WorldWideScience

Sample records for test reactor fuels

  1. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  2. Reactor transients tests for SNR fuel elements in HFR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plitz, H.

    1989-01-01

    In HFR reactor, fuel pins of LMFBR reactors are putted in irradiation specimen capsules cooled with sodium for reactor transients tests. These irradiation capsules are instrumented and the experiences realized until this day give results on: - Fuel pins subjected at a continual variation of power - melting fuel - axial differential elongation of fuel pins

  3. Nuclear fuels for material test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Durazzo, M.; Freitas, C.T. de

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results related do the development of nuclear fuels for reactors cooled and moderated by water have been presented cylindrical and plate type fuels have been described in which the core consists of U compouns dispersed in an Al matrix and is clad with aluminium. Fabrication details involving rollmilling, swaging or hot pressing have been described. Corrosion and irradiation test results are also discussed. The performance of the different types of fuels indicates that it is possible to locally fabricate fuel plates with U 3 O 8 +Al cores (20% enriched U) for use in operating Brazilian research reactors. (Author) [pt

  4. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  5. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong-Seong; Yim, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Han-Soo; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Oh, Je-Yong

    2006-02-15

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34{approx}38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc.

  6. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  7. HFR irradiation testing of light water reactor (LWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.F.W.

    1985-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information with emphasis on LWR fuel rod testing capabilities and hot cell investigation is presented. Additionally a summary of LWR fuel irradiation programmes performed and forthcoming programmes are described. Project management information and a list of publications pertaining to LWR fuel rod test programmes is given

  8. Current and prospective fuel test programmes in the MIR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izhutov, A.L.; Burukin, A.V.; Iljenko, S.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.A.; Shulimov, V.N.; Smirnov, V.P. [State Scientific Centre of Russia Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Ulyanovsk region (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    MIR reactor is a heterogeneous thermal reactor with a moderator and a reflector made of metal beryllium, it has a channel-type design and is placed in a water pool. MIR reactor is mainly designed for testing fragments of fuel elements and fuel assemblies (FA) of different nuclear power reactor types under normal (stationary and transient) operating conditions as well as emergency situations. At present six test loop facilities are being operated (2 PWR loops, 2 BWR loops and 2 steam coolant loops). The majority of current fuel tests is conducted for improving and upgrading the Russian PWR fuel, these tests involve issues such as: -) long term tests of short-size rods with different modifications of cladding materials and fuel pellets; -) further irradiation of power plant re-fabricated and full-size fuel rods up to achieving 80 MW*d/kg U; -) experiments with leaking fuel rods at different burnups and under transient conditions; -) continuation of the RAMP type experiments at high burnup of fuel; and -) in-pile tests with simulation of LOCA and RIA type accidents. Testing of the LEU (low enrichment uranium) research reactor fuel is conducted within the framework of the RERTR programme. Upgrading of the gas cooled and steam cooled loop facilities is scheduled for testing the HTGR fuel and sub-critical water-cooled reactor, correspondingly. The present paper describes the major programs of the WWER high burn-up fuel behavior study in the MIR reactor, capabilities of the applied techniques and some results of the performed irradiation tests. (authors)

  9. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

    1993-01-01

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., is a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. Initial results suggests that full-scale PBR elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of ∼60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperture limit, average energy deposition of ∼100 MW/L may be achievable

  10. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todosow, Michael; Bezler, Paul; Ludewig, Hans; Kato, Walter Y.

    1993-01-01

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., is a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. Initial results suggests that full-scale PBR elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of ˜60-80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperture limit, average energy deposition of ˜100 MW/L may be achievable.

  11. Research and Test Reactor Fuel Elements (RTRFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, Brett W.; Marinak, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    BWX Technologies Inc. (BWXT) has experienced several production improvements over the past year. The homogeneity yields in 4.8 gU/cc U 3 Si 2 plates have increased over last year's already high yields. Through teamwork and innovative manufacturing techniques, maintaining high quality surface finishes on plates and elements is becoming easier and less expensive. Currently, BWXT is designing a fabrication development plan to reach a fuel loading of 9 gU/cc within 2 - 4 years. This development will involve a step approach requested by ANL to produce plates using U-8Mo at a loading of 6 gU/cc first and qualify the fuel at those levels. In achieving the goal of a very high-density fuel loading of 9 gU/cc, BWXT is considering employing several new, state of the art, ultrasonic testing techniques for fuel core evaluation. (author)

  12. Testing plutonium fuel assembly production for fast-neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nougues, B.; Benhamou, A.; Bertothy, G.; Lepetit, H.

    1975-01-01

    The main characteristics of plutonium fuel elements for fast breeder reactors justify specific test procedures and special techniques. The specific tests relating to the Pu content consist of Pu enrichment and distribution tests, determination of the O/M ratio and external contamination tests. The specific tests performed on fuel configuration are: testing of sintered pellet diameter, testing of pin welding and checking of internal assmbly [fr

  13. Feasibility study of the Dragon reactor for HTGR fuel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallroth, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    The Organization of European Community Development (OECD) Dragon high-temperature reactor project has performed HTGR fuel and fuel element testing for about 10 years. To date, a total of about 250 fuel elements have been irradiated and the test program continues. The feasibility of using this test facility for HTGR fuel testing, giving special consideration to U. S. needs, is evaluated. A detailed description for design, preparation, and data acquisition of a test experiment is given together with all possible options on supporting work, which could be carried out by the experienced Dragon project staff. 11 references. (U.S.)

  14. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, D.

    1982-12-01

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO 2 rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H 3 Si-Al dispersion and UO 2 caramel plate fuels

  15. Fabrication of Fast Reactor Fuel Pins for Test Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsten, G. [Institute for Applied Reactor Physics, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Dippel, T. [Institute for Radiochemistry, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Laue, H. J. [Institute for Applied Reactor Physics, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1967-09-15

    An extended irradiation programme is being carried out for the fuel element development of the Karlsruhe fast breeder project. A very important task within the programme is the testing of plutonium-containing fuel pins in a fast-reactor environment. This paper deals with fabrication of such pins by our laboratories at Karlsruhe. For the fast reactor test positions at present envisaged a fuel with 15% plutonium and the uranium fully enriched is appropriate. Hie mixed oxide is both pelletized and vibro-compacted with smeared densities between 80 and 88% theoretical. The pin design is, for example, such that there are two gas plena at the top and bottom, and one blanket above the fuel with the fuel zone fitting to the test reactor core length. The specifications both for fuel and cladding have been adapted to the special purpose of a fast-breeder reactor - the outer dimensions, the choice of cladding and fuel types, the data used and the kind of tests outline the targets of the development. The fuel fabrication is described in detail, and also the powder line used for vibro-compaction. The source materials for the fuel are oxalate PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} from the UF{sub 6} process. The special problems of mechanical mixing and of plutonium homogeneity have been studied. The development of the sintering technique and grain characteristics for vibratory compactive fuel had to overcome serious problems in order to reach 82-83% theoretical. The performance of the pin fabrication needed a major effort in welding, manufacturing of fits and decontamination of the pin surfaces. This was a stimulation for the development of some very subtle control techniques, for example taking clear X-ray photographs and the tube testing. In general the selection of tests was a special task of the production routine. In conclusion the fabrication of the pins resulted in valuable experiences for the further development of fast reactor fuel elements. (author)

  16. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  17. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  18. Situation of test and research reactors' spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Junzo; Sato, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. DOE decided a renewal Off-Site Fuel Policy for stopping to spread a highly enriched uranium which was originally enriched at the U.S., the policy declared that to receive all HEU spent fuels from Test and Research reactors in all the world. In Japan, under bilateral agreement of cooperation between the government of the United States and the government of Japan concerning peaceful uses of nuclear energy, the highly enriched uranium of Test and Research Reactors' fuels was purchased from the U.S. and the fuels had been manufactured in Japan, America, Germany and France. On the other hand, a former president of the U.S. J. Carter proposed that to convert the fuels from HEU to LEU concerning a nonproliferation of nuclear materials in 1978, and Japan absolutely supported this policy. Under this condition, the U.S. stopped to receive the spent fuels from the other countries concerning legal action to the Off-Site Fuels Policy. As a result, the spent fuels are increasing, and to cross to each reactor's storage capacity, and if this policy start, a faced crisis of Test and Research Reactors will be avoided. (author)

  19. Testing of a transport cask for research reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Silva, Luiz Leite da; Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O.; Novara, Oscar E.

    2011-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries which operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a tri-national team and a half-scale model for MTR fuel constructed in Argentina and tested in Brazil. Two test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. Although the specimen has not successfully performed the tests, its overall performance was considered very satisfactory, and improvements are being introduced to the design. A third test sequence is planned for 2011. (author)

  20. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  1. Facility for in-reactor creep testing of fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, E.; Wright, M.G.

    1976-11-01

    A biaxial stress creep test facility has been designed and developed for operation in the WR-1 reactor. This report outlines the rationale for its design and describes its construction and the operating experience with it. The equipment is optimized for the determination of creep data on CANDU fuel cladding. Typical results from Zr-2.5 wt% Nb fuel cladding are used to illustrate the accuracy and reliability obtained. (author)

  2. Fuel motion in overpower tests of metallic integral fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.A.; Bauer, T.H.; Stanford, G.S.; Regis, J.P.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper results from hodoscope data analyses are presented for transient overpower (TOP) tests M5, M6, and M7 at the Transient Reactor Test Facility, with emphasis on transient feedback mechanisms, including prefailure expansion at the tops of the fuel pins, subsequent dispersive axial fuel motion, and losses in relative worth of the fuel pins during the tests. Tests M5 and M6 were the first TOP tests of margin to cladding breach and prefailure elongation of D9-clad ternary (U-Pu-Zr) integral fast reactor-type fuel. Test M7 extended these results to high-burnup fuel and also initiated transient testing of HT-9-clad binary (U-Zr) Fast Flux Test Facility driver fuel. Results show significant prefailure negative reactivity feedback and strongly negative feedback from fuel driven to failure

  3. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  4. Development and testing of the EDF-2 reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeyroux, P.

    1964-01-01

    This technical report reviews the work which has been necessary for defining the EDF-2 fuel element. After giving briefly the EDF-2 reactor characteristics and the preliminary choice of parameters which made it possible to draw up a draft plan for the fuel element, the authors consider the research proper: - Uranium studies: tests on the passage into the β phase of an internal crown of a tube, bending of the tube under the effect of a localized force, welding of the end-pellets and testing for leaks. The resistance of the tube to crushing and of the pellets to yielding under the external pressure have been studied in detail in another CEA report. - Can studies: conditions of production and leak proof testing of the can, resistance of the fins to creep due to the effect of the gas flow. - Studies of the extremities of the element: creep under compression and welding of the plugs to the can. - Cartridge studies: determination of the characteristics of the can fuel fixing grooves and of the canning conditions, verification of the resistance of the fuel element to thermal cycling, determination of the temperature drop at the can-fuel interface dealt with in more detail in another CEA report. - Studies of the whole assembly: this work which concerns the graphite jacket, the support and the cartridge vibrations has been carried out by the Mechanical and Thermal Study Service (Mechanics Section). In this field the Fuel Element Study Section has investigated the behaviour of the centering devices in a gas current. The outcome of this research is the defining of the plan of the element the production process and the production specifications. The validity of ail these out-of-pile tests will be confirmed by the in-pile tests already under way and by irradiation of the elements in the EDF-2 reactor itself. In conclusion the programme is given for improving the fuel element and for defining the fuel element for the second charge. (authors) [fr

  5. Kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The effects of using different low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density, on the kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Simulations were carried out to calculate prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed-neutron fraction, core excess reactivity and neutron flux spectrum. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were used to carry out these calculations. It was observed that both the silicide fuels had the same prompt neutron generation time 0.02% more than that of the original aluminide fuel, while the oxide fuel had a prompt neutron generation time 0.05% less than that of the original aluminide fuel. The effective delayed-neutron fraction decreased for all the fuels; the decrease was maximum at 0.06% for U 3 Si 2 -Al followed by 0.03% for U 3 Si-Al, and 0.01% for U 3 O 8 -Al fuel. The U 3 O 8 -Al fueled reactor gave the maximum ρ excess at BOL which was 21.67% more than the original fuel followed by U 3 Si-Al which was 2.55% more, while that of U 3 Si 2 -Al was 2.50% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The neutron flux of all the fuels was more thermalized, than in the original fuel, in the active fuel region of the core. The thermalization was maximum for U 3 O 8 -Al followed by U 3 Si-Al and then U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel.

  6. The combined use of test reactor experiments and power reactor tests for the development of PCI-resistant fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Vesterlund, G.; Vaernild, O.

    1980-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that for development of PCI-resistant fuel acceptable from the commercial and licensing aspects, extensive and time-consuming work is needed both in a test reactor and in power reactors. The test reactor is necessary for ramp testing to power levels not allowed in power reactors and with the aim of generating fuel failures. It is also used for other special irradiation experiments. The access to power reactors is necessary to generate information on performance in a real LWR core and to incubate at a reasonable cost the large amount of rods required for test reactor ramping. Selected results from the ASEA-ATOM work are used to support these conclusions. (author)

  7. Tests of the RBMK-1500 reactor fuel assemblies in the Leningrad reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aden, V.C.; Varovin, I.A.; Vorontsov, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    Test of fuel assemblies of the RBMK-1500 reactor is conducted in the reactor of the Leningrad NPP unit 2 for proving the calculational values of critical power of the RBMK-1500 reactor fuel assemblies adopted in design. The experiment presupposes the maximal approximation of the fuel assembly operation parameters to the calculational critical parameters without bringing into the mode of heat transfer crisis. The experiments are carried out at 500, 850 and 900 MW(el) of the reactor. The maximal channel power made up 472 kW at 20.5 t/h coolant flow rate and 49% mass steam content at the outlet of the channel. It was concluded that there was supply up to the heat transfer crisis in all the investigated modes. Data of temperature measurings of the fuel element cans, readings of the devices of the failure control system of the fuel element cans and external inspection of the assemblies after the tests testify to it [ru

  8. Testing of research reactor fuel in the high flux reactor (Petten)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.; Markgraf, J.W.; Sordon, G.; Wijtsma, F.J.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Hendriks, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The two types of fuel most frequently used by the main research reactors are metallic: highly enriched uranium (>90%) and silicide low enriched uranium ( 3 . However, a need exists for research on new reactor fuel. This would permit some plants to convert without losses in flux or in cycle length and would allow new reactor projects to achieve higher possibilities especially in fluxes. In these cases research is made either on silicide with higher density, or on other types of fuel (UMo, etc.). In all cases when new fuel is proposed, there is a need, for safety reasons, to test it, especially regarding the mechanical evolution due to burn-up (swelling, etc.). Initially, such tests are often made with separate plates, but lately, using entire elements. Destructive examinations are often necessary. For this type of test, the High Flux Reactor, located in Petten (The Netherlands) has many specific advantages: a large core, providing a variety of interesting positions with high fluence rate; a downward coolant flow simplifies the engineering of the device; there exists easy access with all handling possibilities to the hot-cells; the high number of operating days (>280 days/year), together with the high flux, gives a possibility to reach quickly the high burn-up needs; an experienced engineering department capable of translating specific requirements to tailor-made experimental devices; a well equipped hot-cell laboratory on site to perform all necessary measurements (swelling, γ-scanning, profilometry) and all destructive examinations. In conclusion, the HFR reactor readily permits experimental research on specific fuels used for research reactors with all the necessary facilities on the Petten site. (author)

  9. Drop-in capsule testing of plutonium-based fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Terry, W.K.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Palmer, A.J.; Roesener, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The most attractive way to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) is to use it as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PuO[sub 2]) mixed with urania (UO[sub 2]). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. The proposed weapons-grade MOX fuel is unusual, even relative to ongoing foreign experience with reactor-grade MOX power reactor fuel. Some demonstration of the in- reactor thermal, mechanical, and fission gas release behavior of the prototype fuel will most likely be required in a limited number of test reactor irradiations. The application to license operation with MOX fuel must be amply supported by experimental data. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is capable of playing a key role in the irradiation, development, and licensing of these new fuel types. The ATR is a 250- MW (thermal) LWR designed to study the effects of intense radiation on reactor fuels and materials. For 25 years, the primary role of the ATR has been to serve in experimental investigations for the development of advanced nuclear fuels. Both large- and small-volume test positions in the ATR could be used for MOX fuel irradiation. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, these data can be obtained more quickly by using ATR instead of testing in a commercial LWR. Our previous work in this area has demonstrated that it is technically feasible to perform MOX fuel testing in the ATR. This report documents our analyses of sealed drop-in capsules containing plutonium-based test specimens placed in various ATR positions

  10. Reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor using various low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density were calculated. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity feedback, moderator temperature reactivity feedback, moderator density reactivity feedback and moderator void reactivity feedback. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitudes all the respective reactivity feedbacks from 38 deg. C to 50 deg. C and 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, of all the fuels were very close to each other. The fuel temperature reactivity feedback of the U 3 O 8 -Al was about 2% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The magnitudes of the moderator temperature, moderator density and moderator void reactivity feedbacks of all the fuels, showed very minor variations from the original aluminide fuel.

  11. Preparation results for lifetime test of conversion LEU fuel in plutonium production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Stetskiy, Yu.; Kukharkin, N.; Kalougin, A.; Gavrilov, P.; Ivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The program of converting Russian production reactors for the purpose to stop their plutonium fabrication is currently in progress. The program also provides for operation of these reactors under the conversion mode with using of low-enriched fuel (LEU). LEU fuel elements were developed and activities related to their preparation for reactor tests were carried out. (author)

  12. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication and application of reduced enrichment fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the papers presented in the following areas: (1) Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program Status; (2) Fuel Development; (3) Fuel Demonstrations; (4) General Topics; and (5) Specific Reactor Applications

  13. Testing of HTR UO{sub 2} TRISO fuels in AVR and in material test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kania, Michael J., E-mail: MichaelJKania@googlemail.com [Retired from Lockheed Martin Corp, 20 Beach Road, Averill Park, NY 12018 (United States); Nabielek, Heinz, E-mail: heinznabielek@me.com [Retired from Research Center Jülich, Monschauerstrasse 61, 52355 Düren (Germany); Verfondern, Karl [Research Center Juelich,Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Research Center Juelich,Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The German High Temperature Reactor Fuel Development Program successfully developed, licensed and manufactured many thousands of spherical fuel elements that were used to power the experimental AVR reactor and the commercial THTR reactor. In the 1970s, this program extended the performance envelope of HTR fuels by developing and qualifying the TRISO-coated particle system. Irradiation testing in real-time AVR tests and accelerated MTR tests demonstrated the superior manufacturing process of this fuel and its irradiation performance. In the 1980s, another program direction change was made to a low enriched UO{sub 2} TRISO-coated particle system coupled with high-quality manufacturing specifications designed to meet new HTR plant design needs. These needs included requirements for inherent safety under normal operation and accident conditions. Again, the German fuel development program met and exceeded these challenges by manufacturing and qualifying the low-enriched UO{sub 2} TRISO-fuel system for HTR systems with steam generation, gas-turbine systems and very high temperature process heat applications. Fuel elements were manufactured in production scale facilities that contained near defect free UO{sub 2} TRISO coated particles, homogeneously distributed within a graphite matrix with very low levels of uranium contamination. Good irradiation performance for these elements was demonstrated under normal operating conditions to 12% FIMA and under accident conditions not exceeding 1600 °C.

  14. Conversion of research and test reactors to low enriched uranium fuel: technical overview and program status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans-Ribas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the nuclear research and test reactors worldwide operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel by converting research reactors to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The Reactor Conversion program is currently under the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). 55 of the 129 reactors included in the scope have been already converted to LEU fuel or have shutdown prior to conversion. The major technical activities of the Conversion Program include: (1) the development of advanced LEU fuels; (2) conversion analysis and conversion support; and (3) technology development for the production of Molybdenum-99 (Mo 99 ) with LEU targets. The paper provides an overview of the status of the program, the technical challenges and accomplishments, and the role of international collaborations in the accomplishment of the Conversion Program objectives. Nuclear research and test reactors worldwide have been in operation for over 60 years. Many of these facilities operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to increased worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in the manufacturing of nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel in research reactors by converting them to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor conversion program was initially focused on U.S.-supplied reactors, but in the early 1990s it expanded and began to collaborate with Russian institutes with the objective of converting Russian supplied reactors to the use of LEU fuel.

  15. Opportunities for mixed oxide fuel testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, W.K.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification; (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania; (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition; (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight; (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu; (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu; (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure; (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity; (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products; (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies; and (11) Fuel performance code validation. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory possesses many advantages for performing tests to resolve most of the issues identified above. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified. The facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-West can meet all potential needs for pre- and post-irradiation examination that might arise in a MOX fuel qualification program

  16. Calculation of fuel element temperature TRIGA 2000 reactor in sipping test tubes using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmi KA

    2013-01-01

    It has been calculated the fuel element temperature in the sipping test of Bandung TRIGA 2000 reactor. The calculation needs to be done to ascertain that the fuel element temperatures are below or at the limit of the allowable temperature fuel elements during reactor operation. ensuring that the implementation of the test by using this device, the temperature is still within safety limits. The calculation is done by making a model sipping test tubes containing a fuel element surrounded by 9 fuel elements. according to the position sipping test tubes in the reactor core. by using Gambit. Dimensional model adapted to the dimensions of the tube and the fuel element in the reactor core of Bandung TRIGA 2000 reactor. Sipping test Operation for each fuel element performed for 30 minutes at 300 kW power. Calculations were performed using CFD software and as input adjusted parameters of TRIGA 2000 reactor. Simulations carried out on the operation of the 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 210 minutes. The calculation result shows that the temperature of the fuel in tubes sipping test of 236.06 °C, while the temperature of the wall is 87.58 °C. The maximum temperature in the fuel center of TRIGA 2000 reactor in normal operation is 650 °C. and the boiling is not allowed in the reactor. So it can be concluded that the operation of the sipping test device are is very safe because the fuel center temperature is below the temperature limits the allowable fuel under normal operating conditions as well as the fuel element wall temperature is below the boiling temperature of water. (author)

  17. Performance testing of refractory alloy-clad fuel elements for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, D.S.; Cox, C.M.; Karnesky, R.A.; Millhollen, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Two fast reactor irradiation tests, SP-1 and SP-2, provide a unique and self-consistent data set with which to evaluate the technical feasibility of potential fuel systems for the SP-100 space reactor. Fuel pins fabricated with leading cladding candidates (Nb-1Zr, PWC-11, and Mo-13Re) and fuel forms (UN and UO 2 ) are operated at temperatures typical of those expected in the SP-100 design. The first US fast reactor irradiated, refractory alloy clad fuel pins, from the SP-1 test, reached 1 at. % burnup in EBR-II in March 1985. At that time selected pins were discharged for interim examination. These examinations confirmed the excellent performance of the Nb-1Zr clad uranium oxide and uranium nitride fuel elements, which are the baseline fuel systems for two SP-100 reactor concepts

  18. Subcritical Measurements Research Program for Fresh and Spent Materials Test Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    'A series of subcritical noise measurements were performed on fresh and spent University of Missouri Research Reactor fuel assemblies. These experimental measurements were performed for the purposes of providing benchmark quality data for validating transport theory computer codes and nuclear cross-section data used to perform criticality safety analyses for highly enriched, uranium-aluminum Material Test Reactor fuel assemblies. A mechanical test rig was designed and built to hold up to four fuel assemblies and neutron detectors in a subcritical array. The rig provided researchers with the ability to evaluate the reactivity effects of variable fuel/detector spacing, fuel rotation, and insertion of metal reflector plates into the lattice.'

  19. Power ramping test in the JMTR for PCI study of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.; Kanbara, M.; Ichikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    Power ramping test is essential for PCI study of water reactor fuel. Boiling water capsules have been used for the tests in the JMTR. Heat generation of fuel rod in the capsule can be changed by the He-3 power control facility during reactor operation. Four specially designed fuel rods have been ramped to about 41-43 kW/m; two of them have small gaps filled with iodine, the other two are equipped with centerline temperature thermocouple. Fuel rod elongation detector is equipped to each capsule. For the fuel rods with small gap, unique contraction followed by ordinary fuel relaxation behaviour was observed right after the fast ramping. None of them failed. Future programme includes a series of tests of fuel rods irradiated in the high-pressure water loop at the JMTR and a verification test of remedy fuel which allows daily-load-following operation of BWRs. (author)

  20. Back pressure helium leak testing of fuel elements for Dhruva research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, N G; Ahmad, Anis; Kulkarni, P G; Purushotham, D S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Atomic Fuels Div.

    1994-12-31

    Leak tightness specification on fuel elements for reactor use is always very stringent. The fuel element fabricated for Dhruva reactor is specified to be leak-tight up to 1 x 10{sup -8} std. cc/sec. The fuel element consists of natural metallic uranium rod around 12.5 mm diameter and 3 meter long in encased in aluminium tube and seal welded at both ends. Since helium gas is not filled inside the fuel element while doing seal welding, the only way to do helium leak testing of such fuel rods is by back-pressure technique. This paper describes the development of test facility for carrying out such test and discusses the experiences of carrying out helium leak testing by back-pressure technique on more than 700 numbers of fuel rods for Dhruva reactor. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Uranium-fuel thermal reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping

    2001-01-01

    CENDL-3, the new version of China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library are being processed, and distributed for thermal reactor benchmark analysis recently. The processing was carried out using the NJOY nuclear data processing system. The calculations and analyses of uranium-fuel thermal assemblies TRX-1,2, BAPL-1,2,3, ZEEP-1,2,3 were done with lattice code WIMSD5A. The results were compared with the experimental results, the results of the '1986'WIMS library and the results based on ENDF/B-VI. (author)

  2. Sipping test update device for fuel elements cladding inspections in IPR-r1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.R.; Mesquita, A.Z.; Andrade, E.P.D.; Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: rrr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: edson@cdtn.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    It is in progress at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center), a research project that aims to investigate possible leaks in the fuel elements of the TRIGA reactor, located in this research center. This paper presents the final form of sipping test device for TRIGA reactor, and results of the first experiments setup. Mechanical support strength tests were made by knotting device on the crane, charged with water from the conventional water supply, and tests outside the reactor pool with the use of new non-irradiated fuel elements encapsulated in stainless steel, and available safe stored in this unit. It is expected that tests with graphite elements from reactor pool are done soon after and also the test experiment with the first fuel elements in service positioned in the B ring (central ring) of the reactor core in the coming months. (author)

  3. Sipping test update device for fuel elements cladding inspections in IPR-r1 TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.R.; Mesquita, A.Z.; Andrade, E.P.D.; Gual, Maritza R.

    2015-01-01

    It is in progress at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center), a research project that aims to investigate possible leaks in the fuel elements of the TRIGA reactor, located in this research center. This paper presents the final form of sipping test device for TRIGA reactor, and results of the first experiments setup. Mechanical support strength tests were made by knotting device on the crane, charged with water from the conventional water supply, and tests outside the reactor pool with the use of new non-irradiated fuel elements encapsulated in stainless steel, and available safe stored in this unit. It is expected that tests with graphite elements from reactor pool are done soon after and also the test experiment with the first fuel elements in service positioned in the B ring (central ring) of the reactor core in the coming months. (author)

  4. Basic research on high-uranium density fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugajin, M.; Itoh, A.; Akabori, M.

    1992-01-01

    High-uranium density fuels, uranium silicides (U 3 Si 2 , U 3 Si) and U 6 Me-type uranium alloys (Me = Fe, Mn, Ni), were prepared and examined metallurgically as low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels for research and test reactors. Miniature aluminum-dispersion plate-type fuel (miniplate) and aluminum-clad disk-type fuel specimens were fabricated and subjected to the neutron irradiation in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). Fuel-aluminum compatibility tests were conducted to elucidate the extent of reaction and to identify reaction products. The relative stability of the fuels in an aluminum matrix was established at 350degC or above. Experiments were also performed to predict the chemical form of the solid fission-products in the uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) simulating a high burnup anticipated for reactor service. (author)

  5. Power ramp testing method for PWR fuel rod at research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yidong; Zhang Peisheng; Zhang Aimin; Gao Yongguang; Wang Huarong

    2003-01-01

    A tentative power ramp test for short PWR fuel rod has been conducted at the Heavy Water Research Reactor (HWRR) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The test fuel rod was cooled by the circulating water in the test loop. The power ramp was realized by moving solid neutron-absorbing screen around the fuel rod. The linear power of the fuel rod increased from 220 W/cm to 340 W/cm with a power ramp rate of 20 W/cm/min. The power of the fuel rod was monitored by both in-core thermal and nuclear measurement sensors in the test rig. This test provides experiences for further developing the power ramp test methods for PWR fuel rods at research reactor. (author)

  6. Course of pin fuel test In WWR-M reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, A.S.; Kirsanov, G.A.; Konoplev, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    Pin type fuel element (FE) of square form with twisted ribs was developed in VNIINM as an alternative for tube type FE of research reactors. Two variants of full-scale fuel assemblies (FA) are under test in the core of PNPI WWR-M reactor. One FA contains FE with UO 2 LEU and other - UMo LEU. Both types of FE have an aluminum matrix. Results of the first stages of the test are presented. (author)

  7. Testing of reactor fuel materials using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The tests presented here apply to: the quantitative determination of uranium in the core of fuel element plates by the detection of the number of neutrons produced in photo induced reactions in uranium; the determination of 235 U proportion in uranium dioxide samples, in the form of uranyl nitrate, by the technique of the detection of tracks produced by fission fragments and in pellet samples by passive gamma spectrometry and the checking of uranium homogenization distribution in fuel plates and uranium dioxide pellets. (Author) [pt

  8. Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for a Test or Demonstration Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walters, L. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This document explores startup fuel options for a proposed test/demonstration fast reactor. The fuel options considered are the metallic fuels U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr and the ceramic fuels UO2 and UO2-PuO2 (MOX). Attributes of the candidate fuel choices considered were feedstock availability, fabrication feasibility, rough order of magnitude cost and schedule, and the existing irradiation performance database. The reactor-grade plutonium bearing fuels (U-Pu-Zr and MOX) were eliminated from consideration as the initial startup fuels because the availability and isotopics of domestic plutonium feedstock is uncertain. There are international sources of reactor grade plutonium feedstock but isotopics and availability are also uncertain. Weapons grade plutonium is the only possible source of Pu feedstock in sufficient quantities needed to fuel a startup core. Currently, the available U.S. source of (excess) weapons-grade plutonium is designated for irradiation in commercial light water reactors (LWR) to a level that would preclude diversion. Weapons-grade plutonium also contains a significant concentration of gallium. Gallium presents a potential issue for both the fabrication of MOX fuel as well as possible performance issues for metallic fuel. Also, the construction of a fuel fabrication line for plutonium fuels, with or without a line to remove gallium, is expected to be considerably more expensive than for uranium fuels. In the case of U-Pu-Zr, a relatively small number of fuel pins have been irradiated to high burnup, and in no case has a full assembly been irradiated to high burnup without disassembly and re-constitution. For MOX fuel, the irradiation database from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is extensive. If a significant source of either weapons-grade or reactor-grade Pu became available (i.e., from an international source), a startup core based on Pu could be reconsidered.

  9. Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Larry J.; Ellis, Ronald James; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Spellman, Donald J.; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom

    2009-01-01

    The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

  10. An inspection standard of fuel for the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Sato, Sadao; Hayashi, Kimio; Fukuda, Kosaku; Kaneko, Mitsunobu; Sato, Tsutomu.

    1992-06-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses the fuel comprising coated fuel particles. A general inspection standard for the coated particle fuel, however, has not been established in Japan. Therefore, it has been necessary to prescribe the inspection standard of the fuel for HTTR. Under these circumstances, a fuel inspection standard of HTTR has been established under cooperation of fuel specialists both inside and outside of JAERI on referring to the inspection methods adopted in USA, Germany and Japan for HTGR fuels. Since a large number of coated fuel particle samples is needed to inspect the HTTR fuel, the sampling inspection standard has also been established considering the inspection efficiency. This report presents the inspection and the sampling standards together with an explanation of these standards. These standards will be applied to the HTTR fuel acceptance tests. (author)

  11. Conceptual design of experimental LFR fuel element for testing in TRIGA reactor, ACPR zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastase, D.; Olteanu, G.; Ioan, M.; Pauna, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the pulsed area of the TRIGA reactor (ACPR zone), the irradiation tests called ''rapid insertions of reactivity on different types of nuclear fuel elements'' are usually realized. During these tests, in the fuel element high powers for a relatively short period of time (about few milliseconds) are generated. The generated heat in fuel pellets raise their central temperature to values over 100 deg C. The conceptual design of an experimental fuel element proposed to be developed and presented in this paper must fulfill a couple of requirements, as follows: to ensure full compatibility with irradiation device sample holder (compatibility is achieved through reduced length of the fuel stack pellets - this way assures a flow flattening on the entire length of the fuel element); to be compatible with the project of irradiated fuel bundle in Lead cooled Fast Reactors (LFR). (authors)

  12. Construction and tests of a gamma device for experimental measurements of burnup of nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao Junior, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    The gamma-scanning method is an important tool for the measurement of burnup of nuclear reactor fuel. The adequate knowledge of burnup allows for a better inventory of 'sensitive' fissile materials, better fuel management and provides insight on fuel behaviour and safety margins. This paper is related to the description, construction and operation of a first gamma scanning device, tested by irradiation of prototype PWR fuel pins, 14 cm long, in a Triga Mark-I reactor at very low power. Despite the limitations imposed by the low burnup, the experiment permitted a good checking of the main physical concepts and devices involved in the method. (Author) [pt

  13. Behavior of low-burnup metallic fuels for the integral fast reactor at elevated temperatures in ex-reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Wang, Da-Yung; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    A series of ex-reactor heating tests on low burnup U-26wt.%Pu-10wt.%Zr metallic fuel for the PRISM reactor was conducted to evaluate fuel/cladding metallurgical interaction and its effect on cladding integrity at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the fuel and cladding caused liquid-phase formation and dissolution of the inner surface of the cladding. The rate of cladding penetration was below the existing design correlation, which provides a conservative margin to cladding failure. In a test which enveloped a wide range of postulated reactor transient events, a substantial temporal cladding integrity margin was demonstrated for an intact, whole fuel pin. The cause of the eventual pin breach was reaction-induced cladding thinning combined with fission-gas pressure loading. The behavior of the breached pin was benign. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  14. Fabrication and testing of uranium nitride fuel for space power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, R. B.; Chidester, K. M.; Hoth, C. W.; Mason, R. E.; Petty, R. L.

    1988-02-01

    Uranium nitride fuel was selected for previous space power reactors because of its attractive thermal and physical properties; however, all UN fabrication and testing activities were terminated over ten years ago. An accelerated irradiation test, SP-1, was designed to demonstrate the irradiation performance of Nb-1 Zr clad UN fuel pins for the SP-100 program. A carbothermic-reduction/nitriding process was developed to synthesize UN powders. These powders were fabricated into fuel pellets by conventional cold-pressing and sintering. The pellets were loaded into Nb-1 Zr cladding tubes, irradiated in a fast-test reactor, and destructively examined after 0.8 at% burnup. Preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results show that the fuel pins behaved as designed. Fuel swelling, fission-gas release, and microstructural data are presented, and suggestions to enhance the reliability of UN fuel pins are discussed.

  15. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  16. Review of WWER fuel and material tests in the Halden reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, B.; Kolstad, E.

    2006-01-01

    A review of the tests with WWER fuels and materials conducted in HBWR over the years of cooperation with Russia is presented. The first test with old generation WWER-440 fuel and PWR specification fuel was carried out from 1995 to 1998. Some differences between these fuels regarding irradiation induced densification and pellet design as well as similar fuel thermal behaviour, swelling and FGR were revealed during the test. The data from this test are reviewed and compared with PIE recently performed to confirm the in-pile measurements. The second test was started in March 1999 with the main objective to study different modified WWER fuels also in comparison with PWR fuel. The results indicated that all these modified WWER fuels exhibit improved densification properties relative to earlier tested fuel. In-pile data on fuel densification have been analysed with respect to as fabricated fuel microstructure and can be used for verification of fuel behaviour models. Corrosion and creep tests in the Halden reactor encompass WWER cladding alloys and some results are given. Prospective WWER fuel and material tests foreseen within the frame of the joint program of OECD HRP are also presented. (authors)

  17. Research reactor fuel bundle design review by means of hydrodynamic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorini, A.; Belinco, C.

    1997-01-01

    During the design steps of a fuel bundle for a nuclear reactor, some vibration tests are usually necessary to verify the prototype dynamical response characteristics and the structural integrity. To perform these tests, the known hydrodynamic loop facilities are used to evaluate the vibrational response of the bundle under the different flow conditions that may appear in the reactor. This paper describes the tests performed on a 19 plate fuel bundle prototype designed for a low power research reactor. The tests were done in order to know the dynamical characteristics of the plates and also of the whole bundle under different flow rate conditions. The paper includes a description of the test facilities and the results obtained during the dynamical characterization tests and some preliminary comments about the tests under flowing water are also presented. (author) [es

  18. Seismic hazard analysis for the NTS spent reactor fuel test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, K.W.

    1980-01-01

    An experiment is being directed at the Nevada Test Site to test the feasibility for storage of spent fuel from nuclear reactors in geologic media. As part of this project, an analysis of the earthquake hazard was prepared. This report presents the results of this seismic hazard assessment. Two distinct components of the seismic hazard were addressed: vibratory ground motion and surface displacement

  19. An overview of the fuels and materials testing programme at the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesenack, W [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Halden (Norway). OECD Halden Reaktor Projekt

    1997-08-01

    The fuels and materials testing programme of the OECD Halden Reactor Project is aimed at investigations of fuel and cladding properties at high burnup, water chemistry effects and in-core materials ageing problems. For the execution of this programme, different types of irradiation rigs and experimental facilities providing typical power reactors conditions are available. Data are obtained from in-core sensors developed at the Halden Project; these are shortly described. An overview of the current test programme and the scope of the following years are briefly presented. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs.

  20. Cermet fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. The concept evolved in the 1960's with the objective of developing a reactor design which could be used for a wide range of mobile power generation systems including both Brayton and Rankine power conversion cycles. High temperature thermal cycling tests and in-reactor irradiation tests using cermet fuel were carried out by General Electric in the 1960's as part of the 710 Development Program and by Argonne National laboratory in a subsequent activity. Cermet fuel development programs are currently underway at Argonne National laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Multi-Megawatt Space Power Program. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are 1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and 2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and 3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, there is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of 1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and 2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core

  1. Evaluation of the qualification of SPERT [Special Power Excursion Reactor Test] fuel for use in non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's evaluation of the qualification of the stainless-steel-clad uranium/oxide (UO 2 ) fuel pins for use in non-power reactors. The fuel pins were originally procured in the 1960's as part of the Special Power Excursion Reactor Test (SPERT) program. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) examined 600 SPERT fuel pins to verify that the pins were produced according to specification and to assess their present condition. The pins were visually inspected under 6X magnification and by X-radiographic, destructive, and metallographic examinations. Spectrographic and chemical analyses were performed on the UO 2 fuel. The results of the qualification examinations indicated that the SPERT fuel pins meet the requirements of Phillips Specification No. F-1-SPT and have suffered no physical damage since fabrication. Therefore, the qualification results give reasonable assurance that the SPERT fuel rods are suitable for use in non-power reactors provided that the effects of thin-wall defects in the region of the upper end cap and low-density fuel pellets are evaluated for the intended operating conditions. 1 ref., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  2. Fabrication, inspection, and test plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel irradiation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachs, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of MOX fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the ATR to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. In addition, the test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the data base required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues (ORNL/MD/LTR-76). This Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan (FITP) is a level 2 document as defined in the FMDP LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-78)

  3. Analysis of steam explosions in plate-type, uranium-aluminum fuel test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The concern over steam explosions in nuclear reactors can be traced to prompt critical nuclear excursions in aluminum-clad/fueled test reactors, as well as to explosive events in aluminum, pulp, and paper industries. The Reactor Safety Study prompted an extensive analytical and experimental effort for over a decade. This has led to significant improvements in their understanding of the steam explosion issue for commercial light water reactors. However, little progress has been made toward applying the lessons learned from this effort to the understanding and modeling of steam explosion phenomena in aluminum-clad/fueled research and test reactors. The purposes of this paper are to (a) provide a preliminary analysis of the destructive events in test reactors, based on current understandings of steam explosions; (b) provide a proposed approach for determining the likelihood of a steam explosion event under scenarios in which molten U-Al fuel drops into a water-filled cavity; and (c) present a benchmarking study conducted to estimate peak pressure pulse magnitudes

  4. Observed Changes in As-Fabricated U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Microstructures After Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Madden, James

    2017-12-01

    A low-enriched uranium U-10Mo monolithic nuclear fuel is being developed by the Material Management and Minimization Program, earlier known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, for utilization in research and test reactors around the world that currently use high-enriched uranium fuels. As part of this program, reactor experiments are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor. It must be demonstrated that this fuel type exhibits mechanical integrity, geometric stability, and predictable behavior to high powers and high fission densities in order for it to be a viable fuel for qualification. This paper provides an overview of the microstructures observed at different regions of interest in fuel plates before and after irradiation for fuel samples that have been tested. These fuel plates were fabricated using laboratory-scale fabrication methods. Observations regarding how microstructural changes during irradiation may impact fuel performance are discussed.

  5. Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams

  6. Thermal simulations and tests in the development of a helmet transport spent fuel elements Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba, R.; Quintana, F.; Márquez Turiello, R.; Furnari, J.C.; Pimenta Mourão, R.

    2013-01-01

    A packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a group of researchers to improve the capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. Two half-scale models for MTR fuel were constructed and tested so far and a third one for both MTR and TRIGA fuels will be constructed and tested next. Four test campaigns have been carried out, covering both normal and hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. The thermal test is part of the requirements for the qualification of transportation packages for nuclear reactors spent fuel elements. In this paper both the numerical modelling and experimental thermal tests performed are presented and discussed. The cask is briefly described as well as the finite element model developed and the main adopted hypotheses for the thermal phenomena. The results of both numerical runs and experimental tests are discussed as a tool to validate the thermal modelling. The impact limiters, attached to the cask for protection, were not modelled. (author) [es

  7. Eddy current testing of PWR fuel pencils in the pool of the Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1983-12-01

    A nondestructive testing bench is described. It is devoted to examination of high residual power fuel pencils without stress on the cladding nor interference with cooling. Guiding by fluid bearings decrease the background noise. Scanning speed is limited only by safety criteria and data acquisition configuration. Simultaneous control of various parameters is possible. Associated to an irradiation loop, loaded and unloaded in a reactor swinning pool, this bench can follow fuel pencil degradation after each irradiation cycle [fr

  8. Corrosion of aluminium alloy test coupons in water of spent fuel storage pool at RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Jordanov, G.; Dobrijevic, R.

    2004-12-01

    Study on corrosion of aluminium cladding, of the TVR-S type of enriched uranium spent fuel elements of the research reactor RA in the storage water pool is examined in the framework nr the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Clad-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' since 2002. Standard racks with aluminium coupons are exposed to water in the spent fuel pools of the research reactor RA. After predetermined exposure times along with periodic monitoring of the water parameters, the coupons are examined according to the strategy and the protocol supplied by the IAEA. Description of the standard corrosion racks, experimental protocols, test procedures, water quality monitoring and compilation of results of visual examination of corrosion effects are present in this article. (author)

  9. Integrity assessment of research reactor fuel cladding and material testing using eddy current inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, Donizete Anderson de

    2004-01-01

    A methodology to perform the integrity assessment of research reactors nuclear fuels cladding, such as those installed in IPR-Rl (TRIGA) and IEA-R1 (MTR), using nondestructive electromagnetic inspection (eddy current) is presented. This methodology is constituted by: the development of calibration reference standards, specific for each type of fuel; the development of special test probes; the recommendations for the inspection equipment calibration; the construction of voltage based evaluation curves and the inspection procedures developed for the characterization of detected flaws. The test probes development, specially those designed for the inspection of MTR fuels cladding, which present access difficulties due to the narrow gap between fuel plates (2,89 mm for IEAR-R1), constituted a challenge that demanded the introduction of unusual materials and constructive techniques. The operational performance of the developed resources, as well as the special operative characteristics of the test probes, such as their immunity to adjacent fuel plates interference and electrical resistivity changes of the fuels meat are experimentally demonstrated. The practical applicability of the developed methodology is verified in non radioactive environment, using a dummy MTR fuel element model, similar to an IEA-R1 reactor fuel element, produced and installed in IPEN, Sao Paulo. The efficacy of the proposed methodology was verified by the achieved results. (author)

  10. MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) cores fuel management. Application of a low enrichment reactor for the equilibrium and transitory core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relloso, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes a methodology to define the equilibrium core and a MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) type reactor's fuel management upon multiple boundary conditions, such as: end cycle and permitted maximum reactivities, burn-up extraction and maximun number of movements by rechange. The methodology proposed allows to determine the best options through conceptual relations, prior to a detailed calculation with the core code, reducing the test number with these codes and minimizing in this way CPU cost. The way to better systematized search of transient cores from the first one to the equilibrium one is presented. (Author) [es

  11. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  12. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montierth, Leland M.

    2016-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  13. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  14. A follow-up test of failed fuel element of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerasathien, W.

    1974-01-01

    This thesis is a result of test of a number of nuclear fuel rods which have not been used for a long time due to leakage of radioactivity. Water was circulated through each fuel rod in a test cylinder and radioactivity in water was measured. It was found that the detection of Cesium-137 which has a long half-life, does not indicate the extent of leakage of short-lived radioisotopes, some of which are gaseous. These gases are harmful to the reactor operators and users. A better result was obtained by placing the failed fuel rod in the test cylinder close to the reactor to induce fission. Short half-life gases or other nuclides of the same series were then directly measured

  15. Dissolution of Material and Test reactor Fuel in an H-Canyon Dissolver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-26

    In an amended record of decision for the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site, the US Department of Energy has authorized the dissolution and recovery of U from 1000 bundles of Al-clad SNF. The SNF is fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors and is typically referred to as Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel. Bundles of MTR fuel containing assemblies fabricated from U-Al alloys (or other U compounds) are currently dissolved using a Hg-catalyzed HNO3 flowsheet. Since the development of the existing flowsheet, improved experimental methods have been developed to more accurately characterize the offgas composition and generation rate during laboratory dissolutions. Recently, these new techniques were successfully used to develop a flowsheet for the dissolution of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel. Using the data from the HFIR dissolution flowsheet development and necessary laboratory experiments, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to define flowsheet conditions for the dissolution of MTR fuels. With improved offgas characterization techniques, SRNL will be able define the number of bundles of fuel which can be charged to an H-Canyon dissolver with much less conservatism.

  16. Instrumentation of fuel safety test rods of the PWR system in the Phebus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schley, Robert; Leveque, J.P.; Aujollet, J.M.; Dutraive, Pierre; Colome, Jean; Bouly, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The tests were performed in an experimental cell centred in the core of the PHEBUS water reactor of 50 MW. The CEA make two types of apparatus for testing the safety of PWR fuel. One is for testing a single fuel stick and the other a bunch of 25 sticks. The instrumentation described enables the main parameters of the test to be known: temperatures of the fuel - central temperature of the UO 2 - cladding surface temperatures; temperature of the cooling circuits - thermal balance - temperatures of the structures, etc.; coolant pressure; internal pressure of the fuel sticks; direction and flow rate of the fluid. This instrumentation and the technological problems to be overcome are described and the results of the first tests carried out are given [fr

  17. Post-irradiation studies of test plates for low enriched fuel elements for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groos, E.; Buecker, H.J.; Derz, H.; Schroeder, R.

    1988-07-01

    In developing new fuels for research reactor elements that allow the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) 3 Si 2 , U 3 Si 1.5 , U 3 Si 1.3 and U 3 Si. Even up to high burnup rates (80% fifa) U 3 Si 2 was proved to be a reliable fuel that according to the test results achieved to date complies with all necessary requirements above all with respect to dimensional stability. U 3 Si showed significant changes of the fuel microstructure associated with considerably higher fuel swelling, that will probably exclude its use in research reactor operation. The irradiation of U 3 Si 1.3 and U 3 Si 1.5 plates had to be terminated untimely. Up to a burnup of 40% fifa these plates behaved quite well. An extrapolation to higher burnup rates, however only seems to be possible with reservations. (orig./HP) [de

  18. The development and testing of reduced enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.C.; Foo, M.T.; Berthiaume, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel rods of uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum and clad in aluminum have been developed and tested in the laboratory and in-reactor. The properties of the dispersion fuel materials proved satisfactory with regard to thermal conductivity, aqueous corrosion resistance, strength and ductility, and thermal stability below 473 K. A vacancy condensation model is proposed to account for the thermally-induced swelling that occurs above 473 K by virtue of the chemical reactions that occur between the dispersed silicide fuel particles and the aluminum matrix. The in-reactor fuel core swelling was less than % after irradiation at high powers 76-131 kW/m) to a high terminal burnup (79.2 at% of U-235 atoms). (author)

  19. Irradiation tests on PHWR type fuel elements in TRIGA research reactor of INR Pitesti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horhoianu, Grigore [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). Nuclear Fuel Engineering Lab.; Sorescu, Ion [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). TRIGA Reactor Loop Facility; Parvan, Marcel [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). Hot Cells Lab.

    2012-12-15

    Nine PHWR type fuel elements with reduced length were irradiated in loop A of the TRIGA Research Reactor of INR Pitesti. The primary objective of the test was to determine the performance of nuclear fuel fabricated at INR Pitesti at high linear powers in pressurized water conditions. Six fuel elements were irradiated with a ramp power history, achieving a maximum power of 45 kW/m during pre-ramp and of 64 kW/m in the ramp. The maximum discharge burnup was of 216 MWh/kgU. Another three fuel elements with reduced length were irradiated with declining power history. At the beginning of irradiation the fuel elements achieved a maximum linear power of 66 kW/m. The maximum fuel power was about 1.3 times the maximum expected in PHWR. The maximum discharge burnup was 205 MWh/kgU. The elements were destructively examined in the hot cells of INR Pitesti. Temperature-sensitive parameters such as UO{sub 2} grain growth, fission-gas release and sheath deformations were examined. The tests proved the feasibility of irradiating PHWR type fuel elements at linear powers up to 66 kW/m under pressurized water conditions and demonstrated the possibility of more flexible operation of this fuel in power reactors. This paper presents the results of the investigation. (orig.)

  20. Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz; Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O.; Novara, Oscar E.

    2013-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

  1. Procedures and techniques for the management of experimental fuels from research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    Almost all countries that have undertaken fuel development programs for power, research or military reactors have experimental and exotic fuels, either stored at the original research reactors where they have been tested or at some away-from-reactor storage facility. These spent fuel liabilities cannot follow the standard treatment recognized for modern power reactor fuels. They include experimental and exotic fuels ranging from liquids to coated spheres and in configurations ranging from full test assemblies to post irradiation examination specimens set in resin. This document contains an overview of the extent of the problem of managing experimental and exotic fuels from research and test reactors and an expert evaluation of the overall situation in countries which participated in the meeting

  2. Packaging and transport case of test fuel assembly irradiated in the Creys-Malville reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffroy, J.; Vivien, J.; Pouard, M.; Dujardin, G.N.; Veron, B.; Michoux, H.

    1986-06-01

    Some irradiated fuel assemblies from the fast neutron Creys Malville reactor will be sent to hot laboratories to follow fuel behavior. These test assemblies will be examined after a limited cooling time and transport is realized at high residual power (about 10kW) and cladding temperature should not rise over 500deg C. The fuel assemblies are not dismantled and transported into sodium. The assembly is placed into a case containing sodium plugged and put into a packaging. Dimensioning, thermal behavior, radiation protection and containment are examined [fr

  3. Field test and evaluation of the passive neutron coincidence collar for prototype fast reactor fuel subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Keddar, A.

    1982-08-01

    The passive neutron Coincidence Collar, which was developed for the verification of plutonium content in fast reactor fuel subassemblies, has been field tested using Prototype Fast Reactor fuel. For passive applications, the system measures the 240 Pu-effective mass from the spontaneous fission rate, and in addition, a self-interrogation technique is used to determine the fissile content in the subassembly. Both the passive and active modes were evaluated at the Windscale Works in the United Kingdom. The results of the tests gave a standard deviation 0.75% for the passive count and 3 to 7% for the active measurement for a 1000-s counting time. The unit will be used in the future for the verification of plutonium in fresh fuel assemblies

  4. Hydraulic and hydrodynamic tests for design evaluation of research reactors fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulichevsky, R.; Martin Ghiselli, A.; Fiori, J.; Yedros, P.

    2002-01-01

    During the design steps of research reactors fuel elements some tests are usually necessary to verify its design, i.e.: its hydraulic characteristics, dynamical response and structural integrity. The hydraulic tests are developed in order to know the pressure drops characteristics of different parts or elements of the prototype and of the whole fuel element. Also, some tests are carried out to obtain the velocity distribution of the coolant water across different prototype's sections. The hydrodynamic tests scopes are the assessment of the dynamical characteristics of the fuel elements and their components and its dynamical response considering the forces generated by the coolant flowing water at different flow rate conditions. Endurance tests are also necessary to qualify the structural design of the FE prototypes and their corresponding clamp tools, verifying the whole system structural integrity and wear processes influences. To carry out these tests a special test facility is needed to obtain a proper representation of the hydraulic and geometric boundary conditions of the fuel element. In some cases changes on the fuel element prototype or dummy are necessary to assure that the data results are representative of the case under study. Different kind of sensors are mounted on the test section and also on the fuel element itself when necessary. Some examples of the instrumentation used are strain gauges, displacement transducers, absolute and differential pressure transducers, pitot tubes, etc. The obtained data are, for example, plates' vibration amplitudes and frequencies, whole bundle displacement characterization, pressure drops and flow velocity measurements. The Experimental Low Pressure Loop is a hydraulic loop located at CNEA's Constituyentes Atomic Center and is the test facility where different kind of tests are performed in order to support and evaluate the design of research reactor fuel elements. A brief description of the facility, and examples of

  5. On-Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (∼ 1-mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4%-10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  6. Irradiation test of fuel containing minor actinides in the experimental fast reactor Joyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Sekine, Takashi; Wootan, David; Tanaka, Kosuke; Kitamura, Ryoichi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    The mixed oxide containing minor actinides (MA-MOX) fuel irradiation program is being conducted using the experimental fast reactor Joyo of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency to research early thermal behavior of MA-MOX fuel. Two irradiation experiments were conducted in the Joyo MK-III 3rd operational cycle. Six prepared fuel pins included MOX fuel containing 3% or 5% americium (Am-MOX), MOX fuel containing 2% americium and 2% neptunium (Np/Am-MOX), and reference MOX fuel. The first test was conducted with high linear heat rates of approximately 430 W/cm maintained during only 10 minutes in order to confirm whether or not fuel melting occurred. After 10 minutes irradiation in May 2006, the test subassembly was transferred to the hot cell facility and an Am-MOX pin and a Np/Am-MOX pin were replaced with dummy pins including neutron dosimeters. The test subassembly loaded with the remaining four fuel pins was re-irradiated in Joyo for 24-hours in August 2006 at nearly the same linear power to obtain re-distribution data on MA-MOX fuel. Linear heat rates for each pin were calculated using MCNP, accounting for both prompt and delayed heating components, and then adjusted using E/C for 10 B (n, α) reaction rates measured in the MK-III core neutron field characterization test. Post irradiation examination of these pins to confirm the fuel melting and the local concentration under irradiation of NpO 2-x or AmO 2-x in the (U, Pu)O 2-x fuel are underway. The test results are expected to reduce uncertainties on the design margin in the thermal design for MA-MOX fuel. (author)

  7. Fuel integrity project: analysis of light water reactor fuel rods test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallongeville, M.; Werle, J. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France); McCreesh, G. [BNFL Nuclear Sciences and Technology Services (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    BNFL Nuclear Sciences and Technology Services and COGEMA LOGISTICS started in the year 2000 a joint project known as FIP (Fuel Integrity Project) with the aim of developing realistic methods by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions could be evaluated. To this end BNFL organised tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel pin samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS took responsibility for evaluating the test results. Interpretation of test results included simple mechanical analysis as well as simulation by Finite Element Analysis. The first tests that were available for analysis were an irradiated 3 point bending commissioning trial and a lateral irradiated hull compression test, both simulating the loading during a 9 m lateral regulatory drop. The bending test span corresponded roughly to a fuel pin intergrid distance. The outcome of the test was a failure starting at about 35 mm lateral deflection and a few percent of total deformation. Calculations were carried out using the ANSYS code employing a shell and brick model. The hull lateral compaction test corresponds to a conservative compression by neighbouring pins at the upper end of the fuel pin. In this pin region there are no pellets inside. The cladding broke initially into two and later into four parts, all of which were rather similar. Initial calculations were carried out with LS-DYNA3D models. The models used were optimised in meshing, boundary conditions and material properties. The calculation results compared rather well with the test data, in particular for the detailed ANSYS approach of the 3 point bending test, and allowed good estimations of stresses and deformations under mechanical loading as well as the derivation of material rupture criteria. All this contributed to the development of realistic numerical analysis methods for the evaluation of LWR fuel rod behaviour under both normal and accident transport conditions. This paper describes the results of the 3 point bending

  8. Fuel integrity project: analysis of light water reactor fuel rods test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallongeville, M.; Werle, J.; McCreesh, G.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL Nuclear Sciences and Technology Services and COGEMA LOGISTICS started in the year 2000 a joint project known as FIP (Fuel Integrity Project) with the aim of developing realistic methods by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions could be evaluated. To this end BNFL organised tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel pin samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS took responsibility for evaluating the test results. Interpretation of test results included simple mechanical analysis as well as simulation by Finite Element Analysis. The first tests that were available for analysis were an irradiated 3 point bending commissioning trial and a lateral irradiated hull compression test, both simulating the loading during a 9 m lateral regulatory drop. The bending test span corresponded roughly to a fuel pin intergrid distance. The outcome of the test was a failure starting at about 35 mm lateral deflection and a few percent of total deformation. Calculations were carried out using the ANSYS code employing a shell and brick model. The hull lateral compaction test corresponds to a conservative compression by neighbouring pins at the upper end of the fuel pin. In this pin region there are no pellets inside. The cladding broke initially into two and later into four parts, all of which were rather similar. Initial calculations were carried out with LS-DYNA3D models. The models used were optimised in meshing, boundary conditions and material properties. The calculation results compared rather well with the test data, in particular for the detailed ANSYS approach of the 3 point bending test, and allowed good estimations of stresses and deformations under mechanical loading as well as the derivation of material rupture criteria. All this contributed to the development of realistic numerical analysis methods for the evaluation of LWR fuel rod behaviour under both normal and accident transport conditions. This paper describes the results of the 3 point bending

  9. Progress in the development of very high density research and test reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2528, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    New nuclear fuels are being developed to enable many of the most important research and test reactors worldwide to convert from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuels to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels without significant loss in performance. The last decade of work has focused on the development of uranium-molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) based fuels and is an international effort that includes the active participation of more than ten national programs. The US RERTR program, under the NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is in the process of developing both dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel designs. While the U-Mo fuel alloy has behaved extremely well under irradiation, initial testing (circa 2003) revealed that the U-Mo fuels dispersed in aluminum had an unexpected tendency toward unstable swelling (pillowing) under high-power conditions. Technical investigations were initiated worldwide at this time by the partner programs to understand this behavior as well as to develop and test remedies. The behavior was corrected by modifying the chemistry of the U-Mo/Al interfaces in both fuel designs. In the dispersion fuel design, this was accomplished by the addition of small amounts of silicon to the aluminum matrix material. Two methods are under development for the monolithic fuel design, which include the application of a thin layer of silicon or a thin zirconium based diffusion barrier at the fuel/clad interface. This paper gives an overview of the current status of U-Mo fuel development, including basic research results, manufacturing aspects, results of the latest irradiations and post irradiation examinations, the approach to fuel performance qualification, and the scale-up and commercialization of fabrication technology. (authors)

  10. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1985-02-01

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation [fr

  11. Storage and management of fuel from fast breeder test reactor and KAlpakkam MINI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodhi, B.S.; Rao, M.S.; Natarajan, R.

    1999-01-01

    Two Research Reactors, FBTR (Fast Breeder Test Reactor) and KAMINI (KAlpakkam MINI) are in operation at Kalpakkam, India. FBTR is a 40 MWt reactor. It is the first reactor to use mixed carbide (70% PuC-30% UC) as driver fuel. Special precautions are needed to fabricate pellets in glove boxes under inert atmosphere to take into account the possibility of criticality, radiation, pyrophoricity and toxicity of PuC. FBTR has been operating with small core up to 12 MWt power. The initial limit was 250 W/cm, linear heat rating and 25,000 MWd/t peak burnup. This limit was increased to 320 W/cm and 50,000 MWd/t respectively after rigorous analysis. At present the core has reached 40,000 MWd/t without any pin failure. After 25,000 MWd/t burnup one fuel subassembly (SA) was removed and PEE was carried out. The results were as expected by the analysis. In FBTR, fuel is stored in a container filled with argon and the container is cooled by forced circulation of air (during storage). Closing the fuel cycle is important for the breeder programme. Therefore, efforts have been made to set up a reprocessing plant. It uses the well proven purex process. The irradiated fuel is sheared in a single pin chopper and dissolved in an electrochemical dissolver. The resulting solution after adjusting the valency of Pu to IVth state is processed in the solvent extraction plant using 30% Tri-n-Butyl phosphate/n-dodecane as solvent. KAMINI is 30 kWt neutron source reactor which uses light water as moderator and coolant and has as a fuel U-233 aluminium alloy. Uranium-233 has been indigenously recovered from thorium irradiated in CIRUS reactor at Trombay. KAMINI was made critical on October 1996. It is housed in a vault below one of the hot cells in the Radiometallurgy laboratories of IGCAR. This reactor is planned to be used for neutron radiography of fuel elements and neutron activation analysis. It is available for use by research institutions and universities also. This paper describes the

  12. Oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding for research and test reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G. L.; Robinson, A. B.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Hanan, N.

    2008-08-01

    The oxide thicknesses on aluminum alloy cladding were measured for the test plates from irradiation tests RERTR-6 and 7A in the ATR (advanced test reactor). The measured thicknesses were substantially lower than those of test plates with similar power from other reactors available in the literature. The main reason is believed to be due to the lower pH (pH 5.1-5.3) of the primary coolant water in the ATR than in the other reactors (pH 5.9-6.5) for which we have data. An empirical model for oxide film thickness predictions on aluminum alloy used as fuel cladding in the test reactors was developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, surface heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The applicable ranges of pH and coolant flow rates cover most research and test reactors. The predictions by the new model are in good agreement with the in-pile test data available in the literature as well as with the RERTR test data measured in the ATR.

  13. Oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding for research and test reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: yskim@anl.gov; Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Snelgrove, J.L.; Hanan, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-08-31

    The oxide thicknesses on aluminum alloy cladding were measured for the test plates from irradiation tests RERTR-6 and 7A in the ATR (advanced test reactor). The measured thicknesses were substantially lower than those of test plates with similar power from other reactors available in the literature. The main reason is believed to be due to the lower pH (pH 5.1-5.3) of the primary coolant water in the ATR than in the other reactors (pH 5.9-6.5) for which we have data. An empirical model for oxide film thickness predictions on aluminum alloy used as fuel cladding in the test reactors was developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, surface heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The applicable ranges of pH and coolant flow rates cover most research and test reactors. The predictions by the new model are in good agreement with the in-pile test data available in the literature as well as with the RERTR test data measured in the ATR.

  14. Improving the AGR fuel testing power density profile versus irradiation-time in the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Gray S.; Lillo, Misti A.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235 U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235 U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250degC throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235 U

  15. Fuel rod-grid interaction wear: in-reactor tests (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stackhouse, R.M.

    1979-11-01

    Wear of the Zircaloy cladding of LWBR irradiation test fuel rods, resulting from relative motion between rod and rod support contacts, is reported. Measured wear depths were small, 0.0 to 2.7 mils, but are important in fuel element behavior assessment because of the local loss of cladding thickness, as well as the effect on grid spring forces that laterally restrain the rods. An empirical wear analysis model, based on out-of-pile tests, is presented. The model was used to calculate the wear on the irradiation test fuel rods attributed to a combination of up-and-down motions resulting from power and pressure/temperature cycling of the test reactor, flow-induced vibrations, and assembly handling scratches. The calculated depths are generally deeper than the measured depths

  16. Advanced Research Reactor Fuel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. K.; Park, H. D.; Kim, K. H. (and others)

    2006-04-15

    RERTR program for non-proliferation has propelled to develop high-density U-Mo dispersion fuels, reprocessable and available as nuclear fuel for high performance research reactors in the world. As the centrifugal atomization technology, invented in KAERI, is optimum to fabricate high-density U-Mo fuel powders, it has a great possibility to be applied in commercialization if the atomized fuel shows an acceptable in-reactor performance in irradiation test for qualification. In addition, if rod-type U-Mo dispersion fuel is developed for qualification, it is a great possibility to export the HANARO technology and the U-Mo dispersion fuel to the research reactors supplied in foreign countries in future. In this project, reprocessable rod-type U-Mo test fuel was fabricated, and irradiated in HANARO. New U-Mo fuel to suppress the interaction between U-Mo and Al matrix was designed and evaluated for in-reactor irradiation test. The fabrication process of new U-Mo fuel developed, and the irradiation test fuel was fabricated. In-reactor irradiation data for practical use of U-Mo fuel was collected and evaluated. Application plan of atomized U-Mo powder to the commercialization of U-Mo fuel was investigated.

  17. Technical concept for test of geologic storage of spent reactor fuel in the Climax granite, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Carlson, R.C.; Montan, D.N.; Butkovich, T.R.; Duncan, J.E.; Patrick, W.C.; Wilder, D.G.; Brough, W.G.; Mayr, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Test in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site is a generic test in which spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor are emplaced at, and retrieved from, a plausible waste repository depth in a typical granite. Eleven canisters of spent fuel are emplaced in a storage drift 420 m below the surface along with six electrical simulator canisters. Two adjacent drifts contain electrical heaters which are operated so as to simulate the initial five years of the temperature-stress-displacement fields of a large repository. The site is described, and the pre-operational measurement program and characteristics of the spent fuel are given. Both thermal and mechanical response calculations are summarized. The field instrumentation and data acquisition systems are described, as well as the system for handling the spent fuel

  18. First TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] transient overpower tests on U-Pu-Zr fuel: M5 and M6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, W.R.; Bauer, T.H.; Wright, A.E.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stanford, G.S.; Klickman, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) tests M5 and M6 were the first transient overpower (TOP) tests of the margin to cladding breach and prefailure elongation of metallic U-Pu-Zr ternary fuel, the reference fuel of the Integral Fast Reactor concept. Similar tests on U-Fs fueled EBR-II driver pins were previously performed and reported [1,2]. Results from these earlier tests indicated a margin to failure of about 4 times nominal power and significant axial elongation prior to failure, a feature that was very pronounced at low burnups. While these two fuel types are similar in many respects, the ternary alloy exhibits a much more complex physical structure and is typically irradiated at much higher temperatures. Thus, a prime motivation for performing M5 and M6 was to compare the safety related fuel performance characteristics of U-Fs and U-Pu-Zr. This report described conditions, results, and conclusions of testing of these fuel types

  19. A thermal-hydraulic test rig for advanced fast reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapier, A.C.

    1989-03-01

    A new design of fast reactor fuel assemblies has been proposed in which the pins are supported in grids attached to the wrapper by flexible skirts. Coolant mixing is enhanced by the skirts diverting flow into the cluster of pins at each grid. There are insufficient empirical data available for the detailed design of the skirt or for the input to computer calculations of flow and heat transfer. A test rig to provide these data has been designed and built. (author)

  20. Shock and vibration tests of uranium mononitride fuel pellets for a space power nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Shock and vibration tests were conducted on cylindrically shaped, depleted, uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pellets. The structural capabilities of the pellets were determined under exposure to shock and vibration loading which a nuclear reactor may encounter during launching into space. Various combinations of diametral and axial clearances between the pellets and their enclosing structures were tested. The results of these tests indicate that for present fabrication of UN pellets, a diametral clearance of 0.254 millimeter and an axial clearance of 0.025 millimeter are tolerable when subjected to launch-induced loads.

  1. Technical concept for a test of geologic storage of spent reactor fuel in the climax granite, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Carlson, R.C.; Montan, D.N.; Butkovich, T.R.; Duncan, J.E.; Patrick, W.C.; Wilder, D.G.; Brough, W.G.; Mayr, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    We plan to emplace spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site. In this generic test, 11 canisters of spent fuel will be emplaced with 6 electrical simulator canisters in a storage drift 420 m below in surface and their effects compared. Two adjacent drifts will contain electrical heaters, operated to simulate the temperature-stress-displacement fields of a large repository. We describe the test objectives, the technical issues, the site, the preoperational measurement program, thermal and mechanical response calculations, the characteristics of the spent fuel, the field instrumentation and data-acquisition systems, and the system for handling the spent fuel

  2. Irradiation of inert matrix and mixed oxide fuel in the Halden test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U.

    2001-01-01

    In a new type of fuel, called Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF), plutonium is embedded in a U-free matrix. This offers advantages for more efficient plutonium consumption, higher proliferation resistance, and for inert behaviour later in a waste repository. In the fuel type investigated at PSI, plutonium is dissolved in yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation-resistant cubic phase, with addition of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ-based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden (HBWR), together with MOX fuel (Rig IFA-651.1). The experiment is described herein and results are presented of the first 120 days of irradiation with an average assembly burnup of 47 kWd/cm 3 . The results are compared with neutronic calculations performed before the experiment, and are used to model the fuel behaviour with the PSI-modified TRANSURANUS code. The measured fuel temperatures are within the expected range. An unexpectedly strong densification of the IMF during the first irradiation cycle does not alter the fuel temperatures. An explanation for this behaviour is proposed. The irradiation at higher linear heat rates during forthcoming cycles will deliver information about the fission gas release behaviour of the IMF. (author)

  3. Irradiation of inert matrix and mixed oxide fuel in the Halden test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U

    2001-03-01

    In a new type of fuel, called Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF), plutonium is embedded in a U-free matrix. This offers advantages for more efficient plutonium consumption, higher proliferation resistance, and for inert behaviour later in a waste repository. In the fuel type investigated at PSI, plutonium is dissolved in yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation-resistant cubic phase, with addition of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ-based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden (HBWR), together with MOX fuel (Rig IFA-651.1). The experiment is described herein and results are presented of the first 120 days of irradiation with an average assembly burnup of 47 kWd/cm{sup 3}. The results are compared with neutronic calculations performed before the experiment, and are used to model the fuel behaviour with the PSI-modified TRANSURANUS code. The measured fuel temperatures are within the expected range. An unexpectedly strong densification of the IMF during the first irradiation cycle does not alter the fuel temperatures. An explanation for this behaviour is proposed. The irradiation at higher linear heat rates during forthcoming cycles will deliver information about the fission gas release behaviour of the IMF. (author)

  4. Development of evaluation method of fuel failure fraction during the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Tobita, Tsutomu; Sato, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses coated particles as fuel. During normal operation, short-lived noble gases are mainly released by diffusion from fuel particles with defects in their coating layers (i.e., failed particle). Since noble gases do not plate out on the inner surfaces of primary cooling system, their activities in primary coolant reflect fuel failure fraction in the core. An evaluation method was developed to predict failure fraction of coated fuel particles during normal operation of the HTTR. The method predicts core-average and hot plenum regionwise failure fractions based on the fractional releases, (R/B)s, of noble gases. The (R/B)s are calculated by fission gas concentration measurements in the primary cooling system of the HTTR. Recent fabrication data show that through-coatings failure fraction is extremely low. Then, fractional release from matrix contamination uranium, which is background for accurate evaluation of the fuel failure fraction, should be precisely predicted. This report describes an evaluation method of fuel failure fraction from measurements in the HTTR together with a fission gas release model from fuel compact containing failed particles and matrix contamination uranium. (author)

  5. Fuel elements of research reactors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yongmao; Chen Dianshan; Tan Jiaqiu

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of design, fabrication of fuel elements for research reactors in China, emphasis is placed on the technology of fuel elements for the High Flux Engineering Test Reactor (HFETR). (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    An array of rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurised water reactor is claimed. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel elements for a pressurised water reactor comprise arrays of rods of zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  8. Irradiation of Superheater Test Fuel Elements in the Steam Loop of the R2 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravndal, F

    1967-12-15

    The design, fabrication, irradiation results, and post-irradiation examination for three superheater test fuel elements are described. During the spring of 1966 these clusters, each consisting of six fuel rods, were successfully exposed in the superheater loop No. 5 in the R2 reactor for a maximum of 24 days at a maximum outer cladding surface temperature of {approx} 650 deg C. During irradiation the linear heat rating of the rods was in the range 400-535 W/cm. The diameter of the UO{sub 2} pellets was 11.5 and 13.0 mm; the wall thickness of the 20/25 Nb and 20/35 cladding was in every case 0.4 mm. The diametrical gap between fuel and cladding was one of the main parameters and was chosen to be 0.05, 0.07 and 0.10 mm. These experiments, to be followed by one high cladding temperature irradiation ({approx} 750 deg C) and one long time irradiation ({approx} 6000 MWd/tU), were carried out to demonstrate the operational capability of short superheater test fuel rods at steady and transient operational environments for the Marviken superheater fuel elements and also to provide confirmation of design criteria for the same fuel elements.

  9. Overview of fuel testing capabilities at the OECD Halden reactor project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesenack, W [Institutt for Atomenergi, Halden (Norway). OECD Halden Reaktor Projekt

    1994-12-31

    Fuel performance and reliability investigations at the OECD Haiden Reactor Project are described. They are supported by a variety of irradiation rigs, suitable irradiation techniques and a range of instrumentation. Testing capabilities and applications are mainly aimed at exploring mechanisms of fuel behaviour and high burnup. Examples of fuel performance taken from data provided by the Halden Project for the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme FUMEX are presented. A number of heavily instrumented rigs to suit different test objects have been developed: base irradiation rig, gas meter rig, diameter measurement rig, ramp rig, gas flow rig, instrumented fuel assembly. In core-measurements and variety of sensors as : fuel thermocouples, bellows pressure transducers, fuel stack elongation detectors, cladding diameter gauge and cladding elongation detectors have been used. Techniques which make it possible to obtain reliable data for all relevant burnups from beginning-of-life to ultra high exposure reaching 100 Mwd/kg UO{sub 2} are described. 7 figs., 3 refs.

  10. In-pile instrumentation improvements for fuel irradiations in test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, J.Y.; Bernard, J.L.; Estrade, J.; Geoffroy, G.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of fuel limits and safety margins in normal and off-normal transients in nuclear power plants remains a constant preoccupation for electricity producers and fuel manufacturers. Accurate determination of such limits, through fuel irradiation testing in the OSIRIS reactor at Saclay is closely linked to the reliability of appropriate instrumentation techniques. Two paths are currently followed to obtain short experimental rods: segmented fuel coming directly from power plants, or re-fabrication of rods in hot cells with our FABRICE process. It can be associated with instrumentation such as fuel centerline thermocouple in annular pellets, pressure transducer or fission gas release measurement by gamma-spectrometry using helium sweeping, in analytic experiments. Our present development, to be implemented in 1993, is the the centerline instrumentation of a fuel column with solid pellets. Inserting the thermocouple requires a cold drilling machine, using CO 2 freezing of broken UO 2 (with liquid nitrogen). During the fuel rod irradiation itself, we try to lower the uncertainties associated to power determination, using thermal balance or neutronic calibration, or even gamma spectrometry. A description of the new test train designed for the ISABELLE water loop in OSIRIS is given, with special emphasis on instrumentation: a LVDT for measuring fuel rod elongation and eventual clad failure, and increased number and better localization of thermocouples and SPDN. The third part is devoted to the measurements by optical microdensitometry of neutron radiographs of the fuel pellet dish modification after irradiation. Dishes are generally disappearing through thermal and mechanical deformation of the pellet, and this can eventually be modelized to better understand pellet-cladding mechanical interaction. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs

  11. Reprocessing ability of high density fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, A.; Belieres, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of a new high density fuel is becoming a key issue for Research Reactors operators. Such a new fuel should be a Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) fuel with a high density, to improve present in core performances. It must be compatible with the reprocessing in an industrial plant to provide a steady back-end solution. Within the framework of a work group CEA/CERCA/COGEMA on new fuel development for Research Reactors, COGEMA has performed an evaluation of the reprocessing ability of some fuel dispersants selected as good candidates. The results will allow US to classify these fuel dispersants from a reprocessing ability point of view. (author)

  12. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper presented in the following areas of interest: (1) fuel development; (2) post-irradiation examinations; (3) reprocessing; (4) thermite reaction; (5) fuel fabrication; (6) element tests; (7) core tests; (8) criticals; (9) shipping; and (10) reactors and methods

  13. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  14. Preliminary reactor physics calculations for Exxon LWR fuel testing in the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, W.O.; Nigg, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    The PFB reactor is being considered as an irradiation facility to test LWR fuel rods for Exxon Nuclear Company. Requested test conditions are 18 kW/ft axial peak steady state power in 2.5% initial enrichment, 20,000 MWd/Tu exposed rods. Multigroup transport theory calculations (S/sub n/ and Monte Carlo) showed that this was unattainable in the standard PBF test loop. Thus, a flux multiplier was developed in the form of a Zr-2-clad 0.15-inch thick cylindrical shell of 35% enriched, 88% T.D. UO 2 replacing the flow divider, surrounding the rod within the in-pile tube in PFB. With this flux multiplier installed and assuming an average water density of 0.86 g/cm 3 within the test loop, a Figure of Merit (FOM) for a single-rod test assembly of 0.86 kW/ft-MW +- 5% (at 95% confidence level) was calculated. This FOM is the axial peak linear test rod power per megawatt of reactor power. A reactor power of about 21 megawatts will therefore be required to supply the requested linear test rod axial peak heating rate of 18 kW/ft

  15. MTR loop at the MPR-GA. Siwabessy reactor of Serpong Indonesia for testing of LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbie, B.; Sunaryadi, D.; Supadi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of the MTR-Loop is for testing the specimens of MTR fuel element uprated conditions with respect to the normal conditions of the reactor fuel elements. It is intended to verify the suitability of the fuel elements for operation in a research reactor under preset temperature and pressure conditions. The most important part of the MTR loop is the test section. The fuel elements to be tested are positioned in the test section. For heat removal there is a cooling water flowing through the test section. On this paper the description of the MTR-Loop is described. Installation of the MTR-Loop will be performed in the middle of 1990. In order to facilitate the investigation of fuel behaviour and performance of the new fuel elements the supporting facilities are also already available in the RSG-GAS. (orig.)

  16. Possibilities for power reactor structural material and fuel testing in reactor RA; Mogucnosti reaktora RA za testiranje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinc, R; Lazarevic, Dj; Stefanovic, D; Cupac, S; Pesic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1978-05-15

    Nuclear reactor RA at Vinca has been designed as a high flux general purpose research reactor. Among other it was intended to play a role of material testing reactor. A scope of activities of Material Laboratory and Reactor RA Department of Boris Kidric Institute is presented in this report. Reactor RA capacity for reactor structural material and fuel irradiation is also described. The increase of RA reactor irradiation capacity is based on the improvement of VISA type fuel channel for fast neutron irradiations, as well as on the general neutron flux increase, due to introduction of highly enriched uranium fuel into reactor core and the advanced in-core fuel management. The irradiation capacities described allow for the reactor material and fuel testing to the considerable extent. Istrazivacki reaktor RA u Vinci je projektovan kao visokofluksni istrazivacki reaktor opste namene. Pored ostalog, on je namenjen i za testiranje reaktorskih konstrukcionih materijala i goriva. U radu je dat pregled aktivnosti Laboratorije za materijale IBK i reaktora RA na tom podrucju, kao i opis povecanih mogucnosti reaktora RA za ozracivanje reaktorskih materijala i goriva u cilju njihovog testiranja. Povecanje mogucnosti reaktora RA zasniva se na usavrsavanju specijalnog gorivnog kanala tipa VISA (za ozracivanje materijala brzim neutronima), kao i na opstem povecanju neutronskog fluksa na osnovu uvodjenja i nacina koriscenja visokoobogacenog uranskog goriva u reaktoru RA. Opisane mogucnosti reaktora RA dozvoljavaju u znatnoj meri ispitivanje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora.

  17. Potential of duplex fuel in prebreeder, breeder, and power reactor designs: tests and analyses (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, T.L.; Brennan, J.J.; Duncombe, E.; Schneider, M.J.; Johnson, R.G.R.

    1982-09-01

    Dual region fuel pellets, called duplex pellets, are comprised of an outer annular region of relatively high uranium fuel enrichment and a center pellet of fertile material with no enrichment. UO 2 and ThO 2 are the fissile and fertile materials of interest. Both prebreeders and breeders are discussed as are the performance advantages of duplex pellets over solid pellets in these two pressurized water reactor types. Advantages of duplex pellets for commercial reactor fuel rods are also discussed. Both irradiation test data and analytical results are used in comparisons. Manufacturing of duplex fuel is discussed

  18. The fabrication and performance of Canadian silicide dispersion fuel for test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wood, J.C.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Herbert, L.N.; Schaefer, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Fuel fabrication effort is now concentrated on the commissioning of large-scale process equipment, defining product specifications, developing a quality assurance plan, and setting up a mini-computer material accountancy system. In the irradiation testing program, full-size NRU assemblies containing 20% enriched silicide dispersion fuel have been Irradiated successfully to burnups in the range 65-80 atomic percent. Irradiations have also been conducted on mini-elements having 1.2 mm diameter holes In their mid-sections, some drilled before irradiation and others after irradiation to 22-83 atomic percent burnup. Uranium was lost to the coolant in direct proportion to the surface area of exposed core material. Pre-irradiation in the intact condition appeared to reduce in-reactor corrosion. Fuel cores developed for the NRU reactor are dimensionally very stable, swelling by only 6-8% at the very high burnup of 93 atomic percent. Two important factors contributing to this good performance are cylindrical clad restraint and coarse silicide particles. Thermal ramping tests were conducted on irradiated silicide aspersion fuels. Small segments of fuel cores released 85 Kr starting at about 520 deg. C and peaking at about 680 deg C. After a holding period of 1 hour at 720 deg. C a secondary 85 Kr peak occurred during cooling (at about 330 deg. C) probably due to thermal contraction cracking. Whole mini-elements irradiated to 93 atomic percent burnup were also ramped thermally, with encouraging results. After about 0.25 h at 530 deg. C the aluminum cladding developed very localized small blisters, some with penetrating pin-hole cracks preventing gross pillowing or ballooning. (author)

  19. The fabrication and performance of Canadian silicide dispersion fuel for test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D F; Wood, J C; Berthiaume, L C; Herbert, L N; Schaefer, J D

    1985-07-01

    Fuel fabrication effort is now concentrated on the commissioning of large-scale process equipment, defining product specifications, developing a quality assurance plan, and setting up a mini-computer material accountancy system. In the irradiation testing program, full-size NRU assemblies containing 20% enriched silicide dispersion fuel have been Irradiated successfully to burnups in the range 65-80 atomic percent. Irradiations have also been conducted on mini-elements having 1.2 mm diameter holes In their mid-sections, some drilled before irradiation and others after irradiation to 22-83 atomic percent burnup. Uranium was lost to the coolant in direct proportion to the surface area of exposed core material. Pre-irradiation in the intact condition appeared to reduce in-reactor corrosion. Fuel cores developed for the NRU reactor are dimensionally very stable, swelling by only 6-8% at the very high burnup of 93 atomic percent. Two important factors contributing to this good performance are cylindrical clad restraint and coarse silicide particles. Thermal ramping tests were conducted on irradiated silicide aspersion fuels. Small segments of fuel cores released {sup 85}Kr starting at about 520 deg. C and peaking at about 680 deg C. After a holding period of 1 hour at 720 deg. C a secondary {sup 85}Kr peak occurred during cooling (at about 330 deg. C) probably due to thermal contraction cracking. Whole mini-elements irradiated to 93 atomic percent burnup were also ramped thermally, with encouraging results. After about 0.25 h at 530 deg. C the aluminum cladding developed very localized small blisters, some with penetrating pin-hole cracks preventing gross pillowing or ballooning. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Shungo; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1990-01-01

    In a fuel assembly, if the entire fuels comprise mixed oxide fuels, reactivity change in cold temperature-power operation is increased to worsen the reactor shutdown margin. The reactor shutdown margin has been improved by increasing the burnable poison concentration thereby reducing the reactivity of the fuel assembly. However, since unburnt poisons are present at the completion of the reactor operation, the reactivity can not be utilized effectively to bring about economical disadvantage. In view of the above, the reactivity change between lower temperature-power operations is reduced by providing a non-boiling range with more than 9.1% of cross sectional area at the inside of a channel at the central portion of the fuel assembly. As a result, the amount of the unburnt burnable poisons is decreased, the economy of fuel assembly is improved and the reactor shutdown margin can be increase. (N.H.)

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, C.E.; Waite, E.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  2. Reactor fuel charging equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, Elman.

    1977-01-01

    In many types of reactor fuel charging equipment, tongs or a grab, attached to a trolley, housed in a guide duct, can be used for withdrawing from the core a selected spent fuel assembly or to place a new fuel assembly in the core. In these facilities, the trolley may have wheels that roll on rails in the guide duct. This ensures the correct alignment of the grab, the trolley and fuel assembly when this fuel assembly is being moved. By raising or lowering such a fuel assembly, the trolley can be immerged in the coolant bath of the reactor, whereas at other times it can be at a certain level above the upper surface of the coolant bath. The main object of the invention is to create a fuel handling apparatus for a sodium cooled reactor with bearings lubricated by the sodium coolant and in which the contamination of these bearings is prevented [fr

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Tashima, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies arranged in the form of a lattice wherein there is attached to the interface of one of two adjacent fuel assemblies a plate spring having a concave portion curved toward said interface and to the interface of the other fuel assembly a plate spring having a convex portion curved away from said interface

  4. Tests of experimental fuel elements by the method of nuclear-thermal pulse loadings in 'HYDRA' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastoyashchaya, O.V.; Lebedev, Yu. M.; Chechurov, A.M.; Khvostionov, Ye

    1997-01-01

    The results of tests of experimental fuel elements with uranium dioxide fuel composition embedded in Al and Zr matrix with the enrichment from 90% to 36% in respect to U-235 performed at the pulse 'HYDRA' reactor are presented in this paper. Testing is performed in the frame-work of extensive research program studying the behavior of fuel elements (FE) of research and mini nuclear power systems in case of practically immediate energy release in the fuel taking place during the RIA-type accidents. Duration of the neutron pulse when testing in 'HYDRA' reactor is from 7 to 20 ms. The methods of diagnostics of the state of FE prior to and after testing in the reactor are developed and verified. Mathematical model describing temperature fields inside the FE in the process of testing. and accounting for non-uniformity of fuel composition has been developed in order to summarize experimental results. Experimental data on the limiting values of the energy density leading to deformation and degradation of FE depending on the type of fuel composition have been obtained and the mechanisms for the development of these processes have been determined. The nature of physical-chemical processes taking place in the fuel composition and fuel cladding depending on material composition under different levels of energy deposition is demonstrated. The data on hydrogen generation and radioactive product release out of fuel after failure of FE are presented. (author)

  5. Irradiation tests of THTR fuel elements in the DRAGON reactor (irradiation experiment DR-K3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burck, W.; Duwe, R.; Groos, E.; Mueller, H.

    1977-03-01

    Within the scope of the program 'Development of Spherical Fuel Elements for HTR', similar fuel elements (f.e.) have been irradiated in the DRAGON reactor. The f.e. were fabricated by NUKEM and were to be tested under HTR conditions to scrutinize their employability in the THTR. The fuel was in the form of coated particles moulded into A3 matrix. The kernels of the particles were made of mixed oxide of uranium and thorium with an U 235 enrichment of 90%. One aim of the post irradiation examination was the investigation of irradiation induced changes of mechanical properties (dimensional stability and elastic behaviour) and of the corrosion behaviour which were compared with the properties determined with unirradiated f.e. The measurement of the fission gas release in annealing tests and ceramografic examinations exhibited no damage of the coated particles. The measured concentration distribution of fission metals led to conclusions about their release. All results showed, that neither the coated particles nor the integral fuel spheres experienced any significant changes that could impair their utilization in the THTR. (orig./UA) [de

  6. Accident Testing of High Temperature Reactor Fuel Elements with the KueFA Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Ferreira-Teixeira, A.E.; Van Winckel, S.; Rondinella, V.V.; Allelein, H.J.

    2013-06-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterised by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with Tri-Isotropic (TRISO) coating, designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1600-1650 deg. C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. The Cold Finger Apparatus (KueFA) is used to observe the combined effects of Depressurization and Loss of Forced Circulation (DLOFC) accident scenarios on HTR fuel. Originally designed at the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), an adapted KueFA operates on irradiated fuel in hot cell at JRC-ITU. A fuel pebble is heated in He atmosphere for several hundred hours, mimicking accident temperatures up to 1800 deg. C and realistic temperature transients. Non-gaseous volatile fission products released from the fuel condense on a water cooled stainless steel plate dubbed 'Cold Finger'. Exchanging plates frequently during the experiment and analysing plate deposits by means of HPGe gamma spectroscopy allows a reconstruction of the fission product release as a function of time and temperature. In order to achieve a good quantification of the release, a careful calibration of the setup is mandatory. An especially tailored collimator was designed to perform plate scanning with high spatial resolution, thus yielding information about the fission product distribution on the condensation plates. The analysis of condensation plates from recent KueFA tests shows that fission product release quantification is possible at high and low activity levels. Chemical dissolution has been performed for some condensation plates in order to assess beta nuclides of interest such as 90 Sr and possibly 129 I using an Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and to cross check the HPGe gamma spectroscopy measurements

  7. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  8. Caramel fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.

    1979-11-01

    This fuel for research reactors is made of UO 2 pellets in a zircaloy cladding to replace 93% enriched uranium. It is a cold fuel, non contaminating and non proliferating, enrichment is only 7 to 8%. Irradiation tests were performed until burn-up of 50000 MWD/t [fr

  9. Development of Electrical Capacitance Sensors for Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Testing at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Maolong; Ryals, Matthew; Ali, Amir; Blandford, Edward; Jensen, Colby; Condie, Keith; Svoboda, John; O' Brien, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A variety of instruments are being developed and qualified to support the Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) program and future transient irradiations at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The University of New Mexico (UNM) is working with INL to develop capacitance-based void sensors for determining the timing of critical boiling phenomena in static capsule fuel testing and the volume-averaged void fraction in flow-boiling in-pile water loop fuel testing. The static capsule sensor developed at INL is a plate-type configuration, while UNM is utilizing a ring-type capacitance sensor. Each sensor design has been theoretically and experimentally investigated at INL and UNM. Experiments are being performed at INL in an autoclave to investigate the performance of these sensors under representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions in a static capsule. Experiments have been performed at UNM using air-water two-phase flow to determine the sensitivity and time response of the capacitance sensor under a flow boiling configuration. Initial measurements from the capacitance sensor have demonstrated the validity of the concept to enable real-time measurement of void fraction. The next steps include designing the cabling interface with the flow loop at UNM for Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) ATF testing at TREAT and further characterization of the measurement response for each sensor under varying conditions by experiments and modeling.

  10. Reactor fueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Noriaki; Hirano, Haruyoshi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To optimally position a fuel catcher by mounting a television camera to a fuel catching portion and judging video images by the use of a computer or the like. Constitution: A television camera is mounted to the lower end of a fuel catching mechanism for handling nuclear fuels and a fuel assembly disposed within a reactor core or a fuel storage pool is observed directly from above to judge the position for the fuel assembly by means of video signals. Then, the relative deviation between the actual position of the fuel catcher and that set in a memory device is determined and the positional correction is carried out automatically so as to reduce the determined deviation to zero. This enables to catch the fuel assembly without failure and improves the efficiency for the fuel exchange operation. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. Management and storage of spent nuclear fuel at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work continues on appropriate solutions. The future of nuclear research, with its many benefits to mankind, is in jeopardy in some countries, especially countries without nuclear power programmes, because effective solutions for extended interim storage and final disposition of spent research reactor fuels are not yet available. An advisory Group meeting was convened in Vienna to consider a Database on the Management and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Research and Test Reactors. Sixteen experts from sixteen different countries participated in the Advisory Group meeting and presented country reports, which together represent an overview of the technologies used in spent fuel management and storage at research and test reactors world-wide. The sixteen country reports together with the database summary are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. Thermal analysis for a spent reactor fuel storage test in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montan, D.N.

    1980-09-01

    A test is conducted in which spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear power reactor are emplaced in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site. In this generic test, 11 canisters of spent PWR fuel are emplaced vertically along with 6 electrical simulator canisters on 3 m centers, 4 m below the floor of a storage drift which is 420 m below the surface. Two adjacent parallel drifts contain electrical heaters, operated to simulate (in the vicinity of the storage drift) the temperature fields of a large repository. This test, planned for up to five years duration, uses fairly young fuel (2.5 years out of core) so that the thermal peak will occur during the time frame of the test and will not exceed the peak that would not occur until about 40 years of storage had older fuel (5 to 15 years out of core) been used. This paper describes the calculational techniques and summarizes the results of a large number of thermal calculations used in the concept, basic design and final design of the spent fuel test. The results of the preliminary calculations show the effects of spacing and spent fuel age. Either radiation or convection is sufficient to make the drifts much better thermal conductors than the rock that was removed to create them. The combination of radiation and convection causes the drift surfaces to be nearly isothermal even though the heat source is below the floor. With a nominal ventilation rate of 2 m 3 /s and an ambient rock temperature of 23 0 C, the maximum calculated rock temperature (near the center of the heat source) is about 100 0 C while the maximum air temperature in the drift is around 40 0 C. This ventilation (1 m 3 /s through the main drift and 1/2 m 3 /s through each of the side drifts) will remove about 1/3 of the heat generated during the first five years of storage

  13. Research reactor fuel - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlay, M.R.; Ripley, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    In the two years since the last ANA conference there have been marked changes in the research reactor fuel scene. A new low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, 'monolithic' uranium molybdenum, has shown such promise in initial trials that it may be suitable to meet the objectives of the Joint Declaration signed by Presidents Bush and Putin to commit to converting all US and Russian research reactors to LEU by 2012. Development of more conventional aluminium dispersion UMo LEU fuel has continued in the meantime and is entering the final qualification stage of multiple full sized element irradiations. Despite this progress, the original 2005 timetable for UMo fuel qualification has slipped and research reactors, including the RRR, may not convert from silicide to UMo fuel before 2007. The operators of the Swedish R2 reactor have been forced to pursue the direct route of qualifying a UMo lead test assembly (LTA) in order to meet spent fuel disposal requirements of the Swedish law. The LTA has recently been fabricated and is expected to be loaded shortly into the R2 reactor. We present an update of our previous ANA paper and details of the qualification process for UMo fuel

  14. Method of reactor fueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Toshiro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the cost and shorten the working time by saving fueling neutron detectors and their components. Method: Incore drive tubes for the neutron source range monitor (SRM) and intermediate range monitor (IRM) are disposed respectively within in a reactor core and a SRM detector assembly is inserted to the IRM incore drive tube which is most nearest to the neutron source upon reactor fueling. The reactor core reactivity is monitored by the SRM detector assembly. The SRM detector asesembly inserted into the IRM drive tube is extracted at the time of charging fuels up to the frame connecting the SRM and, thereafter, IRM detection assembly is inserted into the IRM drive tube and the SRM detector assembly is inserted into the SRM drive tube respectively for monitoring the reactor core. (Sekiya, K.)

  15. Accelerating the design and testing of LEU fuel assemblies for conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies proposed geometries and loading specifications of LEU tube-type and pin-type test assemblies that would be suitable for accelerating the conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside of Russia if these fuels are manufactured, qualified by irradiation testing, and made commercially available in Russia. (author)

  16. Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, G.L.; Hoffman, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab

  17. Introduction to the modified TROI test facility for fuel coolant interaction under a submerged reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Young Su; Hong, Seong-Wan; Song, Jin Ho; Hong, Seong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can threaten the integrity of the reactor cavity under a severe accident. A steam explosion can be occurred by the rapid energy transfer in the high-temperature corium melt jet penetrating into water, which makes the dynamic load applying to the surrounding structure. Before a steam explosion, the corium melt jet breaks into small-sized particles, and the steam is generated continuously by the film boiling on the hot surface of the melt contacting with water. The premixing phase consisting of the corium melt, water, and steam can determine the intensity of the steam explosion. Unfortunately, the previous experimental studies on the FCI phenomena have carried out under a free fall of the corium melt jet in a gas phase before interacting with water. The previous TROI (Test for Real cOrium Interaction with water) test facility, that is a well-known test facility for the FCI phenomena in the world, has observed a steam explosion under a free fall of a corium melt jet in a gas phase before contacting a coolant since 2000, which is changing to simulate the FCI phenomena under a submerged reactor vessel. This study introduces the modified TROI test facility as shown in Fig. 1 and the considerations for the experiment with success. The previous TROI test facility, that has observed the molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) with a free fall of the prototypic corium melt in a gas phase before contacting a coolant, was modified to simulate the FCI phenomena under a submerged reactor vessel for the assessment of the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) concept, i.e., without a free-fall distance of the corium melt before contacting water. The superheated prototypic corium melt created by the cold crucible melting method moves on a releasing valve newly installed just above the water level in the interaction vessel. The corium melt will stay on a releasing valve in less than 0.2 seconds to reduce heat loss for preventing the solidification, and

  18. Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x = 0, 8, 19 wt.%) fast reactor fuel test in FFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, D.L., E-mail: Douglas.Porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Tsai Hanchung [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4803 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt.%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4-cm active fuel-column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors, there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning-of-life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608 Degree-Sign C, cooling to 522 Degree-Sign C at end-of-life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non-destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3-cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at {approx}0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a higher production of rare-earth fission products at this location and a higher {Delta}T between fuel center and cladding than at core center, together providing more rare earths at the cladding and

  19. Fast reactor fuel reprocessing. An Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) envisioned the introduction of Plutonium fuelled fast reactors as the intermediate stage, between Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors and Thorium-Uranium-233 based reactors for the Indian Nuclear Power Programme. This necessitated the closing of the fast reactor fuel cycle with Plutonium rich fuel. Aiming to develop a Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (FRFR) technology with low out of pile inventory, the DAE, with over four decades of operating experience in Thermal Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (TRFR), had set up at the India Gandhi Center for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, R and D facilities for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. After two decades of R and D in all the facets, a Pilot Plant for demonstrating FRFR had been set up for reprocessing the FBTR (Fast Breeder Test Reactor) spent mixed carbide fuel. Recently in this plant, mixed carbide fuel with 100 GWd/t burnup fuel with short cooling period had been successfully reprocessed for the first time in the world. All the challenging problems encountered had been successfully overcome. This experience helped in fine tuning the designs of various equipments and processes for the future plants which are under construction and design, namely, the DFRP (Demonstration Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant) and the FRP (Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant). In this paper, a comprehensive review of the experiences in reprocessing the fast reactor fuel of different burnup is presented. Also a brief account of the various developmental activities and strategies for the DFRP and FRP are given. (author)

  20. Cermet fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-09-01

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Fusion reactor fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1972-06-01

    For thermonuclear power reactors based on the continuous fusion of deuterium and tritium the principal fuel processing problems occur in maintaining desired compositions in the primary fuel cycled through the reactor, in the recovery of tritium bred in the blanket surrounding the reactor, and in the prevention of tritium loss to the environment. Since all fuel recycled through the reactor must be cooled to cryogenic conditions for reinjection into the reactor, cryogenic fractional distillation is a likely process for controlling the primary fuel stream composition. Another practical possibility is the permeation of the hydrogen isotopes through thin metal membranes. The removal of tritium from the ash discharged from the power system would be accomplished by chemical procedures to assure physiologically safe concentration levels. The recovery process for tritium from the breeder blanket depends on the nature of the blanket fluids. For molten lithium the only practicable possibility appears to be permeation from the liquid phase. For molten salts the process would involve stripping with inert gas followed by chemical recovery. In either case extremely low concentrations of tritium in the melts would be desirable to maintain low tritium inventories, and to minimize escape of tritium through unwanted permeation, and to avoid embrittlement of metal walls. 21 refs

  2. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    fulfill its mission that is to contribute in improving the quality of life of the Brazilian people. The nuclear fuel cycle is a series of steps involved in the production and use of fuel for nuclear reactors. The Laboratories of Chemistry and Environmental Diagnosis Center, CQMA, support the demand of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program providing chemical characterization of uranium compounds and other related materials. In this period the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) concentrated efforts on improving equipment and systems to enable the IEA-R1 research reactor to operate at higher power, increasing the capacity of radioisotopes production, samples irradiation, tests and experiments. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    to contribute in improving the quality of life of the Brazilian people. The nuclear fuel cycle is a series of steps involved in the production and use of fuel for nuclear reactors. The Laboratories of Chemistry and Environmental Diagnosis Center, CQMA, support the demand of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program providing chemical characterization of uranium compounds and other related materials. In this period the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) concentrated efforts on improving equipment and systems to enable the IEA-R1 research reactor to operate at higher power, increasing the capacity of radioisotopes production, samples irradiation, tests and experiments. (author)

  4. A nondestructive testing device for determining 235U enrichment in power reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lanhua; Liu Nangai

    1990-07-01

    The development and application of a nondestructive testing device are presented, which is used for determining the 235 U enrichment in the mixed fuel of fuel elements with UO 2 pellets. The testing efficiency is improved because the passive gamma ray method and a hole-bored NaI crystal and four channel multichannel analyzer are used. The false discrimination rate is reduced as the average comparing method is taken. This device is simple in structure and easy in operation. It has provided a new testing tool for the fuel elements production in China. This device has successfully been used in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant in testing its fuel elements

  5. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10 21 neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10 21 , but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum

  6. A disposition strategy for highly enriched, aluminum-based fuel from research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.M.; Gould, T.H.; McDonell, W.R.; Bickford, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    The strategy proposed in this paper offers the Department of Energy an approach for disposing of aluminum-based, highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuels from foreign and domestic research reactors. The proposal is technically, socially, and economically sound. If implemented, it would advance US non-proliferation goals while also disposing of the spent fuel's waste by timely and proven methods using existing technologies and facilities at SRS without prolonged and controversial storage of the spent fuel. The fuel would be processed through 221-H. The radioactive fission products (waste) would be treated along with existing SRS high level waste by vitrifying it as borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for disposal in the national geological repository. The HEU would be isotopically diluted, during processing, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) which can not be used to make weapons, thus eliminating proliferation concerns. The LEU can be sold to fabricators of either research reactor fuel or commercial power fuel. This proposed processing-LEU recycle approach has several important advantages over other alternatives, including: Lowest capital investment; lowest net total cost; quickest route to acceptable waste form and final geologic disposal; and likely lowest safety, health, and environmental impacts

  7. Pyro-electrochemical reprocessing of irradiated MOX fast reactor fuel, testing of the reprocessing process with direct MOX fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kormilitzyn, M.V.; Vavilov, S.K.; Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Tselichshev, I.V

    2000-07-01

    One of the advanced technologies for fast reactor fuel recycle is pyro-electrochemical molten salt technology. In 1998 we began to study the next phase of the irradiated oxide fuel reprocessing new process MOX {yields} MOX. This process involves the following steps: - Dissolution of irradiated fuel in molten alkaline metal chlorides, - Purification of melt from fission products that are co-deposited with uranium and plutonium oxides, - Electrochemical co-deposition of uranium and plutonium oxides under the controlled cathode potential, - Production of granulated MOX (crushing,salt separation and sizing), and - Purification of melt from fission products by phosphate precipitation. In 1998 a series of experiments were prepared and carried out in order to validate this process. It was shown that the proposed reprocessing flowsheet of irradiated MOX fuel verified the feasibility of its decontamination from most of its fission products (rare earths, cesium) and minor-actinides (americium, curium)

  8. Pyro-electrochemical reprocessing of irradiated MOX fast reactor fuel, testing of the reprocessing process with direct MOX fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormilitzyn, M.V.; Vavilov, S.K.; Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Tselichshev, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    One of the advanced technologies for fast reactor fuel recycle is pyro-electrochemical molten salt technology. In 1998 we began to study the next phase of the irradiated oxide fuel reprocessing new process MOX → MOX. This process involves the following steps: - Dissolution of irradiated fuel in molten alkaline metal chlorides, - Purification of melt from fission products that are co-deposited with uranium and plutonium oxides, - Electrochemical co-deposition of uranium and plutonium oxides under the controlled cathode potential, - Production of granulated MOX (crushing,salt separation and sizing), and - Purification of melt from fission products by phosphate precipitation. In 1998 a series of experiments were prepared and carried out in order to validate this process. It was shown that the proposed reprocessing flowsheet of irradiated MOX fuel verified the feasibility of its decontamination from most of its fission products (rare earths, cesium) and minor-actinides (americium, curium)

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a cluster of fuel elements supported by transversal grids so that their axes are parallel to and at a distance from each other, in order to establish interstices for the axial flow of a coolant. At least one of the interstices is occupied by an axial duct reserved for an auxiliary cooling fluid and is fitted with side holes through which the auxiliary cooling fluid is sprayed into the cluster. Deflectors extend as from a transversal grid in a position opposite the holes to deflect the cooling fluid jet towards those parts of the fuel elements that are not accessible to the auxiliary coolant. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  10. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  11. Cumulative damage fatigue tests on nuclear reactor Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes at room temperature and 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandarinathan, P.R.; Vasudevan, P.

    1980-01-01

    Cumulative damage fatigue tests were conducted on the Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes at room temperature and 300 0 C on the modified Moore type, four-point-loaded, deflection-controlled, rotating bending fatigue testing machine. The cumulative cycle ratio at fracture for the Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes was found to depend on the sequence of loading, stress history, number of cycles of application of the pre-stress and the test temperature. A Hi-Lo type fatigue loading was found to be very much damaging at room temperature and this feature was not observed in the tests at 300 0 C. Results indicate significant differences in damage interaction and damage propagation under cumulative damage tests at room temperature and at 300 0 C. Block-loading fatigue tests are suggested as the best method to determine the life-time of Zircaloy-2 fuel tubes under random fatigue loading during their service in the reactor. (orig.)

  12. Space reactor fuels performance and development issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wewerka, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three compact reactor concepts are now under consideration by the US Space Nuclear Power Program (the SP-100 Program) as candidates for the first 100-kWe-class space reactor. Each of these reactor designs puts unique constraints and requirements on the fuels system, and raises issues of fuel systems feasibility and performance. This paper presents a brief overview of the fuel requirements for the proposed space reactor designs, a delineation of the technical feasibility issues that each raises, and a description of the fuel systems development and testing program that has been established to address key technical issues

  13. Desludging of N Reactor fuel canisters: Analysis, Test, and data requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The N Reactor fuel is currently stored in canisters in the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. In KE, the canisters have open tops; in KW, the cans have sealed lids, but are vented to release gases. Corrosion products have formed on exposed uranium metal fuel, on carbon steel basin component surfaces, and on aluminum alloy canister surfaces. Much of the corrosion product is retained on the corroding surfaces; however, large inventories of particulates have been released. Some of the corrosion product particulates form sludge on the basin floors; some particulates are retained within the canisters. The floor sludge inventories are much greater in the KE Basin than in the KW Basin because KE Basin operated longer and its water chemistry was less controlled. Another important factor is the absence of lids on the KE canisters, allowing uranium corrosion products to escape and water-borne species, principally iron oxides, to settle in the canisters. The inventories of corrosion products, including those released as particulates inside the canisters, are only beginning to be characterized for the closed canisters in KW Basin. The dominant species in the KE floor sludge are oxides of aluminum, iron, and uranium. A large fraction of the aluminum and uranium floor sludge particulates may have been released during a major fuel segregation campaign in the 1980s, when fuel was emptied from 4990 canisters. Handling and jarring of the fuel and aluminum canisters seems likely to have released particulates from the heavily corroded surfaces. Four candidate methods are discussed for dealing with canister sludge emerged in the N Reactor fuel path forward: place fuel in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) without desludging; drill holes in canisters and drain; drill holes in canisters and flush with water; and remove sludge and repackage the fuel

  14. Neutron metrology in the fuel assemblies of a material test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorbraak, W.P.; Paardekoper, A.; Polle, A.N.; Freudenreich, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    Results are presented of detailed thermal and fast neutron measurements performed in all fuel and control assemblies of the HFR in Petten. The results give information about deviations of a general shape of vertical thermal and fast fluence rate distributions due to material transitions in the reactor core and different control assembly settings. Further it is demonstrated that the ratio of fast and thermal fluence rate at the various monitor positions in the assemblies give useful information for the (relative) local burn-up of the fuel. (orig.)

  15. Equipment for testing a group of nuclear reactor fuel elements for damage to the cans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohm, F.

    1977-01-01

    Equipment is described for use in sodium cooled nuclear reactors, with which the fuel elements consisting of bundles of fuel and fertile rods can be examined for damage to the cans. Fission poducts occurring in the liquid coolant act as indicators. The coolant is sucked via pipelines which penetrate into the elements into a collecting container, and a special pipeline is available for every element of a group, where the highest points of individual pipelines at different hydrostatic heads are taken to the collecting container. This permits the checking of one line at a time due to pressure changes. (UWI) [de

  16. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1983-09-01

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  17. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  18. Continuous parameter determination of irradiated nuclear fuels in the test-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, A.; Junod, E.; Mas, P.; Perdreau, R.

    1977-01-01

    During the irradiation tests of nuclear fuels, the flux level may often be variable by shifting the loops in a high neutron-gradient. So integral fluence measurements are no longer sufficient. The self-powered neutron detectors allow to finely scan instantaneous fluxes. More than 100 such SPN detectors are used on the experiments irradiated in the SILOE reactor. The treatment of the large amount of information is following. A first minicomputer scans all the measurement lines at a variable frequence (10 min to 1 hr) and writes rough voltage values on a magnetic disk. A second computer does a sorting of these values for each set of SPND corresponding to an experiment. At the present time, the main treatment is performed by batch processing by some FORTRAN codes to get time-evolving quantities, such as effective flux, fission power, burn-up, fission product activities, etc. The future development of the system will allow some of these calculations to be performed directly on the second computer in such a manner to control the movements of the loops automatically in view of a given irradiation program

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhorev, Yu.V.; Biryukov, G.I.; Kirilyuk, N.A.; Lobanov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel assembly is proposed for nuclear reactors allowing remote replacement of control rod bundles or their shifting from one assembly to another, i.e., their multipurpose use. This leads to a significant increase in fuel assembly usability. In the fuel assembly the control rod bundle is placed in guide tube channels to which baffles are attached for fuel element spacing. The remote handling of control rods is provided by a hollow cylinder with openings in its lower bottom through which the control rods pass. All control rods in a bundle are mounted to a cross beam which in turn is mounted in the cylinder and is designed for grasping the whole rod bundle by a remotely controlled telescopic mechanism in bundle replacement or shifting. (Z.M.)

  20. Fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Uchikawa, Sadao; Bessho, Yasunori; Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Maruyama, Hiromi; Ozawa, Michihiro; Nakamura, Mitsuya.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns fuel assemblies charged in a BWR type reactor and the reactor core. The fuel assembly comprises fuel rods containing burnable poisons and fuel rods not containing burnable poisons. Both of the highest and the lowest gadolinia concentrations of the fuel rods containing gadolinia as burnable poisons are present in the lower region of the fuel assembly. This can increase the spectral shift effect without increasing the maximum linear power density. (I.N.)

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-10-16

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value.

  3. BR2 Reactor: Irradiation of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwimp, A.

    2005-01-01

    Safe, reliable and economical operation of reactor fuels, both UO 2 and MOX types, requires in-pile testing and qualification up to high target burn-up levels. In-pile testing of advanced fuels for improved performance is also mandatory. The objectives of research performed at SCK-CEN are to perform Neutron irradiation of LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuels in the BR2 reactor under relevant operating and monitoring conditions, as specified by the experimenter's requirements and to improve the on-line measurements on the fuel rods themselves

  4. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d- 3 He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs

  5. Actions needed for RA reactor exploitation - I-IV, Part II, Design project VI-SA 1, Experimental loop for testing the EL-4 reactor fuel elements in the central vertical experimental channel of the RA reactor in Vinca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1961-12-01

    The objective of installing the VISA-1 loop was testing the fuel elements of the EL-4 reactor. The fuel elements planned for testing are natural UO 2 with beryllium cladding, cooled by CO 2 under nominal pressure of 60 at and temperature 600 deg C. central vertical experimental channel of the RA reactor was chosen for installing a test loop cooled by CO 2 . This report contains the detailed design project of the testing loop with the control system and safety analysis of the planned experiment

  6. LWR fuel rod testing facilities in high flux reactor (HFT) Petten for investigation of power cycling and ramping behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markgraf, J; Perry, D; Oudaert, J [Commission of the European Communities, Joint Reserach Centre, Petten Establishment, Petten (Netherlands)

    1983-06-01

    LWR fuel rod irradiation experiments are being performed in HFR's Pool Side Facility (PSF) by means of pressurized boiling water capsules (BWFC). For more than 6 years the major application of these devices has been in performing irradiation programs to investigate the power ramp behaviour of PWR and BWR rods which have been pre-irradiated in power reactors. Irradiation devices with various types of monitoring instrumentation are available, e.g. for fuel rod length, fuel stack length, fuel rod internal pressure and fuel rod central temperature measurements. The application scope covers PWR and BWR fuel rods, with burn-up levels up to 45 MWd/kg(U), max. linear heat generation rates up to 700 W/cm and simulation of constant power change rates between 0.05 and 1000 W/cm.min. The paper describes the different designs of LWR fuel rod testing facilities and associated non-destructive testing devices in use at the HFR Petten. It also addresses the new test capabilities that will become available after exchange of the HFR vessel in 1983. Furthermore it shows some typical results. (author)

  7. Reactor and fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshihiko; Bessho, Yasunori; Sano, Hiroki; Yokomizo, Osamu; Yamashita, Jun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention realizes an effective spectral operation by applying an optimum pressure loss coefficient while taking the characteristics of a lower tie plate into consideration. That is, the pressure loss coefficient of the lower tie plate is optimized by varying the cross sectional area of a fuel assembly flow channel in the lower tie plate or varying the surface roughness of a coolant flow channel in the lower tie plate. Since there is a pressure loss coefficient to optimize the moderator density over a flow rate change region, the effect of spectral shift rods can be improved by setting the optimum pressure loss coefficient of the lower tie plate. According to the present invention, existent fuel assemblies can easily be changed successively to fuel assemblies having spectral shift rods of a great spectral shift effect by using existent reactor facilities as they are. (I.S.)

  8. Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

  9. Annex 1 - Task 08/12 final report, testing the RA reactor fuel element; Prilog 1 - Zavrsni izvestaj o podzadatku 08/12, Ispitivanje gorivnog elementa reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihajlovic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Testing of the RA reactor fuel element is presented in Annex 2 and 3 of this report. Annex 2 describes the construction of individual parts of the fuel elements and the results of the chemical analyses. Annex 3 shows the microstructure of uranium in the fuel element.

  10. Irradiation testing of LEU fuels in the SILOE Reactor - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francis; Baas, Claude; Martel, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of uranium-silicide fuels has continued in the SILOE reactor during the past year. Thickness vs. fission density data from four U 3 Si plates containing 5.5 and 6.0 g U/cm 3 have been analyzed, and the results are presented. The irradiation of a full 60 g U/cm 3 U 3 Si element has begun. In addition, four U 3 Si 2 plates containing 20 to 54 g U/cm 3 are now being irradiated. These irradiations and future plans are discussed in the paper. (author)

  11. Reactor fuel exchanging facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Shin-ichi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable operation of an emergency manual operating mechanism for a fuel exchanger with all operatorless trucks and remote operation of a manipulator even if the exchanger fails during the fuel exchanging operation. Constitution: When a fuel exchanging system fails while connected to a pressure tube of a nuclear reactor during a fuel exchanging operation, a stand-by self-travelling truck automatically runs along a guide line to the position corresponding to the stopping position at that time of the fuel exchanger based on a command from a central control chamber. At this time the truck is switched to manual operation, and approaches the exchanger while being monitored through a television camera and then stops. Then, a manipurator is connected to the emergency manual operating mechanism of the exchanger, and is operated through necessary emergency steps by driving the snout, the magazine, the grab or the like in the exchanger in response to the problem, and necessary operations for the emergency treatment are thus performed. (Sekiya, K.)

  12. Results of recent reactor-material tests on dispersal of oxide fuel from a disrupted core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Wilson, R.J.; Vetter, D.L.; Erickson, E.G.; Dewey, G.

    1985-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations and related analyses are reported addressing the dispersal of molten oxide fuel from a disrupted core via various available pathways for the CRBR system. These investigations included the GAPFLOW tests in which pressure-driven and gravity drainage tests were performed using dispersal pathways mocking up the intersubassembly gaps, the CAMEL C6 and C7 tests in which molten fuel entered sodium-filled control assembly ducts under prototypic thermal-hydraulic conditions, and the Lower Internals Drainage (LID) tests in which molten fuel drained downward through simulated below-core structure (orifice plate stacks) as the bottom of control assembly ducts. The results of SHOTGUN tests addressing basic freezing of molten UO 2 and UO 2 /metal mixtures flowing through circular tubes are also reported. Test results have invariably shown the existance of stable UO 2 crusts on the inside surfaces of the flow paths. Appreciable removal of fuel was indicated prior to freezing-induced immobilization. Application of heat transfer models based upon the presence of stable, insulating fuel crusts tends to overpredict the removal process

  13. Fossil fuel furnace reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, William J.

    1987-01-01

    A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

  14. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  15. Benchmark testing of CENDL-2 for U-fuel thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baocheng; Liu Guisheng; Liu Ping

    1995-01-01

    Based on CENDL-2, NJOY-WIMS code system was used to generate 69-group constants, and do benchmark testing for TRX-1,2; BAPL-UO-2-1,2,3; ZEEP-1,2,3. All the results proved that CENDL-2 is reliable for thermal reactor calculations. (3 tabs.)

  16. Reactivity feedback coefficients of a material test research reactor fueled with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: farhan73@hotmail.com; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2008-10-15

    The reactivity feedback coefficients of a material test research reactor fueled with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuels were calculated. For this purpose, the low-density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, moderator temperature reactivity coefficient and moderator density reactivity coefficient. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the average values of fuel temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, moderator temperature reactivity coefficient and moderator density reactivity coefficient from 20 deg. C to 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, followed the relationships (in units of {delta}k/k x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}) -2.116 - 0.118 {rho}{sub U}, 0.713 - 37.309/{rho}{sub U} and -12.765 - 34.309/{rho}{sub U}, respectively for 4.0 {<=} {rho}{sub U} (g/cm{sup 3}) {<=} 6.0.

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmonier, Pierre; Mesnage, Bernard; Nervi, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    This invention refers to fuel assemblies for a liquid metal cooled fast neutron reactor. Each assembly is composed of a hollow vertical casing, of regular polygonal section, containing a bundle of clad pins filled with a fissile or fertile substance. The casing is open at its upper end and has a cylindrical foot at its lower end for positioning the assembly in a housing provided in the horizontal diagrid, on which the core assembly rests. A set of flat bars located on the external surface of the casing enables it to be correctly orientated in its housing among the other core assemblies [fr

  18. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors have significant advantages as energy sources for closed-cycle power systems. The advantages arise from the removal of temperature limits associated with conventional reactor fuel elements, the wide variety of methods of extracting energy from fissioning gases, and inherent low fissile and fission product in-core inventory due to continuous fuel reprocessing. Example power cycles and their general performance characteristics are discussed. Efficiencies of gaseous fuel reactor systems are shown to be high with resulting minimal environmental effects. A technical overview of the NASA-funded research program in gaseous fuel reactors is described and results of recent tests of uranium hexafluoride (UF6)-fueled critical assemblies are presented.

  19. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmick, H.H.; Schwenk, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is participating in a NASA-sponsored program to demonstrate the feasibility of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor. The work is aimed at acquiring experimental and theoretical information for the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test heat removal by optical radiation. The basic goal of this work is for space applications, however, other NASA-sponsored work suggests several attractive applications to help meet earth-bound energy needs. Such potential benefits are small critical mass, on-site fuel processing, high fuel burnup, low fission fragment inventory in reactor core, high temperature for process heat, optical radiation for photochemistry and space power transmission, and high temperature for advanced propulsion systems. Low power reactor experiments using uranium hexafluoride gas as fuel demonstrated performance in accordance with reactor physics predictions. The final phase of experimental activity now in progress is the fabrication and testing of a buffer gas vortex confinement system

  20. Results of VVER fuel rods tests in the MIR.M1 reactor under power cycling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burukin, A.; Izhutov, A.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Kalygin, V.; Markov, D.; Pimenov, Y.; Novikov, V.; Medvedev, A.; Nesterov, B.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the main results of the 50 ... 60 MWd/kgU burnup VVER fuel rods tests performed in the MIR.M1 reactor loop facilities under power cycling. The non-destructive PIE results are presented as well. A series of experiments was performed, including overall measurement of fuel rod parameters test, in one of which 300 cycles were done. Irradiation under power cycling conditions and PIE of high-burnup VVER fuel rods showed the following: 1) all fuel rods claddings preserved their integrity under irradiation at linear heat rate (LHR) higher than the NPP operating one; 2) experimental data were obtained on the axial and radial cladding strain and fission gas release (FGR) from 50 ... 60 MWd/kgU burnup VVER-440 and VVER-1000 fuel rods as well as on the kinetics of the change in these parameters and fuel temperature under the power cycling; 3) non-destructive PIE results are in a satisfactory correlation with the data obtained by means of in-pile measurement gages during irradiation. (authors)

  1. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the kinetic parameters of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mfarhan_73@yahoo.co.uk; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2008-09-15

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the neutronic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Since the alloying elements have different cross-sections affecting the reactor in different ways, therefore fuels U-Mo (9 w/o) which contain the same elements in same ratio were selected for analysis. Simulations were carried out to calculate core excess reactivity, neutron flux spectrum, prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed neutron fraction and feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, and reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the excess reactivity at the beginning of life does not increase as the uranium density of fuel. Both the prompt neutron generation time and the effective delayed neutron fraction decrease as the uranium density increases. The absolute value of Doppler feedback coefficient increases while the absolute values of reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature decrease.

  2. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the kinetic parameters of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2008-01-01

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the neutronic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Since the alloying elements have different cross-sections affecting the reactor in different ways, therefore fuels U-Mo (9 w/o) which contain the same elements in same ratio were selected for analysis. Simulations were carried out to calculate core excess reactivity, neutron flux spectrum, prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed neutron fraction and feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, and reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the excess reactivity at the beginning of life does not increase as the uranium density of fuel. Both the prompt neutron generation time and the effective delayed neutron fraction decrease as the uranium density increases. The absolute value of Doppler feedback coefficient increases while the absolute values of reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature decrease

  3. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  4. Test facility for auxiliary cooling system (ACS) of fast breeder reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In preparation of constructing ''Monju'', a prototype fast breeder reactor, PNC has been pushing forward its research and development projects and the ACS was constructed under these projects. The auxiliary cooling system is an important engineered safety feature, and is used for safe removal of heat from the reactor at the shutdown. The ACS serves as a means of testing and assessing the auxiliary cooling system for the ''Monju'' and is designed and manufactured to have one fifth capacity of the Monju. The air heat exchanger and the ACS system was designed to withstand higher temperature range of the conventional design code (MITI-501), and finned tubes were applied for effective heat removal. Preheating system was designed to heat up the whole system over 200 0 C within 20 hours to prevent sodium from freezing. Basic performance of ACS was verified satisfactorily by a series of performance tests, such as start up test, flow rate measurement and preheating test before delivery. The experience from designing and construction of ACS and data obtained by these tests will be very instructive for designing and construction of the ''Monju''. (author)

  5. High-240Pu fuel worth in the Fast Test Reactor Engineering Mockup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughtry, J.W.; Dobbin, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Reactivity effects associated with the replacement of low- 240 Pu fuel with high- 240 Pu fuel were calculated and compared to measurements made in the FTR Engineering Mockup Critical (EMC). When the Pu and U isotopic compositions were changed in a way that increased the amounts of 240 Pu and 241 Pu and reduced the amounts of 239 Pu and 238 U while conserving total fissile mass and total fertile mass, the reactivity effect was positive. Calculation-to-experiment bias factors were obtained for this type of change and for the replacement of Fe 2 O 3 with U 3 O 8 in subassembly-size zones of the EMC. The k/sub e/--k/sub c/ bias decreased when high- 240 Pu fuel was introduced and increased when Fe 2 O 3 was replaced with U 3 O 8 . When the two changes were combined, their effects on the k/sub e/ --k/sub c/ bias tended to cancel out. The work described is related to plans for the utilization of light water reactor discharge Pu in the FTR

  6. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the uncontrolled reactivity insertion transients of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: farhan73@hotmail.com; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2009-08-15

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the uncontrolled reactivity insertion transients of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density U-Mo (9w/o) LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program having uranium densities of 6.57 gU/cm{sup 3}, 7.74 gU/cm{sup 3} and 8.57 gU/cm{sup 3}. Simulations were carried out to determine the reactor performance under reactivity insertion transients with totally failed control rods. Ramp reactivities of 0.25$/0.5 s and 1.35$/0.5 s were inserted with reactor operating at full power level of 10 MW. Nuclear reactor analysis code PARET was employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that when reactivity insertion was 0.25$/0.5 s, the new power level attained increased by 5.8% as uranium density increases from 6.57 gU/cm{sup 3} to 8.90 gU/cm{sup 3}. This results in increased maximum temperatures of fuel, clad and coolant outlet, achieved at the new power level, by 4.7 K, 4.4 K and 2.4 K, respectively. When reactivity insertion was 1.35$/0.5 s, the feedback reactivities were unable to control the reactor which resulted in the bulk boiling of the coolant; the one with the highest fuel density was the first to reach the boiling point.

  7. Reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Mitsuhiro; Mori, Kazuma.

    1990-01-01

    In a high burnup degree reactor core, a problem of fuel can corrosion caused by coolants occurs due to long stay in a reactor. Then, the use of fuel cladding tubes with improved corrosion resistance is now undertaken and use of corrosion resistant alloys is attempted. However, since the conventional TIG welding melts the entire portion, the welded portion does not remain only in the corrosive resistant alloy but it forms new alloys of the corrosion resistant alloy and zircaloy as the matrix material or inter-metallic compounds, which degrades the corrosion resistance. In the present invention, a cladding tube comprising a dual layer structure using a corrosion resistant alloy only for a required thickness and an end plug made of the same material as the corrosion resistant alloy are welded at the junction portion by using resistance welding. Then, they are joined under welding by the heat generated to the junction surfaces between both of them, to provide corrosion resistant alloys substantially at the outside of the welded portion as well. Accordingly, the corrosion resistance is not degradated. (T.M.)

  8. Unified fuel elements development for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Stetsky, Y.; Dobrikova, I.

    1998-01-01

    Square cross-section rod type fuel elements have been developed for russian pool-type research reactors. new fuel elements can replace the large nomenclature of tubular fuel elements with around, square and hexahedral cross-sections and to solve a problem of enrichment reduction. the fuel assembly designs with rod type fuel elements have been developed. The overall dimensions of existing the assemblies are preserved in this one. the experimental-industrial fabricating process of fuel elements, based on a joint extrusion method has been developed. The fabricating process has been tested in laboratory conditions, 150 experimental fuel element samples of the various sizes were produced. (author)

  9. Acceleration Test Method for Failure Prediction of the End Cap Contact Region of Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Fuel Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Lee, Young-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Lee, Kang-Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This paper reports the results of an acceleration test to predict the contact-induced failure that could occur at the cylinder-to-hole joint for the fuel rod of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To incorporate the fuel life of the SFR currently under development at KAERI (around 35,000 h), the acceleration test method of reliability engineering was adopted in this work. A finite element method was used to evaluate the flow-induced vibration frequency and amplitude for the test parameter values. Five specimens were tested. The failure criterion during the life of the SFR fuel was applied. The S-N curve of the HT-9, the material of concern, was used to obtain the acceleration factor. As a result, a test time of 16.5 h was obtained for each specimen. It was concluded that the B{sub 0.004} life would be guaranteed for the SFR fuel rods with 99% confidence if no failure was observed at any of the contact surfaces of the five specimens.

  10. The fuel of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the different steps of the preparation of nuclear fuels performed by Cogema. The documents starts with a presentation of the different French reactor types: graphite moderated reactors, PWRs using MOX fuel, fast breeder reactors and research reactors. The second part describes the fuel manufacturing process: conditioning of nuclear materials and fabrication of fuel assemblies. The third part lists the different companies involved in the French nuclear fuel industry while part 4 gives a short presentation of the two Cogema's fuel fabrication plants at Cadarache and Marcoule. Part 5 and 6 concern the quality assurance, the safety and reliability aspects of fuel elements and the R and D programs. The last part presents some aspects of the environmental and personnel protection performed by Cogema. (J.S.)

  11. Safety Assessment Document for the Spent Reactor Fuel Geologic Storage Test in the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Spent Fuel Geologic Storage Test in the Climax Granite Stock is to evaluate the response of a granitic rock mass to the underground storage of encapsulated spent reactor fuel in a geometry that simulates a module of a large-scale geologic repository. This document reports an assessment of the safety of conducting this test. Descriptions are provided of the geography, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology of the Climax Site; the effects of postulated natural phenomena and other activities at the nevada Test Site on the safety of the test; and the design and operation of the test facility and associated equipment. Evaluations are made of both the radiological and nonradiological impacts of normal operations, abnormal operations, and postulated accidents. It is concluded that conduct of the spent fuel test at the Climax Site will not result in any undue risk to the public, property, environment, or site employees

  12. Fast breeder fuel pin bundle tests in the KNK II-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, H.E.; Bojarsky, E.

    1986-11-01

    Three variants of ring elements with test bundles will be reported in this paper: In a first step a ring element was built with a permanently integrated test bundle (19 carbide pins of the Karlsruhe reference concept) while the proven fuel element components have been largely maintained. This irradiation will be completed in autumn 1986 after 380 full power days of operation. The central topic of this paper will be the technique of reloadable ring elements with replaceable test bundles. A first experiment, TOAST, is in preparation. For this experiment, above all the components of the fuel element head and foot had to be newly developed and tested. A special version of double-walled replaceable test bundles to be used in the TETRA temperature transient experiments will be briefly mentioned. It is envisaged in these experiments to vary in a defined manner the coolant flow at remotely assembled test bundles consisting of 19 KNK pins each having undergone a high burnup and to use a measuring and control plug placed on the test bundle so that a variety of fuel pin temperature programs can be realized. Finally, some additional aspects of bundle design will be indicated. (orig./GL) [de

  13. Power from plutonium: fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, J.F.W.

    1981-01-01

    Points of similarity and of difference between fast reactor fuel and fuels for AGR and PWR plants are established. The flow of uranium and plutonium in fast and thermal systems is also mentioned, establishing the role of the fast reactor as a plutonium burner. A historical perspective of fast reactors is given in which the substantial experience accumulated in test and prototype is indicated and it is noted that fast reactors have now entered the commercial phase. The relevance of the data obtained in the test and prototype reactors to the behaviour of commercial fast reactor fuel is considered. The design concepts employed in fuel are reviewed, including sections on core support styles, pin support and pin detail. This is followed by a discussion of current issues under the headings of manufacture, performance and reprocessing. This section includes a consideration of gel fuel, achievable burn-up, irradiation induced distortions and material choices, fuel form, and fuel failure mechanisms. Future development possibilities are also discussed and the Paper concludes with a view on the logic of a UK fast reactor strategy. (U.K.)

  14. Flow instability tests for a particle bed reactor nuclear thermal rocket fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Timothy J.

    1993-05-01

    Recent analyses have focused on the flow stability characteristics of a particle bed reactor (PBR). These laminar flow instabilities may exist in reactors with parallel paths and are caused by the heating of the gas at low Reynolds numbers. This phenomena can be described as follows: several parallel channels are connected at the plenum regions and are stabilized by some inlet temperature and pressure; a perturbation in one channel causes the temperature to rise and increases the gas viscosity and reduces the gas density; the pressure drop is fixed by the plenum regions, therefore, the mass flow rate in the channel would decrease; the decrease in flow reduces the ability to remove the energy added and the temperature increases; and finally, this process could continue until the fuel element fails. Several analyses based on different methods have derived similar curves to show that these instabilities may exist at low Reynolds numbers and high phi's ((Tfinal Tinitial)/Tinitial). These analyses need to be experimentally verified.

  15. Research reactor fuel bundle design review by means of hydrodynamic testing; Ensayos hidrodinamicos para verificacion de diseno de un elemento combustible para reactores de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastorini, A; Belinco, C [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    1998-12-31

    During the design steps of a fuel bundle for a nuclear reactor, some vibration tests are usually necessary to verify the prototype dynamical response characteristics and the structural integrity. To perform these tests, the known hydrodynamic loop facilities are used to evaluate the vibrational response of the bundle under the different flow conditions that may appear in the reactor. This paper describes the tests performed on a 19 plate fuel bundle prototype designed for a low power research reactor. The tests were done in order to know the dynamical characteristics of the plates and also of the whole bundle under different flow rate conditions. The paper includes a description of the test facilities and the results obtained during the dynamical characterization tests and some preliminary comments about the tests under flowing water are also presented. (author) 4 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs. [Espanol] Durante el diseno de un elemento combustible para un reactor nuclear se requiere de la realizacion de ensayos con el objeto de verificar el comportamiento de ese diseno y permitir, de ser necesario, la introduccion de modificaciones al mismo. Para verificar las caracteristicas de respuesta dinamica e integridad estructural, se realizan ensayos de vibraciones que incluyen someter al prototipo a condiciones de circulacion del fluido similares a las que soportara durante la operacion del reactor. Estos ensayos se realizan en facilidades de ensayos conocidas como circuitos hidrodinamicos, que permiten no solo someter el prototipo al flujo de fluido, sino tambien obtener una adecuada caracterizacion de la respuesta del mismo a traves del luso de sensores de distinto tipo. En este trabajo se describen los ensayos realizados sobre un prototipo de elemento combustible de 19 placas destinado a un reactor de investigacion multiproposito de baja potencia. Los ensayos tuvieron como objetivo conocer la respuesta dinamica de las placas individuales y del elemento combustible en su

  16. Analysis and Experimental Qualification of an Irradiation Capsule Design for Testing Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is currently investigating a number of advanced nuclear fuel cladding concepts to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are some of the leading candidates to replace traditional zirconium alloys due to their superior oxidation resistance, provided no prohibitive irradiation-induced embrittlement occurs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed experimental designs to irradiate thin-walled cladding tubes with representative pressurized water reactor geometry in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures. These designs allow for post-irradiation examination (PIE) of cladding that closely resembles expected commercially viable geometries and microstructures. The experiments were designed using relatively inexpensive rabbit capsules for the irradiation vehicle. The simplistic designs combined with the extremely high neutron flux in the HFIR allow for rapid testing of a large test matrix, thus reducing the time and cost needed to advanced cladding materials closer to commercialization. The designs are flexible in that they allow for testing FeCrAl alloys, stainless steels, Inconel alloys, and zirconium alloys (as a reference material) both with and without hydrides. This will allow a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of advanced cladding materials with traditional zirconium alloys. PIE will include studies of dimensional change, microstructure variation, mechanical performance, etc. This work describes the capsule design, neutronic and thermal analyses, and flow testing that were performed to support the qualification of this new irradiation vehicle.

  17. Reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel assembly having a lower end fitting and actuating means interacting therewith for holding the assembly down on the core support stand against the upward flow of coolant. Locking means for interacting with projections on the support stand are carried by the lower end fitting and are actuated by the movement of an actuating rod operated from above the top of the assembly. In one embodiment of the invention the downward movement of the actuating rod forces a latched spring to move outward into locking engagement with a shoulder on the support stand projections. In another embodiment, the actuating rod is rotated to effect the locking between the end fitting and the projection. (author)

  18. Canadian power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, R.D.

    1976-03-01

    The following subjects are covered: the basic CANDU fuel design, the history of the bundle design, the significant differences between CANDU and LWR fuel, bundle manufacture, fissile and structural materials and coolants used in the CANDU fuel program, fuel and material behaviour, and performance under irradiation, fuel physics and management, booster rods and reactivity mechanisms, fuel procurement, organization and industry, and fuel costs. (author)

  19. The integral fast reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1990-01-01

    The liquid-metal reactor (LMR) has the potential to extend the uranium resource by a factor of 50 to 100 over current commercial light water reactors (LWRs). In the integral fast reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system - reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process - is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. A key feature of the IFR concept is the metallic fuel. The lead irradiation tests on the new U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II have surpassed 185000 MWd/t burnup, and its high burnup capability has now been fully demonstrated. The metallic fuel also allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Pyroprocessing, which utilizes high temperatures and molten salt and molten metal solvents, can be advantageously utilized for processing metal fuels because the product is metal suitable for fabrication into new fuel elements. Direct production of a metal product avoids expensive and cumbersome chemical conversion steps that would result from use of the conventional Purex solvent extraction process. The key step in the IFR process is electrorefining, which provides for recovery of the valuable fuel constituents, uranium and plutonium, and for removal of fission products. A notable feature of the IFR process is that the actinide elements accompany plutonium through the process. This results in a major advantage in the high-level waste management

  20. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Veith, D.J.; Giorgis, G.C.; Walker, D.E.; Seim, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF) is the latest in a series of special EBR-II instrumented in-core test facilities. A flow control valve in the facility is programmed to vary the coolant flow, and thus the temperature, in an experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it and coupled to it. In this way, thermal transients can be simulated in that subassembly without changing the temperatures in surrounding subassemblies. The FPTF also monitors sodium flow and temperature, and detects delayed neutrons in the sodium effluent from the experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it. This facility also has an acoustical detector (high-temperature microphone) for detecting sodium boiling

  1. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  2. External attachment of titanium sheathed thermocouples to zirconium nuclear fuel rods for the loss-of-fluid-test (LOFT) Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    A welding process to attach titanium sheathed thermocouples to the outside of the zircaloy clad fuel rods has been developed. A laser beam was selected as the optimum welding process because of the extremely high energy input per unit volume that can be achieved allowing local fusion of a small area irrespective of the difference in material thickness to be joined. Irradiation tests showed no degradation of thermocouples or weld structure. Fast thermal cycle and heater rod blowdown reflood tests were made to subject the weldments to high temperatures, high pressure steam, and fast water quench cycles. From the behavior of these tests, it was concluded that the attachment welds would survive a series of reactor safety tests. 2 refs

  3. Fuel-coolant interaction visualization test for in-vessel corium retention external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Young Su; Hong, Seong Ho; Song, Jin Ho; Hong, Seong Wan [Severe Accident and PHWR Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A visualization test of the fuel-coolant interaction in the Test for Real cOrium Interaction with water (TROI) test facility was carried out. To experimentally simulate the In-Vessel corium Retention (IVR)- External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) conditions, prototypic corium was released directly into the coolant water without a free fall in a gas phase before making contact with the coolant. Corium (34.39 kg) consisting of uranium oxide and zirconium oxide with a weight ratio of 8:2 was superheated, and 22.54 kg of the 34.39 kg corium was passed through water contained in a transparent interaction vessel. An image of the corium jet behavior in the coolant was taken by a high-speed camera every millisecond. Thermocouple junctions installed in the vertical direction of the coolant were cut sequentially by the falling corium jet. It was clearly observed that the visualization image of the corium jet taken during the fuel-coolant interaction corresponded with the temperature variations in the direction of the falling melt. The corium penetrated through the coolant, and the jet leading edge velocity was 2.0 m/s. Debris smaller than 1 mm was 15% of the total weight of the debris collected after a fuel-coolant interaction test, and the mass median diameter was 2.9 mm.

  4. Procedures and techniques for the management of experimental and exotic fuel from research and test reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, D.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1995, the Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique CEA has implemented a three point fuel management plan. One of the three points, the removal and the reprocessing of a wide range of spent fuels stored in different facilities in Saclay, Grenoble and Cadarache nuclear research centers, is described. The COGEMA Group has developed and implemented a comprehensive set of solutions for the management of research reactor and exotic fuels. It includes transport casks, storage casks or interim storage facilities at the reactor site, or at a centralized interim storage, as well as spent fuel reprocessing, material recycling and waste conditioning. (author)

  5. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  6. KüFA safety testing of HTR fuel pebbles irradiated in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: oliver.seeger@rwth-aachen.de [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurie, M., E-mail: mathias.laurie@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Abjani, A. El; Ejton, J.; Boudaud, D.; Freis, D.; Carbol, P.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fütterer, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Energy and Transport (IET), Nuclear Reactor Integrity Assessment and Knowledge Management Unit, PO Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Allelein, H.-J. [Lehrstuhl für Reaktorsicherheit und -technik an der RWTH Aachen, Kackertstraße 9, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur—KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally scrutinize the effects of Depressurization LOss of Forced Circulation (D-LOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. Up to 1600 °C, the reference maximum temperature for these accidents, high-quality German HTR fuel pebbles have already demonstrated a small fission product release. This paper discusses and compares the releases obtained from KüFA-testing the pebbles HFR-K5/3 and HFR-EU1/3, which were both irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. We present the time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission product {sup 137}Cs as well as the fission gas {sup 85}Kr for both pebbles. For HFR-EU1/3 the isotopes {sup 134}Cs and {sup 154}Eu as well as the shorter-lived {sup 110m}Ag have also been measured. A detailed description of the experimental setup and its accuracy is given. The data for the recently tested pebbles is discussed in the context of previous results.

  7. Latest developments in rolled fuels for materials-testing reactors: a trend towards the use of low-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjas, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of rolled fuels and the work done in this field by CERCA is described. The technology developed conforms to low enrichment requirements, whilst guaranteeing a satisfactory level of reactor performance [fr

  8. The use of U3Si2 dispersed in aluminum in plate-type fuel elements for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.; Hobbs, R.W.; Senn, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    A high-density fuel based on U 3 Si 2 dispersed in aluminum has been developed and tested for use in converting plate-type research and test reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. Results of preirradiation testing and the irradiation and postirradiation examination of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements are summarized. Swelling of the U 3 Si 2 fuel particles is a linear function of the fission density in the particle to well beyond the fission density achievable in low-enriched fuels. U 3 Si 2 particle swelling rate is approximately the same as that of the commonly used UAl/sub x/ fuel particle. The presence of minor amounts of U 3 Si or uranium solid solution in the fuel result in greater, but still acceptable, fuel swelling. Blister threshold temperatures are at least as high as those of currently used fuels. An exothermic reaction occurs near the aluminum melting temperature, but the measured energy releases were low enough not to substantially worsen the consequences of an accident. U 3 Si 2 -aluminum dispersion fuel with uranium densities up to at least 4.8 Mg/m 3 is a suitable LEU fuel for typical plate-type research and test reactors. 42 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  9. FY15 Status Report: CIRFT Testing of Spent Nuclear Fuel Rods from Boiler Water Reactor Limerick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of used nuclear fuel (UNF, also known as spent nuclear fuel [SNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. The additional CIRFT was conducted on three HBR rods (R3, R4, and R5) in which two specimens failed and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 10⁷ cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR UNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the UNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum of tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, ten SNF rod segments from BWR Limerick were tested using ORNL CIRFT, with one under static and nine dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at maximum curvature 4.0 m⁻¹. The specimen did not show any sign of failure in three repeated loading cycles to almost same maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitude varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of the tested rod specimens. The cycles to failure were

  10. Testing external surface of fuel element tubes for power nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naugol'nykh, O.G.; Nelyubin, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    Optical methods are regarded perspective for discovery and detection of flaws of external surfaces of fuel element tubes. The TV method has highest information content among them. Two mock-ups of facilities based on the TV method using a ''dissector'' type TV device and a TV tube with charge accumulation (vidikon) have been developed. It is concluded that complex testing - combination of ultrasonic, photoelectric and TV methods in a facility is necessary for discovery and analysis of the whole variety of flaws, though sensitivity of the TV method is enough for disclosure of all the main defects

  11. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I.

    1997-01-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  12. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigon, B.; Vacelet, H.; Dornbusch, D.

    2000-01-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor are presented. Safety criteria are explained. Finally, merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U 3 Si 2 fuel are discussed. (author)

  13. CANDU reactor experience: fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truant, P.T.; Hastings, I.J.

    1985-07-01

    Ontario Hydro has more than 126 reactor-years experience in operating CANDU reactors. Fuel performance has been excellent with 47 000 channel fuelling operations successfully completed and 99.9 percent of the more than 380 000 bundles irradiated operating as designed. Fuel performance limits and fuel defects have had a negligible effect on station safety, reliability, the environment and cost. The actual incapability charged to fuel is less than 0.1 percent over the stations' lifetimes, and more recently has been zero

  14. The second eddy current testing of zircaloy tube samples from the OECD Halden reactor project at Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, Tokai, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwada, Isao; Nishino, Yasuharu

    1986-07-01

    The Reactor Fuel Examination Facility in Tokai/JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) joined to the second round robin programme on eddy current test of the Halden/IFE. In the programme, two zircaloy tube samples with some artificial defects were provided for measurements. To clarify the locations in axial and azimuthal directions, types and dimensions of the provided artificial defects, measured signals from eddy current test were analysed in comparison with the known defects on the calibration tube. As a result, fourteen defects were determined from the measurements. Then, the location, the type and the relative dimension of them were also revealed. The results of those eddy current test are described in this paper. (author)

  15. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  16. The development of fuel pins and material specimens mixed loading irradiation test rig in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. The development of the fuel-material hybrid rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, Yasuko; Someya, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, there were many tests using the irradiation rigs that it was possible to be set irradiation conditions for each compartment independently. In case of no alternative fuel element to irradiate after unloading the irradiated compartments, the irradiation test was restarted with the dummy compartment which the fuel elements was not mounted. If the material specimens are mounted in this space, it is possible to use the irradiation space effectively. For these reasons, the irradiation rig (hybrid rig) is developed that is consolidated with material specimens compartment and fuel elements compartment. Fuel elements and material specimens differ greatly with heat generation, so that the most important issue in developing of hybrid rig is being able to distribute appropriately the coolant flow which satisfies irradiation conditions. The following is described by this report. (1) It was confirmed that the flow distribution of loading the same irradiation rig with the compartment from which a flow demand differs could be satisfied. (2) It was confirmed that temperature setting range of hybrid rig could be equivalent to that of irradiation condition. (3) By standardizing the coolant entrance structure of the compartment lower part, the prospect which can perform easily recombination of the compartment from which a type differs between irradiation rigs was acquired. (author)

  17. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors conference 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapper, Maureen

    2002-01-01

    Foreign Research Reactor Spent nuclear fuel Acceptance Program is actively working with research reactors to accept eligible material before the Acceptance Policy proper expires in 2006. Reactors/governments wishing to participate should contact US immediately if they have not done so already. Program operations are changing to adapt to new challenges. We continue to promote the importance of this Program to senior management in the Department of Energy

  18. Performance of metallic fuels in liquid-metal fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Walters, L.C.; Kittel, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in metallic fuels for liquid-metal fast reactors has come full circle. Metallic fuels are once again a viable alternative for fast reactors because reactor outlet temperature of interest to industry are well within the range where metallic fuels have demonstrated high burnup and reliable performance. In addition, metallic fuel is very tolerant of off-normal events of its high thermal conductivity and fuel behavior. Futhermore, metallic fuels lend themselves to compact and simplified reprocessing and refabrication technologies, a key feature in a new concept for deployment of fast reactors called the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The IFR concept is a metallic-fueled pool reactor(s) coupled to an integral-remote reprocessing and fabrication facility. The purpose of this paper is to review recent metallic fuel performance, much of which was tested and proven during the twenty years of EBR-II operation

  19. Thermochemistry of nuclear fuels in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a large number of elements, accompanied with steep temperature gradient results in dynamic chemistry during nuclear fuel burn-up. Understanding this chemistry is very important for efficient and safe usage of nuclear fuels. The radioactive nature of these fuels puts lot of constraint on regulatory bodies to ensure their accident free operation in the reactors. One of the common aims of advanced fuels is to achieve high burn-up. As burn-up of the fuel increases, chemistry of fission-products becomes increasingly more important. To understand different phenomenon taking place in-pile, many out of-pile experiments are carried out. Extensive studies of thermodynamic properties, phase analysis, thermophysical property evaluation, fuel-fission product clad compatibility are carried out with relevant compounds and simulated fuels (SIMFUEL). All these data are compiled and jointly evaluated using different computational methods to predict fuel behaviour during burn-up. Only when this combined experimental and theoretical information confirms safe operation of the pin, a test pin is prepared and burnt in a test reactor. Every fuel has a different chemistry and different constraints associated with it. In this talk, various thermo-chemical aspects of some of the advanced fuels, mixed carbide, mixed nitride, 'Pu' rich MOX, 'Th' based AHWR fuels and metallic fuels will be discussed. (author)

  20. Long term immersion test of aluminum alloy AA 6061 used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, Evelina M.; Rodriguez, Sebastian; Haddad, Roberto; Lanzani, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present the results of long term immersion tests performed in the aluminum alloy AA 6061, used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors. The tests were performed at open circuit potential in high purity water (ρ = 18.2 MΩ.cm) and in 10 -3 M NaCl solution. Two kinds of assemblies were studied: simple sheets and artificial crevices, immersed during 6, 12 and 18 months at room temperature. In both media and both assemblies, the aluminum hydroxide phases crystalline bayerite and bohemite were identified. It was found that a kind of localized attack named alkaline attack occurs around the iron-rich intermetallics. These particles were confirmed to control the corrosion of the AA 6061 alloy in an aerated medium. Immersion times for up to 18 months did not increase the oxide growth or the alkaline attack on the AA 6061 alloy. (author)

  1. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  2. QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH, 1968 REACTOR FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR FUELS AND MATERIALS BRANCH OF USAEC DIVISION OF REACTOR DEVELOPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J.; de Halas, D. R.; Nightingale, R. E.; Worlton, D. C.

    1968-06-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: nuclear graphite; fuel development for gas-cooled reactors; HTGR graphite studies; nuclear ceramics; fast-reactor nitrides research; non-destructive testing; metallic fuels; basic swelling studies; ATR gas and water loop operation and maintenance; reactor fuels and materials; fast reactor dosimetry and damage analysis; and irradiation damage to reactor metals.

  3. Fuel assembly in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shozo; Kawahara, Akira.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly in a reactor which can effectively prevent damage of the clad tube caused by mutual interference between pellets and the clad tube. Structure: A clad tube for a fuel element, which is located in the outer peripheral portion, among the fuel elements constituting fuel assemblies arranged in assembled and lattice fashion within a channel box, is increased in thickness by reducing the inside diameter thereof to be smaller than that of fuel elements internally located, thereby preventing damage of the clad tube resulting from rapid rise in output produced when control rods are removed. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuchi, Yoko; Aoyama, Motoo; Haikawa, Katsumasa; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Koyama, Jun-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, a region substantially containing burnable poison is divided into an upper region and a lower region having different average concentrations of burnable poison along a transverse cross section perpendicular to the axial direction. The ratio of burnable poison contents of both regions is determined to not more than 80%, and the average concentration of the burnable poison in the lower region is determined to not less than 9% by weight. An infinite multiplication factor at an initial stage of the burning of the fuel assembly is controlled effectively by the burnable poisons. Namely, the ratio of the axial power can be controlled by the distribution of the enrichment degree of uranium fuels and the distribution of the burnable poison concentration in the axial direction. Since the average enrichment degree of the reactor core has to be increased in order to provide an initially loaded reactor core at high burnup degree. Distortion of the power distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core to which fuel assemblies at high enrichment degree are loaded is flattened to improve thermal margin, to extend continuous operation period and increase a burnup degree upon take-out thereby improving fuel economy without worsening the reactor core characteristics of the initially loaded reactor core. (N.H.)

  5. Conditioning of nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A method of conditioning the fuel of a nuclear reactor core to minimize failure of the fuel cladding comprising increasing the fuel rod power to a desired maximum power level at a rate below a critical rate which would cause cladding damage is given. Such conditioning allows subsequent freedom of power changes below and up to said maximum power level with minimized danger of cladding damage. (Auth.)

  6. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  7. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  8. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  9. Experience with spent fuel storage at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 5-8 July 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work begins on appropriate solutions. To obtain an overall picture of the size and extent of these problems, an Advisory Group Meeting on Storage Experience with Spent Fuel from Research Reactors was convened in Vienna 5-8 July 1993, and attended by twelve participants and three observers representing thirteen different countries. These proceedings contain the country reports presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Experience with spent fuel storage at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 5-8 July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work begins on appropriate solutions. To obtain an overall picture of the size and extent of these problems, an Advisory Group Meeting on Storage Experience with Spent Fuel from Research Reactors was convened in Vienna 5-8 July 1993, and attended by twelve participants and three observers representing thirteen different countries. These proceedings contain the country reports presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs.

  11. Preliminary results of the BTF-104 experiment: an in-reactor test of fuel behaviour and fission-product release and transport under LOCA/LOECC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, L W; Elder, P H; Devaal, J W; Irish, J D; Yamazaki, A R [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The BTF-104 experiment is one of a series of in-reactor tests being performed to measure fuel behaviour and fission-product release from nuclear fuel subjected to accident conditions. The primary objective of the BTF-104 experiment was to measure fission-product releases from a CANDU-sized fuel element under combined Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Loss-of-Emergency-Core-Cooling (LOECC) conditions at an average fuel temperature of about 1550 deg C. The preliminary results of the BTF-104 experiment are presented in this paper. (author). 6 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Analysis of irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Kikuchi, Teruo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Sato, Sadao; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Kashimura, Satoru.

    1991-07-01

    Irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles were analyzed by the MICROS-2 code for the fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) under its operating conditions. The analyses were made on the standard core fuel (A-type) and the test fuels comprising the advanced SiC-coated particle fuel (B-1 type) and the ZrC-coated particle fuel (B-2 type). For the B-1 type fuel, the stresses were relieved due to the thicker buffer and SiC layers than for the A type fuel. The slightly decreased thickness of the fourth layer for the B-1 type than for the A type fuel had no significant effect on the stresses. As for the B-2 type fuel, almost the same results as for the B-1 type were obtained under an assumption that the ZrC layer as well as the SiC layer undergoes negligible dimension change within the analysis conditions. The obtained results indicated that the B-1 and B-2 type fuels are better than the A type fuel in terms of integrity against the irradiation-induced stresses. Finally, research subjects for development of the analysis code on the fuel behavior are discussed. (author)

  13. Fabrication of Metallic Fuel Slugs for Irradiation Experiments in Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saify, M.T.; Jha, S.K.; Abdulla, K.K.; Kumar, Arun; Prasad, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Advantages of Metallic fuels for future FBR: → High heavy metal atom density; → Higher thermal conductivity at room temperature that increases with temperature; → Metal fuels can be relatively easily fabricated with close dimensional tolerances; → They have excellent compatibility with liquid metal coolants

  14. Evaluation of endcap welds in thin walled fuel elements of pressurised heavy water reactor by ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Thavasimuthu, M.; Kalyansundaram, P.; Bhattacharya, D.K.; Raj, Baldev

    1992-01-01

    In the pressurised heavy water reactor systems of India, the fuel is encapsulated in thin-walled tubes (0.342 mm) closed with endcaps by resistance welding. The integrity of these fuel elements should be such that no fission gas leakage takes place during reactor operation. The quality control of the endcap welds needed to satisfy this requirement includes helium leak test and destructive metallographic test (on sample basis). This paper discusses the feasibility study that has been carried out in the author's laboratory to develop an immersion ultrasonic test method for evaluating the integrity of the endcap weld region. Through holes of various sizes (0.15mm, 0.2mm, 0.4mm diameter and 0.185mm and 0.342mm deep) were machined by spark erosion machining at the weld joints to simulate defects of various sizes. Line focussed probe of 10 MHz frequency was used for the testing. It was possible to detect clearly all the machined holes. Based on the above standardised procedure, further testing was done on endcap welds which were rejected during fabrication on account of showing leak rate of 3 x 10 -6 std. c.c/sec. or more during helium leak test. Though it was possible to get echoes from the natural defects in the rejected tubes with echo amplitude of 70%, the signal was accompanied by the geometrical reflection (noise) giving an amplitude of 20% from the weld region, giving rise to the problem of resolving the defect indication from the geometric indications. Therefore, signal analysis approach was adopted. The signal obtained from the weld zone were subjected to various analysis procedures like a) autopower spectrum, b) total energy content and c) demodulated auto correlation function. It was possible by all the three methods to differentiate the defect signal from those due to weld geometry or due to noise. Subsequently, metallography was carried out to characterise the type of defects observed during the ultrasonic testing. (author). 4 figs

  15. Broad-Application Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, C.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report is about a new, safe, and operationally efficient DOE reactor of nuclear research and testing proposed for the early to mid- 21st Century. Dubbed the Broad-Application Test Reactor (BATR), the proposed facility incorporates a multiple-application, multiple-mission design to support DOE programs such as naval reactors and space power and propulsion, as well as research in medical, science, isotope, and electronics arenas. DOE research reactors are aging, and implementing major replacement projects requires long lead times. Primary design drivers include safety, low risk, minimum operation cost, mission flexibility, waste minimization, and long life. Scientists and engineers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are evaluating possible fuel forms, structural materials, reactor geometries, coolants, and moderators

  16. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Akihito.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To control power-up rate at the initial burning stage of new fuel assemblies due to fuel exchange in a pressure tube type power reactor. Constitution: Burnable poisons are disposed to a most portion of fuel pellets in a fuel assembly to such a low concentration as the burn-up rate changes with time at the initial stage of the burning. The most portion means substantially more than one-half part of the pellets and gadolinia is used as burn-up poisons to be dispersed and the concentration is set to less than about 0.2 %. Upon elapse of about 15 days after the charging, the burnable poisons are eliminated and the infinite multiplication factors are about at 1.2 to attain a predetermined power state. Since the power-up rate of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly is about 0.1 % power/hour and the power-up rate of the fuel assembly around the exchanged channel is lower than that, it can be lowered sufficiently than the limit for the power-up rate practiced upon reactor start-up thereby enabling to replace fuels during power operation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Development of a general coupling interface for the fuel performance code TRANSURANUS – Tested with the reactor dynamics code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, L.; Rohde, U.; Seidl, M.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A general coupling interface was developed for couplings of the TRANSURANUS code. • With this new tool simplified fuel behavior models in codes can be replaced. • Applicable e.g. for several reactor types and from normal operation up to DBA. • The general coupling interface was applied to the reactor dynamics code DYN3D. • The new coupled code system DYN3D–TRANSURANUS was successfully tested for RIA. - Abstract: A general interface is presented for coupling the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code with thermal hydraulics system, sub-channel thermal hydraulics, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or reactor dynamics codes. As first application the reactor dynamics code DYN3D was coupled at assembly level in order to describe the fuel behavior in more detail. In the coupling, DYN3D provides process time, time-dependent rod power and thermal hydraulics conditions to TRANSURANUS, which in case of the two-way coupling approach transfers parameters like fuel temperature and cladding temperature back to DYN3D. Results of the coupled code system are presented for the reactivity transient scenario, initiated by control rod ejection. More precisely, the two-way coupling approach systematically calculates higher maximum values for the node fuel enthalpy. These differences can be explained thanks to the greater detail in fuel behavior modeling. The numerical performance for DYN3D–TRANSURANUS was proved to be fast and stable. The coupled code system can therefore improve the assessment of safety criteria, at a reasonable computational cost

  18. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean; Hayes, Steven Lowe; Dempsey, Douglas; Harp, Jason Michael

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  19. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  20. Applicability of AWJ technique for dismantling reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Cutting test of imitation of fuel debris and optimization of the cutting condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shin-ichiro; Watatani, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Based on findings during recovery works that followed the accident at Three Mile Island Station 2, it is assumed that the reactor internals at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F) have complex geometries intermixed with melted fuel and confined in limited spaces. Accordingly, abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting method is considered to be a promising technique that can be safely and reasonably used for cutting and removing reactor internals. The authors conducted tests to examine the possibility of application and to solve the problems of this technique. In the tests imitation of fuel debris and optimization of the cutting condition is used. The test result made the measures for some of the associated issues clear, and demonstrated that AWJ cutting method is assumed as one of the promising techniques for removing reactor internals. (author)

  1. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3

  2. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  3. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication, and application of Reduced Enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Base technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-08-01

    The international effort to develop new fuel materials and designs which will make it feasible to fuel research and test reactors throughout the world with low-enrichment uranium, instead of high-enrichment uranium, has made significant progress during the past year. This progress has taken place at research centers located in many different countries, and is of crucial interest to reactor operators and licensors whose geographical distribution is even more varied. It is appropriate, therefore, that international meetings be held periodically to foster direct communication among the specialists in this area. To achieve this purpose, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the third of a series which begun in 1978. The papers presented at this meeting were divided into sessions according to relevant subject: status of RERTR program and safety issues; development of new fuel types; testing of new fuel elements; specific reactor applications. These proceedings were edited by various members of the RERTR Program.

  4. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication, and application of Reduced Enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Base technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    The international effort to develop new fuel materials and designs which will make it feasible to fuel research and test reactors throughout the world with low-enrichment uranium, instead of high-enrichment uranium, has made significant progress during the past year. This progress has taken place at research centers located in many different countries, and is of crucial interest to reactor operators and licensors whose geographical distribution is even more varied. It is appropriate, therefore, that international meetings be held periodically to foster direct communication among the specialists in this area. To achieve this purpose, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the third of a series which begun in 1978. The papers presented at this meeting were divided into sessions according to relevant subject: status of RERTR program and safety issues; development of new fuel types; testing of new fuel elements; specific reactor applications. These proceedings were edited by various members of the RERTR Program

  5. Nuclear reactor internals construction and failed fuel rod detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A system is provided for determining during operation of a nuclear reactor having fluid pressure operated control rod mechanisms the exact location of a fuel assembly with a defective fuel rod. The construction of the reactor internals is simplified in a manner to facilitate the testing for defective fuel rods and the reduce the cost of producing the upper internals of the reactor. 13 claims, 10 drawing figures

  6. Fuel bundle for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.W.; Flora, B.S.; Ford, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns a new, simple and inexpensive system for assembling and dismantling a nuclear reactor fuel bundle. Several fuel rods are fitted in parallel rows between two retaining plates which secure the fuel rods in position and which are maintained in an assembled position by means of several stays fixed to the two end plates. The invention particularly refers to an improved apparatus for fixing the stays to the upper plate by using locking fittings secured to rotating sleeves which are applied against this plate [fr

  7. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guigon, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, Reacteur Jules Horowitz, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vacelet, H. [Compagnie pour l' Etude et la Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques, CERCA, Etablissement de Romans, 26 (France); Dornbusch, D. [Technicatome, Service d' Architecture Generale, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2003-07-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs: from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper will be presented the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor: its total power, neutron flux, fuel element... Safety criteria will be explained. Finally merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel will be discussed. (authors)

  8. Boiling water reactor fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of compensating, without the use of control rods or burnable poisons for power shaping, for reduced moderation of neutrons in an uppermost section of the active core of a boiling water nuclear reactor containing a plurality of elongated fuel rods vertically oriented therein, the fuel rods having nuclear fuel therein, the fuel rods being cooled by water pressurized such that boiling thereof occurs. The method consists of: replacing all of the nuclear fuel in a portion of only the upper half of first predetermined ones of the fuel rods with a solid moderator material of zirconium hydride so that the fuel and the moderator material are axially distributed in the predetermined ones of the fuel rods in an asymmetrical manner relative to a plane through the axial midpoint of each rod and perpendicular to the axis of the rod; placing the moderator material in the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods in respective sealed internal cladding tubes, which are separate from respective external cladding tubes of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods, to prevent interaction between the moderator material and the external cladding tube of each of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods; and wherein the number of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods is at least thirty, and further comprising the steps of: replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the upper quarter of each of the at least thirty rods; and also replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the adjacent lower quarter of at least sixteen of the at least thirty rods

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, H.; Mindnich, F.R.

    1973-01-01

    The fuel rod consists of a can with at least one end cap and a plenum spring between this cap and the fuel. To prevent the hazard that a eutectic mixture is formed during welding of the end cap, a thermal insulation is added between the end cap and plenum spring. It consists of a comical extension of the end cap with a terminal disc against which the spring is supported. The end cap, the extension, and the disc may be formed by one or several pieces. If the disc is separated from the other parts it may be manufactured from chrome steel or VA steel. (DG) [de

  10. Application of genetic algorithm in the fuel management optimization for the high flux engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xueming; Wu Hongchun; Sun Shouhua; Liu Shuiqing

    2003-01-01

    The in-core fuel management optimization model based on the genetic algorithm has been established. An encode/decode technique based on the assemblies position is presented according to the characteristics of HFETR. Different reproduction strategies have been studied. The expert knowledge and the adaptive genetic algorithms are incorporated into the code to get the optimized loading patterns that can be used in HFETR

  11. Test reactor: basic to U.S. breeder reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, B.J.; Harness, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    Long-range energy planning in the U. S. includes development of a national commercial breeder reactor program. U. S. development of the LMFBR is following a conservative sequence of extensive technology development through use of test reactors and demonstration plants prior to construction of commercial plants. Because materials and fuel technology development is considered the first vital step in this sequence, initial U. S. efforts have been directed to the design and construction of a unique test reactor. The Fast Flux Test Facility, FFTF, is a 400 MW(t) reactor with driver fuel locations, open test locations, and closed loops for higher risk experiments. The FFTF will provide a prototypic LMFBR core environment with sufficient instrumentation for detailed core environmental characterization and a testing capability substituted for breeder capability. The unique comprehensive fuel and materials testing capability of the FFTF will be key to achieving long-range objectives of increased power density, improved breeding gain and shorter doubling times. (auth)

  12. Fuel designs for VVER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, K.V.; Carbon, P.; Silberstein, A.

    1995-01-01

    That progresses in efficiency and safety through progresses in technology and better prediction with fully benchmarked upgraded computer codes is a common goal for on the one hand the original designer of the VVER reactors and their respective fuels and on the other hand for EVF a western company resulting from a combined force with highly diversified and complementary talents in reactor and fuel design and manufacturing. It can be expected that this new challenge and dialogue between the two Russian and European industrial ventures will be mutually beneficial and yield innovative and high quality products and as a consequence strong return will be produced for the best interest of utilities operating VVER reactors. (orig./HP)

  13. Preliminary study or RSG-GAS reactor fuel element integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejoedi, A.; Tarigan, A.; Sujalmo; Prayoga, S.; Suhadi

    1996-01-01

    After 8 years of operation, RSG-GAS was able to reach 15 cycles of reactor operation with 116 irradiated fuels, whereas 49 fuels were produced by NUKEM; and the other 67 were produced by PEBN-BATAN. At the 15 T h cycles, it have been used 40 standard fuels and 8 control fuels (Forty standard fuels and eight control fuels have been used in the 15 t h core cycles). Several activities have been performed in the reactor, to investigate the fuel integrity, among of them are: .fuel visual test with under water camera, which the results were recorder in the video cassette, primary water quality test during, reactor operation, fuel failure detector system examination and compared the PIE results in the Radiometallurgy Installation (RMI). The results showed that the fuel integrity, before and after irradiation, have still good performance and the fission products have not been released yet

  14. Breeder reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    The time cycle for breeder reactor development and deployment is longer than the planning horizons for most private industry and governments. The potential advantage and possible desperate need for widely deployed breeder reactors in the future seems to dictate that suitable long-term development and deployment programs be established to provide an adequate base of technology and in time to meet the need. The problems of failing to do so and being confronted with a major requirement for nuclear energy could result in very serious economic and social disruption. The cost of maintaining the needed program, although substantial, is certainly modest compared with the potential problems which could ensue should we fail to proceed

  15. Initial results from dissolution rate testing of N-Reactor spent fuel over a range of potential geologic repository aqueous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.J.; Einziger, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Hanford N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (HSNF) may ultimately be placed in a geologic repository for permanent disposal. To determine whether the engineered barrier system that will be designed for emplacement of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel will also suffice for HSNF, aqueous dissolution rate measurements were conducted on the HSNF. The purpose of these tests was to determine whether HSNF dissolves faster or slower than LWR spent fuel under some limited repository-relevant water chemistry conditions. The tests were conducted using a flowthrough method that allows the dissolution rate of the uranium matrix to be measured without interference by secondary precipitation reactions that would confuse interpretation of the results. Similar tests had been conducted earlier with LWR spent fuel, thereby allowing direct comparisons. Two distinct corrosion modes were observed during the course of these 12 tests. The first, Stage 1, involved no visible corrosion of the test specimen and produced no undissolved corrosion products. The second, Stage 2, resulted in both visible corrosion of the test specimen and left behind undissolved corrosion products. During Stage 1, the rate of dissolution could be readily determined because the dissolved uranium and associated fission products remained in solution where they could be quantitatively analyzed. The measured rates were much faster than has been observed for LWR spent fuel under all conditions tested to date when normalized to the exposed test specimen surface areas. Application of these results to repository conditions, however, requires some comparison of the physical conditions of the different fuels. The surface area of LWR fuel that could potentially be exposed to repository groundwater is estimated to be approximately 100 times greater than HSNF. Therefore, when compared on the basis of mass, which is more relevant to repository conditions, the HSNF and LWR spent fuel dissolve at similar rates

  16. Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, H., E-mail: h.curtius@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kaiser, G.; Mueller, E.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    (IV) oxyhydroxides species due to radiolytic effects cannot completely be ruled out. Solution concentrations of U were within the range of the solubility limits of the solid phase U(OH){sub 4}(am). The determined concentrations of U and Am in solution were about one order of magnitude higher for the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel sample. Here, the formation of U/Si containing secondary phase components and their influence on radionuclide solubility cannot be ruled out. Results of this work show that the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al and UAl{sub x}-Al dispersed research reactor spent fuel samples dissolved completely within the test period of 3.5 years in MgCl{sub 2}-rich brine in the presence of Fe{sup 2+}. In view of final disposal this means that these fuel matrices represent no barrier. The radionuclides will be released instantaneously. Cs (the long-lived isotope {sup 135}Cs is of special concern with respect to final disposal) and Sr were classified as mobile radionuclide species. For U, Am, Pu and Eu, a reimmobilization was observed. Sorption is the process which is assumed to be responsible for the reimmobilization of the long-lived actinide Am and the lanthanide Eu. Solution concentrations of U and Pu seem to be controlled by their solubility controlling solid phases.

  17. Re-irradiation and limit testing of the fuels PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, M.; Molvault, M.

    1978-01-01

    In view of investigating the neutron radiation behavior of PWR fuel pins, the S.P.S. (Services des Piles de Saclay) developed a set of experimental means used at OSIRIS in Saclay Nuclear Research Center. Said devices are shown to be able to meet present problems concerning can failures, power and temperature cycling, remote-control studies. These means can also be used either for statistical studies, they can then receive several samples, or for analytical studies in instrumented devices of large capacity and accelerated irradiation rate [fr

  18. Uranium-plutonium fuel for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, S.A.; Astafiev, V.A.; Clouchenkov, A.E.; Gustchin, K.I.; Menshikova, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    Technology was established for fabrication of MOX fuel pellets from co-precipitated and mechanically blended mixed oxides. Both processes ensure the homogeneous structure of pellets readily dissolvable in nitric acid upon reprocessing. In order to increase the plutonium charge in a reactor-burner a process was tested for producing MOX fuel with higher content of plutonium and an inert diluent. It was shown that it is feasible to produce fuel having homogeneous structure and the content of plutonium up to 45% mass

  19. Continuous parameter determination of irradiated nuclear fuels in test-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, A.; Junod, E.; Mas, P.; Perdreau, R.

    1977-01-01

    Powered Neutron detectors allow to finely scan instantaneous fluxes. More than 100 such SPN detectors are used on the experiments irradiated in the SILOE reactor. The treatment of the large amount of information is the following. A first minicomputer scans all the measurement lines at a variable frequency (10 min. - 1 h) and writes rough voltage values on a magnetic disk. A second computer does a sorting of these values for each set of SPND corresponding to an experiment. At the present time, the main treatment is performed by batch processing by some FORTRAN codes to get time-evolving quantities such as: effective flux, fission power, burn-up, fission product activities, etc

  20. Summary of thermocouple performance during advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments in the advanced test reactor and out-of-pile thermocouple testing in support of such experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. J.; Haggard, DC; Herter, J. W.; Swank, W. D.; Knudson, D. L.; Cherry, R. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 4112, Idaho Falls, ID, (United States); Scervini, M. [University of Cambridge, Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB3 0FS, Cambridge, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple-based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time-dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time-dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B) and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Type C). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with Type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly, Type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluence. Currently, the use of these nickel-based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past 10 years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700 deg. C - 1200 deg. C. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out-of-pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150 deg. C and 1200 deg. C for 2,000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250 deg. C and 200 hours at 1300 deg. C. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity, crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including a Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly

  1. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  2. Progress of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis (I) - reactor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Jeong, Chang Joon; Roh, Gyu Hong; Rhee, Bo Wook; Park, Jee Won

    2003-12-01

    Since 1992, the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor fuel in CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) has been studied as an alternative to the once-through fuel cycle. The DUPIC fuel cycle study is focused on the technical feasibility analysis, the fabrication of DUPIC fuels for irradiation tests and the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance. The feasibility analysis was conducted for the compatibility of the DUPIC fuel with existing CANDU-6 reactors from the viewpoints of reactor physics, reactor safety, fuel cycle economics, etc. This study has summarized the intermediate results of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis, which includes the CANDU reactor physics design requirements, DUPIC fuel core physics design method, performance of the DUPIC fuel core, regional overpower trip setpoint, and the CANDU primary shielding. The physics analysis showed that the CANDU-6 reactor can accommodate the DUPIC fuel without deteriorating the physics design requirements by adjusting the fuel management scheme if the fissile content of the DUPIC fuel is tightly controlled.

  3. Two-Dimensional Mapping of the Calculated Fission Power for the Full-Size Fuel Plate Experiment Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. S.; Lillo, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program assigned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate experiments have been proposed for irradiation testing in the center flux trap (CFT) position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These full-size fuel plate tests are designated as the AFIP tests. The AFIP nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.61-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) per fuel plate. The AFIP test assembly has two test positions. Each test position is designed to hold 2 full-size plates, for a total of 4 full-size plates per test assembly. The AFIP test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U-10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and a plate width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio (L2AR) fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To demonstrate that the AFIP experiment will meet the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2-dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated in order to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential to both the design of the AFIP tests as well as evaluation of the irradiated fuel performance. To support this need, a detailed MCNP Y

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Eye, R.W.M.; Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel element with particles from ceramic fissionable material (e.g. uranium carbide), each one being coated with pyrolitically deposited carbon and all of them being connected at their points of contact by means of an individual crossbar. The crossbar consists of silicon carbide produced by reaction of silicon metal powder with the carbon under the influence of heat. Previously the silicon metal powder together with the particles was kneaded in a solvent and a binder (e.g. epoxy resin in methyl ethyl ketone plus setting agent) to from a pulp. The reaction temperature lies at 1750 0 C. The reaction itself may take place in a nitrogen atmosphere. There will be produced a fuel element with a high overall thermal conductivity. (DG) [de

  5. Note on current position regarding the development by the UKAEA of Reduced Enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, B.

    1983-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority have an MTR fuel fabrication plant located at Dounreay on the north coast of Scotland. The prime function of the plant is to manufacture fuel elements for the UKAEA's own DIDO and PLUTO heavy water reactors located at their research establishment at Harwell. The plant, which has a capacity of about 1000 fuel elements per annum, also manufactures fuel elements, on a commercial basis, for university reactors in the United Kingdom and for a number of customers in overseas countries. The UKAEA have been manufacturing MTR fuel elements of a wide range of designs for over twenty-five years. Following the initiative of the US Government's RERTR programme, the UKAEA have embarked on a modest programme of MTR fuel manufacturing development., irradiation and post-irradiation examination to establish the techniques required to manufacture fuel elements containing uranium of a significantly lower enrichment than that in the fuel elements they currently manufacture. In the first instance this work is being directed towards the production of fuel elements containing uranium of 45% enrichment. After an initial analysis it was recognised that although a satisfactory 45% enriched version of certain of the designs of fuel elements currently manufactured could probably be produced using established U/Al alloy technology, it would be necessary to utilise powder technology for other elements in order to achieve the higher uranium density required. Studies of published information and consideration of the technology and facilities already available at Dounreay prompted the decision to concentrate on the development Of U 3 O 8 /Al cermet type fuel elements of similar geometry to those currently manufactured. Some of the fuel element designs currently manufactured by the UKAEA are listed: Concentric (Extruded) 74% enriched; Concentric Plates 80% enriched with densities 0.60 and 0.53 g U/ cm 3 ; Flat Plate (Swaged) 80% enriched and Flat Plate

  6. Nuclear fuel performance in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, R.B.; Baily, W.E.; Proebstle, R.A.; Armijo, J.S.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A major development program is described to improve the performance of Boiling Water Reactor fuel. This sustained program is described in four parts: 1) performance monitoring, 2) fuel design changes, 3) plant operating recommendations, and 4) advanced fuel programs

  7. Recent metal fuel safety tests in TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.E.; Bauer, T.H.; Lo, R.K.; Robinson, W.R.; Palm, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    In-reactor safety tests have been performed on metal-alloy reactor fuel to study its response to transient-overpower conditions, in particular, the margin to cladding breach and the axial self-extrusion of fuel within intact cladding. Uranium-fissium EBR-II driver fuel elements of several burnups were tested, some to cladding breach and others to incipient breach. Transient fuel motions were monitored, and time and location of breach were measured. The test results and computations of fuel extrusion and cladding failure in metal-alloy fuel are described

  8. Full-fluence tests of experimental thermosetting fuel rods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The irradiation performance of injected thermosetting fuel rods is compared to that of standard pitch-temperature gas-cooled reactor requirements. The primary objective of the experiments reported here was to obtain additional irradiation data at higher fluences for resin-based rods with intermediate binder char contents within the 15 to 30 wt% ''window of acceptability'' that had been previously established. 12 refs

  9. Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

  10. Studies in Phebus reactor of fuel behaviour upon LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manin, A.; Del Negro, R.; Reocreux, M.

    1980-09-01

    The fuel behaviour upon LOCA conditions is studied in an in-pile loop, in Phebus reactor. This paper presents: a short description of Phebus reactor; the current program (adjusting the thermohydraulic conditions in order to get cladding failure); the program developments (consequences involved by cladding failure); the fuel test conditions determination [fr

  11. Fuel element for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a fuel element for nuclear reactors with fuel rods and control rod guide tubes, where the control rod guide tubes are provided with flat projections projecting inwards, in the form of local deformations of the guide tube wall, in order to reduce the radial play between the control rod concerned and the guide tube, and to improve control rod movement. This should ensure that wear on the guide tubes is largely prevented which would be caused by lateral vibration of the control rods in the guide tubes, induced by the flow of coolant. (orig.) [de

  12. Reactor fuel assembly fastening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formanek, F.J.; Schukei, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described, adapted to be locked into first mating surfaces on a core support stand, comprising a lower end fitting having posts for resting on the stand; elongated hook members pivotally connected at one end to the lower end fitting and having a second mating surface at the other end to engage the first mating surfaces; actuating means located between the posts on the lower end fitting and being vertically movable relative to the end fitting; and rigid links pivotally attached at one end to the hook members intermediate the connection of the hook members to the end fitting and the second mating surface and pivotally attached at the other end to the actuating means, the link having a length between the pivoted connections such that the second mating surface on the hook members locks into engagement with the first mating surfaces on the stand as the links approach the horizontal. (author)

  13. Thermophysical properties of reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibowitz, L.

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented of the literature on the enthalpy of uranium, thorium, and plutonium oxide and an approach is described for calculating the vapor pressure and gaseous composition of reactor fuel. In these calculations, thermodynamic functions of gas phase molecular species (obtained from matrix-isolation spectroscopy) are employed in conjunction with condensed phase therodynamics. A summary is presented of the status of this work

  14. Fuel exchanger in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinden, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Osamu.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel exchanger for exchanging fuels in an LMFBR type reactor using liquid metals as coolants. An outer gripper cylinder rotating device for rotating an outer gripper cylinder that holds a gripper is driven, to lower the gripper driving portion and the outer gripper cylinder, fuels are caught by the finger at the top end of the outer gripper cylinder and elevated to extract the fuels from the reactor core. Then, the gripper driving portion casing and the outer gripper cylinder are rotated to rotate the fuels caught by the gripper. Subsequently, the gripper driving portion and the outer gripper cylinder are lowered to charge the fuels in the reactor core. This can directly shuffle the fuels in the reactor core without once transferring the fuels into a reactor storing pot and replacing with other fuels, thereby shortening the shuffling time. (I.N.)

  15. the JHR Material Testing Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roure, C.; Cornu, B.; Berthet, B.; Simon, E.; Estre, N.; Guimbal, P.; Kinnunen, P.; Kotiluoto, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a European experimental reactor under construction in CEA Cadarache. It will be dedicated to material and fuel irradiation tests, and to medical isotopes production. Non-Destructive nuclear Examinations systems (NDE) will be implemented in pools to analyse the irradiated fuel or tested material in their supporting experimental irradiation devices extracted from the core or its immediate periphery. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache is working in collaboration with VTT (Technical Research Centre in Finland) in designing and developing NDE systems implementing gamma-ray spectroscopy and high energy X-ray imaging of the sample and irradiation device. CEA is also designing a neutron radiography system for which NML is working on the detection system. Design studies are performed with Monte Carlo transport codes and specific simulation tools developed by the NML for Xray and neutron imaging. (authors)

  16. Verification tests for CANDU advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chang Hwan; Chang, S.K.; Hong, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    For the development of a CANDU advanced fuel, the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles were tested under reactor operating conditions at the CANDU-Hot test loop. This report describes test results and test methods in the performance verification tests for the CANFLEX-NU bundle design. The main items described in the report are as follows. - Fuel bundle cross-flow test - Endurance fretting/vibration test - Freon CHF test - Production of technical document. (author). 25 refs., 45 tabs., 46 figs

  17. Advanced Instrumentation for Transient Reactor Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael L.; Anderson, Mark; Imel, George; Blue, Tom; Roberts, Jeremy; Davis, Kurt

    2018-01-31

    Transient testing involves placing fuel or material into the core of specialized materials test reactors that are capable of simulating a range of design basis accidents, including reactivity insertion accidents, that require the reactor produce short bursts of intense highpower neutron flux and gamma radiation. Testing fuel behavior in a prototypic neutron environment under high-power, accident-simulation conditions is a key step in licensing nuclear fuels for use in existing and future nuclear power plants. Transient testing of nuclear fuels is needed to develop and prove the safety basis for advanced reactors and fuels. In addition, modern fuel development and design increasingly relies on modeling and simulation efforts that must be informed and validated using specially designed material performance separate effects studies. These studies will require experimental facilities that are able to support variable scale, highly instrumented tests providing data that have appropriate spatial and temporal resolution. Finally, there are efforts now underway to develop advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels with enhanced performance and accident tolerance. These advanced reactor designs will also require new fuel types. These new fuels need to be tested in a controlled environment in order to learn how they respond to accident conditions. For these applications, transient reactor testing is needed to help design fuels with improved performance. In order to maximize the value of transient testing, there is a need for in-situ transient realtime imaging technology (e.g., the neutron detection and imaging system like the hodoscope) to see fuel motion during rapid transient excursions with a higher degree of spatial and temporal resolution and accuracy. There also exists a need for new small, compact local sensors and instrumentation that are capable of collecting data during transients (e.g., local displacements, temperatures, thermal conductivity, neutron flux, etc.).

  18. Reproduction of the RA reactor fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1961-12-01

    This document includes the following nine reports: Final report on task 08/12 - testing the Ra reactor fuel element; design concept for fabrication of RA reactor fuel element; investigation of the microstructure of the Ra reactor fuel element; Final report on task 08/13 producing binary alloys with Al, Mo, Zr, Nb and B additions; fabrication of U-Al alloy; final report on tasks 08/14 and 08/16; final report on task 08/32 diffusion bond between the fuel and the cladding of the Ra reactor fuel element; Final report on task 08/33, fabrication of the RA reactor fuel element cladding; and final report on task 08/36, diffusion of solid state metals [sr

  19. Metallographic examination of (uth) O2 and UO2 fuel tested in power ramp conditions in triga reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioncescu, M.; Uta, O.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the behavior of two fuel experimental elements (EC1 and EC2), by destructive post-irradiation examination. The fuel elements were mounted inside a pattern port, one in extension of the other and irradiated in power ramp conditions in order to check their behavior. Fuel element 1 (EC1) contains (UTh)O''2 pellet, and other one (EC2) UO''2 pellet. The results of destructive post-irradiation examination are evidenced by metallographic and ceramographic analyses. The data obtained from the post-irradiation examinations are used, first to confirm the security, reliability and nuclear fuel performance, and second, for the development of CANDU fuel. The results obtained by destructive examinations regarding the integrity, sheath hydrating and oxidation as well as the structural modifications are typical for fuel elements tested in power ramp conditions. (authors)

  20. Startup testing of Romania dual-core test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Late in 1979 both the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) and the 14-MW steady-state reactor (SSR) were loaded to critical. The fuel loading in both was then carried to completion and low-power testing was conducted. Early in 1980 both reactors successfully underwent high-power testing. The ACPR was operated for several hours at 500 kW and underwent pulse tests culminating in pulses with reactivity insertions of $4.60, peak power levels of about 20,000 MW, energy releases of 100 MW-sec, and peak measured fuel temperatures of 830 deg. C. The SSR was operated in several modes, both with natural convection and forced cooling with one or more pumps. The reactor successfully completed a 120-hr full-power test. Subsequent fuel element inspections confirmed that the fuel has performed without fuel damage or distortion. (author)

  1. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel assembly, hollow guide posts protrude into a fuel assembly and fitting grill from a biased spring pad with a plunger that moves with the spring pad plugging one end of each of the guide posts. A plate on the end fitting grill that has a hole for fluid discharge partially plugs the other end of the guide post. Pressurized water coolant that fills the guide post volume acts as a shock absorber and should the reactor core receive a major seismic or other shock, the fuel assembly is compelled to move towards a pad depending from a transversely disposed support grid. The pad bears against the spring pad and the plunger progressively blocks the orifices provided by slots in the guide posts thus gradually absorbing the applied shock. After the orifice has been completely blocked, controlled fluid discharge continues through a hole coil spring cooperating in the attenuation of the shock. (author)

  2. Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Sik; Grandy, Andrew; Boroski, Andrew; Krajtl, Lubomir; Johnson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    For effective burning of hazardous transuranic (TRU) elements of used nuclear fuel, a transformational advanced reactor concept named SLFFR (Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor) was proposed based on stationary molten metallic fuel. The fuel enters the reactor vessel in a solid form, and then it is heated to molten temperature in a small melting heater. The fuel is contained within a closed, thick container with penetrating coolant channels, and thus it is not mixed with coolant nor flow through the primary heat transfer circuit. The makeup fuel is semi- continuously added to the system, and thus a very small excess reactivity is required. Gaseous fission products are also removed continuously, and a fraction of the fuel is periodically drawn off from the fuel container to a processing facility where non-gaseous mixed fission products and other impurities are removed and then the cleaned fuel is recycled into the fuel container. A reference core design and a preliminary plant system design of a 1000 MWt TRU- burning SLFFR concept were developed using TRU-Ce-Co fuel, Ta-10W fuel container, and sodium coolant. Conservative design approaches were adopted to stay within the current material performance database. Detailed neutronics and thermal-fluidic analyses were performed to develop a reference core design. Region-dependent 33-group cross sections were generated based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 data using the MC2-3 code. Core and fuel cycle analyses were performed in theta-r-z geometries using the DIF3D and REBUS-3 codes. Reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated using the VARI3D perturbation theory code. Thermo-fluidic analyses were performed using the ANSYS FLUENT computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Figure 0.1 shows a schematic radial layout of the reference 1000 MWt SLFFR core, and Table 0.1 summarizes the main design parameters of SLFFR-1000 loop plant. The fuel container is a 2.5 cm thick cylinder with an inner radius of 87.5 cm. The fuel

  3. Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Grandy, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Boroski, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krajtl, Lubomir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Johnson, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    For effective burning of hazardous transuranic (TRU) elements of used nuclear fuel, a transformational advanced reactor concept named SLFFR (Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor) was proposed based on stationary molten metallic fuel. The fuel enters the reactor vessel in a solid form, and then it is heated to molten temperature in a small melting heater. The fuel is contained within a closed, thick container with penetrating coolant channels, and thus it is not mixed with coolant nor flow through the primary heat transfer circuit. The makeup fuel is semi- continuously added to the system, and thus a very small excess reactivity is required. Gaseous fission products are also removed continuously, and a fraction of the fuel is periodically drawn off from the fuel container to a processing facility where non-gaseous mixed fission products and other impurities are removed and then the cleaned fuel is recycled into the fuel container. A reference core design and a preliminary plant system design of a 1000 MWt TRU- burning SLFFR concept were developed using TRU-Ce-Co fuel, Ta-10W fuel container, and sodium coolant. Conservative design approaches were adopted to stay within the current material performance database. Detailed neutronics and thermal-fluidic analyses were performed to develop a reference core design. Region-dependent 33-group cross sections were generated based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 data using the MC2-3 code. Core and fuel cycle analyses were performed in theta-r-z geometries using the DIF3D and REBUS-3 codes. Reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated using the VARI3D perturbation theory code. Thermo-fluidic analyses were performed using the ANSYS FLUENT computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Figure 0.1 shows a schematic radial layout of the reference 1000 MWt SLFFR core, and Table 0.1 summarizes the main design parameters of SLFFR-1000 loop plant. The fuel container is a 2.5 cm thick cylinder with an inner radius of 87.5 cm. The fuel

  4. Commissioning of the STAR test section for experimental simulation of loss of coolant accident using the EC-208 instrumented fuel assembly of the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maprelian, Eduardo; Torres, Walmir M.; Prado, Adelk C.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Franca, Renato L.; Santos, Samuel C.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: emaprel@ipen.br, E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: acprado@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br, E-mail: rlfranca@ipen.br, E-mail: samuelcs@ipen.br, E-mail: lamacedo@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SO (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The three basic safety functions of Research Reactors (RR) are the safe shutdown of the reactor, the proper cooling of the decay heat of the fuel elements and the confinement of radioactive materials. Compared to Nuclear Power Reactors, RR power release is small, yet its three safety functions must be met to ensure the integrity of the reactor. During a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in pool type RR, partial or complete loss of pool water may occur, with consequent partial or complete uncovering of the fuel assemblies. In such an accident, the decay heat removal safety function must not be compromised. The Test Section for Experimental Simulation of Loss of Coolant Accident (STAR) is in commissioning phase. This test section will provide experimental data on partial and total uncovering of the EC-208 instrumented fuel assembly (IFA) irradiated in the IEA-R1. Experimental results will be useful in validation of computer codes for RR safety analysis, particularly on heat removal efficiency aspects (safety function) in accident conditions. STAR comprises a base on which is installed the IFA, the cylindrical stainless steel hull, the compressed air system for the test section emptying and refilling, and the instrumentation for temperature and level measurements. The commissioning tests or pre-operational check, consist of several preliminary tests to verify experimental procedures, the difficulties during assembling of STAR in the pool, the difficulties in control the emptying and refilling velocities, as well as, the repeatability capacity, tests of equipment, valves and systems and tests of instrumentation and data acquisition system. Safety, accuracy and easiness of operation will be checked. (author)

  5. Catalytic Reactor for Inerting of Aircraft Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    Aluminum Panels After Triphase Corrosion Test 79 35 Inerting System Flows in Various Flight Modes 82 36 High Flow Reactor Parametric Data 84 37 System...AD/A-000 939 CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS George H. McDonald, et al AiResearch Manufacturing Company Prepared for: Air Force...190th Street 2b. GROUP Torrance, California .. REPORT TITLE CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS . OESCRIP TIVE NOTEs (Thpe of refpoft

  6. Fuel assemblies for use in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schluderberg, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A fuel assembly for use in pressurized water cooled nuclear fast breeder reactors is described in which moderator to fuel ratios, conducive to a high Pu-U-D 2 O reactor breeding ratio, are obtained whilst at the same time ensuring accurate spacing of fuel pins without the parasitic losses associated with the use of spacer grids. (U.K.)

  7. Aspects of the fast reactors fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouain, D.M.

    1982-06-01

    The fuel cycle for fast reactors, is analysed, regarding the technical aspects of the developing of the reprocessing stages and the fuel fabrication. The environmental impact of LMFBRs and the waste management of this cycle are studied. The economic aspects of the fuel cycle, are studied too. Some coments about the Brazilian fast reactors programs are done. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Environmental concerns in regarding a materials test reactor fuel fabrication facility at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Glaucia R.T.; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Carvalho, Elita F.U.; Riella, Humberto G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the industrial activities success, front to a more and more informed and demanding society and to a more and more competitive market demands an environmental administration policy which doesn't limit itself to assist the legislation but anticipate and prevent, in a responsible way, possible damages to the environment. One of the main programs of the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research of the national Commission of Nuclear Energy located in Brazil, through the Center of Nuclear Fuel -CCN- is to manufacture MTR-type fuel elements using low-enrichment uranium (20 wt % 235 U), to supply its IEA-R1 research reactor. Integrated in this program, this work aims at well developing and assuring a methodology to implant an environment, health and safety policy, foreseeing its management with the use of detailed data reports and through the adoption of new tools for improving the management, in order to fulfil the applicable legislation and accomplish all the environmental, operational and works aspects. The applied methodology for the effluents management comprises different aspects, including the specific environmental legislation of a country, main available effluents treatment techniques, process flow analyses from raw materials and intakes to products, generated effluents, residuals and emissions. Data collections were accomplished for points gathering and tests characterization, classification and compatibility of the generated effluents and their eventual environmental impacts.This study aims to implant the Sustainability Concept in order to guarantee access to financial resources, allowing cost reduction, maximizing long-term profits, preventing and reducing environmental accident risks and stimulating both the attraction and the keeping of a motivated manpower. Work on this project has already started and, even though many technical actions have not still ended, the results have being extremely valuable. These results can already give to CCN

  9. Environmental concerns regarding a materials test reactor fuel fabrication facility at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. R. T.; Durazzo, M.; Carvalho, E. F. U.; Riella, H. G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the industrial activities success, front to a more and more informed and demanding society and to a more and more competitive market demands an environmental administration policy which doesn't limit itself to assist the legislation but anticipate and prevent, in a responsible way, possible damages to the environment. One of the maim programs of the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research of the national Commission of Nuclear Energy located in Brazil, through the Center of Nuclear Fuel - CCN - is to manufacture MTR-type fuel elements using low-enrichment uranium (20 wt% 2 35U), to supply its IEA-RI research reactor. Integrated in this program, this work aims at well developing and assuring a methodology to implant an environment, health and safety policy, foreseeing its management with the use of detailed data reports and through the adoption of new tools for improving the management, in order to fulfil the applicable legislation and accomplish all the environmental, operational and works aspects. The applied methodology for the effluents management comprises different aspects, including the specific environmental legislation of a country, main available effluents treatment techniques, process flow analyses from raw materials and intakes to products, generated effluents, residuals and emissions. Data collections were accomplished for points gathering and tests characterization, classification and compatibility of the generated effluents and their eventual environmental impacts. This study aims to implant the Sustainable Concept in order to guarantee access to financial resources, allowing cost reduction, maximizing long-term profits, preventing and reducing environmental accident risks and stimulating both the attraction and the keeping of a motivated manpower. Work on this project has already started and, even though many technical actions have not still ended, the results have being extremely valuable. These results can already give to CCN

  10. Fuel assembly for FBR type reactor and reactor core thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a fuel assembly to be loaded to a reactor core of a large sized FBR type reactor, in which a coolant density coefficient can be reduced without causing power peaking in the peripheral region of neutron moderators loaded in the reactor core. Namely, the fuel assembly for the FBR type reactor comprises a plurality of fission product-loaded fuel rods and a plurality of fertile material-loaded fuel rods and one or more rods loading neutron moderators. In this case, the plurality of fertile material-loaded fuel rods are disposed to the peripheral region of the neutron moderator-loaded rods. The plurality of fission product-loaded fuel rods are disposed surrounding the peripheral region of the plurality of fertile material-loaded fuel rods. The neutron moderator comprises zirconium hydride, yttrium hydride and calcium hydride. The fission products are mixed oxide fuels. The fertile material comprises depleted uranium or natural uranium. (I.S.)

  11. Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    This meeting contains articles of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008 of Korean Nuclear Society, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Chinese Nuclear Society, European Nuclear Society and American Nuclear Society. It was held on Oct. 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea and subject of Meeting is 'New Clear' Fuel - A green energy solution. This proceedings is comprised of 5 tracks. The main topic titles of track are as follows: Advances in water reactor fuel technology, Fuel performance and operational experience, Transient fuel behavior and safety-related issues, Fuel cycle, spent fuel storage and transportations and Fuel modeling and analysis. (Yi, J. H.)

  12. Irradiation Facilities at the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) (formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950s with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world's data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens

  13. Asymptotic estimation of reactor fueling optimal strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of improving the technical-economic factors of operating. and designed nuclear power plant blocks by developino. internal fuel cycle strategy (reactor fueling regime optimization), taking into account energy system structural peculiarities altogether, is considered. It is shown, that in search of asymptotic solutions of reactor fueling planning tasks the model of fuel energy potential (FEP) is the most ssuitable and effective. FEP represents energy which may be produced from the fuel in a reactor with real dimensions and power, but with hypothetical fresh fuel supply, regime, providing smilar burnup of all the fuel, passing through the reactor, and continuous overloading of infinitely small fuel portion under fule power, and infinitely rapid mixing of fuel in the reactor core volume. Reactor fuel run with such a standard fuel cycle may serve as FEP quantitative measure. Assessment results of optimal WWER-440 reactor fresh fuel supply periodicity are given as an example. The conclusion is drawn that with fuel enrichment x=3.3% the run which is 300 days, is economically justified, taking into account that the cost of one energy unit production is > 3 cop/KW/h

  14. Economic evaluation of fast reactor fuel cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Ping; Zhao Fuyu; Yan Zhou; Li Chong

    2012-01-01

    Economic calculation and analysis of two kinds of nuclear fuel cycle are conducted by check off method, based on the nuclear fuel cycling process and model for fast reactor power plant, and comparison is carried out for the economy of fast reactor fuel cycle and PWR once-through fuel cycle. Calculated based on the current price level, the economy of PWR one-through fuel cycle is better than that of the fast reactor fuel cycle. However, in the long term considering the rising of the natural uranium's price and the development of the post treatment technology for nuclear fuels, the cost of the fast reactor fuel cycle is expected to match or lower than that of the PWR once-through fuel cycle. (authors)

  15. Investigations of uraniumsilicide-based dispersion fuels for the use of low enrichment uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.

    1982-07-01

    The work presents at the outset, a review of the preparation and properties of uranium silicides (U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 ) in so far as these are relevant for their use as dispersants in research reactor fuels. The experimental work deals with the preparation and powder metallurgical processing of Al-clad miniature fuel element plates with U 3 Si- und U 3 Si-Al up to U-densities of 6.0 g U/cm 3 . The compatibility of these silicides with the Al-matrix under equilibrium conditions (873 K) and the influence of the reaction on the dimensional stability of the miniplates is described and discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    For a period of about 10 years AECL had a significant program looking into the possibility of developing U 3 Si as a high density replacement for the UO 2 pellet fuel in use in CANDU power reactors. The element design consisted of a Zircaloy-clad U 3 Si rod containing suitable voidage to accommodate swelling. We found that the binary U 3 Si could not meet the defect criterion for our power reactors, i.e., one month in 300 degree C water with a defect in the sheath and no significant damage to the element. Since U 3 Si could not do the job, a new corrosion resistant ternary U-Si-Al alloy was developed and patented. Fuel elements containing this alloy came close to meeting the defect criterion and showed slightly better irradiation stability than U 3 Si. Shortly after this, the program was terminated for other reasons. We have made much of this experience available to the Low Enrichment Fuel Development Program and will be glad to supply further data to assist this program

  17. Fast reactors fuel Cycle: State in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In this SFEN day we treat all aspects (economics-reactor cores, reprocessing, experience return) of the LMFBR fuel cycle in Europe and we discuss about the development of this type of reactor (EFR project) [fr

  18. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Moody, K.J.; Bradley, K.S.; Lorenzana, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  19. Fast reactor fuel design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, J.F.W.; Chamberlain, A.; Holmes, J.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel design parameters for oxide and carbide fast reactor fuels are reviewed in the context of minimising the total uranium demands for a combined thermal and fast reactor system. The major physical phenomena conditioning fast reactor fuel design, with a target of high burn-up, good breeding and reliable operation, are characterised. These include neutron induced void swelling, irradiation creep, pin failure modes, sub-assembly structural behaviour, behaviour of defect fuel, behaviour of alternative fuel forms. The salient considerations in the commercial scale fabrication and reprocessing of the fuels are reviewed, leading to the delineation of possible routes for the manufacture and reprocessing of Commercial Reactor fuel. From the desiderata and restraints arising from Surveys, Performance and Manufacture, the problems posed to the Designer are considered, and a narrow range of design alternatives is proposed. The paper concludes with a consideration of the development areas and the conceptual problems for fast reactors associated with those areas

  20. Development of nuclear fuel for integrated reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kim, H. K.; Kang, H. S.; Yoon, K. H.; Chun, T. H.; In, W. K.; Oh, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Woo, Y. M

    1999-04-01

    The spacer grid assembly which provides both lateral and vertical support for the fuel rods and also provides a flow channel between the fuel rods to afford the heat transfer from the fuel pellet into the coolant in a reactor, is one of the major structural components of nuclear fuel for LWR. Therefore, the spacer grid assembly is a highly ranked component when the improvement of hardware is pursued for promoting fuel performance. Main objective of this project is to develop the inherent spacer grid assembly and to research relevant technologies on the spacer grid assembly. And, the UO{sub 2}-based SMART fuel is preliminarily designed for the 330MWt class SMART, which is planned to produce heat as well as electricity. Results from this project are listed as follows. 1. Three kinds of spacer grid candidates have been invented and applied for domestic and US patents. In addition, the demo SG(3x3 array) were fabricated, which the mechanical/structural test was carried out with. 2. The mechanical/structural technologies related to the spacer grid development are studied and relevant test requirements were established. 3. Preliminary design data of the UO{sub 2}-based SMART fuel have been produced. The structural characteristics of several components such as the top/bottom end piece and the holddown spring assembly were analysed by consulting the numerical method.

  1. Development of nuclear fuel for integrated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kim, H. K.; Kang, H. S.; Yoon, K. H.; Chun, T. H.; In, W. K.; Oh, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Woo, Y. M.

    1999-04-01

    The spacer grid assembly which provides both lateral and vertical support for the fuel rods and also provides a flow channel between the fuel rods to afford the heat transfer from the fuel pellet into the coolant in a reactor, is one of the major structural components of nuclear fuel for LWR. Therefore, the spacer grid assembly is a highly ranked component when the improvement of hardware is pursued for promoting fuel performance. Main objective of this project is to develop the inherent spacer grid assembly and to research relevant technologies on the spacer grid assembly. And, the UO 2 -based SMART fuel is preliminarily designed for the 330MWt class SMART, which is planned to produce heat as well as electricity. Results from this project are listed as follows. 1. Three kinds of spacer grid candidates have been invented and applied for domestic and US patents. In addition, the demo SG(3x3 array) were fabricated, which the mechanical/structural test was carried out with. 2. The mechanical/structural technologies related to the spacer grid development are studied and relevant test requirements were established. 3. Preliminary design data of the UO 2 -based SMART fuel have been produced. The structural characteristics of several components such as the top/bottom end piece and the holddown spring assembly were analysed by consulting the numerical method

  2. The Canadian research reactor spent fuel situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present research reactor spent fuel situation in Canada. The research reactors currently operating are listed along with the types of fuel that they utilize. Other shut down research reactors contributing to the storage volume are included for completeness. The spent fuel storage facilities associated with these reactors and the methods used to determine criticality safety are described. Finally the current inventory of spent fuel and where it is stored is presented along with concerns for future storage. (author). 3 figs

  3. Pre-test prediction and post-test analysis of PWR fuel rod ballooning in the MT-3 in-pile LOCA simulation experiment in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.T.; Horwood, R.A.; Healey, T.

    1983-01-01

    The USNRC and the UKAEA have jointly funded a series of in-pile LOCA simulation experiments in the Canadian NRU reactor in order to secure further information on the thermal hydraulic and clad deformation response of PWR fuel rod bundles. Test MT-3 in the series was performed using reflood rate and rod internal pressure conditions specified by the UK nuclear industry. The parameters were selected to ensure the development of a near-isothermal clad temperature history during which zircaloy was required to balloon and rupture near the alpha-alpha/beta phase transition. Specification of the reflood rate conditions was assisted by the performance of a precursor test on an unpressurised rod bundle and by complementary application of appropriate thermal hydraulic analyses. Identification of the rod internal pressure needed to cause ballooning and rupture was achieved using a creep deformation model, BALLOON, in conjunction with the clad thermal history defined by the prior thermal hydraulic test. This paper presents the basis of the BALLOON analysis and describes its application in calculating the fill gas pressure for rods MT-3, their axial ballooning profile and the clad temperature at peak radial strain elevations. (author)

  4. Fuel handling system of nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulstich, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel handing system for nuclear reactor plants comprising a reactor vessel having an openable top and removable cover for refueling and containing therein, submerged in coolant water substantially filling the reactor vessel, a fuel core including a multiplicity of fuel bundles formed of groups of sealed tube elements enclosing fissionable fuel assembled into units. It comprises a fuel bundle handing platform moveable over the open top of the reactor vessel; a fuel bundle handing mast extendable downward from the platform with a lower end projecting into the open top reactor vessel to the fuel core submerged in water; a grapple head mounted on the lower end of the mast provided with grappling hook means for attaching to and transporting fuel bundles into and out from the fuel core; and a camera with a prismatic viewing head surrounded by a radioactive resisting quartz cylinder and enclosed within the grapple head which is provided with at least three windows with at least two windows provided with an angled surface for aiming the camera prismatic viewing head in different directions and thereby viewing the fuel bundles of the fuel core from different perspectives, and having a cable connecting the camera with a viewing monitor located above the reactor vessel for observing the fuel bundles of the fuel core and for enabling aiming of the camera prismatic viewing head through the windows by an operator

  5. Fuel cycle problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fuel cycle problems of fusion reactors evolve around the breeding, recovery, containment, and recycling of tritium. These processes are described, and their implications and alternatives are discussed. Technically, fuel cycle problems are solvable; economically, their feasibility is not yet known

  6. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2007-01-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat

  8. Storage device of reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Masaaki.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns storage of spent fuels and provides a storage device capable of securing container-cells in shielding water by remote handling and moving and securing the container-cells easily. Namely, a horizontal support plate has a plurality of openings formed in a lattice like form and is disposed in a pit filled with water. The container-cell has a rectangular cross section, and is inserted and disposed vertically in the openings. Securing members are put between the container-cells above the horizontal support plate, and constituted so as to be expandable from above by remote handling. The securing member is preferably comprised of a vertical screw member and an expandable urging member. Since securing members for securing the container-cells for incorporating reactor fuels are disposed to the horizontal support plate controllable from above by the remote handling, fuel storage device can be disposed without entering into a radiation atmosphere. The container-cells can be settled and exchanged easily after starting of the use of a fuel pit. (I.S.)

  9. Results of fuel elements fabrication on the basis of increased concentration dioxide fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.B.; Afanasiev, V.L.; Enin, A.A.; Suprun, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    According to the Russian Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, that were constructed under the Russian projects, at the Novosibirsk Chemical Concentrates Plant the pilot series of different configuration (WR-M2, MR, IRT-4M) fuel elements, based on increased concentration uranium dioxide fuel, have been fabricated for reactor tests. Comprehensive fabricated fuel elements quality estimation has been carried out. (author)

  10. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Tower, S.N.; Huckestein, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor comprises a 5x5 array of guide tubes in a generally 20x20 array of fuel elements, the guide tubes being arranged to accommodate either control rods or water displacer rods. The fuel assembly has top and bottom Inconel (Registered Trade Mark) grids and intermediate Zircaloy grids in engagement with the guide tubes and supporting the fuel elements and guide tubes while allowing flow of reactor coolant through the assembly. (author)

  11. Design, fabrication, and operation of capsules for the irradiation testing of candidate advanced space reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, K.R.

    1975-04-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments were designed, built, and operated to test uranium mononitride (UN) fuel clad in tungsten-lined T-111 (Ta-8 percent W-2 percent Hf) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel clad in both tungsten-lined T-111 and tungsten-lined Nb-1 percent Zr. A total of nine fuel pins was irradiated (four containing porous UN, two containing dense, nonporous UN, and three containing dense UO 2 ) at average cladding temperatures ranging from 931 to 1015 0 C. The UN experiments, capsules UN-4 and -5, operated for 10,480 and 10,037 hr, respectively, at an average linear heat generation rate of 10 kW/ft. The UO 2 experiment, capsule UN-6, operated for 8333 hr at an average linear heat generation rate of approximately 5 kW/ft. Following irradiation, the nine fuel pins were removed from their capsules, externally examined, and sent to the NASA Plum Brook Facility for more detailed postirradiation examination. During visual examination, it was discovered that the cladding of the fuel pin containing dense UN in each of capsules UN-4 and -5 had failed, exposing the UN fuel to the NaK in which the pins were submerged and permitting the release of fission gas from the failed pins. A rough analysis of the fission gas seen in samples of the gas in the fuel pin region indicated fission gas release-to-birth rates from these fuel pins in the range of 10 -5 . (U.S.)

  12. Integrity assessment of research reactor fuel cladding and material testing using eddy current inspection; Avaliacao de integridade de revestimentos de combustiveis de reatores de pesquisa e teste de materiais utilizando o ensaio de correntes parasitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Donizete Anderson de

    2004-07-01

    A methodology to perform the integrity assessment of research reactors nuclear fuels cladding, such as those installed in IPR-Rl (TRIGA) and IEA-R1 (MTR), using nondestructive electromagnetic inspection (eddy current) is presented. This methodology is constituted by: the development of calibration reference standards, specific for each type of fuel; the development of special test probes; the recommendations for the inspection equipment calibration; the construction of voltage based evaluation curves and the inspection procedures developed for the characterization of detected flaws. The test probes development, specially those designed for the inspection of MTR fuels cladding, which present access difficulties due to the narrow gap between fuel plates (2,89 mm for IEAR-R1), constituted a challenge that demanded the introduction of unusual materials and constructive techniques. The operational performance of the developed resources, as well as the special operative characteristics of the test probes, such as their immunity to adjacent fuel plates interference and electrical resistivity changes of the fuels meat are experimentally demonstrated. The practical applicability of the developed methodology is verified in non radioactive environment, using a dummy MTR fuel element model, similar to an IEA-R1 reactor fuel element, produced and installed in IPEN, Sao Paulo. The efficacy of the proposed methodology was verified by the achieved results. (author)

  13. Future fuel cycle development for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.; McDonnell, F.N.; Griffiths, J.; Boczar, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The CANDU reactor has proven to be safe and economical and has demonstrated outstanding performance with natural uranium fuel. The use of on-power fuelling, coupled with excellent neutron economy, leads to a very flexible reactor system with can utilize a wide variety of fuels. The spectrum of fuel cycles ranges from natural uranium, through slightly enriched uranium, to plutonium and ultimately thorium fuels which offer many of the advantages of the fast breeder reactor system. CANDU can also burn the recycled uranium and/or the plutonium from fuel discharged from light water reactors. This synergistic relationship could obviate the need to re-enrich the reprocessed uranium and allow a simpler reprocessing scheme. Fule management strategies that will permit future fuel cycles to be used in existing CANDU reactors have been identified. Evolutionary design changes will lead to an even greater flexibility, which will guarantee the continued success of the CANDU system. (author)

  14. Fuel and fuel cycles with high burnup for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernushev, V.; Sokolov, F.

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the status and trends in development of nuclear fuel and fuel cycles for WWER reactors. Parameters and main stages of implementation of new fuel cycles will be presented. At present, these new fuel cycles are offered to NPPs. Development of new fuel and fuel cycles based on the following principles: profiling fuel enrichment in a cross section of fuel assemblies; increase of average fuel enrichment in fuel assemblies; use of refuelling schemes with lower neutron leakage ('in-in-out'); use of integrated fuel gadolinium-based burnable absorber (for a five-year fuel cycle); increase of fuel burnup in fuel assemblies; improving the neutron balance by using structural materials with low neutron absorption; use of zirconium alloy claddings which are highly resistant to irradiation and corrosion. The paper also presents the results of fuel operation. (author)

  15. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercg, J.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements to guide tubes for the fuel assemblies of light water nuclear reactors, said assemblies being immersed in operation in the cooling water of the core of such a reactor, the guide tubes being of the type made from zircaloy and fixed at their two ends respectively to an upper end part and a lower end part made from stainless steel or Irconel and which incorporate devices for braking the fall of the control rods which they house during the rapid shutdown of the reactor, wherein the said braking devices are constituted by means for restricting the diameter of the guide tubes comprising for each guide tube a zircaloy inner sleeve spot welded to the said guide tube and whose internal diameter permits the passage, with a calibrated clearance, of the corresponding control rod, the sleeve being distributed over the lower portion of each guide tube and associated with orifices made in the actual guide tubes to produce the progressive hydraulic absorption of the end of the fall of the control rods

  16. Research reactor fuel development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    2000-09-01

    This paper reviews recent U 3 Si 2 and U-Mo dispersion fuel development activities at AECL. The scope of work includes fabrication development, irradiation testing, post-irradiation examination and performance qualification. U-Mo alloys with a variety of compositions, ranging from 6 to 10 wt % Mo, have been fabricated with high purity and homogeneity in the product. The alloys and powders were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction analysis. U-Mo powder samples have been supplied to the Argonne National Laboratory for irradiation testing in the ATR reactor. Low-enriched uranium fuel elements containing U-7 wt % Mo and U-10 wt % Mo with loadings up to 4.5 gU/cm 3 have been fabricated at CRL for irradiation testing in the NRU reactor. The U-Mo fuel elements will be tested in NRU at linear powers up to 145 kW/m, and to 85 atom % 235 U burnup. (author)

  17. Research reactor fuel development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews recent U 3 Si 2 and U-Mo dispersion fuel development activities at AECL. The scope of work includes fabrication development, irradiation testing, postirradiation examination and performance qualification. U-Mo alloys with a variety of compositions, ranging from 6 to 10 wt % Mo, have been fabricated with high purity and homogeneity in the product. The alloys and powders were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction analysis. U-Mo powder samples have been supplied to the Argonne National Laboratory for irradiation testing in the ATR reactor. Low-enriched uranium fuel elements containing U-7 wt % Mo and U-10 wt % Mo with loadings up to 4.5 gU/cm 3 have been fabricated at CRL for irradiation testing in the NRU reactor. The U-Mo fuel elements will be tested in NRU at linear powers up to 145 kW/m, and to 85 atom % 235 U burnup. (author)

  18. IFPE/MT4-MT6A-LOCA, Large-break LOCA in-reactor fuel bundle materials tests at NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Turnbull, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Description - Objectives - Results: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted a series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding mechanical deformation tests in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River National Laboratory in Canada. The objective of these tests was to perform simulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) experiments using full-length light-water reactor fuel rods to study mechanical deformation, flow blockage, and coolability. Three phases of a LOCA (i.e., heat-up, reflood, and quench) were performed in situ using nuclear fissioning to simulate the low-level decay power during a LOCA after shutdown. All tests used PWR-type, non-irradiated fuel rods. Provided here is information on two materials tests, MT-6A and MT-4, which PNNL considers the better characterized for the purposes of setting up computer cases. The NRU reactor is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-type research reactor. It has a power level of 135 MWth and is heavy-water moderated and cooled. The coolant has an inlet temperature of 310 K at a pressure of 0.65 MPa. The MT tests were conducted in a specially designed test train to supply the specified coolant conditions of flowing steam, stagnant steam, and then reflood. Typical instrumentation for the MT tests included fuel centerline thermocouples, cladding inner surface thermocouples, cladding outer surface thermocouples, rod internal gas pressure transducers or pressure switches, coolant channel steam probes, and self-powered neutron detectors. This instrumentation allowed for determining rupture times and cladding temperature. The test rods for the LOCA cases in the NRU reactor were irradiated in flowing steam prior to the transient, stagnant steam during the transient and prior to reflood, and then reflood conditions to complete the transient. Both cladding inner surface and outer surface temperatures were measured, in addition to coolant temperatures. However, only cladding inner surface temperatures were

  19. Research reactor de-fueling and fuel shipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, R.D.; Jawdeh, E.; Strydom, J.

    1998-01-01

    Planning for the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor operations during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games began in early 1995. Before any details could be outlined, several preliminary administrative decisions had to be agreed upon by state, city, and university officials. The two major administrative decisions involving the reactor were (1) the security level and requirements and (2) the fuel status of the reactor. The Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) was a heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with high-enriched uranium. The reactor was first licensed in 1964 with an engineered lifetime of thirty years. The reactor was intended for use in research applications and as a teaching facility for nuclear engineering students and reactor operators. Approximately one year prior to the olympics, the Georgia Tech administration decided that the GTRR fuel would be removed. In addition, a heightened, beyond regulatory requirements, security system was to be implemented. This report describes the scheduling, operations, and procedures

  20. Irradiation facilitates at the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, Blaine S.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC - formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950's with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world's data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens. The paper has the following contents: ATR description and capabilities; ATR operations, quality and safety requirements; Static capsule experiments; Lead experiments; Irradiation test vehicle; In-pile loop experiments; Gas test loop; Future testing; Support facilities at RTC; Conclusions. To summarize, the ATR has a long history in fuel and material irradiations, and will be fulfilling a critical role in the future fuel and material testing necessary to develop the next generation reactor systems and advanced fuel cycles. The

  1. Fuel exchange device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuki, Koji.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention can provide fresh fuels with a rotational angle aligned with the direction in the reactor core, so that the fresh fuels can be inserted being aligned with apertures of the reactor core even if a self orientation mechanism should fail to operate. That is, a rotational angle detection means (1) detects the rotational angle of fresh fuels before insertion to the reactor core. A fuel rotational angle control means (2) controls the rotational angle of the fresh fuels by comparing the detection result of the means (1) and the data for the insertion position of the reactor core. A fuel rotation means (3) compensates the rotational angel of the fresh fuels based on the control signal from the means (2). In this way, when the fresh fuels are inserted to the reactor core, the fresh fuels set at the same angle as that for the aperture of the reactor core. Accordingly, even if the self orientation mechanism should not operate, the fresh fuels can be inserted smoothly. As a result, it is possible to save loss time upon fuel exchange and mitigate operator's burden during operation. (I.S.)

  2. Research reactor spent fuel in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the research reactors in Ukraine, their spent fuel facilities and spent fuel management problems. Nuclear sciences, technology and industry are highly developed in Ukraine. There are 5 NPPs in the country with 14 operating reactors which have total power capacity of 12,800 MW

  3. Plasma-gun fueling for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1980-11-01

    In light of the uncertain extrapolation of gas puffing for reactor fueling and certain limitations to pellet injection, the snowplow plasma gun has been studied as a fueling device. Based on current understanding of gun and plasma behavior a design is proposed, and its performance is predicted in a tokamak reactor environment

  4. Determination of mixture coefficients in tests simulating channels of a fuel assembly in a water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.R.

    1983-09-01

    Here, the mixture coefficients are determined in tests which simulate two symmetric and two assymetric coolant channels of a water cooled reactor. It was studies the effects of coolant flow and of the distance among the coolant channels on these coefficients. The technique used to determine the mixture coefficients was to introduce a tracer (methylene blue) into the flow. The determination of the tracer concentration at the end of the channels was made by means of spectrophotometric analysis. (author)

  5. Status and development of RBMK fuel rods and reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Reshetnikov, F.G.; Ioltukhovsky, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents current status and development of RBMK fuel rods and reactor materials. With regard to fuel rod cladding the following issues have been discussed: corrosion, tensile properties, welding technology and testing of an alternative cladding alloy with a composition of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe. Erbium doped fuel has been suggested for safety improvement. Also analysis of fuel reliability is presented in the paper. (author)

  6. Fissile fuel doubling time characteristics for reactor lifetime fuel logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindler, M.; Harms, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The establishment of nuclear fuel requirements and their efficient utilization requires a detailed knowledge of some aspects of fuel dynamics and processing during the reactor lifetime. It is shown here that the use of the fuel stockpile inventory concept can serve effectively for this fuel management purpose. The temporal variation of the fissile fuel doubling time as well as nonequilibrium core conditions are among the characteristics which thus become more evident. These characteristics - rather than a single figure-of-merit - clearly provide an improved description of the expansion capacity and/or fuel requirements of a nuclear reactor energy system

  7. Irradiation behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Walters, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Metallic fuels were the first fuels chosen for liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMR's). In the late 1960's world-wide interest turned toward ceramic LMR fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel was realized. However, during the 1970's the performance limitations of metallic fuel were resolved in order to achieve a high plant factor at the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The 1980's spawned renewed interest in metallic fuel when the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept emerged at Argonne National Laboratory. A fuel performance demonstration program was put into place to obtain the data needed for the eventual licensing of metallic fuel. This paper will summarize the results of the irradiation program carried out since 1985

  8. Fuel element load/unload machine for the PEC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    GEC Energy Systems Limited are providing two fuel element load/unload machines for use in the Italian fast reactor programme. One will be used in the mechanism test facility (IPM) at Casaccia, to check the salient features of the machine operating in a sodium environment prior to the second machine being installed in the PEC Brasimone Reactor. The machine is used to handle fuel elements, control rods and other reactor components in the sodium-immersed core of the reactor. (U.K.)

  9. Method of fueling for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the monitoring of reactor power with sufficient accuracy, upon starting even without existence of neutron source in case of a low average burnup degree in the reactor core. Constitution: Each of fuel assemblies is charged such that neutron source region monitors for the start-up system in a reactor core neutron instrumentation system having nuclear fuel assemblies and a neutron instrumentation system are surrounded with 4 or 16 fuel assemblies of a low burnup degree. Then, the average burnup degree of the fuel assemblies surrounding the neutron source region monitors are increased than the reactor core burnup degree, whereby neutrons released from the peripheral fuels are increased, sufficient number of neutron counts can be obtained even with no neutron sources upon start-up and the reactor power can be monitored at a sufficient accuracy. (Sekiya, K.)

  10. Hydriding failure in water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    1980-01-01

    Hydriding of the zircaloy cladding has been one of the important causes of failure in water reactor fuel elements. This report reviews the causes, the mechanisms and the methods for prevention of hydriding failure in zircaloy clad water reactor fuel elements. The different types of hydriding of zircaloy cladding have been classified. Various factors influencing zircaloy hydriding from internal and external sources in an operating fuel element have been brought out. The findings of post-irradiation examination of fuel elements from Indian reactors, with respect to clad hydriding and features of hydriding failure are included. (author)

  11. Fast reactor fuel reprocessing in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.; Williams, J.; Buck, C.

    1977-01-01

    Enriched uranium metal fuel irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been reprocessed and refabricated in plants specifically designed for the purpose in the U.K. since 1961. Efficient and reliable fuel recycle is essential to the development of a plutonium based fast reactor system and the importance of establishing at an early stage fast reactor fuel reprocessing has been reinforced by current world difficulties in reprocessing high burn-up thermal reactor oxide fuel. In consequence, the U.K. has decided to reprocess irradiated fuel from the 250 MW(E) Prototype Fast Reactor as an integral part of the fast reactor development programme. Flowsheet and equipment development work for the small scale fully active demonstration plant have been carried out over the past 5 years and the plant will be commissioned and ready for active operation during 1977. In parallel, a comprehensive waste management system has been developed and installed. Based on this development work and the information which will arise from active operation of the plant a parallel development programme has been initiated to provide the basis for the design of a large scale fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant to come into operation in the late 1980s to support the projected U.K. fast reactor installation programme. The paper identifies the important differences between fast reactor and thermal reactor fuel reprocessing technologies and describes some of the development work carried out in these areas for the small scale P.F.R. fuel reprocessing operation. In addition, the development programme in aid of the design of a larger scale fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant is outlined and the current design philosophy is discussed

  12. Fuels and materials testing capabilities in Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.B.; Chastain, S.A.; Culley, G.E.; Ethridge, J.L.; Lovell, A.J.; Newland, D.J.; Pember, L.A.; Puigh, R.J.; Waltar, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor, which started operating in 1982, is a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor located in Hanford, Washington State, and operated by Westinghouse Hanford Co. under contract with U.S. Department of Energy. The reactor has a wide variety of functions for irradiation tests and special tests, and its major purpose is the irradiation of fuel and material for liquid metal reactor, nuclear reactor and space reactor projects. The review first describes major technical specifications and current conditions of the FFTF reactor. Then the plan for irradiation testing is outlined focusing on general features, fuel pin/assembly irradiation tests, and absorber irradiation tests. Assemblies for special tests include the material open test assembly (MOTA), fuel open test assembly (FOTA), closed loop in-reactor assembly (CLIRA), and other special fuel assemblies. An interim examination and maintenance cell (FFTF/IEM cell) and other hot cells are used for nondestructive/destructive tests and physical/mechanical properties test of material after irradiation. (N.K.)

  13. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  14. Breeder reactor fuel fabrication system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.W.; Fritz, R.L.; McLemore, D.R.; Yatabe, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the design and development of remotely operated breeder reactor fuel fabrication and support systems (e.g., analytical chemistry). These activities are focused by the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy to provide: a reliable supply of fuel pins to support US liquid metal cooled breeder reactors and at the same time demonstrate the fabrication of mixed uranium/plutonium fuel by remotely operated and automated methods

  15. Homogeneous Thorium Fuel Cycles in Candu Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.; Edwards, G.W.R.; Magill, M. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    The CANDU{sup R} reactor has an unsurpassed degree of fuel-cycle flexibility, as a consequence of its fuel-channel design, excellent neutron economy, on-power refueling, and simple fuel bundle [1]. These features facilitate the introduction and full exploitation of thorium fuel cycles in Candu reactors in an evolutionary fashion. Because thorium itself does not contain a fissile isotope, neutrons must be provided by adding a fissile material, either within or outside of the thorium-based fuel. Those same Candu features that provide fuel-cycle flexibility also make possible many thorium fuel-cycle options. Various thorium fuel cycles can be categorized by the type and geometry of the added fissile material. The simplest of these fuel cycles are based on homogeneous thorium fuel designs, where the fissile material is mixed uniformly with the fertile thorium. These fuel cycles can be competitive in resource utilization with the best uranium-based fuel cycles, while building up a 'mine' of U-233 in the spent fuel, for possible recycle in thermal reactors. When U-233 is recycled from the spent fuel, thorium-based fuel cycles in Candu reactors can provide substantial improvements in the efficiency of energy production from existing fissile resources. The fissile component driving the initial fuel could be enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233. Many different thorium fuel cycle options have been studied at AECL [2,3]. This paper presents the results of recent homogeneous thorium fuel cycle calculations using plutonium and enriched uranium as driver fuels, with and without U-233 recycle. High and low burnup cases have been investigated for both the once-through and U-233 recycle cases. CANDU{sup R} is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). 1. Boczar, P.G. 'Candu Fuel-Cycle Vision', Presented at IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on 'Fuel Cycle Options for LWRs and HWRs', 1998 April 28 - May 01, also Atomic Energy

  16. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end

  17. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fission product release from nuclear rocket propulsion reactor fuel is an important consideration for nuclear rocket development and application. Fission product data from the last six reactors of the Rover program are collected in this paper to provide as basis for addressing development and testing issues. Fission product loss from the fuel will depend on fuel composition and reactor design and operating parameters. During ground testing, fission products can be contained downstream of the reactor. The last Rover reactor tested, the Nuclear Furnance, was mated to an effluent clean-up system that was effective in preventing the discharge of fission products into the atmosphere

  18. Fast reactor safety testing in Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) in the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.E.; Dutt, D.S.; Harrison, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    Several series of fast reactor safety tests were performed in TREAT during the 1980s. These focused on the transient behavior of full-length oxide fuels (US reference, UK reference, and US advanced design) and on modern metallic fuels. Most of the tests addressed fuel behavior under transient overpower or loss-of-flow conditions. The test series were the PFR/TREAT tests; the RFT, TS, CDT, and RX series on oxide fuels; and the M series on metallic fuels. These are described in terms of their principal results and relevance to analyses and safety evaluation. 4 refs., 3 tabs

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, J.L.; Kmonk, S.; Racki, F.R.

    1981-01-01

    A grid for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly which includes intersecting straps arranged to form a structure of egg crate configuration. The cells defined by the intersecting straps are adapted to contain axially extending fuel rods, each of which occupy one cell, while each control rod guide tube or thimble occupies the space of four cells. To effect attachment of each guide thimble to the grid, a short intermediate sleeve is brazed to the strap walls and the guide thimble is then inserted therein and mechanically secured to the sleeve walls. Each sleeve preferably, although not necessarily, is equipped with circumferentially spaced openings useful in adjusting dimples and springs in adjacent cells. To accurately orient each sleeve in position in the grid, the ends of straps extending in one direction project through transversely extending straps and terminate in the wall of the guide sleeve. Other straps positioned at right angles thereto terminate in that portion of the wall of a strap which lies next to a wall of the sleeve

  20. Fabrication of internally instrumented reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutz, J.D.; Meservey, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures are outlined for fabricating internally instrumented reactor fuel rods while maintaining the original quality assurance level of the rods. Instrumented fuel rods described contain fuel centerline thermocouples, ultrasonic thermometers, and pressure tubes for internal rod gas pressure measurements. Descriptions of the thermocouples and ultrasonic thermometers are also contained

  1. Pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    The fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 and the structural finite element program SAP-IV are applied in a pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology. The applied calculation procedure allows to dimension the fuel rod components and characterize its internal pressure. (author) [pt

  2. Cermet-fueled reactors for multimegawatt space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.L.; Armijo, J.S.; Kruger, G.B.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomisson, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The cermet-fueled reactor has evolved as a potential power source for a broad range of multimegawatt space applications. In particular, the fast spectrum reactor concept can be used to deliver 10s of megawatts of electric power for continuous, long term, unattended operation, and 100s of megawatts of electric power for times exceeding several hundred seconds. The system can also be utilized with either a gas coolant in a Brayton power conversion cycle, or a liquid metal coolant in a Rankine power conversion cycle. Extensive testing of the cermet fuel element has demonstrated that the fuel is capable of operating at very high temperatures under repeated thermal cycling conditions, including transient conditions which approach the multimegawatt burst power requirements. The cermet fuel test performance is reviewed and an advanced cermet-fueled multimegawatt nuclear reactor is described in this paper

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel cycle technology with pyroelectrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiba, O.V.; Maershin, A.A.; Bychkov, A.V.; Zhdanov, A.N.; Kislyj, V.A.; Vavilov, S.K.; Babikov, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A group of dry technologies and processes of vibro-packing granulated fuel in combination with unique properties of vibro-packed FEs make it possible to implement a new comprehensive approach to the fuel cycle with plutonium fuel. Testing of a big number of FEs with vibro-packed U-Pu oxide fuel in the BOR-60 reactor, successful testing of experimental FSAs in the BN-600 rector, reliable operation of the experimental and research complex facilities allow to make the conclusion about a real possibility to develop a safe, economically beneficial U-Pu fuel cycle based on the technologies enumerated above and to use both reactor-grade and weapon-grade plutonium in nuclear reactors with a reliable control and accounting system [ru

  4. Facilities of fuel transfer for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. It particularly concerns facilities for the transfer of fuel assemblies between the reactor core and a fuel transfer area. The installation is simple in construction and enables a relatively small vessel to be used. In greater detail, the invention includes a vessel with a head, fuel assemblies housed in this vessel, and an inlet and outlet for the coolant covering these fuel assemblies. The reactor has a fuel transfer area in communication with this vessel and gear inside the vessel for the transfer of these fuel assemblies. These facilities are borne by the vessel head and serve to transfer the fuel assemblies from the vessel to the transfer area; whilst leaving the fuel assemblies completely immersed in a continuous mass of coolant. A passageway is provided between the vessel and this transfer area for the fuel assemblies. Facilities are provided for closing off this passageway so that the inside of the reactor vessel may be isolated as desired from this fuel transfer area whilst the reactor is operating [fr

  5. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    SFEN, ENS, SNR, ANS, AESJ, CNS KNS, IAEA and NEA are jointly organizing the 2009 International Water Reactor Fuel Performance / TopFuel 2009 Meeting following the 2008 KNS Water Reactor Performance Meeting held during October 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. This meeting is held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in Europe, USA and Asia. In 2009, this meeting will be held in Paris, September 6-10, 2009 in coordination with the Global 2009 Conference at the same date and place. That would lead to a common opening session, some common technical presentations, a common exhibition and common social events. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. Emphasis will be placed on fuel reliability in the general context of nuclear 'Renaissance' and recycling perspective. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. In this frame, the conference track devoted to 'Concepts for transportation and interim storage of spent fuels and conditioned waste' will be shared with 'GLOBAL' conference. Technical Tracks: - 1. Fuel Performance, Reliability and Operational Experience: Fuel operating experience and performance; experience with high burn-up fuels; water side corrosion; stress corrosion cracking; MOX fuel performance; post irradiation data on lead fuel assemblies; radiation effects; water chemistry and corrosion counter-measures. - 2. Transient Fuel Behaviour and Safety Related Issues: Transient fuel behavior and criteria (RIA, LOCA, ATWS, Ramp tests..). Fuel safety-related issues such as PCI (pellet cladding interaction), transient fission gas releases and cladding bursting/ballooning during transient events - Advances in fuel performance modeling and core reload methodology, small and large-scale fuel testing

  6. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    SFEN, ENS, SNR, ANS, AESJ, CNS KNS, IAEA and NEA are jointly organizing the 2009 International Water Reactor Fuel Performance / TopFuel 2009 Meeting following the 2008 KNS Water Reactor Performance Meeting held during October 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. This meeting is held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in Europe, USA and Asia. In 2009, this meeting will be held in Paris, September 6-10, 2009 in coordination with the Global 2009 Conference at the same date and place. That would lead to a common opening session, some common technical presentations, a common exhibition and common social events. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. Emphasis will be placed on fuel reliability in the general context of nuclear 'Renaissance' and recycling perspective. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. In this frame, the conference track devoted to 'Concepts for transportation and interim storage of spent fuels and conditioned waste' will be shared with 'GLOBAL' conference. Technical Tracks: - 1. Fuel Performance, Reliability and Operational Experience: Fuel operating experience and performance; experience with high burn-up fuels; water side corrosion; stress corrosion cracking; MOX fuel performance; post irradiation data on lead fuel assemblies; radiation effects; water chemistry and corrosion counter-measures. - 2. Transient Fuel Behaviour and Safety Related Issues: Transient fuel behavior and criteria (RIA, LOCA, ATWS, Ramp tests..). Fuel safety-related issues such as PCI (pellet cladding interaction), transient fission gas releases and cladding bursting/ballooning during transient events - Advances in fuel performance modeling and core reload methodology, small and large-scale fuel testing facilities. - 3. Advances in Water

  7. Research reactor fuel transport in the U.K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panter, R [U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1983-09-01

    This paper describes the containers currently used for transport of fresh or spent fuel elements for Research and Materials Test Reactors in the U.K., their status, operating procedures and some of the practical difficulties. In the U.K., MTR fuel cycle work is almost entirely the responsibility of the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority.

  8. Design of a mixed-oxide fuel assembly to be assessed as a lead test assembly in a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, H.; Alonso, G.

    2001-01-01

    The open and the close cycle are the two alternatives to pursue during power generation. The reprocessing is a mature process that now shows a more competitive economic aspect, making it more attractive than ever. Mexico has not decided what to do with the existing and future depleted fuel assemblies that will be generated from the power operation, thus the direct disposal and the reprocessing are still being considered. To have enough arguments in one or the other alternatives it is necessary to make an assessment of both. This investigation focus in the MOX fuel design assuming that the reprocessing is the option to follow and looking for the lowest impact in power generation. The first step in a reprocessing program is to analyze the performance of four lead test assemblies (LTA's), thus in this investigation we design the corresponding MOX to be used as LTA's and assess their performance through one operational cycle. (author)

  9. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  10. Handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, K.

    1997-01-01

    In Japan eleven research reactors are in operation. After the 19th International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research Reactors and Test Reactors (RERTR) on October 6-10, 1996, Seoul, Korea, the Five Agency Committee on Highly Enriched Uranium, which consists of Science and Technology Agency, the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) met on November 7,1996, to discuss the handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan. Advantages and disadvantages to return spent fuel to the USA in comparison to Europe were discussed. So far, a number of spent fuel elements in JAERI and KURRI are to be returned to the US. The first shipment to the US is planned for 60 HEU elements from JMTR in 1997. The shipment from KURRI is planned to start in 1999. (author)

  11. Sodium fast reactors with closed fuel cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Raj, Baldev; Vasudeva Rao, PR 0

    2015-01-01

    Sodium Fast Reactors with Closed Fuel Cycle delivers a detailed discussion of an important technology that is being harnessed for commercial energy production in many parts of the world. Presenting the state of the art of sodium-cooled fast reactors with closed fuel cycles, this book:Offers in-depth coverage of reactor physics, materials, design, safety analysis, validations, engineering, construction, and commissioning aspectsFeatures a special chapter on allied sciences to highlight advanced reactor core materials, specialized manufacturing technologies, chemical sensors, in-service inspecti

  12. The chemistry of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss features of the changes in chemical constitution which occur in fuel and fuel rods for water reactors during operation and in fault conditions. The fuel for water reactors consists of pellets of urania (UO 2 ) clad in Zircaloy. An essential step in the prediction of the fate of all the radionuclides in a fault or accident is to possess a detailed knowledge of their chemical behavior at all stages of the development of such incidents. In this paper, the authors consider: the chemical constitution of fuel during operation at temperatures corresponding to rather low ratings, together with a quite detailed discussion of the chemistry within the fuel-clad gap; the behavior of fuel subjected to higher temperatures and ratings than those of contemporary fuel; and the changes in constitution on failure of fuel rods in fault or accident conditions

  13. Development, Fabrication and Characterization of Fuels for Indian Fast Reactor Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Development of Fast Reactor fuels in India started in early Seventies. The successful development of Mixed Carbide fuels for FBTR and MOX fuel for PFBR have given confidence in manufacture of fuels for Fast Reactors. Effort is being put to develop high Breeding Ratio Metallic fuel (binary/ternary). Few fuel pins have been fabricated and is under test irradiation. However, this is only a beginning and complete fuel cycle activities are under development. Metal fuelled Fast Reactors will provide high growth rate in Indian Fast Reactor programme

  14. Main trends and content of works on fabrication of fuel rods with MOX fuel for the WWER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsykanov, V.A.; Golovanov, V.N.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Yurchenko, A.D.; Ilyenko, S.A.; Syuzev, V.N.

    2000-01-01

    The main trends of production of pellet MOX-fuel for the WWER reactors using the trial-experimental equipment at SSC RF RIAR are set forth. The main realized parameters of fabrication of MOX-fuel pellets are presented. The content of the reactor tests program is considered with allowance for their licensing requirements for the WWER reactors. (author)

  15. Fuel element shipping shim for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehri, A.

    1975-01-01

    A shim is described for use in the transportation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies. It comprises a member preferably made of low density polyethylene designed to have three-point contact with the fuel rods of a fuel assembly and being of sufficient flexibility to effectively function as a shock absorber. The shim is designed to self-lock in place when associated with the fuel rods. (Official Gazette)

  16. CANDU reactors with reactor grade plutonium/thorium carbide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Suemer [Atilim Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering; Khan, Mohammed Javed; Ahmed, Rizwan [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Technology

    2011-08-15

    Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, accumulated as nuclear waste of commercial reactors can be re-utilized in CANDU reactors. TRISO type fuel can withstand very high fuel burn ups. On the other hand, carbide fuel would have higher neutronic and thermal performance than oxide fuel. In the present work, RG-PuC/ThC TRISO fuels particles are imbedded body-centered cubic (BCC) in a graphite matrix with a volume fraction of 60%. The fuel compacts conform to the dimensions of sintered CANDU fuel compacts are inserted in 37 zircolay rods to build the fuel zone of a bundle. Investigations have been conducted on a conventional CANDU reactor based on GENTILLYII design with 380 fuel bundles in the core. Three mixed fuel composition have been selected for numerical calculation; (1) 10% RG-PuC + 90% ThC; (2) 30% RG-PuC + 70% ThC; (3) 50% RG-PuC + 50% ThC. Initial reactor criticality values for the modes (1), (2) and (3) are calculated as k{sub {infinity}}{sub ,0} = 1.4848, 1.5756 and 1.627, respectively. Corresponding operation lifetimes are {proportional_to} 2.7, 8.4, and 15 years and with burn ups of {proportional_to} 72 000, 222 000 and 366 000 MW.d/tonne, respectively. Higher initial plutonium charge leads to higher burn ups and longer operation periods. In the course of reactor operation, most of the plutonium will be incinerated. At the end of life, remnants of plutonium isotopes would survive; and few amounts of uranium, americium and curium isotopes would be produced. (orig.)

  17. Candu reactors with thorium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Fehrenbach, P.; Duffey, R.; Kuran, S.; Ivanco, M.; Dyck, G.R.; Chan, P.S.W.; Tyagi, A.K.; Mancuso, C.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade and a half AECL has established a strong record of delivering CANDU 6 nuclear power plants on time and at budget. Inherently flexible features of the CANDU type reactors, such as on-power fuelling, high neutron economy, fuel channel based heat transport system, simple fuel bundle configuration, two independent shut down systems, a cool moderator and a defence-in-depth based safety philosophy provides an evolutionary path to further improvements in design. The immediate milestone on this path is the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM** (ACRTM**), in the form of the ACR-1000TM**. This effort is being followed by the Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) design that will allow water-cooled reactors to attain high efficiencies by increasing the coolant temperature above 550 0 C. Adaptability of the CANDU design to different fuel cycles is another technology advantage that offers an additional avenue for design evolution. Thorium is one of the potential fuels for future reactors due to relative abundance, neutronics advantage as a fertile material in thermal reactors and proliferation resistance. The Thorium fuel cycle is also of interest to China, India, and Turkey due to local abundance that can ensure sustainable energy independence over the long term. AECL has performed an assessment of both CANDU 6 and ACR-1000 designs to identify systems, components, safety features and operational processes that may need to be modified to replace the NU or SEU fuel cycles with one based on Thorium. The paper reviews some of these requirements and the associated practical design solutions. These modifications can either be incorporated into the design prior to construction or, for currently operational reactors, during a refurbishment outage. In parallel with reactor modifications, various Thorium fuel cycles, either based on mixed bundles (homogeneous) or mixed channels (heterogeneous) have been assessed for technical and economic viability. Potential applications of a

  18. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure - TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program is to provide fresh nuclear reactor fuel to United States universities at no, or low, cost to the university. The title of the fuel remains with the United States government and when universities are finished with the fuel, the fuel is returned to the United States government. The program is funded by the United States Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy division, managed by Department of Energy - Idaho Field Office, and contracted to the Idaho National Laboratory's Management and Operations Contractor - Battelle Energy Alliance. Program has been at Idaho since 1977 and INL subcontracts with 26 United States domestic reactor facilities (13 TRIGA facilities, 9 plate fuel facilities, 2 AGN facilities, 1 Pulstar fuel facility, 1 Critical facility). University has not shipped fuel since 1968 and as such, we have no present procedures for shipping spent fuel. In addition: floor loading rate is unknown, many interferences must be removed to allow direct access to the reactor tank, floor space in the reactor cell is very limited, pavement ends inside our fence; some of the surface is not finished. The whole approach is narrow, curving and downhill. A truck large enough to transport the cask cannot pull into the lot and then back out (nearly impossible / refused by drivers); a large capacity (100 ton), long boom crane would have to be used due to loading dock obstructions. Access to the entrance door is on a sidewalk. The campus uses it as a road for construction equipment, deliveries and security response. Large trees are on both sides of sidewalk. Spent fuel shipments have never been done, no procedures approved or in place, no approved casks, no accident or safety analysis for spent fuel loading. Any cask assembly used in this facility will have to be removed from one crane, moved on the floor and then attached to another crane to get from the staging area to the reactor room. Reactor

  19. Fuel transfer system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, L.R.; Marshall, J.R.; Desmarchais, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel transfer system for moving nuclear reactor fuel assemblies from a new fuel storage pit to a containment area containing the nuclear reactor, and for transferring spent fuel assemblies under water from the reactor to a spent fuel storage area. The system includes an underwater track which extends through a wall dividing the fuel building from the reactor containment and a car on the track serves as the vehicle for moving fuel assemblies between these two areas. The car is driven by a motor and linkage extending from an operating deck to a chain belt drive on the car. A housing pivotally mounted at its center on the car is hydraulically actuated to vertically receive a fuel assembly which then is rotated to a horizontal position to permit movement through the wall between the containment and fuel building areas. Return to the vertical position provides for fuel assembly removal and the reverse process is repeated when transferring an assembly in the opposite direction. Limit switches used in controlling operation of the system are designed to be replaced from the operating deck when necessary by tools designed for this purpose. 5 claims, 8 figures

  20. Development of a Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Bundle Deformation Analysis Code - BAMBOO: Development of a Pin Dispersion Model and Verification by the Out-of-Pile Compression Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2004-01-01

    To analyze the wire-wrapped fast breeder reactor fuel pin bundle deformation under bundle/duct interaction conditions, the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has developed the BAMBOO computer code. This code uses the three-dimensional beam element to calculate fuel pin bowing and cladding oval distortion as the primary deformation mechanisms in a fuel pin bundle. The pin dispersion, which is disarrangement of pins in a bundle and would occur during irradiation, was modeled in this code to evaluate its effect on bundle deformation. By applying the contact analysis method commonly used in the finite element method, this model considers the contact conditions at various axial positions as well as the nodal points and can analyze the irregular arrangement of fuel pins with the deviation of the wire configuration.The dispersion model was introduced in the BAMBOO code and verified by using the results of the out-of-pile compression test of the bundle, where the dispersion was caused by the deviation of the wire position. And the effect of the dispersion on the bundle deformation was evaluated based on the analysis results of the code

  1. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor comprises a locking mechanism that is capable of locking the fuel assembly to the core plate of a nuclear reactor to prevent inadvertent movement of the fuel assembly. The locking mechanism comprises a ratchet mechanism 108 that allows the fuel assembly to be easily locked to the core plate but prevents unlocking except when the ratchet is disengaged. The ratchet mechanism is coupled to the locking mechanism by a rotatable guide tube for a control rod or water displacer rod. (author)

  2. Development of alternative fuel for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, P.E.; Ferreira, R.A.N.; Ferraz, W.B.; Lameiras, F.S.; Santos, A.; Assis, G. de; Doerr, W.O.; Wehner, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of alternative fuel cycles in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) such as Th/U and Th/Pu cycles can permit a better utilization of uranium reserves without the necessity of developing new power reactor concepts. The development of the technology of alternative fuels for PWR is one of the objectives of the 'Program on Thorium Utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors' carried out jointly by Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. (NUCLEBRAS), through its Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) and by German institutions, the Julich Nuclear Research Center (KFA), the Kraftwerk Union A.G. (KWU) and NUKEM GmbH. This paper summarizes the results so far obtained in the fuel technology. The development of a fabrication process for PWR fuel pellets from gel-microspheres is reported as well as the design, the specification, and the fabrication of prototype fuel rods for irradiation tests. (Author) [pt

  3. Advanced fuel cycles of WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunin, G.; Novikov, A.; Pavlov, V.; Pavlovichev, A.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper considers characteristics of fuel cycles for the WWER-1000 reactor satisfying the following conditions: duration of the campaign at the nominal power is extended from 250 EFPD up to 470 and more ones; fuel enrichment does not exceed 5 wt.%; fuel assemblies maximum burnup does not exceed 55 MWd/kgHM. Along with uranium fuel, the use of mixed Uranium-Plutonium fuel is considered. Calculations were conducted by codes TVS-M, BIPR-7A and PERMAK-A developed in the RRC Kurchatov Institute, verified for the calculations of uranium fuel and certified by GAN RF

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel sub-assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.; Bishop, J.F.W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved fuel sub-assembly for liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors is described which facilitates dismantling operations for reprocessing purposes. The method of dismantling is described. (U.K.)

  5. Metallic uranium as fuel for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a first overview of the use of metallic uranium and its alloys as an option for fuel for rapid reactors. Aspects are discussed concerning uranium alloys which present high solubility in the gamma phase. (author)

  6. JENDL-3.3 thermal reactor benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Integral tests of JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library have been carried out by Reactor Integral Test WG of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The most important problem in the thermal reactor benchmark testing was the overestimation of the multiplication factor of the U fueled cores. With several revisions of the data of 235 U and the other nuclides, JENDL-3.3 data library gives a good estimation of multiplication factors both for U and Pu fueled thermal reactors. (author)

  7. Design and research of fuel element for pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Sheng

    1994-05-01

    The fuel element is the key component for pulsed reactor and its design is one of kernel techniques for pulsed reactor. Following the GA Company of US the NPIC (Nuclear Power Institute of China) has mastered this technique. Up to now, the first pulsed reactor in China (PRC-1) has been safely operated for about 3 years. The design and research of fuel element undertaken by NPIC is summarized. The verification and evaluation of this design has been carried out by using the results of measured parameters during operation and test of PRC-1 as well as comparing the design parameters published by others

  8. Identifying subassemblies by ultrasound to prevent fuel handling error in sodium fast reactors: First test performed in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumel, Kevin; Lhuillier, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Identifying subassemblies by ultrasound is a method that is being considered to prevent handling errors in sodium fast reactors. It is based on the reading of a code (aligned notches) engraved on the subassembly head by an emitting/receiving ultrasonic sensor. This reading is carried out in sodium with high temperature transducers. The resulting one-dimensional C-scan can be likened to a binary code expressing the subassembly type and number. The first test performed in water investigated two parameters: width and depth of the notches. The code remained legible for notches as thin as 1.6 mm wide. The impact of the depth seems minor in the range under investigation. (authors)

  9. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  10. Proposed high throughput electrorefining treatment for spent N- Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    A high-throughput electrorefining process is being adapted to treat spent N-Reactor fuel for ultimate disposal in a geologic repository. Anodic dissolution tests were made with unirradiated N-Reactor fuel to determine the type of fragmentation necessary to provide fuel segments suitable for this process. Based on these tests, a conceptual design was produced of a plant-scale electrorefiner. In this design, the diameter of an electrode assembly is about 1.07 m (42 in.). Three of these assemblies in an electrorefiner would accommodate a 3-metric-ton batch of N-Reactor fuel that would be processed at a rate of 42 kg of uranium per hour

  11. Development of fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Kurata, Masaki; Koyama, Tadafumi; Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Glatz, Jean-Paul; Rondinella, Vincenzo V.

    2011-01-01

    Fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides (MAs) Np, Am, and Cm and rare earths (REs) Y, Nd, Ce, and Gd are being developed by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) in the METAPHIX project. The basic properties of U-Pu-Zr alloys containing MA (and RE) were characterized by performing ex-reactor experiments. On the basis of the results, test fuel pins including U-Pu-Zr-MA(-RE) alloy ingots in parts of the fuel stack were fabricated and irradiated up to a maximum burnup of ∼10 at% in the Phenix fast reactor (France). Nondestructive postirradiation tests confirmed that no significant damage to the fuel pins occurred. At present, detailed destructive postirradiation examinations are being carried out at ITU. (author)

  12. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  13. The composition of aerosols generated during a severe reactor accident: Experimental results from the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Hobbins, R.R.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results on fission product and aerosol release during the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damages (SFD) Test 1-4 are examined to determine the composition of aerosols that would be generated during a severe reactor accident. The SFD 1-4 measured aerosol contained significant quantities of volatile fission products (VFPs) (cesium, iodine, tellurium), control materials (silver and cadmium), and structural materials (tin), indicating that fission product release, vaporization of control material, and release of tin from oxidized Zircaloy were all important aerosol sources. On average the aerosol composition is between one-quarter and one-half VFPs (especially cesium), with the remainder being control material (especially cadmium), and structural material (especially tin). Source term computer codes like CORSOR-M tend to overpredict the release of structural and control rod material relative to fission products by a factor of between 2 and 15 because the models do not account for relocation of molten control, fuel, and structural material during the degradation process, which tends to reduce the aerosol source. The results indicate that the aerosol generation in a severe reactor accident is intimately linked to the core degradation process. They recommend that these results be used to improve the models in source term computer codes

  14. Fuel assembly for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki.

    1995-01-01

    Ordinary sodium bond-type fuel pins using nitride fuels, carbide fuels or metal fuels and pins incorporated with hydride moderators are loaded in a wrapper tube at a ratio of from 2 to 10% based on the total number of fuel pins. The hydride moderators are sealed in the hydride moderator incorporated pins at the position only for a range from the upper end to a reactor core upper position of substantially 1/4 of the height of the reactor core from the upper end of the reactor core as a center. Then, even upon occurrence of ULOF (loss of flow rate scram failure phenomenon), it gives characteristic of reducing the power only by a doppler coefficient and not causing boiling of coolant sodium but providing stable cooling to the reactor core. Therefore, a way of thinking on the assurance of passive safety is simplified to make a verification including on the reactor structure unnecessary. In an LMFBR type reactor using the fuel assembly, a critical experiment for confirming accuracy of nuclear design is sufficient for the item required for study and development, which provides a great economical effect. (N.H.)

  15. Nuclear reactor fuel sub-assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    An improved fuel sub-assembly for a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor, is described, in which fatigue damage due to buffeting by cross-current flows is reduced and protection is provided against damage by contact with other reactor structures during loading and unloading of the sub-assembly. (U.K.)

  16. Research and development into power reactor fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.

    1983-07-01

    The nuclear fuel in a power reactor must perform reliably during normal operation, and the consequences of abnormal events must be researched and assessed. The present highly reliable operation of the natural UO 2 in the CANDU power reactors has reduced the need for further work in this area; however a core of expertise must be retained for purposes such as training of new staff, retaining the capability of reacting to unforeseen circumstances, and participating in the commercial development of new ideas. The assessment of fuel performance during accidents requires research into many aspects of materials, fuel and fission product behaviour, and the consolidation of that knowledge into computer codes used to evaluate the consequences of any particular accident. This work is growing in scope, much is known from out-reactor work at temperatures up to about 1500 degreesC, but the need for in-reactor verification and investigation of higher-temperature accidents has necessitated the construction of a major new in-reactor test loop and the initiation of the associated out-reactor support programs. Since many of the programs on normal and accident-related performance are generic in nature, they will be applicable to advanced fuel cycles. Work will therefore be gradually transferred from the present, committed power reactor system to support the next generation of thorium-based reactor cycles

  17. Integrating the fuel cycle at IFR [Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    During the past few years Argonne National Laboratory has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), an advanced liquid metal reactor. Much of the IFR technology stems from Argonne National Laboratory's experience with the Experimental Breeder Reactors, EBR 1 and 2. The unique aspect of EBR 2 is its success with high-burnup metallic fuel. Irradiation tests of the new U-Pu-Zr fuel for the IFR have now reached a burnup level of 20%. The results to date have demonstrated excellent performance characteristics of the metallic fuel in both steady-state and off-normal operating conditions. EBR 2 is now fully loaded with the IFR fuel alloys and fuel performance data are being generated. In turn, metallic fuel becomes the key factor in achieving a high degree of passive safety in the IFR. These characteristics were demonstrated dramatically by two landmark tests conducted at EBR 2 in 1986: loss of flow without scram; and loss of heat sink without scram. They demonstrated that the combination of high heat conductivity of metallic fuel and thermal inertia of the large sodium pool can shut the reactor down during potentially severe accidents without depending on human intervention or the operation of active engineered components. The IFR metallic fuel is also the key factor in compact pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing uses high temperatures, molten salt and metal solvents to process metal fuels. The result is suitable for fabrication into new fuel elements. Feasibility studies are to be conducted into the recycling of actinides from light water reactor spent fuel in the IFR using the pyroprocessing approach to extract the actinides (author)

  18. Corrosion testing of uranium silicide fuel specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourns, W.T.

    1968-09-01

    U 3 Si is the most promising high density natural uranium fuel for water-cooled power reactors. Power reactors fuelled with this material are expected to produce cheaper electricity than those fuelled with uranium dioxide. Corrosion tests in 300 o C water preceded extensive in-reactor performance tests of fuel elements and bundles. Proper heat-treatment of U-3.9 wt% Si gives a U 3 5i specimen which corrodes at less than 2 mg/cm 2 h in 300 o C water. This is an order of magnitude lower than the maximum corrosion rate tolerable in a water-cooled reactor. U 3 Si in a defected unbonded Zircaloy-2 sheath showed only a slow uniform sheath expansion in 300 o C water. All tests were done under isothermal conditions in an out-reactor loop. (author)

  19. Corrosion testing of uranium silicide fuel specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourns, W T

    1968-09-15

    U{sub 3}Si is the most promising high density natural uranium fuel for water-cooled power reactors. Power reactors fuelled with this material are expected to produce cheaper electricity than those fuelled with uranium dioxide. Corrosion tests in 300{sup o}C water preceded extensive in-reactor performance tests of fuel elements and bundles. Proper heat-treatment of U-3.9 wt% Si gives a U{sub 3}5i specimen which corrodes at less than 2 mg/cm{sup 2} h in 300{sup o}C water. This is an order of magnitude lower than the maximum corrosion rate tolerable in a water-cooled reactor. U{sub 3}Si in a defected unbonded Zircaloy-2 sheath showed only a slow uniform sheath expansion in 300{sup o}C water. All tests were done under isothermal conditions in an out-reactor loop. (author)

  20. Fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, M.; Le Bouhellec, J.; Eymery, R.; Viala, M.

    1984-08-01

    Simultaneous with the effort on fast breeder reactors launched several years ago in France, equivalent investigations have been conducted on the fuel cycle, and in particular on reprocessing, which is an indispensable operation for this reactor. The Rapsodie experimental reactor was associated with the La Hague reprocessing plant AT1 (1 kg/day), which has reprocessed about one ton of fuel. The fuel from the Phenix demonstration reactor is reprocessed partly at the La Hague UP2 plant and partly at the Marcoule pilot facility, undergoing transformation to reprocess all the fuel (TOR project, 5 t/y). The fuel from the Creys Malville prototype power plant will be reprocessed in a specific plant, which is in the design stage. The preliminary project, named MAR 600 (50 t/y), will mobilize a growing share of the CEA's R and D resources, as the engineering needs of the UP3 ''light water'' plant begins to decline. Nearly 20 tonnes of heavy metals irradiated in fast breeder reactors have been processed in France, 17 of which came from Phenix. The plutonium recovered during this reprocessing allowed the power plant cycle to be closed. This power plant now contains approximately 140 fuel asemblies made up with recycled plutonium, that is, more than 75% of the fuel assemblies in the Phenix core

  1. CANDU fuel - fifteen years of power reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjoy, G.R.; Bain, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel has operated in power reactors since 1962. Analyses of performance statistics, supplemented by examinations of fuel from power reactors and experimental loops have yielded: (a) A thorough understanding of the fundamental behaviour of CANDU fuel. (b) Data showing that the predicted high utilization of uranium has been achieved. Actual fuelling costs in 1976 at the Pickering Generating Station are 1.2 m$/kWh (1976 Canadian dollars) with the simple oncethrough natural-UO 2 fuel cycle. (c) Criteria for operation, which have led to the current very low defect rate of 0.03% of all assemblies and to ''CANLUB'' fuel, which has a graphite interlayer between the fuel and sheath to reduce defects on power increases. (d) Proof that the short length (500 mm), collapsible cladding features of the CANDU bundle are successful and that the fuel can operate at high-power output (current peak outer-element linear power is 58 +- 15% kW/m). Involvement by the utility in all stages of fuel development has resulted in efficient application of this fundamental knowledge to ensure proper fuel specifications, procurement, scheduling into the reactor and feedback to developers, designers and manufacturers. As of mid-1976 over 3 x 10 6 individual elements have been built in a well-estabilished commercially competitive fuel fabrication industry and over 2 x 10 6 elements have been irradiated. Only six defects have been attributed to faulty materials or fabrication, and the use of high-density UO 2 with low-moisture content precluded defects from hydrogen contamination and densification. Development work on UO 2 and other fuel cycles (plutonium and thorium) is continuing, and, because CANDU reactors use on-power fuelling, bundles can be inserted into power reactors for testing. Thus new fuel designs can be quickly adopted to ensure that the CANDU system continues to provide low-cost energy with high reliability

  2. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  3. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  4. Methodology for substantiation of the fast reactor fuel element serviceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsykanov, V.A.; Maershin, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methodological aspects of fast reactor fuel element serviceability substantiation are presented. The choice of the experimental program and strategies of its realization to solve the problem set in short time, taking into account available experimental means, are substantiated. Factors determining fuel element serviceability depending on parameters and operational conditions are considered. The methodological approach recommending separate studing of the factors, which points to the possibility of data acquisition, required for the development of calculational models and substantiation of fuel element serviceability in pilot and experimental reactors, is described. It is shown that the special-purpose data are more useful for the substantiation of fuel element serviceability and analytical method development than unsubstantial and expensive complex tests of fuel elements and fuel assemblies, which should be conducted only at final stages for the improvement of the structure on the whole

  5. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1977-01-01

    Designs of nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids for supporting and spacing fuel elements are described which do not utilize resilient grid plate protrusions in the peripheral band but retain the advantages inherent in the combination resilient and rigid protrusion cells. (U.K.)

  6. Reactor fuel element and fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Seiji; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Ikeda, Atsuko.

    1997-01-01

    A mixture of fission products and burnable poisons is disposed at least to a portion between MOX pellets to form a burnable poison-incorporated fuel element without mixing burnable poisons to the MOX pellets. Alternatively, a mixture of materials other than the fission products and burnable poisons is formed into disks, a fuel lamination portion is divided into at least to two regions, and the ratio of number of the disks of the mixture relative to the volume of the region is increased toward the lower portion of the fuel lamination portion. With such a constitution, the axial power distribution of fuels can be made flat easily. Alternatively, the thickness of the disk of the mixture is increased toward the lower region of the fuel lamination portion to flatten the axial power distribution of the fuels in the same manner easily. The time and the cost required for the manufacture are reduced, and MOX fuels filled with burnable poisons with easy maintenance and control can be realized. (N.H.)

  7. The SPHINX reactor for engineering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Artamkin, K.N.; Bovin, A.P.; Bulkin, Y.M.; Kartashev, E.F.; Korneev, A.A.; Stenbok, I.A.; Terekhov, A.S.; Khmel'Shehikov, V.V.; Cherkashov, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    A research reactor known as SPHINX is under development in the USSR. The reactor will be used mainly to carry out tests on mock-up power reactor fuel assemblies under close-to-normal parameters in experimental loop channels installed in the core and reflector of the reactor, as well as to test samples of structural materials in ampoule and loop channels. The SPHINX reactor is a channel-type reactor with light-water coolant and moderator. Maximum achievable neutron flux density in the experimental channels (cell composition 50% Fe, 50% H 2 O) is 1.1 X 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 · s for fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.7 X 10 15 for thermal neutrons at a reactor power of 200 MW. The design concepts used represent a further development of the technical features which have met with approval in the MR and MIR channel-type engineering test reactors currently in use in the USSR. The 'in-pond channel' construction makes the facility flexible and eases the carrying out of experimental work while keeping discharges of radioactivity into the environment to a low level. The reactor and all associated buildings and constructions conform to modern radiation safety and environmental protection requirements

  8. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    A fiberoptic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurized reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverized coal particles at the pressurized entrained flow reactor in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made. In Orleans a fiberoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belongs to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme. (author)

  9. Fueling method in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Inoue, Kotaro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To extend the burning cycle and decrease the number of fuel exchange batches without increasing the excess reactivity at the initial stage of burning cycles upon fuel loading to an LMFBR type reactor. Method: Each of the burning cycles is divided into a plurality of burning sections. Fuels are charged at the first burning section in each of the cycles such that driver fuel assemblies and blanket assemblies or those assemblies containing neutron absorbers such as boron are distributed in mixture in the reactor core region. At the final stage of the first burning section, the blanket assemblies or neutron absorber-containing assemblies present in mixture are partially or entirely replaced with driver fuel assemblies depending on the number of burning sections such that all of them are replaced with the driver fuel assemblies till the start of the final burning section of the abovementioned cycle. The object of this invention can thus be attained. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Cermet-fueled reactors for advanced space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Taylor, I.N.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-12-01

    Cermet-fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high-performance advanced space power systems. The cermet consists of a hexagonal matrix of a refractory metal and a ceramic fuel, with multiple tubular flow channels. The high performance characteristics of the fuel matrix come from its high strength at elevated temperatures and its high thermal conductivity. The cermet fuel concept evolved in the 1960s with the objective of developing a reactor design that could be used for a wide range of mobile power generating sytems, including both Brayton and Rankine power conversion cycles. High temperature thermal cycling tests for the cermet fuel were carried out by General Electric as part of the 710 Project (General Electric 1966), and by Argonne National Laboratory in the Direct Nuclear Rocket Program (1965). Development programs for cermet fuel are currently under way at Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The high temperature qualification tests from the 1960s have provided a base for the incorporation of cermet fuel in advanced space applications. The status of the cermet fuel development activities and descriptions of the key features of the cermet-fueled reactor design are summarized in this paper

  11. Fuel handling grapple for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousar, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel handling system for nuclear reactor plants. It comprises: a reactor vessel having an openable top and removable cover and containing therein, submerged in water substantially filling the reactor vessel, a fuel core including a multiplicity of fuel bundles formed of groups of sealed tube elements enclosing fissionable fuel assembled into units, the fuel handling system consisting essentially of the combination of: a fuel bundle handling platform movable over the open top of the reactor vessel; a fuel bundle handling mast extendable downward from the platform with a lower end projecting into the open top reactor vessel to the fuel core submerged in water; a grapple head mounted on the lower end of the mast provided with grapple means comprising complementary hooks which pivot inward toward each other to securely grasp a bail handle of a nuclear reactor fuel bundle and pivot backward away from each other to release a bail handle; the grapple means having a hollow cylindrical support shaft fixed within the grapple head with hollow cylindrical sleeves rotatably mounted and fixed in longitudinal axial position on the support shaft and each sleeve having complementary hooks secured thereto whereby each hook pivots with the rotation of the sleeve secured thereto; and the hollow cylindrical support shaft being provided with complementary orifices on opposite sides of its hollow cylindrical and intermediate to the sleeves mounted thereon whereby the orifices on both sides of the hollow cylindrical support shaft are vertically aligned providing a direct in-line optical viewing path downward there-through and a remote operator positioned above the grapple means can observe from overhead the area immediately below the grapple hooks

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Frances M.; Benson, Jeff; Thelen, Mary Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  14. Unification of fuel elements for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulyn, A.V.; Stetskyi, Y.A.; Dobrikova, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    To the purpose of fuel elements unification the possibility of rod fuel assembly (FA) using in the cores of research reactors have been considered in this paper. The calculation results of geometric, hydraulic and thermotechnical parameters of rod assembly are submitted. Several designs of finned square fuel element and fuel assembly are proposed on base of analysis of rod FA characteristics in compare of tube ones. The fuel elements specimens and the model assembly are manufactured. The developed designs are the basis for further optimization after neutron-physical calculations of cores. (author)

  15. Serviceability of rod ceramic fuel pins on motoring conditions of FTP or NEMF reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deryavko, I.I.

    2004-01-01

    The operation conditions of rod ceramic fuel pins in the running hydrogen-cooled technological canals of FTP or NEMF reactor on the motoring conditions are considered. The available postreactor researches of the fuel pins are presented and the additional postreactor researches of fuel pins, tested on this mode in IVG.1 and IRGIT reactors, are carried out. The fuel pins serviceability on motoring conditions of FTP or NEF reactor operation is concluded. (author)

  16. Neutron physics computation of CERCA fuel elements for Maria Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzejewski, K.J.; Kulikowska, T.; Marcinkowska, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron physics parameters of CERCA design fuel elements were calculated in the framework of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program for Maria reactor. The analysis comprises burnup of experimental CERCA design fuel elements for 4 cycles in Maria Reactor To predict the behavior of the mixed core the differences between the CERCA fuel (485 g U-235 as U 3 Si 2 , 5 fuel tubes, low enrichment 19.75 % - LEU) and the presently used MR-6 fuel (430 g as UO 2 , 6 fuel tubes, high enrichment 36 % - HEU) had to be taken into account. The basic tool used in neutron-physics analysis of Maria reactor is program REBUS using in its dedicated libraries of effective microscopic cross sections. The cross sections were prepared using WIMS-ANL code, taking into account the actual structure, temperature and material composition of the fuel elements required preparation of new libraries.The problem is described in the first part of the present paper. In the second part the applicability of the new library is shown on the basis of the fuel core computational analysis. (author)

  17. Fuel recycling and 4. generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Gauche, F.; Mathonniere, G.

    2012-01-01

    The 4. generation reactors meet the demand for sustainability of nuclear power through the saving of the natural resources, the minimization of the volume of wastes, a high safety standard and a high reliability. In the framework of the GIF (Generation 4. International Forum) France has decided to study the sodium-cooled fast reactor. Fast reactors have the capacity to recycle plutonium efficiently and to burn actinides. The long history of reprocessing-recycling of spent fuels in France is an asset. A prototype reactor named ASTRID could be entered into operation in 2020. This article presents the research program on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, gives the status of the ASTRID project and present the scenario of the progressive implementation of 4. generation reactors in the French reactor fleet. (A.C.)

  18. Future fuel cycle and reactor strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Within the framework of the 1997 IAEA Symposium 'Future Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies Adjusting to New Realities', Working Group No.3 produced a Key Issues paper addressing the title of the symposium. The scope of the Key Issues paper included those factors that are expected to remain or become important in the time period from 2015 to 2050, considering all facets of nuclear energy utilization from ore extraction to final disposal of waste products. The paper addressed the factors influencing the choice of reactor and fuel cycle. It then addressed the quantitatively largest category of reactor types expected to be important during the period; that is, thermal reactors burning uranium and plutonium fuel. The fast reactor then was discussed both as a stand-alone technology and as might be used in combination with thermal reactors. Thorium fuel use was discussed briefly. The present paper includes of a digest of the Key Issues Paper. Some comparisons arc made between the directions suggested in that paper and those indicated by the Abstracts of this Technical Committee Meeting- Recommendations are made for work which might be undertaken in the short and medium time frames, to ensure that fuel cycle technologies and processes established by the year 2050 will support the continuation of nuclear energy applications in the long term. (author)

  19. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  20. The role of the neutral beam fueling profile in the performance of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and other tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.K.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Scalings for the stored energy and neutron yield, determined from experimental data are applied to both deuterium-only and deuterium-tritium plasmas in different neutral beam heated operational domains in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The domain of the data considered includes the Supershot, High poloidal beta, Low-mode, and limiter High-mode operational regimes, as well as discharges with a reversed magnetic shear configuration. The new important parameter in the present scaling is the peakedness of the heating beam fueling profile shape. Ion energy confinement and neutron production are relatively insensitive to other plasma parameters compared to the beam fueling peakedness parameter and the heating beam power when considering plasmas that are stable to magnetohydrodynamic modes. However, the stored energy of the electrons is independent of the beam fueling peakedness. The implication of the scalings based on this parameter is related to theoretical transport models such as radial electric field shear and Ion Temperature Gradient marginality models. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks

  1. Fuel deposits, chemistry and CANDU® reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    'Hot conditioning' is a process which occurs as part of commissioning and initial start-up of each CANDU® reactor, the first being the Nuclear Power Demonstration - 2 reactor (NPD). Later, understanding of the cause of the failure of the Pickering Unit 1 G16 fuel channelled to a revised approach to 'hot conditioning', initially demonstrated on Bruce Unit 5. The difference being that during 'hot conditioning' of CANDU® heat transport systems fuel was not in-core until Bruce Unit 5. The 'hot conditioning' processes will be briefly described along with the consequences to fuel. (author)

  2. Fuel management codes for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, B.; Coulon, P.; Mougniot, J.C.; Gouriou, A.; Pontier, M.; Skok, J.; Carnoy, M.; Martin, J.

    The CAPHE code is used for managing and following up fuel subassemblies in the Phenix fast neutron reactor; the principal experimental results obtained since this reactor was commissioned are analyzed with this code. They are mainly concerned with following up fuel subassembly powers and core reactivity variations observed up to the beginning of the fifth Phenix working cycle (3/75). Characteristics of Phenix irradiated fuel subassemblies calculated by the CAPHE code are detailed as at April 1, 1975 (burn-up steel damage)

  3. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    reactor aluminium clad spent fuel. These corrosion activities were quite similar to those carried out in the CRP. Eight Member States participated in Phase-II of the CRP and five Member States in the Regional Project RLA/4/018. Two of the countries participating in the regional project were also participants in the CRP. This report documents the work performed in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II) and in the IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America (RLA/4/018) entitled Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors. The key activity of both, the CRP and the Regional Project, consisted of the exposure of standard racks of corrosion coupons in the spent fuel pools of the participating research reactor laboratories and the evaluation of the coupons after predetermined exposure times, along with periodic monitoring of the storage water and evaluation of sediments settling in the spent fuel pools. The report includes: a description of the standard corrosion racks, experimental protocols, test procedures and water quality monitoring; the specific contributions by each of the participating laboratories; a compilation of all experimental results obtained and the analysis and discussion of the results, along with conclusions

  4. Caramel, uranium oxide fuel plates for water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, Pierre; Delafosse, Jacques; Lestiboudois, Guy; Cerles, J.-M.; Schwartz, J.-P.

    1979-01-01

    The fuel is composed of thin plates assembled parallel to each other to form bundles or assemblies. Each plate is composed of a pavement of uranium oxide pellets, insulated from each other by a zircaloy cladding. The 235 U enrichment does not exceed 8%. The range of uses for this fuel extends from electric power generating reactors to irradiation reactors for research work. A parametric study in test loops has made it possible to determine the operating limits of this thick fuel, without bursting. The resulting diagram gives the permissible power densities, with and without cycling for specific burn-ups beyond 50,000 MWd/t. The thinnest plates were also irradiated in total in the form of advance assemblies irradiated in the core of the OSIRIS pile prior to its transformation. This transformation and the operation of this reactor with a core of 'Caramel' elements is the main trial experiment of this fuel [fr

  5. Reactor fuel depletion benchmark of TINDER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.J.; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Hecht, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A reactor burnup benchmark of TINDER, coupling MCNP6 to CINDER2008, was performed. • TINDER is a poor candidate for fuel depletion calculations using its current libraries. • Data library modification is necessary if fuel depletion is desired from TINDER. - Abstract: Accurate burnup calculations are key to proper nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle modeling, and disposal estimations. The TINDER code, originally designed for activation analyses, has been modified to handle full burnup calculations, including the widely used predictor–corrector feature. In order to properly characterize the performance of TINDER for this application, a benchmark calculation was performed. Although the results followed the trends of past benchmarked codes for a UO 2 PWR fuel sample from the Takahama-3 reactor, there were obvious deficiencies in the final result, likely in the nuclear data library that was used. Isotopic comparisons versus experiment and past code benchmarks are given, as well as hypothesized areas of deficiency and future work

  6. Fuel transporting device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsumi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To obtain a support structure of an excellent quakeproof property for a fuel transporting device provided for the transportation of fuel between a reactor building and an auxiliary building in a pressure tube reactor or the like. Structure: The structure comprises an oblique transfer chute loosely penetrating the reactor building, reactor container and auxiliary building, a transfer chute support outer cylinder surrounding the transfer chute and having one end coupled to the transfer chute and other end coupled to the container, flexible seal members respectively provided on the reactor building side and on the auxiliary building side and surrounding the transfer chute and a slidable support supported on the side of the auxiliary building such that it can be in frictional contact with the outer periphery of the transfer chute. With this construction, the relative displacements of various parts caused by an earthquake or the like can be absorbed by the support outer cylinder, flexible seals and slidable support. (Ikeda, J.)

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel element splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, D.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for removing nuclear fuel from a clad fuel element. The fuel element is power driven past laser beams which simultaneously cut the cladding lengthwise into at least two longitudinal pieces. The axially cut lengths of cladding are then separated, causing the nuclear fuel contained therein to drop into a receptacle for later disposition. The cut lengths of cladding comprise nuclear waste which is disposed of in a suitable manner. 6 claims, 10 drawing figures

  8. Reactor Structure Materials: Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannen, L.; Verwerft, M.

    2000-01-01

    Progress and achievements in 1999 in SCK-CEN's programme on applied and fundamental nuclear fuel research in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is on thermochemical fuel research, the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel as well as on integral experiments

  9. Fabrication of cermet fuel for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Sudhir; Kumar, Arun; Kutty, T.R.G.; Kamath, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) (U,Pu)O 2 , and metallic (U,Pu ,Zr) fuels are considered promising fuels for the fast reactor. The fuel cycle of MOX is well established. The advantages of the oxide fuel are its easy fabricability, good performance in the reactor and a well established reprocessing technology. However the problems lie in low thermal conductivity , low density of the fuel leading to low breeding ratio and consequently longer doubling time. The metallic fuel has the advantages of high thermal conductivity, higher metal density and higher coefficient of linear expansion. The higher coefficient of linear expansion is good from the safety consideration (negative reactivity factor). Because of higher metal density it offers highest breeding ratio and shortest doubling time. Metallic fuel disadvantages comprise large swelling at high burnup, fuel cladding interaction and lower margin between operating and melting temperature. The optimal solution may lie in cermet fuel (U, PuO 2 ), where PuO 2 is dispersed in U metal matrix and combines the favorable features of both the fuel types. The advantages of this fuel include high thermal conductivity, larger margin between melting and operating temperature, ability to retain fission product etc. The matrix being of high density metal the advantage of high breeding ratio is also maintained. In this report some results of fabrication of cermet pellet comprising of UO 2 /PuO 2 dispersed in U metal powder through classical powder metallurgy route and characterization are presented. (author)

  10. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris oe National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  11. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  12. Research reactors and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research reactors can be classified in three main groups according to the moderator which is used. Their technical characteristics are given and the three most recent research and materials testing reactors are described: OSIRIS, ORPHEE and the high-flux reactor of Grenoble. The utilization of research reactors is reviewed in four fields of activity: training, fundamental or applied research and production (eg. radioisotopes) [fr

  13. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country of origin where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programmes have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium, and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. It is hoped that an announcement of the extension of the U.S. Acceptance Programme, which is expected in the very near future, will facilitate the life extensions of many productive TRIGA reactors around the world. (author)

  14. Fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Masanao; Aoyama, Motoo; Masumi, Ryoji; Ishibashi, Yoko.

    1995-01-01

    A fuel assembly comprises a plurality of fuel rods filled with nuclear fuels, a plurality of burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods and a spectral shift-type water rod. As the burnable poison for the burnable poison-incorporated fuel rod, a plurality of burnable poison elements each having a different neutron absorption cross section are used. A burnable poison element such as boron having a relatively small neutron absorbing cross section is disposed more in the upper half region than the lower half region of the burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods. In addition, a burnable poison element such as gadolinium having a relatively large neutron absorbing cross section is disposed more in the lower half-region than the upper half region thereof. This can flatten the power distribution in the vertical direction of the fuel assembly and the power distribution in the horizontal direction at the final stage of the operation cycle. (I.N.)

  15. Effect of kinetic parameters on simultaneous ramp reactivity insertion plus beam tube flooding accident in a typical low enriched U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel-based material testing reactor-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Rubina; Mirza, Nasir M. [Dept. of, Physics, Air University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Sikander M. [Dept. of, Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Post Office Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    This work looks at the effect of changes in kinetic parameters on simultaneous reactivity insertions and beam tube flooding in a typical material testing reactor-type research reactor with low enriched high density (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) fuel. Using a modified PARET code, various ramp reactivity insertions (from $0.1/0.5 s to $1.3/0.5 s) plus beam tube flooding ($0.5/0.25 s) accidents under uncontrolled conditions were analyzed to find their effects on peak power, net reactivity, and temperature. Then, the effects of changes in kinetic parameters including the Doppler coefficient, prompt neutron lifetime, and delayed neutron fractions on simultaneous reactivity insertion and beam tube flooding accidents were analyzed. Results show that the power peak values are significantly sensitive to the Doppler coefficient of the system in coupled accidents. The material testing reactor-type system under such a coupled accident is not very sensitive to changes in the prompt neutron life time; the core under such a coupled transient is not very sensitive to changes in the effective delayed neutron fraction.

  16. RIA tests in CABRI with MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, F.; Papin, J.; Gonnier, C.

    2000-01-01

    Three MOX-fuel tests have been successfully performed within the framework of the CABRI REP-Na test program. From the experimental findings which are presently available, no evidence for thermal effects resulting from the heterogeneous nature of the fuel can be given. There are very clear hints however that fission gas effects are enhanced with regard to the behaviour of UO 2 . The clad rupture observed in REP-Na 7 is of different nature than the failures observed in Cabri tests with UO 2 fuel. Failures of UO 2 fuel rods only occurred when the clad mechanical properties were severely affected by the presence of hydride blisters, while in REP-Na 7 a clear indication is made that the loading potential of the MOX fuel pellets was high enough to break a sound cladding. Concerning the transient fuel behaviour after reaching the critical heat-flux under reactor typical conditions (pressure, temperature and flow), no data base could be provided by the tests in the present sodium test loop (as for the UO 2 fuel behaviour). The IPSN project to implement into the Cabri reactor a pressurised water loop which will allow to simulate the complete RIA accident sequence under PWR reactor typical conditions, aims at providing this missing data base. (author)

  17. Fuel assemblies for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective failed fuel detection by the provision of water rod formed with a connecting section connected to a warmed water feed pipe of a sipping device at the lower portion and with a warmed water jetting port in the lower portion in a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor to thereby carry out rapid sipping. Constitution: Fuel rods and water rods are contained in the channel box of a fuel assembly, and the water rod is provided at its upper portion with a connecting section connected to the warmed water feed pipe of the sipping device and formed at its lower portion with a warmed water jetting port for jetting warmed water fed from the warmed water feed pipe. Upon detection of failed fuels, the reactor operation is shut down and the reactor core is immersed in water. The cover for the reactor container is removed and the cap of the sipping device is inserted to connect the warmed water feed pipe to the connecting section of the water rod. Then, warmed water is fed to the water rod and jetted out from the warmed water jetting port to cause convection and unify the water of the channel box in a short time. Thereafter, specimen is sampled and analyzed for the detection of failed fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Evolution of Particle Bed Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Russell R.; Evans, Robert S.; Husser, Dewayne L.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    To realize the potential performance advantages inherent in a particle bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) applications, high performance particle fuel is required. This fuel must operate safely and without failure at high temperature in high pressure, flowing hydrogen propellant. The mixed mean outlet temperature of the propellant is an important characteristic of PBR performance. This temperature is also a critical parameter for fuel particle design because it dictates the required maximum fuel operating temperature. In this paper, the evolution in PBR fuel form to achieve higher operating temperatures is discussed and the potential thermal performance of the different fuel types is evaluated. It is shown that the optimum fuel type for operation under the demanding conditions in a PBR is a coated, solid carbide particle.

  19. SP-100 Fuel Pin Performance: Results from Irradiation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makenas, Bruce J.; Paxton, Dean M.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Marietta, Martin; Hoth, Carl W.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pins are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    The invention involves a technique to quickly, inexpensively and rigidly attach a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. The invention also allows for the repeated non-destructive removal and replacement of the fuel rod. The proposed fuel rod and support member attachment and removal system consists of a locking cap fastened to the fuel rod and a locking strip fastened to the support member or vice versa. The locking cap has two or more opposing fingers shaped to form a socket. The fingers spring back when moved apart and released. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion

  1. Fuel element for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel elements which consist of parallel longitudinal fuel rods of circular crossection, can be provided with spiral distance pieces, by which the fuel rods support one another, if they are collected together by an outer enclosure. According to the invention, the enclosure includes several strips extending over a small fraction of the rod length, which are connected together by a skeleton rod instead of a fuel rod. The strips can be composed of flat parts which are connected together by the skeleton rod acting as a hinge. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  2. Fuel cracking in relation to fuel oxidation in support of an out-reactor instrumented defected fuel experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quastel, A.; Thiriet, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Lewis, B., E-mail: brent.lewis@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, ON (Canada); Corcoran, E., E-mail: emily.corcoran@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An experimental program funded by the CANDU Owners Group (COG) is studying an out-reactor instrumented defected fuel experiment in Stern Laboratories (Hamilton, Ontario) with guidance from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The objective of this test is to provide experimental data for validation of a mechanistic fuel oxidation model. In this experiment a defected fuel element with UO{sub 2} pellets will be internally heated with an electrical heater element, causing the fuel to crack. By defecting the sheath in-situ the fuel will be exposed to light water coolant near normal reactor operating conditions (pressure 10 MPa and temperature 265-310{sup o}C) causing fuel oxidation, especially near the hotter regions of the fuel in the cracks. The fuel thermal conductivity will change, resulting in a change in the temperature distribution of the fuel element. This paper provides 2D r-θ plane strain solid mechanics models to simulate fuel thermal expansion, where conditions for fuel crack propagation are investigated with the thermal J integral to predict fuel crack stress intensity factors. Finally since fuel crack geometry can affect fuel oxidation this paper shows that the solid mechanics model with pre-set radial cracks can be coupled to a 2D r-θ fuel oxidation model. (author)

  3. Acoustic emission from fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Kennedy, C.R.; Reimann, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal-shock damage of nuclear reactor fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment has been correlated with acoustic-emission data obtained from sensors placed on extensions of the electrical feedthroughs. Ringdown counts, rms output data, and event-location data has been acquired for experiments carried out with single pellets as well as multiple pellet stacks. These tests have shown that acoustic-emission monitoring can provide information indicating the onset and the extent of cracking

  4. International topical meeting. Research Reactor Fuel Management (RRFM) and meeting of the International Group on Reactor Research (IGORR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear research and test reactors have been in operation for over 60 years, over 270 research reactors are currently operating in more than 50 countries. This meeting is dedicated to different aspects of research reactor fuels: new fuels for new reactors, the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels, spent fuel management and computational tools for core simulation. About 80 contributions are reported in this document, they are organized into 7 sessions: 1) international topics and overview on new projects and fuel, 2) new projects and upgrades, 3) fuel development, 4) optimisation and research reactor utilisation, 5) innovative methods in research reactors physics, 6) safety, operation and research reactor conversion, 7) fuel back-end management, and a poster session. Experience from Australian, Romanian, Libyan, Syrian, Vietnamese, South-African and Ghana research reactors are reported among other things. The Russian program for research reactor spent fuel management is described and the status of the American-driven program for the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels is presented. (A.C.)

  5. French experience in research reactor fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packaging for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of spent fuel from power reactors are made on a regular and industrial basis, but this is not yet the case for the transport of spent fuel coming from research reactors. Each shipment is a permanent challenge and requires a reactive organization dealing with all the transportation issues. This presentation will explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimize the corresponding services while remaining in full compliance with the applicable regulations and customer requirements. (author)

  6. MODEL SIMULATION OF GEOMETRY AND STRESS-STRAIN VARIATION OF BATAN FUEL PIN PROTOTYPE DURING IRRADIATION TEST IN RSG-GAS REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwardi Suwardi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MODEL SIMULATION OF GEOMETRY AND STRESS-STRAIN VARIATION OF BATAN FUEL PIN PROTOTYPE DURING IRRADIATION TEST IN RSG-GAS REACTOR*. The first short fuel pin containing natural UO2 pellet in Zry4 cladding has been prepared at the CNFT (Center for Nuclear Fuel Technology then a ramp test will be performed. The present work is part of designing first irradiation experiments in the PRTF (Power Ramp Test Facility of RSG-GAS 30 MW reactor. The thermal mechanic of the pin during irradiation has simulated. The geometry variation of pellet and cladding is modeled by taking into account different phenomena such as thermal expansion, densification, swelling by fission product, thermal creep and radiation growth. The cladding variation is modeled by thermal expansion, thermal and irradiation creeps. The material properties are modeled by MATPRO and standard numerical parameter of TRANSURANUS code. Results of irradiation simulation with 9 kW/m LHR indicates that pellet-clad contacts onset from 0.090 mm initial gaps after 806 d, when pellet radius expansion attain 0.015 mm while inner cladding creep-down 0.075 mm. A newer computation data show that the maximum measured LHR of n-UO2 pin in the PRTF 12.4 kW/m. The next simulation will be done with a higher LHR, up to ~ 25 kW/m. MODEL SIMULASI VARIASI GEOMETRI DAN STRESS-STRAIN DARI PROTOTIP BAHAN BAKAR PIN BATAN SELAMA UJI IRADIASI DI REAKTOR RSG-GAS. Pusat Teknologi Bahan Bakar Nuklir (PTBBN telah menyiapkan tangkai (pin bahan bakar pendek perdana yang berisi pelet UO2 alam dalam kelongsong paduan zircaloy untuk dilakukan uji iradiasi daya naik. Penelitian ini merupakan bagian dari perancangan percobaan iradiasi pertama di PRTF (Power Ramp Test Fasility yang terpasang di reaktor serbaguna RSG-GAS berdaya 30 MW. Telah dilakukan pemodelan dan simulasi kinerja termal mekanikal pin selama iradiasi. Variasi geometri pelet dan kelongsong selama pengujian dimodelkan dengan memperhatikan fenomena ekspansi termal

  7. Research reactor spent fuel management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audero, M.A.; Bevilacqua, A.M.; Mehlich, A.M.; Novara, O.

    2002-01-01

    The research reactor spent fuel (RRSF) management strategy will be presented as well as the interim storage experience. Currently, low-enriched uranium RRSF is in wet interim storage either at reactor site or away from reactor site in a centralized storage facility. High-enriched uranium RRSF from the centralized storage facility has been sent to the USA in the framework of the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The strategy for the management of the RRSF could implement the encapsulation for interim dry storage. As an alternative to encapsulation for dry storage some conditioning processes are being studied which include decladding, isotopic dilution, oxidation and immobilization. The immobilized material will be suitable for final disposal. (author)

  8. Research reactors. Problems of fuel element enrichment reduction. Deliberations and comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    This paper summarises the main data from the major research reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany utilising highly enriched uranium (HEU) and presently available fuel technology for their fuel elements. The required modification for an adaption of the fabrication to lower enriched fuel are considered as well as the consequences on reactor performance operation and licensing. On the basis of past experience with reactor modifications a rough estimate of 82 months is given for the conversion of a reactor to a modified type of fuel and of 70 months for a fuel test program. The conclusions reflect the own calculations and data from other papers submitted to INFCE-WG 8C

  9. Fuel assembly for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Akihiro; Haikawa, Katsumasa; Haraguchi, Yuko; Nakamura, Mitsuya; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    In a BWR type fuel assembly comprising first fuel rods filled with nuclear fission products and second fuel rods filled with burnable poisons and nuclear fission products, the concentration of the burnable poisons mixed to a portion of the second fuel rods is controlled so that it is reduced at the upper portion and increased at the lower portion in the axial direction. In addition, a product of the difference of an average concentration of burnable poisons between the upper portion and the lower portion and the number of fuel rods is determined to higher than a first set value determined corresponding to the limit value of a maximum linear power density. The sum of the difference of the average concentration of the burnable poisons between the upper portion and the lower portion of the second fuel rod and the number of the second fuel rods is determined to lower than a second set value determined corresponding to a required value of a surplus reactivity. If the number of the fuel rods mixed with the burnable poisons is increased, the infinite multiplication factor at an initial stage of the burning is lowered and, if the concentration of the mixed burnable poisons is increased, the time of exhaustion of the burnable poisons is delayed. As a result, the maximum value of the infinite multiplication factor is suppressed thereby enabling to control surplus reactivity. (N.H.)

  10. Fission product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Due to present international concerns over nuclear proliferation, TRIGA reactor fuels will utilize only low-enriched uranium (LEU) (enrichment <20%). This requires increased total uranium loading per unit volume of fuel in order to maintain the appropriate fissile loading. Tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing up to 45 wt-% uranium. These tests, performed in late 1977 and early 1978, were similar to those conducted earlier on TRIGA fuels with 8.5 wt-% U. Fission gas release measurements were made on prototypic specimens from room temperature to 1100 deg. C in the TRIGA King Furnace Facility. The fuel specimens were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at a low power level. The fractional releases of the gaseous nuclides of krypton and xenon were measured under steady-state operating conditions. Clean helium was used to sweep the fission gases released during irradiation from the furnace into a standard gas collection trap for gamma counting. The results of these tests on TRIGA-LEU fuel agree well with data from the similar, earlier tests on TRIGA fuel. The correlation used to calculate the release of fission products from 8.5 wt-% U TRIGA fuel applies equally well for U contents up to 45 wt-%. (author)

  11. Fuel assemblies for use in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochida, Takaaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the plutonium utilization amount and improve the uranium-saving effect in the fuel assemblies of PWR type reactor using mixed uranium-plutonium oxides. Constitution: MOX fuel rods comprising mixed plutonium-uranium oxides are disposed to the outer circumference of a fuel assembly and uranium fuel rods only composed of uranium oxides are disposed to the central portion thereof. In such a fuel assembly, since the uranium fuel rods are present at the periphery of the control rod, the control rod worth is the same as that of the uranium fuel assembly in the prior art. Further, since about 25 % of the entire fuel rods is composed of the MOX fuel rods, the plutonium utilization amount is increased. Further, since the MOX fuel rods at low enrichment degree are present at the outer circumferential portion, mismatching at the boundary to the adjacent MOX fuel assembly is reduced and the problem of local power peaking increase in the MOX fuel assembly is neither present. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Optimum fuel use in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, W.

    1979-07-01

    An optimization program was developed to calculate minimum-cost refuelling schedules for PWR reactors. Optimization was made over several cycles, without any constraints (equilibrium cycle). In developing the optimization program, special consideration was given to an individual treatment of every fuel element and to a sufficiently accurate calculation of all the data required for safe reactor operation. The results of the optimization program were compared with experimental values obtained at Obrigheim nuclear power plant. (orig.) [de

  13. Enhanced Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design for Ukraine reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, M.; Shah, H.

    2015-01-01

    Westinghouse has completed design, development, and region quantity delivery of an enhanced Westinghouse fuel assembly for WWER-1000 reactors to support continued safe reactor operations. The enhanced design builds on the successful performance of an earlier generation design which has operated in the South Ukraine 3 reactor for multiple cycles without any fuel rod failures. Incorporated design enhancements include a thicker spacer grid outer strap, an enhanced spacer grid outer strap profile to limit the risk for, and impact of, mechanical interaction/interference with coresident fuel, an all Alloy 718 grid structure for improved stability and strength, and improvements to the top and bottom nozzles. Capable of meeting increased lateral loads generated from using a higher axial trip limit for the refueling machine crane, the design was verified by extensive mechanical and thermalhydraulic testing, which included a newly developed fuel assembly-to-fuel assembly handling test rig to assess performance during bounding core loading and unloading conditions. Through these extensive design enhancements and comprehensive testing program, the enhanced WWER-1000 design provides additional performance, handling, and reliability margins for safe reactor operation. (authors)

  14. Assessment of the thorium fuel cycle in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Homan, F.J.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the role of thorium fuel cycles in power reactors. Three thermal reactor systems were considered: Light Water Reactors (LWRs); High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs); and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) of the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor (CANDU) type; most of the effort was on these systems. A summary comparing thorium and uranium fuel cycles in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) was also compiled

  15. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo; Ritchie, Iain G.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programs have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU), and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. (author)

  16. Test reactor risk assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, R.H.; Rawlins, J.K.; Stewart, M.E.

    1976-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the identification of accident initiating events and the fault modeling of systems, including common mode identification, as these methods are applied in overall test reactor risk assessment. The methods are exemplified by a determination of risks to a loss of primary coolant flow in the Engineering Test Reactor

  17. Fuel behavior in advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolme, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel rod behavior of advanced pressurized water reactors under steady state conditions has been investigated in this study. System-80+ and Westinghouse Vantage-5 fuels have been considered as advanced pressurized water reactor fuels to be analyzed. The purpose of this study is to analyze the sensitivity of ditferent models and the effect of selected design parameters on the overall fuel behavior. FRAPCON-II computer code has been used for the analyses. Different modelling options of FRAPCON-II have also been considered in these analyses. Analyses have been performed in two main parts. In the first part, effects of operating conditions on fuel behavior have been investigated. First, fuel rod response under normal operating conditions has been analyzed. Then, fuel rod response to different fuel ratings has been calculated. In the second part, in order to estimate the effect of design parameters on fuel behavior, parametric analyses have been performed. In this part, the effects of initial gap thickness, as fabricated fuel density, and initial fill gas pressure on fuel behavior have been analyzed. The computations showed that both of the fuel rods used in this study operate within the safety limits. However, FRAPCON-II modelling options have been resulted in different behavior due to their modelling characteristics. Hence, with the absence of experimental data, it is difficult to make assesment for the best fuel parameters. It is also difficult to estimate error associated with the results. To improve the performance of the code, it is necessary to develop better experimental correlations for material properties in order to analyze the eftect ot considerably different design parameters rather than nominal rod parameters

  18. IAEA Activities in the Area of Fast Reactors and Related Fuels and Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, S.; Basak, U.; Dyck, G.; Inozemtsev, V.; Toti, A.; Zeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: • The IAEA role to support fast reactors and associated fuel cycle development programmes; • Main IAEA activities on fast reactors and related fuel and fuel cycle technology; • Main IAEA deliverables on fast reactors and related fuel and fuel cycle technology

  19. Research reactors fuel cycle problems and dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, R.

    2004-01-01

    During last 10 years, some problems appeared in different steps of research reactors fuel cycle. Actually the majority of these reactors have been built in the 60s and these reactors were operated during all this long period in a cycle with steps which were dedicated to this activity. Progressively and for reasons often economical, certain steps of the cycle became more and more difficult to manage due to closing of some specialised workshops in the activities of scraps recycling, irradiated fuel reprocessing, even fuel fabrication. Other steps of the cycle meet or will meet difficulties, in particular supplying of fissile raw material LEU or HEU because this material was mostly produced in enrichment units existing mainly for military reason. Rarefaction of fissile material lead to use more and more enriched uraniums said 'of technical quality', that is to say which come from mixing of varied qualities of enriched material, containing products resulting from reprocessing. Actually, problems of end of fuel cycle are increased, either consisting of intermediary storage on the site of reactor or on specialised sites, or consisting of reprocessing. This brief summary shows most difficulties which are met today by a major part of industrials of the fuel cycle in the exercise of their activities

  20. Fuel assembly and nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Aoyama, Motoo; Yamashita, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly and a nuclear reactor core capable of improving a transmutation rate of transuranium elements while improving a residual rate of fission products. In a reactor core of a BWR type reactor to which fuel rods with transuranium elements (TRU) enriched are loaded, the enrichment degree of transuranium elements occupying in fuel materials is determined not less than 2wt%, as well as a ratio of number of atoms between hydrogen and fuel heavy metals in an average reactor core under usual operation state (H/HM) is determined not more than 3 times. In addition, a ratio of the volumes between coolant regions and fuel material regions is determined not more than 2 times. A T ratio (TRU/Pu) is lowered as the TRU enrichment degree is higher and the H/HM ratio is lower. In order to reduce the T ratio not more than 1, the TRU enrichment degree is determined as not less than 2wt%, and the H/HM ratio is determined to not more than 3 times. Accordingly, since the H/HM ratio is reduced to not more than 1, and TRU is transmuted while recycling it with plutonium, the transmutation ratio of transuranium elements can be improved while improving the residual rate of fission products. (N.H.)

  1. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  2. Structural analysis of reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of fuel-element modeling is presented that traces the development of codes for the prediction of light-water-reactor and fast-breeder-reactor fuel-element performance. It is concluded that although the mathematical analysis is now far advanced, the development and incorporation of mechanistic constitutive equations has not kept pace. The resultant reliance on empirical correlations severely limits the physical insight that can be gained from code extrapolations. Current efforts include modeling of alternate fuel systems, analysis of local fuel-cladding interactions, and development of a predictive capability for off-normal behavior. Future work should help remedy the current constitutive deficiencies and should include the development of deterministic failure criteria for use in design

  3. Test reactors in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corella, M.R.; Gomez Alonso, M.

    1983-01-01

    INFCE work on research reactor core conversion from HEU to LEU, attracted a raising interest on this type of nuclear reactors. In this context, the present work shows a compilation of worldwide research and test nuclear reactors, now in operation, under construction, or planned, as well as decommissioned reactors (tables A to F). Brief descriptions of these reactors are included in tables G to L. In table M a summary view of reactors with power level between 10 and 30 MWt is shown. Attention is focused on that power range, as it has been considered in very preliminar studies for a new research reactor. Almost all data have been obtained from current available bibliography. (author)

  4. Nuclear reactor seismic fuel assembly grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The strength of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly is enhanced by increasing the crush strength of the zircaloy spacer grids which locate and support the fuel elements in the fuel assembly. Increased resistance to deformation as a result of laterally directed forces is achieved by increasing the section modulus of the perimeter strip through bending the upper and lower edges thereof inwardly. The perimeter strip is further rigidized by forming, in the central portion thereof, dimples which extend inwardly with respect to the fuel assembly. The integrity of the spacer grid may also be enhanced by providing back-up arches for some or all of the integral fuel element locating springs and the strength of the fuel assembly may be further enhanced by providing, intermediate its ends, a steel seismic grid. 13 claims, 6 figures

  5. Reactor fuel performance data file, 1985 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Fujita, Misao; Watanabe, Kohji.

    1986-07-01

    In safety evaluation and integrity studies of reactor fuel, data on fuel performance are the most basic materials. The Fuel Reliability Laboratory No.1 has obtained the fuel performance data by joining in some international programs to study the safety and integrity of fuel. Those data have only used for the studies in the above two fields. However, if the data are rearranged and compiled in a easily usable form, they can be utilized in other field of studies. Then, a 'data file' on fuel performance is beeing compiled by adding data from open literatures to those obtained in international programs. The present report is prepared on the basis of the data file compiled by March in 1986. (author)

  6. Fuel element for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linning, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement of the fuel element for a fast nuclear reactor described in patent 15 89 010 is proposed which should avoid possible damage due to swelling of the fuel. While the fuel element according to patent 15 89 010 is made in the form of a tube, here a further metal jacket is inserted in the centre of the fuel rod and the intermediate layer (ceramic uranium compound) is provided on both sides, so that the nuclear fuel is situated in the centre of the annular construction. Ceramic uranium or plutonium compounds (preferably carbide) form the fuel zone in the form of circular pellets, which are surrounded by annular gaps, so that gaseous fission products can escape. (UWI) [de

  7. Fuel management approach in IRIS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Franceschini, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of fuel management approach employed in IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure). It introduces the initial, rather ambitious, fuel management goals and discusses their evolution that reflected the fast pace of progress of the overall project. The updated objectives rely on using currently licensed fuel technology, thus enabling near-term deployment of IRIS, while still providing improved fuel utilization. The paper focuses on the reference core design and fuel management strategy that is considered in pre-application licensing, which enables extended cycle of three to four years. The extended cycle reduces maintenance outage time and increases capacity factor, thus reducing the cost of electricity. Approaches to achieving this goal are discussed, including use of different reloading strategies. Additional fuel management options, which are not part of the licensing process, but are pursued as long-term research for possible future implementation, are presented as well. (Author)

  8. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  9. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Quist, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  10. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  11. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R; Joutsenoja, T [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    A fibre-optic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurised reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverised coal particles at the pressurised entrained flow reactor of VTT Energy in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made in order to study the effects of oxygen concentration (3-30 vol%) and pressure (0.2-1.0 MPa) on the particle temperature. The fuels used in the experiments were Westerholt, Polish and Goettelborn hvb coals, Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite. The initial nominal fuel particle size varied in the experiments from 70 to 250 ,{mu}m and the gas temperature was typically 1173 K. For the anthracite also the effects of gas temperature (1073-1423K) and CO{sub 2} concentration (6-80 vol%) were studied. In Orleans a fibreoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor of CNRS and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. The fuel in the experiments was pulverised Goettelborn char. The reliability of optical temperature measurement in this particular application was analysed. In Essen a fibre-optic pyrometric technique that is capable to measure bed and fuel particle temperatures was applied to an atmospheric fluidised bed reactor of DMT. The effects of oxygen concentration (3-8 vol%) and bed temperature (1123-1193 K) on the fuel particle temperature were studied. The fuels in these were Westerholt coal and char and EBV-coal. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belonged to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme (contract JOU2-CT93-0331). (orig.)

  12. Status of fuel irradiation tests in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hark Rho; Lee, Choong Sung; Lee, Kye Hong; Jun, Byung Jin; Lee, Ji Bok

    1999-01-01

    Since 1996 after finishing the long-term operational test, HANARO (High-Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) has been extensively used for material irradiation tests, beam application research, radioisotope production and neutron activation analysis. This paper presents the fuel irradiation test activities which are now conducted or have been finished in HANARO. KAERI developed LEU fuel using an atomization method for the research reactors. Using this LEU, we have set up and conducted three irradiation programs: (1) medium power irradiation test using a short-length mini-assembly made of 3.15 gU/cc U 3 Si, (2) high power irradiation tests using full-length test assemblies made of 3.15 gU/cc U 3 Si, and (3) irradiation test using a short-length mini-plate made of 4.8 gU/cc U 3 Si 2 . DUPIC (Direct Use of spent PWR fuels in CANDU Reactors) simulation fuel pellets, of which compositions are very similar to DUPIC pellets to keep the similarity in the thermo-mechanical property, were developed. Three mini-elements including 5 pellets each were installed in a capsule. This capsule has been irradiated for 2 months and unloaded from the HANARO core at the end of September 1999. Another very important test is the HANARO fuel qualification program at high power, which is required to resolve the licensing issue. This test is imposed on the HANARO operation license due to insufficient test data under high power environment. To resolve this licensing issue, we have been carrying out the required irradiation tests and PIE (Post-irradiation Examination) tests. Through this program, it is believed that the resolution of the licensing issue is achieved. In addition to these programs, several fuel test plans are under way. Through these vigorous activities of fuel irradiation test programs, HANARO is sure to significantly contribute to the national nuclear R and D programs. (author)

  13. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel element assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawiec, D.M.; Bevilacqua, F.

    1974-01-01

    The fuel elements of each fuel element group are separated from each other by means of a multitude of thin, intersecting plates in the from of grid strips. Flow deflectors near the surface of the fuel elements are used in order to make the coolant flow more turbulent. They are designed as vanes and arranged at a distance on the grid strips. Each deflector vane has two arms stretching in opposite directions, each one into a neighbouring channel. In outward direction, the deflector vanes are converging. The strips with the vanes can be put on the supporting grid of the fuel elements. The vane structure can be reinforced by providing distortions in the strip material near the vanes. (DG) [de

  15. History of fast reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, J.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Frost, B.R.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Mustelier, J.P. (COGEMA, Velizy-Villacoublay (France)); Bagley, K.Q. (AEA Reactor Services, Risley (United Kingdom)); Crittenden, G.C. (AEA Reactor Services, Dounreay (United Kingdom)); Dievoet, J. van (Belgonucleaire, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-09-01

    The first fast breeder eactors, constructed in the 1945-1960 time period, used metallic fuels composed of uranium, plutonium, or their alloys. They were chosen because most existing reactor operating experience had been obtained on metallic fuels and because they provided the highest breeding ratios. Difficulties in obtaining adequate dimensional stability in metallic fuel elements under conditions of high fuel burnup led in the 1960s to the virtual worldwide choice of ceramic fuels. Although ceramic fuels provide lower breeding performance, this objective is no longer an important consideration in most national programs. Mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide became the ceramic fuel that has received the widest use. The more advanced ceramic fuels, mixed uranium and plutonium carbides and nitrides, continue under development. More recently, metal fuel elements of improved design have joined ceramic fuels in achieving goal burnups of 15 to 20 percent. Low-swelling fuel cladding alloys have also been continuously developed to deal with the unexpected problem of void formation in stainless steels subjected to fast neutron irradiation, a phenomenon first observed in the 1960s. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of gamma ray from fuel of high temperature engineering test reactor. Method of measurement and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-02-01

    To obtain information in the HTTR core directly, gamma ray from fuel blocks was measured when fuel blocks were discharged from the core and reloaded to the core. Gamma ray was measured using GM detector, CZT semiconductor detector installed in a door valve and area monitors installed in a stand pipe compartment. The measurement was carried out for 20 fuel blocks in 4 columns considering the symmetry of uranium enrichment distribution in the core. Relative axial distribution in each column obtained by the GM detector and CZT detector agreed with calculated results. However, calculation values showed higher values than measured values in upper region of the core, lower those in lower region of the core. The axial distributions were also evaluated by the area monitors. The measured values agreed with calculated values. It became clear that it was possible to obtain the data inside the core by this method. (author)

  17. Evaluation of core physics analysis methods for conversion of the INL advanced test reactor to low-enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M. D.; Chang, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR. (authors)

  18. Developing the MAPLE materials test reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Lidstone, R.F.; Donnelly, J.V.

    1992-05-01

    MAPLE-MTR is a new multipurpose research facility being planned by AECL Research as a possible replacement for the 35-year-old NRU reactor. In developing the MAPLE-MTR concept, AECL is starting from the recent design and licensing experience with the MAPLE-X10 reactor. By starting from technology developed to support the MAPLE-X10 design and adapting it to produce a concept that satisfies the requirements of fuel channel materials testing and fuel irradiation programs, AECL expects to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel, heat transfer). Formulation of the MAPLE-MTR concept is at an early stage. This report describes the irradiation requirements of the research areas, how these needs are translated into design criteria for the project and elements of the preliminary design concept

  19. Catalyzed deuterium fueled tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Catalyzed deuterium fuel presents several advantages relative to D-T. These are, freedom from tritium breeding, high charged particle power fraction and lowered neutron energy deposition in the blanket. Higher temperature operation, lower power densities and increased confinement are simultaneously required. However, the present study has developed designs which have capitalized upon the advantages of catalyzed deuterium to overcome the difficulties associated with the fuel while obtaining high efficiency

  20. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Sugaya, Naoto; Ohtsuka, Kaoru; Hanakawa, Hiroki; Onuma, Yuichi; Hosokawa, Jinsaku; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Tamura, Kazuo; Hotta, Kohji; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  1. Integral approach to innovative fuel and material investigations in the Halden reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, B.

    2009-01-01

    Integral approach used for fuel and material investigations in the Halden reactor can be used in support of qualification and certification of fuel to be introduced in commercial NPPs. This approach has been partly used for WWER fuel investigation in the Halden Reactor in a series of irradiation tests. In-pile fuel performance tests with reliable measurements provided by Halden instrumentation under different conditions can be used for validation of the WWER fuel behaviour models and verification of fuel performance codes. These models and codes can be used for qualification of innovative fuel behaviour under extended conditions

  2. Advanced CANDU reactors fuel analysis through optimal fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingle, C.P.; Bonin, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of alternate CANDU fuels along with natural uranium-based fuel was carried out from the view point of optimal in-core fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium. The alternate fuels considered in the present work include thorium containing oxide mixtures (MOX), plutonium-based MOX, and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel recycled in CANDU reactors (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU (DUPIC)); these are compared with the usual natural UO 2 fuel. The focus of the study is on the 'Approach to Refuelling Equilibrium' period which immediately follows the initial commissioning of the reactor. The in-core fuel management problem for this period is treated as an optimization problem in which the objective function is the refuelling frequency to be minimized by adjusting the following decision variables: the channel to be refuelled next, the time of the refuelling and the number of fresh fuel bundles to be inserted in the channel. Several constraints are also included in the optimisation problem which is solved using Perturbation Theory. Both the present 37-rod CANDU fuel bundle and the proposed CANFLEX bundle designs are part of this study. The results include the time to reach refuelling equilibrium from initial start-up of the reactor, the average discharge burnup, the average refuelling frequency and the average channel and bundle powers relative to natural UO 2 . The model was initially tested and the average discharge burnup for natural UO 2 came within 2% of the industry accepted 199 MWh/kgHE. For this type of fuel, the optimization exercise predicted the savings of 43 bundles per full power year. In addition to producing average discharge burnups and other parameters for the advanced fuels investigated, the optimisation model also evidenced some problem areas like high power densities for fuels such as the DUPIC. Perturbation Theory has proven itself to be an accurate and valuable optimization tool in predicting the time between

  3. Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-09-01

    The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by

  4. Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmack, Jon

    2009-01-01

    The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4-5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat energie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric - Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the

  5. Fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Motoo; Oyama, Jun-ichi; Masumi, Ryoji; Soneda, Hideo.

    1994-01-01

    A fuel assembly comprises a plurality of fuel rods filled with nuclear fuels, a plurality of burnable poison rods incorporated with burnable poisons, and water rods which can vary the height in the tube depending on the coolant flow rate flown into the assembly. The amount of entire burnable poisons of the burnable poison-containing rods in adjacent with the water rods is smaller than the amount of entire burnable poisons in the burnable poison containing rods not in adjacent with the water rods. Then the average concentration of burnable poisons in the axial upper half region is made smaller than the average concentration of the burnable poisons at the axial lower half region. Further, a burnable poison concentration at the upper half region of at least one of burnable poison-containing rods in adjacent with the water rods is made lower than the burnable poison concentration in the lower half region. Since this can fasten the combustion of the burnable poisons, a fuel assembly having good fuel economy can be attained. (I.N.)

  6. Impacts of reactor. Induced cladding defects on spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.

    1978-01-01

    Defects arise in the fuel cladding on a small fraction of fuel rods during irradiation in water-cooled power reactors. Defects from mechanical damage in fuel handling and shipping have been almost negligible. No commercial water reactor fuel has yet been observed to develop defects while stored in spent fuel pools. In some pools, defective fuel is placed in closed canisters as it is removed from the reactor. However, hundreds of defective fuel bundles are stored in numerous pools on the same basis as intact fuel. Radioactive species carried into the pool from the reactor coolant must be dealt with by the pool purification system. However, additional radiation releases from the defective fuel during storage appear tu be minimal, with the possible exception of fuel discharged while the reactor is operating (CANDU fuel). Over approximately two decades, defective commercial fuel has been handled, stored, shipped and reprocessed. (author)

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly for fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyunin, V.G.; Murogov, V.M.; Troyanov, M.F.; Rinejskij, A.A.; Ustinov, G.G.; Shmelev, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The fuel assembly of a fast reactor consists of fuel elements comprising sections with fissionable and breeding material and tubes with hollows designed for entrapping gaseous fission products. Tubes joining up to the said sections are divided in a middle and a peripheral group such that at least one of the tube groups is placed in the space behind the coolant inlet ports. The configuration above allows reducing internal overpressure in the fuel assembly, thus reducing the volume of necessary structural elements in the core. (J.B.)

  8. DUPIC fuel performance from reactor physics viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H.; Rhee, B.W.; Park, H.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary study was performed for the evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) parameters of nominal DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactor. For the reference 2-bundle shift refueling scheme, the predicted ramped power and power increase of the 43-element DUPIC fuel in the equilibrium core are below the SCC thresholds of CANDU natural uranium fuel. For 4-bundle shift refueling scheme, the envelope of element ramped power and power increase upon refueling are 8% and 44% higher than those of 2-bundle shift refueling scheme on the average, respectively, and both schemes are not expected to cause SCC failures. (author)

  9. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  10. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Hidemitsu; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo

    1998-01-01

    The MOX fuel assembly of the present invention is of a c-lattice type loaded to a BWR type reactor. 74 MOX fuel rods filled with mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium and two water rods disposed to a space equal to that for 7 MOX fuel rods are arranged in 9 x 9 matrix. MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are disposed to four corners of the 9 x 9 matrix. The enrichment degree means a ratio of the weight of fission products based on the total weight of fuels. Two MOX fuel rods having the same enrichment degree are arranged in each direction so as to be continuous from the MOX fuel rods at four corners in the direction of the same row and different column and same column and the different row. In addition, among the outermost circumferential portion of the 9 x 9 matrix, MOX fuel rods having a lower enrichment degree next to the MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are arranged, each by three to a portion where MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are not disposed. (I.N.)

  11. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    failure mechanisms; accident testing; fuel and fission product chemistry; fuel cycles; fission product transport; spent fuel management; and nuclear hydrogen production. This knowledge base was gained over nearly fifty years of fuel materials research and development in the international HTGR community. The primary intent of this effort is that this documented experience will provide the basis for further development of HTGR fuels and reactor systems. In many ways this book is a unique source of past experience, and hopefully, it will serve as an important part of future development of nuclear energy worldwide for the new generation scientists and engineers

  12. Inspecting fuel pellets for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilks, R.S.; Sternheim, E.; Breakey, G.A.; Sturges, R.H.; Taleff, A.; Castner, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method of controlling the inspection, sorting and classifying of nuclear reactor fuel pellets, including a mechanical handling system and a computer controlled data processing system, is described. Having investigated the diameter, length, surface flaws and weights of the pellets, they are sorted accordingly and the relevant data are stored. (U.K.)

  13. Thermophysical properties of fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper identifies the fuel properties for which more data are needed for fast-reactor safety analysis. In addition, a brief review is given of current research on the vapor pressure over liquid UO 2 and (U,PU)O/sub 2-x/, the solid-solid phase transition in actinide oxides, and the thermal conductivity of molten urania

  14. MTR fuel plate qualification in OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacristan, P.; Boulcourt, P.; Naury, S.; Marchard, L.; Carcreff, H.; Noirot, J.

    2005-01-01

    Qualification of new MTR fuel needs the irradiation in research reactors under representative neutronic, heat flux and thermohydraulic conditions. The experiments are performed in France in the OSIRIS reactor by irradiating MTR full size fuel plates in the IRIS device located in the reactor core. The fuel plates are easily removed from the device during the shutdown of the reactor for performing thickness measurements along the plates by means of a swelling measurement device. Beside the calculation capabilities, the experimental platform includes: the ISIS neutron mock-up for the measurement of neutron flux distribution along the plates; the γ spectrometry for the purpose of measuring the activities of the radionuclides representative of the power and the burnup and to compare with the neutronic calculation. Owing to the experience feedback, a good agreement is observed between calculation and measurement; destructive post irradiation examinations in the LECA facility (Cadarache). New irradiations with the IRIS device and at higher heat flux are under preparation for qualification of MTR fuels. (author)

  15. Process for producing nuclear reactor fuel oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goenrich, H.; Druckenbrodt, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The waste gases of the calcination process furnace in the AVC or AV/PuC process (manufacture of nuclear reactor fuel dioxides) are returned to the furnace in a closed circuit. The NH 3 produced replaces the hydrogen which would otherwise be required for reduction in this process. (orig.) [de

  16. Method for processing spent nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenson, M.; Zebroski, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus are claimed for processing spent nuclear reactor fuel wherein plutonium is continuously contaminated with radioactive fission products and diluted with uranium. Plutonium of sufficient purity to fabricate nuclear weapons cannot be produced by the process or in the disclosed reprocessing plant. Diversion of plutonium is prevented by radiation hazards and ease of detection

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel replacement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayano, Hiroyuki; Joge, Toshio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To permit the direction in which a fuel replacement unit is moving to be monitored by the operator. Structure: When a fuel replacement unit approaches an intermediate goal position preset in the path of movement, renewal of data display on a goal position indicator is made every time the goal position is changed. With this renewal, the prevailing direction of movement of the fuel replacement unit can be monitored by the operator. When the control of movement is initiated, the co-ordinates of the intermediate goal point A are displayed on a goal position indicator. When the replacement unit reaches point A, the co-ordinates of the next intermediate point B are displayed, and upon reaching point B the co-ordinates of the (last) goal point C are displayed. (Nakamura, S.)

  18. Power-to-melt evaluation of fresh mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel. Technical improvements of the post-irradiation-experiment and the evaluation of the results for the power-to-melt test PTM-2 in 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kushida, Naoya; Koizumi, Atsuhiro

    1999-11-01

    The second Power-To-Melt (PTM) test, PTM-2, was performed in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. All of the twenty-four fuel pins of the irradiation vehicle, B5D-2, for the PTM-2 test, were provided for post-irradiation-experiment (PIE) to evaluate the PTM values. In this study, the PIE technique for PTM test was established and the PTM results were evaluated. The findings are as follows: The maximum fuel-melting ratio on the transverse section was 10.7%, and was within the limit of fuel-melting in this PTM test enough. Unexpected fuel-melting amount to a ratio of 11.8% was found at ∼24 mm below the peak power elevation in a test fuel pin. It is possible that this arose from secondary fuel-melting. Combination of metallographical observation with X-ray microanalysis of plutonium distribution was very effective for the identification of once-molten fuel zone. The PTM evaluation suggested that dependence of the PTM on the fuel pellet density was stronger than that of previous foreign PTM tests, while the dependence on the pellet-cladding gap and the oxygen-to-metal ratio was indistinctly. The dependence on the cladding temperature and the fill gas composition was not shown as well. (author)

  19. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  20. Radiographic inspection and densitometric evaluation of CP-5 reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staroba, J.F.; Knoerzer, T.W.

    1978-02-01

    This report covers the radiographic and densitometric techniques used as part of a quality verification program for CP-5 reactor fuel by the Nondestructive Assay Section of the Special Materials Division. Other nondestructive tests used were ultrasonic and gamma-ray spectrometry. The main objectives were to perform a one-hundred percent radiographic inspection of the fuel tubes and to derive a quantitative relationship between fuel thickness and film density with the use of fabricated fuel step wedges. By the use of tangential x-ray techniques, measurements were made of fuel peaks or ''hot spots'' that protruded above the main fuel line. Other general problems in radiographic inspection and solutions for the upgrading of the total radiographic inspection program are also discussed

  1. Fuel transfer cask concept design for reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nabil Ab Rahim; Phongsakorn Prak; Tonny Lanyau; Mohd Fazli Zakaria

    2010-01-01

    Reactor Triga PUSPATI (RTP) has been operated since 1982 till now. For such long period, the organization feels the need to upgrade the power from 1 MW to 3 MW which involved changing new fuels. Spent fuels will be stored in a Spent Fuel Pool. The process of transferring spent fuels into Spent Fuels Pool required a fuel transfer cask. This paper discussed the design concept for the fuel transfer cast which is essential equipment for reactor upgrading mission. (author)

  2. Inter renewal travelling wave reactor with rotary fuel columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    To realize the COP21 decision, this paper proposes Inter Renewal Travelling Wave Reactor that bear high burn-up rate 50% and product TRU fuel efficiently. The reactor is based on 4S Fast Reactor and has Reactor Fuel Columns as fuel assemblies that equalize temperature in the fuel assembly so that fewer structure is need to restrain thermal transformation. To equalize burn-up rate of all fuel assemblies in the reactor, each rotary fuel column has each motor-lifter. The rotary fuel column has two types (Cylinder type and Heat Pipe type using natrium at 15 kPa which supply high temperature energy for Ultra Super Critical power plant). At 4 years cycle all rotary fuel columns of the reactor are renewed by the metallurgy method (vacuum re-smelting) and TRU fuel is gotten from the water fuel. (author)

  3. Non destructive testing of PWR type fuel pencils by Foucault currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, L.

    1984-09-01

    The device presented in this paper, has been developed to satisfy, first, the requirements of nondestructive examinations of irradiated fuel pencils. The technics used allow the acquisition of reliable and detailed information on the state of cans. The computerized data exploitation allows to integrate quickly any improvement factor while allowing to carry out the researches on the automatic diagnostic of Eddy current signals. Now, the equipments of the bench allow visual, metrological and Foucault current simultaneous examinations [fr

  4. Reliability testing of failed fuel location system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental reliability tests performed in order to prove the reliability parameters for Failed Fuel Location System (FFLS), equipment used to detect in which channel of a particular heat transport loop a fuel failure is located, and to find in which channel what particular bundle pair is failed. To do so, D20 samples from each reactor channel are sequentially monitored to detect a comparatively high level of delayed neutron activity. 15 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Flow induced deformation and collapse of a thin rectangular plate with application to the Engineering Test Reactor nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This work examines a single flat fuel plate bounded by two channels and determines static plate deflections, resultant forces and bending stresses due to pressure differential and hydrodynamic loadings. The classical then reactangular plate equations are used to model the fuel plate. These equations contain as an input the hydrodynamic loading function for modeling the fluid-structural interaction. Two models of the channel flow are developed. One assumes the accelerating potential core flow is laminar with developing two-dimensional laminar boundary layers being formed on the channel walls. The Schlichting entry length solution for developing laminar flow is found to be valid the entire length of the channel. The second model assumes the core flow is fully-developed turbulent the entire length of the channel. Hydrodynamic loading functions are developed for both flow models containing parameters for fluid density, fluid velocity, Reynolds number and channel and plate dimensions. Hence the effects of each parameter can be examined independently. A criterion is developed for predicting ETR fuel plate collapse at high channel flow velocities, 1067 cm/s (420 in/sec) (R/sub e/ = 60,000). The criterion predicts that in order to prevent ETR plate collapse the inlet velocities between channels must not differ by more than 2%

  6. Quality assurance for breeder reactor fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Fuel performance in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) depends on fabrication of fuel to rigorous quality standards. The quality program including Management, Procurement, Fabrication, Inspection, Records, and Audits is discussed as well as unique mixed oxide fuel inspections such as homogeneity inspection, analytical chemistry, and nondestructive fissile assay

  7. Utilization of the experimental reactor Osiris for the study and the development of fuels of the fast neutron reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcon, M.; Faugere, J.L.; Genthon, J.P.; Maillot, R.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear fuel tests for the fast neutron reactor type have been carried out at the Osiris reactor: thermal study of (U,Pu)O 2 oxide by measurement with thermocouples in the core of the fuel pellet; study of the effects of power cycling on nuclear fuel; study of the mechanical interactions between oxide and cladding by measurement of the cladding deformation during irradiation [fr

  8. Reprocessing of fast neutron reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, M.

    1981-05-01

    A PUREX process specially adapted to fast neutron reactor fuels is employed. The results obtained indicate that the aqueous process can be applied to this type of fuel: almost 10 years operation at the AT 1 plant which processes fuel from RAPSODIE; the good results obtained at the MARCOULE pilot plant on large batches of reference fuels. The CEA is continuing its work to transfer this technology onto an industrial scale. Industrial prototypes and the launching of the TOR (traitement d'oxydes rapides) project will facilitate this transfer. In 1984, it is expected that fast fuels will be able to be processed on a significant scale and that supplementary R and D facilities will be available [fr

  9. Overview of remote technologies applied to research reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerdoegh, M.; Takats, F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of the remote technologies applied to research reactor fuels. Due to many reasons, the remote technology utilization to research reactor fuel is not so widespread as it is for power reactor fuels, however, the advantages of the application of such techniques are obvious. (author)

  10. Electrorefining open-quotes Nclose quotes reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    Principles of purifying of uranium metal by electrorefining are reviewed. Metal reactor fuel after irradiation is a form of impure uranium. Dissolution and deposition electrorefining processes were developed for spent metal fuel under the Integral Fast Reactor Program. Application of these processes to the conditioning of spent N-reactor fuel slugs is examined

  11. Fuel assembly and reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Yoko; Mochida, Takaaki; Soneda, Hideo.

    1994-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having moderator rods, an axial average value of a ratio between the total of the lateral cross sectional area of a portion to be filled with moderators and the total of the lateral cross sectional area of fuel pellets is determined as greater than 0.4, a lateral cross sectional area of a portion to be filled with moderators per one moderator rod is determined as from 14 to 50cm 2 and the ratio between the total of the lateral cross sectional area of moderators and a total of the lateral cross sectional area of fuel pellets in a horizontal cross section is determined as from 2.7 to 3.4. Since the axial average value for lateral cross sectional area of a portion to be filled with moderators/lateral cross sectional area of fuel pellets is determined as ≥ 0.4, the lateral cross sectional area of moderators of moderator rods is increased, the lateral cross sectional area of a gap water region is decreased to reduce the value of local power peaking coefficient, so that thermal margin is ensured. At least one of the moderating rods is formed as a double-walled water rod tube to enhance an effect of spectral shift by flow rate control, reduce an uranium enrichment degree, and conduct operation without inserting control rods. (N.H.)

  12. Nuclear reactor core and fuel element therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortescue, P.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. This core consists of vertical columns of disengageable fuel elements stacked one atop another. These columns are arranged in side-by-side relationship to form a substantially continuous horizontal array. Each of the fuel elements include a block of refractory material having relatively good thermal conductivity and neutron moderating characteristics. The block has a pair of parallel flat top and bottom end faces and sides which are substantially prependicular to the end faces. The sides of each block is aligned vertically within a vertical column, with the sides of vertically adjacent blocks. Each of the blocks contains fuel chambers, including outer rows containing only fuel chambers along the sides of the block have nuclear fuel material disposed in them. The blocks also contain vertical coolant holes which are located inside the fuel chambers in the outer rows and the fuel chambers which are not located in the outer rows with the fuel chambers and which extend axially completely through from end face to end face and form continuous vertical intracolumn coolant passageways in the reactor core. The blocks have vertical grooves extending along the sides of the blocks form interblock channels which align in groups to form continuous vertical intercolumn coolant passsageways in the reactor core. The blocks are in the form of a regular hexagonal prism with each side of the block having vertical gooves defining one half of one of the coolant interblock channels, six corner edges on the blocks have vertical groves defining one-third of an interblock channel, the vertical sides of the blocks defining planar vertical surfaces

  13. Equations of macrotransport in reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokin, A.P.; Zhukov, A.V.; Kornienko, Yu.N.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The rigorous statement of equations of macrotransport is obtained. These equations are bases for channel-by-channel methods of thermohydraulic calculations of reactor fuel assemblies within the scope of the model of discontinuous multiphase coolant flow (including chemical reactions); they also describe a wide range of problems on thermo-physical reactor fuel assembly justification. It has been carried out by smoothing equations of mass, momentum and enthalpy transfer in cross section of each phase of the elementary fuel assembly subchannel. The equation for cross section flows is obtaind by smoothing the equation of momentum transfer on the interphase. Interaction of phases on the channel boundary is described using the Stanton number. The conclusion is performed using the generalized equation of substance transfer. The statement of channel-by-channel method without the scope of homogeneous flow model is given

  14. Fuel deposits, chemistry and CANDU reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    'Hot conditioning' is a process which occurs as part of commissioning and initial start-up of each CANDU reactor, the first being the Nuclear Power Demonstration-2 reactor (NPD). Later, understanding of the cause of the failure of the Pickering Unit 1 G16 fuel channel led to a revised approach to 'hot conditioning', initially demonstrated on Bruce Unit 5, and subsequently utilized for each CANDU unit since. The difference being that during 'hot conditioning' of CANDU heat transport systems fuel was not in-core until Bruce Unit 5. The 'hot conditioning' processes will be briefly described along with the consequences to fuel. (author)

  15. Future reactors and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastoin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Known world reserves of oil and natural gas may only last another 50 years and therefore nuclear energy will become more important in the future. Industrialised countries should also be encouraged to conserve their oil reserves to make better use of them and share them with less developed countries. France already produces 30% or more of its primary energy from uranium in the form of nuclear generated electricity. France has therefore accumulated considerable expertise in all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Each stage of the fuel cycle, extraction, enrichment, fuel fabrication, fissile material utilisation, reprocessing and waste storage is discussed. The utilisation of fissile material is the most important stage and this is considered in more detail under headings: increase in burn-up, spectral shift, plutonium utilisation including recycling in pressurized water reactors and fast reactors and utilisation of reprocessed uranium. It is concluded that nuclear power for electricity production will be widely used throughout the world in the future. (UK)

  16. Nondestructive testing of nuclear reactor components integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mala, M.; Miklos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy must respond to current challenges in the energy market. The significant parameters are increase of the nuclear fuel price, closed fuel cycle, reduction and safe and the final disposal of high level radioactive waste. Nowadays, the discussions on suitable energy mix are taking place not only here in Czech Republic, but also in many other European countries. It is necessary to establish an appropriate ratio among the production of electricity from conventional, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Also, it is necessary to find ways how to streamline the economy, central part of the nuclear fuel cycle and thereby to increase the competitiveness of nuclear energy. This streamlining can be carried out by improving utilization of existing nuclear fuel with maintaining a high degree of nuclear facilities safety. Increasing operational reliability and safety together with increasing utilization of nuclear fuel place increasing demands on monitoring of changes during fuel burnup. The potential fuel assembly damages in light water reactors are prevented by the introduction of new procedures and programs of the fuel assembly monitoring. One of them is the Post Irradiation Inspection Program (PIIP) which is a good tool for monitoring of chemical regime impact on the fuel assembly cladding behavior. Main nondestructive techniques that are used at nuclear power plants for the fuel assembly integrity evaluation are ultrasonic measurements, eddy current measurements, radiographic testing, acoustic techniques and others. Ultrasonic system is usual tool for leak fuel rod evaluation and it is also used at Temelin NPP. Since 2009, Temelin NPP has cooperated with Research Center Rez Ltd in frame of PIIP program at both units WWER 1000. This program was established for US VVantage6 fuel assemblies and also it continues for Russian TVSA-T fuel assemblies. (author)

  17. New fuels for proliferation-safe research reactors. SCK-CEN a kingpin in international research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berghe, S.

    2011-01-01

    A number of research reactors in the world, including BR2, are still working on highly enriched proliferation sensitive nuclear fuel. Extremely high-density fuel is required to make possible the switch to low-enriched fuel without loss of effectiveness. In the past few years, SCK-CEN has developed into the global test station for new, low-enriched fuels.

  18. A cermet fuel reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Work on the cermet fuel reactor done in the 1960's by General Electric (GE) and the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that had as its goal the development of systems that could be used for nuclear rocket propulsion as well as closed cycle propulsion system designs for ship propulsion, space nuclear propulsion, and other propulsion systems is reviewed. It is concluded that the work done in the 1960's has demonstrated that we can have excellent thermal and mechanical performance with cermet fuel. Thousands of hours of testing were performed on the cermet fuel at both GE and AGL, including very rapid transients and some radiation performance history. We conclude that there are no feasibility issues with cermet fuel. What is needed is reactivation of existing technology and qualification testing of a specific fuel form. We believe this can be done with a minimum development risk.

  19. A cermet fuel reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, G.

    1991-01-01

    Work on the cermet fuel reactor done in the 1960's by General Electric (GE) and the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that had as its goal the development of systems that could be used for nuclear rocket propulsion as well as closed cycle propulsion system designs for ship propulsion, space nuclear propulsion, and other propulsion systems is reviewed. It is concluded that we can have excellent thermal and mechanical performance with cermet fuel. Thousands of hours of testing were performed on the cermet fuel at both GE and AGL, including very rapid transients and some radiation performance history. We conclude that there are no feasibility issues with cermet fuel. What is needed is reactivation of existing technology and qualification testing of a specific fuel form. We believe this can be done with a minimum development risk

  20. Issues of high-burnup fuel for advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belac, J.; Milisdoerfer, L.

    2004-12-01

    A brief description is given of nuclear fuels for Generation III+ and IV reactors, and the major steps needed for a successful implementation of new fuels in prospective types of newly designed power reactors are outlined. The following reactor types are discussed: gas cooled fast reactors, heavy metal (lead) cooled fast reactors, molten salt cooled reactors, sodium cooled fast reactors, supercritical water cooled reactors, and very high temperature reactors. The following are regarded as priority areas for future investigations: (i) spent fuel radiotoxicity; (ii) proliferation volatility; (iii) neutron physics characteristics and inherent safety element assessment; technical and economic analysis of the manufacture of advanced fuels; technical and economic analysis of the fuel cycle back end, possibilities of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, storage and disposal. In parallel, work should be done on the validation and verification of analytical tools using existing and/or newly acquired experimental data. (P.A.)