Radiological Safety Program are routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests; and protective actions in support of the nuclear testing program. These are conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. 28 refs., 37 figs., 30 tabs

  1. Intra-site Secure Transport Vehicle test and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the past many DOE and DoD facilities involved in handling nuclear material realized a need to enhance the safely and security for movement of sensitive materials within their facility, or ''intra-site''. There have been prior efforts to improve on-site transportation; however, there remains a requirement for enhanced on-site transportation at a number of facilities. The requirements for on-site transportation are driven by security, safety, and operational concerns. The Intra-site Secure Transport Vehicle (ISTV) was designed to address these concerns specifically for DOE site applications with a standardized vehicle design. This paper briefly reviews the ISTV design features providing significant enhancement of onsite transportation safety and security, and also describes the test and evaluation activities either complete of underway to validate the vehicle design and operation

  2. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  3. Results of the indoor radiological survey at the W.R. Grace Co., Curtis Bay site, Baltimore, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1989-07-01

    The W.R. Grace Company, Davison Chemical Division, conducted developmental research and extraction of thorium from monazite ore at its Curtis Bay facility in Baltimore, Maryland, during the 1950s under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Only one of the numerous buildings on the site was used for these operations. A 1979 aerial survey of the site for the Department of Energy (DOE) indicated that a comprehensive ground survey was required to determine whether or not any contamination remained from the AEC activities in that building. A radiological scoping survey performed later that year for DOE by a team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), disclosed surface contamination (alpha) levels in excess of DOE criteria on all five levels of the building. As a result of this finding, two additional surveys were performed in 1986 by ORNL at the request of DOE to evaluate any present or potential health risk. They are detailed in this report. The results of the 1986 surveys revealed several areas having elevated levels of radiation as a result of significant quantities of thorium on some building surfaces such as floors and ceiling beams. Most areas were small spots and in locations of low occupancy; thus, the possibility for significant exposure to workers was judged to be low. To confirm this evaluation, annual radiation exposure estimates for workers frequenting the few, larger contaminated areas on the site were derived using ORNL survey data and occupancy factors provided by the W.R. Grace Company. Estimates ranged from 27 to 41 mrem/yr or a maximum of 41% of the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for members of the general public. 2 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Radiological survey of sites around two cement producing factories: WAPCO and PURECHEM, Ewekoro, Southwestern Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adewole, O.O.; Egunjobi, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil samples were collected around WAPCO at Ewekoro and PURECHEM at Onigbedu, which are both cement producing factories in Ogun State, Nigeria. The natural radioactivity concentrations are the mean absorbed doses of 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th at various selected locations were determined. The mean radionuclide concentration of 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th were 141.6 21.5, 27.5 9.7 and 31.3 11.1 Bq/I for WAPCO factory at selected sites. Also these values were 179.5 28.3, 21.9 7.6 and 31.2 11.7 Bq/I respectively in the same order for PURECHEM factory at selected locations. The survey revealed that the radiation doses due to natural radio nuclides in the environment under investigation are very low and insignificant to cause any serious health problems to the people living in the area.

  5. On the population dose close to the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Peterson, L.; Pivovarov, S.; Rukhin, A.; Seredavina, T.; Sushkova, N.; Artemyev, O.; Abildinova, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: As a result of nuclear weapon tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) radiation exposure of inhabitants in surrounding villages has occurred over a period of several decades. Despite a number of published reports the determination of cumulative doses to the associated population and its uncertainty has not been finalized yet. Among the factors complicating this task are a) the time passed, b) the lack of direct personal dosimetry within the population possibly exposed, c) significant migration (out and in), d) inhomogeneous distribution of radionuclide deposition, e) new settlers at the SNTS and f) economic activities at the SNTS. This paper reports on the contribution of the ISTC-project K-465.2 'Complex examination of Semipalatinsk Test Site Region's population by advanced dosimetry methods' in assessing the population dose. The main results have been obtained during a period of three years by using the recent methodological progress made in EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel. Tooth enamel of people from settlements Dolon, Bodene, Cheremushki, Mostik, which were affected mainly by the first atomic explosion 1949, settlement Sarjal, affected by the first thermonuclear explosion in 1953, and as a control village Maysk, where radiological and meteorological records suggest that there was no significant radionuclide deposition near this village despite its position at the borders of SNTS, were investigated. Fresh tooth samples were used, which reflect well the current radiological situation. Additional measurements included e.g. environmental monitoring and in-vivo monitoring. EPR results suggest the existence of two sub-populations with different dose distributions: One with doses in the range of expected values from both natural background and SNTS testing, and another one with still higher doses not explained by the observed radioactive contamination. This finding is rather surprising. Additional research is needed to obtain a better statistic

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 135: Areas 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. H. Cox

    2001-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, was closed in accordance with the approved Corrective Action Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). CAU 135 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CAS). Two of these CAS's were identified in the Corrective Action Investigation Data Quality Objective meeting as being improperly identified as underground storage tanks. CAS 25-02-03 identified as the Deluge Valve Pit was actually an underground electrical vault and CAS 25-02-10 identified as an Underground Storage Tank was actually a former above ground storage tank filled with demineralized water. Both of these CAS's are recommended for a no further action closure. CAS 25-02-01 the Underground Storage Tanks commonly referred to as the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault was closed by decontaminating the vault structure and conducting a radiological verification survey to document compliance with the Nevada Test Site unrestricted use release criteria. The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive and cell service area drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999, discussed in ''The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (DOE/NV, 199a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples exceeded the preliminary action levels for polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. The CAU 135 closure activities consisted of scabbling radiological ''hot spots

  7. BIOMETRICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF TEST SITES FOR MAIZE BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domagoj Šimić

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Yield stability of genotypes and analysis of genotype×environment interaction (GEI as important objects in analyses of multienvironment trials are well documented in Croatia. However, little is known about suitability and biometrical characters of the sites where genotypes should be tested. Objectives of this study were in combined analysis of balanced maize trials i to compare test sites in joint linear regression analysis and ii to compare several stability models by clustering test sites in order to assess biometrical suitability of particular test sites. Partitioning of GEI sum of squares according to the symmetrical joint linear regression analysis revealed highly significant Tukey's test, heterogeneity of environmental regressions and residual deviations. Mean grain yields, within-macroenvironment error mean squares, and stability parameters varied considerably among 16 macroenvironments. The highest grain yields were recorded in Osijek in both years and in Varaždin in 1996, with more than 11 t ha-1 . It seems that Feričanci would be optimum test site with relatively high and consistent yield and high values of entry mean squares indicating satisfactory differentiation among cultivars. However, four clustering methods generally did not correspond. According to three out of four clustering methods, two macroenvironments of Feričanci provide similar results. Employing other methods such as shifted multiplicative models, which effectively eliminate significant rank-change interaction, appears to be more reasonable.

  8. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  9. Defense waste management operations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kendall, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management activities were initiated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of low-level wastes (LLW) produced by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) weapons testing program. Disposal activities have expanded from the burial of atmospheric weapons testing debris to demonstration facilities for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) waste, transuranic (TRU) waste storage and certification, and the development of a mixed waste (MW) facility. Site specific operational research projects support technology development required for the various disposal facilities. The annual cost of managing the facilities is about $6 million depending on waste volumes and types

  10. Radiological bile acid absorption test {sup 75}SeHCAT in patients with diarrhoea of unknown cause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudberg, U. [St. Goeran`s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Nylander, B. [St. Goeran`s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose with this study was to investigate the usefulness of the {sup 75}SeHCAT test in patients suffering from `functional` diarrhoea and to disclose earlier radiological investigations performed in the course of disease. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with chronic diarrhoea of unknown cause were investigated with the {sup 75}SeHCAT test. The cholestyramine test and an estimation of oro-caecal transit time (OCTT) were also performed in 13 and 10 patients respectively. Results: Ten patients had low 7-day retention ({<=}15%). Nine of these were tested with cholestyramine and 8 showed complete relief from the diarrhoea. The cholestyramine test had no effect on the 4 patients with normal bile acid retention. No correlation was found between the retention of {sup 75}SeHCAT and OCCT. A total of 80 inconclusive gastrointestinal barium examinations were performed during the course of disease. Conclusion: Pathological bile acid retention, studied with the radiological {sup 75}SeHCAT test, is common in patients with diarrhoea of unknown cause. The test should be performed earlier in the course of disease in order to prevent unnecessary radiological investigations and to reduce patient suffering and distress. (orig.).

  11. Defense waste management operations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kendall, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management activities were initiated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of low-level wastes (LLW) produced by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) weapons testing program. Disposal activities have expanded from the burial of atmospheric weapons testing debris to demonstration facilities for greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) waste, transuranic (TRU) waste storage and certification, and the development of a mixed waste (MW) facility. Site specific operational research projects support technology development required for the various disposal facilities. The annual cost of managing the facilities is about $6 million depending on waste volumes and types. The paper discusses site selection; establishment of the Radioactive Waste Management Project; operations with respect to low-level radioactive wastes, transuranic waste storage, greater confinement disposal test, and mixed waste management facility; and related research activities such as tritium migration studies, revegetation studies, and in-situ monitoring of organics

  12. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  13. Intermodal transportation of low-level radioactive waste to the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) presently serves as a disposal site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated by DOE-approved generators. The environmental impacts resulting from the disposal of LLW at the NTS are discussed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Nevada Test Site Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada (NTS EIS). During the formal NTS EIS scoping period, it became clear that transportation of LLW was an issue that required attention. Therefore, the Nevada Transportation Protocol Working Group (TPWG) was formed in 1995 to identify, prioritize, and understand local issues and concerns associated with the transportation of LLW to the NTS. Currently, generators of LLW ship their waste to the NTS by legal-weight truck. In 1995, the TPWG suggested the DOE could reduce transportation costs and enhance public safety by using rail transportation. The DOE announced, in October 1996, that they would study the potential for intermodal transportation of LLW to the NTS, by transferring the LLW containers from rail cars to trucks for movements to the NTS. The TPWG and DOE/NV prepared the NTS Intermodal Transportation Facility Site and Routing Evaluation Study to present basic data and analyses on alternative rail-to-truck transfer sites and related truck routes for LLW shipments to the NTS. This Environmental Assessment (EA) identifies the potential environmental impacts and transportation risks of using new intermodal transfer sites and truck routes or continuing current operations to accomplish the objectives of minimizing radiological risk, enhancing safety, and reducing cost. DOE/NV will use the results of the assessment to decide whether or not to encourage the LLW generators and their transportation contractors to change their current operations to accomplish these objectives

  14. Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank (UST) release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of each hydrocarbon release has not been documented, therefore, this report addresses the remedial activities completed for each release site. The hydrocarbon release associated with each tank site within CAU 450 was remediated by excavating the impacted soil. Clean closure of the release was verified through soil sample analysis by an off-site laboratory. All release closure activities were completed following standard environmental and regulatory guidelines. Based upon site observations during the remedial activities and the soil sample analytical results, which indicated that soil concentrations were below the Nevada Administrative code (NAC) Action Level of 100 mg/kg, it is anticipated that each of the release CASs be closed without further action

  15. On the population dose around the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Dederichs, H.; Ostapczuk, P.; Hille, R.; Artemev, O.; Ptitskaya, L.; Akhmetov, M.; Pivovarov, S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1949 the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (NTS) was extensively used by the former Soviet government as a testing range for atomic weapons. Atmospheric and underground tests were finally stopped in 1962 and 1989, respectively. The Ministry of the Russian Federation of Atomic Energy officially counts a total of 456 tests, including 116 atmospheric tests. The total yield of the nuclear explosions carried out was 6.3 Megatons equivalent with 6.7 PetaBq of 1 37C s and 3.7 PetaBq of 9 0S r being released into the athmosphere. Some of the athmospheric radioactive tests shielded plumes, which extended far beyond the outer borders of the NTS. Already the first Soviet atomic bomb test on August 29, 1949 due to unfavourable meteorological conditions affected the villages of Dolon and Moistik. Since 1995 joint investigations performed by the Research Centre Julich in cooperation with the Kazakh National Nuclear Centre in the region of the former nuclear test site near Semipalatinsk besides environmental measurents also involve the assessment of the current dose of the population at and around the test site in addition to the important retrospective determination of the dose of persons affected by the atmospheric tests

  16. Measured data from the Avery Island Site C heater test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, H.; Stickney, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    Over the past six years, a comprehensive field testing program was conducted in the Avery Island salt mine. Three single canister heater tests were included in the testing program. Specifically, electric heaters, which simulate canisters of heat-generating nuclear waste, were placed in the floor of the Avery Island salt mine, and measurements were made of the response of the salt to heating. These tests were in operation by June 1978. One of the three heater tests, Site C, operated for a period of 1858 days and was decommissioned during July and August 1983. This data report presents the temperature and displacement data gathered during the operation and decommissioning of the Site C heater test. The purpose of this data report is to transmit the data to the scientific community. Rigorous analysis and interpretation of the data are considered beyond the scope of a data report. 6 references, 21 figures, 1 table

  17. Operational Testing of a Combined Hardware-Software Strategy for Triage of Radiologically-Contaminated Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Edward J

    2015-08-01

    After a radiological dispersal device (RDD) event, it is possible for radionuclides to enter the human body through inhalation, ingestion, and skin and wound absorption. The dominant pathway will be through inhalation. From a health physics perspective, it is important to know the magnitude of the intake to perform dosimetric assessments. From a medical perspective, removal of radionuclides leading to dose (hence risk) aversion is of high importance. The efficacy of medical decorporation strategies is extremely dependent upon the time of treatment delivery after intake. The "golden hour," or more realistically 3-4 h, is imperative when attempting to increase removal of radionuclides from extracellular fluids prior to cellular incorporation. To assist medical first response personnel in making timely decisions regarding appropriate treatment delivery modes, a software tool has been developed which compiles existing radionuclide decorporation therapy data and allows a user to perform simple triage leading to potential appropriate decorporation treatment strategies. Three triage algorithms were included: (1) multi-parameter model (MPM), (2) clinical decision guidance (CDG) model, and (3) annual limit on intake (ALI) model. A radiation triage mask (RTM) has simultaneously been developed to provide a simple and rapid hardware solution for first responders to triage internally exposed personnel in the field. The hardware/software strategy was field tested with a military medical unit and was found by end-users to be relatively simple to learn and use.

  18. Results of the radiological survey at the Jessop Steel Company Site, 500 Green Street, Washington, Pennsylvania (JSP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1991-04-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at the Jessop Steel company, 500 Green Street, Washington, Pennsylvania (JSP001) in 1989. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U, as a result of work contracted to the Atomic Energy Commission. The survey included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha and beta-gamma radiation levels; and soil dust, debris, grinding wheel, and air sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey and sampling covered portions of the exterior ground surface, the roof and gutter section above the saw shop and rolling mill area of building D, and the interiors of buildings A, B, C and D. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines for radium, thorium, and uranium. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from typical background levels in the Pennsylvania are. 7 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Results of the radiological survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company facility, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if the facility had become contaminated with residuals containing radioactive materials during the work performed under government contract from February to September, 1956. The survey included gamma scanning over a circumscribed area around and outside of the building, and gamma scanning over most accessible indoor floor surfaces as well as the collection of soil and other samples for radionuclide analyses. Roof trusses were beta-gamma scanned in locations where floor contamination was found. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in indoor and outdoor samples, and radiation measurements over floor and overhead surfaces, in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines. Elevated uranium concentrations outdoors were limited to several small, isolated spots. Radiation measurements exceeded guidelines indoors over numerous spots and areas inside the building, mainly in the areas that had been used in the early government work

  20. A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.K.; Foley, R.D.; Tiner, P.F.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Uziel, M.S.; Swaja, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Operations Office and the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program. Results of this investigation indicate that the source of radioactive contamination at the point of the contamination incident is from one of the underground abandoned lines. The contamination in soil is likely the result of residual contamination from years of waste transport and maintenance operations (e.g., replacement of degraded joints, upgrading or replacement of entire pipelines, and associated landscaping activities). However, because (1) there is currently an active LLW line positioned in the same subsurface trench with the abandoned lines and (2) the physical condition of the abandoned lines may be brittle, this inquiry could not determine which abandoned line was responsible for the subsurface contamination. Soil sampling at the location of the contamination incident and along the pipeline route was performed in a manner so as not to damage the active LLW line and abandoned lines. Recommendations for corrective actions are included

  1. Results of the radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site properties, Oxford, Ohio (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Properties, Oxford, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September of 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, primarily 238 U, from uranium machining operations conducted for National Lead of Ohio, a prime Atomic Energy Commission contractor. The survey included scan measurement of direct radiation levels inside and outside the former laboratory, outdoors on eight properties adjoining the former laboratory, and the city right-of-way adjacent to the surveyed properties. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples taken from each property and the exterior of the laboratory. Fixed surface residual radioactivity was measured inside the laboratory and outside the building. Air samples were collected, direct exposure was measured, and samples were collected to measure transferable radioactivity inside the building. Results of the survey indicate areas where surface and soil contamination level s are above the DOE guidelines for uncontrolled areas

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River Site and surrounding area, Aiken, South Carolina, October--November 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1993-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of October 14 to November 23, 1991, over an area surrounding the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The area is situated 15 kilometers south of Aiken, South Carolina. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma ray environment of the SRS and surrounding areas. Contour maps showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level were constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates measured within the survey region are generally uniform and typical of natural background. The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution. Enhanced exposure rates not attributable to natural background were measured over several areas within the survey region. The manmade radionuclides detected in these areas, cesium-137, cobalt-60, and protactinium-234m, were produced by the reactor operations and material processing conducted at the SRS. The radiation levels produced by these nuclides are consistent with those levels measured during previous SRS aerial surveys. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries

  3. DEPLOYMENT OF INNOVATIVE CHARACTERIZATION TECHNOLOGIES AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARSSIM PROCESS AT RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED SITES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALB,P.D.; MILIAN,L.; LUCKETT,L.; WATTERS,D.; MILLER,K.M.; GOGOLAK,C.

    2001-05-01

    The success of this Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project is measured on several levels. First, the deployment of this innovative approach using in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM was successfully established for all three phases of D and D characterization, i.e., pre-job scoping, on-going disposition of waste, and final status surveys upon completion of the activity. Unlike traditional D and D projects, since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project (BGRR-DP) is operating on an accelerated schedule, much of the work is being carried out simultaneously. Rather than complete a full characterization of the facility before D and D work begins, specific removal actions require characterization as the activity progresses. Thus, the need for rapid and cost-effective techniques for characterization is heightened. Secondly, since the approach used for this ASTD project was not thoroughly proven prior to deployment, a large effort was devoted to demonstrating technical comparability to project managers, regulators and stakeholders. During the initial phases, large numbers of replicate samples were taken and analyzed by conventional baseline techniques to ensure that BGRR-DP quality assurance standards were met. ASTD project staff prepared comparisons of data gathered using ISOCS and BetaScint with traditional laboratory methods and presented this information to BGRR-DP staff and regulators from EPA Region II, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, and the Suffolk County Board of Health. As the results of comparability evaluations became available, approval for these methods was received and the techniques associated with in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM were gradually integrated into BGRR-DP procedures.

  4. DEPLOYMENT OF INNOVATIVE CHARACTERIZATION TECHNOLOGIES AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARSSIM PROCESS AT RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED SITES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KALB, P.D.; MILIAN, L.; LUCKETT, L.; WATTERS, D.; MILLER, K.M.; GOGOLAK, C.

    2001-01-01

    The success of this Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project is measured on several levels. First, the deployment of this innovative approach using in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM was successfully established for all three phases of D and D characterization, i.e., pre-job scoping, on-going disposition of waste, and final status surveys upon completion of the activity. Unlike traditional D and D projects, since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project (BGRR-DP) is operating on an accelerated schedule, much of the work is being carried out simultaneously. Rather than complete a full characterization of the facility before D and D work begins, specific removal actions require characterization as the activity progresses. Thus, the need for rapid and cost-effective techniques for characterization is heightened. Secondly, since the approach used for this ASTD project was not thoroughly proven prior to deployment, a large effort was devoted to demonstrating technical comparability to project managers, regulators and stakeholders. During the initial phases, large numbers of replicate samples were taken and analyzed by conventional baseline techniques to ensure that BGRR-DP quality assurance standards were met. ASTD project staff prepared comparisons of data gathered using ISOCS and BetaScint with traditional laboratory methods and presented this information to BGRR-DP staff and regulators from EPA Region II, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, and the Suffolk County Board of Health. As the results of comparability evaluations became available, approval for these methods was received and the techniques associated with in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM were gradually integrated into BGRR-DP procedures

  5. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described

  6. Hanford Site physical separations CERCLA treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general procedures to be followed to conduct a physical separations soil treatability test in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site, Washington. The objective of this test is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems as a means of concentrating chemical and radioactive contaminants into fine soil fractions and thereby minimizing waste volumes. If successful the technology could be applied to clean up millions of cubic meters of contaminated soils in waste sites at Hanford and other sites. It is not the intent of this test to remove contaminated materials from the fine soils. Physical separation is a simple and comparatively low cost technology to potentially achieve a significant reduction in the volume of contaminated soils. Organic contaminants are expected to be insignificant for the 300-FF-I Operable Unit test, and further removal of metals and radioactive contaminants from the fine fraction of soils will require secondary treatment such as chemical extraction, electromagnetic separation, or other technologies. Additional investigations/testing are recommended to assess the economic and technical feasibility of applying secondary treatment technologies, but are not within the scope of this test. This plan provides guidance and specifications for the treatability test to be conducted as a service contract. More detailed instructions and procedures will be provided as part of the vendors (sellers) proposal. The procedures will be approved by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and finalized by the seller prior to initiating the test

  7. Project Miracle Play, Humid Water Test, Onsite Radiological Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Safety and Medical Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberry, C.E.; Salazar, A. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Tatum Dome Test Site, located approximately 34 kilometers southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, was the site for the second Humid Water Test in a series of detonable gas explosions of Operation Miracle Play that took place in the cavity created by the Salmon Test, a 5 KT nuclear detonation. In addition, another nuclear detonation, the Sterling Test (0.38 KT), and the Diode Tube Test (Operation Miracle Play), a gas explosion with an assumed yield of 100 tons, were detonated in the same cavity. The Humid Water Test was inadvertently detonated on April 19, 1970. The scheduled readiness date was April 21, 1970. The burial depth was approximately 2,700 feet in the center of the 55-foot radius cavity. The design yield was equivalent to 315 tons of TNT. The explosive mixture consisted of natural gas (99 percent methane) and oxygen, with a mixture of 1.6 to 1 oxygen and methane, respectively. (Some nitrogen was also pumped into the cavity during the purging of the filling lines.) The purpose of the event was to investigate the simulation of blast effect of underground nuclear explosions involving detonable gas mixtures, and to measure the reduction in seismic motion due to decoupling of explosions in an overdriven cavity. Radiation monitoring activities are described

  8. Site Release Report for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.E. Rasmuson

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope and aspect were chosen for comparison to

  9. Site Release Reports for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.E. Rasmuson

    2002-04-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope

  10. An aerial radiological survey of Par Pond and associated drainage pathways of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The first of a three-phase effort to radiologically monitor the lowering of Par Pond and associated drainage pathways was conducted over three areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The areas surveyed during this first phase included Par Pond, the Savannah River swamp from Steel Creek to Little Hell Landing, and Lower Three Runs Creek from the mouth of Lower Three Runs to the Highway 301 Bridge. The first phase was conducted to coincide with the lowering of the water level of Par Pond to an elevation of 190 feet above sea level. Additional surveys were conducted when the water level was at an elevation of 180 feet and prior to refill. The first survey began August 19, 1991, and was completed September 11, 1991. The second survey was conducted in October/November, 1991, during the SRS site-wide survey, and the third survey was conducted in August/September, 1992. Only the Par Pond area itself was surveyed during the third and final phase. The radiation detected over the Creek Plantation portion of the Savannah River swamp and Lower Three Runs areas during the August 1991 survey was consistent with the spatial distribution, quantity, and kinds of radionuclides detected during the 1983 and 1986 surveys. No migration of man-made gamma emitting materials was detected when compared to the prior surveys. The major differences occurred along the Par Pond shoreline where lowered water levels exposed the contaminated pond bed. The activity in the pond bed was attenuated by the water cover prior to the start of the lowering of Par Pond in June 1991. The data collected during each survey were processed in the field and were presented to SRS. A comparison report is being generated after the completion of each survey. A final report will be generated for the three surveys and will include a quantitative comparison of the three surveys in the Par Pond area only

  11. Overview of software development at the parabolic dish test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazono, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development history of the data acquisition and data analysis software is discussed. The software development occurred between 1978 and 1984 in support of solar energy module testing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site, located within Edwards Test Station. The development went through incremental stages, starting with a simple single-user BASIC set of programs, and progressing to the relative complex multi-user FORTRAN system that was used until the termination of the project. Additional software in support of testing is discussed including software in support of a meteorological subsystem and the Test Bed Concentrator Control Console interface. Conclusions and recommendations for further development are discussed.

  12. 137Cs Radiological risk estimation of NSD facility at Karawang site by using RESRAD onsite application: effect of cover thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, B.; Prihastuti, S.; Moersidik, S. S.

    2018-02-01

    The operational of near surface disposal facility during waste packages loading activity into the facility, or in a monitoring activity around disposal facility at Karawang area is predicted to give a radiological risk to radiation workers. The thickness of disposal facility cover system affected the number of radiological risk of workers. Due to this reason, a radiological risk estimation needs to be considered. RESRAD onsite code is applied for this purpose by analyse the individual accepted dose and radiological risk data of radiation workers. The obtained results and then are compared with radiation protection reference in accordance with national regulation. In this case, the data from the experimental result of Karawang clay as host of disposal facility such as Kd value of 137Cs was used. Results showed that the thickness of the cover layer of disposal facility affected to the radiological risk which accepted by workers in a near surface disposal facility.

  13. Preliminary site design for the SP-100 ground engineering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, C.M.; Miller, W.C.; Mahaffey, M.K.

    1986-04-01

    In November, 1985, Hanford was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) as the preferred site for a full-scale test of the integrated nuclear subsystem for SP-100. The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company, was assigned as the lead contractor for the Test Site. The nuclear subsystem, which includes the reactor and its primary heat transport system, will be provided by the System Developer, another contractor to be selected by DOE in late FY-1986. In addition to reactor operations, test site responsibilities include preparation of the facility plus design, procurement and installation of a vacuum chamber to house the reactor, a secondary heat transport system to dispose of the reactor heat, a facility control system, and postirradiation examination. At the conclusion of the test program, waste disposal and facility decommissioning are required. The test site must also prepare appropriate environmental and safety evaluations. This paper summarizes the preliminary design requirements, the status of design, and plans to achieve full power operation of the test reactor in September, 1990

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present

  15. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's. It was released for unrestricted use in 1968 following a radiological survey by the Atomic Energy Commission and is now a reserve training center for the U.S. Marine Sixth Motor Transport Battalion. The present survey was undertaken to determine whether the existing radiological status of the property is consistent with current health guidelines and radiation protection practices. The radiological survey included measurement of residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels, radon and radon daughter concentrations in buildings, external gamma radiation levels on the site and on adjacent property, and radium concentrations in soil on the site and on adjacent property. Surface contamination levels exceeded U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidelines and 222 Rn concentration levels exceeded the non-occupational maximum permissible concentration MPC/sub a/ of 3 pCi/liter in some structures. These results indicate the possible need for extensive radon and radon daughter measurements in structures both onsite and offsite over periods as suggested by the U.S. Surgeon General

  16. Political aspects of nuclear test effects at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydykov, E.B.; Panin, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes tense struggle of Kazakhstan people for closure of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site. It reveals major foreign policy aspects and nuclear test effects for both Kazakhstan and the world community. (author)

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU

  18. Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site. This report contains remedial verification of the soil sample analytical results for the following: Area 11 Tweezer facility; Area 12 boiler house; Area 12 service station; Area 23 bypass yard; Area 23 service station; Area 25 power house; Area 25 tech. services building; Area 25 tech. operations building; Area 26 power house; and Area 27 boiler house

  19. Long term radiological effects on plants and animals of a deep geological repository. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torudd, Jesper [Facilia AB (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    This study is part of the safety assessment of the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, called SR-Site. The purpose of the report is to clarify whether the environment is protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiation after a possible future release of radioactive matter from the planned repository. According to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), biological diversity and sustainable use of biological resources must be protected, and the evaluation should pay special attention to threatened and endemic species as well as economically and culturally valuable species. The report shows the approach to, and results of, calculations of dose rates to organisms other than man. The calculations are based on modelled activity concentrations from a potential future radioactive release, provided by a separate modelling project. Calculations were performed with the ERICA Tool, a software programme developed by an EU research project. In the ERICA Tool, dose rates for site specific organisms (i.e., occurring at the site) were calculated using input data such as size dimensions and masses of organisms, ecosystems and habitats, concentration ratios for the studied elements (i.e. the ratio of accumulated element concentration in the body compared with the element concentration in the surrounding environment) and maximum activity concentrations of radionuclides from the modelled future release. The results are provided in terms of final dose rates for each studied organism. In accordance with rationales of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the ERICA project, Representative (site-specific) Organisms from the planned site of the future repository were studied. Ideally, the organisms selected would meet the criteria defined by both SSM (species worth protecting) and by ICRP and ERICA (so-called Reference Organisms). Since activity concentrations for a number of radionuclides were missing for some of the studied

  20. Long term radiological effects on plants and animals of a deep geological repository. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torudd, Jesper (Facilia AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This study is part of the safety assessment of the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, called SR-Site. The purpose of the report is to clarify whether the environment is protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiation after a possible future release of radioactive matter from the planned repository. According to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), biological diversity and sustainable use of biological resources must be protected, and the evaluation should pay special attention to threatened and endemic species as well as economically and culturally valuable species. The report shows the approach to, and results of, calculations of dose rates to organisms other than man. The calculations are based on modelled activity concentrations from a potential future radioactive release, provided by a separate modelling project. Calculations were performed with the ERICA Tool, a software programme developed by an EU research project. In the ERICA Tool, dose rates for site specific organisms (i.e., occurring at the site) were calculated using input data such as size dimensions and masses of organisms, ecosystems and habitats, concentration ratios for the studied elements (i.e. the ratio of accumulated element concentration in the body compared with the element concentration in the surrounding environment) and maximum activity concentrations of radionuclides from the modelled future release. The results are provided in terms of final dose rates for each studied organism. In accordance with rationales of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the ERICA project, Representative (site-specific) Organisms from the planned site of the future repository were studied. Ideally, the organisms selected would meet the criteria defined by both SSM (species worth protecting) and by ICRP and ERICA (so-called Reference Organisms). Since activity concentrations for a number of radionuclides were missing for some of the studied

  1. Long term radiological effects on plants and animals of a deep geological repository. SR-Site Biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torudd, Jesper

    2010-12-01

    This study is part of the safety assessment of the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, called SR-Site. The purpose of the report is to clarify whether the environment is protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiation after a possible future release of radioactive matter from the planned repository. According to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), biological diversity and sustainable use of biological resources must be protected, and the evaluation should pay special attention to threatened and endemic species as well as economically and culturally valuable species. The report shows the approach to, and results of, calculations of dose rates to organisms other than man. The calculations are based on modelled activity concentrations from a potential future radioactive release, provided by a separate modelling project. Calculations were performed with the ERICA Tool, a software programme developed by an EU research project. In the ERICA Tool, dose rates for site specific organisms (i.e., occurring at the site) were calculated using input data such as size dimensions and masses of organisms, ecosystems and habitats, concentration ratios for the studied elements (i.e. the ratio of accumulated element concentration in the body compared with the element concentration in the surrounding environment) and maximum activity concentrations of radionuclides from the modelled future release. The results are provided in terms of final dose rates for each studied organism. In accordance with rationales of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the ERICA project, Representative (site-specific) Organisms from the planned site of the future repository were studied. Ideally, the organisms selected would meet the criteria defined by both SSM (species worth protecting) and by ICRP and ERICA (so-called Reference Organisms). Since activity concentrations for a number of radionuclides were missing for some of the studied

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field- investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the 'Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions

  4. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Building Site 421, United States, Watertown Arsenel, Watertown, MA. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of surveys of the current radiological condition of the Building Site 421, United States Arsenal Watertown, Watertown, Massachusetts. Findings of this survey indicate there are four spots involving an area of less than 6000 cm/sup 2/ of identifiable low-level residual radioactivity on the concrete pad which is all that remains of Building Site 421. The largest spot is approximately 5000 cm/sup 2/. The other three spots are 100 cm/sup 2/ or less. The beta-gamma readings at these spots are 8.4 x 10/sup 2/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/ and 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/. No alpha contamination was found at these locations. Gamma spectral analysis of a chip of contaminated concrete from one of the spots indicates that the contaminant is natural uranium. This contamination is fixed in the concrete and does not present an internal or external exposure hazard under present conditions. A hypothetical hazard analysis under a conservative set of assumed conditions indicates minimal internal hazard. The highest End Window contact reading was 0.09 mR/h. None of the other three spots indicated an elevated direct reading with the End Window Detector. Radon daughter concentrations were determined at three locations on the Building 421 pad. These were 0.00013 WL, 0.00011 WL and 0.00009 WL. According to the Surgeon General's Guidelines found in 10 CFR 712, radon daughter concentrations below 0.03 WL do not require remedial action in structures other than private dwellings and schools. Soil samples taken about the site indicate no elevated levels above the natural background levels in the soil. A gamma spectral analysis of a water sample obtained from the storm sewer line near the Building 421 pad indicates no elevated radioactivity in the sample. It was therefore felt that no contamination is present in this sewer.

  5. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Building Site 421, United States, Watertown Arsenel, Watertown, MA. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of surveys of the current radiological condition of the Building Site 421, United States Arsenal Watertown, Watertown, Massachusetts. Findings of this survey indicate there are four spots involving an area of less than 6000 cm 2 of identifiable low-level residual radioactivity on the concrete pad which is all that remains of Building Site 421. The largest spot is approximately 5000 cm 2 . The other three spots are 100 cm 2 or less. The beta-gamma readings at these spots are 8.4 x 10 2 dis/min-100 cm 2 , 2.2 x 10 5 dis/min-100 cm 2 , 2.2 x 10 5 dis/min-100 cm 2 and 8.5 x 10 4 dis/min-100 cm 2 . No alpha contamination was found at these locations. Gamma spectral analysis of a chip of contaminated concrete from one of the spots indicates that the contaminant is natural uranium. This contamination is fixed in the concrete and does not present an internal or external exposure hazard under present conditions. A hypothetical hazard analysis under a conservative set of assumed conditions indicates minimal internal hazard. The highest End Window contact reading was 0.09 mR/h. None of the other three spots indicated an elevated direct reading with the End Window Detector. Radon daughter concentrations were determined at three locations on the Building 421 pad. These were 0.00013 WL, 0.00011 WL and 0.00009 WL. According to the Surgeon General's Guidelines found in 10 CFR 712, radon daughter concentrations below 0.03 WL do not require remedial action in structures other than private dwellings and schools. Soil samples taken about the site indicate no elevated levels above the natural background levels in the soil. A gamma spectral analysis of a water sample obtained from the storm sewer line near the Building 421 pad indicates no elevated radioactivity in the sample. It was therefore felt that no contamination is present in this sewer

  6. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing sites Mexican Hat, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Audit date: May 3--7, 1993, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing sites in Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona. This audit was conducted May 3--7, 1993, by Bill James and Gerry Simiele of the TAC. Three site-specific findings and four observations were identified during the audit and are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the audit is that the majority of the radiological aspects of the Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona, remedial action programs are performed adequately. However, the findings identify that there is some inconsistency in following procedures and meeting requirements for contamination control, and a lack of communication between the RAC and the DOE on variances from the published remedial action plan (RAP)

  7. Geomechanics of the Climax mine-by, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-03-01

    A generic test of retrievable geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies in an underground chamber is being conducted at the Nevada Test Site. The horizontal shrinkage of the pillars is not explainable, but the vertical pillar stresses are easily understood. A two-phase project was initiated to estimate the in-situ deformability of the Climax granite and to refine the in-situ stress field data, and to model the mine-by

  8. Development and testing of a system for meteorological and radiological data centralizing on Magurele zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaus, M.; Niculescu, D.

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of European collaboration co-ordinated by F.Z. Karlsruhe, the adapting, installing and developing of a decision support system for nuclear emergency management is now in progress in NIPNE. The decision support system RODOS will be available to the Romanian competent authorities - as well as to many western and eastern countries - in case of nuclear accidents. One main task in implementing the decision support system is to provide as input, among others, on-line real-time radiological and meteorological data, measured in national territory. For that purpose the regional and national measuring networks had to be connected to the central RODOS station in NIPNE. As the first step the sources of data existing on the Magurele zone were coupled to the RODOS system. The main sources of data are different meteorological sensors and flowmeters installed at three levels on the meteorological tower and a remote gamma-ray area monitor with several measuring locations in Magurele zone, connected by radio links to the central unit in Nuclear Instruments and Methods Department. For transmission of collected data to the central RODOS station, a local area network was implemented to connect all the computers. The Ethernet - based network uses optical fiber between buildings, coaxial and twisted cable inside buildings and suitable Hewlett-Packard hubs and transceivers. Several communication software packages based on TCP/IP protocols were installed on the computers and tested. The real-time data transfer between collecting computers and the central station will be carried out by automatic triggering of FTP programs at regular time intervals. The local network provides also a link to Internet, so that the indispensable exchange of data with similar RODOS centers in other countries, especially with the coordinating institute in Karlsruhe, as well as with other organizations is ensured. (authors)

  9. Guidelines on Training, Examination and Certification in Digital Industrial Radiology Testing (RT-D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The IAEA promotes industrial applications of non-destructive testing (NDT) technologies. NDT methods are primarily used for the detection, location and sizing of surface and internal defects in, for example, welds, castings, forging, composite materials and concrete. Various NDT methods are also used in the preventive maintenance of nuclear power plants, aircraft and bridges. Thus, NDT technology contributes significantly to the improvement of the quality of industrial products and the integrity of equipment and plants. The introduction of powerful computers and reliable imaging technology has had significant impact on traditional, nuclear based NDT methods. During the introduction phase in digital industrial radiography (DIR), the digitization of films provided economy of storage, efficiency of communication and accuracy of dimensional measurement. NDT laboratories are progressing rapidly with the digitalization of NDT data. New radiologic imaging techniques in DIR, using image intensifier systems, computed radiography with phosphor imaging plates and digital detector arrays, have increased the capacity for visualization of defects and have revealed new potential for accurate evaluation and measurement. The development of DIR has been of continuing interest to the IAEA and national NDT societies in recent years. This has led to the formation of projects on the development and application of advanced industrial radiography and tomography techniques under the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology. This publication is intended to provide resource material to support vocational training to NDT radiographers on digital industrial radiography and to help NDT training centres and certification bodies in Member States to establish their own courses, curricula and certification systems in this technology

  10. Operational radioactive waste management plan for the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The Operational Radioactive Waste Management Plan for the Nevada Test Site establishes procedures and methods for the safe shipping, receiving, processing, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. Included are NTS radioactive waste disposition program guidelines, procedures for radioactive waste management, a description of storage and disposal areas and facilities, and a glossary of specifications and requirements

  11. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized

  12. Nevada test site radionuclide inventory and distribution: project operations plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    This document is the operational plan for conducting the Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The basic objective of this program is to inventory the significant radionuclides of NTS origin in NTS surface soil. The expected duration of the program is five years. This plan includes the program objectives, methods, organization, and schedules

  13. Ore levels in Paleozoic of Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergaliev, G.Kh.; Myasnikov, A.K.; Fomichev, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    The regularity of the deposition of main mineralization of industrial types within Semipalatinsk test site proves and here and there defines more exactly location of the ore levels in Eastern Kazakhstan. Two mega levels, namely: Cambrian-Ordovician (siliceous-basalt, island-arc) and Carboniferous (especially carbonaceous-tarragons) ones are the most perspective for localizing the leading gold mineralization in the region

  14. Soil monitoring in Pavlodar region adjoining to Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuleubaev, B.A.; Ramazanov, Zh.R.; Askarov, E.V.

    2004-01-01

    A problem of territory study and rehabilitation contaminated with man-caused radionuclides is an important task and it has economic, social, and ecology aspects. The problem is crucial for Pavlodar region due to real proximity and to partial location of Semipalatinsk Test Site on its territory. (author)

  15. Integrated radiobioecological monitoring of Semipalatinsk test site: general approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejsebaev, A.T.; Shenal', K.; Bakhtin, M.M.; Kadyrova, N.Zh.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents major research directions and general methodology for establishment of an integrated radio-bio-ecological monitoring system at the territory of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Also, it briefly provides the first results of monitoring the natural plant and animal populations at STS. (author)

  16. Environmental survey of southern part of former Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharikov, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    The present paper discusses results of the environmental survey performed in selected areas of Semipalatinsk test site southern part and gives calculations of possible annual radionuclide (Cs-37, Sr-90 and Pu-239/240) intake due to local husbandry products. (author)

  17. Options for clean-up of the Maralinga test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This report examines the limit of contamination of the soil and ground cover by 239 Pu, 235 U and 241 Am which may be considered as permitting the unrestricted land use of the former nuclear weapon test sites at Emu and Maralinga by Aboriginal groups. It reports on the options available to achieve this objective and their cost

  18. 78 FR 12259 - Unmanned Aircraft System Test Site Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... addressing potential UAS privacy concerns, as set out herein, contact Gregory C. Carter, Office of the Chief... address privacy concerns relating to the operation of the test site program, the FAA intends to include in... among policymakers, privacy advocates, and the industry regarding broader questions concerning the use...

  19. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  20. Radiological surveillance of Remedial Action activities at the processing site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, April 12--16, 1993. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological surveillance of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site in Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The requirements and attributes examined during the audit were developed from reviewing working-level procedures developed by the RAC. Objective evidence, comments, and observations were verified based on investigating procedures, documentation, records located at the site, personal interviews, and tours of the site. No findings were identified during this audit. Ten site-specific observations, three good practice observations, and five programmatic observations are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the surveillance is that the radiological aspects of the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, remedial action program are performed adequately. The results of the good practice observations indicate that the site health physics (HP) staff is taking the initiative to address and resolve potential issues, and implement suggestions useful to the UMTRA Project. However, potential exists for improving designated storage areas for general items, and the RAC Project Office should consider resolving site-specific and procedural inconsistencies

  1. Probabilistic Description of a Clay Site using CPTU tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sarah; Lauridsen, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2012-01-01

    A clay site at the harbour of Aarhus, where numerous cone penetration tests have been conducted, is assessed. The upper part of the soil deposit is disregarded, and only the clay sections are investigated. The thickness of the clay deposit varies from 5 to 6 meters, and is sliced into sections of...... a geotechnical assessment of a site, using both the method for classifying soil behaviour types and applying statistics, yield a new level of information, and certainty about the estimates of the strength parameters which are the important outcome of such a site description.......A clay site at the harbour of Aarhus, where numerous cone penetration tests have been conducted, is assessed. The upper part of the soil deposit is disregarded, and only the clay sections are investigated. The thickness of the clay deposit varies from 5 to 6 meters, and is sliced into sections of 1...... meter in thickness. For each slice, a map of the variation of the undrained shear strength is created through Kriging and the probability of finding weak zones in the deposit is calculated. This results in a description of the spatial variation of the undrained shear strength at the site. Making...

  2. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  4. LLNL Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  5. Off-site monitoring for the Mighty Oak nuclear test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Smith, A.E.; Costa, C.F.

    1986-07-01

    After a nuclear explosives test, code name Mighty Oak, the tunnel leading to the test point became contaminated with radioactive debris. To re-enter and recover valuable equipment and data, the DOE purged the tunnel air using particulate and charcoal filters to minimize discharge of radioactivity to the atmosphere. During this purging, the EPA established special air samples supplementing their routine air monitoring networks. Analysis of the collected samples for radioactive noble gases and for gamma-emitting radionuclides indicated that only low levels of xenon-133 were released in amounts detectable in populated areas near the Nevada Test Site. The maximum dose to an individual was calculated to be 0.36 microrem, assuming that person remained in the open field at the measurement site during the whole period of the purging

  6. CTBTO tests its on-site inspection regime in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    The former Soviet Union's nuclear test site at Semipalatinsk in the east of today's Kazakhstan was closed down after Kazakhstan became an independent State in 1991. This region in the Kazakh steppe is deserted and pockmarked by countless craters, remnants of over 450 nuclear explosions that were detonated there. In September 2008, the area will start brimming with activity. Scientists, diplomats and journalists will arrive from all over the world to witness an endeavour in the Kazakh steppe that is of great significance for the safety of our planet. The organization that monitors the comprehensive ban on nuclear testing will conduct a large scale exercise to test one of the key elements of its global alarm system - on-site inspections.

  7. Environmental site assessments should include radon gas testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    There are two emerging influences that will require radon gas testing as part of many property transfers and most site assessments. These requirements come from lending regulators and state legislatures. Fannie Mae and others have developed environmental investigation guidelines for the purchase of environmentally contaminated real estate. These guidelines include radon gas testing for many properties. Several states have enacted laws that require environmental disclosure forms be prepared to ensure that the parties involved in certain real estate transactions are aware of the environmental liabilities that may come with the transfer of property. Indiana has recently enacted legislation that would require the disclosure of the presence of radon gas on many commercial real estate transactions. With more lenders and state governments likely to follow this trend, radon gas testing should be performed during all property transfers and site assessment to protect the parties involved from any legal liabilities

  8. On-site tests on the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morilhat, P.; Favennec, J.M.; Neau, P.; Preudhomme, E.

    1996-01-01

    On-site tests and experiments are performed by EDF Research and Development Division on the nuclear power plants to assess the behaviour of major components submitted to thermal and vibratory solicitations. On-going studies deal with the qualification of new nuclear power plant standard and with the feedback of plants under operation. The tests, particularly the investigation tests, correspond to large investments and entail an important data volume which must ensure the continuity over a long period of the order of magnitude of the in-service plant life (around 40 years). This paper addresses the on-site experimental activities, describes the means to be used, and gives an example: the qualification of SG of new 1450 MW nuclear power plants. (author)

  9. Rehabilitation of the former nuclear test sites at Maralinga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.; Davoren, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra, has commenced tendering procedures for appointment of a Project Management Organisation for the Rehabilitation of the former British atomic weapon test sites at Maralinga and Emu in South Australia. This paper gives a historical background to the atomic tests, and reports scientific and engineering studies conducted by the Technical Assessment Group (TAG) to define practical and economic options for rehabilitation of the former test sites. The rehabilitation option preferred by the Australian Government will focus on removal and burial of soil and fragments highly contaminated with plutonium oxide, and erection of warning fences around areas where permanent residence will not be permitted. The application of in-situ vitrification is under investigation for stabilisation of twenty one disposal pits containing up to twenty kilograms of plutonium at Taranaki. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  10. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  11. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-01-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material

  12. Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

    1993-01-01

    An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring

  13. How to Read Your Radiology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Index A-Z How to Read Your Radiology Report Imaging studies such as magnetic resonance imaging ( ... radiology report. top of page Sections of the Radiology Report Type of exam The type of exam ...

  14. Site study plan for intermediate hydrology clusters tests wells Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic characteristics of intermediate-depth formations at the proposed Deaf Smith County, Texas, repository site, wells called Intermediate Hydrology clusters will test the Dewey Lake, Alibates, Salado, Yates, Upper and Lower Seven Rivers, and Queen Grayburg Formations. Sixteen wells will be installed at six locations. One location will have four wills, two locations will have three wells, and three locations will have two wells for a total of 16 wells. Testing of the formations is to proceed from the bottom up, with 2-day pumping tests at the less permeable formations. Tracer tests and tests for verticall hydraulic properties will be designed and performed after other hydrologic tests are completed. After testing, selected wells are to be completed as single or possibly dual monitoring wells to observe water-level trends. To develop a hydrogeologic testing plan, the response of each formation to potential testing procedures was evaluated using design values and an assumend range for hydraulic parameters. These evaluations indicate that hydraulic properties of a sandy zone of the Dockum, the lower Sever Rivers, and possibly the Alibates and Queen/Grayburg can be determined by pumping tests. Standard of shut-in slug tests must be conducted in the remaining formations. Tests of very long duration would be required to determine the verticla properties of less permeable formations. Tracer tests would also require weeks or months. 61 figs., 34 refs., 4 tabs

  15. Evaluation of soil radioactivity data from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    Since 1951, 933 nuclear tests have been conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and test areas on the adjacent Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR). Until the early 1960s. the majority of tests were atmospheric, involving detonation of nuclear explosive devices on the ground or on a tower, suspended from a balloon or dropped from an airplane. Since the signing of the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963, most tests have been conducted underground, although several shallow subsurface tests took place between 1962 and 1968. As a result of the aboveground and near-surface nuclear explosions, as well as ventings of underground tests, destruction of nuclear devices with conventional explosives, and nuclear-rocket engine tests, the surface soil on portions of the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides. Relatively little consideration was given to the environmental effects of nuclear testing during the first two decades of operations at the NTS. Since the early 1970s, however, increasingly strict environmental regulations have forced greater attention to be given to contamination problems at the site and how to remediate them. One key element in the current environmental restoration program at the NTS is determining the amount and extent of radioactivity in the surface soil. The general distribution of soil radioactivity on the NTS is already well known as a result of several programs carried out in the 1970s and 1980s. However, questions have been raised as to whether the data from those earlier studies are suitable for use in the current environmental assessments and risk analyses. The primary purpose of this preliminary data review is to determine to what extent the historical data collected at the NTS can be used in the characterization/remediation process

  16. Technological considerations in emergency instrumentation preparedness. Phase II-D. Evaluation testing and calibration methodology for emergency radiological instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramson, P.E.; Andersen, B.V.; Fleming, D.M.; Kathren, R.L.; Mulhern, O.R.; Newton, C.E.; Oscarson, E.E.; Selby, J.M.

    1976-09-01

    In response to recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the Division of Operational Safety, U.S. ERDA has contracted with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories to survey the adequacy of existing instrumentation at nuclear fuel cycle facilities to meet emergency requirements and to develop technical criteria for instrumentation systems to be used in assessment of environmental conditions following plant emergencies. This report, the fifth in a series, provides: (1) calibration methods to assure the quality of radiological measurements and (2) testing procedures for determining whether an emergency radiological instrument meets the performance specifications. Three previous reports in this series identified the emergency instrumentation needs for power reactors, mixed oxide fuel plants, and fuel reprocessing facilities. Each of these three reports contains a Section VI, which sets forth applicable radiological instrument performance criteria and calibration requirements. Testing and calibration procedures in this report have been formatted in two parts: IV and V, each divided into three subsections: (1) Power Reactors, (2) Mixed Oxide Fuel Plants, and (3) Fuel Reprocessing Facilities. The three performance criteria subsections directly coincide with the performance criteria sections of the previous reports. These performance criteria sections have been reproduced in this report as Part III with references of ''required action'' added

  17. GIS Modelling of Radionuclide Transport from the Semipalatinsk Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakay, L.; Zakarin, E.; Mahura, A.; Baklanov, A.; Sorensen, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the software complex GIS-project MigRad (Migration of Radionuclide) was developed, tested and applied for the territory of the Semipalatinsk test site/ polygon (Republic of Kazakhstan), where since 1961, in total 348 underground nuclear explosions were conducted. The MigRad is oriented on integration of large volumes of different information (mapping, ground-based, and satellite-based survey): and also includes modeling on its base local redistribution of radionuclides by precipitation and surface waters and by long-range transport of radioactive aerosols. The existing thermal anomaly on territory of the polygon was investigated in details, and the object-oriented analysis was applied for the studied area. Employing the RUNOFF model, the simulation of radionuclides migration with surface waters was performed. Employing the DERMA model, the simulation of long-term atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition patterns for cesium was conducted from 3 selected locations (Balapan, Delegen, and Experimental Field). Employing geoinformation technology, the mapping of the of the high temperature zones and epicenters of radioactive aerosols transport for the territory of the test site was carried out with post-processing and integration of modelling results into GIS environment. Contamination levels of pollution due to former nuclear explosions for population and environment of the surrounding polygon territories of Kazakhstan as well as adjacent countries were analyzed and evaluated. The MigRad was designed as instrument for comprehensive analysis of complex territorial processes influenced by former nuclear explosions on the territory of Semipalatinsk test site. It provides possibilities in detailed analyses for (i) extensive cartographic material, remote sensing, and field measurements data collected in different level databases; (ii) radionuclide migration with flows using accumulation and redistribution of soil particles; (iii) thermal anomalies

  18. Model testing for the remediation assessment of a radium contaminated site in Olen, Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeck, Lieve; Kanyar, Bela; Krajewski, Pawel; Kryshev, Alexander; Lietava, Peter; Nenyei, Arpad; Sazykina, Tatiana; Yu, Charley; Zeevaert, Theo

    2005-01-01

    Environmental assessment models are used as decision-aiding tools in the selection of remediation options for radioactively contaminated sites. In most cases, the effectiveness of the remedial actions in terms of dose savings cannot be demonstrated directly, but can be established with the help of environmental assessment models, through the assessment of future radiological impacts. It should be emphasized that, given the complexity of the processes involved and our current understanding of how they operate, these models are simplified descriptions of the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and therefore imperfect. One way of testing and improving the reliability of the models is to compare their predictions with real data and/or the predictions of other models. Within the framework of the Remediation Assessment Working Group (RAWG) of the BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) programme coordinated by IAEA, two scenarios were constructed and applied to test the reliability of environmental assessment models when remedial actions are involved. As a test site, an area of approximately 100 ha contaminated by the discharges of an old radium extraction plant in Olen (Belgium) has been considered. In the first scenario, a real situation was evaluated and model predictions were compared with measured data. In the second scenario the model predictions for specific hypothetical but realistic situations were compared. Most of the biosphere models were not developed to assess the performance of remedial actions and had to be modified for this purpose. It was demonstrated clearly that the modeller's experience and familiarity with the mathematical model, the site and with the scenario play a very important role in the outcome of the model calculations. More model testing studies, preferably for real situations, are needed in order to improve the models and modelling methods and to expand the areas in which the models are applicable

  19. Radiological survey of the low-level radioactive waste burial site at the Palos Forest Preserve, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two landfill sites containing low-level radioactive waste material, Site A and Plot M, are located 14 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois in the Palos Forest Preserve. Site A is the former location of the Argonne National Laboratory. Buried at Site A in 1956 were the dismantled reactor shells, building walls, and cooling towers from three of the world's first nuclear reactors. Plot M was used from 1943 to 1949 for burial of low-level radioactive wastes derived from Site A operations and from the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory. Tritiated water was detected in 1973 in some of the Forest Preserve picnic wells located 500 to 1000 yards north of Plot M. An extensive surveillance program was initiated in 1976 to: (1) study the elevated tritium content of some picnic wells and its observed seasonal fluctuations, (2) establish if other radionuclides buried in Plot M or remaining at Site A have migrated, (3) establish the rate of groundwater movement in the glacial till and underlying dolomite aquifer, (4) determine the tritium content of the till and aquifer, and (5) predict future tritium levels in the well water. Several test wells were installed in the soil and dolomite bedrock to monitor radioactivity in groundwater, measure water levels, and provide other geohydrological information. Tritium has migrated from the Plot M burial trenches into the surrounding drift. The tritium plume, the contaminated zone in the drift in which tritium concentrations exceed 10 nanocuries per liter of water (nCi/L), has migrated at least 165 feet horizontally northward and 130 feet vertically downward to the bedrock surface. Small amounts of other radionuclides - uranium, plutonium, and strontium-90 - have been found in boreholes beneath the concrete cap covering Plot M, but not in the subsoil outside of the Plot. The radionuclide concentrations found to date are too low to result in any measureable radiation exposure to the public

  20. COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the performance

  1. Potential sites for a spent unreprocessed fuel facility (SURFF), southwesten part of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, D.L.; Eckel, E.B.; Ohl, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    In the absence of specific criteria, the topography, geomorphology, and geology of Jackass Flats and vicinity in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site are evaluated by arbitrary guidelines for a Spent Unreprocessed Fuel Facility. The guidelines include requirements for surface slopes of less than 5%, 61 m of alluvium beneath the site, an area free of active erosion or deposition, lack of faults, a minimum area of 5 km 2 , no potential for flooding, and as many logistical support facilities as possible. The geology of the Jackass Flats area is similar to the rest of the Nevada Test Site in topographic relief (305-1,200 m), stratigraphy (complexly folded and faulted Paleozoic sediments overlain by Tertiary ash-flow tuffs and lavas overlain in turn by younger alluvium), and structure (Paleozoic thrust faults and folds, strike-slip faults, proximity to volcanic centers, and Basin and Range normal faults). Of the stratigraphic units at the potential Spent Unreprocessed Fuel Facility site in Jackass Flats, only the thickness and stability of the alluvium are of immediate importance. Basin and Range faults and a possible extension of the Mine Mountain fault need further investigation. The combination of a slope map and a simplified geologic and physiographic map into one map shows several potential sites for a Spent Unreprocessed Fuel Facility in Jackass Flats. The potential areas have slopes of less than 5% and contain only desert pavement or segmented pavement--the two physiographic categories having the greatest geomorphic and hydraulic stability. Before further work can be done, specific criteria for a Spent Unreprocessed Fuel Facility site must be defined. Following criteria definition, potential sites will require detailed topographic and geologic studies, subsurface investigations (including geophysical methods, trenching, and perhaps shallow drilling for faults in alluvium), detailed surface hydrologic studies, and possibly subsurface hydrologic studies

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant Evenson

    2006-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The 'Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204

  4. Preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical tool for the preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part the functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning the methodologies, techniques and available results of research on such emergencies. To ensure effective response to radiation emergencies when needed, provisions should be made for regular training of emergency response personnel. As stated in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Safety Requirements, Safety Standard Series No. GS-R-2), 'The operator and the response organizations shall make arrangements for the selection of personnel and training to ensure that the personnel have the requisite knowledge, skills, abilities, equipment, procedures and other arrangements to perform their assigned response functions'. A further requirement is that 'Exercise programmes shall be conducted to ensure that all specified functions required to be performed for emergency response and all organizational interfaces for facilities in threat category I, II or III and the national level programmes for threat category IV or V are tested at suitable intervals'. In 2004 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(48)/RES/10 encouraged Member States to 'implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency'. This document is published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. It was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, the exercise structure, terms and scenarios must be

  5. Radiological status of the environment around the site of Saint-Pierre (Cantal). IRSN Third-party expertise. Part 1: situational analysis and additional studies to be performed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document reports the first part of a study which aimed at verifying the relevance of available studies and measurements for the Saint-Pierre ancient mining site and regarding risks related to radioactivity. More specifically, this study aimed at defining the most precisely as possible the perimeter of potential influence of this site for three pollution vectors (water, air, soils) with respect to available studies and in terms of necessary additional studies, at assessing the radiological impact on populations living, working or staying at the neighbourhood of this restored site, and at proposing an evolution of the current survey arrangement in order to make it more adapted and reliable. This first part is dedicated to the analysis of all existing documents in order to define required additional elements (analysis, sampling, surveys, and so on) for a better knowledge of the present radiological status of the studied site. After a presentation of the physical and human characteristics of the site, and of its geological and mineralogical context, and recalled the past mining activities (extraction, processing, wastes, waste rock and tailings), the report proposes an analysis per component: external exposure, radon and dusts, underground waters, surface waters, sediments, aquatic fauna and flora, food products. An assessment and recommendations are formulated. Financial aspects are discussed

  6. Lightning vulnerability of nuclear explosive test systems at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasbrouck, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    A task force chartered to evaluate the effects of lightning on nuclear explosives at the Nevada Test Site has made several recommendations intended to provide lightning-invulnerable test device systems. When these recommendations have been implemented, the systems will be tested using full-threat-level simulated lightning

  7. Mixed waste disposal facility at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, P.T.; Kendall, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a law suit brought against DOE resulted in the requirement that DOE be subject to regulation by the state and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for all hazardous wastes, including mixed wastes. Therefore, all DOE facilities generating, storing, treating, or disposing of mixed wastes will be regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCTA). In FY 1985, DOE Headquarters requested DOE low-level waste (LLW) sites to apply for a RCRA Part B Permit to operate radioactive mixed waste facilities. An application for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was prepared and submitted to the EPA, Region IX in November 1985 for review and approval. At that time, the state of Nevada had not yet received authorization for hazardous wastes nor had they applied for regulatory authority for mixed wastes. In October 1986, DOE Nevada Operations Office was informed by the Rocky Flats Plant that some past waste shipments to NTS contained trace quantities of hazardous substances. Under Colorado law, these wastes are defined as mixed. A DOE Headquarters task force was convened by the Under Secretary to investigate the situation. The task force concluded that DOE has a high priority need to develop a permitted mixed waste site and that DOE Nevada Operations Office should develop a fast track project to obtain this site and all necessary permits. The status and issues to be resolved on the permit for a mixed waste site are discussed

  8. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

  9. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 576: Miscellaneous Radiological Sites and Debris Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 576 is located in Areas 2, 3, 5, 8, and 9 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 576 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 576, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 00-99-01, Potential Source Material; 02-99-12, U-2af (Kennebec) Surface Rad-Chem Piping; 03-99-20, Area 3 Subsurface Rad-Chem Piping; 05-19-04, Frenchman Flat Rad Waste Dump ; 09-99-08, U-9x (Allegheny) Subsurface Rad-Chem Piping; 09-99-09, U-9its u24 (Avens-Alkermes) Surface Contaminated Flex Line These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD).

  11. Application to transfer radioactive waste to the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    All waste described in this application has been, and will be, generated by LANL in support of the nuclear weapons test program at the NTS. All waste originates on the NTS. DOE Order 5820.2A states that low-level radioactive waste shall be disposed of at the site where it is generated, when practical. Since the waste is produced at the NTS, it is cost effective for LANL to dispose of the waste at the NTS

  12. 2003 Nevada Test Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Nevada Test Site. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. Medical Effects and Dosimetric Data from Nuclear Tests at the Semipalatinsk Test Site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balmukhanov, S. B; Abdrakhmanov, J. N; Balmukhanov, T. S; Gusev, B. I; Kurakina, N. N; Raisov, T. G

    2006-01-01

    .... The Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS), or Polygon as it was called, was instituted in 1947. Data relating to the radiation levels were declassified in 1992 and are published in the first two tables of this report...

  14. Environmental radiation measurements at the former Soviet Union's Semipalatinsk nuclear test site and surrounding villages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shebell, P.; Hutter, A.R.

    1996-07-01

    Two scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Measurements Laboratory served as scientific experts to the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Mission to Kazakhstan: Strengthening Radiation and Nuclear Safety Infrastructures in Countries of the former USSR, Special Task - Preassessment of the radiological situation in the Semipalatinsk and western areas of Kazakhstan. The former Soviet Union's largest nuclear test site was located near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, and following Kazakhstan's independence, the IAEA committed to studying the environmental contamination and the resulting radiation exposure risk to the population due to 346 underground, 87 atmospheric and 26 surface nuclear detonations performed at the site between 1949 and 1989. As part of an 11-member team, environmental radiation measurements were performed during 2 weeks in July 1994. Approximately 30 sites were visited both within the boundaries of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site as well as in and around surrounding villages. Specifically, the objectives of the EML team were to apply independent methods and equipment to assess potential current radiation exposures to the population. Towards this end, the EML scientists collected in-situ gamma-ray spectra, performed external gamma dose rate measurements using pressurized ionization chambers, and collected soil samples in order to estimate the inventory and to determine the depth distribution of radionuclides of interest. With the exception of an area near an open-quotes atomic lakeclose quotes and a 1 km 2 area encompassing ground zero, all the areas visited by the team had external dose rates that were within typical environmental levels. The measurements taken within a 15 km radius of ground zero had elevated levels of 137 Cs as well as the activation products 152 Eu and 60 Co, The dose rate within a 1 km radius of ground zero ranged from 500 to 30000 nGy h -1

  15. Radiation-related monitoring and environmental research at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Patton, S.E.; Shinn, J.H.; Black, S.C.; Costa, C.F.; Elle, D.R.; Essington, E.H.; Gilbert, R.O.; Gonzalez, D.A.; Hunter, R.B.; Medica, P.A.; McArthur, R.D.; Thompson, C.B.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Romney, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    Beginning with the first nuclear-weapons-related tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1951, a radiation-related monitoring program was established to determine the levels and distribution of radionuclides released. Primary methods involved survey-meter-equipped field-monitoring teams and placement of film badges and air-sampling devices at fixed locations. Beginning in the mid-1950s, more stringent standards, the results of this monitoring program, and the results of related research programs led to increased engineering efforts to reduce local fallout. With passage of the National Environmental Policy Act and increased concern about possible effects of radiation exposure, environmental activities related to the NTS increased. There is now an extensive monitoring program at the NTS to assess radiological conditions resulting from past tests and from continued testing of nuclear-weapons devices. In populated areas near NTS, there is also a monitoring effort that relies on assistance from local communities. Other efforts include reconstruction of radiation doses received by offsite residents during the 1950s and 1960s, determination of the current inventory and distribution of radionuclides in surface soil, and studies of the movement of radionuclides in the desert ecosystem

  16. Rehabilitation of former nuclear test sites in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A range of options with indicative cost estimates and timescale has been defined for clean-up of the former British nuclear test sites at Maralinga and Emu in South Australia. The situation at the former test sites on the Monte Bello Islands has been reported separately. The predominant contributor to potential radiation dose at the test sites is residual plutonium contamination of soil which may be incorporated into the body through inhalation of resuspended dust. Acceptable levels of radioactive soil contamination based upon organ doses from incorporated plutonium and the associated health detriment are proposed by the Technical Assessment Group for a series of land-use options ranging from fully unrestricted habitation by Aboriginals including the case of high dependence on local plants and animals for food: to casual access by Aboriginals assuming retained or, if necessary, extended fences. The area of land affected and the quantity of soil and other material with more than the proposed limit of contamination as well as a range of remedial measures for reduction of the contamination to a level acceptable for each of the land-use options has been assessed and methods proposed for safe disposal of the contaminated materials. The associated costs of these remedial measures and disposal methods have also been estimated. 28 refs., 71 tabs., 45 figs

  17. DOUBLE TRACKS Test Site interim corrective action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The DOUBLE TRACKS site is located on Range 71 north of the Nellis Air Force Range, northwest of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). DOUBLE TRACKS was the first of four experiments that constituted Operation ROLLER COASTER. On May 15, 1963, weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium were dispersed using 54 kilograms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. The explosion occurred in the open, 0.3 m above the steel plate. No fission yield was detected from the test, and the total amount of plutonium deposited on the ground surface was estimated to be between 980 and 1,600 grams. The test device was composed primarily of uranium-238 and plutonium-239. The mass ratio of uranium to plutonium was 4.35. The objective of the corrective action is to reduce the potential risk to human health and the environment and to demonstrate technically viable and cost-effective excavation, transportation, and disposal. To achieve these objectives, Bechtel Nevada (BN) will remove soil with a total transuranic activity greater then 200 pCI/g, containerize the soil in ``supersacks,`` transport the filled ``supersacks`` to the NTS, and dispose of them in the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site. During this interim corrective action, BN will also conduct a limited demonstration of an alternative method for excavation of radioactive near-surface soil contamination.

  18. Development testing of grouting and liner technology for humid sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    Shallow land burial, although practiced for many years, has not always secured radionuclides from the biosphere in humid environments. To develop and demonstrate improved burial technology the Engineered Test Facility was implemented. An integral part of this experiment was site characterization, with geologic and hydrologic factors as major the components. Improved techniques for burial of low-level waste were developed and tested in the laboratory before being applied in the field. The two techniques studied were membrane trench liner and grouting void spaces

  19. Study of radionuclide contamination at the former Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemyev, O.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper the contamination technical areas of the former Semipalatinsk test site is discussed in details. It is concluded, that radioactive contamination of the Degelen technical area caused by underground nuclear tests is mainly retained within tunnels and cavities. Investigation showed that many tunnel portal areas here are contaminated by radioactive substances. Areas of significantly high contamination levels are also found at the Balapan technical area mainly around borehole sleeves. A serious source of radioactive contamination is tritium in used boreholes and high content of radionuclides produced due to the fission of nuclear device and activation of rocks at crater rim around the Atom lake

  20. Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-01-01

    This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring two low-level radioactive waste disposal sites at the Nevada Test Site. This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring two low-level radioactive waste disposal sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) are managed and operated by Bechtel Nevada (BN) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) for these sites is based on guidance for developing closure plans issued by the DOE (DOE, 1999a). The plan does not closely follow the format suggested by the DOE guidance to better accommodate differences between the two RWMSs, especially in terms of operations and site characteristics. The modification reduces redundancy and provides a smoother progression of the discussion. Further, much of the information that would be included in the individual plans is the same, and integration provides efficient presentation. A cross-walk between the contents of the ICMP and the DOE guidance is given in Appendix A. Closure and monitoring were integrated because monitoring measures the degree to which the operational and closed disposal facilities are meeting performance objectives specified in the manual to DOE Order O 435.1. Department of Energy Order 435.1 governs management of radioactive waste, and associated with it are Manual DOE M 435.1-1 and Guidance DOE G 435.1-1. The performance objectives are intended to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment from radiological exposure associated with the RWMSs now and in the future

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