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Sample records for test population hand

  1. Sites of dermatitis in a patch test population: hand dermatitis is associated with polysensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, B C; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Menné, T

    2009-01-01

    . Methods A matched case-control study was carried out including 394 polysensitized and 726 single/double-sensitized patients who responded to a postal questionnaire. All subjects were recruited from a hospital patch test population. Results The hands were the most frequent and the anogenital region...... was the least frequent skin area affected with dermatitis. Dermatitis on the hands/wrists [odds ratio (OR) 1.58], in the armpits (OR 1.56) and on the back (OR 1.91) was positively associated with polysensitization. The hands were the only skin area with dermatitis which maintained the association...... compared with single/double-sensitized patients. Conclusions Special awareness in patients with hand dermatitis seems justified either to prevent development of multiple contact allergies or to document polysensitization as an aetiological factor....

  2. Retesting with the TRUE Test in a population-based twin cohort with hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Menné, Torkil

    2007-01-01

    Population-based studies on contact allergy with retesting of individuals are infrequently performed. Variable degrees of persistence are reported when individuals with contact allergy are retested with years in between. The patch test results of 270 individuals tested in 2005-2006 are presented ...

  3. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test in an Italian Population

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    Greta Culicchia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper describes the Italian translation and adaptation to the Italian culture of the original version of the Jebsen-Taylor hand function test and conveys the procedure for testing its validity and reliability. Design. The cultural adaptation process and validation were based on data from a group of people with no clinical evidence of disease or impairment of the upper limbs. The process required a forward and reverse translation in its original language. The scale obtained was reviewed by 8 experts in the field of psychometrics dealing with statistical methods that are useful for the behavioral and social sciences. The Italian adapted version of the JTHFT was then produced and validated. Participants. The test was submitted to 320 people with no clinical evidence of disease in order to test its acceptability and consistency. Results. The total time required to perform each subtest was 80.16 ± 43.13 seconds for the nondominant hand (NDH and 49.97±27.28 seconds for the dominant hand (DH. The internal consistency (assessed with Pearson’s r and the reliability or the construct validity (assessed with Cronbach’s alpha are significative. Conclusions. This is the first study reporting the result of the translation, cultural adaptation, and validation protocols of the JTHFT in Italian. It provides a new tool for Italian professionals to measure the functionality of the hand in participants with various upper limb pathologies.

  4. Performing Allen's test in immobile hand: The Esmarch bandage method

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    Nebil Yesiloglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an alternative method of assessing hand vascular flow using a modification of Allen's test is presented. This technique may be helpful for patients who have immobile hands due to severe trauma, patients scheduled for free tissue transfer reconstruction, patients under general anesthesia in intensive care units that require serial arterial blood gas analyses, and emergency coronary by-pass candidates who decided to receive radial arterial grafts. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(3.000: 83-85

  5. ADAPTATION OF DASH OUTCOME MEASURES TO SLOVENIAN POPULATION - FUNCTIONALITY OF ARM, SHOULDER AND HAND

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    Katja Semprimožnik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACT BackgroundIn Slovenia, there is no test for upper limb function, which would be uniform for all institutions and would allow comparison of results of the therapy and upper limb rehabilitation with medical centers. MethodsAfter reviewing the existing hand function tests and current literature we decided to translate the DASH test - Disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand. Adaptation was tested on patient population in outpatient hand clinic, General hospital Celje and showed good validity, reliability and responsiveness. Results and discussionAdaptation of DASH test to Slovene population is a procedure, where language and cultural differences must be considered. Testing the adapted DASH in the general population shows good validity, reliability and responsiveness of adapted test. ConclusionTranslations DASH test, QuickDASH test and instructions for scoring the DASH outcome measures are approved by the Institute for Work and Health. Translations are published on their site and available for use.

  6. Analysis of 344 Hand Injuries in a Pediatric Population

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    Byung-Joon Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to identify comprehensive hand injury patterns in different pediatric age groups and to assess their risk factors.MethodsThis retrospective study was conducted among patients younger than 16-year-old who presented to the emergency room of a general hospital located in Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea, and were treated for an injury of the finger or hand from January 2010 to December 2014. The authors analyzed the medical records of 344 patients. Age was categorized according to five groups.ResultsA total of 391 injury sites of 344 patients were evaluated for this study. Overall and in each group, male patients were in the majority. With regard to dominant or non-dominant hand involvement, there were no significant differences. Door-related injuries were the most common cause in the age groups of 0 to 3, 4 to 6, and 7 to 9 years. Sport/recreational activities or physical conflict injuries were the most common cause in those aged 10 to 12 and 13 to 15. Amputation and crushing injury was the most common type in those aged 0 to 3 and 4 to 6 years. However, in those aged 10 to 12 and 13 to 15, deep laceration and closed fracture was the most common type. With increasing age, closed injuries tended to increase more sharply than open injuries, extensor tendon rupture more than flexor injuries, and the level of injury moved proximally.ConclusionsThis study provides a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology of hand injuries in the pediatric population.

  7. A proposal for benchmark tests for underactuated or compliant hands

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    G. A. Kragten

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of agreement in the literature as to what exactly quantifies the performance of underactuated hands. This paper proposes two benchmark tests to measure the ability of underactuated hands to grasp different objects and the ability to hold the objects when force disturbances apply. The first test determines the smallest and largest cylindrical object which can be successfully grasped in an enveloping grasp or in a pinch grasp. The second test provides the maximal allowable force which can be applied to a grasped object without loosing it. A setup was constructed consisting of standard components. Exemplary tests were applied to the Delft Hand 2. The proposed benchmark tests are representative to quantify the performance of pick and place operations with underactuated hands. The results of the tests can be applied to evaluate, compare, and improve the performance of robotic hands.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  8. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF PATCH TEST IN HAND AND FOOT ECZEMAS

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    Sravani Sandhya Bellam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present study is undertaken to evaluate the results of patch test in 50 patients having hand and foot eczema attending skin OPD from October 2010 to September 2012 at KIMS, Narketpally. RESULTS Maximum number of cases in this study belong to 16-30 yrs. (46%.  In majority of cases, eczema was seen in both hands and feet (40%. Hand and foot eczema was commonly seen in construction workers (42.3%.  Mean duration of illness is 19.48 months.  42% of patients presented with acute eczema followed by subacute eczema (38% and then chronic eczema (20%.  Personal and family history of atopy was seen in only 4% and 6%, respectively.  Hand and foot eczema (42.3% was the commonest eczema followed by hand (30.74% and then foot eczema (11.53% and others (15.37%.  57.69% of patients are positive to more than one allergen and 42.3% were positive to single allergen.  Multiple allergens positivity is seen in construction workers (30.76%.  Potassium di chromate (28.5% is the common allergen found in patch test followed by Parthenium (16.6% followed by Paraphenylenediamine (14% and then Cobalt sulphate and Thiuram mix (9.5% and lastly Parabens mix, Nickel sulphate, Black rubber mix and Neomycin (4.7%.  Positive patch test is more commonly observed in patients having hands and or foot eczemas (42.30%. CONCLUSION Hand and foot eczema (42% was the commonest eczema followed by hand (30% and then foot eczema (11.5% and others (15.3%. Potassium dichromate is the commonest sensitiser (28.8%. We encountered a high degree of patch test positivity in our study group and the Indian standard series proved to be very useful.

  9. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

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    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests.

  10. Development and pilot testing of HEXORR: Hand EXOskeleton Rehabilitation Robot

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    Godfrey Sasha B

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following acute therapeutic interventions, the majority of stroke survivors are left with a poorly functioning hemiparetic hand. Rehabilitation robotics has shown promise in providing patients with intensive therapy leading to functional gains. Because of the hand's crucial role in performing activities of daily living, attention to hand therapy has recently increased. Methods This paper introduces a newly developed Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot (HEXORR. This device has been designed to provide full range of motion (ROM for all of the hand's digits. The thumb actuator allows for variable thumb plane of motion to incorporate different degrees of extension/flexion and abduction/adduction. Compensation algorithms have been developed to improve the exoskeleton's backdrivability by counteracting gravity, stiction and kinetic friction. We have also designed a force assistance mode that provides extension assistance based on each individual's needs. A pilot study was conducted on 9 unimpaired and 5 chronic stroke subjects to investigate the device's ability to allow physiologically accurate hand movements throughout the full ROM. The study also tested the efficacy of the force assistance mode with the goal of increasing stroke subjects' active ROM while still requiring active extension torque on the part of the subject. Results For 12 of the hand digits'15 joints in neurologically normal subjects, there were no significant ROM differences (P > 0.05 between active movements performed inside and outside of HEXORR. Interjoint coordination was examined in the 1st and 3rd digits, and no differences were found between inside and outside of the device (P > 0.05. Stroke subjects were capable of performing free hand movements inside of the exoskeleton and the force assistance mode was successful in increasing active ROM by 43 ± 5% (P Conclusions Our pilot study shows that this device is capable of moving the hand's digits through

  11. Development and pilot testing of HEXORR: hand EXOskeleton rehabilitation robot.

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    Schabowsky, Christopher N; Godfrey, Sasha B; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2010-07-28

    Following acute therapeutic interventions, the majority of stroke survivors are left with a poorly functioning hemiparetic hand. Rehabilitation robotics has shown promise in providing patients with intensive therapy leading to functional gains. Because of the hand's crucial role in performing activities of daily living, attention to hand therapy has recently increased. This paper introduces a newly developed Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot (HEXORR). This device has been designed to provide full range of motion (ROM) for all of the hand's digits. The thumb actuator allows for variable thumb plane of motion to incorporate different degrees of extension/flexion and abduction/adduction. Compensation algorithms have been developed to improve the exoskeleton's backdrivability by counteracting gravity, stiction and kinetic friction. We have also designed a force assistance mode that provides extension assistance based on each individual's needs. A pilot study was conducted on 9 unimpaired and 5 chronic stroke subjects to investigate the device's ability to allow physiologically accurate hand movements throughout the full ROM. The study also tested the efficacy of the force assistance mode with the goal of increasing stroke subjects' active ROM while still requiring active extension torque on the part of the subject. For 12 of the hand digits'15 joints in neurologically normal subjects, there were no significant ROM differences (P > 0.05) between active movements performed inside and outside of HEXORR. Interjoint coordination was examined in the 1st and 3rd digits, and no differences were found between inside and outside of the device (P > 0.05). Stroke subjects were capable of performing free hand movements inside of the exoskeleton and the force assistance mode was successful in increasing active ROM by 43 +/- 5% (P hand's digits through nearly the entire ROM with physiologically accurate trajectories. Stroke subjects received the device intervention well and

  12. Estimation of stature from hand and handprint dimensions in a Western Australian population.

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    Ishak, Nur-Intaniah; Hemy, Naomi; Franklin, Daniel

    2012-03-10

    As part of the formulation of a biological profile, the estimation of stature is an important element that provides useful data towards narrowing the pool of potentially matching identities. Recent literature has demonstrated that anthropometry of the hand has considerable promise for the accurate estimation of stature; although the technique has only been tested in a relatively limited range of populations. The aim of the present study, therefore, is to assess the reliability and accuracy of using anthropometric hand measurements for the estimation of stature in a contemporary Western Australian population; we also evaluate whether stature can be accurately estimated from the measurement of handprints. The study sample comprises 91 male and 110 female adult individuals. Following the measurement of stature, seven measurements are taken on each hand and its corresponding print. To establish the reliability of acquiring these measurements, a precision study was performed prior to primary data collection. Measurements data are analysed using basic univariate statistics and simple and multiple regression analyses. Our results show that the degree of measurement error and reliability are well within accepted standards. Stature prediction accuracy using hand and handprint measurements ranges from ±4.74 to 6.53cm, which is comparable to established skeletal standards for the hand. This study provides new forensic standards for the estimation of stature in a Western Australian population and also demonstrates that the measurement and analysis of handprints affords a novel source of profiling data that is statistically quantified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of Stature from Hand Measurements and Handprints in a Sample of Saudi Population

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    Maryna Kornieieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stature estimation is a commonly used method in forensic identification analysis. The tracks and remnants available at crime scene or catastrophes can give extensive information concerning the biological profiles of unknown persons. However, the investigator should take into account the constitutional peculiarities of the population where the evidence was found due to the high specificity of such data. The present work aimed at studying the ethnic peculiarities of the Saudi Arabian population and to estimate stature using the measurements of hands and handprints. A total of 200 native Saudi subjects of both genders within the age group of 17 to 26 years were included in the study. The height of each participant was measured and correlated with hand length, palm  length, and the hand breadth measured on both sides. Descriptive statistical analysis, paired samples T-test, Pearson correlation analysis, and regression analysis were performed. Obtained regression equations have a 1-4 cm deviation when used for the stature estimation in the population from which the data have been obtained. The accurate estimation rate of the formulae is >95%.

  14. Hand-to-Hand Model for Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis to Estimate Fat Free Mass in a Healthy Population

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    Hsueh-Kuan Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish a hand-to-hand (HH model for bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA fat free mass (FFM estimation by comparing with a standing position hand-to-foot (HF BIA model and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA; we also verified the reliability of the newly developed model. A total of 704 healthy Chinese individuals (403 men and 301 women participated. FFM (FFMDXA reference variables were measured using DXA and segmental BIA. Further, regression analysis, Bland–Altman plots, and cross-validation (2/3 participants as the modeling group, 1/3 as the validation group; three turns were repeated for validation grouping were conducted to compare tests of agreement with FFMDXA reference variables. In male participants, the hand-to-hand BIA model estimation equation was calculated as follows: FFMmHH = 0.537 h2/ZHH − 0.126 year + 0.217 weight + 18.235 (r2 = 0.919, standard estimate of error (SEE = 2.164 kg, n = 269. The mean validated correlation coefficients and limits of agreement (LOAs of the Bland–Altman analysis of the calculated values for FFMmHH and FFMDXA were 0.958 and −4.369–4.343 kg, respectively, for hand-to-foot BIA model measurements for men; the FFM (FFMmHF and FFMDXA were 0.958 and −4.356–4.375 kg, respectively. The hand-to-hand BIA model estimating equation for female participants was FFMFHH = 0.615 h2/ZHH − 0.144 year + 0.132 weight + 16.507 (r2 = 0.870, SEE = 1.884 kg, n = 201; the three mean validated correlation coefficient and LOA for the hand-to-foot BIA model measurements for female participants (FFMFHH and FFMDXA were 0.929 and −3.880–3.886 kg, respectively. The FFMHF and FFMDXA were 0.942 and −3.511–3.489 kg, respectively. The results of both hand-to-hand and hand-to-foot BIA models demonstrated similar reliability, and the hand-to-hand BIA models are practical for assessing FFM.

  15. Incidence of hand eczema in a population-based twin cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, A; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Ravn, H

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based studies on the incidence of hand eczema are sparse. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this prospective follow-up study was to determine the incidence rate of hand eczema in a population-based twin cohort. Secondly, the role of genetic factors and other potential risk factors...... for hand eczema was investigated. METHODS: A questionnaire on self-reported hand eczema was answered by 5610 and 4128 twin individuals in 1996 and 2005, respectively. Data were analysed in a Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS: The crude incidence rate was 8.8 cases per 1000 person-years (95% confidence...... interval, [CI] 7.7-9.9). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) dependent on the co-twin's hand eczema status revealed a significant, doubled risk for monozygotic twin individuals with a co-twin affected by hand eczema, compared with dizygotic twin individuals with a co-twin affected by hand eczema (IRR 2.4, 95% CI...

  16. Hand function tests and questions on hand symptoms as related to the Stockholm workshop scales for diagnosis of hand-arm vibration syndrome.

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    Cederlund, R; Iwarsson, S; Lundborg, G

    2003-04-01

    The severity of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is usually graded according to the Stockholm workshop scales. Although the Stockholm workshop scales are regarded the gold standard for assessing the severity of HAVS, they are based primarily on subjective symptoms. The aim of the present study was to explore the agreement between Stockholm workshop scales and the outcome from ten well-defined clinical tests commonly used in hand rehabilitation for assessment of hand function. One hundred and eleven vibration-exposed workers participated in the study. Ten objective tests of hand function and four questions on subjective hand symptoms were included. The results indicated that, out of these tests, perception of vibration, perception of touch/pressure and dexterity showed a moderate agreement with Stockholm workshop scales. Among specific questions on hand symptoms, cold intolerance and pain showed a high agreement with Stockholm workshop scales. It is concluded that defined objective tests combined with directed questions on specific hand symptoms, together with the Stockholm workshop scales, may be helpful for diagnosing HAVS.

  17. Mantel test in population genetics

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    José Alexandre F. Diniz-Filho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparison of genetic divergence or genetic distances, estimated by pairwise F ST and related statistics, with geographical distances by Mantel test is one of the most popular approaches to evaluate spatial processes driving population structure. There have been, however, recent criticisms and discussions on the statistical performance of the Mantel test. Simultaneously, alternative frameworks for data analyses are being proposed. Here, we review the Mantel test and its variations, including Mantel correlograms and partial correlations and regressions. For illustrative purposes, we studied spatial genetic divergence among 25 populations of Dipteryx alata ("Baru", a tree species endemic to the Cerrado, the Brazilian savannas, based on 8 microsatellite loci. We also applied alternative methods to analyze spatial patterns in this dataset, especially a multivariate generalization of Spatial Eigenfunction Analysis based on redundancy analysis. The different approaches resulted in similar estimates of the magnitude of spatial structure in the genetic data. Furthermore, the results were expected based on previous knowledge of the ecological and evolutionary processes underlying genetic variation in this species. Our review shows that a careful application and interpretation of Mantel tests, especially Mantel correlograms, can overcome some potential statistical problems and provide a simple and useful tool for multivariate analysis of spatial patterns of genetic divergence.

  18. Winter season, frequent hand washing, and irritant patch test reactions to detergents are associated with hand dermatitis in health care workers.

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    Callahan, Adrienne; Baron, Elma; Fekedulegn, Desta; Kashon, Michael; Yucesoy, Berran; Johnson, Victor J; Domingo, Diana Santo; Kirkland, Brent; Luster, Michael I; Nedorost, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Irritant hand dermatitis (IHD) is common in health care workers. We studied endogenous irritant contact dermatitis threshold by patch testing and exogenous factors such as season and hand washing for their association with IHD in health care workers. Irritant patch testing with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), sodium hydroxide, and benzalkonium chloride at varying concentrations was measured in 113 health care workers. Examination for hand dermatitis occurred at 1-month intervals for a period of 6 months in the Midwestern United States. Positive patch testing to low-concentration SLS was associated with IHD (P = 0.0310) after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, season, history of childhood flexural dermatitis, mean indoor relative humidity, and glove and hand sanitizer usage. Subjects with a positive patch test to SLS were 78% more likely to have occurrence of IHD (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-3.45). Hand washing frequency (≥10 times a day; IRR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.01-2.39) and cold season (IRR = 2.76; 95% CI, 1.35-5.65) were associated with IHD. No association was found between history of childhood flexural dermatitis and IHD in this population. Both genetic and environmental factors are important in the etiology of IHD and should be considered in designing strategies to protect, educate, and treat susceptible individuals.

  19. The epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population--prevalence and main findings.

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    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Linneberg, Allan; Menné, Torkil

    2010-02-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors of hand eczema in the general population. These studies are of high value as they tend to be less biased than studies using clinical populations and as they are important for healthcare decision makers when they allocate resources. This study aimed to review the epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population. Literature was examined using Pubmed-Medline, Biosis, Science Citation Index, and dermatology text books. On the basis of studies performed between 1964 and 2007, the point prevalence of hand eczema was around 4%, the 1-year prevalence nearly 10%, whereas the lifetime prevalence reached 15%. Based on seven studies, the median incidence rate of hand eczema was 5.5 cases/1000 person-years (women = 9.6 and men = 4.0). A high incidence rate was associated with female sex, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. Atopic dermatitis was the single most important risk factor for hand eczema. Hand eczema resulted in medical consultations in 70%, sick leave (> 7 days) in about 20%, and job change in about 10%. Mean sick time was longer among those with allergic hand eczema than those with atopic and irritant hand eczema. Moderate to severe extension of hand eczema was the strongest risk factor for persistence of hand eczema. Other risk factors included early onset of hand eczema and childhood eczema. The aetiology of hand eczema is multifactorial and includes environmental as well as genetic factors. Future studies should focus on unresolved areas of hand eczema, for example, genetic predisposition.

  20. Determination of hand and palm area as a ratio of body surface area in Indian population

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    Agarwal Pawan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accurate estimation of body surface area (BSA burn is important. In small and patchy burns, the patient′s hand is used to estimate percentage of burn which is traditionally considered as 1%. There is discrepancy about what percentage of TBSA is constituted by the palm and hand. Therefore, this study was designed to determine correctly the TBSA represented by the palmar surface of the entire hand and palm in the Indian population. Material and Methods: 300 healthy adult (male and female and 300 healthy children (male and female were included in the study. TBSA was calculated using DuBois formula and hand and palm surface area was calculated using hand tracing on plain paper. The hand/palm percentage of BSA (ratio was determined by dividing hand/palm surface area by total BSA. Results: The mean hand and palm ratio for adults was 0.92% and 0.50%, respectively. The mean hand and palm ratio in children was 1.06% and 0.632%, respectively. Conclusion: The hand area (palm plus digits is more closely represented to 1% of TBSA in Indian population.

  1. The epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population--prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Linneberg, Allan

    2010-01-01

    . This study aimed to review the epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population. Literature was examined using Pubmed-Medline, Biosis, Science Citation Index, and dermatology text books. On the basis of studies performed between 1964 and 2007, the point prevalence of hand eczema was around 4%, the 1...

  2. Medical consultations in relation to severity of hand eczema in the general population

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    Hald, M.; Berg, N.D.; Elberling, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Hand eczema is a common disease with a wide severity spectrum. Little information exists concerning the association between the severity of hand eczema and medical consultations. Objectives To describe the self-rated severity of hand eczema in a general population and the relationship...... to seeking medical attention. Methods A questionnaire on self-reported hypersensitivity including two questions on hand eczema was sent to a random sample of 6000 individuals, aged 18-69 years, living in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 4242 individuals (71%) answered the questionnaire. All individuals who...... reported hand eczema (n = 752) within the previous 12 months received a more detailed questionnaire focused on hand eczema and a previously validated photographic guide with four groups of severity ranging from almost clear to very severe. Results Five hundred and sixty-four individuals (75%) returned...

  3. Medical consultations in relation to severity of hand eczema in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, M; Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Elberling, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is a common disease with a wide severity spectrum. Little information exists concerning the association between the severity of hand eczema and medical consultations. OBJECTIVES: To describe the self-rated severity of hand eczema in a general population and the relationship...... to seeking medical attention. METHODS: A questionnaire on self-reported hypersensitivity including two questions on hand eczema was sent to a random sample of 6000 individuals, aged 18-69 years, living in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 4242 individuals (71%) answered the questionnaire. All individuals who...... reported hand eczema (n = 752) within the previous 12 months received a more detailed questionnaire focused on hand eczema and a previously validated photographic guide with four groups of severity ranging from almost clear to very severe. RESULTS: Five hundred and sixty-four individuals (75%) returned...

  4. Testing the Effects of Social Norms and Behavioral Privacy on Hand Washing: A Field Experiment

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    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Maloney, Erin K.; Braz, Mary; Shulman, Hillary C.

    2013-01-01

    A 2-part study examines the influence of normative messages on college males' hand washing perceptions and behaviors. Study 1 tests for the appropriateness of hand washing as a target of social norms campaigns and tests messages designed to change perceived descriptive norms. Results indicated that hand washing behavior is appropriate for health…

  5. The epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population--prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Linneberg, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors of hand eczema in the general population. These studies are of high value as they tend to be less biased than studies using clinical populations and as they are important for healthcare decision makers when they allocate resources....... This study aimed to review the epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population. Literature was examined using Pubmed-Medline, Biosis, Science Citation Index, and dermatology text books. On the basis of studies performed between 1964 and 2007, the point prevalence of hand eczema was around 4%, the 1......-year prevalence nearly 10%, whereas the lifetime prevalence reached 15%. Based on seven studies, the median incidence rate of hand eczema was 5.5 cases/1000 person-years (women = 9.6 and men = 4.0). A high incidence rate was associated with female sex, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work...

  6. Reliability of the "Ten Test" for assessment of discriminative sensation in hand trauma.

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    Berger, Michael J; Regan, William R; Seal, Alex; Bristol, Sean G

    2016-10-01

    "Ten Test" (TT) is a bedside measure of discriminative sensation, whereby the magnitude of abnormal sensation to moving light touch is normalized to an area of normal sensation on an 11-point Likert scale (0-10). The purposes of this study were to determine reliability parameters of the TT in a cohort of patients presenting to a hand trauma clinic with subjectively altered sensation post-injury and to compare the reliability of TT to that of the Weinstein Enhanced Sensory Test (WEST). Study participants (n = 29, mean age = 37 ± 12) comprised patients presenting to an outpatient hand trauma clinic with recent hand trauma and self reported abnormal sensation. Participants underwent TT and WEST by two separate raters on the same day. Interrater reliability, response stability and responsiveness of each test were determined by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC: 2, 1), standard error of measurement (SEM) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and minimal detectable difference score, with 95% CI (MDD95), respectively. The TT displayed excellent interrater reliability (ICC = 0.95, 95% CI 0.89-0.97) compared to good reliability for WEST (ICC = 0.78, 95% CI 0.58-0.89). The range of true scores expected with 95% confidence based on the SEM (i.e. response stability), was ±1.1 for TT and ±1.1 for WEST. MDD95 scores reflecting test responsiveness were 1.5 and 1.6 for TT and WEST, respectively. The TT displayed excellent reliability parameters in this patient population. Reliability parameters were stronger for TT compared to WEST. These results provide support for the use of TT as a component of the sensory exam in hand trauma. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimation of sex from the metric assessment of digital hand radiographs in a Western Australian population.

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    DeSilva, Rebecca; Flavel, Ambika; Franklin, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The forensic anthropologist is responsible for contributing to the identification of an unknown by constructing a biological profile from their skeletal remains. Towards achieving this goal, anthropologists can apply population and temporally specific standards with known error margins to morphometric data collected from a decedent. Recent research relating to the formulation of sex estimation standards has focussed on the assessment of bones other than the traditionally favoured pelvis and cranium, such as long bones of the appendicular skeleton. In particular, sex estimation standards based on morphometric data from metacarpals and phalanges have reported classification accuracy rates of 80% (and above) based on a narrow range of populations. The purpose of this study is to provide population-specific hand bone sex-estimation standards for a contemporary Western Australian population. The present study examines digital right hand radiographs of 300 adults of known age, equally represented by sex. A total of 40 measurements were taken in each hand (metacarpals and proximal phalanges); the measurements were then analysed using univariate statistics and cross-validated direct and stepwise discriminant function analysis. All hand bone measurements were significantly sexually dimorphic, with a tendency for the width measurements to express a higher degree of dimorphism than the length measurements. A maximum cross-validated classification accuracy of 91% was achieved with a sex bias of -6%. The standards presented here can be used in future forensic investigations that require sex estimation of hand bones in a Western Australian population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Patch test results of hand eczema patients : relation to clinical types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M B; Christoffers, W A; Coenraads, P J; Schuttelaar, M L A

    BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis is a well-known cause of hand eczema, although the influence of contact allergens on different clinical types of hand eczema remains still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To identify most common positive tested allergens among hand eczema patients and to define the

  9. Association between Second-Hand Smoking and Laryngopathy in the General Population of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwoo; Cho, Sunghyoun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The relationship between second-hand smoking and laryngopathy has not yet been reported. Thus, this study investigates the relationship between second-hand smoking and laryngopathy and suggests basic empirical data to prevent laryngopathy. Methods This study analyzed 1,905 non-smokers over the age of 19 (269 men and 1,636 women) who completed the health questionnaire, laryngeal endoscope test, and urine cotinine test in the 2008 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Second-hand smoking was defined as a urine cotinine concentration of 50ng/ml and over. Confounding factors included age, gender, education, household income, occupation, alcohol consumption, and coffee consumption. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were presented for the relationship between second-hand smoking and laryngopathy by using Poisson regression analysis. Results There was a significant relationship between second-hand smoking and laryngopathy (psmokers exposed to second-hand smoking had a 2.5 times (RR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.19–5.08) significantly higher risk of laryngopathy than non-smokers not exposed to second-hand smoking (psecond-hand smoking and laryngopathy. More effective anti-smoking policies are required to protect the health of both non-smokers and smokers. PMID:27861497

  10. The skill components of a therapeutic chopsticks task and their relationship with hand function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H M; Chang, J J

    1999-12-01

    Chopsticks are the primary tools used for eating and the physical movements of control are familiar to Chinese people. Chopsticks are easy to obtain in most rehabilitative settings. Occupational therapists often guide patients to practice miscellaneous chopsticks tasks to increase hand function in any case. The objective of this study was to investigate the skill components of the therapeutic chopsticks task and their relationship with hand function tests, and to identify clinical value. Eighty normal subjects (41 males and 39 females) whose age ranged from 17 to 26 years old participated in this study. Five standard hand function tests including three dexterity tests [Minnesota Rate of Manipulation Test (MRMT), Purdue Pegboard Test, and O'Connor Tweezer Dexterity Test (OTDT)], and two strength tests (Jamar Handgrip Test, and Pinchometer Test) were chosen to measure the dexterity and strength of hands. Additionally, the Test of Chopsticks Manipulation (TCM) was designed and used to assess the chopsticks manipulation skills. Subjects were tested with all the hand function tests and TCM in a random sequence. Results of six tests were obtained for each subject. Factor analysis showed that the skill components of TCM should be categorized into the "dexterity" component. In addition, a significant relationship (p < 0.05) was only seen between TCM and OTDT, there was no significant correlation between TCM and the other hand function tests. Findings in this study are valuable in setting the rehabilitation programs for patients with dexterity problems.

  11. Patch and Prick Tests in Hand Eczema: Results of A Sixty Seven Patient Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Fettahlıoğlu Karaman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The patch and prick tests have a place in the management of patients with hand eczema. In this study, we investigated whether some of the clinical features patients with hand eczema could provide us with the predictability of skin test results. Methods: In Çukurova University Faculty of Medicine, 67 consecutive patients with hand eczema; evaluated in terms of duration of disease, morphology and severity. All of the patients were undergoes patch tested with the European Standard Series, and needle testing with routine aeroallergens. Results: Patch test with at least one allergen was positive in 46.3% of the patients; wheras this rate was 23.9% for prick test. The likelihood of having a contact sensitivity of patients complaining of hand eczema for at least three years was statistically more significant [odds ratio (OR 0.9]. Although statistically not significant, it is less likely to be sensitized to patients with keratotic and/or licheniform hand eczema (OR 0.3. The severity of hand eczema was not predictive of patch test, there was no indicator of needle test positivity. Conclusion: We strongly recommend patch testing in all patients with prolonged hand eczema.

  12. Clinical characteristics and consequences of hand eczema - an 8-year follow-up study of a population-based twin cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Ravn, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few population-based clinical follow-up studies on hand eczema are reported. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize clinical symptoms and to examine occupational and medical consequences as well as persistence of hand eczema in a population-based twin cohort. PATIENTS....../METHODS: A total of 274 individuals with and without hand eczema were examined, patch tested, and interviewed in 1997-1998 and 2005-2006. Data on 188 individuals with hand eczema in 2005-2006 were analysed. RESULTS: Erythema and scaling were the most frequent symptoms, and fingers and palms were most often...... affected. Mean hand eczema severity index score in individuals with clinical symptoms was 12.0. Sick leave was reported by 12.4%; job change by 8.5%. Being in the lowest socio-economic group and atopic dermatitis were risk factors for sick leave [odds ratio (OR) = 5.6; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1...

  13. Diabetes is associated with increased hand pain in erosive hand osteoarthritis: data from a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Karin; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Østerås, Nina; Nordsletten, Lars; Natvig, Bård; Haugen, Ida K

    2015-02-01

    To explore factors related to hand pain in persons with radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA). Persons in the Musculoskeletal Pain in Ullensaker Study with radiographic hand OA (≥1 joint with Kellgren/Lawrence grade ≥2) were included (n = 530). We examined the cross-sectional association between possible explanatory variables and hand pain in the entire sample and in 2 hand OA phenotypes (erosive versus nonerosive) using structural equation analyses. Outcome variables were the Australian/Canadian Hand Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN; range 0-20) and number of tender finger joints upon palpation (NTJ; range 0-30). The mean age was 65 years (40-79 years) and 375 participants were women (71%). Diabetes mellitus, female sex, lower education status, familial OA, infrequent alcohol drinking, widespread pain, poor mental health, and higher number of finger joints with ultrasound-detected synovitis and radiographic OA were related to more hand pain in the entire sample. Stratified analyses showed that diabetes mellitus was strongly associated with AUSCAN pain (B-unstandardized coefficient = 3.81 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.27, 5.35]) and NTJ (B-unstandardized coefficient = 4.16 [95% CI 2.01, 6.31]) in erosive hand OA only. In nonerosive OA, lower education status, having familial OA, and poor mental health were associated with hand OA pain. Widespread pain was associated with both outcomes in both phenotypes. Structural and inflammatory OA changes as well as demographic factors, psychosocial factors, and diabetes mellitus were associated with pain in hand OA. The strong association between diabetes mellitus and pain in erosive hand OA should be further explored. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Electromyographic Activity of the Upper Limb in Three Hand Function Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Sanches Silva

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The results suggested the existence of differences in the muscle activation pattern during the performance of hand function evaluations. Occupational therapists should be aware of unique muscle requirements and its impact on the results of dexterity tests during hand function evaluation.

  15. A Turbo Pascal program for testing eye-hand coordination by means of tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, M

    1992-02-01

    A Turbo Pascal program for eye-hand coordination testing using standard PC XT/AT mouse is presented. The contour segments of three simple figures (square, circle and triangle) are chosen as tracing trajectories. Tracing performance expressed in root mean squared (RMS) and modulus mean error (MME) measures are calculated and used, together with tracing time for evaluation of eye hand coordination ability.

  16. Stereotypical hand movements in 144 subjects with Rett syndrome from the population-based Australian database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Philippa; Downs, Jenny; Bebbington, Ami; Williams, Simon; Jacoby, Peter; Kaufmann, Walter E; Leonard, Helen

    2010-02-15

    Stereotypic hand movements are a feature of Rett Syndrome but few studies have observed their nature systematically. Video data in familiar settings were obtained on subjects (n = 144) identified from an Australian population-based database. Hand stereotypies were demonstrated by most subjects (94.4%), 15 categories were observed and midline wringing was seen in approximately 60% of subjects. There was a median of two stereotypies per subject but this number decreased with age. Clapping and mouthing of hands were more prevalent in girls younger than 8 years and wringing was more prevalent in women 19 years or older. Clapping was commoner in those with p.R306C and early truncating mutations, and much rarer in those with p.R106W, p.R270X, p.R168X, and p.R255X. Stereotypies tended to be less frequent in those with more severe mutations. Otherwise, there were no clear relationships between our categories of stereotypies and mutation. Approximately a quarter each had predominantly right and left handed stereotypies and for the remaining half, no clear laterality was seen. Results were similar for all cases and when restricted to those with a pathogenic mutation. Hand stereotypies changed with increasing age but limited relationships with MECP2 mutations were identified. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Thermovision Analysis Changes of Human Hand Surface Temperature in Cold Pressor Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwałczyńska, Agnieszka; Gruszka, Katarzyna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Sobiech, Krzysztof A

    2015-01-01

    The cold pressor test (CTP) as a diagnostic method of the circulatory system reactivity may be a basis for the qualification for thermal stimulation therapy. The aim of the work was a thermovisual assessment of the reaction to the Hines and Brown cold pressor test. A group of 30 healthy men in the age of 23.5 ± 0.8 years were examined. The average weight of the examinees was 78.4 ± 9.2 kg, their height 180.7 ± 5.9 cms, and BMI 23.9 ± 2.2 kg/m(2). A thermovisual picture of a tested and not tested hand of all the subjects was taken before and after the cold pressor test. Under the influence of cold water the surface temperature of a tested hand has decreased in a statistically significant way by 8.3°C on average, which is 29% of the temperature before the test, whilst the temperature of an untested hand dropped by 0.67°C. The decreases of temperature were not even and there was a statistically significant difference between the dorsal and palmar side of the hand. The correlation between the changes of systolic blood pressure and the hand surface temperature before and after CTP was observed.

  18. Estimation of stature from hand dimensions in Bengalee population, West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitava Pal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stature estimation from decomposing bodies and incomplete skeletons particularly in personal identification is considered as one of the biggest aspects of forensic science. This issue has gained importance in recent times due to mass disasters like terrorist attacks, mass murders, transport accidents, floods and earthquakes. Thus, the present study was undertaken to set up a standard formulae to estimate stature from hand dimensions in the Bengalee population. Measurements of different hand dimensions and statures were taken from 1662 adult Bengalee women aged from 20 to 40 years following the standard technique and appropriate landmarks. There was no statistically significant bilateral variation of the measurements. The correlation coefficients between stature and all variables were positive and statistically significant (p < 0.001. The hand length and palm length showed a better correlation with stature than the other variables. Simple linear regression equations and multiple linear regression equation were formulated for stature estimation using the hand dimensions. The derived equations were applied to the control group and it was noted that the percentage difference between true stature of the control and the estimated stature ranged from 0.01% to 0.15%. The multiple linear regression equation was more reliable than the simple linear regression equations as a lower standard error of estimate and higher value of determination coefficient and multiple correlation coefficient. From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that hand dimensions can be successfully used for estimating stature of adult Bengalee women in forensic practice by enforcement agencies and forensic scientists.

  19. HIV testing in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemcke, Asja; Kjøller, Mette; Ekholm, Ola

    2007-01-01

    between HIV testing and background variables, such as gender, age, marital status, educational level, and sexual orientation. RESULTS: Overall 28.5% of the Danish population aged over 16 years have "ever been tested for HIV". More females (29.4%) than males (27.6%) were tested; 12.6% might not be aware......AIMS: To describe the accumulated prevalence of HIV testing in the Danish population until and including the year 2000. METHODS: The study was based on nationally representative data from the Danish Health Interview Survey 2000. Multiple logistic regression analysis investigated the association...... of their blood being HIV tested when donating blood. More males (17.1%) than females (13.8%) had donated blood after 1985. Although males 30-39 years old were the most tested, males 50-59 years old had the highest odds of having donated blood after 1985. Concerning education, the less education one had, the less...

  20. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk and persistence of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis: results from a general population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Carlsen, B C; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Hand eczema is prevalent in the general population. It remains unclear whether or not filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations increase the overall risk of hand eczema or only increase the risk of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis....

  1. Design and testing of an under-actuated surface EMG-driven hand exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lince, A; Celadon, N; Battezzato, A; Favetto, A; Appendino, S; Ariano, P; Paleari, M

    2017-07-01

    Stroke and other neurological pathologies are an increasing cause of hand impairment, involving expensive rehabilitative therapies. In this scenario, robotics applied to hand rehabilitation and assistance appears particularly promising in order to lower therapy costs and boost its efficacy. This work shows a recently conceived hand exoskeleton, from the design and realization to its preliminary evaluation. A control strategy based on surface electromyography (sEMG) signals is integrated: preliminary tests performed on healthy subjects show the validity of this choice. The testing protocol, applied on healthy subjects, demonstrated the robustness of the whole system, both in terms of mimicking a physiological distribution of finger forces across subjects, and of realizing an effective control strategy based on the user's intention.

  2. Differences among Holland Types as Measured by the Hand Test: An Attempt at Construct Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Frank R, Jr.; Wagner, Edwin E.

    1982-01-01

    Subjects classified into one of six Holland personality types on the basis of the Vocational Preference Inventory high-point codes differed significantly with respect to absolute and relative number of responses on certain Hand Test scoring variables. These results provide evidence for the construct validity of the postulated vocational types.…

  3. Developing a Diagnostic Test of Verbs for Hands-on Craft Workshops

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes and evaluates the development of The Verbs for Craft Test, a small-scale diagnostic instrument to measure knowledge of 50 common imperative verbs found in spoken discourse related to technical instruction requiring the use of one’s hands. Still under development, the test is designed to contribute to a pedagogic approach towards relevant English language learning materials to help train professionals of the Japanese craft industry, especially in the context ...

  4. Using hand proportions to test taxonomic boundaries within the Tupaia glis species complex (Scandentia, Tupaiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargos, Eric J.; Woodman, Neal; Reese, Aspen T.; Olson, Link E.

    2013-01-01

    Treeshrews (order Scandentia) comprise 2 families of squirrel-sized terrestrial, arboreal, and scansorial mammals distributed throughout much of tropical South and Southeast Asia. The last comprehensive taxonomic revision of treeshrews was published in 1913, and a well-supported phylogeny clarifying relationships among all currently recognized extant species within the order has only recently been published. Within the family Tupaiidae, 2 widely distributed species, the northern treeshrew, Tupaia belangeri (Wagner, 1841), and the common treeshrew, T. glis (Diard, 1820), represent a particularly vexing taxonomic complex. These 2 species are currently distinguished primarily based on their respective distributions north and south of the Isthmus of Kra on the Malay Peninsula and on their different mammae counts. This problematic species complex includes 54 published synonyms, many of which represent putative island endemics. The widespread T. glis and T. belangeri collectively comprise a monophyletic assemblage representing the sister lineage to a clade composed of the golden-bellied treeshrew, T. chrysogaster Miller, 1903 (Mentawai Islands), and the long-footed treeshrew, T. longipes (Thomas, 1893) (Borneo). As part of a morphological investigation of the T. glis–T. belangeri complex, we studied the proportions of hand bones, which have previously been shown to be useful in discriminating species of soricids (true shrews). We measured 38 variables from digital X-ray images of 148 museum study skins representing several subspecies of T. glis, T. belangeri, T. chrysogaster, and T. longipes and analyzed these data using principal components and cluster analyses. Manus proportions among these 4 species readily distinguish them, particularly in the cases of T. chrysogaster and T. longipes. We then tested the distinctiveness of several of the populations comprising T. glis and T. longipes. T. longipes longipes and T. l. salatana Lyon, 1913, are distinguishable from each

  5. Estimation of stature from hand and handprint measurements in Iban population in Sarawak, Malaysia and its applications in forensic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifly, Nuranis-Raihan; Wahab, Roswanira Abd; Layang, Elizabeth; Ismail, Dzulkiflee; Desa, Wan Nur Syuhaila Mat; Hisham, Salina; Mahat, Naji A

    2018-01-01

    Handprints and dismembered hands are commonly found during crime scene investigations and disaster victim identifications, respectively. It has been indicated that the accuracy of handprint and hand measurements for estimating stature maybe population specific. Since Iban is the largest ethnic population in Sarawak, Malaysia and because the application of anthropometry of hand and handprint within this population as well as other populations within the Southeast Asian countries remain unreported, this present study that investigated the reliability and accuracy of these two anthropometric aspects acquires forensic significance. Upon measuring the height, 21 measurements were recorded on each hand and the corresponding handprint of 50 male and 52 female consented adult Iban subjects. Using univariate statistics as well as simple and multiple regression analyses, interpretation of the measurements examined here was attempted. Results revealed that lengths of hand and handprint are the more reliable traits for estimating stature in both the male and female Iban subjects (p Malaysia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlates of exposure to second-hand smoke in an urban Mediterranean population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borras Josep

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To describe the socio-demographic factors associated with exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS in different settings (home, leisure, and workplace. Methods We analysed cross-sectional data on self-reported SHS exposure in 1059 non-daily smokers interviewed in the Cornellà Health Interview Survey Follow-up Study in 2002. We calculated age-adjusted prevalence rates and prevalence rate ratios of SHS exposure at home, at the workplace, during leisure time, and in any of these settings. Results The age-standardized prevalence rate of SHS exposure in any setting was 69.5% in men and 62.9% in women. Among men, 25.9% reported passive smoking at home, 55.1% during leisure time, and 34.0% at the workplace. Among women, prevalence rates in these settings were 34.1%, 44.3% and 30.1%, respectively. Overall exposure to SHS decreased with age in both men and women. In men, SHS exposure was related to marital status, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol intake. In women, SHS exposure was related to educational level, marital status, occupational status, self-perceived health, smoking-related illness, and alcohol intake. Conclusion The prevalence of SHS exposure in this population was high. The strongest association with exposure were found for age and occupational status in men, and age and educational level in women.

  7. SURVEILLANCE TEST (ENVIRONMENTAL) OF GRENADE, HAND RIOT, CS, ABC-M7A2; DPGR 387.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tests were conducted to determine the effects of environment upon the storage and functioning of the grenade , hand, riot, CS, ABC-M7A2, in climates...represented by the arctic, desert, temperate, and tropic test sites. The grenade is a 28-gauge steel cylinder 2.5 inches in diameter and 4.5 inches...long. It is ignited by a standard M201A1 fuze threaded into the grenade top. It is filled with approximately 275 grams of CS agent - pyrotechnic mix in

  8. Testing Precision of Measurements with Hand-Held GPS-Device GPSMAP 76CS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Župan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Small hand-held GPS-devices are more and more in use these days. A need for their accuracy and precision testing arises. Precision of measurements with the small hand-held GPS-device GPSMAP 76CS is described in this paper. Also, the correlation between reading "accuracy" during survey and deviations of individual measurements from their average value has been explored. The importance of the research is in the fact that according to our knowledge, there are not any explanations or definitions of "accuracy" shown on the screen of GPSMAP 76CS or similar devices in available references.Ključne riječi

  9. EFFECT OF PRANAYAMA AND EYE EXERCISES ON EYE TO HAND COORDINATION: STUDY BY FINGER DEXTERITY TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our eyes are bo dy's most well developed sensory organs. Indeed, a far larger part of our brain is devoted to the functions of eyesight than to those of hearing, taste, touch or smell together. We usually take our eyesight for granted, although when vision problems develop, most of us will do everything in our capacity to restore our eyesight to normal . Eyes work together to perceive depth thus allowing us to coordinate with motor actions. Practicing relaxation exercises in the form of pranayama and eye exercise has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. AIM: To study the effect of pranayama and eye exercises on eye to hand coordination. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study consisted of 60 healthy subjects divided equally into two groups. One group practiced kapalabhati pranayama and eye exercises for eight weeks whereas other group did not participate in any kind of exercise. The effect of pranayama and eye exercises on eye to hand coordination were assessed by finger dexterity test by using O′Connor finger dexterity task. RESULTS: There was significant improvement in eye to hand coordination in subjects practicing pranayama and eye exercises. Fi nger dexterity test values in study group before and after intervention were 31±4.94 and 33±4.98 respectively. Whereas in control group the values were 29.9±5.7 and 30.1±5.31 respectively. CONCLUSION: Both Kapalabhati pranayama and eye to hand coordination can improve fine motor skills

  10. Fundamentals of endoscopic surgery: creation and validation of the hands-on test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Melina C; Dunkin, Brian J; Fried, Gerald M; Mellinger, John D; Trus, Thadeus; Kaneva, Pepa; Lyons, Calvin; Korndorffer, James R; Ujiki, Michael; Velanovich, Vic; Kochman, Michael L; Tsuda, Shawn; Martinez, Jose; Scott, Daniel J; Korus, Gary; Park, Adrian; Marks, Jeffrey M

    2014-03-01

    The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery™ (FES) program consists of online materials and didactic and skills-based tests. All components were designed to measure the skills and knowledge required to perform safe flexible endoscopy. The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the hands-on component of the FES examination, and to establish the pass score. Expert endoscopists identified the critical skill set required for flexible endoscopy. They were then modeled in a virtual reality simulator (GI Mentor™ II, Simbionix™ Ltd., Airport City, Israel) to create five tasks and metrics. Scores were designed to measure both speed and precision. Validity evidence was assessed by correlating performance with self-reported endoscopic experience (surgeons and gastroenterologists [GIs]). Internal consistency of each test task was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliability was determined by having the same participant perform the test a second time and comparing their scores. Passing scores were determined by a contrasting groups methodology and use of receiver operating characteristic curves. A total of 160 participants (17 % GIs) performed the simulator test. Scores on the five tasks showed good internal consistency reliability and all had significant correlations with endoscopic experience. Total FES scores correlated 0.73, with participants' level of endoscopic experience providing evidence of their validity, and their internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.82. Test-retest reliability was assessed in 11 participants, and the intraclass correlation was 0.85. The passing score was determined and is estimated to have a sensitivity (true positive rate) of 0.81 and a 1-specificity (false positive rate) of 0.21. The FES hands-on skills test examines the basic procedural components required to perform safe flexible endoscopy. It meets rigorous standards of reliability and validity required for high

  11. Improvement of the Van Lieshout hand function test for tetraplegia using a Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooren, A I F; Arnould, C; Smeets, R J E M; Bongers, H M H; Seelen, H A M

    2013-10-01

    Cross-sectional study. The Van Lieshout hand function test for tetraplegia (VLT) measures the quality of arm-hand functioning in persons with tetraplegia. It is valid, reliable and responsive. However, it does not satisfy all the criteria for interval level measurement. The present study aims to apply the Rasch model to the VLT short form (VLT-SF) to upgrade its scale type towards interval level, and to verify if the requirements of an objective measure are satisfied in the revised version. Eight Dutch Rehabilitation centres. The VLT-SF data of 73 tetraplegic patients were Rasch-analysed (RUMM2030 software, RUMM Laboratory Pty Ltd, Perth, Australia) to verify the order of response categories, unidimensionality and reliability of the VLT-SF, and to assess its applicability regardless of (motor) lesion completeness. Seven of the ten VLT-SF items showed disordered response categories. The six original response categories were therefore recoded into three or four categories. After recoding, all items satisfied the model requirement of unidimensionality. The items were relatively well-targeted on the subjects' arm-hand skilled performance measures, leading to a good person separation index (R=0.91). The difficulty hierarchy of the VLT-SF items was invariant across patient subgroups of (motor) lesion completeness. Provided that response categories are recoded, VLT-SF Rasch analysis showed that the requirements of an objective measure were satisfied. This allows to compare the measurements of different patients quantitatively, and to follow their results over time.

  12. Simplified and quantitative saliva buffer capacity test using a hand-held pH meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasako, Yuichi; Moritsuka, Michiyo; Foxton, Richard M; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji; Nomura, Satoshi

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate and compare saliva buffer capacity using a hand-held pH meter and a commercial buffer strip in patients at risk of caries. To obtain stimulated saliva, 109 patients were given a paraffin wax to chew for 5 minutes. After reading the pH value of 0.5 ml of tested saliva using a portable hand-held pH meter (B-212), 10 microl of 0.1N HCl was titrated into the obtained saliva up to a total titration of 160 microl, and then the pH value read each time. The commercial buffer strip (CRT) was also evaluated. The correlation in ranking results (high, medium, low) between the B-212 pH meter and CRT buffer were statistically analyzed by the Bartlett's test (P buffer capacity were 50%, 17% and 33% respectively for the B-212 pH meter, and 56%, 17% and 27% respectively for the CRT. For the CRT buffer, 23 out of 109 cases showed inconclusive color change under the colorimetric test. There was significant correlation between ranking buffer capacity measured by the B-212 pH meter and the CRT buffer (P < 0.001).

  13. UV Disinfection of Hand-Rinse Greywater and Performance Testing Using Indigenous Staphylococcus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Shoults

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Greywater reuse is a feasible solution for decreasing raw water extraction in urban and rural settings. However, pathogen-specific performance guidelines and regulations have only recently been recommended; practical means to assess performance are missing. Here we examine the efficacy of Staphylococcus spp. as an endogenous surrogate for greywater pathogen reduction performance testing, by evaluating UV-C irradiation of hand-rinse greywater, and the variability in UV resistance between different wild Staphylococcus species. Hand-rinse greywater samples were collected from five participants, and a collimated UV-C beam (256 nm was used to assess log10 reductions. Assays of colony-forming units on tryptic soy agar (TSA were compared to mannitol salt agar (MSA using LysostaphinTM to confirm Staphylococcus spp. After irradiating raw hand-rinse samples to a dose of 220 mJ·cm−2, log10 reductions of Staphylococcus spp. were similar (2.1 and 2.2, respectively, p = 0.112. The similarity of the reduction based on TSA and Staphylococcus-specific culture assays following UV irradiation and the dominating presence of Staphylococcus spp. suggests that Staphylococcus spp. could be used as an endogenous performance surrogate group for greywater treatment testing. Suspended wild Staphylococcus isolates were irradiated with 256 nm UV-C to compare the variability of different Staphylococcus species. Staphylococcus isolates exhibited significant variance in log10 reduction values when exposed to 11 mJ·cm−2 of UV-C. Staphylococcus hominis subsp. hominis exhibited surprising resistance to UV-C, with only a 1.6-log10 reduction when exposed to 11 mJ·cm−2 of UV-C (most other isolates exhibited > 5-log10 reduction. The efficacy of UV-C was also significantly reduced when the sunscreen oxybenzone was present at a possible endogenous greywater concentration.

  14. Two-Point Discrimination Test in the Treatment of Right-handed Females with Lumbosacral Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Saeidian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-somatic causes of pain may aggravate painful complaints and complicate the conservative management of diseases such as lumbo-sacral disk root disease. The two-point discrimination test has been used for assessment of diseases, which change patients' skin sensation. This study aims to find out how applicable is two-point discrimination test in the conservative treatment of lumbo-sacral disk diseases. Twenty right-handed females suffering from unilateral lumbo-sacral disk disease were admitted for a conservative treatment from 2006 to 2009. The treatment con-sisted of a week bed rest, physiotherapy, and medication. They were subjected to straight leg raising tests, and their pains were evaluated using visual analog scale. The values of two-point discrimination test were obtained bilaterally for L4, L5 and S1 dermatomes. Changes between the involved and intact lower limbs as well as values of two-point discrimination test before and after the treatment were also compared. In addition, the correlation between the outcome of two-point discrimination, straight leg raising tests, or pain scores were evaluated. There was a significant (P<0.001 difference between the changes in the values of two-point discrimination test, pain scales, or straight leg raising tests in the involved and intact limbs before and after the treatment. However, correlation among variables did not reach statistical significance (P<0.94, r=0.017. The results indicated that although two-point discrimination test is a feasible and objective tool to evaluate patients' improvements during the conservative management of lumbo-sacral disk diseases, there were no strong correlations between two-point discrimination test and straight leg raising tests, or pain scale.

  15. Two-Point Discrimination Test in the Treatment of Right-handed Females with Lumbosacral Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidian, Seyed Reza; Moghaddam, Hadi Fathi; Ahangarpour, Akram; Latifi, Seyed Mahmood

    2011-01-01

    Non-somatic causes of pain may aggravate painful complaints and complicate the conservative management of diseases such as lumbo-sacral disk root disease. The two-point discrimination test has been used for assessment of diseases, which change patients' skin sensation. This study aims to find out how applicable is two-point discrimination test in the conservative treatment of lumbo-sacral disk diseases. Twenty right-handed females suffering from unilateral lumbo-sacral disk disease were admitted for a conservative treatment from 2006 to 2009. The treatment consisted of a week bed rest, physiotherapy, and medication. They were subjected to straight leg raising tests, and their pains were evaluated using visual analog scale. The values of two-point discrimination test were obtained bilaterally for L4, L5 and S1 dermatomes. Changes between the involved and intact lower limbs as well as values of two-point discrimination test before and after the treatment were also compared. In addition, the correlation between the outcome of two-point discrimination, straight leg raising tests, or pain scores were evaluated. There was a significant (P<0.001) difference between the changes in the values of two-point discrimination test, pain scales, or straight leg raising tests in the involved and intact limbs before and after the treatment. However, correlation among variables did not reach statistical significance (P<0.94, r=0.017). The results indicated that although two-point discrimination test is a feasible and objective tool to evaluate patients' improvements during the conservative management of lumbo-sacral disk diseases, there were no strong correlations between two-point discrimination test and straight leg raising tests, or pain scale. PMID:23115415

  16. TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY OF HAND GRIP STRENGTH MEASUREMENT USING A JAMAR HAND DYNAMOMETER IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE AND CHRONIC CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejazi G

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the test-retest reliability of Jamar hand held dynamometer for measuring handgrip strength (HGS in patients with acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy and to find out the difference in measurement of the handgrip strength between acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy. Methods: A prospective, observational and non-experimental, the comparative study design was used. A sample of 72 subjects (37 women and 35 men suffering from cervical radiculopathy were divided into two groups i.e., Group A(acute and Group B(chronic, handgrip strength was measured using Jamar hand held dynamometer on two occasions by the same rater with an interval of 7-days. Data collection was based on standard guidelines of American Society of Hand Therapists. Three gripping trials (measured in Kg with patient’s arm in standardized arm position were recorded. The data was analyzed from the mean score obtained from the sample. Result: One-way Analysis of Variance(ANOVA was used to evaluate test-retest reliability and Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparison Test used to find the difference between handgrip strength among acute and chronic Cervical radiculopathy cases. Greater P-value (>0.05 in both testing session, as well as 95% of the confidence interval, shows the reliability of the instrument and lesser p-value (0.05 in female subjects shows no significant difference in handgrip strength between the two groups. Conclusion: Excellent test-retest reliability for hand grip strength measurement was measured in patients with acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy shows that the equipment could be used as an assessment tool for this patient and significant difference exists among male handgrip strength between acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy cases whereas no difference exists among female handgrip strength between acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy cases.

  17. The evaluation test of hand-held dual-sensor ALIS in Croatia and Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Motoyuki; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2007-04-01

    We are developing a new hand-held land mine detection dual-sensor (ALIS) which is equipped with a metal detector and a GPR. ALIS is equipped with a sensor tracking system, which can record the GPR and Metal detector signal with its location. It makes possible to process the data after the data was acquired, including migration. The migration processing drastically increases the quality of the images of the buried objects. Evaluation test of ALIS has been conducted in several test sites. In February 2006, a one-month evaluation test was conducted in Croatia, and in October- December 2006, a two-month evaluation test was conducted in Croatia. Since the dual-sensor is a new landmine detection sensor, and the conventional evaluation procedure developed for metal detectors cannot directly be applied for the dual sensor. In Croatia, the detection probability was comparable to that by a metal detector operated by local deminers. In addition, we showed that ALIS provides image of buried objects by GPR, which can be used for identification. Therefore, their performances were sufficiently high. Then the test was also conducted in Cambodia. The test was carried out by 2 local deminers independently, which allows studying the influence of different operators and increases the statistical value of the results.

  18. Hand bone mineral density reference values in a Turkish healthy female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioglu, Kenan; Dogu, Beril; Sirzai, Hulya; Yilmaz, Figen; Kuran, Banu

    2017-12-01

    In this study we aimed at identifying the bone mineral density (BMD) reference values of hands, according to age, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and assessing the correlation of these values with lumbar and femoral BMD values. A total of 403 healthy women aged between 20 and 70 participated in our study. All BMD measurements are performed by DEXA method on both hands, anteroposterior lumbar spine (L2-L4) and right femur (femoral neck, total femur) regions. BMD results of all the patients were divided to 10-year age categories and evaluated in five subgroups in total (20-30 to 61-70). Among the 10-year age categories we found both dominant and non-dominant hand peak bone mass values in the 31-40 years age group (0.423 ± 0.039 g/cm², 0.410 ± 0.043 g/cm², respectively). Statistically significant positive correlation was defined between dominant and non-dominant hand BMD values and L2-L4 spine, femur neck and total femur values (for dominant hand r = 0.636, P = 0.0001; r = 0.645, P = 0.0001; r = 0.623; P = 0.0001; for non-dominant hand r = 0.624, P = 0.0001; r = 0.637, P = 0.0001, r = 0.623, P = 0.0001, respectively). Regarding the relationship of age and menopause with BMD results, a negative statistical relationship was observed among dominant and non-dominant hand, L2-L4 spine, femoral neck and total femur BMD values (P = 0.0001). Our study has provided hand BMD reference values in women aged between 20-70 years; further studies are needed to investigate the role of these values in identifying diseases causing osteoporosis in the hand and in evaluating treatment. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Estimation of stature from dimensions of hands and feet in a North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Sharma, Abhilasha

    2007-08-01

    In medico-legal autopsies, establishing personal identity of the victims is often required. Estimation of stature from extremities and their parts plays an important role in identifying the dead in forensic examinations. The study examines the relationship between stature and dimensions of hands and feet among Rajputs of Himachal Pradesh -- a North Indian endogamous group. The purpose for understanding these examinations was the paucity in the literature of studies that allow the reconstruction of stature from various dimensions of hands and feet amongst Rajputs. Hand length, hand breadth, foot length and foot breadth of 246 subjects comprising 123 males and 123 females ranging in age from 17 to 20 years were taken independently on left and right side of each individual. Statistical analyses indicated that the bilateral variation was insignificant for all the measurements except hand breadth in both the sexes (Perror of estimate) indicate that the foot length provides highest reliability and accuracy in estimating stature of an unknown individual. The regression equations were checked for their accuracy by comparing the estimated stature and actual stature.

  20. The relationship between clinical and standardized tests for hand-arm vibration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, C J M; Mason, H; Harding, A-H

    2016-06-01

    Standardized laboratory tests are undertaken to assist the diagnosis and staging of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS), but the strength of the relationship between the tests and clinical stages of HAVS is unknown. To assess the relationship between the results of thermal aesthesiometry (TA), vibrotactile (VT) thresholds and cold provocation (CP) tests with the modified Stockholm scales for HAVS and to determine whether the relationship is affected by finger skin temperature. Consecutive records of workers referred to a Tier 5 HAVS assessment centre from 2006 to 2015 were identified. The diagnosis and staging of cases was undertaken from the clinical information contained in the records. Cases with alternative or mixed diagnoses were excluded and staging performed according to the modified Stockholm scale without knowledge of the results of the standardized laboratory tests. A total of 279 cases of HAVS were analysed. Although there was a significant trend for sensorineural (SN) and vascular scores to increase with clinical stage (P 30°C. CP scores distributed bimodally and correlated poorly with clinical staging (r = 0.2). Standardized SN tests distinguish between the lower Stockholm stages, but not above 2SN early. This has implications for health surveillance and UK policy. © Crown copyright 2016.

  1. Usage of ultraviolet test method for monitoring the efficacy of surgical hand rub technique among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanyolos, Erzsebet; Peto, Katalin; Viszlai, Aida; Miko, Iren; Furka, Istvan; Nemeth, Norbert; Orosi, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Adequate hand movements are essential in surgical hand rub, so it is important for medical students to learn it correctly. To assess its efficacy, we aimed to use ultraviolet (UV) light test after applying fluorescent solution. Digital images of the hands of 253 medical students were analyzed during "Basic Surgical Techniques" course on the 10th (Survey 1) and 14th (Survey 2) week of the curriculum to check the process and the skills development. The last step of the surgical hand rub was performed with a fluorescent solution, and then the hands were placed under UV light. Photographs were taken and analyzed. Every uncovered area was considered an error. Number and the localization of missed spots and its extent was determined. For evaluation, palmar (P) and dorsal (D) sides of the hands were divided into regions of interest (1-distal phalanxes, 2-thumb and first metacarpus, 3-second to fifth fingers, and 4-second to fifth metacarpals). Various magnitude and number of failure occurred in 123 (48.61%) students in survey 1 and in 65 (25.69%) in survey 2. The most frequent sites of the missed spots were D/2 and P/4 region in survey 1 and D/1 and P/4 in survey 2. There was an improvement seen in survey 2, as shown by a decrease in the number and extent of missed spots. Right-handed students made fewer mistakes on their nondominant hands than left-handed students (n = 23) did. The method was suitable to monitor the efficacy of surgical hand rub technique and identify the mistakes and the critical sites. The main advantage of the UV test was the immediate feedback, which resulted in a distinct improvement. Applying the UV test to the medical education and training may contribute to improvement in the compliance and the efficacy of the technique of surgical hand rub among the students. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hand grip endurance test relates to clinical state and prognosis in COPD patients better than 6-minute walk test distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovarik M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Miroslav Kovarik,1,2 Vera Joskova,1,2 Anna Patkova,1,2 Vladimir Koblizek,3 Zdenek Zadak,2 Miloslav Hronek1,2 1Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic; 2Department of Research and Development, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic; 3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Purpose: Patients with COPD present peripheral muscle dysfunction and atrophy, expressed as muscle strength and endurance reduction. The goal of this study was direct dynamometric assessment of hand grip endurance and strength in relation to the stage of disease, multidimensional predictors of mortality, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no previous study determining these parameters.Patients and methods: In this observational study, 58 consecutive outpatients with stable COPD and 25 volunteers without respiratory problems were compared. All COPD subjects underwent a comprehensive examination to determine COPD severity, prognostic scales, and 6MWT. Body composition, basic spirometric parameters, and hand grip strength and endurance were determined in all study participants.Results: Patients in the COPD group had a 15% decrease in maximum strength (P=0.012 and a 28% decrease in area under the force/time curve (AUC of the endurance test (P<0.001 compared to the control group. Dynamometric parameters were significantly negatively associated with the stage of disease and values of multivariable prediction indexes, and positively associated with the results of 6MWT. In most cases, closer associations were found with AUC than with 6MWT and in the gender-specific groups.Conclusion: Both hand grip strength and endurance are impaired in COPD patients in comparison with the control group. In particular, AUC could be considered as an attractive option not only to

  3. Serological tests for diagnosis and staging of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Dennis S; Yan, Ji-Geng; Zhang, Lin-Ling; Kaplan, Rachel E; Riley, Danny A; Matloub, Hani S

    2008-06-01

    The current gold standard for the diagnosis and staging of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is the Stockholm workshop scale, which is subjective and relies on the patient's recalling ability and honesty. Therefore, great potentials exist for diagnostic and staging errors. The purpose of this study is to determine if objective serum tests, such as levels of soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), may be used in the diagnosis and staging of HAVS. Twenty two nonsmokers were divided into a control group (n = 11) and a vibration group (n = 11). The control group included subjects without history of frequent vibrating tool use. The vibration group included construction workers with average vibrating tool use of 12.2 years. All were classified according to the Stockholm workshop scale (SN, sensorineural symptoms; V, vascular symptoms. SN0, no numbness; SN1, intermittent numbness; SN2, reduced sensory perception; SN3, reduced tactile discrimination; V0, no vasospasmic attacks; V1, intermittent vasospasm involving distal phalanges; V2, intermittent vasospasm extending to middle phalanges; V3, intermittent vasospasm extending to proximal phalanges; V4, skin atrophy/necrosis). All control subjects were SN0 V0. Seven out of 11 vibration subjects were SN1 V1, and 4 out of 11 were SN1 V2. A 10-cm(3) sample of venous blood was collected from each subject. The sTM and sICAM-1 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean plasma sTM levels were as follows: control group = 2.93 +/- 0.47 ng/ml, and vibration group = 3.61 +/- 0.24 ng/ml. The mean plasma sICAM-1 levels were as follows: control group = 218.8 +/- 54.1 ng/ml, and vibration group = 300.3 +/- 53.2 ng/ml. The sTM and sICAM-1 differences between control and vibration groups were statistically significant (p Stockholm workshop scale, mean plasma sTM levels were SN0 V0 group = 2.93 +/- 0.47 ng/ml, SN1 V1 group = 3.59 +/- 0.25 ng/ml, and SN1 V2 group = 3

  4. Differentiation between Acting-Out and Non-Acting-Out Alcoholics with the Rorschach and Hand Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramis, Samuel L.; Wagner, Edwin E.

    1980-01-01

    Hand Test and Rorschach variables significantly differentiated two subgroups of aggressive and nonaggressive alcoholics. The aggressive group was characterized as hostile and impulsive. The predictor variables that emerged have practical value for recognizing the potential acting-out alcoholic. (Author)

  5. Estimation of stature from diversified hand anthropometric dimensions from Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Soo-Chan; Yun, Myung Hwan

    2015-10-01

    The anthropometric method has served as a useful tool in reducing the amount of time and effort in confirmation of identity. This study is based on a sample of 321 people (167 males and 154 females) from South Korea. Twenty-nine variables including lengths, breadths, thickness, and circumference of their hands and wrists were measured. The body dimension data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. To find the relationship between the various parts of the hand and height, Pearson correlation coefficients for the parts were compared. Further, the single regression and determination coefficient of a regression estimation equation (R(2)) and standard error of estimate (S.E.E) were calculated to compare prediction reliability. Hand length was found to be the variable with the highest correlation to stature in both males (r = 0.628) and females (r = 0.534). For male subjects, hand length (R(2) = 0.398) and palm length (R(2) = 0.358) proved to be the greatest determining factors for the regression equation. For both males and females, an R-square value of 0.643 was obtained with an estimation error of ±5.719 cm by using the derived multiple regressions. In this study single and multiple regression equations were derived for accurate estimation of stature and hand length was found to be the most relevant predictor of stature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  6. Hand Function in a Population-Based Sample of Young Children with Unilateral or Bilateral Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevberg, Gunvor L; Østensjø, Sigrid; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena; Elkjær, Sonja; Jahnsen, Reidun B

    2017-10-20

    To describe aspects of hand function in a population-based sample of young children with clinical signs of unilateral or bilateral cerebral palsy (CP). A cross-sectional study with data from national CP registers in Norway. Manual ability was classified with the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) or Mini-MACS. Hand use in bimanual activities was measured with the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) for unilateral CP or the newly developed Both Hands Assessment (BoHA) for bilateral CP. From 202 children, 128 (57 females) were included (Mini-MACS/MACS levels I-V, mean age 30.4 months; SD = 12.1). Manual abilities were distributed across levels I-III in unilateral CP and levels I-V in bilateral CP. Variations in AHA and BoHA units were large. One-way ANOVA revealed associations between higher AHA or BoHA units and Mini-MACS/MACS levels of higher ability (p CP, children with bilateral CP showed greater variation in Mini-MACS/MACS levels, and both sub-groups showed large variations in AHA or BoHA units. The classifications and assessments used in this study are useful to differentiate young children's ability levels. Such information is important to tailor upper limb interventions to the specific needs of children with CP.

  7. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) Are Predominantly Right-Handed: Replication in Three Populations of Apes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, William D.; Wesley, Michael J.; Izard, M. Kay; Hook, Michelle; Schapiro, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Population-level right-handedness has historically been considered a hallmark of human evolution. Even though recent studies in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have demonstrated population-level right-handedness for certain behaviors, some have questioned the validity and consistency of these findings by arguing that reported laterality effects are specific to certain colonies of apes and to those chimpanzees reared by humans. The authors report evidence of population-level right-handedness in 3 separate colonies of chimpanzees. Moreover, handedness in the 3 colonies was unrelated to the proportion of subjects that were raised by humans. This is the strongest evidence to date that population-level handedness is evident in chimpanzees and is not an artifact of human rearing. PMID:15174946

  8. Trail Making Test A improves performance characteristics of the International HIV Dementia Scale to identify symptomatic HAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermchai, Thep; Valcour, Victor; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Clifford, David; Paul, Robert H; Tipsuk, Somporn; Fletcher, James L K; Degruttola, Victor; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Hutchings, Nicholas; Shikuma, Cecilia; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-04-01

    Although HIV-associated dementia (HAD) occurs in less than 5 % of individuals with access to combination antiretroviral therapy, rates of milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) are much higher. We sought to define an optimal cut point for the International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) in Thailand for the identification of symptomatic HAND, defined as both HAD and mild neurocognitive disorder. We then sought to determine if adding a simple test from a larger neuropsychological battery could improve the performance characteristics for identifying symptomatic HAND. In this study, subjects comprising 75 seropositive adults in Bangkok, Thailand, completed neuropsychological tests and underwent a full neurological assessment. HAND diagnoses were determined by consensus conference using the 2007 Frascati criteria, blinded to the IHDS results. The optimal IHDS cut point was determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis with cross-validation. Individual neuropsychological tests were then evaluated and combined with the IHDS to test performance characteristics. The IHDS was poor at detecting symptomatic HAND at the optimized cut point of ≤ 10 (sensitivity, 53.3 %; specificity, 89.8 %). Trail Making Test A was most effective in improving performance characteristics when combined with the IHDS, with net sensitivity of 86 % and specificity of 79 %. In this setting, the IHDS performed poorly in identifying symptomatic HAND, but was substantially improved by the addition of Trail Making Test A, which typically requires less than 2 min to complete. This combination should be validated in a larger setting since it may address the critical need for HAND screening instruments in international settings.

  9. Estimation of Stature from Hand Measurements and Handprints in a Sample of Saudi Population

    OpenAIRE

    Maryna Kornieieva; Azza H. Elelemi

    2016-01-01

    Stature estimation is a commonly used method in forensic identification analysis. The tracks and remnants available at crime scene or catastrophes can give extensive information concerning the biological profiles of unknown persons. However, the investigator should take into account the constitutional peculiarities of the population where the evidence was found due to the high specificity of such data. The present work aimed at studying the ethnic peculiarities of the Saudi Arabian population...

  10. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based...... fragrance allergy and hand eczema. In future studies, a more detailed exposure assessment is needed, combined with patch test studies among patients with hand eczema tested with relevant fragrance allergens, as well as experimental control exposure studies to specific fragrance allergens on the hands....... As exposures to fragrances on the hands are often simultaneous exposures to irritants, this combined exposure approach needs to be considered....

  11. Clinical evaluation of hand-arm-vibration syndrome in shipyard workers: sensitivity and specificity as compared to Stockholm classification and vibrometry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, D C; Allen, R; Bureau, P; Cherniack, M; Hans, J; Robinson, M

    1998-02-01

    The hand-arm-vibration syndrome (HAVS) is a complex entity composed of circulatory, sensory, and motor disturbances, as well as associated musculoskeletal components. This study was performed to find a diagnostic testing modality with sufficient sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value to be utilized as a screening test for this disorder in a working population. A full range of testing modalities was utilized in the shipyard medical department. In addition, a clinical diagnosis of vascular and sensorineural disease was established in the workers by a combination of plethysmography, vibrometry, two point discrimination, and monofilament testing in an independent occupational medicine clinic. No one test modality met the requirements for such a definitive diagnostic test. Rather, a range of modalities was required to reach any acceptable level of predictive value, with sufficient degrees of specificity and sensitivity.

  12. Hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.; Flyvholm, M.-A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Healthcare workers are at increased risk of developing hand eczema. Objectives. To investigate the prevalence and severity of self-reported hand eczema, and to relate the findings to demographic data, occupation, medical speciality, wards, shifts, and working hours. Patients....../materials/methods. A survey of 3181 healthcare workers was performed. Data were analysed with logistic regression. Data on sick leave and notification to the authorities were obtained. Results. The response rate was 71% (2274 of 3181). The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema was 21%, and was positively associated with atopic....... The 21% prevalence of hand eczema in healthcare workers is double the prevalence in the background population. Eleven per cent of hand eczema patients reported severe/very severe eczema. No significant differences were found between professions or medical specialities with respect to prevalence...

  13. Generating Tap Test Images with a Free-Hand Motorized Tapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, D.; Foreman, C.; Hsu, D.

    2009-03-01

    Previously we have described the Computer Aided Tap Tester (CATT), a simple instrumented probe and software that facilitates the generation of tap test C-scans in field environments. Early in the CATT development it was noted that inspectors prefer hand tapping at random locations over the part, eventually covering the part to the satisfaction of the inspector. To speed inspections, a regimented method of tapping was incorporated into the CATT via a grid laid over the part. Although the CATT system is quite simple to use, the method of tapping at each grid location in a pre-determined raster pattern continues to encounter resistance from the inspectors. The preferred free scanning of the inspection area dovetails nicely with the GenScan system previously reported on, where the operator scans over the inspection area freely, starting with larger pixels, and refines the geometry of flaw indications with finer pixels. As part of an Air Force project, we are merging the CATT instrumented tap data with position encoding and pixel change on-the-fly features of the GenScan. A description and demonstration of its operation will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory under Contract♯FA8650-04-C-5228 at Iowa State University's Center for NDE.

  14. Population testing for cancer predisposing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Wardle, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Technological advances raise the possibility of systematic population-based genetic testing for cancer-predisposing mutations, but it is uncertain whether benefits outweigh disadvantages. We directly compared the psychological/quality-of-life consequences of such an approach to family history (FH)–based testing. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial of BRCA1/2 gene-mutation testing in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, we compared testing all participants in the...

  15. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of the Sollerman hand function test in patients with chronic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogårdh, Christina; Persson, Ann L; Sjölund, Bengt H

    2007-01-01

    test seems to be a reliable test in patients with chronic stroke, but we recommend that the same examiner evaluates a patient's hand function pre- and post-treatment.......PURPOSE: To examine whether the Sollerman hand function test is reliable in a test-retest situation in patients with chronic stroke. METHOD: Three independent examiners observed each patient at three experimental sessions; two days in week 1 (short-term test-retest) and one day in week 4 (long......-term test-retest). A total of 24 patients with chronic stroke (mean age; 59.7 years, mean time since stroke onset 29.6 months) participated. The examiners simultaneously assessed the patients' ability to perform 20 subtests. Both ordinal data (generalized kappa) and total sum scores (Spearman's rank...

  16. A test of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Qiuying; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2011-11-01

    Testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is used routinely as an important initial step for genotype data quality checking. Departure from HWE can be caused by many factors, such as genotyping errors, population stratification, and disease association, if we use affected individuals only. In a structured population, even if a marker is in HWE in each subpopulation, data may show departure from HWE if allele frequencies are different in different subpopulations and such a departure can be misinterpreted as a potential problem in genotyping quality, resulting in false exclusion from future analysis. In this article, we propose a new HWE test, a test for HWE in structured populations (HWES) that can assess departure from HWE and take into account of population stratification at the same time. Our proposed test can distinguish departure from HWE caused by population stratification and departure from HWE caused by other factors. We use simulation studies as well as applications to real data sets to evaluate the performance of the proposed test. Results show that, for a wide range of population structures, our proposed test has correct type I error rates while the traditional χ(2) test will lead to false-positive results. In homogenous populations, our proposed test has comparable power with the traditional χ(2) test. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Quality of life and depression in a population of occupational hand eczema patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvetkovski, Rikke Skoet; Zachariae, Robert; Jensen, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    has considerable impact on quality of life (QoL) and may lead to depression. The aims of the study were to determine risk factors for low QoL, the frequency and severity of depression among OHE patients and changes in QoL and depression after 12 months of follow up. The study population, 758 patients...... was 82% at baseline and 91% at follow up. The mean Dermatology Life Quality Index total score was 5.5 for all patients and 7.8 for severe OHE cases. Severe OHE cases and lower socioeconomic status were independently associated with low QoL. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe depression was 9%. Only...

  18. Motor imagery in Asperger syndrome: testing action simulation by the hand laterality task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Conson

    Full Text Available Asperger syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopmental condition within the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD characterized by specific difficulties in social interaction, communication and behavioural control. In recent years, it has been suggested that ASD is related to a dysfunction of action simulation processes, but studies employing imitation or action observation tasks provided mixed results. Here, we addressed action simulation processes in adolescents with AS by means of a motor imagery task, the classical hand laterality task (to decide whether a rotated hand image is left or right; mental rotation of letters was also evaluated. As a specific marker of action simulation in hand rotation, we assessed the so-called biomechanical effect, that is the advantage for judging hand pictures showing physically comfortable versus physically awkward positions. We found the biomechanical effect in typically-developing participants but not in participants with AS. Overall performance on both hand laterality and letter rotation tasks, instead, did not differ in the two groups. These findings demonstrated a specific alteration of motor imagery skills in AS. We suggest that impaired mental simulation and imitation of goal-less movements in ASD could be related to shared cognitive mechanisms.

  19. 78 FR 20695 - Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method... has recently developed updated versions of its minimum performance standards for walk-through metal...

  20. Hand Eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Uma Shankar; Besarwal, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rahul; Agarwal, Puneet; Napalia, Sheetal

    2014-01-01

    Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of all occupational contact dermatitis. So, it becomes important to find the exact etiology and classification of the disease and to use the appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Despite its importance in the dermatological practice, very few Indian studies have been done till date to investigate the epidemiological trends, etiology, and treatment options for hand eczema. In this review, we tried to find the etiology, epidemiology, and available treatment modalities for chronic hand eczema patients. PMID:24891648

  1. Factorial Invariance in Multiple Populations: A Multiple Testing Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2013-01-01

    A multiple testing method for examining factorial invariance for latent constructs evaluated by multiple indicators in distinct populations is outlined. The procedure is based on the false discovery rate concept and multiple individual restriction tests and resolves general limitations of a popular factorial invariance testing approach. The…

  2. Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Omni-Hand was developed by Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The multiple digit hand has an opposable thumb and a flexible wrist. Electric muscles called Minnacs power wrist joints and the interchangeable digits. Two hands have been delivered to NASA for evaluation for potential use on space missions and the unit is commercially available for applications like hazardous materials handling and manufacturing automation. Previous SBIR contracts resulted in the Omni-Wrist and Omni-Wrist II robotic systems, which are commercially available for spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, as well as other uses.

  3. Reference values for the transformed Van Lieshout hand function test for tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooren, A I F; Arnould, C; Smeets, R J E M; Snoek, G; Seelen, H A M

    2013-10-01

    Longitudinal cohort study. Previously, the Van Lieshout hand function test for tetraplegia (short form)(VLT-SF) has been transformed into an interval scale (r_VLT-SF) using the Rasch analysis, thereby fulfilling the requirements of an objective measurement. The present study aims (1) to transform r_VLT-SFlogit scores (r_VLT-SFlogit) into 0-100 scores (r_VLT-SF100) in order to facilitate communication amongst its users and (2) to describe r_VLT-SF100 reference values in order to refine the prediction of upper extremity skilled performance in persons with tetraplegia. Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres. The VLT-SF data of tetraplegic patients from eight Dutch rehabilitation centres, gathered at the start of the active rehabilitation (t1), 3 months after t1 (t2) and at the time of discharge (t3), have been used. The r_VLT-SF100 total score for t1 and t3 were computed, anchored on the data for t2. Reference values (medians and interquartiles) for different subgroups were calculated at different moments during the rehabilitation. Data at t1 (n=64), t2 (n=73) and t3 (n=69) were used. The r_VLT-SFlogit scores (-4.78-6.32) were transformed into r_VLT-SF100 (0-100) at t2. Reference values were established for persons with motor complete or incomplete lesions with either a high (C1-C6) or a low (C7-T1) lesion level at t1, t2 and t3. Significant differences (P<0.025) in r_VLT-SF100 were found for most subgroups and different time intervals. The r_VLT-SFlogit scores were converted into r_VLT-SF100 scores, and reference values of the r_VLT-SF100 have been established for different subgroups of tetraplegic patients at different stages during rehabilitation. The r_VLT-SF100 has been proven to be able to detect improvement over time.

  4. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based...... fragrance allergy and hand eczema. In future studies, a more detailed exposure assessment is needed, combined with patch test studies among patients with hand eczema tested with relevant fragrance allergens, as well as experimental control exposure studies to specific fragrance allergens on the hands...

  5. In vitro strain in human metacarpal bones during striking: testing the pugilism hypothesis of hominin hand evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Joshua; Jung, Rebekah; Carrier, David R

    2015-10-01

    The hands of hominins (i.e. bipedal apes) are distinguished by skeletal proportions that are known to enhance manual dexterity but also allow the formation of a clenched fist. Because male-male physical competition is important in the mating systems of most species of great apes, including humans, we tested the hypothesis that a clenched fist protects the metacarpal bones from injury by reducing the level of strain during striking. We used cadaver arms to measure in vitro strain in metacarpals during forward strikes with buttressed and unbuttressed fist postures and during side slaps with an open palm. If the protective buttressing hypothesis is correct, the clenched fist posture should substantially reduce strain in the metacarpal bones during striking and therefore reduce the risk of fracture. Recorded strains were significantly higher in strikes in which the hand was secured in unbuttressed and slapping postures than in the fully buttressed posture. Our results suggest that humans can safely strike with 55% more force with a fully buttressed fist than with an unbuttressed fist and with twofold more force with a buttressed fist than with an open-hand slap. Thus, the evolutionary significance of the proportions of the hominin hand may be that these are the proportions that improved manual dexterity while at the same time making it possible for the hand to be used as a club during fighting. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Test-retest reliability of Antonovsky's 13-item sense of coherence scale in patients with hand-related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alice Ørts; Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Cederlund, Ragnhild

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report on the distribution and test-retest reliability of Antonovsky's 13-item Sense of Coherence (SOC-13) Scale in patients with hand-related disorders (HRD). Links between the SOC-13 score and factors such as age, number of days between date of injury and start of rehabilitation......, gender and educational level were explored. METHOD: Survey with test-retest, using self-administered questionnaire. SOC-13 was completed before starting rehabilitation at an outpatient clinic after 14 days and three months. Adult patients with HRD were included. RESULTS: A total of 170 participants...... to be a powerful tool to measure the ICF component personal factors, which could have an impact on patients' rehabilitation outcomes. Implications for rehabilitation Antonovsky's SOC-13 scale showed test-retest reliability for patients with hand-related disorders. The SOC-13 scale could be a suitable tool to help...

  7. Testing of a Hybrid FES-Robot Assisted Hand Motor Training Program in Sub-Acute Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRIGORAS, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available While hands-on therapy is the most commonly used technique for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke, it requires a therapist and residual activity and is best suited for active-assisted exercises. Robotic therapy on the other hand, can provide intention driven training in a motivating environment. We compared a robotic and standard therapy group, allowing intention driven finger flexion/extention respectively active-assisted exercises and a standard therapy only group. A total of 25 patients, 2 to 6 months post–stroke, with moderate motor deficit (Fugl-Meyer Assessment or FMA between 15 and 50, were randomly assigned in one of the groups. Patients practiced 30 minutes of hands-on therapy each day for 2 weeks with a supplementary 30 minutes of robotic therapy each day for patients in the experimental group. Subjects were evaluated using the FMA, Box and Blocks test (BBT and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS before and after the treatment. Patients in the experimental group showed higher average gain in all tests than those in the control group but only the SIS average gain was on the limit of statistical significance. This study shows the potential efficacy of robotic therapy for hand rehabilitation in subacute stroke patients.

  8. Self-management of musculoskeletal hand pain and hand problems in community-dwelling adults aged 50 years and older: results from a cross-sectional study in a UK population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Helen; Dziedzic, Krysia; Nicholls, Elaine; Croft, Peter

    2016-10-06

    Musculoskeletal pain is common in adults, with the hand being frequently affected. Healthcare services have the potential to be of benefit to adults with hand pain and problems, through promotion and facilitation of self-management. This paper explores existing self-management in a UK population of community-dwelling adults aged 50 years and over using data from surveys and a nested clinical cohort study. Self-management of hand problems was considered in three ways: self-directed treatment approaches used, adaptation behaviours adopted and choice to consult with a healthcare professional. The treatment approaches most commonly used were 'exercise/movement' (n = 151, 69 %) and 'resting' the hands (n = 139, 69 %). The use of adaptation behaviour was widespread: 217 (99 %) people reported using one or more adaptation behaviours. Under half of survey respondents who reported hand pain (n = 783, 43 %) had consulted a healthcare professional about their problem during the last year: the lowest rate of consultation was for occupational therapy (n = 60, 3 %). Self-directed treatment and adaptation behaviours were widespread in adults aged 50 years and over with hand problems, but consultation with a healthcare professional was low.

  9. Hand Eczema

    OpenAIRE

    Uma Shankar Agarwal; Raj Kumar Besarwal; Rahul Gupta; Puneet Agarwal; Sheetal Napalia

    2014-01-01

    Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of ...

  10. SURVEILLANCE TEST, (ENVIRONMENTAL) OF GRENADE, HAND, RIOT, DM, E21R1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The grenade was subjected to environmental field testing from 47 to 49 months. The grenade will function satisfactorily during this length of testing at the Arctic, Desert, Temperate and Tropic Test Sites.

  11. Mental status testing in elderly Hispanic populations: special concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahurin, R K; Espino, D V; Holifield, E B

    1992-01-01

    The rapid growth of the older Hispanic population highlights the importance of accurately assessing the mental status of these individuals. Although several community surveys have reported relatively higher rates of cognitive impairment among older Hispanics, closer analysis has revealed excessive false positives and the underestimation of cognitive functioning. Problems inherent in the mental status testing of this group include the lack of appropriately translated and culturally sensitive instrumentation, the diversity of the population, differences in their educational experiences, and bias in the test-taking situation. Commonly used neuropsychological test batteries have generally been neither translated nor normed for Hispanic subjects. To minimize cultural differences, cross-cultural tests have used nonverbal content; however, nonverbal testing does not, in itself, remove cultural bias. Alternative methods of testing that may reduce bias include performance-based assessment of everyday living skills and measurement of basic psychophysiological responses.

  12. Nerve injuries to the volar aspect of the hand: A comparison of the reliability of the Weber static test versus the gauze test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijon, Charles; Diaz, Juan José Hidalgo; Pizza, Chiara; Facca, Sybille; Pereira, Alexis; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    When examining lacerations to the volar aspect of the hand a gauze test may usually be performed to detect nerve injuries. However, published literature suggests that its sensitivity and specificity are lower than 100%. The aim of this study was to determine whether a Weber static (main hypothesis) and dynamic test or a Semmes-Weinstein test (secondary hypotheses) could be a more reliable test than the gauze test to rule out any nerve injury and avoid unnecessary wound explorations. Our case series included a total of 102 patients presenting with 123 palmar lacerations and 158 nerve injuries. On arrival at the emergency department, every patient was tested for epicritic sensation at the pulp of the injured and contralateral fingers with the Weber static and dynamic tests and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. All lacerations underwent exploration under anesthetic to rule out nerve injury. The sensitivities of the gauze test, the Weber static test, the Weber dynamic test and the Semmes Weinstein monofilament test were proven to be 82.5%, 98.6%, 97.9% and 86.7% respectively. The specificities of the gauze test, the Weber static test, the Weber dynamic test and the Semmes Weinstein monofilament test were 79%, 79%, 79% and 78.9% respectively. Examination of lacerations to the volar aspect of the hand to rule out any nerve injuries should include a Weber static test instead of a gauze test. A negative Weber static test should not however discourage a surgical exploration of the laceration to rule out tendinous or vascular injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of self-reported hand eczema: a cross-sectional population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T

    2010-01-01

    . It has been debated whether life-style factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: The current study aimed to investigate whether self-reported hand eczema was associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in the general population. METHODS...... were analysed with logistic regression analyses and associations were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: The prevalence of hand eczema was higher among previous smokers (OR = 1.13; CI = 0.90-1.40), current light smokers (OR = 1.51; CI = 1.14-2.02) and current...

  14. The effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of self-reported hand eczema: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Johansen, J D

    2010-03-01

    Hand eczema is a prevalent disorder that leads to high health care costs as well as a decreased quality of life. Important risk factors include atopic dermatitis, contact allergy and wet work whereas the role of null mutations in the filaggrin gene complex remains to be clarified. It has been debated whether life-style factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with hand eczema. The current study aimed to investigate whether self-reported hand eczema was associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in the general population. Between June 2006 and May 2008, a cross-sectional study was performed in the general population in Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark. A random sample of 7931 subjects aged 18-69 years old was invited to participate in a general health examination including a questionnaire; 3471 (44%) participated. Data were analysed with logistic regression analyses and associations were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The prevalence of hand eczema was higher among previous smokers (OR = 1.13; CI = 0.90-1.40), current light smokers (OR = 1.51; CI = 1.14-2.02) and current heavy smokers (OR = 1.38; CI = 0.99-1.92) compared with never-smokers. Tobacco smoking was positively associated with hand eczema among adults from the general population in Denmark. Apparently, current light smokers ( 15 g daily) but this needs to be reconfirmed. Alcohol consumption was not associated with hand eczema.

  15. Long-term adaptation to neck/shoulder pain and perceptual performance in a hand laterality motor imagery test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Hans O; Röijezon, Ulric; Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2010-01-01

    The effect of neck/shoulder pain on the performance in a hand laterality motor imagery test was studied. Responses to the Cooper and Shepard (1975, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 104 48-56) hand laterality test were explored in twenty-four individuals with chronic non-specific neck pain and twenty-one subjects with chronic neck pain of traumatic origin (whiplash-associated disorder). Twenty-two controls were also included in the study. Digitalised right- or left-hand stimuli were presented at five different stimulus angles (0 degrees, 45 degrees laterally, 90 degrees laterally, 135 degrees laterally, and 180 degrees). The experimental task was to decide the laterality as fast and accurately as possible. The performance, both reaction time (RT) and accuracy, of the two experimental groups was contrasted with that of the control group. The main results revealed that the subjects afflicted with whiplash injury on the average exhibited a faster response pattern than symptom-free healthy controls. Despite their musculoskeletal deficits and experience of pain these volunteers also exhibited a preserved speed-accuracy tradeoff. Longer duration of time with symptoms of neck pain was, moreover, associated with progressively faster RTs. These results point to perceptual learning and may reflect different stages of adaptation to neck pain.

  16. Acceptance of genetic testing in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Hakonen, A; Hietala, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze effects of age, education and gender on acceptance of genetic testing. Subjects, n = 1967 aged 15-69, were a stratified random sample of the Finnish population. One thousand, one hundred and sixty nine subjects, 530 men and 639 women, returned the questionnaire....... The majority of the respondents approved of the availability of genetic testing. Young, aged 15-24, were more favourable towards testing and more willing to undergo suggested tests, but they were also more worried than others about the misuse of test results. Men aged 45-69 with only basic education were more...... in favour of mandatory genetic testing than other respondents. Respondents with university education were more critical towards genetic testing and expressed their worry about eugenics more often than other education groups. In conclusion, there are age, education and gender related differences...

  17. Children with Atopic Dermatitis Should Always be Patch-tested if They Have Hand or Foot Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Olhardt, Sanna; Rådehed, Jeanette; Svensson, Åke

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease among children in industrialised countries. Many factors influence this disease in a negative way and contact allergy is one such factor. The aim of the study was to examine the frequency of contact allergy among children with the diagnosis atopic dermatitis. Contact allergy was found in 22/82 children (26.8%), the most common from Amerchol L101 (11.0%), potassium dichromate (7.3%), and nickel sulfate (4.9%). A statistically significant difference in contact allergy frequency was demonstrated for those with hand and/or foot eczema compared to those without. Children with atopic dermatitis who suffer from hand and/or foot dermatitis should always be patch-tested to evaluate whether they have a relevant contact allergy and thus allergic contact dermatitis.

  18. Hand collection - hand harvest

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of activities related to the collection and harvest of seeds on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. Information about hand...

  19. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based...... on a systematic literature research using both a manual and a Medline based search. The search identified 39 studies, including epidemiological patch test studies, general population patch test studies, case studies, and studies of occupational groups. The published data indicate a possible association between...... fragrance allergy and hand eczema. In future studies, a more detailed exposure assessment is needed, combined with patch test studies among patients with hand eczema tested with relevant fragrance allergens, as well as experimental control exposure studies to specific fragrance allergens on the hands...

  20. Assessing handedness in pre-schoolers: Construction and initial validation of a hand preference test for 4-6-year-olds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URSULA KASTNER-KOLLER

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and validate a test for measuring the handedness of pre-school children. The newly developed test consists of 14 activities for checking various aspects of hand preference and was administered to a Viennese sample of 120 children of the ages 4 to 6.5 (18 left-handed, 17 ambidextrous and 85 right-handed. For the purpose of validation, the handedness of the children was assessed via a questionnaire given to parents, observation of the hand used to draw and testing of visual-motor skills as well as general level of development using the Viennese Development Test (WET, Kastner-Koller & Deimann, 2002. The hand preference test proved to be reliable (α=0.97. The inter-correlations of the handedness measures gathered (parent’s estimate as well as observation of drawing hand with the hand preference test substantiates the concurrent validity of the procedure. Right-handers exhibited the most pronounced hand preference; while the hand use of left-handers was significantly less lateralized. Irrespective of the direction of handedness, children with a consistent hand preference had higher total development scores than children with inconsistent use, i.e. frequent changes in hand used for a specific activity. Compared to ambidextrous and right-handed children, left-handers achieved significantly lower scores in the field of visual-motor skills. The results highlight the necessity of a reliable method for differentiated measurement of handedness as early as pre-school.

  1. The Relationship of Scores on Elizur's Hostility System on the Rorschach to the Acting-Out Score on the Hand Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between Elizur's Hostility Scoring on the Rorschach Test and the Acting-Out Score on the Hand Test was examined. Correlations between the two measures (using several scoring procedures) ranged from .40 to .64. (JKS)

  2. Potentiating and fatiguing cortical reactions in a voluntary fatigue test of a human hand muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Zwarts, MJ; Kernell, Daniel

    Fatigue-associated changes in the excitability of central motor mechanisms were investigated using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex. Test stimuli were applied before, during and after a voluntary fatigue test of the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI). Subjects were

  3. Markets, Managerialism and Teachers' Work: The Invisible Hand of High Stakes Testing in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Howard; Wood, Phil

    2013-01-01

    High stakes testing has been long established in the English school system. In this article, we seek to demonstrate how testing has become pivotal to securing the neo-liberal restructuring of schools, that commenced during the Thatcher era, and is reaching a critical point at the current time. Central to this project has been the need to assert…

  4. Economic impact of hand and wrist injuries: Health-care costs and productivity costs in a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. de Putter (Dennis); R.W. Selles (Ruud); S. Polinder (Suzanne); M.J.M. Panneman (Martien); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); E.F. van Beeck (Ed)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Injuries to the hand and wrist account for approximately 20% of patient visits to emergency departments and may impose a large economic burden. The purpose of this study was to estimate the total health-care costs and productivity costs of injuries to the hand and wrist and

  5. Evidence-based training as primary prevention of hand eczema in a population of hospital cleaning workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Kim K B; Randbøll, Ingelise; Ryborg, Malene F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin disorders accounted for one third of all recognised occupational diseases in Denmark in 2010. Wet work is a risk factor for the development of occupational hand eczema. The consequences of occupational hand eczema include sick leave, loss of job and impaired quality of life...

  6. Sex determination from hand dimensions and index/ring finger length ratio in North Saudi population: Medico-legal view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrous AbdelBasset Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: By using the anthropometric measurements of hand dimensions, sex can be estimated with a high accuracy. It is, therefore, an important tool to be included in forensic identification when a hand is detected at the scene in mass disasters and criminal situations.

  7. Nurses' perceptions of the benefits and adverse effects of hand disinfection: alcohol-based hand rubs vs. hygienic handwashing: a multicentre questionnaire study with additional patch testing by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, N; Becker, D; Jappe, U; John, S M; Ladwig, A; Spornraft-Ragaller, P; Uter, W; Löffler, H

    2009-03-01

    Nurses have a high risk of developing hand eczema due to hand disinfection procedures. To investigate the perception of nurses regarding the adverse effects of hand washing (HW) and alcoholic disinfection (ADI), and to obtain data on the prevalence of hand dermatitis and sensitization to alcohols and alcohol-based hand rubs (ABHRs). A self-administered questionnaire survey, carried out as a pilot study (PS), followed by a modified multicentre study (MC) in five hospitals. Patch tests to ethanol (80%), 1-propanol (60%), 2-propanol (70%) and ABHRs were performed in a subsample. The majority (PS 60.1%; MC 69.5%) of nurses considered ADI to be more damaging than HW. Mostly, ADI and HW were suspected to have irritant effects (ADI 79.2%/52.1%; HW 65.5%/36.2%) compared with an allergenic potential (ADI 10.4%/5.8%; HW 7.8%/3.9%). The prevalence of hand dermatitis in the MC was 13.4% by self-diagnosis and 22.4% by symptom-based questions. In 50 tested individuals no sensitization and only two irritant reactions to alcohols and three single-positive reactions to ABHRs were observed, none of the latter related to alcohols. Although ADI is known to cause less skin irritation than HW, nurses perceive ADI as more damaging, resulting in: (i) a low compliance with ADI and (ii) a higher prevalence of hand dermatitis because the more deleterious HW is preferred. This may result in an increase in occupational disease and nosocomial infections. Educational programmes should promote ADI as a procedure with good efficiency and skin tolerability to reduce the prevalence of hand eczema in nurses and to enhance compliance with hand hygiene standards.

  8. Hand eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Shankar Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of all occupational contact dermatitis. So, it becomes important to find the exact etiology and classification of the disease and to use the appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Despite its importance in the dermatological practice, very few Indian studies have been done till date to investigate the epidemiological trends, etiology, and treatment options for hand eczema. In this review, we tried to find the etiology, epidemiology, and available treatment modalities for chronic hand eczema patients.

  9. The Topsoil Tour. The Hands-On Test Kit & Mini Curriculum for Exploring Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte Co., Chestertown, MD.

    The goal of this mini-curriculum is for students to examine, discover, and compare the physical and chemical properties of soil. Seven units are designed to be presented as a lecture and to allow 30 to 40 students to perform every procedure, each testing their own soil sample. Games are provided in each section to reinforce the concepts presented…

  10. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Therapy Email to a friend * required fields From * ... ensure a healthy style of work. Find a Hand Therapist Search for a hand therapist in your ...

  11. One-leg standing test for elderly populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikawa, Takehiro; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Takebayashi, Toru; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2009-09-01

    The one-leg standing (OLS) test is one of the balance tests used to diagnose musculoskeletal ambulation disability symptom complex (MARS), a condition newly defined by three professional Japanese medical societies in 2006 to help identify the symptoms of motor organ deterioration and establish preventive strategies. Although many studies have used the OLS test, none has shown conclusively that the test can be used as a practical marker of frailty among elderly people, especially in community settings. Based on the type of epidemiological study -- i.e., descriptive epidemiology and analytical epidemiology (observational and intervention studies) -- we reviewed evidence on three fundamental issues related to the OLS test: (1) testing procedures and reference values; (2) the associations between the OLS time and negative events; (3) improvement of the OLS time by intervention. These issues are key to any discussion of whether the OLS test can be used as a practical marker for predicting frailty in community-dwelling elderly populations. Articles were collected from MEDLINE databases using the search terms "one- leg standing" and the other names included in the same category. Because various procedures are used to carry out the OLS test, the measured values for the OLS time varied widely from study to study. Some observational studies showed that the OLS time is related to negative events such as falls, declines in activity of daily living, and other morbidity. OLS times could be improved by several interventions. This review suggests that the OLS test can be a tool for predicting frailty in community-dwelling elderly populations. However, our review should be interpreted with caution because we did not confirm the evidence level of each of the studies we selected. Further research on this topic is needed.

  12. A medical hand tool physical interaction evaluation approach for prototype testing using patient care simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Aleksandra; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a physical ergonomics assessment approach for medical device handles. The method assesses wrist posture and force of exertion simultaneously by task element. Electrogoniometers and EMG sensors were connected through a data acquisition module for synchronization with video recordings of trials. Task analysis of video recordings were performed offline with Observer XT software. Average posture and force data across several repetitions of individual task elements were calculated and presented in a format suitable for informing product designers of specific issues during a test trial. A handle comfort questionnaire is proposed to survey subjective responses. The evaluation approach was applied to an endoscope needle in sampling a biopsy from the stomach wall using a gastrointestinal track simulator with ten physician surrogates. The results showed that for all task elements the wrist was in extension (33(°)-45(°)). Peak muscle forces ranged from 28% to 68% MVC across the three muscles studied. Muscle peak forces were above ACGIH HAL maximum threshold limits for four of the seven task elements, and above the action limit for all seven task elements for two muscles. The handle comfort questionnaire data also supported the high muscle force findings, and also on force distribution on the handle due to contact stresses. This combined approach could be used to collect and report detailed early stage ergonomics data from user trials on patient care simulators. The approach is proposed for use by medical device designers at the design stage of new products using prototypes, but it could also be used on existing products with real patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  14. Hand washing practices and the occurrence of enteropathogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... levels of compliance to hand washing and related this to the occurrence of infectious bacteria in the test population. A questionnaire which contained information on bio-demographic characteristics and hand hygiene practices was applied to 100 individuals in the study population. Microbiological samples were obtained, ...

  15. Hand Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin ... A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ...

  16. Claw hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulnar nerve palsy - claw hand; Ulnar nerve dysfunction - claw hand; Ulnar claw ... Someone can be born with claw hand (congenital), or they can develop it because of certain disorders, such as nerve injury.

  17. Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

    1994-12-01

    A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

  18. Test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer for lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Wang, Min-Hung; Lin, Hsiu-Ching

    2013-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer (HDD) for measuring lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities (ID). The other purposes were to: (1) compare the lower-limb muscle strength between children with and without ID; (2) probe the relationship between the muscle forces and agility performance in ID; and (3) explore the factors associated with muscle strength in ID. Sixty-one participants (30 boys and 31 girls; mean age=14.1 ± 3.3 year) were assessed by the HDD using a "make" test. The comparative group consisted of 63 typically developing children (33 boys and 30 girls; mean age=14.9 ± 2.1 year). The ID group demonstrated lower muscle groups than in typically developing group. Except for the ankle plantarflexors (ICC=0.69, SEM=0.72), test-retest analysis showed good intrarater reliability with ICC ranging from 0.81 to 0.96, and intrarater SEM values ranged from 0.40 to 0.57. The HDD has the potential to be a reliable tool for strength measurement in ID. Muscle strength was positively related to agility performance. Regression analysis indicated that height, weight, BMI, and activity level were significant predictors of muscle strength in ID. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations of hand-washing frequency with incidence of acute respiratory tract infection and influenza-like illness in adults: a population-based study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Hanna; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Linde, Annika; Nyrén, Olof

    2014-09-18

    Frequent hand-washing is standard advice for avoidance of respiratory tract infections, but the evidence for a preventive effect in a general community setting is sparse. We therefore set out to quantify, in a population-based adult general population cohort, the possible protection against acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) conferred by a person's self-perceived hand-washing frequency. During the pandemic influenza season from September 2009 through May 2010, a cohort of 4365 adult residents of Stockholm County, Sweden, reported respiratory illnesses in real-time. A questionnaire about typical contact and hand-washing behaviour was administered at the end of the period (response rate 70%). There was no significant decrease in ARI rates among adults with increased daily hand-washing frequency: Compared to 2-4 times/day, 5-9 times was associated with an adjusted ARI rate ratio (RR) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.33), 10-19 times with RR = 1.22 (CI 0.97-1.53), and ≥20 times with RR = 1.03 (CI 0.81-1.32). A similar lack of effect was seen for influenza-like illness, and in all investigated subgroups. We found no clear effect modification by contact behaviour. Health care workers exhibited rate ratio point estimates below unity, but no dose-risk trend. Our results suggest that increases in what adult laymen perceive as being adequate hand-washing may not significantly reduce the risk of ARIs. This might have implications for the design of public health campaigns in the face of threatening outbreaks of respiratory infections. However, the generalizability of our results to non-pandemic circumstances should be further explored.

  20. Usability test of a hand exoskeleton for activities of daily living: an example of user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenara, Maria; Cempini, Marco; Gómez, Cristina; Cortese, Mario; Martín, Cristina; Medina, Josep; Vitiello, Nicola; Opisso, Eloy

    2017-01-01

    (1) To assess a robotic device (Handexos) during the design process with regard to usability, end user satisfaction and safety, (2) to determine whether Handexos can improve the activities of daily living (ADLs) of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients and stroke patients with upper-limb dysfunction. During a 2-year development stage of the device, a total of 37 participants (aged 22-68), 28 clinicians (experts) and nine patients with SCI or stroke (end users) were included in a user-centered design process featuring usability tests. They performed five grasps wearing the device. The assessments were obtained at the end of the session by filling out a questionnaire and making suggestions. The experts' opinion was that the modified device was an improvement over the preliminary version, although this was not reflected in the scores. Whereas end user scores for comfort, grasp, performance and safety were above the sufficiency threshold, the scores for year 2 were lower than those for year 1. The findings demonstrate that although Handexos meets the initial functional requirements and underlines the potential for assisting SCI and post-stroke subjects in ADLs, several aspects such as mechanical complexity and low adaptability to different hand sizes need to be further addressed. Implications for Rehabilitation Wearable robotics devices could improve the activities of daily living in patients with spinal cord injury or stroke. They could be a tool for rehabilitation of the upper limb. Further usability tests to improve this type of tools are recommended.

  1. Android Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    . On such occasions, android and humanoid hand models should have similar structure, functions, and performance as the human hand. In this paper we present the anatomy, and the key functionalities of the human hand followed by a literature review on android/humanoid hands for grasping and manipulating objects...

  2. Measurement properties of the short version of the van Lieshout test for arm/hand function of persons with tetraplegia after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, M.W.M.; van Lieshout, G.; Seelen, H.A.M.; Snoek, G.J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Pons, C.

    2006-01-01

    Study design: Two validation studies. Objectives: To assess the measurement properties of the short version of the Van Lieshout test (VLT-SV), a new test for arm/hand function of persons with tetraplegia after spinal cord injury (SCI). Setting: Two specialized rehabilitation centres in The

  3. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  4. A dinamometria manual e seu uso na avaliação nutricional Hand grip strength test and its use in nutritional assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maia Schlüssel

    2008-04-01

    individual, the type of instrument used, the number of measurements performed, the rest periods between measurements, the presence of verbal stimulation and a warm-up prior to the test can also influence the results. Therefore, it is important to develop a standardized protocol to improve the reliability of the measurements for this variable. Normative data for hand grip strength are still scarce and the literature still resents from the existence of reference values from population-based studies.

  5. Global HIV Prevention, Testing, and Counseling in Military Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Michael P; Sloan, Margo; Wankie, Che; Woodland, Kelly; Reader, Elizabeth; Porter, Bruce; Shaffer, Richard; Macera, Caroline A; Bulterys, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the general population in low- and middle-income countries, military members tend to be male, young, travel more frequently away from their main sexual partners, drink more alcohol and have a consistent source of income. All of these factors may lead to an increased risk of contracting HIV. In response, the Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program advocates for the integration of HIV prevention "building blocks" into military health services to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV among foreign uniformed services. The building blocks include basic HIV education including outreach, condom promotion, enabling HIV policies, HIV testing services, screening for sexually transmitted infections, voluntary medical male circumcision where appropriate, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and other supportive services. The Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs supports implementation of these building blocks though partnerships with foreign militaries. This comprehensive prevention package, when closely linked with HIV treatment services, is the cornerstone of creating an HIVfree generation in military and surrounding communities worldwide. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Hantavirus testing in small mammal populations of northcentral New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggs, J.; Bennett, K.; Foxx, T. [and others

    1995-07-01

    In 1993, an outbreak of a new strain of hantavirus in the southwestern US indicated that deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the primary carrier of the virus. In 1993 and 1994, the Ecological Studies Team (EST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory surveyed small mammal populations in Los Alamos County, New Mexico, primarily for ecological risk assessment (ecorisk) studies. At the request of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the School of Medicine at the University of New Mexico, EST also collected blood samples from captured animals for use in determining seroprevalence of hantavirus in this region due to the recent outbreak of this virus in the four-comers region of the Southwest. The deer mouse was the most commonly captured species during the tripping sessions. Other species sampled included harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis), least chipmunk (Eutamias minimus), long-tailed vole (Microtus longicaudus), Mexican woodrat (Neotoma mexicana), and brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii). The team collected blood samples from tripped animals following CDC`s suggested guidelines. Results of the 1993 and 1994 hantavirus testing identified a total overall seroprevalence of approximately 5.5% and 4.2%, respectively. The highest seroprevalence rates were found in deer mice seri (3--6%), but results on several species were inconclusive; further studies will be necessary, to quantify seroprevalence rates in those species. Seroprevalence rates for Los Alamos County were much lower than elsewhere in the region.

  7. Association Between Overweight and Obesity and Risk of Clinically Diagnosed Knee, Hip, and Hand Osteoarthritis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Carlen; Leyland, Kirsten M; Peat, George; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel K; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Studies of previous cohorts have demonstrated an association between a status of overweight/obesity and the presence of knee and hand osteoarthritis (OA). However, no data on the effect of these factors on the OA burden are available. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of being overweight or obese on the incidence of routinely diagnosed knee, hip, and hand OA. The study was conducted in a population-based cohort using primary care records from the Sistema d'Informació per al Desenvolupament de l'Investigació en Atenció Primària database (>5.5 million subjects, covering >80% of the population of Catalonia, Spain). Participants were subjects ages ≥40 years who were without a diagnosis of OA on January 1, 2006 and had available body mass index (BMI) data. All subjects were followed up from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010 or to the time of loss to follow-up or death. Measures included the World Health Organization categories of BMI (exposure), and incident clinical diagnoses of knee, hip, or hand OA according to International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision codes. In total, 1,764,061 subjects were observed for a median follow-up period of 4.45 years (interquartile range 4.19-4.98 years). Incidence rates (per 1,000 person-years at risk) of knee, hip, and hand OA were 3.7 (99% confidence interval [99% CI] 3.6-3.8), 1.7 (99% CI 1.7-1.8), and 2.6 (99% CI 2.5-2.7), respectively, among subjects in the normal weight category, and 19.5 (99% CI 19.1-19.9), 3.8 (99% CI 3.7-4.0), and 4.0 (99% CI 3.9-4.2), respectively, in those with a classification of grade II obesity. Compared to subjects with normal weight, being overweight or obese increased the risk of OA at all 3 joint sites, especially at the knee. A status of overweight, grade I obesity, and grade II obesity increased the risk of knee OA by a factor of 2-fold, 3.1-fold, and 4.7-fold, respectively. Being overweight or obese increases the risk of hand, hip, and knee OA, with the

  8. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene R Faber

    Full Text Available This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years from national (n = 13, regional (n = 11 and local training centres (n = 19 participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter and using a tennis or table tennis ball. 'Within session' reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate 'between sessions' reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05. The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001. Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between -8 and +7 repetitions with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between -3 and +3 repetitions. Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test.

  9. [Hand osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šenolt, Ladislav

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic disorder causing pain and limitation of mobility of affected joints. The prevalence of hand OA increases with age and more often affects females. Clinical signs obviously do not correlate with radiographic findings - symptomatic hand OA affects approximately 26 % of adult subjects, but radiographic changes can be found in up to two thirds of females and half of males older than 55 years.Disease course differ among individual patients. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disease. Nodal hand OA is the most common subtype affecting interphalangeal joints, thumb base OA affects first carpometacarpal joint. Erosive OA represents a specific subtype of hand OA, which is associated with joint inflammation, more pain, functional limitation and erosive findings on radiographs.Treatment of OA is limited. Analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the only agents reducing symptoms. New insights into the pathogenesis of disease should contribute to the development of novel effective treatment of hand OA.

  10. Inter-Tester Reliability and Precision of Manual Muscle Testing and Hand-Held Dynamometry in Lower Limb Muscles of Children with Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Kate; Hunt, Adrienne; Daley, Deborah; Sims, Susan; Adams, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and measurement precision of manual muscle testing (MMT) and hand-held dynamometry (HHD) were compared for children with spina bifida. Strength measures were obtained of the hip flexors, hip abductors, and knee extensors of 20 children (10 males, 10 females; mean age 9 years 10 months; range: 5 to 15 years) by two experienced physical…

  11. Does an Eye-Hand Coordination Test Have Added Value as Part of Talent Identification in Table Tennis? : A Validity and Reproducibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, IR (Irene); Nijhuis-van der Sanden, MWG (Ria); Oosterveld, FGJ (Frits)

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7–12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and

  12. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, I.R.; Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric testing of the Arabic version of the Patient-Rated Wrist Hand Evaluation (PRWHE-A) in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, Fatmah N; MacDermid, Joy C; Tang, Ada; Kho, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study was to 1) perform a cross-cultural Arabic translation for the Patient-Rated Wrist and Hand Evaluation (PRWHE-A) using standardized guidelines and, 2) to test the psychometrics properties of the translated measure. A total of 48 patients with variety of hand disabilities, a mean age of 47 ± 16 years were recruited and assessed two times. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used for assessing test-retest reliability of the PRWHE-A and its subscales while Cronbach's alpha (CA) was used for assessing the internal consistency. Construct validity was assessed by examining the strength of the correlation between the PRWHE-A and the Arabic version of the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH-A). The PRWHE-A demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability (ICC= 0.97) and internal consistency (CA= 0.96). The DASH-A demonstrated moderately to low correlation (r= 0.64) with the PRWHE-A. The results of this study indicated that PRWHE-A is a reliable and valid assessment tool and can be used in patients with different wrist/hand disabilities whose primary language is Arabic. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of ozonated water on the basis of ASTM E1174 for standardized testing of hand wash formulations for healthcare personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Saito, K; Kashiwazaki, J; Aoyagi, T; Arai, K; Hara, Y; Kobari, S; Mori, H; Ohashi, K; Takano, Y; Kaku, M; Kanemitsu, K

    2018-02-13

    We evaluated the bacterial removal effects of hand washing with ozonated water using the ASTM E1174 standard test method. Thirty healthy volunteers were assigned randomly to three groups: ozonated water, antimicrobial soap and water, and non-antimicrobial soap and water. A 3 log 10 CFU reduction was achieved by washing hands with ozonated water or antimicrobial soap and water. However, ozonated water was not significantly superior to non-antimicrobial soap and water. Ozonated water may remove bacteria from the hands to at least a similar extent as that by non-antimicrobial soap and water in the absence of visible dirt or body fluid contamination. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Treatment Type Is Associated with Population Hand Preferences in Patients with Unilateral Coronal Synostosis: Implications for Functional Cerebral Lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gary F; Wood, Benjamin C; Amdur, Richard L; Jeelani, Yasser; Reddy, Sri; Proctor, Mark R; Oh, Albert K

    2015-12-01

    Left-handedness is a highly conserved marker of cerebral functional laterality in the human population; elevated rates of left-handedness have been documented in patients with unilateral coronal synostosis treated with fronto-orbital advancement. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the prevalence of left-handedness in patients with nonsyndromic unilateral coronal synostosis is related to treatment. The incidence of left-handedness was compared among three groups: patients who were previously treated for unilateral coronal synostosis with endoscopic suturectomy and postoperative helmet therapy (group I); patients with unilateral coronal synostosis managed with fronto-orbital advancement (group II); and healthy, unaffected controls (group III). Group I was composed of 19 patients; the side of synostosis was equally distributed (nine right and 10 left), and female gender was more common (n = 13). Mean age at endoscopic suturectomy and helmet therapy was 85.3 days, and the determination of handedness was performed at a mean age of 89.3 months. The rate of left-handedness in group I was 5.3 percent, not significantly different from that of the controls (group III) (11.5 percent) (p = 0.69) but significantly less than that observed in the fronto-orbital advancement patients (group II) (30.2 percent) (p = 0.023). Patients who underwent endoscopic suturectomy and helmet therapy for nonsyndromic unilateral coronal synostosis and healthy controls demonstrated functional cerebral lateralization with respect to handedness that differed from patients who underwent fronto-orbital advancement. The reason may be related to the type of procedure, secondary effects of general anesthesia, or age at which the procedure was performed.

  16. Suicide and Other-Cause Mortality after Early Exposure to Smoking and Second Hand Smoking: A 12-Year Population-Based Follow-Up Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Chin-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available The association between smoking and suicide is still controversial, particular for early life cigarette smoking exposure. Few studies have investigated this association in adolescents using population-based cohorts, and the relationship with second hand smoking (SHS exposure has not been addressed.In this study, we followed a large population-based sample of younger people to investigate the association between smoking, SHS exposure and suicide mortality. Between October 1995 and June 1996, 162,682 junior high school students ages 11 to 16 years old living in a geographic catchment area in Taiwan were enrolled and then followed till December 2007 (1,948,432 person-years through linkage to the National Death Certification System. Participants who were currently smoking at baseline had a greater than six-fold higher suicide mortality than those who did not smoke (29.5 vs. 4.8 per 100,000 person-years, p20 cigarettes/per day. The estimated depression-adjusted odds ratio did not change substantially. The population attributable fractions for suicide associated with smoking and heavy SHS exposure (>20 cigarettes/per day were 9.6% and 10.6%, respectively.This study showed evidence of excess suicide mortality among young adults exposed to active or passive early life cigarette smoking.

  17. Hand measuring eqipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This note is used in connection with a 3 x 2 hours laboratory exercise as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The laboratory includes a demonstration of a series of hand measuring tools as well as a number of exercises, illustrating the use of hand measuring equipment...

  18. Stance foot alignment and hand positioning alter star excursion balance test scores in those with chronic ankle instability: What are we really assessing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuğ, Mutlu

    2017-04-01

    The literature has consistently shown that the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) is a reliable and valid tool to anticipate the risk of lower extremity injury, assess dynamic postural control differences among groups, and assess the effectiveness of balance training programs in both healthy individuals and people with lower extremity injuries. However, there is no standard administration technique for the SEBT in research, clinical practice, or performance settings. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to compare six different combinations (3 different foot alignments × 2 hand positions) on the SEBT performance in those with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Repeated Measures Design. University Research Laboratory. Twenty-five university students with CAI (12 males, 13 females; age: 20.3 ± 2.4 years, height: 172.7 ± 7.4 cm, weight: 77.5 ± 15.3 kg. 25.9 ± 4.0 kg/m2) voluntarily participated in the study. Six different SEBT positions were used to assess dynamic postural control. Three foot positions: 1) Foot centered; 2) Toe fixed; and 3) Toe-heel changing and two hand placements: 1) Hands free and 2) Hands on the hips were used in this study. After 6familiarization trials for each condition, three Star Excursion Balance Test scores were recorded. Normalized reach distance (% of leg length) in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions as well as a composite reach score quantified dynamic postural control. Both foot alignment and hand position significantly altered normalized SEBT reach distance in the anterior (p < 0.003), posteromedial (p < 0.001), posterolateral (p < 0.001), and composite reach scores (p < 0.001). Different foot alignments and hand constraints significantly altered normalized reach distances and the composite score in individuals with CAI. These results do not suggest that any combination of foot alignments and/or hand constraints is superior. However, changing the toe/heel position, while maintaining hands on the

  19. In vivo protocol for testing efficacy of hand-washing agents against viruses and bacteria: experiments with rotavirus and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S A; Sattar, S A; Springthorpe, V S; Wells, G A; Tostowaryk, W

    1989-01-01

    Ten antiseptic formulations, an unmedicated liquid soap, and tap water alone were compared for their capacities to eliminate human rotavirus from the finger pads of adult volunteers; three of the antiseptics, the soap, and the tap water alone were also tested against Escherichia coli. A fecal suspension of virus or bacterium was placed on each finger pad and air dried. The contaminated site was exposed to the test product for 10 s, rinsed in tap water, and dried on a paper towel. The residual virus or bacterium was then eluted. Selected agents were also tested by an analogous whole-hand method by which the entire palm surfaces of both hands were contaminated. Alcohols (70%) alone or with Savlon reduced the virus titer by greater than 99%, whereas the reductions by Proviodine, Dettol, and Hibisol ranged from 95 to 97%. Aqueous solutions of chlorhexidine gluconate were significantly less effective for virus removal or inactivation than 70% alcohol solutions. Furthermore, Savlon in water (1:200) was found to be much less effective in eliminating the virus (80.6%) than the bacterium (98.9%). The tap water alone and the soap reduced the virus titers by 83.6 and 72.5% and the bacterial titers by 90 and 68.7%, respectively. The results of the whole-hand method agreed well with those of the finger pad protocol. We conclude that the finger pad method is a suitable model for testing the in vivo efficacy of hand-washing agents and emphasize the need for using appropriate test viruses and bacteria. PMID:2559658

  20. Population screening and cascade testing for carriers of SMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Melanie; Calabro, Vanessa; Chong, Belinda; Gardiner, Nicole; Cowie, Shannon; du Sart, Desiree

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common autosomal-recessive diseases, caused by absence of both copies of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Identification of SMA carriers has important implications for individuals with a family history and the general population. SMA carriers

  1. The effects of smiling or crying facial expressions on grip strength, measured with a hand dynamometer and the bi-digital O-ring test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozerkan, K N

    2001-01-01

    The effects of smiling or crying facial expressions on grip strength and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test were evaluated in this study. Ten right-handed basketball players (age group 18-28) were included in the study. Grip strength was measured with a Riester hand dynamometer and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test successively, after the players had looked at the drawing of a "crying face" for 5 seconds from a distance of 40 cm at the eye level. Immediately afterwards they were shown the drawing of a "smiling face" and were asked to grip with the same condition. Once all 10 players carried out this experiment, the order in which the drawings were shown was reversed. We then proceeded to measure the same variables, using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. The statistics obtained thereby were subjected to Pearsons correlation coefficient and paired t-test. Using a hand dynamometer and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, it was found that, in both tests, the "smiling face" drawing (first crying, then smiling face: with hand dynamometer, it increased from 8.34+/-0.97 kg to 9.18+/-0.9 kg; t=5.39,p=0.0001) increased the grip strength of the basketball players, and the "crying face" drawing (first smiling face, then crying face: with hand dynamometer it decreased from 9.35 +/- 0.90 kg to 8.51+/- 0.96 kg; t=9.81, p=0.0001) decreased the grip strength. Exposure to the smiling face drawing increased the grip strength, and exposure to the crying face decreased it, in every subject tested in this group. Similar effects were observed with the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (first crying, then smiling: it increased from -2.80 +/- 1.13 to 2.20 +/- 1.32; t=33.54, p=0.0001; first smiling then crying: it decreased from 2.40 +/- 1.34 to -2.20 +/- 1.62; t = 15.06, p=0.0001).

  2. Performance Comparison Between FEDERICA Hand and LARM Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Carbone

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two robotic hands that have been developed at University Federico II of Naples and at the University of Cassino. FEDERICA Hand and LARM Hand are described in terms of design and operational features. In particular, careful attention is paid to the differences between the above-mentioned hands in terms of transmission systems. FEDERICA Hand uses tendons and pulleys to drive phalanxes, while LARM Hand uses cross four-bar linkages. Results of experimental tests are reported to show how key design issues affect each robotic hand's performance.

  3. Efficacy of permethrin insecticide tested against populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Susceptibility test was conducted on the adult mosquitoes using 0.75 % permethrin impregnated paper embedded in World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic test kit following standard procedure. Knockdown rate was recorded at 5 min interval for 1 hr and the final mortality was determined at 24 hr post exposure time.

  4. HIV testing among youths in a Nigerian local population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'avaient pas subi au test du dépistage du SIDA, 237 soit 68,2% voudraient le faire dans le cas ou le test est gratuit, 278 soit 79,9% des sondés voulaient le faire. Des jeunes célibataires, ceux avec enseignement secondaire du moins et des ...

  5. Field Test of Gopher Tortoise (Gopherus Polyphemus) Population Estimation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    of Herpetology 14:177-182. Auffenberg, W., and R. Franz. 1982. The Status and distribution of the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). 12, U.S...gopher tortoise (Gopherus-polyphemus) burrows in coastal scrub and slash pine flatwoods. Journal of Herpetology 25:317-321. Buckland, S. T., D. R... Herpetology 26:281-289. Doonan, T. J. 1986. A demographic study of an isolated population of the gopher tortoise, Gopherus polyphemus, and an assessment of a

  6. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in their care by ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  7. The Hoffmann reflex from the flexor pollicis longus of the thumb in left-handed subjects: spinal motor asymmetry and supraspinal facilitation to Cattell's intelligence test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, U

    1989-10-01

    The spinal motor asymmetry was studied in left-handers. Hand preference was assessed by Geschwind scores (GS), and hand skill by peg moving task, the reflex responses were recorded from the long flexor muscle of the thumb. The H-reflex could be elicited by averaging during cortico-spinal facilitation (voluntary isometric force). The Cattell's Culture Fair Intelligence Test was used to assess the individual differences in mental abilities. H-reflexes were found to be significantly larger on the left than the right side. The amplitude of H-reflex increased linearly with force applied to transducer by the thumb. This facilitation was more pronounced for the left than the right reflexes. Removal of the visual visual input caused facilitation in H-reflex (supraspinal disinhibition). Post-activation potentiation was also observed in H-reflex. There was a positive linear correlation between the degree of left-hand preference (-GSs) and left-hand skill. The correlation for the right-hand skill was not significant. There was a linear correlation between the degree of left-hand preference and the right minus left hand skill. There was an inverse correlation between left-hand skill and H-reflex from left. The correlation for the right side did not reach the 5% significance level. The force-reflex relation did not show any significant change to IQ for the right H-reflex. The left H-reflexes were significantly larger in subjects with high IQ than those with low IQ. The regression line and its slope for the force-reflex relation on the left was found to be higher in subjects with high IQ than those with low IQs. There was a positive linear relationship between IQ and H reflex from left. The correlation for the right side was not as pronounced as that for the left side. The left minus right H reflex was also positive linearly correlated with IQ. These results provide further evidence for the psycho-motor hypothesis (Tan. 1988b) as well as the spinal motor asymmetry to handedness

  8. Changes in the Patch Test Population Over a Ten-Year Period at the Contact Dermatitis Clinic, Siriraj Hospital: A University-Based Tertiary Care Hospital in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutasinee Phaitoonwattanakij

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several factors which have an impact on patch test results. In the past, comparing the populations between different institutes, without appropriate indicators was difficult. Thus, the MOAHLFA index (Male, Occupational, Atopic dermatitis, Hand dermatitis, Leg dermatitis, Face dermatitis and Age above 40 years was developed. However, the study of this index in Thailand is limited. Objective: To investigate the MOAHLFA index in patch testing population in the Contact Dermatitis Clinic at Siriraj Hospital. Methods: The clinical parameters of patients who underwent patch testing at Contact Dermatitis Clinic, Siriraj Hospital during 10 years were studied. Results: Our patch test population showed a statistically significant increase in the proportion of male and patients aged above 40 years while a statistical decrease was found in those with occupational skin diseases with a history of atopic dermatitis, and lesions on the hands during a decade. Conclusion: This study revealed patch-test population attending Siriraj contact dermatitis clinic changed in 10-years period. According to MOAHLFA index, the changes were increasing of male, aged >40 years but decreasing of atopic, occupational-related contact allergy patients.

  9. [Anatomical contents in the Rorschach test: comparison between a population of nurses and a control group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebert, J; Thiltges, E; Wertz, C; Blavier, A

    2013-04-01

    The study of answer contents to a Rorschach test leads to numerous debates and controversies. From a pragmatic point of view, the recurrent question is to understand the meaning of a content (or its repetition) in a protocol. From a discursive and perceptive point of view, it is hazardous to give an interpretation other than descriptive and contextual. Indeed, no single interpretative theory or analysis method is able to determine with certainty and rigor a strict correlation between people's psychological functioning and the contents they perceive. In this empirical context, we studied the "anatomy" answers (frequencies and formal qualities) in a population of nurses (n=38) matched with a control group (non-medical subjects, n=38). The Rorschach test was administrated according to the recommendations of the Integrated System. The average of An+Xy answers was clearly and significantly higher in the nurse population (3.58) than in the control group (0.89) and than in the three comparative norms that we selected (from 0.96 to 1.83). Concerning the formal quality, the repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction effect: although subjects in the control group gave a similar number of ordinary, unusual and minus forms for An+Xy answers, the nurses gave more erroneous (minus) forms (1.79) than unusual forms (1.21) and finally than ordinary forms (0.58). Two hypotheses may be suggested in order to explain our findings. On one hand, it is highly probable that our results are linked to the everyday body confrontation in a nurse's job. On the other hand, we suggest that by giving An+Xy answers, nurses tend to reveal some idiosyncratic characteristics in order to show their own identity. Indeed, our nurse subjects were selected because of their job, and so they complied with the social identity that was implicitly expected. This is congruent with the complex functioning in social reality: in a social group, people will not verbalize all of their

  10. Reliability of different mark-recapture methods for population size estimation tested against reference population sizes constructed from field data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegret Grimm

    Full Text Available Reliable estimates of population size are fundamental in many ecological studies and biodiversity conservation. Selecting appropriate methods to estimate abundance is often very difficult, especially if data are scarce. Most studies concerning the reliability of different estimators used simulation data based on assumptions about capture variability that do not necessarily reflect conditions in natural populations. Here, we used data from an intensively studied closed population of the arboreal gecko Gehyra variegata to construct reference population sizes for assessing twelve different population size estimators in terms of bias, precision, accuracy, and their 95%-confidence intervals. Two of the reference populations reflect natural biological entities, whereas the other reference populations reflect artificial subsets of the population. Since individual heterogeneity was assumed, we tested modifications of the Lincoln-Petersen estimator, a set of models in programs MARK and CARE-2, and a truncated geometric distribution. Ranking of methods was similar across criteria. Models accounting for individual heterogeneity performed best in all assessment criteria. For populations from heterogeneous habitats without obvious covariates explaining individual heterogeneity, we recommend using the moment estimator or the interpolated jackknife estimator (both implemented in CAPTURE/MARK. If data for capture frequencies are substantial, we recommend the sample coverage or the estimating equation (both models implemented in CARE-2. Depending on the distribution of catchabilities, our proposed multiple Lincoln-Petersen and a truncated geometric distribution obtained comparably good results. The former usually resulted in a minimum population size and the latter can be recommended when there is a long tail of low capture probabilities. Models with covariates and mixture models performed poorly. Our approach identified suitable methods and extended options to

  11. Does the Use of Hands-On Learning, with Manipulatives, Improve the Test Scores of Secondary Education Geometry Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Cindy

    This report describes a program for increasing adolescent visualization and understanding of geometry problems. The targeted population consisted of high school students in two geometry classes in a growing middle-class community. The inability of students to adequately visualize and understand geometry problems was documented through teacher-made…

  12. Cost effectiveness of population based BRCA1 founder mutation testing in Sephardi Jewish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shreeya; Legood, Rosa; Evans, D Gareth; Turnbull, Clare; Antoniou, Antonis C; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian; Manchanda, Ranjit

    2017-12-26

    Population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 founder-mutation testing has been demonstrated as cost-effective compared to family-history(FH) based testing in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) women. However, only one of the three AJ BRCA1/BRCA2 founder-mutations (185delAG(c.68_69delAG), 5382insC(c.5266dupC) and 6174delT(c.5946delT)) is found in the Sephardi Jewish(SJ) population (185delAG(c.68_69delAG)) and the overall prevalence of BRCA mutations in the SJ population is accordingly lower (0.7% compared to 2.5% in the AJ population). Cost-effectiveness analyses of BRCA testing have not previously been performed at these lower BRCA prevalence levels seen in SJ. Here we present a cost-effectiveness analysis for UK and US populations comparing population-testing with Clinical-criteria/FH-based testing in SJ women. A Markov model was built comparing the lifetime costs-&-effects of population-based BRCA1-testing with testing using FH-based clinical criteria in SJ women ≥30years. BRCA1-carriers identified were offered MRI/mammograms and risk-reducing surgery. Costs are reported at 2015 prices. Outcomes include breast cancer(BC), ovarian cancer(OC) and excess deaths from heart disease. All costs-&-outcomes are discounted at 3.5%. The time horizon is life-time, and perspective is payer. The incremental-cost-effectiveness-ratio (ICER) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) was calculated. Parameter uncertainty was evaluated through one-way and probabilistic-sensitivity-analysis (PSA). Population-testing resulted in gain in life-expectancy of 12months (QALY=1.00). The baseline discounted ICER for UK population-based testing =£67.04/QALY and for US population=$308.42/QALY. Results were robust in the one-way sensitivity analysis. The PSA showed 100% of simulations were cost-effective at £20,000/QALY UK and the $100,000/QALY US WTP thresholds. Scenario analysis showed, population-testing remains cost-effective in UK and US populations even if pre-menopausal oophorectomy does not reduce BC-risk or if

  13. Hand Washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that mystery object in the park or your cat rub against you after using the litter pan. Fido and Fluffy are dirtier than you might think. Even if you're a good hand-washer, your friends may be harboring some ...

  14. Hand eczema classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diepgen, T L; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandao, F M

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Hand eczema is a long-lasting disease with a high prevalence in the background population. The disease has severe, negative effects on quality of life and sometimes on social status. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors for onset and prognosis, but treatment...... of the disease is rarely evidence based, and a classification system for different subdiagnoses of hand eczema is not agreed upon. Randomized controlled trials investigating the treatment of hand eczema are called for. For this, as well as for clinical purposes, a generally accepted classification system...... A classification system for hand eczema is proposed. Conclusions It is suggested that this classification be used in clinical work and in clinical trials....

  15. Some multivariate tests for differences in sexual dimorphism between human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vark, G N; van der Sman, P G; Dijkema, J; Buikstra, J E

    1989-01-01

    Two multivariate statistical tests are presented for examining differences in sexual dimorphism between human populations. One test refers to general differences in sexual dimorphism; the other, only to differences in size aspects of sexual dimorphism. There is no current resolution to the complementary problem of testing for differences of direction in sexual dimorphism. By applying the tests to a comparison of sexual dimorphism in 26 samples of skulls from a world-wide distribution of human populations, significant results (at alpha = 0.05) were found in the majority of cases with the general test, and in a minority of cases with the size test.

  16. Hand Matters: Left-Hand Gestures Enhance Metaphor Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyriou, Paraskevi; Mohr, Christine; Kita, Sotaro

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that speech-accompanying gestures influence cognitive processes, but it is not clear whether the gestural benefit is specific to the gesturing hand. Two experiments tested the "(right/left) hand-specificity" hypothesis for self-oriented functions of gestures: gestures with a particular hand enhance cognitive processes…

  17. Fine motor skills enhance lexical processing of embodied vocabulary: A test of the nimble-hands, nimble-minds hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggate, Sebastian; Stoeger, Heidrun

    2017-10-01

    Research suggests that fine motor skills (FMS) are linked to aspects of cognitive development in children. Additionally, lexical processing advantages exist for words implying a high body-object interaction (BOI), with initial findings indicating that such words in turn link to children's FMS-for which we propose and evaluate four competing hypotheses. First, a maturational account argues that any links between FMS and lexical processing should not exist once developmental variables are controlled for. Second, functionalism posits that any link between FMS and lexical processing arises due to environmental interactions. Third, the semantic richness hypothesis argues that sensorimotor input improves lexical processing, but predicts no links between FMS and lexical processing. A fourth account, the nimble-hands, nimble minds (NHNM) hypothesis, proposes that having greater FMS improves lexical processing for high-BOI words. In two experiments, the response latencies of preschool children (n = 90, n = 76, ages = 5;1) to 45 lexical items encompassing high-BOI, low-BOI, and less imageable words were measured, alongside measures of FMS, reasoning, and general receptive/expressive vocabulary. High-BOI words appeared to show unique links to FMS, which remained after accounting for low-BOI and less imageable words, general vocabulary, reasoning, and chronological age. Although further work is needed, the findings provide initial support for the NHNM hypothesis.

  18. Increasing Student Understanding of Microscope Optics by Building and Testing the Limits of Simple, Hand-Made Model Microscopes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drace, Kevin; Couch, Brett; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek’s design using simple materials—paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory’s learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced) under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics. PMID:23653781

  19. Alternative hand contamination technique to compare the activities of antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial soaps under different test conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuls, Janice L; Rodgers, Nancy D; Fischler, George E; Howard, Jeanne M; Patel, Monica; Weidner, Patrick L; Duran, Melani H

    2008-06-01

    Antimicrobial hand soaps provide a greater bacterial reduction than nonantimicrobial soaps. However, the link between greater bacterial reduction and a reduction of disease has not been definitively demonstrated. Confounding factors, such as compliance, soap volume, and wash time, may all influence the outcomes of studies. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of wash time and soap volume on the relative activities and the subsequent transfer of bacteria to inanimate objects for antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial soaps. Increasing the wash time from 15 to 30 seconds increased reduction of Shigella flexneri from 2.90 to 3.33 log(10) counts (P = 0.086) for the antimicrobial soap, while nonantimicrobial soap achieved reductions of 1.72 and 1.67 log(10) counts (P > 0.6). Increasing soap volume increased bacterial reductions for both the antimicrobial and the nonantimicrobial soaps. When the soap volume was normalized based on weight (approximately 3 g), nonantimicrobial soap reduced Serratia marcescens by 1.08 log(10) counts, compared to the 3.83-log(10) reduction caused by the antimicrobial soap (P antimicrobial soap resulted in a bacterial recovery of 2.49 log(10) counts, compared to the 4.22-log(10) (P soap. This indicates that nonantimicrobial soap was less active and that the effectiveness of antimicrobial soaps can be improved with longer wash time and greater soap volume. The transfer of bacteria to objects was significantly reduced due to greater reduction in bacteria following the use of antimicrobial soap.

  20. Increasing Student Understanding of Microscope Optics by Building and Testing the Limits of Simple, Hand-Made Model Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drace

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek’s design using simple materials—paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory’s learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics.

  1. Auditory Verbal Learning Test in a Large Nonclinical Portuguese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Sara; Gonçalves, Alexandra; Pinto, Cláudia; Almeida, Eduarda; Gomes, Filomena; Moreira, Inês; Fernandes, Joana; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to produce adjusted normative data for the Portuguese version of the Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT). The study included 1,068 community-dwelling individuals (736 women, 332 men) aged 18 to 93 years old (Mage = 56 years, SD = 18) who had educational backgrounds ranging from 0 to 24 years (M = 9.8 years, SD = 5.3). The results showed that sex, age, and education were significantly associated with AVLT performance. These demographic characteristics accounted for 24% to 35% of the variance of direct recall trials and for 8% to 39% of the variance of derived recall scores. The normative data for direct and derived recall scores are presented as regression-based algorithms to adjust for sex, age, and education with subsequent correspondence between adjusted scores and percentile distribution. The norms for the recognition correct score are presented as algorithms to estimate the recognition scores for 5th, 10th, and 18th percentiles for each combination of the variables sex, age, and education.

  2. Alternative Hand Contamination Technique To Compare the Activities of Antimicrobial and Nonantimicrobial Soaps under Different Test Conditions▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuls, Janice L.; Rodgers, Nancy D.; Fischler, George E.; Howard, Jeanne M.; Patel, Monica; Weidner, Patrick L.; Duran, Melani H.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial hand soaps provide a greater bacterial reduction than nonantimicrobial soaps. However, the link between greater bacterial reduction and a reduction of disease has not been definitively demonstrated. Confounding factors, such as compliance, soap volume, and wash time, may all influence the outcomes of studies. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of wash time and soap volume on the relative activities and the subsequent transfer of bacteria to inanimate objects for antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial soaps. Increasing the wash time from 15 to 30 seconds increased reduction of Shigella flexneri from 2.90 to 3.33 log10 counts (P = 0.086) for the antimicrobial soap, while nonantimicrobial soap achieved reductions of 1.72 and 1.67 log10 counts (P > 0.6). Increasing soap volume increased bacterial reductions for both the antimicrobial and the nonantimicrobial soaps. When the soap volume was normalized based on weight (∼3 g), nonantimicrobial soap reduced Serratia marcescens by 1.08 log10 counts, compared to the 3.83-log10 reduction caused by the antimicrobial soap (P antimicrobial soap resulted in a bacterial recovery of 2.49 log10 counts, compared to the 4.22-log10 (P soap. This indicates that nonantimicrobial soap was less active and that the effectiveness of antimicrobial soaps can be improved with longer wash time and greater soap volume. The transfer of bacteria to objects was significantly reduced due to greater reduction in bacteria following the use of antimicrobial soap. PMID:18441107

  3. Object-oriented design and programming with C++ your hands-on guide to C++ programming, with special emphasis on design, testing, and reuse

    CERN Document Server

    Leach, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++: Your Hands-On Guide to C++ Programming, with Special Emphasis on Design, Testing, and Reuse provides a list of software engineering principles to guide the software development process. This book presents the fundamentals of the C++ language.Organized into two parts encompassing 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of C++ and describes object-oriented programming and the history of C++. This text then introduces classes, polymorphism, inheritance, and overloading. Other chapters consider the C++ preprocessor and organization of class l

  4. Cellphone-based hand-held microplate reader for point-of-care ELISA testing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Brandon; Cortazar, Bingen; Tseng, Derek; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Wei, Qingshan; Chan, Raymond Y.; Burbano, Jordi; Farooqui, Qamar; Lewinski, Michael; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a microplate format has been a gold standard first-line clinical test for diagnosis of various diseases including infectious diseases. However, this technology requires a relatively large and expensive multi-well scanning spectrophotometer to read and quantify the signal from each well, hindering its implementation in resource-limited-settings. Here, we demonstrate a cost-effective and handheld smartphone-based colorimetric microplate reader for rapid digitization and quantification of immunoserology-related ELISA tests in a conventional 96-well plate format at the point of care (POC). This device consists of a bundle of 96 optical fibers to collect the transmitted light from each well of the microplate and direct all the transmission signals from the wells onto the camera of the mobile-phone. Captured images are then transmitted to a remote server through a custom-designed app, and both quantitative and qualitative diagnostic results are returned back to the user within ~1 minute per 96-well plate by using a machine learning algorithm. We tested this mobile-phone based micro-plate reader in a clinical microbiology lab using FDA-approved mumps IgG, measles IgG, and herpes simplex virus IgG (HSV-1 and HSV-2) ELISA tests on 1138 remnant patient samples (roughly 50% training and 50% testing), and achieved an overall accuracy of ~99% or higher for each ELISA test. This handheld and cost-effective platform could be immediately useful for large-scale vaccination monitoring in low-infrastructure settings, and also for other high-throughput disease screening applications at POC.

  5. An investigation of the statistical power of neutrality tests based on comparative and population genetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, Weiwei; Nielsen, Rasmus; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we investigate the statistical power of several tests of selective neutrality based on patterns of genetic diversity within and between species. The goal is to compare tests based solely on population genetic data with tests using comparative data or a combination of comparative...

  6. Rapid Point-of-Care Diagnostic Test for Syphilis in High-Risk Populations, Manaus, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzaken, Adele S.; de Andrade Rodrigues, Ệnio José; Mayaud, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the acceptability and operational suitability of a rapid point-of-care syphilis test and identified barriers to testing among high-risk groups and healthcare professionals in a sexually transmitted infections clinic in Manaus, Brazil. Use of this test could considerably alleviate the impact of syphilis in hard-to-reach populations in the Amazon region of Brazil. PMID:19331762

  7. Hand-held cell phone use while driving legislation and observed driver behavior among population sub-groups in the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toni M Rudisill; Motao Zhu

    2017-01-01

    .... This study examined whether universal hand-held calling while driving bans were associated with lower road-side observed hand-held cell phone conversations across drivers of different ages (16-24, 25-59, ≥60 years), sexes, races...

  8. A Randomization Test for Controlling Population Stratification in Whole-Genome Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Kimmel, Gad; Jordan, Michael I.; Halperin, Eran; Shamir, Ron; Karp, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Population stratification can be a serious obstacle in the analysis of genomewide association studies. We propose a method for evaluating the significance of association scores in whole-genome cohorts with stratification. Our approach is a randomization test akin to a standard permutation test. It conditions on the genotype matrix and thus takes into account not only the population structure but also the complex linkage disequilibrium structure of the genome. As we show in simulation experime...

  9. Management of pediatric hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodaki, Eirini; Kisch, Tobias; Mauss, Karl L; Senyaman, Oezge; Kraemer, Robert; Mailänder, Peter; Wünsch, Lutz; Stang, Felix

    2015-04-01

    Hand burns are common in the pediatric population. Optimal hand function is a crucial component of a high-quality survival after burn injury. This can only be achieved with a coordinated approach to the injuries. The aim of this study was to review the management algorithm and outcomes of pediatric hand burns at our institution. In total, 70 children fulfilling our study criteria were treated for a burn hand injury in our Burn Care Center between January 2008 and May 2013. 14 of the 70 pediatric patients underwent surgery because of the depth of the hand burns. The management algorithm depending on the depth of the burn is described. Two patients underwent correction surgery due to burn contractures later. For a successful outcome of the burned hand, the interdisciplinary involvement and cooperation of the plastic and pediatric surgeon, hand therapist, burn team, patient and their parents are crucial.

  10. Achieving high acceptability of HIV testing in a population-based survey among immigrants in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiittala, Paula J; Kivelä, Pia S; Ristola, Matti A; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Koponen, Päivikki M S; Mölsä, Mulki; Ollgren, Jukka; Liitsola, Kirsi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing among migrants in Finland and the factors contributing to non-acceptance. The Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study 'Maamu' was the first national population-based Health Interview and Examination Survey (HIS/HES) among migrants in Finland. A total of 386 Kurdish, Russian and Somali immigrants in Helsinki participated in the study. Despite the participants' different sociodemographic backgrounds, a high rate of test acceptability (92%, 95% CI 90-95) was achieved. HIV test acceptance was associated with pretest counselling, ability to understand spoken Finnish or Swedish and employment status. No participants tested positive for HIV. The results imply that a universal HIV testing strategy is well accepted in a low-HIV prevalence immigrant population and can be included in a general health examination in immigrant population-based surveys. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  11. BOOK REVIEW - DOC, PATIENTS' OUTCOME IS IN YOUR HAND. IMPROVE YOUR CLINICAL SKILL WITH DERMATOLOGY CLINICAL SKILL TEST KIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHNA RIDZWAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The author has condensed her almost 30 years of working experience to present dermatology in a uniqueand interesting manner in this book. Unlike a textbook, the reader is guided on common as well as commonly misdiagnosed skin conditions including adverse drug reactions and occupational dermatoses by a series of quizzes which are different from the usual multiple choice type of questions. Responses are scored accordingto their implications on the respondent; for example, the answer will denote that the respondent is either a safe doctor, wasteful of resources or may cause harm to the patient.It will be advantageous for the reader to know basic dermatology but the author has considered readers who may be unfamiliar with the terms by first testing the reader on his knowledge of common dermatological terminologies. The correct answers are given. Useful tips are also provided to differentiate and recognise the skin lesions. With more than 300 coloured images of a wide range of skin conditions collected from local patients, the reader will be able to actively challenge himself in privacy and at his own pace. This book is simple and fun as a learning tool and will be very useful for housemen, postgraduate medical trainees and primary healthcare providers who want to assess their skills in dermatology.

  12. The diabetic hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Circhetta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic condition characterized by persistent hyperglycaemia with resultant morbidity and mortality related to its microvascular and macrovascular complications. In addition diabetes is also associated with several musculoskeletal disorders of the hand, that can be debilitating. There is increased incidence of these abnormalities in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes compared with the general population, related to disease duration but not to the age or sex. Typical diabetes associated hand condition include the palmar flexor tenosynovitis, Dupuytren’s contracture, syndrome of limited joint mobility, carpal tunnel syndrome, Charcot arthropathy and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Maintaining good glycaemic control by exercise, diet and drugs improves or prevents the development of these hand rheumatic condition. In this brief report we review the rational therapeutic approach to these disorders.

  13. Hand-held cell phone use while driving legislation and observed driver behavior among population sub-groups in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudisill, Toni M; Zhu, Motao

    2017-05-12

    Cell phone use behaviors are known to vary across demographic sub-groups and geographic locations. This study examined whether universal hand-held calling while driving bans were associated with lower road-side observed hand-held cell phone conversations across drivers of different ages (16-24, 25-59, ≥60 years), sexes, races (White, African American, or other), ruralities (suburban, rural, or urban), and regions (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West). Data from the 2008-2013 National Occupant Protection Use Survey were merged with states' cell phone use while driving legislation. The exposure was presence of a universal hand-held cell phone ban at time of observation. Logistic regression was used to assess the odds of drivers having a hand-held cell phone conversation. Sub-groups differences were assessed using models with interaction terms. When universal hand-held cell phone bans were effective, hand-held cell phone conversations were lower across all driver demographic sub-groups and regions. Sub-group differences existed among the sexes (p-value, cell phone bans, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of a driver hand-held phone conversation was 0.34 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.28, 0.41] for females versus 0.47 (CI 0.40, 0.55) for males and 0.31 (CI 0.25, 0.38) for drivers in Western states compared to 0.47 (CI 0.30, 0.72) in the Northeast and 0.50 (CI 0.38, 0.66) in the South. The presence of universal hand-held cell phone bans were associated lower hand-held cell phone conversations across all driver sub-groups and regions. Hand-held phone conversations were particularly lower among female drivers and those from Western states when these bans were in effect. Public health interventions concerning hand-held cell phone use while driving could reasonably target all drivers.

  14. A Pilot Study of Rapid Hepatitis C Testing in Probation and Parole Populations in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Nickolas D; Patry, Emily J; Bazerman, Lauri B; Noska, Amanda; Kuo, Irene; Kurth, Ann; Beckwith, Curt G

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects between five and seven million individuals in the United States and chronic infection can lead to liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Probation/parole offices are a novel setting for rapid HCV testing, providing outreach to populations at increased risk for HCV infection and/or transmitting HCV to others. While some correctional facilities offer HCV testing, many individuals who present to probation/parole offices are never or briefly incarcerated and may not access medical services. We conducted a rapid HCV testing pilot at probation/parole offices in Rhode Island. Overall, 130 people accepted rapid HCV testing, of whom 12 had reactive tests. Only four of these individuals presented to a community-based clinic for confirmatory testing, despite being offered a monetary incentive. Identifying and addressing barriers to HCV confirmatory testing and follow-up care is critical to increasing the uptake of HCV care and treatment in this vulnerable population.

  15. Population growth rate determinants for Arbacia: Evaluating ecological relevance of toxicity test endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacci, D.; Gleason, T.; Munns, W.R. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1995-12-31

    A population dynamics model for the sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata, was recently developed incorporating life stage endpoints frequently measured in acute and chronic toxicity studies. Model elasticity analysis was used to demonstrate that population growth rate was influenced most by adult survival and least by early life stage success, calling into question the ecological relevance of results from standardized Arbacia fertilization and larval development toxicity tests. Two approaches were used to continue this evaluation. Actual and hypothetical dose-response curves for toxicant exposures over multiple life stages were used to evaluate contributions to population growth rate of stage-specific toxicant effects. Additionally, relationships between critical life stages were developed from laboratory data for Arbacia. The results of this analysis underscore the importance of understanding both endpoint sensitivity to toxicants and sensitivity of population growth rate to test endpoints in determining the ecological relevance of toxicity tests results.

  16. Experimental test of genetic rescue in isolated populations of brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary L.; Coombs, Jason A.; Hudy, Mark; Nislow, Keith H.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic rescue is an increasingly considered conservation measure to address genetic erosion associated with habitat loss and fragmentation. The resulting gene flow from facilitating migration may improve fitness and adaptive potential, but is not without risks (e.g., outbreeding depression). Here, we conducted a test of genetic rescue by translocating ten (five of each sex) brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from a single source to four nearby and isolated stream populations. To control for the demographic contribution of translocated individuals, ten resident individuals (five of each sex) were removed from each recipient population. Prior to the introduction of translocated individuals, the two smallest above-barrier populations had substantially lower genetic diversity, and all populations had reduced effective number of breeders relative to adjacent below-barrier populations. In the first reproductive bout following translocation, 31 of 40 (78%) translocated individuals reproduced successfully. Translocated individuals contributed to more families than expected under random mating and generally produced larger full-sibling families. We observed relatively high (>20%) introgression in three of the four recipient populations. The translocations increased genetic diversity of recipient populations by 45% in allelic richness and 25% in expected heterozygosity. Additionally, strong evidence of hybrid vigour was observed through significantly larger body sizes of hybrid offspring relative to resident offspring in all recipient populations. Continued monitoring of these populations will test for negative fitness effects beyond the first generation. However, these results provide much-needed experimental data to inform the potential effectiveness of genetic rescue-motivated translocations.

  17. Smart Hand For Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Paolo

    1987-10-01

    Sensor based, computer controlled end effectors for mechanical arms are receiving more and more attention in the robotics industry, because commonly available grippers are only adequate for simple pick and place tasks. This paper describes the current status of the research at JPL on a smart hand for a Puma 560 robot arm. The hand is a self contained, autonomous system, capable of executing high level commands from a supervisory computer. The mechanism consists of parallel fingers, powered by a DC motor, and controlled by a microprocessor embedded in the hand housing. Special sensors are integrated in the hand for measuring the grasp force of the fingers, and for measuring forces and torques applied between the arm and the surrounding environment. Fingers can be exercised under position, velocity and force control modes. The single-chip microcomputer in the hand executes the tasks of communication, data acquisition and sensor based motor control, with a sample cycle of 2 ms and a transmission rate of 9600 baud. The smart hand described in this paper represents a new development in the area of end effector design because of its multi-functionality and autonomy. It will also be a versatile test bed for experimenting with advanced control schemes for dexterous manipulation.

  18. A probabilistic method for testing and estimating selection differences between populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yungang; Wang, Minxian; Huang, Xin; Li, Ran; Xu, Hongyang; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li

    2015-12-01

    Human populations around the world encounter various environmental challenges and, consequently, develop genetic adaptations to different selection forces. Identifying the differences in natural selection between populations is critical for understanding the roles of specific genetic variants in evolutionary adaptation. Although numerous methods have been developed to detect genetic loci under recent directional selection, a probabilistic solution for testing and quantifying selection differences between populations is lacking. Here we report the development of a probabilistic method for testing and estimating selection differences between populations. By use of a probabilistic model of genetic drift and selection, we showed that logarithm odds ratios of allele frequencies provide estimates of the differences in selection coefficients between populations. The estimates approximate a normal distribution, and variance can be estimated using genome-wide variants. This allows us to quantify differences in selection coefficients and to determine the confidence intervals of the estimate. Our work also revealed the link between genetic association testing and hypothesis testing of selection differences. It therefore supplies a solution for hypothesis testing of selection differences. This method was applied to a genome-wide data analysis of Han and Tibetan populations. The results confirmed that both the EPAS1 and EGLN1 genes are under statistically different selection in Han and Tibetan populations. We further estimated differences in the selection coefficients for genetic variants involved in melanin formation and determined their confidence intervals between continental population groups. Application of the method to empirical data demonstrated the outstanding capability of this novel approach for testing and quantifying differences in natural selection. © 2015 He et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Quality assurance of spirometry in a population-based study -predictors of good outcome in spirometry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wan C; Bourbeau, Jean; O'Donnell, Denis; Aaron, Shawn; Maltais, Francois; Marciniuk, Darcy; Hernandez, Paul; Cowie, Robert; Chapman, Kenneth; Sonia Buist, A; Sin, Don; Mark Fitzgerald, J

    2014-04-01

    The assurance of high-quality spirometry testing remains a challenge. Spirometry training consisted of standardized coaching followed by certification for 35 spirometry-naïve and 9 spirometry-experienced research assistants. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator (BD) in random population samples of 5176 people aged 40 years and older from 9 sites in Canada. using the hand-held EasyOne spirometer (ndd Medical Technologies Inc., Andover, MA, USA). Pulmonary function quality assurance with over reading was conducted centrally in Vancouver: spirograms were reviewed and graded according to ATS/ERS standards with prompt feedback to the technician at each site. Descriptive statistics were calculated for manoeuvre acceptability and repeatability variables. A logistic regression model was constructed for the predictors of spirometry quality success. 95% of test sessions achieved pre-determined quality standards for back extrapolated volume (BEV), time to peak flow (PEFT) and end of test volume (EOTV). The mean forced expiratory time (FET) was 11.2 seconds. Then, 90% and 95% of all manoeuvres had FEV1 and FVC that were repeatable within 150 ml and 200 ml respectively. Test quality was slightly better for post-BD test sessions compared with pre-BD for both groups of research assistants. Independent predictors of acceptable test quality included participant characteristics: female sex, younger age, greater BD responsiveness; but not study site or prior experience in completing spirometry by the technologist. Good quality spirometry tests are attainable in large multicenter epidemiological studies by trained research assistants, irrespective of their prior experience in spirometry.

  20. Case report: BRCA in the Ashkenazi population: are current testing guidelines too exclusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunders Katherine H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The BRCA1/2 genes account for a significant portion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and they are especially prevalent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Women who have a mutation can prevent breast and ovarian cancer with surgical intervention. We describe an Ashkenazi Jewish patient who illustrates that current testing criteria are too restrictive, particularly for this population of patients. The patient's sister was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 33; however, she was not a mutation carrier. Based on practice guidelines, the patient was not recommended genetic testing. She subsequently underwent direct-to-consumer (DTC testing and discovered that she was a mutation carrier. This case demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the higher prevalence of BRCA mutations in the Ashkenazi population. It also exemplifies the need to involve medical professionals, including genetic counselors, in the dissemination of DNA test results.

  1. A likelihood ratio test of population Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang; Zhang, Sanguo; Zhou, Chuan; Sile, Saba

    2009-04-01

    Testing Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in the control group is commonly used to detect genotyping errors in genetic association studies. We propose a likelihood ratio test for testing HWE in the study population using both case and control samples. This test incorporates underlying association models. Another feature is that, when we infer the disease-genotype association, we explicitly incorporate HWE or a possible departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (DHWE) into the model. Our unified framework enables us to infer the disease-genotype association when a detected DHWE needs to be part of the model after causes for the DHWE are explored. Real data sets are used to illustrate the application of the methodology and its implication in genetic association studies. Our analysis and interpretation touch on issues such as genotyping errors, population selection, population stratification, or the study sampling plan, that all could be the cause of DHWE.

  2. Radiation doses to local populations near nuclear weapons test sites worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing was conducted in the atmosphere at numerous sites worldwide between 1946 and 1980, which resulted in exposures to local populations as a consequence of fallout of radioactive debris. The nuclear tests were conducted by five nations (United States, Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France, and China) primarily at 16 sites. The 16 testing sites, located in nine different countries on five continents (plus Oceania) contributed nearly all of the radioactive materials released to the environment by atmospheric testing; only small amounts were released at a fewother minor testing sites. The 16 sites discussed here are Nevada Test Site, USA (North American continent), Bikini and Enewetak, Marshall Islands (Oceania); Johnston Island, USA (Oceania), Christmas and Malden Island, Kiribati (Oceania); Emu Field, Maralinga, and Monte Bello Islands, Australia (Australian continent); Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia (Oceania), Reggane, Algeria (Africa), Novaya Zemlya and Kapustin Yar, Russia (Europe), Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan (Asia), and Lop Nor, China (Asia). There were large differences in the numbers of tests conducted at each location and in the total explosive yields. Those factors, as well as differences in population density, lifestyle, environment, and climate at each site, led to large differences in the doses received by local populations. In general, the tests conducted earliest led to the highest individual and population exposures, although the amount of information available for a few of these sites is insufficient to provide any detailed evaluation of radiation exposures. The most comprehensive information for any site is for the Nevada Test Site. The disparities in available information add difficulty to determining the radiation exposures of local populations at each site. It is the goal of this paper to summarize the available information on external and internal doses received by the public living in the regions near each of the

  3. Hand Matters: Left-Hand Gestures Enhance Metaphor Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that speech-accompanying gestures influence cognitive processes, but it is not clear whether the gestural benefit is specific to the gesturing hand. Two experiments tested the “(right/left) hand-specificity” hypothesis for self-oriented functions of gestures: gestures with a particular hand enhance cognitive processes involving the hemisphere contralateral to the gesturing hand. Specifically, we tested whether left-hand gestures enhance metaphor explanation, which involves right-hemispheric processing. In Experiment 1, right-handers explained metaphorical phrases (e.g., “to spill the beans,” beans represent pieces of information). Participants kept the one hand (right, left) still while they were allowed to spontaneously gesture (or not) with their other free hand (left, right). Metaphor explanations were better when participants chose to gesture when their left hand was free than when they did not. An analogous effect of gesturing was not found when their right hand was free. In Experiment 2, different right-handers performed the same metaphor explanation task but, unlike Experiment 1, they were encouraged to gesture with their left or right hand or to not gesture at all. Metaphor explanations were better when participants gestured with their left hand than when they did not gesture, but the right hand gesture condition did not significantly differ from the no-gesture condition. Furthermore, we measured participants’ mouth asymmetry during additional verbal tasks to determine individual differences in the degree of right-hemispheric involvement in speech production. The left-over-right-side mouth dominance, indicating stronger right-hemispheric involvement, positively correlated with the left-over-right-hand gestural benefit on metaphor explanation. These converging findings supported the “hand-specificity” hypothesis. PMID:28080121

  4. Length of tick repellency depends on formulation of the repellent compound (icaridin = Saltidin®): tests on Ixodes persulcatus and Ixodes ricinus placed on hands and clothes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    The present study had the aim to test the repellent potential of the compound icaridin = Saltidin® against the tick species Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes persulcatus using different formulations of the compound. Tests were done on backs of impregnated human hands, on impregnated linen cloth and versus impregnated dog hair. It was found that 1. Ixodes persulcatus-the common Eastern European, Russian Ixodes species is significantly sensitive to icaridin = Saltidin® as I. ricinus protecting for the test period of 5 h. This is an important finding, since I. persulcatus is the vector of agents of the severe Eastern meningoencephalitis; 2. that this repellent compound acts similarly on both I. ricinus and I. persulcatus, when sprayed either on naked skin or on cloths; 3. that there are only slight differences in duration of the repellency when using different formulations containing icaridin = Saltidin®; 4. that icaridin = Saltidin® sprayed on dog hair has identical repellent effects like those seen on human skin and cloths; thus, this compound can also be used to protect animals such as dogs, cats, horses; and 5. that the icaridin = Saltidin® did not induce a bad sensation on skin, nor bad smells; furthermore, it was not sticky and did not leave residuals neither on clothes nor on dog's hair.

  5. Evaluation of hand functions in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tander, Berna; Akpolat, Tekin; Durmus, Dilek; Canturk, Ferhan

    2007-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) have many musculoskeletal abnormalities, including hand dysfunction. The Sollerman test evaluates hand grip function in daily activities. The relationships between Sollerman test (dominant hand) with Duruoz's Hand Index (DHI), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) tests have not been investigated previously. The aims of this study are to evaluate hand grip function using the Sollerman test in hemodialysis (HD) patients, correlate this test with other measures evaluating hand function or psychosocial status, and investigate factors that can affect Sollerman test. One-hundred twenty HD patients (64 male, 56 female, mean age 51 +/- 1.4 years, mean duration of HD therapy 5.3 +/- 3.7 years) were included in this study. The HAQ, DHI, and BDI scores were determined by standard techniques. All patients underwent the Jamar grip test and Sollerman test for the dominant (D) and non-dominant hand (ND). We found a positive correlation between Sollerman test (dominant hand) with Sollerman test-ND, Jamar-D, and Jamar-ND tests. There were negative correlations between Sollerman test with age, HAQ, BDI, and DHI tests. The relationships between Sollerman test (dominant hand) with DHI, HAQ, and BDI tests have not been investigated previously. This study showed the correlations between the Sollerman test (dominant hand) and other tests (either positive or negative). Psychosocial problems can affect hand functions.

  6. Expanding HIV testing efforts in concentrated epidemic settings: a population-based survey from rural Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Pharris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To improve HIV prevention and care programs, it is important to understand the uptake of HIV testing and to identify population segments in need of increased HIV testing. This is particularly crucial in countries with concentrated HIV epidemics, where HIV prevalence continues to rise in the general population. This study analyzes determinants of HIV testing in a rural Vietnamese population in order to identify potential access barriers and areas for promoting HIV testing services. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional survey of 1874 randomly sampled adults was linked to pregnancy, migration and economic cohort data from a demographic surveillance site (DSS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine which factors were associated with having tested for HIV. RESULTS: The age-adjusted prevalence of ever-testing for HIV was 7.6%; however 79% of those who reported feeling at-risk of contracting HIV had never tested. In multivariate analysis, younger age (aOR 1.85, 95% CI 1.14-3.01, higher economic status (aOR 3.4, 95% CI 2.21-5.22, and semi-urban residence (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.53-3.66 were associated with having been tested for HIV. HIV testing rates did not differ between women of reproductive age who had recently been pregnant and those who had not. CONCLUSIONS: We found low testing uptake (6% among pregnant women despite an existing prevention of mother-to-child HIV testing policy, and lower-than-expected testing among persons who felt that they were at-risk of HIV. Poverty and residence in a more geographically remote location were associated with less HIV testing. In addition to current HIV testing strategies focusing on high-risk groups, we recommend targeting HIV testing in concentrated HIV epidemic settings to focus on a scaled-up provision of antenatal testing. Additional recommendations include removing financial and geographic access barriers to client-initiated testing, and encouraging provider

  7. Smoky homes: gender, socioeconomic and housing disparities in second hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure in a large population-based Australian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonevski, B; Paul, C; Jones, A; Bisquera, A; Regan, T

    2014-03-01

    Although research suggests that socioeconomic status (SES) will be related to housing type with regard to second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure, there has been no comprehensive examination of these relationships. This study aimed to explore associations between SHS exposure a) at home and b) at other places, and a number of SES, housing, and health factors. Data were drawn from the 45 and Up Study, a large cohort study with 266,848 adults in New South Wales, Australia, of which 160,824 participants aged 45-65years were included in this study. Associations between socio-demographic characteristics, smoking status, housing-type, SES, and exposure to SHS were explored initially using Chi-square tests. Ordinal logistic models were created with increasing exposure to SHS at home and at other places. When measuring SHS exposure at home, being female (odds ratio (OR)=1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.2, 1.3); being of lower age (45-49years vs 60-64years, OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.3, 1.5), being a current smoker of over 20 cigarettes per day (vs never smoked, OR=10.2, 95%CI=9.4,11); living in other types of dwelling compared to living at home (OR=1.3, 95%CI=1.1, 1.4), living with a partner (vs being single OR=2.3, 95%CI=2.1, 2.5), and low SES measures were associated with increased exposure. Increasing SHS exposure at other places was also related to low SES measures, however unlike SHS exposure at home, SHS exposure at other places was associated with being male (OR=1.5, 95%CI=1.5, 1.6); and greater paid hours of work (OR=1.3, 95%CI=1.2, 1.3). Improved monitoring of SHS exposure in high risk environments is required. Tailoring SHS messages to environments may also be required, for example to women living in units, apartments and mobile homes and males in lower income workplaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A randomization test for controlling population stratification in whole-genome association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Gad; Jordan, Michael I; Halperin, Eran; Shamir, Ron; Karp, Richard M

    2007-11-01

    Population stratification can be a serious obstacle in the analysis of genomewide association studies. We propose a method for evaluating the significance of association scores in whole-genome cohorts with stratification. Our approach is a randomization test akin to a standard permutation test. It conditions on the genotype matrix and thus takes into account not only the population structure but also the complex linkage disequilibrium structure of the genome. As we show in simulation experiments, our method achieves higher power and significantly better control over false-positive rates than do existing methods. In addition, it can be easily applied to whole-genome association studies.

  9. Hand hygiene among physicians: performance, beliefs, and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Didier; Simon, Anne; Hugonnet, Stéphane; Pessoa-Silva, Carmen Lúcia; Sauvan, Valérie; Perneger, Thomas V

    2004-07-06

    Physician adherence to hand hygiene remains low in most hospitals. To identify risk factors for nonadherence and assess beliefs and perceptions associated with hand hygiene among physicians. Cross-sectional survey of physician practices, beliefs, and attitudes toward hand hygiene. Large university hospital. 163 physicians. Individual observation of physician hand hygiene practices during routine patient care with documentation of relevant risk factors; self-report questionnaire to measure beliefs and perceptions. Logistic regression identified variables independently associated with adherence. Adherence averaged 57% and varied markedly across medical specialties. In multivariate analysis, adherence was associated with the awareness of being observed, the belief of being a role model for other colleagues, a positive attitude toward hand hygiene after patient contact, and easy access to hand-rub solution. Conversely, high workload, activities associated with a high risk for cross-transmission, and certain technical medical specialties (surgery, anesthesiology, emergency medicine, and intensive care medicine) were risk factors for nonadherence. Direct observation of physicians may have influenced both adherence to hand hygiene and responses to the self-report questionnaire. Generalizability of study results requires additional testing in other health care settings and physician populations. Physician adherence to hand hygiene is associated with work and system constraints, as well as knowledge and cognitive factors. At the individual level, strengthening a positive attitude toward hand hygiene and reinforcing the conviction that each individual can influence the group behavior may improve adherence among physicians. Physicians who work in technical specialties should also be targeted for improvement.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of population based BRCA testing with varying Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Patel, Shreeya; Antoniou, Antonis C; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Turnbull, Clare; Evans, D Gareth; Hopper, John L; Macinnis, Robert J; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian; Legood, Rosa

    2017-11-01

    Population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing has been found to be cost-effective compared with family history-based testing in Ashkenazi-Jewish women were >30 years old with 4 Ashkenazi-Jewish grandparents. However, individuals may have 1, 2, or 3 Ashkenazi-Jewish grandparents, and cost-effectiveness data are lacking at these lower BRCA prevalence estimates. We present an updated cost-effectiveness analysis of population BRCA1/BRCA2 testing for women with 1, 2, and 3 Ashkenazi-Jewish grandparents. Decision analysis model. Lifetime costs and effects of population and family history-based testing were compared with the use of a decision analysis model. 56% BRCA carriers are missed by family history criteria alone. Analyses were conducted for United Kingdom and United States populations. Model parameters were obtained from the Genetic Cancer Prediction through Population Screening trial and published literature. Model parameters and BRCA population prevalence for individuals with 3, 2, or 1 Ashkenazi-Jewish grandparent were adjusted for the relative frequency of BRCA mutations in the Ashkenazi-Jewish and general populations. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated for all Ashkenazi-Jewish grandparent scenarios. Costs, along with outcomes, were discounted at 3.5%. The time horizon of the analysis is "life-time," and perspective is "payer." Probabilistic sensitivity analysis evaluated model uncertainty. Population testing for BRCA mutations is cost-saving in Ashkenazi-Jewish women with 2, 3, or 4 grandparents (22-33 days life-gained) in the United Kingdom and 1, 2, 3, or 4 grandparents (12-26 days life-gained) in the United States populations, respectively. It is also extremely cost-effective in women in the United Kingdom with just 1 Ashkenazi-Jewish grandparent with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £863 per quality-adjusted life-years and 15 days life gained. Results show that population-testing remains cost-effective at the £20,000-30000 per quality

  11. Hand-drawn&written pen-on-paper electrochemiluminescence immunodevice powered by rechargeable battery for low-cost point-of-care testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongmei; Kong, Qingkun; Wang, Shaowei; Xu, Jinmeng; Bian, Zhaoquan; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a pen-on-paper electrochemiluminescence (PoP-ECL) device was entirely hand drawn and written in commercially available crayon and pencil in turn for the first time, and a constant potential-triggered sandwich-type immunosensor was introduced into the PoP-ECL device to form a low-cost ECL immunodevice proof. Each PoP-ECL device contained a hydrophilic paper channel and two PoP electrodes, and the PoP-ECL device was produced as follows: crayon was firstly used to draw hydrophobic regions on pure cellulose paper to create the hydrophilic paper channels followed with a baking treatment, and then a 6B-type black pencil with low resistivity was applied for precision writing, as the PoP electrodes, across the hydrophilic paper channel. For further point-of-care testing, a portable, low-cost rechargeable battery was employed as the power source to provide constant potential to the PoP electrodes to trigger the ECL. Using Carbohydrate antigen 199 as model analyte, this PoP-ECL immunodevice showed a good linear response range from 0.01-200 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0055 U mL(-1), a high sensitivity and stability. The proposed PoP-ECL immunodevice could be used in point-of-care testing of other tumor markers for remote regions and developing countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-term practice effects and variability in cognitive testing in a healthy elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, L.; Rasmussen, L.S.; Siersma, V.

    2012-01-01

    and variability in test performance. The aim of this study was to collect cognitive test results with repeated testing in an elderly healthy population. METHODS: 161 healthy controls =60years were included. Cognitive testing was performed upon entry into the study, at 1week and 3months. Practice effect......BACKGROUND: Cognitive decline in the elderly is a subject of intense focus. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding definition of significant decline in connection with repeated testing and the interpretation of cognitive tests results must take into account the practice effect...... was evaluated on 7 neuropsychological measures and reference values of clinically important changes were calculated according to z-scores above 1.96. RESULTS: Test scores improved significantly (p...

  13. Hands on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Christine; Ryan, Bridget; Stewart, Moira

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether there is a relationship in family medicine between higher overall job satisfaction and doing a wider range of procedures. DESIGN Secondary analysis of a population survey (mailed questionnaire) using multiple regression analysis. SETTING Canadian family practices. PARTICIPANTS Family physicians who responded to the 2001 National Family Physician Workforce Survey conducted by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and whose main practice settings were private offices or clinics, community clinics, community health centres, or academic family medicine teaching units. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Family physicians’ overall job satisfaction. The predictor variable was range of procedures performed, defined as the variety of procedures done by family physicians. Eight potential confounding variables were examined: age; sex; solo versus group practice; population served by practice (urban, semiurban, rural); number of medical services offered; teaching (yes, no); constraints to medical care services; and the balance of physicians’ personal and professional commitments. RESULTS Of 19 762 physicians who responded to the question on job satisfaction, 15.8% were dissatisfied, 54.3% were moderately satisfied, and 29.8% were very satisfied overall. In multiple regression analysis, when controlling for confounding variables, the range of procedures done by family physicians was significantly associated with overall job satisfaction (P = .0001). The larger the range of procedures, the more satisfied the physician. The percentage of those very satisfied ranged from 28.1% for family physicians who did only a few procedures (0 to 4) to 33.5% for those who did 10 or more procedures. Greater satisfaction was reported by very young and very old male physicians, those in solo practice, rural physicians, teachers, those who had fewer constraints to medical care services, and those who thought their balance of personal and professional commitments was

  14. The association between hand eczema and nickel allergy has weakened among young women in the general population following the Danish nickel regulation: results from two cross-sectional studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Linneberg, Allan René; Menné, Torkil

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An association between nickel contact allergy and hand eczema has previously been demonstrated. In 1990, Denmark regulated the extent of nickel release in the ear-piercing process as well as nickel release from consumer products. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the effect...... tested with nickel. Data were analysed by logistic regression analyses and associations were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: The prevalence of concomitant nickel contact allergy and a history of hand eczema decreased among 18-35-year-old women from 9.......0% in 1990 to 2.1% in 2006 (P association between nickel contact allergy and a history of hand eczema decreased in this age group between 1990 (OR = 3.63; CI = 1.33-9.96) and 2006 (OR = 0.65; CI = 0.29-1.46). Among older women, no significant changes were observed in the association between...

  15. Testing the Role of Habitat Isolation among Ecologically Divergent Gall Wasp Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Egan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Habitat isolation occurs when habitat preferences lower the probability of mating between individuals associated with differing habitats. While a potential barrier to gene flow during ecological speciation, the effect of habitat isolation on reproductive isolation has rarely been directly tested. Herein, we first estimated habitat preference for each of six populations of the gall wasp Belonocnema treatae inhabiting either Quercus virginiana or Q. geminata. We then estimated the importance of habitat isolation in generating reproductive isolation between B. treatae populations that were host specific to either Q. virginiana or Q. geminata by measuring mate preference in the presence and absence of the respective host plants. All populations exhibited host preference for their native plant, and assortative mating increased significantly in the presence of the respective host plants. This host-plant-mediated assortative mating demonstrates that habitat isolation likely plays an important role in promoting reproductive isolation among populations of this host-specific gall former.

  16. Requirement for cystatin C testing in chronic kidney disease: a retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserson, Daniel S; Shine, Brian; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; James, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) determines chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, but underestimates renal function. The 2014 updated guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that GPs reduce overdiagnosis of CKD stage 3a (eGFR 45-60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) by using the renal biomarker cystatin C. To determine the population requirement for cystatin C testing, compared with current national availability of the assay. Retrospective study of primary care laboratory requests in Oxfordshire, England. The first creatinine results from tests ordered in primary care over a 6-year period (2008-2014) in a population of 600 000 in Oxfordshire were analysed and the number of patients with CKD stage 3a without proteinuria (who, in accordance with NICE guidance, required cystatin C) was determined. A conservative estimate of the national need was provided by scaling the population of Oxfordshire to the national population (CKD prevalence in the county is below the national average). Cystatin C assay availability was determined using national databases of laboratory assay provision. From a population of 600 000, there were 22 240 individuals with stable stage 3a CKD and no proteinuria. As the population of Oxfordshire equates to 1% of the UK population, there is an initial requirement for at least 2 million people to have their CKD status determined with cystatin C testing. Eight laboratories (2.1% of UK laboratories) reported cystatin C assay provision. There is a substantial gap between cystatin C assay requirements in primary care and national assay provision. This is a major barrier to implementing NICE guidance. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  17. Genetic susceptibility to Gilbert's syndrome in a valencian population; efficacy of the fasting test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A K; Escartín, N; Monzó, C; Guzmán, C; Ferrer, I; González-Muñoz, C; Peña, P; Monzó, V; Marcaida, G; Rodríguez-López, R

    To describe the populational distribution of the UGT1A1*28 variant (genetic variant code rs8175347) located in the promotor of the UGT gene and correlate its genotypes with the results of the fasting test, as well as its relationship with the biochemical disorder of Gilbert's syndrome (GS) in a Valencian population. We studied the prevalence of the genotypes (TA) 6/6 (TA) 6/7 and (TA) 7/7 of the deleterious variant rs8175347 in 144 patients with hyperbilirubinemia, 38 of whom had previously undergone the fasting test to diagnose GS, and in 150 control patients. By analysing the genomic region of the TATA box of the UGT1A1 gene promotor using Sanger sequencing, we established the correlation between the rs8175347 genotypes and the fasting test results and with the patients' biochemical disorders. The rate of heterozygosity of allele (TA) 7 in the control population was 32% and increased to 87.59% among the patients with suspected GS. The rate of genotype TA 7/7 was 81.94% among the patients with hyperbilirubinemia, compared with 11.33% in the control patients. The fasting test showed a 15.79% rate of false negatives and a 5.26% rate of false positives. The high frequency of allele (TA) 7 among the Valencian control population, almost double the 5% reported for European control patients, confirms the high rate of GS reported in the Spanish population, without observing significant differences between the geographical ends of the country. The efficacy and reliability of the fasting test for the diagnosis of GS is questionable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Test-Retest Reliability of Measurements of Hand-Grip Strength Obtained by Dynamometry from Older Adults: A Systematic Review of Research in the PubMed Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, R W

    2017-01-01

    A systematic review was performed to summarize literature describing the test-retest reliability of grip strength measures obtained from older adults. Relevant literature was identified via a PubMed search. Seventeen articles were deemed appropriate based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The relative test-retest reliability of grip strength measures obtained by dynamometry was good to excellent (intra-class correlation coefficients > 0.80) in all but 3 studies, which involved older adults with severe dementia. Absolute reliability, as indicated by summary statistics such as the minimum detectable change (95%), was more variable. As a percentage, that change ranged from 14.5% to 98.5%. Consequently, clinicians can be confident in the relative reliability of grip strength measures obtained from at risk older adults. However, relatively large percentage changes in grip strength may be necessary to conclude with confidence that a real change has occurred over time in some populations.

  19. Can intraspecific competition drive disruptive selection? An experimental test in natural populations of sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Daniel I

    2004-03-01

    Theory suggests that frequency-dependent resource competition will disproportionately impact the most common phenotypes in a population. The resulting disruptive selection forms the driving force behind evolutionary models of niche diversification, character release, ecological sexual dimorphism, resource polymorphism, and sympatric speciation. However, there is little empirical support for the idea that intraspecific competition generates disruptive selection. This paper presents a test of this theory, using natural populations of the three-spine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus. Sticklebacks exhibit substantial individual specialization associated with phenotypic variation and so are likely to experience frequency-dependent competition and hence disruptive selection. Using body size and relative gonad mass as indirect measures of potential fecundity and hence fitness, I show that an important aspect of trophic morphology, gill raker length, is subject to disruptive selection in one of two natural lake populations. To test whether this apparent disruptive selection could have been caused by competition, I manipulated population densities in pairs of large enclosures in each of five lakes. In each lake I removed fish from one enclosure and added them to the other to create paired low- and high-population-density treatments with natural phenotype distributions. Again using indirect measures of fitness, disruptive selection was consistently stronger in high-density than low-density enclosures. These results support long-standing theoretical arguments that intraspecific competition drives disruptive selection and thus may be an important causal agent in the evolution of ecological variation.

  20. Populism

    OpenAIRE

    Abts, Koenraad; Van Kessel, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Populism is a concept applied to a wide range of political movements and actors across the globe. There is, at the same time, considerable confusion about the attributes and manifestation of populism, as well as its impact on democracy. This contribution identifies the defining elements of the populist ideology and discusses the varieties in which populism manifests itself, for instance as a component of certain party families. We finally discuss various normative interpretations of populism,...

  1. Testing Local Adaptation in Five Populations of Hyalella azteca in Northern Alberta's Oil Sands Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Steven R; Gauthier, Patrick T; Pyle, Gregory G

    2017-02-01

    Canada's oil sands hold the third largest petroleum reserves worldwide and have experienced rapid economic growth. The oil sands region provides an ideal location for studying local adaptations through reciprocal transplant (RT) because populations within the region have been historically exposed to naturally occurring bitumen. Our objectives were to (1) determine if Hyalella azteca from habitats within the oil sands region exhibited increased tolerance to constituents associated with industrial bitumen extraction compared with H. azteca from habitats outside the region; and (2) determine if any observed tolerance was attributable to local adaptation. Five populations of H. azteca were reciprocally transplanted from reclaimed and reference wetlands: four from local wetlands plus one naïve laboratory population. Survival, toxicity, and behaviour were measured before and after the RT period. Survival varied by population and site. These results show that the differences in responses among populations are likely not attributable to local adaptation and that laboratory populations of H. azteca provide ecologically relevant results when tested in the field.

  2. Evaluation of a simple test of reaction time for baseline concussion testing in a population of high school athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James; Wilson, Julie; Young, Julie; Duerson, Drew; Swisher, Gail; Collins, Christy L; Meehan, William P

    2015-01-01

    A common sequela of concussions is impaired reaction time. Computerized neurocognitive tests commonly measure reaction time. A simple clinical test for reaction time has been studied previously in college athletes; whether this test is valid and reliable when assessing younger athletes remains unknown. Our study examines the reliability and validity of this test in a population of high school athletes. Cross-sectional study. Two American High Schools. High school athletes (N = 448) participating in American football or soccer during the academic years 2011 to 2012 and 2012 to 2013. All study participants completed a computerized baseline neurocognitive assessment that included a measure of reaction time (RT comp), in addition to a clinical measure of reaction time that assessed how far a standard measuring device would fall prior to the athlete catching it (RT clin). Validity was assessed by determining the correlation between RT clin and RT comp. Reliability was assessed by measuring the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the repeated measures of RT clin and RT comp taken 1 year apart. In the first year of study, RT clin and RT comp were positively but weakly correlated (rs = 0.229, P Reaction time impairment commonly results from concussion and is among the most clinically important measures of the condition. The device evaluated in this study has previously been investigated as a reaction time measure in college athletes. This study investigates the clinical generalizability of the device in a younger population. A video abstract showing how the RT clin device is used in practice is available as Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JSM/A43.

  3. Temporal trends in lipid testing among children and adolescents: A population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Sriram

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Unfavorable lipid levels during childhood are associated with subsequent development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The American Academy of Pediatrics and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in 2011 recommended universal lipid screening for children between ages 9–11 years and between ages 17–21 years. The objective of the study was to determine temporal trends in lipid testing among children and young adults in a mid-western population. The Rochester Epidemiology Project database was used to identify lipid testing in ages 2–21 years (n = 51,176 in the Olmsted County population from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2014. Generalized estimating equations with Poisson distribution were used to test for temporal trends in lipid testing across the age groups. There was modest increase in lipid testing in children in the age groups, 9–11 years and 17–21 years (1.5% in 2008 to 2.2% in 2014, P < 0.001 and 4.4% in 2008 to 4.6% in 2014, P = 0.02, respectively. There was a significant decrease in proportion of 17–21 year olds with elevated total cholesterol (16.2% in 2008 to 11.6% in 2014; P = 0.01 and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (22.6% in 2008 to 12.6% in 2014; P < 0.001. In this population-based study, rates of lipid testing increased minimally only in the last six years. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to improve guideline dissemination and address attitudes, practices and barriers to lipid testing in children and young adults.

  4. Cross-culturally modified University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test for a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Aytug; Tekeli, Hakan; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Yasar, Halit; Kendirli, Mustafa T; Saglam, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) is a well-developed and popular olfactory test, which has been validated in various populations. However, there was only one study in a Turkish population, and this study indicated that the North American version of the UPSIT was not enough to evaluate the olfactory functions of Turkish population. So, we developed a cross-cultural adaptation of the UPSIT, the UPSIT-Turkish (UPSIT-T). Thus, the goal of this study was to investigate the applicability of the UPSIT-T in healthy Turkish subjects. The study included 51 healthy individuals who reported having normal olfactory function. The participants were administered the North American version of the UPSIT firstly, and then, after a day UPSIT-T was applied to the participants. The results of two smell tests were compared, and the applicability of UPSIT-T was evaluated. The mean (standard deviation) value for correctly identified odors was 27.2 ± 5.7 (range, 14-38) with the UPSIT application, whereas the mean (standard deviation) value for correctly identified odors was 35.9 ± 3.1 for UPSIT-T. There was a statistically significant increase in the scores of the participants when UPSIT-T was performed (p < 0.001). The identification rates of 10 test odorants were <80% for our study group, and 2 of 10 were <70% for the UPSIT-T. The UPSIT-T modification is an adequate olfactory test for clinical use in a Turkish population.

  5. Typhoid fever: hurdles to adequate hand washing for disease prevention among the population of a peri-urban informal settlement in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, James; McCool, Judith; Kool, Jacob; Salusalu, Mosese

    2013-01-01

    The Pacific island nation of Fiji Islands has high rates of endemic typhoid fever which is difficult to diagnose and often underreported. However, the majority of cases are preventable through use of safe water; adequate sanitation; vaccination; and, most sustainable of all, simple hygienic behaviour, such as hand washing with soap (HWWS). Despite many attempts by public health authorities, little progress has been made in the area of environmental adaptation and behaviour change. To explore perceptions of typhoid fever risk among urban squatters and behavioural determinants surrounding HWWS, indigenous Fijians living in informal settlements with high typhoid fever incidence were invited to participate in focus group discussions. In-depth interviews were conducted with community leaders. Perceptions of typhoid fever suggest confusion about risk factors, symptoms and communicability. Environmental barriers for hand washing were related to water and soap access. Standard social marketing approaches have been trialled with little clear evidence of impact. Despite this, we continue to advocate for the social and cultural determinants of typhoid prevention to remain central to future public health strategies. Despite behaviour change being notoriously difficult, we argue that community-driven behaviour adaptation initiatives based on sound epidemiological evidence and health communication theory are likely to have significant impact and greater likelihood of sustainability.

  6. Typhoid fever: hurdles to adequate hand washing for disease prevention among the population of a peri-urban informal settlement in Fiji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosese Salusalu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem/context: The Pacific island nation of Fiji Islands has high rates of endemic typhoid fever which is difficult to diagnose and often underreported. However, the majority of cases are preventable through use of safe water; adequate sanitation; vaccination; and, most sustainable of all, simple hygienic behaviour, such as hand washing with soap (HWWS. Despite many attempts by public health authorities, little progress has been made in the area of environmental adaptation and behaviour change. Action: To explore perceptions of typhoid fever risk among urban squatters and behavioural determinants surrounding HWWS, indigenous Fijians living in informal settlements with high typhoid fever incidence were invited to participate in focus group discussions. In-depth interviews were conducted with community leaders. Outcome: Perceptions of typhoid fever suggest confusion about risk factors, symptoms and communicability. Environmental barriers for hand washing were related to water and soap access. Standard social marketing approaches have been trialled with little clear evidence of impact. Despite this, we continue to advocate for the social and cultural determinants of typhoid prevention to remain central to future public health strategies. Discussion: Despite behaviour change being notoriously difficult, we argue that community-driven behaviour adaptation initiatives based on sound epidemiological evidence and health communication theory are likely to have significant impact and greater likelihood of sustainability.

  7. Korean hand acupressure for motion sickness in prehospital trauma care: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded trial in a geriatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertalanffy, Petra; Hoerauf, Klaus; Fleischhackl, Roman; Strasser, Helmut; Wicke, Franziska; Greher, Manfred; Gustorff, Burkhard; Kober, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Patients with trauma or medical illnesses transported to the hospital by ambulance have a frequent incidence of motion sickness. Because the administration of drugs in the ambulance is prohibited by law in Austria, the noninvasive Korean hand acupressure point at K-K9 may be an alternative against nausea and vomiting. We enrolled 100 geriatric patients with minor trauma, randomizing them into a K-K9 group and a sham acupressure group. We recorded visual analog scores (VAS) for nausea and for the patient's overall satisfaction with the treatment, hemodynamic variables, and peripheral vasoconstriction. In the K-K9 group, a significant (P patients had been vasoconstricted at the emergency site before treatment, there was a significant difference (P patients at the hospital (4 and 46 constricted and dilated, respectively, in the K-K9 group versus 48 and 2 constricted and dilated, respectively, in the sham group). On arrival in the hospital, a significant difference (P patients' overall satisfaction with the provided care was significantly higher (P patient satisfaction. Korean hand acupressure at the K-K9 point was effective in reducing nausea and subjective symptoms of motion sickness in emergency trauma transport of patients at high risk of motion sickness.

  8. Postpartum Diabetes Testing Rates after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Canadian Women: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butalia, Sonia; Donovan, Lois; Savu, Anamaria; Johnson, Jeffrey; Edwards, Alun; Kaul, Padma

    2017-05-12

    We assessed the rate and type of postpartum glycemic testing in women with impaired glucose tolerance of pregnancy (IGTp) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We examined whether the likelihood of testing was modulated by patients' characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. Our population-level cohort study included data from 132,905 pregnancies between October 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, in Alberta, Canada. Laboratory data within 270 days before and 1 year after delivery were used to identify pregnancies involving IGTp/GDM and postpartum glycemic testing, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify maternal and pregnancy factors associated with postpartum testing. A total of 8,703 pregnancies were affected by IGTp (n=3669) or GDM (n=5034) as defined by the prevailing Canadian Diabetes Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. By 1 year postpartum, 55.1% had undergone glycemic assessments. Of those, 59.7% had had 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests, 17.4% had had glycated hemoglobin tests without oral glucose tolerance tests and 22.9% had had only fasting or random glucose tests. Women with IGTp or GDM, respectively, who were younger, smokers and residing in rural areas and whose labours were not induced were less likely to be tested postpartum. Having large for gestational age infants was also associated with a lower likelihood of postpartum testing in women with GDM. Despite a universal health-care system in Canada, many women with IGTp or GDM do not undergo postpartum glucose testing. Maternal and pregnancy characteristics influence postpartum testing and provide valuable information for creating targeted strategies to improve postpartum testing in this group of high-risk women. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Performance on the Benton Visual Retention Test in an educationally diverse elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun Hyun; Lee, Dong Young; Choo, Il Han; Youn, Jong Choul; Kim, Ki Woong; Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Suh, Kwan Woo; Paek, Yong Su; Jun, Yong Ho; Woo, Jong Inn

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of demographic variables on the performances of Administrations A and C of the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) in a geriatric population with a wide range of educational achievement. We administered the test to 554 nondemented elders aged 60-90 years with an educational history of from zero to 25 years. Age and education significantly influenced Administrations A and C, although gender had no main effect. We observed significant Education x Gender interactions for Administrations A and C, Age x Gender interactions for Administration A, and Age x Education interactions for Administration C. Our results suggest that both nonverbal memory and constructional ability are influenced by age and education. Although there is no overall gender effect, men seem to outperform women in a poorly educated (for Administrations A and C) or relatively older (for Administration A) elderly population.

  10. SNP sets and reading ability: testing confirmation of a 10-SNP set in a population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Michelle; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Bates, Timothy C

    2011-06-01

    A set of 10 SNPs associated with reading ability in 7-year-olds was reported based on initial pooled analyses of 100K SNP chip data, with follow-up testing stages using pooling and individual testing. Here we examine this association in an adolescent population sample of Australian twins and siblings (N = 1177) aged 12 to 25 years. One (rs1842129) of the 10 SNPs approached significance (P = .05) but no support was found for the remaining 9 SNPs or the SNP set itself. Results indicate that these SNPs are not associated with reading ability in an Australian population. The results are interpreted as supporting use of much larger SNP sets in common disorders where effects are small.

  11. [Identification of susceptibility gene for pig umbilical hernia in different populations using transmission disequilibrium test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying; Long, Yi; Ruan, Guorong; Wu, Lihua; Zhang, Zhiyan; Xiao, Shijun; Deng, Weiyun; Lv, Xianshan; Hu, Dou; Wu, Guozao; Shen, Huqun; Liao, Xinjun; Ding, Nengshui; Huang, Lusheng

    2014-10-01

    A genome-wide scan for pig umbilical hernia (UH) was performed in a White Duroc × Erhualian resource population reported by our previously study, which detected two susceptibility microsatellite markers (SWR1928 on SSC7 and SW830 on SSC10) significantly affecting pig UH. Herein, fine mapping studies and identification of susceptibility genes for UH were performed in two different populations. A total of 40 SNPs in 12 positional candidate genes located on the two significant segments were genotyped in the F2/F3 resource population. Quality control of the genotype data and transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) were conducted using Plink v1.07 software. The results showed that g.708G>A in IL16 (interleukin 16) gene and g.10664G>A in CDC73 (cell division cycle 73) gene were significantly associated with pig UH. These two prominent SNPs and another two weakly associated SNPs g.10546A>G and g.10811A>G in CDC73 were also undergone the replication TDT test in the outbred commercial populations. All SNPs in the CDC73 gene were confirmed to be significantly associated with pig UH (PG and g.10811A>G with extreme significant level (Ppig UH according to its biological functions and the molecular pathogenesis of UH.

  12. Use of Pearson's Chi-Square for Testing Equality of Percentile Profiles across Multiple Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William D; Beyl, Robbie A; Burton, Jeffrey H; Johnson, Callie M; Romer, Jacob E; Zhang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    In large sample studies where distributions may be skewed and not readily transformed to symmetry, it may be of greater interest to compare different distributions in terms of percentiles rather than means. For example, it may be more informative to compare two or more populations with respect to their within population distributions by testing the hypothesis that their corresponding respective 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles are equal. As a generalization of the median test, the proposed test statistic is asymptotically distributed as Chi-square with degrees of freedom dependent upon the number of percentiles tested and constraints of the null hypothesis. Results from simulation studies are used to validate the nominal 0.05 significance level under the null hypothesis, and asymptotic power properties that are suitable for testing equality of percentile profiles against selected profile discrepancies for a variety of underlying distributions. A pragmatic example is provided to illustrate the comparison of the percentile profiles for four body mass index distributions.

  13. A Student's Hands-on Introduction to Radio Astronomy With the Simple Construction, Operation and Testing, Utilizing Commonly Available Materials, of a Functioning Solar Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D.

    2016-12-01

    Our study of the Sun, an object that provides life to this planet but also is a serious threat to the existence we now enjoy, is frequently limited in hands-on activities by the unavailability of the necessary observational tools. While small optical telescopes are more easily obtained, telescopes that work the other regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as the radio frequencies, are unusual. Radio emissions from solar storms, however, can be "viewed" by a student constructing a simple, tunable and inexpensive radio telescope designed to receive the most common radio frequencies broadcast from the Sun during such a storm. The apparatus employs normally available materials and technology in new purposes. Utilizing this telescope, students have the ability to test and modify its design for changes in frequency and signal amplitude, and therefore examine a wide spectrum of radio emission emanating from our star. This engaging introduction to radio electronics not only involves the study of the electrical circuit involved, but also sets the student up for detailed study in the form of specific research projects focusing on solar activity in the radio wavelengths. So far, my students have been actively involved in varying the electrical properties of a simple one-transistor circuit that selects the observational frequencies of the solar radio telescope they have constructed. Student research projects also have examined antenna design in terms of directionality and signal strength gain. In the future, collaboration is possible to link student observers in different locations on this planet, allowing for significant peer evaluation and cooperation. NASA's "Project Jove", a program that Sonoma Valley High School and Robert Ferguson Observatory have been connected with since about the year 2000, already has a worldwide collaboration network in place for similar student-operated radio telescopes for primarily studying Jupiter. Because of the higher frequencies with

  14. Testing the goodness of supplementary feeding to enhance population viability in an endangered vulture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Oro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human-predator conflicts are directly or indirectly threatening many species with extinction. Thus, biologists are urged to find simple solutions to complex situations while avoiding unforeseen conservation outcomes. The provision of supplementary food at artificial feeding sites (AFS is frequently used in the conservation of scavenger bird populations currently suffering from indirect poisoning, although no scientific studies on its effectiveness have been conducted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a long-term data set of 95 individually marked birds from the largest European core of the endangered bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus to test the long-term effects of specific AFS for bearded vultures on their survival rates (by CMR models and population dynamics (by Monte Carlo simulations in an area where fatalities derived from illegal poisoning and the use of other toxics like veterinary drugs have increased over the last several years. Our data support the positive relationship between the use of AFS and survival. However, contrary to theoretical predictions (e.g. high and more stable adult survival among long-lived species, the use of AFS increased only survival of pre-adults. Moreover, AFS buffered the effects of illegal poisoning on this age-class, while adult survival decreased over years. Our simulations predicted a maximum value of extinction probability over a time horizon of 50 years. Population projections run with survival rates expected in scenarios without poisoning predicted the situation of least conservation concern, while including only AFS can maintain a large floater surplus that may delay population decline but fails to reduce poisoning risk among adults. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although AFS are not effective to save bearded vultures from an expected population decline, they delay population extinction and can be a useful tool for prolonging population viability while combating illegal and indirect

  15. Tactile display on the remaining hand for unilateral hand amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human rely profoundly on tactile feedback from fingertips to interact with the environment, whereas most hand prostheses used in clinics provide no tactile feedback. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility to use a tactile display glove that can be worn by a unilateral hand amputee on the remaining healthy hand to display tactile feedback from a hand prosthesis. The main benefit is that users could easily distinguish the feedback for each finger, even without training. The claimed advantage is supported by preliminary tests with healthy subjects. This approach may lead to the development of effective and affordable tactile display devices that provide tactile feedback for individual fingertip of hand prostheses.

  16. Prevalence of the absence of palmaris longus muscle assessed by a new examination test (Hiz-Ediz Test in the population residing in the area of Van, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Erden

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary goal of this trial was to show the compatibility between a new test technique (Hiz-Ediz test for detection of palmaris longus muscle (PLM agenesis, which we recently developed, and the former tests, the Schaeffer and Mishra’s second tests.Materials and methods: One thousand cases were enrolled in this trial. Schaeffer’s test, Mishra’s second test and Hiz-Ediz tests were applied to all cases. Examinations were performed to determine differences between genders and both hands. Consistency between all three tests was investigated.Results: In the Hiz-Ediz test, PLM agenesis was determined in 15.1%. No significant difference was found between the rates of unilateral and bilateral tendon agenesis determined by three tests (p>0.05. When the consistency of the three tests was evaluated using the kappa test, full consistency was determined between Mishra’s second and the Hiz-Ediz test; however, full consistency was not determined between the Schaffer’s and the other two tests. But, no statistical difference was found between the three tests.Conclusion: Our results indicate that the prevalence of PLM agenesis is consistent with the available data. The Hiz-Ediz test can be applied easily and safely to determine and to visualize the PLM agenesis, when compared to the Mishra’s second test and the Schaeffer’s test. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 254-259.

  17. Population Growth, Energy Use, and Pollution: Understanding the Driving Forces of Global Change. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Michael

    Since the beginning of the scientific revolution in the 1700s, the absolute scale of the human economy has increased many times over, and, with it, the impact on the natural environment. This learning module's activities introduce the student to linkages among population growth, energy use, level of economic and technological development and their…

  18. Attitudes Toward Breast Cancer Genetic Testing in Five Special Population Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J; Muñoz, Edgar; Holden, Alan E; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Smith, Selina A; Wong-Kim, Evaon; Wyatt, Stephen W; Suarez, Lucina

    2015-01-01

    This study examined interest in and attitudes toward genetic testing in 5 different population groups. The survey included African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, and Appalachian women with varying familial histories of breast cancer. A total of 49 women were interviewed in person. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical techniques were used to assess ethnic group differences. Overall, interest in testing was high. All groups endorsed more benefits than risks. There were group differences regarding endorsement of specific benefits and risks: testing to "follow doctor recommendations" (p=0.017), "concern for effects on family" (p=0.044), "distrust of modern medicine" (p=0.036), "cost" (p=0.025), and "concerns about communication of results to others" (p=0.032). There was a significant inverse relationship between interest and genetic testing cost (p<0.050), with the exception of Latinas, who showed the highest level of interest regardless of increasing cost. Cost may be an important barrier to obtaining genetic testing services, and participants would benefit by genetic counseling that incorporates the unique cultural values and beliefs of each group to create an individualized, culturally competent program. Further research about attitudes toward genetic testing is needed among Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Appalachians for whom data are severely lacking. Future study of the different Latina perceptions toward genetic testing are encouraged.

  19. Invasive Candidiasis in Various Patient Populations: Incorporating Non-Culture Diagnostic Tests into Rational Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Cornelius J.; Shields, Ryan K.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mortality rates due to invasive candidiasis remain unacceptably high, in part because the poor sensitivity and slow turn-around time of cultures delay the initiation of antifungal treatment. β-d-glucan (Fungitell) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based (T2Candida) assays are FDA-approved adjuncts to cultures for diagnosing invasive candidiasis, but their clinical roles are unclear. We propose a Bayesian framework for interpreting non-culture test results and developing rational patient management strategies, which considers test performance and types of invasive candidiasis that are most common in various patient populations. β-d-glucan sensitivity/specificity for candidemia and intra-abdominal candidiasis is ~80%/80% and ~60%/75%, respectively. In settings with 1%–10% likelihood of candidemia, anticipated β-d-glucan positive and negative predictive values are ~4%–31% and ≥97%, respectively. Corresponding values in settings with 3%–30% likelihood of intra-abdominal candidiasis are ~7%–51% and ~78%–98%. β-d-glucan is predicted to be useful in guiding antifungal treatment for wide ranges of populations at-risk for candidemia (incidence ~5%–40%) or intra-abdominal candidiasis (~7%–20%). Validated PCR-based assays should broaden windows to include populations at lower-risk for candidemia (incidence ≥~2%) and higher-risk for intra-abdominal candidiasis (up to ~40%). In the management of individual patients, non-culture tests may also have value outside of these windows. The proposals we put forth are not definitive treatment guidelines, but rather represent starting points for clinical trial design and debate by the infectious diseases community. The principles presented here will be applicable to other assays as they enter the clinic, and to existing assays as more data become available from different populations. PMID:29376927

  20. Targeted genetic testing for familial hypercholesterolaemia using next generation sequencing: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsworthy, Penny J; Vandrovcova, Jana; Thomas, Ellen R A; Campbell, Archie; Kerr, Shona M; Biggs, Jennifer; Game, Laurence; Soutar, Anne K; Smith, Blair H; Dominiczak, Anna F; Porteous, David J; Morris, Andrew D; Scotland, Generation; Aitman, Timothy J

    2014-06-23

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common Mendelian condition which, untreated, results in premature coronary heart disease. An estimated 88% of FH cases are undiagnosed in the UK. We previously validated a method for FH mutation detection in a lipid clinic population using next generation sequencing (NGS), but this did not address the challenge of identifying index cases in primary care where most undiagnosed patients receive healthcare. Here, we evaluate the targeted use of NGS as a potential route to diagnosis of FH in a primary care population subset selected for hypercholesterolaemia. We used microfluidics-based PCR amplification coupled with NGS and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to detect mutations in LDLR, APOB and PCSK9 in three phenotypic groups within the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study including 193 individuals with high total cholesterol, 232 with moderately high total cholesterol despite cholesterol-lowering therapy, and 192 normocholesterolaemic controls. Pathogenic mutations were found in 2.1% of hypercholesterolaemic individuals, in 2.2% of subjects on cholesterol-lowering therapy and in 42% of their available first-degree relatives. In addition, variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUCS) were detected in 1.4% of the hypercholesterolaemic and cholesterol-lowering therapy groups. No pathogenic variants or VUCS were detected in controls. We demonstrated that population-based genetic testing using these protocols is able to deliver definitive molecular diagnoses of FH in individuals with high cholesterol or on cholesterol-lowering therapy. The lower cost and labour associated with NGS-based testing may increase the attractiveness of a population-based approach to FH detection compared to genetic testing with conventional sequencing. This could provide one route to increasing the present low percentage of FH cases with a genetic diagnosis.

  1. Spontaneous breathing test in the prediction of extubation failure in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Milena Siciliano; Rebello, Celso Moura; Vale, Luciana Assis Pires Andrade; Santos, Érica; Prado, Cristiane do

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether the spontaneous breathing test can predict the extubation failure in pediatric population. A prospective and observational study that evaluated data of inpatients at the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit between May 2011 and August 2013, receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours followed by extubation. The patients were classified in two groups: Test Group, with patients extubated after spontaneous breathing test, and Control Group, with patients extubated without spontaneous breathing test. A total of 95 children were enrolled in the study, 71 in the Test Group and 24 in the Control Group. A direct comparison was made between the two groups regarding sex, age, mechanical ventilation time, indication to start mechanical ventilation and respiratory parameters before extubation in the Control Group, and before the spontaneous breathing test in the Test Group. There was no difference between the parameters evaluated. According to the analysis of probability of extubation failure between the two groups, the likelihood of extubation failure in the Control Group was 1,412 higher than in the Test Group, nevertheless, this range did not reach significance (p=0.706). This model was considered well-adjusted according to the Hosmer-Lemeshow test (p=0.758). The spontaneous breathing test was not able to predict the extubation failure in pediatric population. Avaliar se o teste de respiração espontânea pode ser utilizado para predizer falha da extubação na população pediátrica. Estudo prospectivo, observacional, no qual foram avaliados todos os pacientes internados no Centro de Terapia Intensiva Pediátrica, no período de maio de 2011 a agosto de 2013, que utilizaram ventilação mecânica por mais de 24 horas e que foram extubados. Os pacientes foram classificados em dois grupos: Grupo Teste, que incluiu os pacientes extubados depois do teste de respiração espontânea; e Grupo Controle, pacientes foram sem teste de respiração espont

  2. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  3. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: ... Hand Washing For Nurses - Duration: 2:57. Kevin Gorin 213,219 views ...

  4. Hand and Wrist Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Tumors and Wrist Tumors Email to a friend * ... are seen commonly. CAUSES Common Types of Wrist Hand Tumors Ganglion Cysts (Figure 1): This is the ...

  5. Hand splint - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100142.htm Hand splint - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... out of 4 Overview To begin making a hand dressing, place the injured hand around a cloth ...

  6. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High resolution [22. ...

  7. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High resolution [22. ...

  8. Outpatient penicillin use after negative skin testing and drug challenge in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Matthieu; Paradis, Louis; Nguyen, Mélanie; Bégin, Philippe; Paradis, Jean; Des Roches, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The practice of elective penicillin skin testing could be compromised by the fact that patients, their parents, or their physicians remain reluctant to reuse penicillin-class antibiotics (PCAs) despite a negative evaluation by an allergist. This study addresses reuse of PCAs in a pediatric population after negative penicillin skin testing and drug challenge and factors associated with its reluctance. All children evaluated for a history of penicillin allergy at the CHU Sainte-Justine Allergy Clinic between January 1998 and June 2000 with negative skin testing and drug challenge were included in the study. A telephone survey was conducted between May and October 2002 to assess the perception of the initial reaction by the parents, subsequent use of antibiotics, and antibiotic-related adverse reactions. Among the 200 children selected, parents of 170 (85%) children completed the survey. Since the allergist evaluation, 130 (76%) children had received antibiotics. PCA was used in 59 (45%) children. Parents of 24 (18%) children refused PCAs because they still feared an adverse reaction. They were more likely to have been very frightened by their child's allergic reaction than other parents whose children had used PCAs (p = 0.008). Although elective penicillin skin testing is useful and safe in the pediatric population, a significant proportion of parents still refuse PCAs even though they are needed. Identification of parents that were very frightened by their children's allergic reactions and additional reassurance could improve this situation.

  9. Adding to the spectrum of insulin sensitive populations for mixed meal tolerance test glucose reliability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglialunga, Sabina; Guerrero, Angelica; Roessig, Julie M; Rubin, Paul; Dehn, Clayton A

    2016-01-01

    As a measure of insulin sensitivity, the mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT) is a simple technique that can provide robust results. The assay consists of examining plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide prior to and following the consumption of a test meal. While this procedure has been used in clinical research for several years, there is no set standard protocol, and only until recently has the reliability of this assay been thoroughly evaluated in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes subjects. Interestingly, the results from this recent study demonstrated stronger MMTT reliability for the prediabetes and diabetes cohorts compared to obese controls. This finding suggests that the obese control group may have more inherent variability in glucose response during a meal challenge likely due to compensatory influences typically observed in non-diabetic insulin-resistant subjects. Furthermore, this study raises the question whether the MMTT assay is reliable in a non-obese cohort. Therefore, to promote the standardization of this technique and contribute to the band of insulin sensitive populations, we employed the same methodology and test meal as the reference study to evaluate the MMTT reliability in healthy and overweight men. Indeed, the interclass coefficient revealed high glucose response repeatability during the MMTT in insulin-sensitive men. Overall, the MMTT is a reliable test across a range of insulin sensitivity including healthy men. However, we propose further investigation may be required to fully define the utility of this methodology in obese non-diabetic insulin-resistant populations.

  10. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline B; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility and their psych......INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...... as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established...

  11. Replaying Evolution to Test the Cause of Extinction of One Ecotype in an Experimentally Evolved Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Caroline B; Blount, Zachary D; Lenski, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    In a long-term evolution experiment with Escherichia coli, bacteria in one of twelve populations evolved the ability to consume citrate, a previously unexploited resource in a glucose-limited medium. This innovation led to the frequency-dependent coexistence of citrate-consuming (Cit+) and non-consuming (Cit-) ecotypes, with Cit-bacteria persisting on the exogenously supplied glucose as well as other carbon molecules released by the Cit+ bacteria. After more than 10,000 generations of coexistence, however, the Cit-lineage went extinct; cells with the Cit-phenotype dropped to levels below detection, and the Cit-clade could not be detected by molecular assays based on its unique genotype. We hypothesized that this extinction was a deterministic outcome of evolutionary change within the population, specifically the appearance of a more-fit Cit+ ecotype that competitively excluded the Cit-ecotype. We tested this hypothesis by re-evolving the population from a frozen population sample taken within 500 generations of the extinction and from another sample taken several thousand generations earlier, in each case for 500 generations and with 20-fold replication. To our surprise, the Cit-type did not go extinct in any of these replays, and Cit-cells also persisted in a single replicate that was propagated for 2,500 generations. Even more unexpectedly, we showed that the Cit-ecotype could reinvade the Cit+ population after its extinction. Taken together, these results indicate that the extinction of the Cit-ecotype was not a deterministic outcome driven by competitive exclusion by the Cit+ ecotype. The extinction also cannot be explained by demographic stochasticity alone, as the population size of the Cit-ecotype should have been many thousands of cells even during the daily transfer events. Instead, we infer that the extinction must have been caused by a rare chance event in which some aspect of the experimental conditions was inadvertently perturbed.

  12. Replaying Evolution to Test the Cause of Extinction of One Ecotype in an Experimentally Evolved Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Turner

    Full Text Available In a long-term evolution experiment with Escherichia coli, bacteria in one of twelve populations evolved the ability to consume citrate, a previously unexploited resource in a glucose-limited medium. This innovation led to the frequency-dependent coexistence of citrate-consuming (Cit+ and non-consuming (Cit- ecotypes, with Cit-bacteria persisting on the exogenously supplied glucose as well as other carbon molecules released by the Cit+ bacteria. After more than 10,000 generations of coexistence, however, the Cit-lineage went extinct; cells with the Cit-phenotype dropped to levels below detection, and the Cit-clade could not be detected by molecular assays based on its unique genotype. We hypothesized that this extinction was a deterministic outcome of evolutionary change within the population, specifically the appearance of a more-fit Cit+ ecotype that competitively excluded the Cit-ecotype. We tested this hypothesis by re-evolving the population from a frozen population sample taken within 500 generations of the extinction and from another sample taken several thousand generations earlier, in each case for 500 generations and with 20-fold replication. To our surprise, the Cit-type did not go extinct in any of these replays, and Cit-cells also persisted in a single replicate that was propagated for 2,500 generations. Even more unexpectedly, we showed that the Cit-ecotype could reinvade the Cit+ population after its extinction. Taken together, these results indicate that the extinction of the Cit-ecotype was not a deterministic outcome driven by competitive exclusion by the Cit+ ecotype. The extinction also cannot be explained by demographic stochasticity alone, as the population size of the Cit-ecotype should have been many thousands of cells even during the daily transfer events. Instead, we infer that the extinction must have been caused by a rare chance event in which some aspect of the experimental conditions was inadvertently perturbed.

  13. Attitudes Regarding Participation in a Diabetes Screening Test among an Assyrian Immigrant Population in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immigrants from the Middle East have higher prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D compared with native Swedes. The aim of the study was to describe and understand health beliefs in relation to T2D as well as attitudes regarding participation in a screening process in a local group of Assyrian immigrants living in Sweden. A qualitative and quantitative method was chosen in which 43 individuals participated in a health check-up and 13 agreed to be interviewed. Interviews were conducted, anthropometric measurements and blood tests were collected, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. In total, 13 of the 43 participants were diagnosed with impaired glucose metabolism, 4 of these 13 had TD2. The interviewed participants perceived that screening was an opportunity to discover more about their health and to care for themselves and their families. Nevertheless, they were not necessarily committed to taking action as a consequence of the screening. Instead, they professed that their health was not solely in their own hands and that they felt safe that God would provide for them. Assyrians’ background and religion affect their health beliefs and willingness to participate in screening for TD2.

  14. Depression as sickness behavior? A test of the host defense hypothesis in a high pathogen population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Trumble, Benjamin C; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Blackwell, Aaron D; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Sadness is an emotion universally recognized across cultures, suggesting it plays an important functional role in regulating human behavior. Numerous adaptive explanations of persistent sadness interfering with daily functioning (hereafter "depression") have been proposed, but most do not explain frequent bidirectional associations between depression and greater immune activation. Here we test several predictions of the host defense hypothesis, which posits that depression is part of a broader coordinated evolved response to infection or tissue injury (i.e. "sickness behavior") that promotes energy conservation and reallocation to facilitate immune activation. In a high pathogen population of lean and relatively egalitarian Bolivian forager-horticulturalists, we test whether depression and its symptoms are associated with greater baseline concentration of immune biomarkers reliably associated with depression in Western populations (i.e. tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1 beta [IL-1β], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and C-reactive protein [CRP]). We also test whether greater pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to ex vivo antigen stimulation are associated with depression and its symptoms, which is expected if depression facilitates immune activation. These predictions are largely supported in a sample of older adult Tsimane (mean±SD age=53.2±11.0, range=34-85, n=649) after adjusting for potential confounders. Emotional, cognitive and somatic symptoms of depression are each associated with greater immune activation, both at baseline and in response to ex vivo stimulation. The association between depression and greater immune activation is therefore not unique to Western populations. While our findings are not predicted by other adaptive hypotheses of depression, they are not incompatible with those hypotheses and future research is necessary to isolate and test competing predictions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Test Population Selection from Weibull-Based, Monte Carlo Simulations of Fatigue Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life is probabilistic and not deterministic. Experimentally establishing the fatigue life of materials, components, and systems is both time consuming and costly. As a result, conclusions regarding fatigue life are often inferred from a statistically insufficient number of physical tests. A proposed methodology for comparing life results as a function of variability due to Weibull parameters, variability between successive trials, and variability due to size of the experimental population is presented. Using Monte Carlo simulation of randomly selected lives from a large Weibull distribution, the variation in the L10 fatigue life of aluminum alloy AL6061 rotating rod fatigue tests was determined as a function of population size. These results were compared to the L10 fatigue lives of small (10 each) populations from AL2024, AL7075 and AL6061. For aluminum alloy AL6061, a simple algebraic relationship was established for the upper and lower L10 fatigue life limits as a function of the number of specimens failed. For most engineering applications where less than 30 percent variability can be tolerated in the maximum and minimum values, at least 30 to 35 test samples are necessary. The variability of test results based on small sample sizes can be greater than actual differences, if any, that exists between materials and can result in erroneous conclusions. The fatigue life of AL2024 is statistically longer than AL6061 and AL7075. However, there is no statistical difference between the fatigue lives of AL6061 and AL7075 even though AL7075 had a fatigue life 30 percent greater than AL6061.

  16. Effect of Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke on the Quality of Life: A Nationwide Population-Based Study from South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Wook Kim

    Full Text Available Although exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS has been associated with various medical conditions, only limited data are available on its association with health-related quality of life (HRQOL, particularly data obtained with the EQ-5D or EQ visual analogue scale (VAS.This cross-sectional study evaluated 10,532 adult never-smokers who participated in the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. By using linear regression models to adjust for possible confounders and incorporating survey weights in analyses, the association between exposure to SHS and HRQOL-measured with the EQ-5D index and the EQ-VAS score-was evaluated. Data were further stratified by the amount of exposure time.After weighted analysis and adjustment, exposure to SHS was significantly associated with lower measures on the EQ-5D index (β = -0.007, P = 0.005 and EQ-VAS score (β = -1.936, P < 0.001. When comparing the unexposed group with the groups exposed <2h/day and ≥2h/day, exposure to a longer duration of SHS was significantly associated with lower scores on the EQ-5D index and the EQ-VAS score.In conclusion, exposure to SHS was associated with reduced HRQOL measured by the EQ-5D index and EQ-VAS score, revealing a dose-response relationship.

  17. Smoke-Free Workplaces Are Associated with Protection from Second-Hand Smoke at Homes in Nigeria: Evidence for Population-Level Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kaleta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evidence suggests that smoke-free workplace policies may change social norms towards exposing others to second-hand smoke at home. The aim of the study was to assess whether being employed in a smoke-free workplace (SFWP is associated with living in a smoke-free home (SFH. We used the data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey conducted in Nigeria in 2012, in which 9,765 individuals were interviewed including 1,856 persons who worked indoors. The percentage of Nigerians employed in SFWP that reported living in a SFH was higher compared to those employed in a workplace where smoking occurred (95% versus 73%. Working in a SFWP was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of living in a SFH (OR = 5.3; p<0.001. Urban inhabitants indicated more frequently that they lived in SFH compared to rural residents (OR = 2.0; p=0.006. The odds of living in a SFH were significantly higher among nonsmokers and nonsmokeless tobacco users compared to smokers and smokeless tobacco users (OR = 28.8; p<0.001; OR = 7.0; p<0.001. These findings support the need for implementation of comprehensive smoke-free policies in Nigeria that result in substantial health benefits.

  18. Normal range of cambridge low contrast test; a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Fotouhi, Akbar; Hashemi, Hassan; Yekta, Abbas Ali; Heravian, Javad; Abdolahinia, Tahereh; Norouzi Rad, Reza; Asgari, Soheila; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the range of contrast sensitivity (CS) and its determinants in a normal population, Mashhad, Iran. In this cross-sectional population based study, 4,453 individuals were invited of whom 3,132 persons agreed to participate (response rate, 70.4%). CS data from 2,449 eligible individuals were analyzed. CS was determined using the Cambridge low contrast square-wave grating test, and its associations with age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) refractive error, were analyzed. Mean age of the participants was 29.1±17.3 (range, 4-89) years and 66.4% were female. Mean CS was 239.6±233.3 and 234.6±228.6 cps in right and left eyes, respectively. Mean binocular CS was 310.9±249.0 cps. Multiple linear regression showed that CS was inversely correlated with older age (β=-1.1, PCambridge low-contrast grating test reported herein may serve as a reference for the general population in Iran. Our findings can be used for both research and clinical applications, particularly for evaluations of the outcomes of refractive surgery. In the current study, CS was lower in older subjects, myopic individuals and patients with lower BCVA.

  19. Experimental tests for heritable morphological color plasticity in non-native brown trout (Salmo trutta populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A H Westley

    Full Text Available The success of invasive species is frequently attributed to phenotypic plasticity, which facilitates persistence in novel environments. Here we report on experimental tests to determine whether the intensity of cryptic coloration patterns in a global invader (brown trout, Salmo trutta was primarily the result of plasticity or heritable variation. Juvenile F1 offspring were created through experimental crosses of wild-caught parents and reared for 30 days in the laboratory in a split-brood design on either light or dark-colored gravel substrate. Skin and fin coloration quantified with digital photography and image analysis indicated strong plastic effects in response to substrate color; individuals reared on dark substrate had both darker melanin-based skin color and carotenoid-based fin colors than other members of their population reared on light substrate. Slopes of skin and fin color reaction norms were parallel between environments, which is not consistent with heritable population-level plasticity to substrate color. Similarly, we observed weak differences in population-level color within an environment, again suggesting little genetic control on the intensity of skin and fin colors. Taken as whole, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that phenotypic plasticity may have facilitated the success of brown trout invasions and suggests that plasticity is the most likely explanation for the variation in color intensity observed among these populations in nature.

  20. Noninvasive prenatal testing for fetal trisomy in a mixed risk factors pregnancy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wai-Hou; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Chang, Yi-Wen; Yang, Ming-Jie; Chen, Chih-Yao; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Yen, Ming-Shyen

    2015-04-01

    This study assesses the performance of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal aneuploidies in a mixed risk factors pregnancy population. Data review of 169 pregnant women undergoing prenatal aneuploidy screening in a single tertiary medical center was conducted. Indications included maternal anxiety, advanced maternal age, abnormal nuchal translucency, and high/moderate risk of first trimester Down syndrome screening. Multifetal pregnancies and patients receiving in vitro fertilization were also enrolled for analysis. A total of 169 patients were enrolled in this study during a time period from July 2012 to June 2014. For patients' ≥ 34 years, anxiety about amniocentesis was the most common reason for patients selecting NIPT for fetal aneuploidy screening, with 107 (88.4%) patients choosing NIPT for this reason. Among the total patient population, two patients showed a positive result from NIPT. One patient displayed 47, XXY, which was confirmed to be a false-positive result. The other patient displayed trisomy 18, which was confirmed by an amniotic cell culture. The sensitivity for NIPT is 100% with the specificity 99.4%. NIPT for fetal aneuploidy in a mixed risk factors pregnancy population showed high accuracy. NIPT applied to the low risk population might reassure the anxious family. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test for analyzing population genetic surveys with complex sample designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Yesupriya, Ajay; Chang, Man-Huei; Dowling, Nicole F; Khoury, Muin J; Scott, Alastair J

    2010-04-15

    Testing for deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is a widely recommended practice for population-based genetic association studies. However, current methods for this test assume a simple random sample and may not be appropriate for sample surveys with complex survey designs. In this paper, the authors present a test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium that adjusts for the sample weights and correlation of data collected in complex surveys. The authors perform this test by using a simple adjustment to procedures developed to analyze data from complex survey designs available within the SAS statistical software package (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina). Using 90 genetic markers from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the authors found that survey-adjusted and -unadjusted estimates of the disequilibrium coefficient were generally similar within self-reported races/ethnicities. However, estimates of the variance of the disequilibrium coefficient were significantly different between the 2 methods. Because the results of the survey-adjusted tests account for correlation among participants sampled within the same cluster, and the possibility of having related individuals sampled from the same household, the authors recommend use of this test when analyzing genetic data originating from sample surveys with complex survey designs to assess deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  2. HIV testing and counselling for migrant populations living in high-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-del Arco, Debora; Monge, Susana; Azcoaga, Amaya; Rio, Isabel; Hernando, Victoria; Gonzalez, Cristina; Alejos, Belen; Caro, Ana Maria; Perez-Cachafeiro, Santiago; Ramirez-Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar, Francisco; Noori, Teymur; Del Amo, Julia

    2013-12-01

    The barriers to HIV testing and counselling that migrants encounter can jeopardize proactive HIV testing that relies on the fact that HIV testing must be linked to care. We analyse available evidence on HIV testing and counselling strategies targeting migrants and ethnic minorities in high-income countries. Systematic literature review of the five main databases of articles in English from Europe, North America and Australia between 2005 and 2009. Of 1034 abstracts, 37 articles were selected. Migrants, mainly from HIV-endemic countries, are at risk of HIV infection and its consequences. The HIV prevalence among migrants is higher than the general population's, and migrants have higher frequency of delayed HIV diagnosis. For migrants from countries with low HIV prevalence and for ethnic minorities, socio-economic vulnerability puts them at risk of acquiring HIV. Migrants have specific legal and administrative impediments to accessing HIV testing-in some countries, undocumented migrants are not entitled to health care-as well as cultural and linguistic barriers, racism and xenophobia. Migrants and ethnic minorities fear stigma from their communities, yet community acceptance is key for well-being. Migrants and ethnic minorities should be offered HIV testing, but the barriers highlighted in this review may deter programs from achieving the final goal, which is linking migrants and ethnic minorities to HIV clinical care under the public health perspective.

  3. A Prospective Controlled Trial of an Electronic Hand Hygiene Reminder System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Richard T.; Barysauskas, Constance M.; Rundensteiner, Elke A.; Wang, Di; Barton, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of electronic hand hygiene reminder systems has been proposed as an approach to improve hand hygiene compliance among healthcare workers, although information on efficacy is limited. We prospectively assessed whether hand hygiene activities among healthcare workers could be increased using an electronic hand hygiene monitoring and reminder system. Methods. A prospective controlled clinical trial was conducted in 2 medical intensive care units (ICUs) at an academic medical center with comparable patient populations, healthcare staff, and physical layout. Hand hygiene activity was monitored concurrently in both ICUs, and the reminder system was installed in the test ICU. The reminder system was tested during 3 administered phases including: room entry/exit chimes, display of real-time hand hygiene activity, and a combination of the 2. Results. In the test ICU, the mean number of hand hygiene events increased from 1538 per day at baseline to 1911 per day (24% increase) with the use of a combination of room entry/exit chimes, real-time displays of hand hygiene activity, and manager reports (P hand hygiene to room entry/exit events also increased from 26.1% to 36.6% (40% increase, P hand hygiene events per day) during the follow-up phase. There was no significant change in hand hygiene activity in the control ICU during the course of the trial. Conclusions. In an ICU setting, an electronic hand hygiene reminder system that provided real-time feedback on overall unit-wide hand hygiene performance significantly increased hand hygiene activity. PMID:26430698

  4. [Validation of the Eating Attitudes Test as a screening instrument for eating disorders in general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Fernández, María Angeles; Ruiz-Lázaro, Pedro Manuel; Labrador, Francisco Javier; Raich, Rosa María

    2014-02-20

    To validate the best cut-off point of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), Spanish version, for the screening of eating disorders (ED) in the general population. This was a transversal cross-sectional study. The EAT-40 Spanish version was administered to a representative sample of 1.543 students, age range 12 to 21 years, in the Region of Madrid. Six hundred and two participants (probable cases and a random sample of controls) were interviewed. The best diagnostic prediction was obtained with a cut-off point of 21, with sensitivity: 88.2%; specificity: 62.1%; positive predictive value: 17.7%; negative predictive value: 62.1%. Use of a cut-off point of 21 is recommended in epidemiological studies of eating disorders in the Spanish general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Tying the Manager's Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Vázquez-Vicente, Xosé H.

    2003-01-01

    AbstractWe discuss and empirically examine a firm-level equivalent of the ancient problem of `tying the King's hands,' namely how to maximize managerial intervention for `good cause,' while avoiding intervention for `bad cause.' Managers may opportunistically intervene when such intervention prod......, using path-analysis, on a rich dataset, based on 329 firms in the Spanish food and electric/electronic industries....... assets, strong trade unions, corporate culture, etc. may function as constraints on managerial proclivities to opportunistically intervene. Thus, firms can make credible commitments that check managerial proclivities to opportunistically intervene. We derive 5 hypotheses from these ideas, and test them...

  6. Habitat fragmentation, vole population fluctuations, and the ROMPA hypothesis: An experimental test using model landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzli, George O

    2016-11-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation leads to smaller size of habitat patches and to greater distance between patches. The ROMPA hypothesis (ratio of optimal to marginal patch area) uniquely links vole population fluctuations to the composition of the landscape. It states that as ROMPA decreases (fragmentation increases), vole population fluctuations will increase (including the tendency to display multi-annual cycles in abundance) because decreased proportions of optimal habitat result in greater population declines and longer recovery time after a harsh season. To date, only comparative observations in the field have supported the hypothesis. This paper reports the results of the first experimental test. I used prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, and mowed grassland to create model landscapes with 3 levels of ROMPA (high with 25% mowed, medium with 50% mowed and low with 75% mowed). As ROMPA decreased, distances between patches of favorable habitat (high cover) increased owing to a greater proportion of unfavorable (mowed) habitat. Results from the first year with intensive live trapping indicated that the preconditions for operation of the hypothesis existed (inversely density dependent emigration and, as ROMPA decreased, increased per capita mortality and decreased per capita movement between optimal patches). Nevertheless, contrary to the prediction of the hypothesis that populations in landscapes with high ROMPA should have the lowest variability, 5 years of trapping indicated that variability was lowest with medium ROMPA. The design of field experiments may never be perfect, but these results indicate that the ROMPA hypothesis needs further rigorous testing. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Genetic testing of canine degenerative myelopathy in the South African Boxer dog population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth E. Zeiler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM is a progressive disease process that is diagnosed late in life and mainly affects the pelvic limbs. Factors that make an ante-mortem definitive diagnosis of DM include: an insidious onset and clinical manifestation that mimics other disease processes of the pelvic limbs (hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament rupture, etc. or there may even be concurrent disease processes, old-age onset and lack of reliable diagnostic methods. Until recently, South African dog owners had to submit samples to laboratories overseas for genetic testing in order to confirm an affected dog (homozygous A/A and to aid in the ante-mortem diagnosis of DM. Only affected dogs have been confirmed to manifest the clinical signs of DM. This study aimed to verify whether genetic testing by a local genetic laboratory was possible in order to detect a missense mutation of the superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1 that is implicated in causing the clinical signs of DM. The study also aimed to detect and map the inheritance of this disease process in a local Boxer dog population where the pedigree of the sampled population was known. Venous blood collected from Boxer dogs using a simple random sampling technique. The samples were genotyped for the SOD1:c.118G>A polymorphism. Carrier and affected Boxer dogs were detected. A pedigree that demonstrated the significance of inheriting a carrier or affected state in the population was mapped. The present study concludes that genotyping of the missense mutation in Boxer dogs is possible in South Africa. There are carrier and affected Boxer dogs in the local population, making DM a plausible diagnosis in aged dogs presenting with pelvic limb pathology.

  8. Tuberculosis testing among populations with high HIV risk in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Michele G.; Laniado-Laborin, Rafael; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Cerecer, Paris; Lozada, Remedios; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Burgos, Jose Luis; Garfein, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of prior tuberculin skin testing (TST) among populations at risk for HIV infection in Tijuana, Mexico, and to identify factors associated with TST. Methods Sex workers, injection drug users, noninjecting drug users, and homeless persons ≥ 18 years old were recruited by using targeted sampling for risk assessment interviews and serologic testing for HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify correlates of self-reported TST history. Results Of 502 participants, 38.0% reported prior TST, which was associated with previous incarceration in the United States of America [odds ratio (OR) = 13.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 7.37–24.33] and injection drug use (OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.27–3.11). Positive results on serologic tests for M. tuberculosis infection (57%) and HIV (4.2%) were not associated with a prior TST. Conclusions A history of TST was lower in HIV-positive participants even though TST is indicated for persons with HIV in Mexico. Fewer than half the individuals at high risk for HIV in this study had a history of TST; however, TST was fairly common among those individuals with a prior history of incarceration. Increased tuberculosis screening is needed for populations at risk of contracting HIV in Tijuana, particularly those outside of criminal justice settings. PMID:22910722

  9. Influence of negative stereotypes and beliefs on neuropsychological test performance in a traumatic brain injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Karen A; Mateer, Catherine A; Tuokko, Holly A; Spencer-Rodgers, Julie

    2014-02-01

    The impact of stereotype threat and self-efficacy beliefs on neuropsychological test performance in a clinical traumatic brain injury (TBI) population was investigated. A total of 42 individuals with mild-to-moderate TBI and 42 (age-, gender-, educationally matched) healthy adults were recruited. The study consisted of a 2 (Type of injury: control, TBI) × 2 (Threat Condition: reduced threat, heightened threat) between-participants design. The purpose of the reduced threat condition was to reduce negative stereotyped beliefs regarding cognitive effects of TBI and to emphasize personal control over cognition. The heightened threat condition consisted of an opposing view. Main effects included greater anxiety, motivation, and dejection but reduced memory self-efficacy for head-injured-groups, compared to control groups. On neuropsychological testing, the TBI-heightened-threat-group displayed lower scores on Initial Encoding (initial recall) and trended toward displaying lower scores on Attention (working memory) compared to the TBI-reduced-threat-group. No effect was found for Delayed Recall measures. Memory self-efficacy mediated the relation between threat condition and neuropsychological performance, indicating a potential mechanism for the threat effect. The findings highlight the impact of stereotype threat and self-referent beliefs on neuropsychological test performance in a clinical TBI population.

  10. Tuberculosis testing among populations with high HIV risk in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Michele G; Laniado-Laborin, Rafael; Rodwell, Timothy C; Cerecer, Paris; Lozada, Remedios; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Burgos, Jose Luis; Garfein, Richard S

    2012-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of prior tuberculin skin testing (TST) among populations at risk for HIV infection in Tijuana, Mexico, and to identify factors associated with TST. Sex workers, injection drug users, noninjecting drug users, and homeless persons > 18 years old were recruited by using targeted sampling for risk assessment interviews and serologic testing for HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify correlates of self-reported TST history. Of 502 participants, 38.0% reported prior TST, which was associated with previous incarceration in the United States of America [odds ratio (OR) = 13.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 7.37-24.33] and injection drug use (OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.27- 3.11). Positive results on serologic tests for M. tuberculosis infection (57%) and HIV (4.2%) were not associated with a prior TST. A history of TST was lower in HIV-positive participants even though TST is indicated for persons with HIV in Mexico. Fewer than half the individuals at high risk for HIV in this study had a history of TST; however, TST was fairly common among those individuals with a prior history of incarceration. Increased tuberculosis screening is needed for populations at risk of contracting HIV in Tijuana, particularly those outside of criminal justice settings.

  11. [Does the hand solely belong in the hands of a qualified hand surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Asim; Kols, Kerstin; Fischer, Klaus; Schönberger, Michael; Allert, Sixtus

    2017-09-01

    Background In Germany, Hand Surgery is an additional qualification that can only be obtained by a three-year training after a completed residency in General Surgery, Plastic Surgery or Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery. Nevertheless, injuries and diseases of the hand are also treated by physicians without this particular qualification. It is questionable whether these treatments more often lead to medical malpractice. Material and Methods 376 charges of medical malpractice in surgical treatments of the hand and forearm that were closed in 2014 and 2015 were collected by the Arbitration Board for Medical Liability Issues of the Medical Association of North Germany.Cases with proven medical malpractice were classified by the qualification of the physician in charge and analysed. A statistical analysis was performed with the use of the program SPSS (IBM). Results Medical malpractice was proven in 42 of 113 cases with an attending physician who held the additional qualification for Hand Surgery (37.2 %). For physicians without this qualification, the figures were 79 out of 155 (51.0 %) in the group of trauma and orthopaedic surgeons and 54 out of 108 (50.0 %) in the group of general surgeons. The differences between the hand surgeons and the trauma and orthopaedic surgeons (p = 0.017) and between hand surgeons and general surgeons were significant (p = 0.037). Conclusions It was shown that physicians with an additional qualification in hand surgery had signifcantly fewer proven medical malpratice cases than physicians without this qualification. The following trends were observed in the cases of the physicians without the additional qualification in hand surgery: underestimation of the severity of trauma to soft tissues and infections of the hand, errors in the surgical examination of the hand, including functional tests of tendons and nerves, as well as in diagnostic findings after X-ray studies of the hand. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. The Replicability of the Negative Testing Effect: Differences Across Participant Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W; Rawson, Katherine A; Peterson, Daniel J; Wissman, Kathryn T

    2017-11-02

    Although memory retrieval often enhances subsequent memory, Peterson and Mulligan (2013) reported conditions under which retrieval produces poorer subsequent recall-the negative testing effect. The item-specific-relational account proposes that the effect occurs when retrieval disrupts interitem organizational processing relative to the restudy condition. Rawson et al. (2015), in contrast, failed to replicate the negative testing effect despite repeated high-powered attempts. This article examines the discrepant results, ruling out differences in procedures, and concludes that differences in participant population produced the varying outcome. Specifically, participants from the University of North Carolina (UNC) and Kent State University (KSU) completed the same version of the negative-testing paradigm and were assessed on several measures of cognitive ability (working memory capacity, Raven's progressive matrices, and SAT or ACT score). For the UNC sample, free recall scores and the amount of category clustering (a measure of organizational processing) was greater in the restudy than retrieval condition (i.e., the negative testing effect was found); for the KSU sample, there was no difference on either measure. Furthermore, in the restudy condition, recall and clustering was greater for UNC than KSU students whereas in the retrieval condition, there was no effect of site on either measure. As expected, measures of cognitive ability were greater for the UNC than KSU sample. The results indicate that the negative testing effect is replicable but is subject to limitation related to the participant population. An analysis in terms of the relationship between cognitive ability and memory predicted this pattern of results. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. [Concordance of tuberculin tests and Interferon gamma release assays in the prison population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco Mouriño, A; Orcau Palau, A; Jané Galliga, R; Escribano Ibáñez, M; Caylà Buqueras, J A; Solé Zapata, N; del Baño Hollín, L; Quintero del Río, S; Ferrer Escobar, M D; Mangues Bafalluy, J; Guerrero Moreno, R A; Martín Sánchez, V

    2011-01-01

    To study the agreement of Tuberculin Skin Tests (TST) and Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRA) when screening tuberculosis infection amongst inmates recently admitted to prison. Prospective study conducted in a prison during the months of May and June 2009. Inmates without a TB history, with previous TST negatives or without prior TSTs were included. Participants signed an informed consent form and the study was approved by an independent Ethical Committee. TST (positive 10 > or = mm) and IGRA (Quantiferon TB-Gold) were performed and standardized data collection was carried out. The agreement between both tests was analysed using the Kappa index. A total of 181 people were included. 62% were foreign-born, 17% had previous BCG vaccination, 8.4% were IDUs and 4% HIV-infected. Foreign born subjects were more frequently vaccinated and presented less drug use and HIV infection than people born in Spain. (p=0.02, p=0.02 and p=0.01 respectively). TST results were positive in 24% and IGRA in 26%. Both tests were performed in 149 people (82%). Discordant results were observed in 15.8%. Agreement of the Kappa coefficient was 0.6 (CI 0.4-0.7). Agreement was better in the native population (K=0.8) and worse in BCG vaccinated (K=0.4) and foreign-born subjects (K=0.8). Overall agreement was moderate and was less amongst vaccinated subjects and those born abroad. Extension of the study could be useful to evaluate which test better predicts the risk of progression to active TB and the cost-benefit of both tests among the prison population.

  14. Hand gestures mouse cursor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian-Avram Vincze

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the implementation of a human-computer interface for controlling the mouse cursor. The test reveal the fact: a low-cost web camera some processing algorithms are quite enough to control the mouse cursor on computers. Even if the system is influenced by the illuminance level on the plane of the hand, the current study may represent a start point for some studies on the hand tracking and gesture recognition field.

  15. The Geriatric Hand: Correlation of Hand-Muscle Function and Activity Restriction in Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incel, Nurgul Arinci; Sezgin, Melek; As, Ismet; Cimen, Ozlem Bolgen; Sahin, Gunsah

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the importance of hand manipulation in activities of daily living (ADL), deterioration of hand function because of various factors reduces quality and independence of life of the geriatric population. The aim of this study was to identify age-induced changes in manual function and to quantify the correlations between hand-muscle…

  16. In vivo quantification of bone-fluorine by delayed neutron activation analysis: a pilot study of hand-bone-fluorine levels in a Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Mike; Gräfe, James L; Aslam; Byun, Soo-Hyun; Chettle, David R; Egden, Lesley M; Webber, Colin E; McNeill, Fiona E

    2012-03-01

    Humans can be exposed to fluorine (F) through their diet, occupation, environment and oral dental care products. Fluorine, at proper dosages, is believed to have positive effects by reducing the incidence of dental caries, but fluorine toxicity can occur when people are exposed to excessive quantities of fluorine. In this paper we present the results of a small pilot in vivo study on 33 participants living in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The mean age of participants was 45 ± 18 years with a range of 20-87 years. The observed calcium normalized hand-bone-fluorine concentrations in this small pilot study ranged from 1.1 to 8.8 mg F/g Ca. Every person measured in this study had levels of fluorine in bone above the detection limit of the system. The average fluorine concentration in bone was found to be 3.5 ± 0.4 mg F/g Ca. No difference was observed in average concentration for men and women. In addition, a significant correlation (r(2) = 0.55, p fluorine content and age. The amount of fluorine was found to increase at a rate of 0.084 ± 0.014 mg F/g Ca per year. There was no significant difference observed in this small group of subjects between the accumulation rates in men and women. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time data from in vivo measurement of fluorine content in humans by neutron activation analysis have been presented. The data determined by this technique were found to be consistent with results from ex vivo studies from other countries. We suggest that the data demonstrate that this low risk non-invasive diagnostic technique will permit the routine assessment of bone-fluorine content with potential application in the study of clinical bone-related diseases. This small study demonstrated that people in Southern Ontario are exposed to fluoride in measureable quantities, and that fluoride can be seen to accumulate in bone with age. However, all volunteers were found to have levels below those expected with clinical fluorosis, and only

  17. Normative data for the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test in the older French-Quebec population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Monica; Bherer, Louis; Joubert, Sven; Gagnon, Jean-François; Blanchet, Sophie; Rouleau, Isabelle; Macoir, Joël; Hudon, Carol

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to establish normative data for the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, a test assessing verbal episodic memory, in the older French-Quebec population. A total of 432 French-speaking participants aged between 55 and 93 years old, from the Province of Quebec (Canada), were included in the study. Using multiple regression analyses, normative data were developed for five variable of interest, namely scores on trial 1, sum of trials 1 to 5, interference list B, immediate recall of list A, and delayed recall of list A. Results showed that age, education, and sex were associated with performance on all variables. Equations to calculate the expected score for a participant based on sex, age, and education level as well as the Z score were developed. This study provides clinicians with normative data that take into account the participants' sociodemographic characteristics, thus giving a more accurate interpretation of the results.

  18. Applicability of the MoCA-S test in populations with little education in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, F; Zunzunegui, Mv; Lord, C; Alvarado, B; García, A

    2013-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to report on the use of the Spanish version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-S) as cognitive screening tool in a population aged 65 to 74 years in the Andes Mountains of Colombia, assessing the influence of education, and to examine its test-retest reliability. We performed a cross-sectional study of 150 subjects aged 65 to 74 years recruited from older community social centers in Manizales, Colombia. The Leganes Cognitive Test (LCT), a cognitive screening test for populations with low education, was used to exclude those who were likely to have dementia. The associations between the MoCA total score and cognitive domains and education were examined in the total sample and in those likely free of dementia. MoCA-S test-retest reliability was estimated by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between two measurements taken 7 days apart. Participants had low levels of formal education (mean years of schooling, 4.8). According to the LCT, the proportion of people screening positive for dementia was 16% (n = 24). The mean MoCA-S scores were 16.1/30 among illiterate subjects, 18.2/30 among those with incomplete primary school, and 20.3/30 among those with complete primary school (p educated older Colombians, but scores were strongly dependent on years of education. Social and cultural factors must be considered when interpreting MoCA-S given the high error rates on items that depend on the ability to read and write and on culture. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Denmark: HAND in HAND Policy Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Hilmar Dyrborg; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2018-01-01

    Som del af det internationale EU finansierede projekt Hand in Hand, der fokuserer på de såkaldte SEI-kompetencer (Social, Emotional, Intercultural), er dansk policy i relation til elevernes sociale, emotionelle og interkulturelle læring kortlagt i denne rapport. Der refereres bl.a. til "elevernes...

  20. HIV Testing Within At-Risk Populations in the United States and the Reasons for Seeking or Avoiding HIV Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kellerman, Scott E; Lehman, Stan J; Lansky, Amy; Stevens, Mark R; Hecht, Frederick M; Bindman, Andrew B; Wortley, Pascale M

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:We determined proportions of high-risk persons tested for HIV, the reasons for testing and not testing, and attitudes and perceptions regarding HIV testing, information that is critical for planning prevention programs...

  1. Allergens associated with severe symptoms of hand eczema and a poor prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Marianne; Agner, Tove; Blands, Jette

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contact allergy is frequent among persons with hand eczema and may be associated with a poor prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To identify allergens associated with the most severe initial clinical symptoms and the worst prognosis in a cohort of hand eczema patients followed for 6 months. METHODS......: The study population comprised 799 consecutive hand eczema patients enrolled during January 2006-February 2007. All patients were patch tested with the European baseline series. Severity assessment of the hand eczema was performed initially and at the 6-month follow-up using a validated scoring system...... (HECSI). With logistic regression analyses, associations of severe hand eczema or a poor prognosis with 15 individual allergens were analysed and adjusted for by sex, age, atopic dermatitis and other allergens. RESULTS: At baseline, greater severity of hand eczema was associated with a positive patch...

  2. Effects of time and recall of patch test results on quality of life (QoL) after testing. Cross-sectional study analyzing QoL in hand eczema patients 1, 5 and 10 years after patch testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Wasim N; Lindberg, Magnus

    2017-08-01

    Patch testing can improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL). To study the impact on HRQOL of elapsed time after patch testing (1-10 years), and how the outcome of testing and patients' recall affects HRQOL. The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire was sent to all patients (aged 18-65 years) who were patch tested for suspected contact allergy in 2009, 2005 and 2000 at the Department of Dermatology in Örebro. The response rate was 51% (n = 256). The DLQI score was significantly lower at 10 years after patch testing (mean DLQI = 5.5) than at 1 year (mean DLQI = 7.7). Work was the most impaired aspect. A binary logistic model showed that only time (10 years after testing) was associated with no effect, a light effect or a moderate effect (DLQI test results concerning full recall, partial recall or no recall of diagnosed allergens. Although there was an improvement in HRQOL over time, the work aspect remained a major problem. The improvement was not affected by the outcome of testing and patients' recall of test results. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. PopPAnTe: population and pedigree association testing for quantitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Alessia; Al-Shafai, Mashael; Al Muftah, Wadha A; Zaghlool, Shaza B; Mangino, Massimo; Suhre, Karsten; Falchi, Mario

    2017-02-10

    Family-based designs, from twin studies to isolated populations with their complex genealogical data, are a valuable resource for genetic studies of heritable molecular biomarkers. Existing software for family-based studies have mainly focused on facilitating association between response phenotypes and genetic markers, and no user-friendly tools are at present available to straightforwardly extend association studies in related samples to large datasets of generic quantitative data, as those generated by current -omics technologies. We developed PopPAnTe, a user-friendly Java program, which evaluates the association of quantitative data in related samples. Additionally, PopPAnTe implements data pre and post processing, region based testing, and empirical assessment of associations. PopPAnTe is an integrated and flexible framework for pairwise association testing in related samples with a large number of predictors and response variables. It works either with family data of any size and complexity, or, when the genealogical information is unknown, it uses genetic similarity information between individuals as those inferred from genome-wide genetic data. It can therefore be particularly useful in facilitating usage of biobank data collections from population isolates when extensive genealogical information is missing.

  4. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Oncotype DX Test Receipt in a Statewide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brigette A; Aminawung, Jenerius A; Abu-Khalaf, Maysa M; Evans, Suzanne B; Su, Kevin; Mehta, Rajni; Wang, Shi-Yi; Gross, Cary P

    2017-03-01

    Background: Racial disparities have been reported in breast cancer care, yet little is known about disparities in access to gene expression profiling (GEP) tests. Given the impact of GEP test results, such as those of Oncotype DX (ODx), on treatment decision-making for hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer, it is particularly important to assess disparities in its use. Methods: We conducted a retrospective population-based study of 8,784 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in Connecticut during 2011 through 2013. We assessed the association between race, ethnicity, and ODx receipt among women with HR+ breast cancer for whom NCCN does and does not recommend ODx testing, using bivariate and multivariate logistic analyses. Results: We identified 5,294 women who met study inclusion criteria: 83.8% were white, 6.3% black, and 7.4% Hispanic. Overall, 50.9% (n=4,131) of women in the guideline-recommended group received ODx testing compared with 18.5% (n=1,163) in the nonrecommended group. More white women received the ODx test compared with black and Hispanic women in the recommended and nonrecommended groups (51.4% vs 44.6% and 47.7%; and 21.2% vs 9.0% and 9.7%, respectively). After adjusting for tumor and clinical characteristics, we observed significantly lower ODx use among black (odds ratio [OR], 0.64; 95% CI, 0.47-0.88) and Hispanic women (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.45-0.77) compared with white women in the recommended group and in the guideline-discordant group (blacks: OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.20-0.78, and Hispanics: OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23-0.85). Conclusions: In this population-based study, we identified racial disparities in ODx testing. Disparities in access to innovative cancer care technologies may further exacerbate existing disparities in breast cancer outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  5. The value and role of non-invasive prenatal testing in a select South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnyani, C N; Nicolaou, E; Bister, S

    2016-09-09

    Concerns have been raised about the injudicious use of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which often leads to inaccuracies in interpretation of the role and value of cfDNA in prenatal screening.  To determine the value and role of NIPT in a select South African (SA) population.  A retrospective review of patients who elected to have NIPT between 1 October 2013 and 30 June 2015 at the Morningside Mediclinic Maternal and Fetal Medicine Centre in Johannesburg, SA. Patients had NIPT after either combined first-trimester screening (CFTS) or a second-trimester ultrasound scan. Data were collected on details of the first- and/or second-trimester screening, results of the NIPT, invasive tests done, decisions made in the event of abnormal results, and pregnancy outcomes.  Overall, 3 473 first- and second-trimester fetal assessments were done at the centre during the study period, and 2.3% of patients (n=82) elected to have NIPT. The majority of these individuals elected to have NIPT on the basis of positive findings on CFTS, or markers of aneuploidy detected on a second-trimester ultrasound scan. Of the tests done, 97.6% produced results. Of those with no results, one did not meet quality metrics and the other had a low fetal fraction of cfDNA. There were two abnormal NIPT results, one indicating a high risk of trisomy 13 and the other a triploidy. Patients who screened negative elected not to have an invasive test.  The value of NIPT in this study was that it made it possible to avoid a number of invasive tests. NIPT had a role in contingency screening.

  6. [Hand and endocrine diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Ryndak, Amélie; Karrouz, Wassila; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie; Baudoux, Florence

    2013-12-01

    The whole of hormones likely influence state of hands, modifying colouring and trophicity of the skin and having influence on its muscular, tendineous, osseous, articular components. Thus state of the hands contributes to the recognition of the endocrine diseases: hot and moist hands of the Graves' disease, dry, cold and infiltrated hands in myxoedema, pale and fine hands of hypopituitarism, broad and thick hand of acromegaly, brachymetacarpia in the pseudohypoparathyroidism… Diabetes exposes particularly to tendineous and articular retractions, to whitlows and ungual mycosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. A retrospective study of two populations to test a simple rule for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohar, Jill A; Yawn, Barbara P; Ruppel, Gregg L; Donohue, James F

    2016-06-04

    Chronic lung disease is common and often under-diagnosed. To test a simple rule for conducting spirometry we reviewed spirograms from two populations, occupational medicine evaluations (OME) conducted by Saint Louis and Wake Forest Universities at 3 sites (n = 3260, mean age 64.14 years, 95 % CI 58.94-69.34, 97 % men) and conducted by Wake Forest University preop clinic (POC) at one site (n = 845, mean age 62.10 years, 95 % CI 50.46-73.74, 57 % men). This retrospective review of database information that the first author collected prospectively identified rates, types, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive value for lung function abnormalities and associated mortality rate found when conducting spirometry based on the 20/40 rule (≥20 years of smoking in those aged ≥ 40 years) in the OME population. To determine the reproducibility of the 20/40 rule for conducting spirometry, the rule was applied to the POC population. A lung function abnormality was found in 74 % of the OME population and 67 % of the POC population. Sensitivity of the rule was 85 % for an obstructive pattern and 77 % for any abnormality on spirometry. Positive and negative predictive values of the rule for a spirometric abnormality were 74 and 55 %, respectively. Patients with an obstructive pattern were at greater risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.39 [confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.93] vs. normal) and death (hazard ratio (HR) 1.53, 95 % CI 1.20-1.84) than subjects with normal spirometry. Restricted spirometry patterns were also associated with greater risk of coronary disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.7 [CI 1.23-2.35]) and death (Hazard ratio 1.40, 95 % CI 1.08-1.72). Smokers (≥ 20 pack years) age ≥ 40 years are at an increased risk for lung function abnormalities and those abnormalities are associated with greater presence of coronary heart disease and increased all-cause mortality. Use of the 20/40 rule could provide a

  8. Simple Stellar Population Modeling of Quasar Host Galaxies with Diffusion K-Means Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Gregory; Moravec, E. A.; Tremonti, C. A.; Wolf, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the correlation of the masses of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxy stellar spheroid velocity dispersions (the M-sigma relation) was greeted as clear evidence for the co-evolution of host galaxies and their SMBHs. However, studies in the last five years have posited that this relation could arise from central-limit properties of hierarchical formation alone. To address the question of whether and how often the SMBHs evolve with their host galaxies, it is necessary to look at galaxies whose SMBHs are actively growing—quasars—and determine the host galaxy properties. The central nuclei of quasar host galaxies complicate this type of study because their high luminosity tends to wash out their host galaxies. But, by using 3-D spectroscopy with the integral field unit (IFU) Sparsepak on the WIYN telescope, we have shown that the quasar light can be mostly isolated to one fiber in order to obtain the spectra of the quasar and the host galaxy concurrently. We can then model simultaneously the scattered quasar light and the stellar populations in the host galaxy fiber using a new simple stellar population (SSP) modeling method called diffusion k-means (DFK). The objectives of the research presented in this poster are to model synthetic quasar host galaxies using a DFK basis and a more traditional basis, compare the accuracy of both modeling methods, and test the affects of various prescriptions for masking the quasar lines in the host galaxy fiber. We present results from our SSP modeling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) results for DFK and traditional modeling schemes using synthetic data. By determining and then using the more robust stellar population modeling method, we can more confidently study quasar host galaxies to answer remaining questions in galaxy evolution. This work was partially supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship (NSF Grant DGE-0718123) and through the NSF's REU program (NSF Award

  9. Penicillin skin testing is a safe and effective tool for evaluating penicillin allergy in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephanie J; Park, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Penicillin skin testing has been validated in the evaluation of adult patients with penicillin allergy. However, the commercially available benzylpenicilloyl polylysine (Pre-Pen) is not indicated in the pediatric population. Moreover, the safety and validity of penicillin skin testing in the pediatric population has not been well studied. We describe the safety and validity of penicillin skin testing in the evaluation of children with a history of penicillin allergy. Children (penicillin allergy were evaluated with penicillin skin tests and were reviewed for basic demographics, penicillin skin test results, adverse drug reaction to penicillin after penicillin skin test, and adverse reaction to penicillin skin test. By using the χ(2) test, we compared the differences in the proportion of children and adults with a positive penicillin skin test. P value (penicillin skin testing; 703 of 778 patients had a negative penicillin skin test (90.4%), 66 had a positive test (8.5%), and 9 had an equivocal test (1.1%). Children were more likely to have a positive penicillin skin test (P penicillin skin test (52%) were challenged with penicillin, and 14 of 369 patients (3.8%) had an adverse drug reaction. No adverse reactions to penicillin skin testing were observed. Penicillin skin testing was safe and effective in the evaluation of children with a history of penicillin allergy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hand carriage of Candida occurs at lesser rates in hospital personnel who use antimicrobial hand disinfectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Mustafa; Sahin, Idris; Oksuz, Sukru; Sencan, Irfan; Kucukbayrak, Abdulkadir; Cakir, Selma; Ozaydin, Cigdem

    2014-09-01

    The hands of hospital personnel are considered to be important for colonization and infection of patients with Candida spp. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different hand disinfectants in reducing the carriage of Candida species on the hands of hospital personnel. A controlled study was conducted at Duzce University School of Medicine Hospital. Eighty hospital personnel were included in the trial. Subjects were divided into 4 groups according to hand hygiene procedures: group 1, hand rubbing with alcohol-based solution; group 2, hand washing with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate; group 3, hand washing with 7.5% povidone-iodine; group 4, hand washing with plain soap and water. The hands of all participants were tested by culture with the broth wash technique. Hand carriage of Candida spp. was lower in the 4% chlorhexidine gluconate group (10.5%, p = 0.006), in the 7.5% povidone-iodine group (18.7%, p = 0.043), and in the alcohol-based hand rub group (21.1%, p = 0.048) compared to the group washing hands with plain soap and water (50%). The use of hand disinfectant containing antimicrobial agents is more effective than hand washing with water and soap in reducing carriage of Candida on the hands of hospital personnel. It is recommended that hospital personnel use an antimicrobial hand disinfectant in units where there is a high risk of Candida infection.

  11. Effects of culture and education on neuropsychological testing: a preliminary study with indigenous and nonindigenous population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Solís, F; Ramirez, M; Ardila, A

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the influence of education and of culture on the neuropsychological profile of an indigenous and a nonindigenous population. The sample included 27 individuals divided into four groups: (a) seven illiterate Maya indigenous participants, (b) six illiterate Pame indigenous participants, (c) seven nonindigenous participants with no education, and (d) seven Maya indigenous participants with 1 to 4 years of education . A brief neuropsychological test battery developed and standardized in Mexico was individually administered. Results demonstrated differential effects for both variables. Both groups of indigenous participants (Maya and Pame) obtained higher scores in visuospatial tasks, and the level of education had significant effects on working and verbal memory. Our data suggested that culture dictates what it is important for survival and that education could be considered as a type of subculture that facilitates the development of certain skills.

  12. Testing for a genetic response to sexual selection in a wild Drosophila population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosden, T P; Thomson, J R; Blows, M W; Schaul, A; Chenoweth, S F

    2016-06-01

    In accordance with the consensus that sexual selection is responsible for the rapid evolution of display traits on macroevolutionary scales, microevolutionary studies suggest sexual selection is a widespread and often strong form of directional selection in nature. However, empirical evidence for the contemporary evolution of sexually selected traits via sexual rather than natural selection remains weak. In this study, we used a novel application of quantitative genetic breeding designs to test for a genetic response to sexual selection on eight chemical display traits from a field population of the fly, Drosophila serrata. Using our quantitative genetic approach, we were able to detect a genetically based difference in means between groups of males descended from fathers who had either successfully sired offspring or were randomly collected from the same wild population for one of these display traits, the diene (Z,Z)-5,9-C27 : 2 . Our experimental results, in combination with previous laboratory studies on this system, suggest that both natural and sexual selection may be influencing the evolutionary trajectories of these traits in nature, limiting the capacity for a contemporary evolutionary response. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. A statistical design for testing transgenerational genomic imprinting in natural human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Li

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a phenomenon in which the same allele is expressed differently, depending on its parental origin. Such a phenomenon, also called the parent-of-origin effect, has been recognized to play a pivotal role in embryological development and pathogenesis in many species. Here we propose a statistical design for detecting imprinted loci that control quantitative traits based on a random set of three-generation families from a natural population in humans. This design provides a pathway for characterizing the effects of imprinted genes on a complex trait or disease at different generations and testing transgenerational changes of imprinted effects. The design is integrated with population and cytogenetic principles of gene segregation and transmission from a previous generation to next. The implementation of the EM algorithm within the design framework leads to the estimation of genetic parameters that define imprinted effects. A simulation study is used to investigate the statistical properties of the model and validate its utilization. This new design, coupled with increasingly used genome-wide association studies, should have an immediate implication for studying the genetic architecture of complex traits in humans.

  14. Are indirect genetic benefits associated with polyandry? Testing predictions in a natural population of lemon sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBattista, Joseph D; Feldheim, Kevin A; Gruber, Samuel H; Hendry, Andrew P

    2008-02-01

    Multiple mating has clear fitness benefits for males, but uncertain benefits and costs for females. We tested for indirect genetic benefits of polyandry in a natural population, by using data from a long-term genetic and demographic study of lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) at Bimini, Bahamas. To do so, we followed the fates of individuals from six cohorts (450 age-0 and 254 age-1 fish) in relation to their individual level of genetic variation, and whether they were from polyandrous or monoandrous litters. We find that offspring from polyandrous litters did not have a greater genetic diversity or greater survival than did the offspring of monoandrous litters. We also find no evidence of positive associations between individual offspring genetic diversity metrics and our surrogate measure of fitness (i.e. survival). In fact, age-1 individuals with fewer heterozygous microsatellite loci and more genetically similar parents were more likely to survive to age-2. Thus, polyandry in female lemon sharks does not appear to be adaptive from the perspective of indirect genetic benefits to offspring. It may instead be the result of convenience polyandry, whereby females mate multiply to avoid harassment by males. Our inability to find indirect genetic benefits of polyandry despite detailed pedigree and survival information suggests the need for similar assessments in other natural populations.

  15. Attitudes toward genetic testing among the general population and relatives of patients with a severe genetic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietala, M; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R

    1995-01-01

    In the present study we explore the attitudes of the Finnish population toward genetic testing by conducting a questionnaire study of a stratified sample of the population as well as of family members of patients with a severe hereditary disease, aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU). The questionnaire ev...

  16. Timing and proximate causes of mortality in wild bird populations: testing Ashmole’s hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Daniel C.; Martin, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Fecundity in birds is widely recognized to increase with latitude across diverse phylogenetic groups and regions, yet the causes of this variation remain enigmatic. Ashmole’s hypothesis is one of the most broadly accepted explanations for this pattern. This hypothesis suggests that increasing seasonality leads to increasing overwinter mortality due to resource scarcity during the lean season (e.g., winter) in higher latitude climates. This mortality is then thought to yield increased per-capita resources for breeding that allow larger clutch sizes at high latitudes. Support for this hypothesis has been based on indirect tests, whereas the underlying mechanisms and assumptions remain poorly explored. We used a meta-analysis of over 150 published studies to test two underlying and critical assumptions of Ashmole’s hypothesis: first, that ad ult mortality is greatest during the season of greatest resource scarcity, and second, t hat most mortality is caused by starvation. We found that the lean season (winter) was generally not the season of greatest mortality. Instead, spring or summer was most frequently the season of greatest mortality. Moreover, monthly survival rates were not explained by monthly productivity, again opposing predictions from Ashmole’s hypothesis. Finally, predation, rather than starvation, was the most frequent proximate cause o f mortality. Our results do not support the mechanistic predictions of Ashmole‘s hypothesis, and suggest alternative explanations of latitudinal variation in clutch size should remain under consideration. Our meta-analysis also highlights a paucity of data available on the timing and causes of mortality in many bird populations, particularly tropical bird populations, despite the clear theoretical and empirical importance of such data.

  17. Hand eczema in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, C G; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have evaluated the incidence and prevalence of hand eczema in unselected adults. However, no studies have followed unselected adolescents from primary school into adult life to evaluate the course and risk factors for hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the incidence...... of hand eczema from adolescence to adulthood and prevalence of hand eczema in young adults together with risk factors for hand eczema. METHODS: A cohort of 1501 unselected 8(th) grade schoolchildren was established in 1995. In 2010, 1206 young adults from the cohort were asked to complete a questionnaire...... and participate in a clinical examination including patch testing (TRUE(®) Test). RESULTS: The incidence of hand eczema was 8.8/1000 person-years. The one-year period prevalence of hand eczema in the young adults was 14.3% (127/891) and the point prevalence 7.1% (63/891) with significantly higher prevalence...

  18. Hand fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000552.htm Hand fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... need to be repaired with surgery. Types of Hand Fractures Your fracture may be in one of ...

  19. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the ...

  20. Hand and Finger Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or ... autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next. Up next Wash your Hands - it just ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... also aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  3. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... United States, patients get more than a million infections in the hospital while being treated for something else. The best way to help prevent infection is to practice proper hand hygiene. Hand Hygiene ...

  4. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... views 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help ...

  6. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... LIVES - Clean Your Hands - No action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 59, ... 328 views 1:53 Good Sam Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 2:28. Good Samaritan Medical Center ...

  7. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand ... High resolution [22.9 MB] Open Captioned [14.5 MB] Request a higher resolution file Copy the ...

  8. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hospital while being treated for something else. The best way to help prevent infection is to practice proper hand hygiene. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives shows how patients can play an active role in reminding healthcare ...

  9. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... Please Parents Want To Do What′s Best The Obesity Epidemic Outbreaks CDC: Protecting Americans through Global Health ... best way to help prevent infection is to practice proper hand hygiene. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives shows ...

  10. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Arthritis of the Hand Page ( 1 ) The hand and wrist have multiple small joints that work together to ... a shoelace. When the joints are affected by arthritis, activities of daily living can be difficult. Arthritis ...

  11. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... next. Up next Wash your Hands - it just makes sense. - Duration: 1:36. Seema Marwaha 335,368 views 1:36 WHO: SAVE LIVES - Clean Your Hands - No action today; no cure tomorrow - ...

  12. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Moments of Hand Hygiene - Duration: 1:53. Salem Health 11,700 views 1:53 Good Sam Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 2:28. Good Samaritan Medical Center 2,398 views 2:28 Hand Hygiene Saves Lives - Duration: 5:12. ... 1:38 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former ...

  13. Hand hygiene strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Yazaji, Eskandar Alex

    2011-01-01

    Hand hygiene is one of the major players in preventing healthcare associated infections. However, healthcare workers compliance with hand hygiene continues to be a challenge. This article will address strategies to help improving hand hygiene compliance. Keywords: hand hygiene; healthcare associated infections; multidisciplinary program; system change; accountability; education; feedback(Published: 18 July 2011)Citation: Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives 2011, 1: 72...

  14. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based on a ...

  15. Latent variable mixture models to test for differential item functioning: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuyun; Sawatzky, Richard; Hopman, Wilma; Mayo, Nancy; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Liu, Juxin; Prior, Jerilynn; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Josse, Robert G; Towheed, Tanveer; Davison, K Shawn; Lix, Lisa M

    2017-05-15

    Comparisons of population health status using self-report measures such as the SF-36 rest on the assumption that the measured items have a common interpretation across sub-groups. However, self-report measures may be sensitive to differential item functioning (DIF), which occurs when sub-groups with the same underlying health status have a different probability of item response. This study tested for DIF on the SF-36 physical functioning (PF) and mental health (MH) sub-scales in population-based data using latent variable mixture models (LVMMs). Data were from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), a prospective national cohort study. LVMMs were applied to the ten PF and five MH SF-36 items. A standard two-parameter graded response model with one latent class was compared to multi-class LVMMs. Multivariable logistic regression models with pseudo-class random draws characterized the latent classes on demographic and health variables. The CaMos cohort consisted of 9423 respondents. A three-class LVMM fit the PF sub-scale, with class proportions of 0.59, 0.24, and 0.17. For the MH sub-scale, a two-class model fit the data, with class proportions of 0.69 and 0.31. For PF items, the probabilities of reporting greater limitations were consistently higher in classes 2 and 3 than class 1. For MH items, respondents in class 2 reported more health problems than in class 1. Differences in item thresholds and factor loadings between one-class and multi-class models were observed for both sub-scales. Demographic and health variables were associated with class membership. This study revealed DIF in population-based SF-36 data; the results suggest that PF and MH sub-scale scores may not be comparable across sub-groups defined by demographic and health status variables, although effects were frequently small to moderate in size. Evaluation of DIF should be a routine step when analysing population-based self-report data to ensure valid comparisons amongst sub-groups.

  16. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Wash your Hands - it just makes sense. - Duration: 1:36. Seema Marwaha 353,242 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: ... 3:10 Hand Washing Technique - WHO Approved - Duration: 1:19. AllYouWantTV 632,779 views 1:19 5 ...

  17. Hand x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  18. Robotic hand and fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  19. Guideline Implementation: Hand Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Judith L

    2017-02-01

    Performing proper hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis is essential to reducing the rates of health care-associated infections, including surgical site infections. The updated AORN "Guideline for hand hygiene" provides guidance on hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, the wearing of fingernail polish and artificial nails, proper skin care to prevent dermatitis, the wearing of jewelry, hand hygiene product selection, and quality assurance and performance improvement considerations. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel make informed decisions about hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis. The key points address the necessity of keeping fingernails and skin healthy, not wearing jewelry on the hands or wrists in the perioperative area, properly performing hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, and involving patients and visitors in hand hygiene initiatives. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... 574 views 3:40 Proper Hand Washing For Nurses - Duration: 2:57. Kevin Gorin 221,991 views 2:57 A very serious message about hand hygiene in hospitals - Duration: 3:51. seriousaboutHAI 130,444 views 3:51 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former Saskatoon ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 61,636 views 3:10 Hand Washing ... 51 5 videos Play all Hand washing 2018 health.services health.services Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music ...

  2. Fecal occult blood versus DNA testing: indirect comparison in a colorectal cancer screening population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenner H

    2017-07-01

    .3% (48.3–60.3%, respectively. These sensitivities are higher than those reported for MSDT (92.3% and 43.6%, p=0.66 and 0.003, respectively.Conclusion: In this large screening population, FIT showed equivalent or better diagnostic performance in comparison to reported performance of MSDT. Keywords: colorectal cancer screening, fecal occult blood test, fecal immunochemical test, sensitivity, specificity, test performance

  3. Classification of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Aalto-Korte, K; Andersen, K E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classification of hand eczema (HE) is mandatory in epidemiological and clinical studies, and also important in clinical work. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to test a recently proposed classification system of HE in clinical practice in a prospective multicentre study. METHODS: Patients were...... HE, protein contact dermatitis/contact urticaria, hyperkeratotic endogenous eczema and vesicular endogenous eczema, respectively. An additional diagnosis was given if symptoms indicated that factors additional to the main diagnosis were of importance for the disease. RESULTS: Four hundred and twenty......%) could not be classified. 38% had one additional diagnosis and 26% had two or more additional diagnoses. Eczema on feet was found in 30% of the patients, statistically significantly more frequently associated with hyperkeratotic and vesicular endogenous eczema. CONCLUSION: We find that the classification...

  4. Normative Values of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire for Patients with and without Hand Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Michael T; Shauver, Melissa J; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-09-01

    The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire has been widely used for nearly 20 years to assess patients with a variety of hand and upper extremity conditions. However, normative data have not previously been collected, limiting interpretation. The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire was administered to 579 participants recruited from the general population. In addition, participants were asked to identify any problem affecting their hand(s), including trauma, hand disease/condition, systemic illness, or nonspecific symptoms. Comorbidities and demographic data were also collected. Total Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire score for healthy individuals was indicative of generally good hand function (95.2; 95 percent CI, 94.3 to 96.1). Individuals with unilateral trauma scored for their affected hand (90.3; 95 percent CI, 87.9 to 92.6) lower than their healthy hand (mean difference, 5.7; 95 percent CI, 3.2 to 8.3). For individuals with and without hand trauma, total Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire score decreased with increasing number of comorbidities. Many of the differences in Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire score between the problem hand and unaffected hand were smaller than the minimal clinically important difference of 3.0 to 23.0 for known abnormalities of the hand and upper extremity. These normative data provide appropriate baseline information for individuals with and without underlying hand conditions. Most notably, these findings suggest that individuals with a unilateral problem establish new subnormative values for both their affected and unaffected hands. These data will encourage an appropriate understanding of the results of future studies using the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire.

  5. Testing yawning hypotheses in wild populations of two strepsirrhine species: Propithecus verreauxi and Lemur catta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannella, Alessandra; Norscia, Ivan; Stanyon, Roscoe; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    Yawning, although easily recognized, is difficult to explain. Traditional explanations stressed physiological mechanisms, but more recently, behavioral processes have received increasing attention. This is the first study to test a range of hypotheses on yawning in wild primate populations. We studied two sympatric strepsirrhine species, Lemur catta, and Propithecus verreauxi, of the Ankoba forest (24.99°S, 46.29°E, Berenty reserve) in southern Madagascar. Sexual dimorphism is lacking in both species. However, their differences in ecological and behavioral characteristics facilitate comparative tests of hypotheses on yawning. Our results show that within each species males and females yawned with similar frequencies supporting the Dimorphism Hypothesis, which predicts that low sexual dimorphism leads to little inter-sexual differences in yawning. In support of the State Changing Hypothesis yawning frequencies was linked to the sleep-wake cycle and punctuated transitions from one behavior to another. Accordingly, yawning frequencies were significantly higher in L. catta than in P. verreauxi, because L. catta has a higher basal level of activity and consequently a higher number of behavioral transitions. In agreement with the Anxiety Hypothesis, yawning increased significantly in the 10 min following predatory attacks or aggression. Our findings provide the first empirical evidence of a direct connection between anxiety and yawning in lemurs. Our results show that yawning in these two strepsirrhines occurs in different contexts, but more research will be necessary to determine if yawns are a single, unitary behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Validation of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults in a Danish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtekaer Haesum, Lisa Korsbakke; Ehlers, Lars; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2015-09-01

    To describe how the original American full-length version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) was translated and adapted for use in the Danish setting and culture. A reliable Danish version of the TOFHLA was created and pretested using patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as case group. Forty-two patients with COPD completed the Danish TOFHLA and participated in a face-to-face interview concerning their basic demographics. Statistical analyses were conducted to explore the demographic data provided by the participants and to determine the internal consistency and reliability of the Danish TOFHLA. The mean age of sample was 68.7 years (range 34-86). The face validity, internal consistency and item to scale correlations of the Danish TOFHLA were determined and found to fulfil well-established criteria; on this basis, we found the reliability and consistency of the Danish TOFHLA to be satisfying. The Danish TOFHLA is now ready for application in future research projects, which test levels of functional health literacy in an elderly Danish population at risk of chronic diseases. The evolvement in the measurement of health literacy is still ongoing, as there is a need to refine existing methods. Until recently, there has been a total lack of instruments for assessing health literacy in Scandinavia; it is hoped that this development of the Danish TOFHLA will promote further research within the field of health literacy in Scandinavia and other European countries. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Amelogenin test abnormalities revealed in Belarusian population during forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovko, Sergey; Shyla, Alena; Korban, Victorya; Borovko, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    Study of gender markers is a part of routine forensic genetic examination of crime scene and reference samples, paternity testing and personal identification. Amelogenin locus as a gender marker is included in majority of forensic STR kits of different manufacturers. In current study we report 11 cases of amelogenin abnormalities identified in males of Belarusian origin: 9 cases of AMELY dropout and 2 cases of AMELX dropout. Cases were obtained from forensic casework (n=9) and paternity testing (n=2) groups. In 4 out of 9 AMELY-negative cases deletion of AMELY was associated with the loss of DYS458 marker. In addition, we identified 3 males with SRY-positive XX male syndrome. Deletion of the long arm of the Y-chromosome was detected in two XX males. Loss of the major part of the Y-chromosome was identified in the third XX male. The presence of two X-chromosomes in XX males was confirmed with the use of Mentype(®) Argus X-8 PCR Amplification Kit. AMELY null allele observed in 2 out of 9 cases with AMELY dropout can be caused by mutation in the primer-binding site of AMELY allele. Primer-binding site mutations of AMELX can result in AMELX dropout identified in 2 cases with amplification failure of AMELX. Our study represents the first report and molecular genetic investigation of amelogenin abnormalities in the Belarusian population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A sensitive guaiac faecal occult blood test is less useful than an immunochemical test for colorectal cancer screening in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, B C-Y; Wong, W M; Cheung, K L; Tong, T S M; Rozen, P; Young, G P; Chu, K W; Ho, J; Law, W L; Tung, H M; Lai, K C; Hu, W H C; Chan, C K; Lam, S K

    2003-11-01

    Colorectal cancer screening by guaiac faecal occult blood test has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in Western populations. The optimal faecal occult blood test, whether guaiac or immunochemical, for colorectal cancer screening in the Chinese population remains to be defined. To compare the performance characteristics of a sensitive guaiac-based faecal occult blood test (Hemoccult SENSA) and an immunochemical faecal occult blood test (FlexSure OBT) in a Chinese population referred for colonoscopy. One hundred and thirty-five consecutive patients who were referred for colonoscopy and who met the study inclusion criteria took samples for the two faecal occult blood tests simultaneously from three successive stool specimens, with no dietary restrictions. All tests were developed and interpreted by a single experienced technician who was blind to the clinical diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value for the detection of colorectal adenomas and cancers were estimated for the two tests. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value for the detection of significant colorectal neoplasia (adenomas > or = 1.0 cm and cancers) were 91%, 70% and 18% for Hemoccult SENSA and 82%, 94% and 47% for FlexSure OBT. The specificity and positive predictive value were significantly higher for FlexSure OBT than for Hemoccult SENSA (P occult blood tests did not improve the accuracy. The positive predictive value of the immunochemical faecal occult blood test for the detection of significant colorectal neoplasia was 29% better than that of the sensitive guaiac-based test. This may relate to the Chinese diet and requires further study. The poor specificity of the sensitive guaiac-based test, without dietary restriction, makes it less useful for colorectal cancer screening in a Chinese population.

  9. Association of schistosomiasis with false-positive HIV test results in an African adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Dean B; Baisely, Kathy J; McNerney, Ruth; Hambleton, Ian; Chirwa, Tobias; Ross, David A; Changalucha, John; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Helmby, Helena; Dunne, David W; Mabey, David; Hayes, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the factors associated with the high rate of false-positive test results observed with the 4th-generation Murex HIV Ag/Ab Combination EIA (enzyme immunoassay) within an adolescent and young-adult cohort in northwest Tanzania. (4th-generation assays by definition detect both HIV antigen and antibody.) The clinical and sociodemographic factors associated with false-positive HIV results were analyzed for 6,940 Tanzanian adolescents and young adults. A subsample of 284 Murex assay-negative and 240 false-positive serum samples were analyzed for immunological factors, including IgG antibodies to malaria and schistosoma parasites, heterophile antibodies, and rheumatoid factor (RF) titers. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). False-positive HIV test results were associated with evidence of other infections. False positivity was strongly associated with increasing levels of Schistosoma haematobium worm IgG1, with adolescents with optical densities in the top quartile being at the highest risk (adjusted OR=40.7, 95% CI=8.5 to 194.2 compared with the risk for those in the bottom quartile). False positivity was also significantly associated with increasing S. mansoni egg IgG1 titers and RF titers of >or=80 (adjusted OR=8.2, 95% CI=2.8 to 24.3). There was a significant negative association between Murex assay false positivity and the levels of S. mansoni worm IgG1 and IgG2 and Plasmodium falciparum IgG1 and IgG4. In Africa, endemic infections may affect the specificities of immunoassays for HIV infection. Caution should be used when the results of 4th-generation HIV test results are interpreted for African adolescent populations.

  10. Population genetic structure in Atlantic and Pacific Ocean common murres (Uria aalge): natural replicate tests of post-Pleistocene evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris-Pocock, J A; Taylor, S A; Birt, T P; Damus, M; Piatt, J F; Warheit, K I; Friesen, V L

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the factors that influence population differentiation in temperate taxa can be difficult because the signatures of both historic and contemporary demographics are often reflected in population genetic patterns. Fortunately, analyses based on coalescent theory can help untangle the relative influence of these historic and contemporary factors. Common murres (Uria aalge) are vagile seabirds that breed in the boreal and low arctic waters of the Northern Hemisphere. Previous analyses revealed that Atlantic and Pacific populations are genetically distinct; however, less is known about population genetic structure within ocean basins. We employed the mitochondrial control region, four microsatellite loci and four intron loci to investigate population genetic structure throughout the range of common murres. As in previous studies, we found that Atlantic and Pacific populations diverged during the Pleistocene and do not currently exchange migrants. Therefore, Atlantic and Pacific murre populations can be used as natural replicates to test mechanisms of population differentiation. While we found little population genetic structure within the Pacific, we detected significant east-west structuring among Atlantic colonies. The degree that population genetic structure reflected contemporary population demographics also differed between ocean basins. Specifically, while the low levels of population differentiation in the Pacific are at least partially due to high levels of contemporary gene flow, the east-west structuring of populations within the Atlantic appears to be the result of historic fragmentation of populations rather than restricted contemporary gene flow. The contrasting results in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans highlight the necessity of carefully considering multilocus nonequilibrium population genetic approaches when reconstructing the demographic history of temperate Northern Hemisphere taxa.

  11. Statistical distributions of test statistics used for quantitative trait association mapping in structured populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyssèdre Simon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spurious associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and phenotypes are a major issue in genome-wide association studies and have led to underestimation of type 1 error rate and overestimation of the number of quantitative trait loci found. Many authors have investigated the influence of population structure on the robustness of methods by simulation. This paper is aimed at developing further the algebraic formalization of power and type 1 error rate for some of the classical statistical methods used: simple regression, two approximate methods of mixed models involving the effect of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and a random polygenic effect (GRAMMAR and FASTA and the transmission/disequilibrium test for quantitative traits and nuclear families. Analytical formulae were derived using matrix algebra for the first and second moments of the statistical tests, assuming a true mixed model with a polygenic effect and SNP effects. Results The expectation and variance of the test statistics and their marginal expectations and variances according to the distribution of genotypes and estimators of variance components are given as a function of the relationship matrix and of the heritability of the polygenic effect. These formulae were used to compute type 1 error rate and power for any kind of relationship matrix between phenotyped and genotyped individuals for any level of heritability. For the regression method, type 1 error rate increased with the variability of relationships and with heritability, but decreased with the GRAMMAR method and was not affected with the FASTA and quantitative transmission/disequilibrium test methods. Conclusions The formulae can be easily used to provide the correct threshold of type 1 error rate and to calculate the power when designing experiments or data collection protocols. The results concerning the efficacy of each method agree with simulation results in the literature but were

  12. Testing support for the northern and southern dispersal routes out of Africa: an analysis of Levantine and southern Arabian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Deven N; Al-Meeri, Ali; Mulligan, Connie J

    2017-12-01

    The Northern Dispersal Route (NDR) and Southern Dispersal Route (SDR) are hypothesized to have been used by modern humans in the dispersal out of Africa. The NDR follows the Nile into Northeast Africa and crosses the Red Sea into the Levant. The SDR emerges from the Horn of Africa and crosses the Bab el-Mandeb into southern Arabia. In this study, we analyze genetic data from populations living along the NDR and SDR to test support for each dispersal route. We genotyped 90 Yemeni samples on the Affymetrix Human Origins array. We analyzed these data with published data from Levantine and other southern Arabian populations as well as 157 comparative populations for a total sample size of >550,000 genetic variants from >2,000 individuals in >160 populations. We calculated outgroup f3 statistics to test how Levantine and southern Arabian populations relate to African populations living along the NDR and SDR and to other non-African populations. We find that Levantine and southern Arabian populations bear similar genetic relationships to both African and non-African populations, thus providing no support for the use of one dispersal route over the other. Our results are consistent with a history of gene flow between the Levant and southern Arabia. Consideration of genetic, archaeological, and paleoclimate data provide a slight edge for the SDR but, ultimately, more data are needed to definitively identify which dispersal route out of Africa was used. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Testing for reproductive interference in the population dynamics of two congeneric species of herbivorous mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Alba, J M; Sabelis, M W

    2014-01-01

    When phylogenetically close, two competing species may reproductively interfere, and thereby affect their population dynamics. We tested for reproductive interference (RI) between two congeneric haplo-diploid spider mites, Tetranychus evansi and Tetranychus urticae, by investigating their interspecific mating and their population dynamics when they competed on the same plants. They are both pests of tomato, but differ in the host plant defences that they suppress or induce. To reduce the effect of plant-mediated interaction, we used a mutant tomato plant lacking jasmonate-mediated anti-herbivore defences in the competition experiment. In addition, to manipulate the effect of RI, we introduced founder females already mated with conspecific males in mild RI treatments or founder, virgin females in strong RI treatments (in either case together with heterospecific and conspecific males). As females show first-male sperm precedence, RI should occur especially in the founder generation under strong RI treatments. We found that T. urticae outcompeted T. evansi in mild, but not in strong RI treatments. Thus, T. evansi interfered reproductively with T. urticae. This result was supported by crossing experiments showing frequent interspecific copulations, strong postmating reproductive isolation and a preference of T. evansi males to mate with T. urticae (instead of conspecific) females, whereas T. urticae males preferred conspecific females. We conclude that interspecific mating comes at a cost due to asymmetric mate preferences of males. Because RI by T. evansi can improve its competitiveness to T. urticae, we propose that RI partly explains why T. evansi became invasive in Europe where T. urticae is endemic. PMID:24865602

  14. Computerized adaptive testing of population psychological distress: simulation-based evaluation of GHQ-30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochl, Jan; Böhnke, Jan R; Pickett, Kate E; Croudace, Tim J

    2016-06-01

    Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) items are frequently used to assess psychological distress but no study to date has investigated the GHQ-30's potential for adaptive administration. In computerized adaptive testing (CAT) items are matched optimally to the targeted distress level of respondents instead of relying on fixed-length versions of instruments. We therefore calibrate GHQ-30 items and report a simulation study exploring the potential of this instrument for adaptive administration in a longitudinal setting. GHQ-30 responses of 3445 participants with 2 completed assessments (baseline, 7-year follow-up) in the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey were calibrated using item response theory. Our simulation study evaluated the efficiency of CAT administration of the items, cross-sectionally and longitudinally, with different estimators, item selection methods, and measurement precision criteria. To yield accurate distress measurements (marginal reliability at least 0.90) nearly all GHQ-30 items need to be administered to most survey respondents in general population samples. When lower accuracy is permissible (marginal reliability of 0.80), adaptive administration saves approximately 2/3 of the items. For longitudinal applications, change scores based on the complete set of GHQ-30 items correlate highly with change scores from adaptive administrations. The rationale for CAT-GHQ-30 is only supported when the required marginal reliability is lower than 0.9, which is most likely to be the case in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies assessing mean changes in populations. Precise measurement of psychological distress at the individual level can be achieved, but requires the deployment of all 30 items.

  15. [Integration of Injured Hands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Reiner

    2017-02-01

    Any injury of a hand more or less disintegrates the injured hand. The rehabilitation of an alienated hand is prolonged. How can the alienation of the own but injured hand and the involuntary and unconscious inhibition of its perception and use be diagnosed, explained, avoided and designated? Medical observations and interviews with patients and therapists on the occasion of rehabilitation of hand injuries resulted in the development of a new concept of biopsychosocial integrating rehabilitation and a creative hand therapy with the objective of integrating injured and alienated hands. The inhibition of the gesture of thinking has been the most revealing sign for the diagnosis of a disintegration of an injured hand. Explanation: The involuntary inhibition to recognize and use an injured hand causes and implicates the alienation of the rested hand. Information by hand surgeons and hand therapists. Creative hand therapy guides the attention to complex and pleasing activities. In complex disintegrations after hand injuries the hand as well as the person need help. Designation: Hypotheses: Posttraumatic Proportionate Regional Disintegration while the tissues heal. Posttraumatic Complex Regional Disintegration, if the disintegration overruns the healing of tissues or if the person suffers. The Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is distinguished as a rare exception of a biopsychosocial disintegration. Posttraumatic regional disintegration seems to be proportionate while the tissues are healing. If the mentioned sensations of the patients and the visible signs of disintegration persist, the disorder spreads onto the biopsychosocial unit of the person. This disorder of hand and person may be designated as a complex disorder. The impact of a proportionate posttraumatic disintegration as well as the formation and exacerbation of a complex posttraumatic disintegration may be prevented by the facilitation of the integration of an injured hand. Scientific prove is needed for: the

  16. In vivo evaluation of the persistant and residual antimicrobial properties of three hand-scrub and hand-rub regimes in a simulated surgical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausoleil, C M; Paulson, D S; Bogert, A; Lewis, G S

    2012-08-01

    The use of antimicrobial formulations for disinfecting hands prior to surgery has been shown to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. Such formulations must demonstrate an immediate reduction of microbial flora on the hands that persists while the hands are gloved. This study compared persistent and residual antimicrobial effects of three simulated in-use surgical hand-cleansing procedures, one using a scrub followed by a hand rub with products containing chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), and two using a scrub with a cleansing soap followed by a hand rub with one of two alcohol-based products. The study was executed in two phases. In phase 1, persistent antimicrobial effects versus the resident microbial flora of volunteer subjects' hands were evaluated. In phase 2, the residual antimicrobial effects were challenged with the application of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) on to the hands of volunteer subjects. Phase 1 testing showed that significantly greater reductions of normal flora (P ≤ 0.00) persisted with a scrub with the CHG product followed by alcohol/CHG hand rub, than were achieved by scrubs with soap followed by application of either of the other hand rubs. Through all protocols of phase 2, the CHG scrub and alcohol/CHG hand rub produced significantly greater reductions of the S. aureus population (P ≤ 0.00) than did a soap scrub in combination with the other two hand rubs. The combination of a scrub and rub with products containing CHG and alcohol was shown to reduce significantly and persistently both the resident flora and contaminating transient bacteria on skin beneath surgical gloves. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Note on Two-Sample Tests for Comparing Intra-Individual Genetic Sequence Diversity between Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, E. E.; Bhattacharya, T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary present four U-statistic based tests to compare genetic diversity between different samples. The proposed tests improved upon previously used methods by accounting for the correlations in the data. We find, however, that the same correlations introduce an unacceptable bias in the sample estimators used for the variance and covariance of the inter-sequence genetic distances for modest sample sizes. Here, we compute unbiased estimators for these and test the resulting improvement using simulated data. We also show that, contrary to the claims in Gilbert et al., it is not always possible to apply the Welch–Satterthwaite approximate t-test, and we provide explicit formulas for the degrees of freedom to be used when, on the other hand, such approximation is indeed possible. PMID:23004569

  18. [Correlation between ICIQ-UI-SF score and personality testing results over a urinary incontinent population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, L; De Mol, J; Mélot, C; Falez, F

    2016-03-01

    We found out the personality pattern of an incontinent population and proceeded to a correlation between the personality inventory and the ICIQ-UI-SF (International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form) to demonstrate reliability and sincerity of the answers and to establish that a personality disturbance may impact the physiopathology of micturition. We performed an observational prospective study. It included patient's answers to a computed questionnaire combining a double ICIQ-UI-SF questionnaire and the 71 questions of the Minimult questionnaire. Forty-seven patients were asked to participate. Over 37 patients included, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney non parametric test confirmed agreement of the two ICIQ-UI-SF questionnaires with P=0.1792. Twenty-three patients were validated to the Minimult inventory with F scalevalidity scale using ROC analysis. We observed an AUC of 0.559 with sensitivity 78.6% and specificity 43.5%. No L score was above 70 demonstrating absence of lie. No personality disturbance was found in 9 cases. We observed six cases with a high hypochondric value, five with a high depressive value, and four with a high hysteric value. This neurotic triad was found in two cases. We noticed five cases with psychopathic deviance relative to antisocial behaviour while values of paranoia and hypomania were high in one case without any association of these personality aspects, which demonstrated absence of behavioural problem. Psychotic profile associating schizophrenia, paranoia, depression and hypomania was not found. We outlined in half of the valid population a significant high psycho-asthenic pattern. We conclude that a correlation between the personality inventory and the ICIQ-UI-SF is feasible. The comparative study demonstrate reliability of answers. Sincerity is established by the Minimult L scale. We confirm and precise literature information over clinical personality pattern of this population and observe relevant

  19. Does population screening for Chlamydia trachomatis raise anxiety among those tested? Findings from a population based chlamydia screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Nicola

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of urine testing for Chlamydia trachomatis has raised the possibility of large-scale screening for this sexually transmitted infection, which is now the most common in the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an invitation to be screened for chlamydia and of receiving a negative result on levels of anxiety, depression and self-esteem. Methods 19,773 men and women aged 16 to 39 years, selected at random from 27 general practices in two large city areas (Bristol and Birmingham were invited by post to send home-collected urine samples or vulvo-vaginal swabs for chlamydia testing. Questionnaires enquiring about anxiety, depression and self-esteem were sent to random samples of those offered screening: one month before the dispatch of invitations; when participants returned samples; and after receiving a negative result. Results Home screening was associated with an overall reduction in anxiety scores. An invitation to participate did not increase anxiety levels. Anxiety scores in men were lower after receiving the invitation than at baseline. Amongst women anxiety was reduced after receipt of negative test results. Neither depression nor self-esteem scores were affected by screening. Conclusion Postal screening for chlamydia does not appear to have a negative impact on overall psychological well-being and can lead to a decrease in anxiety levels among respondents. There is, however, a clear difference between men and women in when this reduction occurs.

  20. Malthus under a Microscope: Using the Soil Nematode "Coenorhabditis elegans" to Test Darwin's Premises about Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Melinda M.

    2007-01-01

    Biological evolution is one of the over-arching concepts recommended for student learning by the "National Science Education Standards." As with all such complex concepts, student understanding of evolution is improved when instruction includes hands-on, inquiry-based activities. However, even authors writing in strong support of teaching…

  1. Preliminary Population Size Estimation of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Kazakhstan: Implications for HIV Testing and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Elwin; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Hunt, Timothy; Primbetova, Sholpan; Gun Lee, Yong; Berry, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the population size of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Kazakhstan and their HIV testing history. We conducted structured interviews with MSM in four geographically disparate cities-N = 400 (n = 100/city)-to implement four population estimation methods and ascertain HIV testing history. Approximately 3.2% of men-corresponding to ∼154,000 individuals-in Kazakhstan aged 18-59 are MSM. The 49.9% of the sample who reported taking an HIV test far exceeds the <1% reported as MSM in surveillance data. HIV testing surveillance in Kazakhstan has underestimated the number of MSM. This underscores the need to redress social and structural barriers to HIV testing and disclosure of sexual behavior experienced by MSM in Kazakhstan. Recommendations include promoting cultural sensitivity among testing staff through quality assurance and regular training, and increasing protection and public awareness through antidiscrimination policy development.

  2. Testing reported associations of genetic risk factors for oral clefts in a large Irish study population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tonia C.; Molloy, Anne M.; Pangilinan, Faith; Troendle, James F.; Kirke, Peadar N.; Conley, Mary R.; Orr, David J. A.; Earley, Michael; McKiernan, Eamon; Lynn, Ena C.; Doyle, Anne; Scott, John M.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Mills, James L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Suggestive, but not conclusive, studies implicate many genetic variants in oral cleft etiology. We used a large, ethnically homogenous study population to test whether reported associations between nonsyndromic oral clefts and 12 genes (CLPTM1, CRISPLD2, FGFR2, GABRB3, GLI2, IRF6, PTCH1, RARA, RYK, SATB2, SUMO1, TGFA) could be confirmed. METHODS Thirty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in exons, splice sites, and conserved non-coding regions were studied in 509 patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP), 383 with cleft palate only (CP), 838 mothers and 719 fathers of patients with oral clefts, and 902 controls from Ireland. Case-control and family-based statistical tests were performed using isolated oral clefts for the main analyses. RESULTS In case-control comparisons, the minor allele of PTCH1 A562A (rs2066836) was associated with reduced odds of CLP (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.13–0.64 for homozygotes) whereas the minor allele of PTCH1 L1315P (rs357564) was associated with increased odds of CLP (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07–1.74 for heterozygotes and OR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.09–2.24 for homozygotes). The minor allele of one SUMO1 SNP, rs3769817 located in intron 2, was associated with increased odds of CP (OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.06–1.99 for heterozygotes). Transmission disequilibrium was observed for the minor allele of TGFA V159V (rs2166975) which was over-transmitted to CP cases (P=0.041). CONCLUSIONS For 10 of the 12 genes, this is the largest candidate gene study of nonsyndromic oral clefts to date. The findings provide further evidence that PTCH1, SUMO1, and TGFA contribute to nonsyndromic oral clefts. PMID:19937600

  3. Culture qualitatively but not quantitatively influences performance in the Boston naming test in a chinese-speaking population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Bin; Lin, Chi-Ying; Lin, Ker-Neng; Yeh, Yen-Chi; Chen, Wei-Ta; Wang, Kuo-Shu; Wang, Pei-Ning

    2014-01-01

    The Boston Naming Test (BNT) is the most frequently administered confrontational naming test, but the cultural background of the patients may influence their performance in the BNT. The aim of this study was to identify differences in performance in the BNT between a Chinese population in Taiwan, Chinese populations in other areas and a Caucasian population. A total of 264 native, Chinese-speaking, cognitively normal elders aged >60 years were enrolled in our study and conducted the 30-item Chinese version of the BNT. Another 10 BNT studies were categorized, analyzed and compared with the present study. Higher education was associated with higher scores, whereas age and gender had no effect on performance in the BNT. The score of the Chinese-speaking population was equivalent to the English-speaking population. A disparity in difficulties with items was not only apparent between the Taiwanese and Caucasian populations, but also between the Chinese-speaking populations in the different geographic areas. For the most part, the impact of culture on performance in the BNT may not be quantitative but qualitative. Attention should be paid to a potential effect of culture on difficulties with items when administering the BNT to non-English-speaking populations. Understanding differences in performance in the BNT in distinct cultural settings improves the clinical application of the BNT.

  4. Culture Qualitatively but Not Quantitatively Influences Performance in the Boston Naming Test in a Chinese-Speaking Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Bin Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The Boston Naming Test (BNT is the most frequently administered confrontational naming test, but the cultural background of the patients may influence their performance in the BNT. The aim of this study was to identify differences in performance in the BNT between a Chinese population in Taiwan, Chinese populations in other areas and a Caucasian population. Methods: A total of 264 native, Chinese-speaking, cognitively normal elders aged >60 years were enrolled in our study and conducted the 30-item Chinese version of the BNT. Another 10 BNT studies were categorized, analyzed and compared with the present study. Results: Higher education was associated with higher scores, whereas age and gender had no effect on performance in the BNT. The score of the Chinese-speaking population was equivalent to the English-speaking population. A disparity in difficulties with items was not only apparent between the Taiwanese and Caucasian populations, but also between the Chinese-speaking populations in the different geographic areas. Conclusion: For the most part, the impact of culture on performance in the BNT may not be quantitative but qualitative. Attention should be paid to a potential effect of culture on difficulties with items when administering the BNT to non-English-speaking populations. Understanding differences in performance in the BNT in distinct cultural settings improves the clinical application of the BNT.

  5. Relationship of testosterone and nonverbal intelligence to hand preference and hand skill in right-handed young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, U

    1990-10-01

    The relationship between serum testosterone level and nonverbal intelligence was studied in right-handed young adults with regard to handedness. Hand preference was assessed by the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. Hand skill was measured by a peg moving task. Serum testosterone level was determined using tritium-marked-radioimmunoassay. Visual-spatial performance (nonverbal intelligence) was measured by Cattell's Culture Fair Intelligence Test. In men with consistent right-hand preference (GSs: 80 to 100), IQ was found to be positively linearly related to serum testosterone, which exhibited two regression lines belonging to low and high difference in skill between hands. In females with consistent right-handedness, there was a negative linear correlation between IQ and serum testosterone, which also exhibited two different regression lines according to difference in skill between hands. In males with moderate right-hand preference (GSs 50 to 75), IQ was found to be positively linearly related to serum testosterone, exhibiting two different (same slopes) regression lines according to difference in skill between hands. In females with moderate right-hand preference, IQ first increased and then decreased with serum testosterone, exhibiting a quadratic relationship. These results suggested that serum testosterone in young adults may be associated with visual-spatial performance depending upon sex, hand preference, and hand skill.

  6. Transfer of fibres on the hands of living subjects and their persistence during hand washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungwook; Han, Aleum; Kim, Sojung; Son, Dasom; Min, Heewon

    2014-12-01

    Textile fibres were transferred to the hands of ten living subjects and their persistence was determined after hand washing. Average number of fibres transferred was 300 ± 133 (female 288 ± 92, male 311 ± 163) per 100 cm(2) hand area in the 100 experiments. However the number of fibres transferred was not gender dependent but individual dependent. The hand texture of subjects was compared with the number of fibres transferred but the relationship was not observed. The number of fibres transferred varied significantly for the 10 repeated experiments performed under the same conditions for the same subject. The subjects were then asked to wash their hands with water. One test group washed their hands with standing water, and the other with running tap water. Afterwards, the number of fibres remaining on the test subjects' hands were investigated. Migration of the fibres on the surface of the observed hands did occur but total loss of transferred fibre after hand washing did not occur. The average number of fibres remaining per 100 cm(2) hand area was 14 ± 10 (range=3-72) for hand washing with standing water, and 10 ± 12 (range=0-79) for washing with running tap water. The results of this study show the possibility of finding fibres on the hands of a person involved in a criminal case even after hand washing before fibre collection. Copyright © 2014 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The application of the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 2 test to elite female soccer populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, P. S.; Bendiksen, Mads; Dellal, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test level 2 (Yo-Yo IE2) to elite female soccer populations. Elite senior (n¿=¿92), youth (n¿=¿42), domestic (n¿=¿46) and sub-elite female soccer players (n¿=¿19) carried out the Yo-Yo IE2 test on numerous...... occasions across the season. Test-retest coefficient of variation (CV) in Yo-Yo IE2 test performance in domestic female players was 4.5%. Elite senior female players' Yo-Yo IE2 test performances were better (P¿...

  8. The Avocado Hand

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rahmani, G

    2017-11-01

    Accidental self-inflicted knife injuries to digits are a common cause of tendon and nerve injury requiring hand surgery. There has been an apparent increase in avocado related hand injuries. Classically, the patients hold the avocado in their non-dominant hand while using a knife to cut\\/peel the fruit with their dominant hand. The mechanism of injury is usually a stabbing injury to the non-dominant hand as the knife slips past the stone, through the soft avocado fruit. Despite their apparent increased incidence, we could not find any cases in the literature which describe the “avocado hand”. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman who sustained a significant hand injury while preparing an avocado. She required exploration and repair of a digital nerve under regional anaesthesia and has since made a full recovery.

  9. Self-Reported HIV-Positive Status But Subsequent HIV-Negative Test Result Using Rapid Diagnostic Testing Algorithms Among Seven Sub-Saharan African Military Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has con- firmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However... interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosur- veys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of per- sonnel...positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World

  10. Thyroid gland status among population living around the semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhumadilov, Z. [Semipalatinsk State Medical Academy (Kazakstan); Land, C.; Hartshorne, M. [and others

    2000-05-01

    From 1949-1962, regions of Kazakstan near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) were contaminated with high levels of radioactive fallout from atomic bomb tests carried out at the SNTS. The effective-dose is a principal criterion for the evaluation of the effect of radioactive fallout upon population. Thyroid disease prevalence may be ascertained, as a biomarker of radiation exposure and because it is of interest in itself. Some features from three studies of thyroid gland status among population living around SNTS will be reported. The first study is a case review of pathological findings of 7,271 patients from three regions adjacent to the SNTS, who were surgically treated during 1966-96; the second is a thyroid screening study of a cohort of 3000 village residents who were <20 years of age at the time of major fallout events in the Semipalatinsk region; the third is a complex molecular, morphological investigation and some approaches to rehabilitation of patients with thyroid abnormalities. Our first study revealed that there is a significant trend for the proportion of thyroid cancer to increase over time in the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakstan 20-29 years after onset of testing in 1949, which might be related to radiation exposure. There are many ethnic groups in this region. Our research among two main ethnic groups (native Kazakh and European extraction) detected that the initial level of thyroid abnormalities and thyroid cancer was higher among residents of European extraction. The total number of surgical cases increased among both ethnic groups over the years, but the numbers of cases with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer increased dramatically among ethnic Kazakhs. Overall, papillary and follicular cancers predominated, but it should be noted the relatively high percentage of follicular cancers after 1982 in the Semipalatinsk region. The primary screening outcome measure was the prevaleance of thyroid nodules as determined by

  11. Implants in the hand; Implantate der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanivenhaus, A. [Medizinische Universitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Increasingly, implants in the region of hand joints and the wrist represent an alternative for the treatment of post-traumatic, inflamed, or degenerative joint damage. The diversity of hand functions also results in varied solutions, which are effective in their stability, mobility, and distraction. Different materials are necessary for this, and they require subtile radiological control. The native X-ray represents the substantial method to observe migration of the implants. Each interface between titanium, ceramic, zirconium, pyrocarbon, and silicon to the bone has to be assessed differently in order to obtain a relevant statement. The finger joints and to a limited extent the wrist represent the artificial joints with limited alternative therapy. Other implants in the hand should only be applied after strict indication and patient compliance, as arthrodesis and resection arthroplasty have shown very good long-term results. (orig.) [German] Implantate im Bereich der Gelenke der Hand und des Handgelenks stellen zunehmend Alternativen bei der Versorgung posttraumatischer, entzuendlicher oder degenerativer Gelenkschaeden dar. Die Vielfalt der Handfunktionen fuehrt auch zu unterschiedlichen Loesungen, die durch Stabilitaet, Mobilitaet und Distraktion wirksam werden. Dafuer sind unterschiedliche Materialien erforderlich, die eine subtile radiologische Kontrolle erfordern. Das Nativroentgen stellt das wesentlichste Verfahren zur Verlaufsbeobachtung von Implantaten dar. Das Interface zwischen Titan, Keramik, Zirkonium, Pyrokarbon und Silikon zum Knochen muss unterschiedlich bewertet werden, um relevante Aussagen treffen zu koennen. Die Fingergelenke und in begrenztem Ausmass auch das Handgelenk stellen Kunstgelenke mit geringen Alternativtherapiemoeglichkeiten dar. Die uebrigen Implantate der Hand sollten nur bei strenger Indikationsstellung und hoher Patientencompliance Anwendung finden, da Arthrodese oder Resektionsarthroplastik gute Langzeitresultate aufweisen. (orig.)

  12. Dextrous robot hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Subramanian T. (Editor); Iberall, Thea (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies of human hand function and their implications for the design of robot hands are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include human grasp choice and robotic grasp analysis, opposition space and human prehension, coordination in normal and prosthetic reaching, and intelligent exploration by the human hand. Consideration is given to a task-oriented dextrous manipulation architecture, the control architecture for the Belgrade/USC hand, the analysis of multifingered grasping and manipulation, and tactile sensing for shape interpretation. Diagrams, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  13. Osteomyelitis of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, R; Barlow, G

    2016-05-01

    Osteomyelitis of the hand is uncommon, but if not adequately and promptly treated the detrimental effects on hand function can be devastating. The majority of literature on osteomyelitis relates to the lower limb, but the principles of management are applicable to the hand, with good surgical debridement and culture-guided antimicrobial therapy. For osteomyelitis in general, antibiotic therapy of 4-6 weeks' duration (intravenous and/or oral) is typically recommended. In the hand, length and mode of antibiotic administration are still under study. V. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Investigating the Relationship between Test-Taker Background Characteristics and Test Performance in a Heterogeneous English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) Test Population: A Factor Analytic Approach. Research Report. ETS RR-15-25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Venessa F.; Yoo, Hanwook

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the heterogeneity in the English-as-a-second-language (ESL) test population by modeling the relationship between test-taker background characteristics and test performance as measured by the "TOEFL iBT"® using a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) with covariate approach. The background characteristics studied…

  15. Frequency of bone mineral density testing in adult kidney transplant recipients from Ontario, Canada: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Kyla L; Zou, Guangyong; Leslie, William D; McArthur, Eric; Lam, Ngan N; Knoll, Gregory A; Kim, S Joseph; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hodsman, Anthony B; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    We lack consensus on the clinical value, frequency, and timing of bone mineral density (BMD) testing in kidney transplant recipients. This study sought to determine practice patterns in BMD testing across kidney transplant centres in Ontario, Canada, and to compare the frequency of testing in kidney transplant recipients to non-transplant reference groups. Using healthcare databases from Ontario, Canada we conducted a population-based cohort study of adult kidney transplant recipients who received a transplant from 1994-2009. We used logistic regression to determine if there was a statistically significant difference across transplant centres in the decision to perform at least one BMD test after transplantation, adjusting for covariates that may influence a physician's decision to order a BMD test. We used the McNemar's test to compare the number of recipients who had at least one BMD test to non-transplant reference groups (matching on age, sex, and date of cohort entry). In the first 3 years after transplant, 4821 kidney transplant recipients underwent 4802 BMD tests (median 1 test per recipient, range 0 to 6 tests), costing $600,000 (2014 CAD equivalent dollars). Across the six centres, the proportion of recipients receiving at least one BMD test varied widely (ranging from 15.6 to 92.1 %; P population with a previous non-vertebral fracture [hip, forearm, proximal humerus], 13.8 %; general population with no previous non-vertebral fracture, 8.5 %; P value <0.001 for each of the comparisons). There is substantial practice variability in BMD testing after transplant. New high-quality information is needed to inform the utility, optimal timing, and frequency of BMD testing in kidney transplant recipients.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of population screening for BRCA mutations in Ashkenazi jewish women compared with family history-based testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Legood, Rosa; Burnell, Matthew; McGuire, Alistair; Raikou, Maria; Loggenberg, Kelly; Wardle, Jane; Sanderson, Saskia; Gessler, Sue; Side, Lucy; Balogun, Nyala; Desai, Rakshit; Kumar, Ajith; Dorkins, Huw; Wallis, Yvonne; Chapman, Cyril; Taylor, Rohan; Jacobs, Chris; Tomlinson, Ian; Beller, Uziel; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Population-based testing for BRCA1/2 mutations detects the high proportion of carriers not identified by cancer family history (FH)-based testing. We compared the cost-effectiveness of population-based BRCA testing with the standard FH-based approach in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women. A decision-analytic model was developed to compare lifetime costs and effects amongst AJ women in the UK of BRCA founder-mutation testing amongst: 1) all women in the population age 30 years or older and 2) just those with a strong FH (≥10% mutation risk). The model assumes that BRCA carriers are offered risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy and annual MRI/mammography screening or risk-reducing mastectomy. Model probabilities utilize the Genetic Cancer Prediction through Population Screening trial/published literature to estimate total costs, effects in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), cancer incidence, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and population impact. Costs are reported at 2010 prices. Costs/outcomes were discounted at 3.5%. We used deterministic/probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) to evaluate model uncertainty. Compared with FH-based testing, population-screening saved 0.090 more life-years and 0.101 more QALYs resulting in 33 days' gain in life expectancy. Population screening was found to be cost saving with a baseline-discounted ICER of -£2079/QALY. Population-based screening lowered ovarian and breast cancer incidence by 0.34% and 0.62%. Assuming 71% testing uptake, this leads to 276 fewer ovarian and 508 fewer breast cancer cases. Overall, reduction in treatment costs led to a discounted cost savings of £3.7 million. Deterministic sensitivity analysis and 94% of simulations on PSA (threshold £20000) indicated that population screening is cost-effective, compared with current NHS policy. Population-based screening for BRCA mutations is highly cost-effective compared with an FH-based approach in AJ women age 30 years and older. © The Author

  17. Cost-effectiveness of Population Screening for BRCA Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Women Compared With Family History–Based Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Legood, Rosa; Burnell, Matthew; McGuire, Alistair; Raikou, Maria; Loggenberg, Kelly; Wardle, Jane; Sanderson, Saskia; Gessler, Sue; Side, Lucy; Balogun, Nyala; Desai, Rakshit; Kumar, Ajith; Dorkins, Huw; Wallis, Yvonne; Chapman, Cyril; Taylor, Rohan; Jacobs, Chris; Tomlinson, Ian; Beller, Uziel; Menon, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Population-based testing for BRCA1/2 mutations detects the high proportion of carriers not identified by cancer family history (FH)–based testing. We compared the cost-effectiveness of population-based BRCA testing with the standard FH-based approach in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women. Methods: A decision-analytic model was developed to compare lifetime costs and effects amongst AJ women in the UK of BRCA founder-mutation testing amongst: 1) all women in the population age 30 years or older and 2) just those with a strong FH (≥10% mutation risk). The model assumes that BRCA carriers are offered risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy and annual MRI/mammography screening or risk-reducing mastectomy. Model probabilities utilize the Genetic Cancer Prediction through Population Screening trial/published literature to estimate total costs, effects in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), cancer incidence, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and population impact. Costs are reported at 2010 prices. Costs/outcomes were discounted at 3.5%. We used deterministic/probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) to evaluate model uncertainty. Results: Compared with FH-based testing, population-screening saved 0.090 more life-years and 0.101 more QALYs resulting in 33 days’ gain in life expectancy. Population screening was found to be cost saving with a baseline-discounted ICER of -£2079/QALY. Population-based screening lowered ovarian and breast cancer incidence by 0.34% and 0.62%. Assuming 71% testing uptake, this leads to 276 fewer ovarian and 508 fewer breast cancer cases. Overall, reduction in treatment costs led to a discounted cost savings of £3.7 million. Deterministic sensitivity analysis and 94% of simulations on PSA (threshold £20000) indicated that population screening is cost-effective, compared with current NHS policy. Conclusion: Population-based screening for BRCA mutations is highly cost-effective compared with an FH-based approach in AJ

  18. Efficiency of voluntary closing hand and hook prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    The Delft Institute of Prosthetics and Orthotics has started a research program to develop an improved voluntary closing, body-powered hand prosthesis. Five commercially available voluntary closing terminal devices were mechanically tested: three hands [Hosmer APRL VC hand, Hosmer Soft VC Male hand,

  19. [Hand surgery training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutet, F; Haloua, J P

    2003-10-01

    Training of the hand surgeon HAND SURGEON A CONCEPT: The hand surgeon is supposed to be in charge of all the hand lesions regarding, skeleton, muscles, tendons, nerves and vessels. He has to be able to insure reparation and coverage of all of them. So he is involved in all the structures, which insure integrity and function of the hand. PURPOSE AND WAYS OF TRAINING: To obtain the asked ability, the hand surgeon training has to be global and sustained by two underlying surgical specialities: orthopedic surgery and plastic and reconstructive surgery. From 2000 after many years of dealings, a Right to the Title in Hand Surgery was born. This Right to the Title wants to be the formal recognition of the specific training of the hand surgeon. For the well-recognized ancient hand surgeons they need to be confirmed by one's peers. Now a day the hand surgeon has to satisfy to this specific training: Passed the complete training and exam of the Orthopedic or Plastic surgery board. Spent at least 6 months as resident in the other underlying specialty. Passed a microsurgery examination. Passed one of the four national Hand Surgery diplomas (DIU/Inter-Universitary Diploma). The examinations have been harmonized. A common formation is delivered regarding hand surgery, the way of examination is the same and the formation is 2 years long. The final exam is presented in front of board of examiners where a teacher of one of the other three national diplomas is present. Spent at least 2 years in a formative hand surgery unit, listed by the French College of Hand Surgeons, as senior surgeon. Those requirements are heavy to assume and need a heavy personal involvement. That seems to be necessary to have an ability level as high as possible. Emergency surgery practice is absolutely necessary in this training. All the 17 university formative hand surgery units listed by the French College of Hand Surgeons are members of the FESUM (European Federation of the Emergency Hand Units

  20. Quality of prenatal care questionnaire: psychometric testing in an Australia population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sword, Wendy; Heaman, Maureen; Biro, Mary Anne; Homer, Caroline; Yelland, Jane; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Bradford-Janke, Amanda

    2015-09-10

    The quality of antenatal care is recognized as critical to the effectiveness of care in optimizing maternal and child health outcomes. However, research has been hindered by the lack of a theoretically-grounded and psychometrically sound instrument to assess the quality of antenatal care. In response to this need, the 46-item Quality of Prenatal Care Questionnaire (QPCQ) was developed and tested in a Canadian context. The objective of this study was to validate the QPCQ and to establish its internal consistency reliability in an Australian population. Study participants were recruited from two public maternity services in two Australian states: Monash Health, Victoria and Wollongong Hospital, New South Wales. Women were eligible to participate if they had given birth to a single live infant, were 18 years or older, had at least three antenatal visits during the pregnancy, and could speak, read and write English. Study questionnaires were completed in hospital. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted. Construct validity, including convergent validity, was further assessed against existing questionnaires: the Patient Expectations and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care (PESPC) and the Prenatal Interpersonal Processes of Care (PIPC). Internal consistency reliability of the QPCQ and each of its six subscales was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Two hundred and ninety-nine women participated in the study. CFA verified and confirmed the six factors (subscales) of the QPCQ. A hypothesis-testing approach and an assessment of convergent validity further supported construct validity of the instrument. The QPCQ had acceptable internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.97), as did each of the six factors (Cronbach's alpha = 0.74 to 0.95). The QPCQ is a valid and reliable self-report measure of antenatal care quality. This instrument fills a scientific gap and can be used in research to examine relationships between the quality of antenatal care and

  1. Testing the circadian gene hypothesis in prostate cancer: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Stevens, Richard G; Hoffman, Aaron E; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Kwon, Erika M; Ostrander, Elaine A; Davis, Scott; Zheng, Tongzhang; Stanford, Janet L

    2009-12-15

    Circadian genes are responsible for maintaining the ancient adaptation of a 24-hour circadian rhythm and influence a variety of cancer-related biological pathways, including the regulation of sex hormone levels. However, few studies have been undertaken to investigate the role of circadian genes in the development of prostate cancer, the most common cancer type among men (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer). The current genetic association study tested the circadian gene hypothesis in relation to prostate cancer by genotyping a total of 41 tagging and amino acid-altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 10 circadian-related genes in a population-based case-control study of Caucasian men (n = 1,308 cases and 1,266 controls). Our results showed that at least one SNP in nine core circadian genes (rs885747 and rs2289591 in PER1; rs7602358 in PER2; rs1012477 in PER3; rs1534891 in CSNK1E; rs12315175 in CRY1; rs2292912 in CRY2; rs7950226 in ARNTL; rs11133373 in CLOCK; and rs1369481, rs895521, and rs17024926 in NPAS2) was significantly associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (either overall risk or risk of aggressive disease), and the risk estimate for four SNPs in three genes (rs885747 and rs2289591 in PER1, rs1012477 in PER3, and rs11133373 in CLOCK) varied by disease aggressiveness. Further analyses of haplotypes were consistent with these genotyping results. Findings from this candidate gene association study support the hypothesis of a link between genetic variants in circadian genes and prostate cancer risk, warranting further confirmation and mechanistic investigation of circadian biomarkers in prostate tumorigenesis.

  2. Hand washing for preventing diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejemot, R I; Ehiri, J E; Meremikwu, M M; Critchley, J A

    2008-01-23

    reduction is comparable to the effect of providing clean water in low-income areas. However, trials with longer follow up and that test different methods of promoting hand washing are needed.

  3. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... AllYouWantTV 616,527 views 1:19 WHO: SAVE LIVES - Clean Your Hands - No action today; no cure ... 10,684 views 1:53 Clean hands save lives - Duration: 0:59. NIHClinicalCenter 2,298 views 0: ...

  4. HAND INJURIES IN VOLLEYBALL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BHAIRO, NH; NIJSTEN, MWN; VANDALEN, KC; TENDUIS, HJ

    We studied the long-term sequelae of hand injuries as a result of playing volleyball. In a retrospective study, 226 patients with injuries of the hand who were seen over a 5-year period at our Trauma Department, were investigated. Females accounted for 66 % of all injuries. The mean age was 26

  5. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... University & Jefferson Health 402,107 views 5:46 Germ Smart - Wash Your Hands! - Duration: 4:50. Former ... 1:53 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former Saskatoon Health Region ...

  6. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than a million infections in the hospital while being treated for something else. The best way to help prevent infection is to practice proper hand hygiene. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives shows how patients can play an active role ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 041 views 3:51 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ... 851 views 5:12 Good Sam Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 2:28. Good Samaritan Medical Center ...

  8. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 257 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ... 039 views 3:38 Good Sam Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 2:28. Good Samaritan Medical Center ...

  9. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Wash your Hands - it just makes sense. - Duration: 1:36. Seema Marwaha 340,286 views 1:36 Hand Washing Technique - WHO Approved - Duration: 1:19. AllYouWantTV 624,593 views 1:19 WHO: ...

  10. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also aims to address myths and misperceptions ... views 3:56 Creative Communication - LifeBouy Hand Washing Campaign - Duration: 2:08. LIQVD ASIA 15,338 views ...

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... health.services health.services Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ... 700 views 1:53 Good Sam Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 2:28. Good Samaritan Medical Center ...

  12. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Any adult with DM in the tropics with hand cellulitis, infection and gangrene qualifies for TDHS.[1-4] It is a terminology used to describe a specific acute symptom complex found in diabetic patients in the tropics usually follows minor trauma to the hand and associated with progressive synergistic form of gangrene.

  13. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 56,897 views 3:10 Handwashing Gangnam ... Moments of Hand Hygiene - Duration: 1:53. Salem Health 10,662 views 1:53 Clean hands save ...

  14. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 60,515 views 3:10 Hand Washing Technique - ... soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 155,252 views 1:27 Good Sam Hand ...

  15. Clean Hands Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 05 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former Saskatoon Health Region 71,984 views 5:45 WHO: How to handwash? With soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 155,252 views 1:27 Good Sam Hand ...

  16. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 05 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former Saskatoon Health Region 71,984 views 5:45 WHO: How to handwash? With soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 155,252 views 1:27 Good Sam Hand ...

  17. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare ... World Health Organization 48,051 views 1:19 Role play done by Oman AlKhair Hospital on Hand ...

  18. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 002 views 3:51 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ... 269 views 1:38 Good Sam Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 2:28. Good Samaritan Medical Center ...

  19. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Up next Wash your Hands - it just makes sense. - Duration: 1:36. Seema Marwaha 335,368 views ... Kevin Gorin 217,022 views 2:57 The 5 Moments of Hand Hygiene - Duration: 1:53. Salem ...

  20. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 61,636 views 3:10 Hand Washing Technique - ... soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 167,916 views 1:27 Proper Hand Washing ...

  1. The split hand sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Benny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral sclerosis (ALS is a disease characterized by pure motor asymmetric wasting of various muscles with associated upper motor neuron signs. The split hand sign, which is because of dissociated muscle weakness in the hands (thenar muscles disproportionately wasted as compared to the hypothenar muscles is a useful clinical sign for bed side diagnosis of ALS.

  2. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I J K L M ... d’Opération d’Urgence (COU) Portuguese Vacine-se e proteja-se contra o sarampo Somali Halagu Tallaalo ... Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Basics Send Us Feedback What do you think of our videos? Your feedback ...

  3. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Marwaha 355,166 views 1:36 Hand Washing Technique - WHO Approved - Duration: 1:19. AllYouWantTV 633,052 ... 54,858 views 1:19 NHS Hand Wash Technique - Duration: 1:17. Onclick - Bespoke Digital Learning 9, ...

  4. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 57,621 views 3:10 Healthcare Worker ... Moments of Hand Hygiene - Duration: 1:53. Salem Health 10,684 views 1:53 Hand Washing Video ...

  5. Pneumatically actuated hand tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cool, J.C.; Rijnsaardt, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract of NL 9401195 (A) Pneumatically actuated hand tool for carrying out a mechanical operation, provided with an exchangeable gas cartridge in which the gas which is required for pneumatic actuation is stored. More particularly, the hand tool is provided with at least one pneumatic motor, at

  6. Public Awareness and Use of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Results From 3 State Population-Based Surveys, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Debra; Zlot, Amy; Johnson, Jenny; Annis-Emeott, Ann; Lee, Patrick W.; Bland, Mary Pat; Edwards, Karen L.; Oehlke, Kristin; Giles, Rebecca T.; Rafferty, Ann; Cook, Michelle L.; Khoury, Muin J.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted population-based surveys on direct-to-consumer nutrigenomic testing in Michigan, Oregon, and Utah as part of the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Awareness of the tests was highest in Oregon (24.4%) and lowest in Michigan (7.6%). Predictors of awareness were more education, higher income, and increasing age, except among those 65 years or older. Less than 1% had used a health-related direct-to-consumer genetic test. Public health systems should increase consumer and provider education and continue surveillance on direct-to-consumer genetic tests. PMID:19106425

  7. The Expansion of National Educational Systems: Tests of a Population Ecology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Francois; Hannan, Michael T.

    1977-01-01

    This paper investigates the expansion of enrollments in national systems of education during the 1950-1970 period from the point of view of the population ecology of organizations. A simplified dynamic model of the growth of a population of educational organizations is estimated using various techniques for pooling time series of data. (Author/JM)

  8. Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptides: testing in general populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemos, J.A. de; Hildebrandt, P.

    2008-01-01

    . In comparative studies to date, NT-proBNP performs at least as well as BNP in the detection of heart disease and prognostication in the general population. In some studies and subgroups, NT-proBNP appears to outperform BNP in population screening. More needs to be learned about noncardiac sources of NT...

  9. Comparative performance of the Geenius™ HIV-1/HIV-2 supplemental test in Florida's public health testing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordan, Sally; Bennett, Berry; Lee, Meghan; Crowe, Susanne

    2017-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published updated guidelines in 2014 for the laboratory diagnosis of HIV in the United States, which recommend use of a supplemental immunoassay (IA) that differentiates HIV-1 from HIV-2 after a repeatedly reactive HIV-1/2 antigen/antibody "Combo" screening test. In October 2014, Bio-Rad Laboratories introduced the FDA-cleared Geenius HIV-1/HIV-2 Supplemental assay and in July 2016, it replaced the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation rapid test as the second test in the HIV diagnostic algorithm. To compare performance of the new FDA-cleared Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/HIV-2 Supplemental assay and the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation assay for use as the primary supplemental test in the 2014 CDC/APHL HIV Diagnostic Algorithm. Two sets of specimens were used to assess the performance of Geenius; 340 select retrospective specimens, obtained through routine clinical submissions from individuals seeking HIV serostatus determinations and 10 known HIV-2 antibody reactive specimens provided by Bio-Rad Laboratories. Panels were created and characterized solely by in-house laboratory results. The panels consisted of: algorithm-defined "established HIV-1 infections" (n=250), "acute HIV-1 infections" (n=20), "early HIV-1 infections" (n=10) and "false positive Combo specimens" (n=60). CONCLUSIONS: The Geenius assay provides significant advantages over Multispot as an appropriate replacement for the primary supplemental test in the HIV Diagnostic Algorithm. In this retrospective study, Geenius was highly concordant with Multispot, reclassified some acute and early algorithm-defined HIV-1 positive specimens and demonstrated a potential decrease in the number HIV-1 RNA nucleic acid amplification tests needed to complete the diagnostic algorithm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a New Device for Simplifying and Standardizing Stool Sample Preparation for Viral Molecular Testing with Limited Hands-On Time

    OpenAIRE

    Feghoul, Linda; Salmona, Maud; Cherot, Janine; Fahd, Mony; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Vachon, Carole; Perrod, Aurélie; Bourgeois, Philippe; Scieux, Catherine; Baruchel, André; Simon, François; Legoff, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive molecular assays have greatly improved the diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis. However, the proper preparation of stool samples for clinical testing remains an issue. bioMérieux has developed a stool preprocessing device (SPD) that includes a spoon for calibrated sampling and a vial containing buffer, glass beads, and two filters. The resulting stool filtrate is used for nucleic acid extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SPD for the quantificat...

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of a hand-held milk electrical conductivity meter compared to the California mastitis test for mastitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosgate, G T; Petzer, I M; Karzis, J

    2013-04-01

    Screening tests for mastitis can play an important role in proactive mastitis control programs. The primary objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of milk electrical conductivity (EC) to the California mastitis test (CMT) in commercial dairy cattle in South Africa using Bayesian methods without a perfect reference test. A total of 1848 quarter milk specimens were collected from 173 cows sampled during six sequential farm visits. Of these samples, 25.8% yielded pathogenic bacterial isolates. The most frequently isolated species were coagulase negative Staphylococci (n=346), Streptococcus agalactiae (n=54), and Staphylococcus aureus (n=42). The overall cow-level prevalence of mastitis was 54% based on the Bayesian latent class (BLC) analysis. The CMT was more accurate than EC for classification of cows having somatic cell counts >200,000/mL and for isolation of a bacterial pathogen. BLC analysis also suggested an overall benefit of CMT over EC but the statistical evidence was not strong (P=0.257). The Bayesian model estimated the sensitivity and specificity of EC (measured via resistance) at a cut-point of >25 mΩ/cm to be 89.9% and 86.8%, respectively. The CMT had a sensitivity and specificity of 94.5% and 77.7%, respectively, when evaluated at the weak positive cut-point. EC was useful for identifying milk specimens harbouring pathogens but was not able to differentiate among evaluated bacterial isolates. Screening tests can be used to improve udder health as part of a proactive management plan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Value of the "Test & Treat" Strategy for Uninvestigated Dyspepsia at Low Prevalence Rates of Helicobacter pylori in the Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agréus, Lars; Talley, Nicholas J; Jones, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In populations with a low prevalence rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection from Western countries, guidelines for the management of uninvestigated dyspepsia generally recommend that the "test and treat" strategy should be avoided in favor of empiric proton-pump inhibitor therapy in younger patients (on average pylori infection has fallen from about 30% to about 10% in Sweden and other countries. We aimed to explore whether the rationale for test and treat is relevant in contemporary clinical practice. In settings with an infection rate in the adult population of 30% and 10%, we modeled the positive and negative predictive values for indirect (nonendoscopy) tests on current H. pylori infection with a presumed sensitivity and specificity of 95%. We then calculated the difference in false-negative and false-positive test outcome, and eradication prescription rates in the two scenarios. While the positive predictive value for the test decreased from 0.89 to 0.68 when the prevalence of H. pylori fell from 30% to 10%, there were only 1% more false-negative tests and 1% less false-positive tests. The eradication prescription rate would decrease by 18% with a 10% prevalence rate. The recommendation to stop applying "test and treat" at lower prevalence rates of H. pylori should be reconsidered. The test and treat strategy is the preferred approach for most patients who present with dyspepsia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Survival of pneumococcus on hands and fomites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beissbarth Jemima

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal hand contamination in Indigenous children in remote communities is common (37%. It is not clear whether this requires frequent inoculation, or if pneumococci will survive on hands for long periods of time. Thus the aim of this study was to determine the survival time of pneumococci on hands and fomites. Findings The hands of 3 adult volunteers, a glass plate and plastic ball were inoculated with pneumococci suspended in two different media. Survival at specified time intervals was determined by swabbing and re-culture onto horse blood agar. Pneumococci inoculated onto hands of volunteers were recovered after 3 minutes at 4% to 79% of the initial inoculum. Recovery from one individual was consistently higher. By one hour, only a small number of pneumococci were recovered and this was dependent on the suspension medium used. At subsequent intervals and up to 3 hours after inoculation, Conclusion The poor survival of pneumococci on hands suggests that the high prevalence of pneumococcal hand contamination in some populations is related to frequent inoculation rather than long survival. It is plausible that hand contamination plays a (brief role in transmission directly, and indirectly through contamination via fomites. Regular hand washing and timely cleansing or removal of contaminated fomites may aid control of pneumococcal transmission via these routes.

  14. Natural control capabilities of robotic hands by hand amputated subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Caputo, Barbara; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    People with transradial hand amputations who own a myoelectric prosthesis currently have some control capabilities via sEMG. However, the control systems are still limited and not natural. The Ninapro project is aiming at helping the scientific community to overcome these limits through the creation of publicly available electromyography data sources to develop and test machine learning algorithms. In this paper we describe the movement classification results gained from three subjects with an homogeneous level of amputation, and we compare them with the results of 40 intact subjects. The number of considered subjects can seem small at first sight, but it is not considering the literature of the field (which has to face the difficulty of recruiting trans-radial hand amputated subjects). The classification is performed with four different classifiers and the obtained balanced classification rates are up to 58.6% on 50 movements, which is an excellent result compared to the current literature. Successively, for each subject we find a subset of up to 9 highly independent movements, (defined as movements that can be distinguished with more than 90% accuracy), which is a deeply innovative step in literature. The natural control of a robotic hand in so many movements could lead to an immediate progress in robotic hand prosthetics and it could deeply change the quality of life of amputated subjects.

  15. Quasispecies-like behavior observed in catalytic RNA populations evolving in a test tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman Niles

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the RNA World, molecular populations were probably very small and highly susceptible to the force of strong random drift. In conjunction with Muller's Ratchet, this would have imposed difficulties for the preservation of the genetic information and the survival of the populations. Mechanisms that allowed these nascent populations to overcome this problem must have been advantageous. Results Using continuous in vitro evolution experimentation with an increased mutation rate imposed by MnCl2, it was found that clonal 100-molecule populations of ribozymes clearly exhibit certain characteristics of a quasispecies. This is the first time this has been seen with a catalytic RNA. Extensive genotypic sampling from two replicate lineages was gathered and phylogenetic networks were constructed to elucidate the structure of the evolving RNA populations. A common distribution was found in which a mutant sequence was present at high frequency, surrounded by a cloud of mutant with lower frequencies. This is a typical distribution of quasispecies. Most of the mutants in these clouds were connected by short Hamming distance values, indicating their close relatedness. Conclusions The quasispecies nature of mutant RNA clouds facilitates the recovery of genotypes under pressure of being removed from the population by random drift. The empirical populations therefore evolved a genotypic resiliency despite a high mutation rate by adopting the characteristics of quasispecies, implying that primordial RNA pools could have used this strategy to avoid extinction.

  16. Hand eczema severity and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, Tove; Andersen, Klaus E; Brandao, Francisco M

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hand eczema is a chronic disease with negative impact on quality of life (QoL). In this study, QoL in hand eczema patients is assessed and related to age, sex, severity, and diagnostic subgroups. Methods: A total of 416 patients with hand eczema from 10 European patch...... test clinics participated in the study. Data on QoL were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Severity was assessed by a scoring system (Hand Eczema Severity Index, HECSI) as well as frequency of eruptions and sick leave due to hand eczema...... was found for hand eczema severity and age (P eczema severity...

  17. Evaluation of an automated immunochemical fecal occult blood test for colorectal neoplasia detection in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai Man; Lam, Shiu Kum; Cheung, Kwan Lok; Tong, Teresa Sze Man; Rozen, Paul; Young, Graeme P; Chu, Kin Wah; Ho, Judy; Law, Wai Lun; Tung, Hiu Ming; Choi, Hok Kwok; Lee, Yee Man; Lai, Kam Chuen; Hu, Wayne H C; Chan, Chi Kuen; Yuen, Man Fung; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu

    2003-05-15

    Most commercial fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) used for colorectal carcinoma screening of Western populations are guaiac-based, manually developed, subjective, and sensitive to dietary components. Preliminary studies demonstrated the unsuitability of these tests for screening a Chinese population. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of a human hemoglobin-specific automated immunochemical FOBT, the Magstream 1000/Hem SP (Fujirebio, Inc., Tokyo, Japan), in a Chinese population referred for colonoscopy. Two hundred fifty consecutive patients who were referred for colonoscopy and met the study inclusion criteria provided samples for the immunochemical FOBT (without dietary restrictions) from two successive stool specimens. Tests were developed with an automated instrument that had an adjustable sensitivity threshold. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for detecting colorectal adenomas and carcinomas were calculated according to the manufacturer's instructions over a range of sensitivity levels. At the optimal threshold level, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for detection of significant colorectal neoplasia (adenomas >or= 1.0 cm and carcinomas) were 62%, 93%, and 44%, respectively. The test was easy to use, and results did not depend on operator experience. The automated immunochemical FOBT used in the current study was a robust, convenient, and useful tool for colorectal carcinoma screening in the study population. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.DOI 10.1002/cncr.11369

  18. The false-positive and false-negative predictive value of HIV antibody test in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Shi, Zhixu; Wang, Cannan; Yang, Haitao; Li, Lei; Dai, Yudong; Liu, Yuanbao; Sun, Jinfang; Pu, Yuepu

    2008-01-01

    To analyse the relationship between the false-positive/false-negative predictive value (FPPV/FNPV) of the HIV-antibody (HIV-Ab) test and prevalence in different Chinese population groups. HIV prevalence among different population groups was obtained by a screening survey of blood donors and the national HIV/AIDS surveillance programme in China. Given the sensitivity and specificity of a test kit and the prevalence of HIV infection, the estimated values of FPPV/FNPV were calculated using Bayes' formula. The actual value of FPPV of blood donors was obtained by screening 1,195,286 blood donors. This study indicates that the FPPV of HIV-Ab enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assays varies widely in different Chinese populations: about 99.5% in the blood donor population, but only 3.2% in the injecting-drug users in high-risk areas. In 1,195,286 sera specimens from the blood donors, 2439 specimens were HIV-Ab positive by third ELISA, and 11 HIV cases were confirmed by Western blot. The HIV prevalence of the blood donor population in this survey was 0.0009% (11/1,195,286), but the HIV-Ab positive rate of third ELISA is 0.2% (2439/1,195,286) and 222 times higher than the prevalence. Evaluation of HIV prevalence through the HIV-Ab positive rate by third ELISA will significantly overestimate the true prevalence in a low-prevalence population. Individual HIV-infection status should be taken into consideration when analysing the results of HIV-Ab tests in a population with low infection.

  19. Hand Robotic Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lauri; Gordon, Andrew M; Kim, Heakyung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the impact of training with a hand robotic device on hand paresis and function in a population of children with hemiparesis. Twelve children with hemiparesis (mean age, 9 [SD, 3.64] years) completed participation in this prospective, experimental, pilot study. Participants underwent clinical assessments at baseline and again 6 weeks later with instructions to not initiate new therapies. After these assessments, participants received 6 weeks of training with a hand robotic device, consisting of 1-hour sessions, 3 times weekly. Assessments were repeated on completion of training. Results showed significant improvements after training on the Assisting Hand Assessment (mean difference, 2.0 Assisting Hand Assessment units; P = 0.011) and on the upper-extremity component of the Fugl-Meyer scale (raw score mean difference, 4.334; P = 0.001). No significant improvements between pretest and posttest were noted on the Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function, the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, or the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory after intervention. Total active mobility of digits and grip strength also failed to demonstrate significant changes after training. Participants tolerated training with the hand robotic device, and significant improvements in bimanual hand use, as well as impairment-based scales, were noted. Improvements were carried over into bimanual skills during play. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Understand key components of neuroplasticity; (2) Discuss the benefits of robotic therapy in the recovery of hand function in pediatric patients with hemiplegia; and (3) Appropriately incorporate robotic therapy into the treatment plan of pediatric patients with hemiplegia. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the

  20. Estimation of HIV-testing rates to maximize early diagnosis-derived benefits at the individual and population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilernia, Dario A; Monaco, Daniela C; Cesar, Carina; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J; Friedman, Samuel R; Cahn, Pedro; Salomon, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    In HIV infection, initiation of treatment is associated with improved clinical outcom and reduced rate of sexual transmission. However, difficulty in detecting infection in early stages impairs those benefits. We determined the minimum testing rate that maximizes benefits derived from early diagnosis. We developed a mathematical model of HIV infection, diagnosis and treatment that allows studying both diagnosed and undiagnosed populations, as well as determining the impact of modifying time to diagnosis and testing rates. The model's external consistency was assessed by estimating time to AIDS and death in absence of treatment as well as by estimating age-dependent mortality rates during treatment, and comparing them with data previously reported from CASCADE and DHCS cohorts. In our model, life expectancy of patients diagnosed before 8 years post infection is the same as HIV-negative population. After this time point, age at death is significantly dependent on diagnosis delay but initiation of treatment increases life expectancy to similar levels as HIV-negative population. Early mortality during HAART is dependent on treatment CD4 threshold until 6 years post infection and becomes dependent on diagnosis delay after 6 years post infection. By modifying testing rates, we estimate that an annual testing rate of 20% leads to diagnosis of 90% of infected individuals within the first 8.2 years of infection and that current testing rate in middle-high income settings stands close to 10%. In addition, many differences between low-income and middle-high incomes can be predicted by solely modifying the diagnosis delay. To increase testing rate of undiagnosed HIV population by two-fold in middle-high income settings will minimize early mortality during initiation of treatment and global mortality rate as well as maximize life expectancy. Our results highlight the impact of achieving early diagnosis and the importance of strongly work on improving HIV testing rates.

  1. Estimation of HIV-testing rates to maximize early diagnosis-derived benefits at the individual and population level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario A Dilernia

    Full Text Available In HIV infection, initiation of treatment is associated with improved clinical outcom and reduced rate of sexual transmission. However, difficulty in detecting infection in early stages impairs those benefits. We determined the minimum testing rate that maximizes benefits derived from early diagnosis.We developed a mathematical model of HIV infection, diagnosis and treatment that allows studying both diagnosed and undiagnosed populations, as well as determining the impact of modifying time to diagnosis and testing rates. The model's external consistency was assessed by estimating time to AIDS and death in absence of treatment as well as by estimating age-dependent mortality rates during treatment, and comparing them with data previously reported from CASCADE and DHCS cohorts.In our model, life expectancy of patients diagnosed before 8 years post infection is the same as HIV-negative population. After this time point, age at death is significantly dependent on diagnosis delay but initiation of treatment increases life expectancy to similar levels as HIV-negative population. Early mortality during HAART is dependent on treatment CD4 threshold until 6 years post infection and becomes dependent on diagnosis delay after 6 years post infection. By modifying testing rates, we estimate that an annual testing rate of 20% leads to diagnosis of 90% of infected individuals within the first 8.2 years of infection and that current testing rate in middle-high income settings stands close to 10%. In addition, many differences between low-income and middle-high incomes can be predicted by solely modifying the diagnosis delay.To increase testing rate of undiagnosed HIV population by two-fold in middle-high income settings will minimize early mortality during initiation of treatment and global mortality rate as well as maximize life expectancy. Our results highlight the impact of achieving early diagnosis and the importance of strongly work on improving HIV

  2. Pediatric hand burns: thermal, electrical, chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mark; Armstrong, Milton B; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2009-07-01

    Young children often use their hands for exploration of their surroundings, and this often leads to the hand being the primary site of injury. Because of this and many associated factors, burns of the pediatric hands are relatively common, with thermal injuries being the most frequent. Electrical and chemical etiologies contribute a minor portion of the burn injuries in the pediatric population. Some key differences should be considered in the management of hand burns in a pediatric patient versus an adult. In general, minor superficial burns will heal satisfactorily only with topical care. Deeper partial-thickness and full-thickness burns, however, require surgical interventions. Special care should always be taken in the management of electrical and chemical burns because the pathophysiology of these injuries are unique. Treatment of pediatric hand burns should also involve close and thorough follow-up to assess not only for healing and restoration of function of the injury but also for psychologic and emotional trauma.

  3. HIV testing and counselling for migrant populations living in high-income countries: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-del Arco, Debora; Monge, Susana; Azcoaga, Amaya; Rio, Isabel; Hernando, Victoria; Gonzalez, Cristina; Alejos, Belen; Caro, Ana Maria; Perez-Cachafeiro, Santiago; Ramirez-Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar, Francisco; Noori, Teymur; Del Amo, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Background: The barriers to HIV testing and counselling that migrants encounter can jeopardize proactive HIV testing that relies on the fact that HIV testing must be linked to care. We analyse available evidence on HIV testing and counselling strategies targeting migrants and ethnic minorities in high-income countries. Methods: Systematic literature review of the five main databases of articles in English from Europe, North America and Australia between 2005 and 2009. Results: Of 1034 abstrac...

  4. Population testing for cancer predisposing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the Ashkenazi-Jewish community: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Loggenberg, Kelly; Sanderson, Saskia; Burnell, Matthew; Wardle, Jane; Gessler, Sue; Side, Lucy; Balogun, Nyala; Desai, Rakshit; Kumar, Ajith; Dorkins, Huw; Wallis, Yvonne; Chapman, Cyril; Taylor, Rohan; Jacobs, Chris; Tomlinson, Ian; McGuire, Alistair; Beller, Uziel; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances raise the possibility of systematic population-based genetic testing for cancer-predisposing mutations, but it is uncertain whether benefits outweigh disadvantages. We directly compared the psychological/quality-of-life consequences of such an approach to family history (FH)-based testing. In a randomized controlled trial of BRCA1/2 gene-mutation testing in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, we compared testing all participants in the population screening (PS) arm with testing those fulfilling standard FH-based clinical criteria (FH arm). Following a targeted community campaign, AJ participants older than 18 years were recruited by self-referral after pretest genetic counseling. The effects of BRCA1/2 genetic testing on acceptability, psychological impact, and quality-of-life measures were assessed by random effects regression analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. One thousand, one hundred sixty-eight AJ individuals were counseled, 1042 consented, 1034 were randomly assigned (691 women, 343 men), and 1017 were eligible for analysis. Mean age was 54.3 (SD = 14.66) years. Thirteen BRCA1/2 carriers were identified in the PS arm, nine in the FH arm. Five more carriers were detected among FH-negative FH-arm participants following study completion. There were no statistically significant differences between the FH and PS arms at seven days or three months on measures of anxiety, depression, health anxiety, distress, uncertainty, and quality-of-life. Contrast tests indicated that overall anxiety (P = .0001) and uncertainty (P = .005) associated with genetic testing decreased; positive experience scores increased (P = .0001); quality-of-life and health anxiety did not change with time. Overall, 56% of carriers did not fulfill clinical criteria for genetic testing, and the BRCA1/2 prevalence was 2.45%. Compared with FH-based testing, population-based genetic testing in Ashkenazi Jews doesn't adversely affect short-term psychological

  5. Pedigree-based assignment tests for reversing coyote (Canis latrans) introgression into the wild red wolf (Canis rufus) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig R; Adams, Jennifer R; Waits, Lisette P

    2003-12-01

    The principal threat to the persistence of the endangered red wolf (Canis rufus) in the wild is hybridization with the coyote (Canis latrans). To facilitate idengification and removal of hybrids, assignment tests are developed which use genotype data to estimate identity as coyote, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 or full red wolf. The tests use genotypes from the red wolves that founded the surviving population and the resulting pedigree, rather than a contemporary red wolf sample. The tests are evaluated by analysing both captive red wolves at 18 microsatellite loci, and data simulated under a highly parameterized, biologically reasonable model. The accuracy of assignment rates are generally high, with over 95% of known red wolves idengified correctly. There are, however, tradeoffs between ambiguous assignments and misassignments, and between misidengifying red wolves as hybrids and hybrids as red wolves. These result in a compromise between limiting introgression and avoiding demographic losses. The management priorities and level of introgression determine the combination of test and removal strategy that best balances these tradeoffs. Ultimately, we conclude that the use of the assignment tests has the capacity to arrest and reverse introgression. To our knowledge, the presented approach is novel in that it accounts for genetic drift when the genotypes under analysis are temporally separated from the reference populations to which they are being assigned. These methods may be valuable in cases where reference databases for small populations have aged substantially, pedigree information is available or data are generated from historical samples.

  6. Using behavior-analytic implicit tests to assess sexual interests among normal and sex-offender populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Bryan; O’Reilly, Anthony; Gavin, Amanda; Ruiz, Maria R.; Arancibia, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of implicit tests for measuring biases and behavioral predispositions is a recent development within psychology. While such tests are usually researched within a social-cognitive paradigm, behavioral researchers have also begun to view these tests as potential tests of conditioning histories, including in the sexual domain. Objective The objective of this paper is to illustrate the utility of a behavioral approach to implicit testing and means by which implicit tests can be built to the standards of behavioral psychologists. Design Research findings illustrating the short history of implicit testing within the experimental analysis of behavior are reviewed. Relevant parallel and overlapping research findings from the field of social cognition and on the Implicit Association Test are also outlined. Results New preliminary data obtained with both normal and sex offender populations are described in order to illustrate how behavior-analytically conceived implicit tests may have potential as investigative tools for assessing histories of sexual arousal conditioning and derived stimulus associations. Conclusion It is concluded that popular implicit tests are likely sensitive to conditioned and derived stimulus associations in the history of the test-taker rather than ‘unconscious cognitions’, per se. PMID:24693346

  7. Using behavior-analytic implicit tests to assess sexual interests among normal and sex-offender populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Bryan; O'Reilly, Anthony; Gavin, Amanda; Ruiz, Maria R; Arancibia, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    The development of implicit tests for measuring biases and behavioral predispositions is a recent development within psychology. While such tests are usually researched within a social-cognitive paradigm, behavioral researchers have also begun to view these tests as potential tests of conditioning histories, including in the sexual domain. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the utility of a behavioral approach to implicit testing and means by which implicit tests can be built to the standards of behavioral psychologists. Research findings illustrating the short history of implicit testing within the experimental analysis of behavior are reviewed. Relevant parallel and overlapping research findings from the field of social cognition and on the Implicit Association Test are also outlined. New preliminary data obtained with both normal and sex offender populations are described in order to illustrate how behavior-analytically conceived implicit tests may have potential as investigative tools for assessing histories of sexual arousal conditioning and derived stimulus associations. It is concluded that popular implicit tests are likely sensitive to conditioned and derived stimulus associations in the history of the test-taker rather than 'unconscious cognitions', per se.

  8. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/campa... . Comments on this ... are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/... This video can ...

  9. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) ... prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > File Formats Help: How do I ...

  10. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe ...

  11. A Myoelectric Hand Splint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Frances; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Development of a myoelectrically controlled hand splint permitting ambulating mobility of the user is discussed. The role of occupational therapy in the research and design of the device and the training of the patient are emphasized. (Authors)

  12. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... makes for happy holidays Loading... Even the scrooges will smile at 3 free months of ad-free ... Autoplay When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next. Up next Wash your Hands - ...

  13. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 59K ...

  14. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... Please Parents Want To Do What′s Best The Obesity Epidemic Outbreaks CDC: Protecting Americans through Global Health ... captioning. Videos are prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene ...

  15. Hand Eczema: Treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Tamara Theresia; Agner, Tove

    2017-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease, it affects young people, is often work-related, and the burden of the disease is significant for the individual as well as for society. Factors to be considered when choosing a treatment strategy are, among others, whether the eczema is acute or chronic, the sever......Hand eczema is a common disease, it affects young people, is often work-related, and the burden of the disease is significant for the individual as well as for society. Factors to be considered when choosing a treatment strategy are, among others, whether the eczema is acute or chronic......, the severity of the disease, and the specific sub-diagnosis of hand eczema, which relates to the etiology as well as the morphology of the disease. Optimal treatment is still a challenge. This review seeks to provide an overview of the most updated treatment of hand eczema....

  16. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... get more than a million infections in the hospital while being treated for something else. The best ... reminding healthcare providers to practice hand hygiene in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. Release Date: 8/4/ ...

  17. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 60K ...

  18. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... Lives Wash Your Hands Physical Activity Knees Lifted High Making Health Easier: Active Living in Philadelphia, PA ... Go: Passport To Health (4:17) Vital Signs High Blood Pressure Spanish Diseases & Conditions Hablemos de la ...

  19. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean ... 290 views 1:27 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former Saskatoon ...

  20. Osteoarthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Osteoarthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... for those with osteoarthritis. TREATMENT The Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis When diagnosing osteoarthritis, your doctor will ask you ...

  1. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... CDC-TV videos cover a variety of health, safety and preparedness topics and include closed-captioning. Videos are prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to report the video? Sign in to report ... WHO: SAVE LIVES - Clean Your Hands - No action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health ...

  3. Second Hand Smoke: Danger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Second Hand Smoke: Danger! Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Make ... the United States are still exposed to secondhand smoke, even though cigarette smoking rates are dropping and ...

  4. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Duration: 4:13. Seeker 139,093 views 4:13 Hand Hygiene from rubbing to dancing - Duration: 3:56. Hopitaux ... Loading... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators ...

  6. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean ... 584 views 1:53 Hand Hygiene for Health Care Workers - Germ Smart - Duration: 5:45. Former Saskatoon ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Prevention (CDC) 199,340 views 1:04 Preventing Cancer Infections: Hand Washing - Duration: 0:57. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients 643 views 0:57 Dettol Global Handwashing ...

  8. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... Other versions: Spanish (5:10) Healthy Living Featured Videos Fight Germs. Wash Your Hands! Making Health Easier: ... Us Feedback What do you think of our videos? Your feedback about CDC-TV and our videos ...

  9. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Published on May 5, 2017 This video for healthcare providers is intended to promote or encourage adherence ... role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www. ...

  10. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 61K Loading... ...

  11. Hand-held Dynamo-metry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, Rutger Jan Otto van der

    1992-01-01

    This study describes the application of a hand-held dynamometer that was designed to measure muscle strength in normal individuals and neurological patients in a simple way, comparable to manual muscle testing. Zie: Summary

  12. Trends and correlates of HIV testing during pregnancy in racially/ethnically diverse insured population, 1997-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jean M; Liu, In-Lu A; Towner, William J

    2009-09-01

    To describe the trends in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing during pregnancy from 1997 through 2006, and the demographic, clinical, and health system correlates of being tested in a diverse insured population. Health plan members who had one or more births at > or = 20 weeks gestation from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2006 in Kaiser Permanente Southern California hospitals were included in this retrospective analysis. Data were obtained from the infants' birth certificate, and administrative and laboratory databases. Multiple log binomial regression analyses were used to generate adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each characteristic. Of the 240,575 women with 302,246 pregnancies, the proportion tested for HIV during pregnancy increased from 77.6% in 1997 to 91.0% in 2006 (P (trend) /=30, having more than a high school education, and residing in census blocks with the highest income tertile. Additionally, women were less likely to be tested after their first birth, if enrolling in prenatal care in the third trimester, or if they had a gap in insurance during their pregnancy. Of the 53,566 women with two sequential pregnancies, 78.5% were tested during both pregnancies. In an insured racially/ethnically patient population, the testing rate exceeded 90% in 2006. Achieving and sustaining these high testing levels has public health implications.

  13. Plasma renin and cardiovascular responses to the cold pressor test differ in black and white populations: The SABPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafane, L F; Schutte, R; Van Rooyen, J M; Schutte, A E

    2016-05-01

    Low plasma renin levels and augmented cardiovascular reactivity to stress are common in blacks and have been linked to the development of hypertension in this population. We (i) compared cardiovascular and plasma renin reactivity to a cold pressor test between a black and white population; and (ii) investigated the associations between cardiovascular and plasma renin reactivity within the black and white populations. Our population consisted of 153 black and 188 white men and women (age range, 20-65 years). We measured blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), total peripheral resistance (TPR), Windkessel arterial compliance, and determined plasma renin levels at rest and during the cold pressor test. Reactivity was calculated for each participant as the percentage change from the resting value. We found lower renin and elevated BP in blacks compared with whites at rest and during stress (both, Prenin reactivity in blacks only (β=0.17; P=0.041), while in whites diastolic BP reactivity was positively associated with renin reactivity (β=0.21; P=0.005). Although blacks had suppressed renin levels at rest and during acute stress, vascular resistance reactivity associated positively with renin reactivity only in the black population. These results suggest that low renin levels in blacks during rest and stress are linked to increased peripheral vascular responses to stress, which may contribute to elevated BP in blacks.

  14. Hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlyne eArnould

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP, making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA. The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10 years; range: 6–16 years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes-Weinstein aesthesiometer, stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test, proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints, grip strength (Jamar dynamometer, gross manual dexterity (Box and Block Test, and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test. MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, gross manual dexterity in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas grip strength was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with gross manual dexterity. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions.

  15. Evaluation of ability of reference toxicity tests to identify stress in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, E.W.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Greer, E.I.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Rabeni, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    Standard methods for conducting toxicity tests imply that the condition of test organisms can be established using reference toxicity tests. However, only a limited number of studies have evaluated whether reference toxicity tests can actually be used to determine if organisms are in good condition at the start of a test. We evaluated the ability of reference toxicants to identify stress associated with starvation in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca using acute toxicity tests and four reference toxicants: KCl, CdCl2, sodium pentachlorophenate (NaPCP), and carbaryl. Stress associated with severe starvation was observed with exposure of amphipods to carbaryl or NaPCP but not with exposure to KCl or CdCl2 (i.e., lower LC50 with severe starvation). Although the LC50s for NaPCP and carbaryl were statistically different between starved and fed amphipods, this difference may not be biologically significant given the variability expected in acute lethality tests. Stress associated with sieving, heat shock, or cold shock of amphipods before the start of a test was not evident with exposure to carbaryl or KCl as reference toxicants. The chemicals evaluated in this study provided minimal information about the condition of the organisms used to start a toxicity test. Laboratories should periodically perform reference toxicity tests to assess the sensitivity of life stages or strains of test organisms. However, use of other test acceptability criteria required in standard methods such as minimum survival, growth, or reproduction of organisms in the control treatment at the end of a test, provides more useful information about the condition of organisms used to start a test compared to data generated from reference toxicity tests.

  16. Evaluation of a New Device for Simplifying and Standardizing Stool Sample Preparation for Viral Molecular Testing with Limited Hands-On Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghoul, Linda; Salmona, Maud; Cherot, Janine; Fahd, Mony; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Vachon, Carole; Perrod, Aurélie; Bourgeois, Philippe; Scieux, Catherine; Baruchel, André; Simon, François; LeGoff, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Sensitive molecular assays have greatly improved the diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis. However, the proper preparation of stool samples for clinical testing remains an issue. bioMérieux has developed a stool preprocessing device (SPD) that includes a spoon for calibrated sampling and a vial containing buffer, glass beads, and two filters. The resulting stool filtrate is used for nucleic acid extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SPD for the quantification of human adenovirus (HAdV) DNA in stool samples collected from hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. HAdV DNA was quantified with the Adenovirus R-gene kit. The suitability of the device to reproducibly quantify HAdV DNA in stools using different extraction platforms (easyMAG and QIAsymphony) was determined using archived HAdV-positive stool samples. Coefficients of variation of HAdV DNA quantifications ranged from 1.79% to 1.83%, and no difference in quantification was observed between the two extraction systems. The HAdV DNA limit of quantification using the SPD was 3.75 log10copies/g of stool. HAdV DNA quantification using the SPD was then compared to that of the routine preprocessing technique on 75 fresh stool samples collected prospectively from pediatric HSCT recipients at risk for HAdV infections. Thirty-eight samples were HAdV DNA positive with both the SPD and routine preprocessing methods. HAdV DNA loads were on average 1.14-log10copies/g of stool higher with the SPD (Pstool samples in DNA. The use of the SPD for the detection of other gastrointestinal infections warrants further evaluation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Reduction of the spermatogonial population in rat testes flown on Space Lab-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Stevenson, J.; Corbett, R.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.

    1985-01-01

    Quantization of the testicular spermatogonial population reduction in six rats is performed 12 hours after their return from seven days aboard Space Lab-3. The observed 7.1 percent organ weight loss, and 7.5 percent stage six spermatogonial cell population reduction in comparison with control rats correlate very well. Accurate dosimetry was not conducted on board, but radiation can not be considered the primary cause of the observed change. The decrease in protein kinase in the heart of these rats indicates that stress from adapting to weightlessness, the final jet flight, or other sources, is an important factor.

  18. Real-time, universal screening for acute HIV infection in a routine HIV counseling and testing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Christopher D; McPherson, J Todd; Leone, Peter A; Smurzynski, Marlene; Owen-O'Dowd, Judy; Peace-Brewer, Amy L; Harris, Juanita; Hicks, Charles B; Eron, Joseph J; Fiscus, Susan A

    2002-07-10

    Acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cannot be diagnosed by routine antibody tests and is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. However, HIV nucleic acid-based testing is widely used to screen for antibody-negative acute infection among low-risk blood donors. To assess the feasibility of screening in high-volume laboratories for acute and long-term HIV infection in a routine HIV testing population, in which HIV infection prevalence is low, using specimen pooling and HIV RNA reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests. Clinical diagnostic performance evaluation at a state-funded public health virology and serology laboratory. A total of 8505 consecutive individuals presenting for routine HIV counseling and testing during a total of 20 business days to simulate a month of testing in August and December 2001 at 110 publicly funded testing sites in North Carolina. Prevalence of acute and long-term HIV infection. Serum specimens negative by HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) were screened in pools by an ultrasensitive HIV RNA RT-PCR test. Results for individual HIV RNA-positive specimens were reclassified as true or false according to results of confirmatory testing. Of the 8505 individuals screened, 8194 had not previously tested HIV positive and had sufficient serum to complete the testing protocol. Of those, 39 had long-term HIV infection (prevalence, 47.6 per 10,000 at-risk persons [95% confidence interval, 33.8-65.0 per 10,000]). Of the 8155 at-risk individuals whose antibody tests were negative, 5 were HIV RNA positive. Four of those had true-positive acute infection (prevalence, 4.9 per 10,000 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-12.5 per 10,000]). All 4 were women; 2 developed symptoms consistent with an acute retroviral syndrome in the week after testing. Screening all specimens required 147 HIV RNA tests. Overall specificity of the strategy was 0.9999. These findings suggest the widespread diagnosis of acute HIV infections in a routine

  19. Gingival blood glucose estimation with reagent test strips: a method to detect diabetes in a periodontal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shreya; Kohad, Ramesh; Yeltiwar, Ramreddy; Shetty, Karunakar

    2011-11-01

    Periodontal disease is considered the sixth complication of diabetes. Therefore, as a foremost responsibility of the periodontist, the present study was carried out to screen an unsuspecting periodontal population for the presence of diabetes with the help of gingival blood glucose and reagent test strips. A total of 356 patients with no known medical history of diabetes visiting the outpatient Department of Periodontics, at the Government Dental College and Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India, were divided into 3 groups: group 1 included patients with a healthy periodontium; group 2, patients with gingivitis; and group 3, patients with periodontitis. Gingival blood, formed by puncturing the interdental papilla of the upper anterior teeth with a lancet, was allowed to fall onto a test reagent strip, where the color change was noted, and corresponding glucose values recorded. Patients with glucose values >120 gm% (per manufacturer provided chart) were sent for glucose tolerance tests to confirm their glycemic status. Patients with abnormal glucose tolerance values were further referred to a physician for the confirmation of diabetes. Diabetes was detected in 19.1% of the survey population, of which 3.9% of patients belonged to group 1, 7.8% of patients belonged to group 2, and 7.3% of patients belonged to group 3. Diabetes was detected in 40.8% of patients with hyperglycemia, of which 8.4% of patients belonged to group 1, 16.8% of patients belonged to group 2, and 15.6% of patients belonged to group 3. A total of 10.11% of the survey population who tested positive for diabetes were females and 8.99% were males. The use of reagent strips for the estimation of gingival blood glucose seemed to be a suitable option for the screening of an unsuspecting periodontal population for the presence of diabetes; however, additional studies in a larger population are needed to confirm their suitability.

  20. Factors associated with combined hand and foot eczema Associations between foot and hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Aalto-Korte, K; Andersen, K E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As for hand eczema, the etiology of foot eczema is multifactorial, and not very well understood. The aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with foot eczema in a cohort of hand eczema patients being classified into different subgroups. METHODS: Associations between...... foot and hand eczema was studied in a cross sectional design in a cohort of hand eczema patients. Consecutive patients were recruited from 9 different European Centres during the period October 2011 - September 2012. Data on demographic factors, presence of foot eczema, hand eczema duration...... and severity, and whether the hand eczema was work-related or not were available, as well as patch-test results. RESULTS: Of a total of 427 hand eczema patients identified, information on foot eczema was available in 419 patients who were included in the present study. 125 patients (29.8 %) had concomitant...

  1. Routine HIV testing in Botswana: a population-based study on attitudes, practices, and human rights concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Botswana government recently implemented a policy of routine or "opt-out" HIV testing in response to the high prevalence of HIV infection, estimated at 37% of adults.We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,268 adults from five districts in Botswana to assess knowledge of and attitudes toward routine testing, correlates of HIV testing, and barriers and facilitators to testing, 11 months after the introduction of this policy. Most participants (81% reported being extremely or very much in favor of routine testing. The majority believed that this policy would decrease barriers to testing (89%, HIV-related stigma (60%, and violence toward women (55%, and would increase access to antiretroviral treatment (93%. At the same time, 43% of participants believed that routine testing would lead people to avoid going to the doctor for fear of testing, and 14% believed that this policy could increase gender-based violence related to testing. The prevalence of self-reported HIV testing was 48%. Adjusted correlates of testing included female gender (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9, higher education (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5-2.7, more frequent healthcare visits (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3-2.7, perceived access to HIV testing (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.5, and inconsistent condom use (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1. Individuals with stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV and AIDS were less likely to have been tested for HIV/AIDS (AOR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.5-0.9 or to have heard of routine testing (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.76. While experiences with voluntary and routine testing overall were positive, 68% felt that they could not refuse the HIV test. Key barriers to testing included fear of learning one's status (49%, lack of perceived HIV risk (43%, and fear of having to change sexual practices with a positive HIV test (33%.Routine testing appears to be widely supported and may reduce barriers to testing in Botswana. As routine testing is

  2. [Hand injuries from combat sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, W A; Laier, P

    2015-06-01

    Each year 3.1% of German adults suffer from accidents related to sports and 75% of the injured athletes are male between 20 and 29 years old. The upper limbs are affected in more than 20% of cases and one third of these injuries involve the hands and fingers. More than half a million athletes are organized in combat sport associations in Germany with an increasing trend. Combat sports are commonly said to have a high risk of injuries to the hand. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis as well as to describe typical hand injuries associated with combat sports. A systematic review of literature (up to January 2015) in PubMed/Medline and The Cochrane Library as well as a secondary search in the reference lists were carried out. Conclusive comparative studies on the incidence and severity of hand injuries directly related to combat sports action could not be found in the currently available literature. The overall risk of suffering from a sports injury seems to be relatively low in combat sports compared to other sports. Boxing, however, seems to be the most dangerous sport for injuries to the upper extremities and especially the hand. The injury pattern after punching (emergency patients and professional boxers) shows that more than half of these fractures affect the 5th metacarpal and 25% of these are the classical boxer's fracture. This differs significantly from the fracture distribution generally associated with sports, where fractures of the phalanges are the most common. Two rare conditions that may occur as a result of repeated punching are referred to as carpal bossing and boxer's knuckle and excellent results are described for both injury forms after surgical therapy.

  3. Why Is Hand Washing So Important? (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gynecologist? Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies Why Is Hand Washing So Important? KidsHealth > For Parents > Why Is ... es tan importante lavarse las manos? Why Is Hand Washing So Important? Kids don't always listen ...

  4. Population-based colorectal cancer screening by fecal immunochemical testing over multiple rounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlugt, M.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major causes of death in the Netherlands, accounting for over 5100 deaths in 2015. Population screening aims to detect CRC or its precursors, advanced adenoma, in an early phase, thereby reducing CRC morbidity and mortality. A recent observational study

  5. Dynamical role of predators in population cycles of a forest insect: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Turchin; A.D. Taylor; J.D. Reeve

    1999-01-01

    Population cycles occur frequently in forest insects.Time-series analysis of fluctuations in one such insect, the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis), suggests that beetle dynamics are dominated by an ecological process acting in a delayed density-dependent manner.The hypothesis that delayed density-dependence in this insect results from its interaction with...

  6. Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila J. Finney Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty around the value of and appropriate regulatory models for direct-to-consumer (DTC genetic testing underscores the importance of tracking public awareness of these services. We analyzed nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2008 (n=7,674 and 2011 (n=3,959 to assess population-level changes in awareness of DTC genetic testing in the U.S. and to explore sociodemographic, health care, Internet use, and population density correlates. Overall, awareness increased significantly from 29% in 2008 to 37% in 2011. The observed increase in awareness from 2008 to 2011 remained significant (OR=1.39 even when adjusted for sociodemographic variables, health care access, Internet use, and population density. Independent of survey year, the odds of awareness of DTC genetic tests were significantly higher for those aged 50–64 (OR=1.64, and 65–74 (OR=1.60; college graduates (OR=2.02; those with a regular source of health care (OR=1.27; those with a prior cancer diagnosis (OR=1.24; those who use the Internet (OR=1.27; and those living in urban areas (OR=1.25. Surveillance of awareness—along with empirical data on use of and response to genetic risk information—can inform public health and policy efforts to maximize benefits and minimize risks of DTC genetic testing.

  7. Hands of early primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Doug M; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Chester, Stephen G B; Bloch, Jonathan I; Godinot, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Questions surrounding the origin and early evolution of primates continue to be the subject of debate. Though anatomy of the skull and inferred dietary shifts are often the focus, detailed studies of postcrania and inferred locomotor capabilities can also provide crucial data that advance understanding of transitions in early primate evolution. In particular, the hand skeleton includes characteristics thought to reflect foraging, locomotion, and posture. Here we review what is known about the early evolution of primate hands from a comparative perspective that incorporates data from the fossil record. Additionally, we provide new comparative data and documentation of skeletal morphology for Paleogene plesiadapiforms, notharctines, cercamoniines, adapines, and omomyiforms. Finally, we discuss implications of these data for understanding locomotor transitions during the origin and early evolutionary history of primates. Known plesiadapiform species cannot be differentiated from extant primates based on either intrinsic hand proportions or hand-to-body size proportions. Nonetheless, the presence of claws and a different metacarpophalangeal [corrected] joint form in plesiadapiforms indicate different grasping mechanics. Notharctines and cercamoniines have intrinsic hand proportions with extremely elongated proximal phalanges and digit rays relative to metacarpals, resembling tarsiers and galagos. But their hand-to-body size proportions are typical of many extant primates (unlike those of tarsiers, and possibly Teilhardina, which have extremely large hands). Non-adapine adapiforms and omomyids exhibit additional carpal features suggesting more limited dorsiflexion, greater ulnar deviation, and a more habitually divergent pollex than observed plesiadapiforms. Together, features differentiating adapiforms and omomyiforms from plesiadapiforms indicate increased reliance on vertical prehensile-clinging and grasp-leaping, possibly in combination with predatory behaviors in

  8. Contact allergy to allergens of the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) has decreased modestly in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Johansen, J D

    2009-11-01

    The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population is nearly 20%. This study aimed to monitor the development of contact allergy to allergens from the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) between 1990 and 2006. Two random samples of adults from the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark, were invited to participate in a general health examination including patch testing. In 1990 and 2006, we patch tested and questioned 543 and 3460 adult Danes. Patch test readings were performed on day 2 only. The overall prevalence decreased significantly from 15.5% in 1990 to 10.0% in 2006, mainly as a result of a decrease in thimerosal allergy from 3.4% to 0.8%. Furthermore, the prevalence of cobalt allergy and rubber-related allergens decreased from 1.1% to 0.2% and from 1.5% to 0.2%, respectively. Stratification by sex and age group revealed decreasing prevalences of contact allergy in all male age groups and in young and middle-aged female age groups (18-55 years) whereas increasing prevalences were observed among older women (56-69 years). The diverging trend observed in women was probably explained by a cohort effect due to a change in the prevalence of nickel allergy following the Danish regulation on nickel exposure. Although the overall prevalence of contact allergy decreased in the general population, frequent contact allergens such as fragrance mix II and methyldibromo glutaronitrile were not tested. Thus, contact allergy remains prevalent in the general population.

  9. The influence of control format and hand design in single axis myoelectric hands: assessment of functionality of prosthetic hands using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyberd, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    It is important to measure the functional capabilities of a prosthesis in order to make informed decisions when prescribing a limb. To measure the functional of a range of commercial single degree of freedom hands to act as baseline comparisons for the newer multi-axis hands. Form-board and self-timed tasks. Repeated measures with a single subject using a validated assessment tool. The test measured the function of three conventional, single axis, powered hands, controlled by five different myocontroller formats. One transcarpal device was also tested. When controlled by the same type of two channel myoelectric controllers (proportional voluntary opening, voluntary closing) the overall functional scores were similar for all similar types of hand, with a maximum score of 94 out of 100. The smaller transcarpel hand had a score of 84. Only when a more limited single channel three state controller was used was the score much lower (81). All of the hands were of a similar design and were set in a precision grip, but the precision grip did not achieve the highest individual grip score. Additionally, while the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) score is dependent on the speed of execution of the task, the speed of the prosthesis did not have as great an impact on the score as the other variables. This study provides comparative data between similar designs of commercial hands. This will allow clinicians to be better informed when they prescribe a device for a user.

  10. Hand Specific Representations in Language Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eMoody-Triantis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Theories of embodied cognition argue that language comprehension involves sensory-motor re-enactments of the actions described. However, the degree of specificity of these re-enactments as well as the relationship between action and language remains a matter of debate. Here we investigate these issues by examining how hand-specific information (left or right hand is recruited in language comprehension and action execution. An fMRI study tested right-handed participants in two separate tasks that were designed to be as similar as possible to increase sensitivity of the comparison across task: an action execution go/no-go task where participants performed right or left hand actions, and a language task where participants read sentences describing the same left or right handed actions as in the execution task. We found that language-induced activity did not match the hand-specific patterns of activity found for action execution in primary somatosensory and motor cortex, but it overlapped with pre-motor and parietal regions associated with action planning. Within these pre-motor regions, both right hand actions and sentences elicited stronger activity than left hand actions and sentences - a dominant hand effect -. Importantly, both dorsal and ventral sections of the left pre-central gyrus were recruited by both tasks, suggesting different action features being recruited. These results suggest that (a language comprehension elicits motor representations that are hand-specific and akin to multimodal action plans, rather than full action re-enactments; and (b language comprehension and action execution share schematic hand-specific representations that are richer for the dominant hand, and thus linked to previous motor experience.

  11. QTL mapping for test weight by using F2:3 population in maize

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on the genetic map containing 180 polymorphic SSR markers with an average linkage distance of 11.0 cM, QTL for maize test weight were ... epistatic interactions also formed an important genetic basis for test weight in maize. [Ding J.-Q., Ma ..... genetic basis of inbreeding depression and heterosis in rice. I. Biomass.

  12. Intertester reliability of the talk test in a cardiac rehabilitation population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annemette Krintel; Maribo, Thomas; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The validity of the Talk Test (TT) is well documented, but the reliability of the test is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the absolute and relative intertester reliability of the TT in cardiac patients. METHODS: Cardiac patients (n = 64) who had completed an exercise rehab...

  13. Hand Hygiene: When and How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand Hygiene When and How August 2009 How to handrub? How to handwash? RUB HANDS FOR HAND HYGIENE! WASH HANDS WHEN VISIBLY SOILED Duration of the ... from its use. When? YOUR 5 MOMENTS FOR HAND HYGIENE 1 BEFORETOUCHINGA PATIENT 2 B P ECFLOER R ...

  14. Estimation of stature from hand length in Gujarat region

    OpenAIRE

    Jitendra Patel; Bharat Patel; Ritesh Shah; Naimish Bhojak; Jalpa Desai

    2014-01-01

    Background Estimation of stature from hand length differs in various researchers in different ethnic groups. Same is done here to derive the regression equations for correct estimation of stature from hand lengths in Gujarati population. Objective An attempt is done here to find out correlation between stature and hand length in Gujarati population between 18-22 years of age and possibly to derived regression equation for the same. Material and method Stature and...

  15. Thyroid testing and management of hypothyroidism during pregnancy: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfors, Michaela; Åkerud, Helena; Berglund, Anna; Skogö, Johan; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Wikström, Anna-Karin

    2013-07-01

    There are international guidelines on thyroid function testing and management of hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Few studies have evaluated how they are implemented into clinical practice. In this descriptive study, we assessed the implementation of international guidelines in this field into local guidelines and also into clinical practice. In a nationwide survey, all guidelines in Sweden were collected (n = 29), and the adherence of the local guidelines to The Endocrine Society Guidelines 2007 was evaluated. In a follow-up in 1 district, 5254 pregnant women with an estimated date of delivery between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2011, were included for subsequent review of their medical reports. All but 1 district had guidelines on the subject. All local guidelines included fewer than the 10 listed reasons for thyroid testing recommended by The Endocrine Society Guidelines. Furthermore, most guidelines recommended additional types of thyroid function tests to TSH sampling and lower trimester-specific TSH upper reference limits for women on levothyroxine treatment (P < .001). In the follow-up, the thyroid testing rate was 20%, with an overall frequency of women with trimester-specific elevated TSH of 18.5%. More than half of the women (50.9%) who were on levothyroxine treatment at conception had an elevated TSH level at thyroid testing according to The Endocrine Society Guidelines. The local guidelines are variable and poorly compliant with international guidelines. Performance of thyroid testing is not optimal, and rates of elevated TSH at testing are extremely high in subgroups.

  16. Simulation of Finnish population history, guided by empirical genetic data, to assess power of rare-variant tests in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sophie R; Agarwala, Vineeta; Flannick, Jason; Chiang, Charleston W K; Altshuler, David; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2014-05-01

    Finnish samples have been extensively utilized in studying single-gene disorders, where the founder effect has clearly aided in discovery, and more recently in genome-wide association studies of complex traits, where the founder effect has had less obvious impacts. As the field starts to explore rare variants' contribution to polygenic traits, it is of great importance to characterize and confirm the Finnish founder effect in sequencing data and to assess its implications for rare-variant association studies. Here, we employ forward simulation, guided by empirical deep resequencing data, to model the genetic architecture of quantitative polygenic traits in both the general European and the Finnish populations simultaneously. We demonstrate that power of rare-variant association tests is higher in the Finnish population, especially when variants' phenotypic effects are tightly coupled with fitness effects and therefore reflect a greater contribution of rarer variants. SKAT-O, variable-threshold tests, and single-variant tests are more powerful than other rare-variant methods in the Finnish population across a range of genetic models. We also compare the relative power and efficiency of exome array genotyping to those of high-coverage exome sequencing. At a fixed cost, less expensive genotyping strategies have far greater power than sequencing; in a fixed number of samples, however, genotyping arrays miss a substantial portion of genetic signals detected in sequencing, even in the Finnish founder population. As genetic studies probe sequence variation at greater depth in more diverse populations, our simulation approach provides a framework for evaluating various study designs for gene discovery. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An experimental test of character displacement's role in promoting postmating isolation between conspecific populations in contrasting competitive environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, David W; Rice, Amber M

    2007-10-01

    Ecological character displacement takes place when two closely related species co-occur in only part of their geographical range, and selection to minimize competition between them promotes divergence in resource-use traits in sympatry but not in allopatry. Because populations sympatric with the heterospecific competitor will experience a different competitive environment than conspecific populations in allopatry, conspecific populations from these two competitive environments will also diverge in resource traits as an indirect consequence of interspecific ecological character displacement. Ultimately, ecologically dependent postmating isolation may arise between conspecific populations from these divergent competitive environments if offspring produced by matings between them are competitively inferior in either type of competitive environment. Yet, there are no direct tests of character displacement's role in initiating such postmating isolation. Here, we present a test by comparing the phenotypes and performances of spadefoot toad tadpoles produced from between-competitive-environment (BCE) matings versus those produced from within-competitive-environment (WCE) matings. When raised with naturally occurring competitors, BCE offspring grew significantly less and were significantly smaller than WCE offspring. BCE offspring generally performed worse even when raised alone, suggesting that they may have harbored intrinsic genetic incompatibilities. Moreover, the difference in growth and body size of BCE versus WCE offspring was significantly greater when each was raised with competitors than when each was raised alone, suggesting that BCE tadpoles were competitively inferior to WCE tadpoles. Presumably, this enhanced difference arose because BCE tadpoles produced an intermediate resource-use phenotype that is less well adapted to either competitive environment. Because larval size is under strong, positive, directional selection, reduced growth and size of BCE

  18. Accurate localization of organ representation areas on the feet & hands using the bi-digital O-ring test resonance phenomenon: its clinical implication in diagnosis & treatment--Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Y

    1994-01-01

    Accuracy of the widely used organ representation areas, currently used in different schools of foot and hand reflexology was evaluated using Bi-Digital O-Ring test resonance phenomenon. Our previous study indicated that mapping organ representation areas of the tongue using Bi-Digital O-Ring Test resonance phenomenon between 2 identical substances often provided more reliable clinical information for both diagnosis and treatment than the 2 widely used, but crude, traditional schools of Chinese tongue diagnosis. This same method was applied for the mapping of the organ representation areas on the feet and hands. We succeeded in mapping the following areas on human feet: 1) Middle (3rd) toe on the sole side represents the following starting from the tip: A) Head, B) Face with eye, ear, nose, and mouth (1st Digit) C) Neck and organs within the neck (narrow band of space between 1st crease after the 1st digit and crease at the junction of the beginning of the sole); 2) 2nd and 4th toe represent upper extremities, the beginning tip being fingers and hands. The crease at the base of these toes represents the shoulder. The 2nd toe represents right upper extremity, and the 4th toe represents left upper extremity; 3) 1st and 5th toes in both the right and left feet represent lower extremities with the tip being the toes and soles of feet. The crease at the base of these toes represents the inguinal area. The 1st toe of each foot represents right lower extremity, and 5th toe represents left lower extremity. The sole of the foot is divided into the following 3 distinctive sections. 1) Upper (1st) section represents organs in the chest cavity including 2 thymus glands, trachea, 2 lungs, with the heart between them, and with the esophagus appearing as a narrow band outside of the lung near and below the 1st and 2nd toe depending upon the individual. Chest section occupies the first 1/3 to 1/5 (on a relatively long foot) of the entire sole. The boundary between the chest and G

  19. Self-reported HIV-positive status but subsequent HIV-negative test result using rapid diagnostic testing algorithms among seven sub-Saharan African military populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Harbertson

    Full Text Available HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs combined in an algorithm are the current standard for HIV diagnosis in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has confirmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However, false-positive RDT algorithm results have been reported due to a variety of factors, such as suboptimal quality assurance procedures and inaccurate interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosurveys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of personnel self-reporting HIV positivity, but subsequently testing HIV-negative during the serosurvey. The frequency of individuals who reported they were HIV-positive but subsequently tested HIV-negative using RDT algorithms ranged from 3.3 to 91.1%, suggesting significant rates of prior false-positive HIV RDT algorithm results, which should be confirmed using biological testing across time in future studies. Simple measures could substantially reduce false-positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World Health Organization's HIV testing guidelines. Other measures to improve RDT algorithm specificity include classifying individuals with weakly positive test lines as HIV indeterminate and retesting. While expansion of HIV testing in resource-limited countries is critical to identifying HIV-infected individuals for appropriate care and treatment, careful attention to potential causes of false HIV-positive results are needed to prevent the significant medical, psychological, and fiscal costs resulting from individuals receiving a false-positive HIV diagnosis.

  20. Self-reported HIV-positive status but subsequent HIV-negative test result using rapid diagnostic testing algorithms among seven sub-Saharan African military populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbertson, Judith; Hale, Braden R; Tran, Bonnie R; Thomas, Anne G; Grillo, Michael P; Jacobs, Marni B; McAnany, Jennifer; Shaffer, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) combined in an algorithm are the current standard for HIV diagnosis in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has confirmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However, false-positive RDT algorithm results have been reported due to a variety of factors, such as suboptimal quality assurance procedures and inaccurate interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosurveys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of personnel self-reporting HIV positivity, but subsequently testing HIV-negative during the serosurvey. The frequency of individuals who reported they were HIV-positive but subsequently tested HIV-negative using RDT algorithms ranged from 3.3 to 91.1%, suggesting significant rates of prior false-positive HIV RDT algorithm results, which should be confirmed using biological testing across time in future studies. Simple measures could substantially reduce false-positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World Health Organization's HIV testing guidelines. Other measures to improve RDT algorithm specificity include classifying individuals with weakly positive test lines as HIV indeterminate and retesting. While expansion of HIV testing in resource-limited countries is critical to identifying HIV-infected individuals for appropriate care and treatment, careful attention to potential causes of false HIV-positive results are needed to prevent the significant medical, psychological, and fiscal costs resulting from individuals receiving a false-positive HIV diagnosis.

  1. Noninvasive prenatal testing in routine clinical practice for a high-risk population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guijie; Yi, Jianping; Han, Baosheng; Liu, Heng; Guo, Wanru; Shi, Chong; Yin, Lirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to summarize the effects of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) on aneuploidy among high-risk participants in Tangshan Maternal and Children Health Hospital. NIPT or invasive prenatal diagnosis was recommended to patients with a high risk of fetal aneuploidy from February 2013 to February 2014. Patients who exhibited eligibility and applied for NIPT from January 2012 to January 2013 were included in a comparison group. The rates of patients who underwent invasive testing, declined to undergo further testing, and manifested trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were compared between two groups. Follow-up data were obtained from the participants who underwent NIPT from 2013 to 2014. A total of 7223 patients (3018 and 4205 individuals before and after NIPT) were eligible for analysis. After NIPT was introduced in 2013 to 2014, 727 patients (17.3%) underwent invasive testing, 2828 preferred NIPT (67.3%), and 650 declined to undergo further testing (15.5%). A total of 34 cases of trisomies 21, 18, and 13 (0.8%) were found. In 2012 to 2013, 565 patients (18.7%) underwent invasive testing and 2453 declined to undergo further testing (81.3%). A total of 7 cases of trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were documented (0.2%). Of these cases, 24 were found from NIPT and 10 cases were found from invasive testing. The number of participants who declined to undergo further testing significantly decreased after NIPT was introduced (81.3% vs. 15.5%, P NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were 100% and 99.9%, respectively. The detection rates of NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 also significantly increased (0.2% vs. 0.8%, P testing remained unchanged (18.7% vs. 17.3%, P = 0.12). The positive predictive values of NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were 100%, 83.3%, and 50.0%, respectively. The false positive rates of NIPT were 0% and 0.04%. With NIPT implementation in clinical practice, the rate of declining a follow-up test among high-risk women was decreased and the detection

  2. Emotion recognition from facial expressions: a normative study of the Ekman 60-Faces Test in the Italian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodich, Alessandra; Cerami, Chiara; Canessa, Nicola; Crespi, Chiara; Marcone, Alessandra; Arpone, Marta; Realmuto, Sabrina; Cappa, Stefano F

    2014-07-01

    The Ekman 60-Faces (EK-60F) Test is a well-known neuropsychological tool assessing emotion recognition from facial expressions. It is the most employed task for research purposes in psychiatric and neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, such as the behavioral variant of Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD). Despite its remarkable usefulness in the social cognition research field, to date, there are still no normative data for the Italian population, thus limiting its application in a clinical context. In this study, we report procedures and normative data for the Italian version of the test. A hundred and thirty-two healthy Italian participants aged between 20 and 79 years with at least 5 years of education were recruited on a voluntary basis. They were administered the EK-60F Test from the Ekman and Friesen series of Pictures of Facial Affect after a preliminary semantic recognition test of the six basic emotions (i.e., anger, fear, sadness, happiness, disgust, surprise). Data were analyzed according to the Capitani procedure [1]. The regression analysis revealed significant effects of demographic variables, with younger, more educated, female subjects showing higher scores. Normative data were then applied to a sample of 15 bvFTD patients which showed global impaired performance in the task, consistently with the clinical condition. We provided EK-60F Test normative data for the Italian population allowing the investigation of global emotion recognition ability as well as selective impairment of basic emotions recognition, both for clinical and research purposes.

  3. Verbal fluency tests: Normative data for the Latin American Spanish speaking adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarrieta-Landa, L; Rivera, D; Galarza-Del-Angel, J; Garza, M T; Saracho, C P; Rodríguez, W; Chávez-Oliveros, M; Rábago, B; Leibach, G; Schebela, S; Martínez, C; Luna, M; Longoni, M; Ocampo-Barba, N; Rodríguez, G; Aliaga, A; Esenarro, L; García de la Cadena, C; Perrin, B P; Arango-Lasprilla, J C

    2015-01-01

    To generate normative data for the Verbal Fluency Tests across 11 countries in Latin America, with country-specific adjustments for gender, age, and education, where appropriate. The sample consisted of 3,977 healthy adults who were recruited from Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and, Puerto Rico. Each subject was administered the Verbal Fluency Test as part of a larger neuropsychological battery. A standardized five-step statistical procedure was used to generate the norms. The final multiple linear regression models for the letter F explained 8-30% of the variance, 7-32% for letter A, 8-32% for the letter S, and 16-43% for the animal category in Verbal Fluency Test scores. Although t-tests showed significant differences between men and women on the Verbal Fluency Test, they did not have an effect size larger than 0.3. As a result, gender-adjusted norms were not generated. This is the first normative multicenter study conducted in Latin America aiming to create norms for the Verbal Fluency Test; this study will have important outcomes for the future of neuropsychology in the region.

  4. A person-oriented approach to hand hygiene behaviour: Emotional empathy fosters hand hygiene practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassenrath, Claudia; Diefenbacher, Svenja; Siegel, André; Keller, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Adopting a social-psychological approach, this research examines whether emotional empathy, an affective reaction regarding another's well-being, fosters hand hygiene as this affects other's health-related well-being extensively. Three studies tested this notion: (a) a cross-sectional study involving a sample of health care workers at a German hospital, (b) an experiment testing the causal effect of empathy on hand hygiene behaviour and (c) an 11-week prospective study testing whether an empathy induction affected disinfectant usage frequency in two different wards of a hospital. Self-reported hand hygiene behaviour based on day reconstruction method was measured in Study 1, actual hand sanitation behaviour was observed in Study 2 and disinfectant usage frequency in two different hospital wards was assessed in Study 3. Study 1 reveals an association of empathy with hand hygiene cross-sectionally, Study 2 documents the causal effect of empathy on increased hand sanitation. Study 3 shows an empathy induction increases hand sanitiser usage in the hospital. Increasing emotional empathy promotes hand hygiene behaviour, also in hospitals. Besides providing new impulses for the design of effective interventions, these findings bear theoretical significance as they document the explanatory power of empathy regarding a distal explanandum (hand hygiene).

  5. Further Evaluation of Covariate Analysis using Empirical Bayes Estimates in Population Pharmacokinetics: the Perception of Shrinkage and Likelihood Ratio Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu Steven; Yuan, Min; Yang, Haitao; Feng, Yan; Xu, Jinfeng; Pinheiro, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Covariate analysis based on population pharmacokinetics (PPK) is used to identify clinically relevant factors. The likelihood ratio test (LRT) based on nonlinear mixed effect model fits is currently recommended for covariate identification, whereas individual empirical Bayesian estimates (EBEs) are considered unreliable due to the presence of shrinkage. The objectives of this research were to investigate the type I error for LRT and EBE approaches, to confirm the similarity of power between the LRT and EBE approaches from a previous report and to explore the influence of shrinkage on LRT and EBE inferences. Using an oral one-compartment PK model with a single covariate impacting on clearance, we conducted a wide range of simulations according to a two-way factorial design. The results revealed that the EBE-based regression not only provided almost identical power for detecting a covariate effect, but also controlled the false positive rate better than the LRT approach. Shrinkage of EBEs is likely not the root cause for decrease in power or inflated false positive rate although the size of the covariate effect tends to be underestimated at high shrinkage. In summary, contrary to the current recommendations, EBEs may be a better choice for statistical tests in PPK covariate analysis compared to LRT. We proposed a three-step covariate modeling approach for population PK analysis to utilize the advantages of EBEs while overcoming their shortcomings, which allows not only markedly reducing the run time for population PK analysis, but also providing more accurate covariate tests.

  6. Hand dermatitis: uncommon presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Hand dermatitis is a common diagnosis seen in dermatologic and general practice. It can present with typical morphology, but uncommon manifestations are possible. This review reports on common and uncommon presentations of irritant and allergic hand dermatitis focusing on uncommon localizations, time course, and morphology such as follicular, pustular, bullous, ulcerous, exudative erythema multiforme-like, purpuric, lichenoid, pigmented, and depigmented skin lesions. Clinical diagnosis can be challenging. Even histopathology is not always very helpful. Thorough evaluation of the patient's history and investigation of clinical morphology are the cornerstones of diagnosis.

  7. Mind the hand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2014-01-01

    their hands in activities around touchscreens, focusing in particular on how they collaborate. The analysis presented here is part of a research study on the use of touchscreens in children’s embodied and multimodal collaborative learning activities in their everyday classrooms. The general aim of the study......, to construct and problem solve, and to show and imitate. The analyses show how a space emerges from the interaction between the children and the touchscreen, and how their hand movements reveal intelligence-as-action. Three situations with three different pairs were analysed to explore how children use...

  8. Adam Smith's Invisible Hands

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Minowitz

    2004-01-01

    William Grampp’s JPE article on Adam Smith is creative and provocative. It errs, however, by disparaging the invisible hand’s importance as a symbol of various economic processes that help societies prosper in ways that individuals neither intend nor comprehend. Four specific problems stand out. First, Grampp unsoundly tries to limit the relevance of the invisible hand within the Wealth of Nations to situations in which a merchant increases domestic capital and strengthens national defens...

  9. Dexterity analysis and robot hand design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, LU; Soni, A. H.; Chunsheng, Cai; Brown, Max

    1988-01-01

    Understanding about a dexterous robot hand's motion ranges is important to the precision grasping and precision manipulation. A planar robot hand is studied for object orientation, including ranges of motion, measures with respect to the palm, position reaching of a point in the grasped object, and rotation of the object about the reference point. The rotational dexterity index and dexterity chart are introduced and an analysis procedure is developed for calculating these quantities. A design procedure for determining the hand kinematic parameters based on a desired partial or complete dexterity chart is also developed. These procedures have been tested in detail for a planar robot hand with two 2- or 3-link fingers. The derived results are shown to be useful to performance evaluation, kinematic parameter design, and grasping motion planning for a planar robot hand.

  10. Animal Bites of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin ... A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ...

  11. Hand Washing: Do's and Dont's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a sick person Inserting or removing contact lenses Always wash your hands after: Preparing food Using ... best to wash your hands with soap and water. Follow these steps: Wet your hands with running ...

  12. Swiss population-based reference data for six symptom validity tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Giger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Los resultados encontrados en la evaluación de la validez de los síntomas (SVT deberían ser inmunes a las variables sociodemográficas. Así, los sujetos sanos y cooperadores deberían superar los tests de SVT. El ob- jetivo de este estudio es obtener datos de referencia de una serie de pruebas utilizadas en la evaluación de la validez de los síntomas, en una muestra representativa de 100 ciudadanos suizos, germano-hablantes, de entre 18 y 60 años: Medical Symptom Validity Test, Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology, Amsterdam Short-Term Memory Test, Emotional Numbing Test, Reliable Digit Span y Maximum Span Forward. Los análisis de regresión múltiple reflejaron que las variables edad e inteligencia verbal afectaron a los resultados de varias de las pruebas, mientras que no fue así para las variables sexo y nivel educativo. La tasa de resultados positivos osciló entre el 1% (Emotional Numbing Test, Structured Inventory of Malin- gered Symptomatology y el 4% (Maximum Span Forward. Una cuestión relevante que se desprende de este estudio es si dichos resultados positivos en las muestras de referencia

  13. HIV testing and counselling for migrant populations living in high-income countries: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Susana; Azcoaga, Amaya; Rio, Isabel; Hernando, Victoria; Gonzalez, Cristina; Alejos, Belen; Caro, Ana Maria; Perez-Cachafeiro, Santiago; Ramirez-Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar, Francisco; Noori, Teymur; Del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Background: The barriers to HIV testing and counselling that migrants encounter can jeopardize proactive HIV testing that relies on the fact that HIV testing must be linked to care. We analyse available evidence on HIV testing and counselling strategies targeting migrants and ethnic minorities in high-income countries. Methods: Systematic literature review of the five main databases of articles in English from Europe, North America and Australia between 2005 and 2009. Results: Of 1034 abstracts, 37 articles were selected. Migrants, mainly from HIV-endemic countries, are at risk of HIV infection and its consequences. The HIV prevalence among migrants is higher than the general population’s, and migrants have higher frequency of delayed HIV diagnosis. For migrants from countries with low HIV prevalence and for ethnic minorities, socio-economic vulnerability puts them at risk of acquiring HIV. Migrants have specific legal and administrative impediments to accessing HIV testing—in some countries, undocumented migrants are not entitled to health care—as well as cultural and linguistic barriers, racism and xenophobia. Migrants and ethnic minorities fear stigma from their communities, yet community acceptance is key for well-being. Conclusions: Migrants and ethnic minorities should be offered HIV testing, but the barriers highlighted in this review may deter programs from achieving the final goal, which is linking migrants and ethnic minorities to HIV clinical care under the public health perspective. PMID:23002238

  14. Development of a Population Balance Model of a pharmaceutical drying process and testing of solution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F.C.; Gernaey, Krist; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Drying is frequently used in the production of pharmaceutical tablets. Simulation-based control strategy development for such a drying process requires a detailed model. First, the drying of wet granules is modelled using a Population Balance Model. A growth term based on a reduced model was used......, which describes the decrease of the moisture content, to follow the moisture content distribution for a batch of granules. Secondly, different solution methods for solving the PBM are compared. The effect of grid size (discretization methods) is analyzed in terms of accuracy and calculation time. All...

  15. The adult prevalence of HIV in Zambia: results from a population based mobile testing survey conducted in 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Kapata, Nathan; Klinkenberg, Eveline; William, Ngosa; Mazyanga, Liwewe; Musukwa, Katoba; Kawesha, Elizabeth Chizema; Masiye, Felix; Mwaba, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the adult prevalence of HIV among the adult population in Zambia and determine whether demographic characteristics were associated with being HIV positive. A cross sectional population based survey to asses HIV status among participants aged 15 years and above in a national tuberculosis prevalence survey. Counselling was offered to participants who tested for HIV. The prevalence was estimated using a logistic regression model. Univariate and multivariate associations of social demographic characteristics with HIV were determined. Of the 46,099 individuals who were eligible to participate in the survey, 44,761 (97.1 %) underwent pre-test counselling for HIV; out of which 30,605 (68.4 %) consented to be tested and 30, 584 (99.9 %) were tested. HIV prevalence was estimated to be 6.6 % (95 % CI 5.8-7.4); with females having a higher prevalence than males 7.7 % (95 % CI 6.8-8.7) versus 5.2 % (95 % CI 4.4-5.9). HIV prevalence was higher among urban (9.8 %; 95 % CI 8.8-10.7) than rural residents (5.0 %; 95 % CI 4.3-5.8). The risk of HIV was double among urban dwellers than among their rural counterparts. Being divorced or widowed was associated with a threefold higher risk of being HIV positive than being never married. The risk of being HIV positive was four times higher among those with tuberculosis than those without tuberculosis. HIV prevalence was lower than previously estimated in the country. The burden of HIV showed sociodemographic disparities signifying a need to target key populations or epidemic drivers. Mobile testing for HIV on a national scale in the context of TB prevalence surveys could be explored further in other settings.

  16. Reliability and internal validity of the michigan hand questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bryan T; Morris, Steven F

    2014-10-01

    The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) remains one of very few to be based on validated and systematic methods in its creation. However, test-retest reliability and internal validity have not been appropriately investigated in any other English-speaking population outside the original development sample. The objective of this study is to examine the reliability and internal validity of the MHQ in a Canadian population. All patients with a clinical hand problem but no hand immobilization who attended our Plastic Surgery Clinic were invited to participate in this study. Patients were asked to complete the MHQ, and then contacted to arrange for completion of the MHQ a second time. Internal validity was estimated using Cronbach alpha. Reliability was estimated using the method of Bland and Altman, and intraclass correlation coefficients. Correlation analysis between score differences and time between tests was performed. Full versions of the MHQ were completed by 116 participants on their initial visit, while only 77 participants completed a second MHQ. Cronbach alpha ranged from 0.84 to 0.95 for the MHQ subscales. Intraclass-correlation coefficients ranged from 0.71 to 0.84 for the subscales. The magnitude of the limits of agreement for the subscales ranged from 13.8 to 26.2. The difference in scores between the first and second tests was not related to the time between tests. The high values of Cronbach alpha indicate high internal validity, but that there may be redundancy between items in the MHQ, which could be eliminated without losing information. Reliability of the MHQ is considered moderate. The limits of agreement are considered wide, indicating potential issues with respect to interpretation of a change in score between 2 administrations of the MHQ.

  17. Test of Sex Estimation Equations on Carpal Bones in a Northeastern Thai Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laowatthanaphong, S; Das, S; Phatsara, M; Tuamsuk, P; Mahakkanukrauh, P

    2016-01-01

    Sex assessment is an essential step in person identification, both in forensic and anthropological contexts. Many parts of skeletal remains such as skull, pelvis and long bones have been proven to be useful in determining sex. However, literature has shown that short bones such as carpal bones are also sexually dimorphic. In the last few years, there was an unpublished study using lunate, scaphoid and hamate from bone collection in Northern Thailand to create 6 discriminant equations to assess sex. The objective of this study was to investigate the application of those equations in the sample from other parts of Thailand. A sample of 50 individuals (25 males and 25 females), kindly supplied by Department of Anatomy, Khonkaen University, Khon-kaen, Thailand, was examined. The age of the individuals ranged from 48-87 years old for males and 38-87 years old for females. The classification accuracies ranged from 82%-98% with right hamate yielding the highest accuracy. These results proved the applicability of those 6 discriminant equations in a population from Northeastern Thailand. Further studies should include population from other parts of Thailand.

  18. Hands-On Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  19. [Hand and occupational diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Choudat, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    Hand is frequently the site of work accidents or occupational diseases. The musculoskeletal upper limb is the first recognized occupational disease and carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common of them. The most common location of occupational dermatoses is the hand. Their causes are often multifactorial, involving chemical irritants, physical, allergens and endogenous factors (mainly atopic dermatitis). Occupational exposure to microtrauma and iterative use of vibrating tools may also be the cause of hypothenar hammer syndrome and acrosyndromes. The frequent chronicity and functional impairment induced by these attacks can cause lasting disabilities, an inability to source workstation. Occupational physician is a focal point for helping to maintain the position and the prevention of socioprofessional disinsertion. Many pathologies of the hand related to professional activity may benefit from a statement in occupational disease and thus allow the patient to obtain compensation and employment protection. Prevention of occupational hand diseases should be made by all health actors, especially in occupations and industries at risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Wash Your Hands

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-08

    This video shows kids how to properly wash their hands, one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.  Created: 3/8/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/8/2010.

  1. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  2. Moving Hands, Moving Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setti, Annalisa; Borghi, Anna M.; Tessari, Alessia

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigated with a priming paradigm whether uni and bimanual actions presented as primes differently affected language processing. Animals' (self-moving entities) and plants' (not self-moving entities) names were used as targets. As prime we used grasping hands, presented both as static images and videos. The results showed an…

  3. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 59,337 views 3:10 Healthcare Worker ... Wash Your Hands! - Duration: 4:50. Former Saskatoon Health Region 1,940,773 views 4:50 Handwashing ...

  4. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. 473. Introduction ... diabetes.[2,3] Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a terminology ... 1Department of Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku‑Ozalla, 2Department of Medicine, Enugu State. University of ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RichmarkVideos 316 views 3:12 Hand Washing Steps Animation - Duration: 1:38. CreatorOfCastell 157,886 views 1: ... Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help Loading... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators ...

  6. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... De Las Manos Salva Vidas Mi Salud, Mi Decisión, Mi Futuro Salud Pregestacional ¿Yo? ¿Tener un Bebé? ¿ ... Living Featured Videos Fight Germs. Wash Your Hands! Making Health Easier: Healthy Snacking in Philadelphia, PA Making ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hygiene Saves Lives - Duration: 5:12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 92,523 views 5:12 Hand Washing Steps Animation - Duration: 1:38. CreatorOfCastell 157,813 views 1:38 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  8. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 61,257 views 3:10 Germ Smart - Wash Your Hands! - Duration: 4:50. Former Saskatoon Health Region 1,984,158 views 4:50 Wash ' ...

  9. Hands-on Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  10. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson Health 402,107 views 5:46 WHO: SAVE LIVES - ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 61,636 views 3:10 Hand Washing ...

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson Health 402,935 views 5:46 WHO: SAVE LIVES - ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 61,636 views 3:10 Hand Washing ...

  12. Prevalence of hand eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, Pieter Jan

    1983-01-01

    This thesis describes and discusses the results of a series of investigations into the occurence of skin diseases of the hands and forearms. The problem is approached from an occupational dermatological point ofview and focuses on contacteczema/dermatitis, which is the primary component of the

  13. Photographic Documentation and Hand Eczema Severity Index for Severity Assessment of Hand Eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabludovska, Kristine; Ibler, Kristina S; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand eczema (HE) is a fluctuating disease, and an objective assessment of HE severity is coveted. OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to test the association between Hand Eczema Severity Index (HECSI) score and panel scores of photographs taken by dermatologists. METHODS: A total...

  14. Syphilis serology: Seroprevalence in a selected population and considerations on the Euroline WB test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amodeo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The clinical diagnosis of syphilis is always supported by appropriate laboratory tests and the test results are interpreted with reference to the patient’s history. In the diagnosis of syphilis, the use of tests based on antibody search that recognize both treponemal and reaginic antigens increases the diagnostic chances. Our study discusses the various serological and alternative tests currently available along with their limitations, and relates their results to the likely corresponding clinical stage of the disease. Methods: in our laboratory were analyzed 264 sera and 4 liquor (123 Females, 145 Males. 187 patients are subject at low risk for luetic infection, including pregnant woman, patient with organ transplant, outpatients or hospitalized undergoing routine serological, and 81 from patients with confirmed syphilis including 4 pregnant women in antibiotic treatment, patients with suspected disease, HIV positive and patients with autoimmune diseases with Cardiolipin positive. All sera were tested with ELISA Anti-Treponema pallidum Screen (IgG / IgM and in parallel with agglutination tests VDRL and TPHA. On all positive sera was tested Euroline-WB EUROIMMUN and reading done with the program EuroLineScan. Results: by ELISA Anti-Treponema pallidum Screen IgG / IgM 162 sera were negative and 106 sera positive (39.5%, distributed as follows: 45 (42% with a value greater than 200 RU / ml, 43 (41% with a value> 22 RU / ml and 18 (17% with a borderline value between> 16 to <22 RU / ml. The execution of the Blot IgG showed: 18 negative sera, 6 with borderline value with one only band of specific antigens (p15, p45, p47 or p17, while 82, including 4 liquor (neurolue, were certainly positive showing more than one band antibody to the treponemal antigens. Only one patient had in place at the time of screening, an initial infection; in fact, there was a single clear positivity in the IgM protein bands, while 7 sera was uncertain values

  15. Following the Worms: Detection of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Eggs on Mothers' Hands and Household Produce in Rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbaum, Lauren; Swarthout, Jenna; Mboya, John; Pickering, Amy J

    2017-11-01

    Approximately one-quarter of the world's population is infected with at least one species of soil-transmitted helminth (STH). The role of produce and hands in STH transmission is not well understood. We collected and processed mother hand rinse and garden-grown produce rinse samples from 116 rural households in Kakamega, Kenya, in an area previously identified to have high STH egg contamination in household soil. Ascaris was the only STH species detected; 0.9% of hand rinse, 3.5% of leafy produce, and 1.8% of root produce samples had Ascaris eggs. Our results indicate produce and hands can carry Ascaris eggs. However, due to the low detected prevalence of eggs on hands and produce, and a high prevalence of cooking the produce items tested, these pathways might have a minor contribution to STH exposure in this setting.

  16. An Economic Analysis of Cell-Free DNA Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing in the US General Pregnancy Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Benn

    Full Text Available Analyze the economic value of replacing conventional fetal aneuploidy screening approaches with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT in the general pregnancy population.Using decision-analysis modeling, we compared conventional screening to NIPT with cell-free DNA (cfDNA analysis in the annual US pregnancy population. Sensitivity and specificity for fetal aneuploidies, trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, and monosomy X, were estimated using published data and modeling of both first- and second trimester screening. Costs were assigned for each prenatal test component and for an affected birth. The overall cost to the healthcare system considered screening costs, the number of aneuploid cases detected, invasive procedures performed, procedure-related euploid losses, and affected pregnancies averted. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of variation in parameters. Costs were reported in 2014 US Dollars.Replacing conventional screening with NIPT would reduce healthcare costs if it can be provided for $744 or less in the general pregnancy population. The most influential variables were timing of screening entry, screening costs, and pregnancy termination rates. Of the 13,176 affected pregnancies undergoing screening, NIPT detected 96.5% (12,717/13,176 of cases, compared with 85.9% (11,314/13,176 by conventional approaches. NIPT reduced invasive procedures by 60.0%, with NIPT and conventional methods resulting in 24,596 and 61,430 invasive procedures, respectively. The number of procedure-related euploid fetal losses was reduced by 73.5% (194/264 in the general screening population.Based on our analysis, universal application of NIPT would increase fetal aneuploidy detection rates and can be economically justified. Offering this testing to all pregnant women is associated with substantial prenatal healthcare benefits.

  17. An Economic Analysis of Cell-Free DNA Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing in the US General Pregnancy Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Peter; Curnow, Kirsten J; Chapman, Steven; Michalopoulos, Steven N; Hornberger, John; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Analyze the economic value of replacing conventional fetal aneuploidy screening approaches with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in the general pregnancy population. Using decision-analysis modeling, we compared conventional screening to NIPT with cell-free DNA (cfDNA) analysis in the annual US pregnancy population. Sensitivity and specificity for fetal aneuploidies, trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, and monosomy X, were estimated using published data and modeling of both first- and second trimester screening. Costs were assigned for each prenatal test component and for an affected birth. The overall cost to the healthcare system considered screening costs, the number of aneuploid cases detected, invasive procedures performed, procedure-related euploid losses, and affected pregnancies averted. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of variation in parameters. Costs were reported in 2014 US Dollars. Replacing conventional screening with NIPT would reduce healthcare costs if it can be provided for $744 or less in the general pregnancy population. The most influential variables were timing of screening entry, screening costs, and pregnancy termination rates. Of the 13,176 affected pregnancies undergoing screening, NIPT detected 96.5% (12,717/13,176) of cases, compared with 85.9% (11,314/13,176) by conventional approaches. NIPT reduced invasive procedures by 60.0%, with NIPT and conventional methods resulting in 24,596 and 61,430 invasive procedures, respectively. The number of procedure-related euploid fetal losses was reduced by 73.5% (194/264) in the general screening population. Based on our analysis, universal application of NIPT would increase fetal aneuploidy detection rates and can be economically justified. Offering this testing to all pregnant women is associated with substantial prenatal healthcare benefits.

  18. Effectiveness of hand sorting, flotation/washing, dehulling and combinations thereof on the decontamination of mycotoxin-contaminated white maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matumba, Limbikani; Van Poucke, Christof; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Jacobs, Bart; De Saeger, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Maize is one of the major staple foods of Sub-Saharan Africa and is consumed as whole or dehulled grain. In this region, where the environmental conditions favour fungal growth and mycotoxin production, the majority of the population are subsistence consumers who, unfortunately, have little or no access to mycotoxin testing of their food. In an attempt to develop feasible reduction strategies in dietary mycotoxin exposure of the population, a three-factorial design experiment was conducted to examine and compare the efficacy of hand sorting, flotation, dehulling and combinations thereof in removing naturally occurring aflatoxins, fumonisins, nivalenol, deoxynivalenol and alternariol in shelled white maize. Regression analysis was used to determine the significant (p hand sorting had the greatest effect on mycotoxin removal, while flotation yielded the least effect. In particular hand sorting left hand sorting of maize grains is being recommended as a last line of defence against mycotoxin exposure among subsistence consumers.

  19. The Draw a Scientist Test: A Different Population and a Somewhat Different Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark D.; Henley, Tracy B.; Snell, Catherine M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined Draw-a-Scientist-Test (DAST) images solicited from 212 undergraduate students for the presence of traditional gender stereotypes. Participants were 100 males and 112 females enrolled in psychology or computer science courses with a mean age of 21.02 years. A standard multiple regression generated a model that accounts for the…

  20. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... Announcement CDC-RFA-PS10-10138, ``Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately... Assistance Number: 93.523 The Affordable Care Act: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention and Public... Number 93.523 The Affordable Care Act: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention and Public Health...

  1. [Development and testing of theories of population dynamics]. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, W.W.; Bence, J.R.; McCauley, E.; Nisbet, R.M.

    1990-03-15

    We report new analyses to test competing models of the Daphnia/algal interaction. Our model is good at predicting equilibrium algal densities, and if our new insights can account for stability in this system across a wide range of natural environments, this may contribute to understanding predator-prey dynamics in general.

  2. Use of microsatellite markers in an American beech (Fagus grandifolia) population and paternity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Koch; Dave Carey; M.E. Mason

    2010-01-01

    Cross-species amplification of six microsatellite markers from European beech (Fagus sylvatica Linn) and nine markers from Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume) was tested in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.). Three microsatellites from each species were successfully adapted for use in American beech...

  3. Hand problems among endourologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Kelly A; Pak, Raymond W; Cleary, Ryan C; Colon-Herdman, Arturo; Bagley, Demetrius H

    2011-12-01

    Endourology has evolved rapidly for the management of both benign and malignant disease of the upper urinary tract. Limited data exist, however, on the occupational hazards posed by complex endourologic procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and possible causes of hand problems among endourologists who routinely perform flexible ureteroscopy compared with controls. An online computer survey targeted members of the Endourological Society and psychiatrists in academic and community settings. A total of 600 endourologists and 578 psychiatrists were contacted by e-mail. Invited physicians were queried regarding their practice settings and symptoms of hand pain, neuropathy, and/or discomfort. Survey responses were obtained from 122 (20.3%) endourologists and 74 (12.8%) psychiatrists. Of endourologists, 61% were in an academic setting and 70% devoted their practice to endourology. Endourologists were in practice for a mean 13 years, performing 4.5 ureteroscopic cases per week with a mean operative time of 50 minutes. Hand/wrist problems were reported by 39 (32%) endourologists compared with 14 (19%) psychiatrists (P=0.0486, relative risk [RR]=1.69). Surgeons who preferred counterintuitive ureteroscope deflection were significantly more likely to have problems (56%) compared with intuitive users (27%) (RR 2.07, P=0.0139) or those with no preference (26%) (RR 2.15, P=0.0451). Overall, most respondents (85%) with hand/wrist problems needed either medical or surgical intervention. Hand and wrist problems are very common among endourologists. Future studies are needed to develop more ergonomic platforms and thereby reduce the endourologist's exposure to these occupational hazards.

  4. Reference values of mechanical and thermal pain tests in a pain-free population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neziri, Alban Y; Scaramozzino, Pasquale; Andersen, Ole K; Dickenson, Anthony H; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Curatolo, Michele

    2011-04-01

    Quantitative sensory tests are widely used in human research to evaluate the effect of analgesics and explore altered pain mechanisms, such as central sensitization. In order to apply these tests in clinical practice, knowledge of reference values is essential. The aim of this study was to determine the reference values of pain thresholds for mechanical and thermal stimuli, as well as withdrawal time for the cold pressor test in 300 pain-free subjects. Pain detection and pain tolerance thresholds to pressure, heat and cold were determined at three body sites: (1) lower back, (2) suprascapular region and (3) second toe (for pressure) or the lateral aspect of the leg (for heat and cold). The influences of gender, age, height, weight, body-mass index (BMI), body side of testing, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing and parameters of Short-Form 36 (SF-36) were analyzed by multiple regressions. Quantile regressions were performed to define the 5th, 10th and 25th percentiles as reference values for pain hypersensitivity and the 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles as reference values for pain hyposensitivity. Gender, age and/or the interaction of age with gender were the only variables that consistently affected the pain measures. Women were more pain sensitive than men. However, the influence of gender decreased with increasing age. In conclusion, normative values of parameters related to pressure, heat and cold pain stimuli were determined. Reference values have to be stratified by body region, gender and age. The determination of these reference values will now allow the clinical application of the tests for detecting abnormal pain reactions in individual patients. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychosocial determinants of HIV testing across stages of change in Spanish population: a cross-sectional national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jose Fuster-RuizdeApodaca

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of this research is to study the psychosocial determinants of HIV-testing as a function of the decision or change stage concerning this health behavior. The determinants considered in the major ongoing health models and the stages contemplated in the Precaution Adoption Process Model are analysed. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 1,554 people over 16 years of age living in Spain by a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI. The sample design was randomised, with quotas of sex and age. The survey measured various psychosocial determinants of health behaviors considered in the main cognitive theories, the interviewees' stage of change concerning HIV-testing (lack of awareness, decision not to act, decision to act, action, maintenance, and abandonment, and the signal for the action of getting tested or the perceived barriers to being tested. Results Approximately two thirds of the population had not ever had the HIV test. The predominant stage was lack of awareness. The most frequently perceived barriers to testing were related to the health system and to the stigma. We also found that the psychosocial determinants studied differed depending on the respondents' stage of change. Perception of risk, perceived self-efficacy, proximity to people who had been tested, perceived benefits of knowing the diagnosis, and a positive instrumental and emotional attitude were positively associated with the decision and maintenance of testing behavior. However, unrealistic underestimation of the risk of HIV infection, stereotypes about the infection, and the perceived severity of HIV were associated with the decision not to be tested. Conclusions There are various sociocognitive and motivational profiles depending on people’s decision stage concerning HIV-testing. Knowing this profile may allow us to design interventions to influence the psychosocial determinants that characterise each stage of change.

  6. Psychosocial determinants of HIV testing across stages of change in Spanish population: a cross-sectional national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-RuizdeApodaca, Maria Jose; Laguia, Ana; Molero, Fernando; Toledo, Javier; Arrillaga, Arantxa; Jaen, Angeles

    2017-03-07

    The goal of this research is to study the psychosocial determinants of HIV-testing as a function of the decision or change stage concerning this health behavior. The determinants considered in the major ongoing health models and the stages contemplated in the Precaution Adoption Process Model are analysed. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 1,554 people over 16 years of age living in Spain by a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI). The sample design was randomised, with quotas of sex and age. The survey measured various psychosocial determinants of health behaviors considered in the main cognitive theories, the interviewees' stage of change concerning HIV-testing (lack of awareness, decision not to act, decision to act, action, maintenance, and abandonment), and the signal for the action of getting tested or the perceived barriers to being tested. Approximately two thirds of the population had not ever had the HIV test. The predominant stage was lack of awareness. The most frequently perceived barriers to testing were related to the health system and to the stigma. We also found that the psychosocial determinants studied differed depending on the respondents' stage of change. Perception of risk, perceived self-efficacy, proximity to people who had been tested, perceived benefits of knowing the diagnosis, and a positive instrumental and emotional attitude were positively associated with the decision and maintenance of testing behavior. However, unrealistic underestimation of the risk of HIV infection, stereotypes about the infection, and the perceived severity of HIV were associated with the decision not to be tested. There are various sociocognitive and motivational profiles depending on people's decision stage concerning HIV-testing. Knowing this profile may allow us to design interventions to influence the psychosocial determinants that characterise each stage of change.

  7. Implications of using whole genome sequencing to test unselected populations for high risk breast cancer genes: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Kroese, Mark; Burton, Hilary; Pharoah, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The decision to test for high risk breast cancer gene mutations is traditionally based on risk scores derived from age, family and personal cancer history. Next generation sequencing technologies such as whole genome sequencing (WGS) make wider population testing more feasible. In the UK's 100,000 Genomes Project, mutations in 16 genes including BRCA1 and BRCA2 are to be actively sought regardless of clinical presentation. The implications of deploying this approach at scale for patients and clinical services are unclear. In this study we aimed to model the effect of using WGS to test an unselected UK population for high risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene variants to inform the debate around approaches to secondary genomic findings. We modelled the test performance of WGS for identifying pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in an unselected hypothetical population of 100,000 UK women, using published literature to derive model input parameters. We calculated analytic and clinical validity, described potential health outcomes and highlighted current areas of uncertainty. We also performed a sensitivity analysis in which we re-ran the model 100,000 times to investigate the effect of varying input parameters. In our models WGS was predicted to identify correctly 93 pathogenic BRCA1 mutations and 151 BRCA2 mutations in 120 and 200 women respectively, resulting in an analytic sensitivity of 75.5-77.5 %. Of 244 women with identified pathogenic mutations, we estimated that 132 (range 121-198) would develop breast cancer, so could potentially be helped by intervention. We also predicted that breast cancer would occur in 41 women (range 36-62) incorrectly identified with no pathogenic mutations and in 12,460 women without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. There was considerable uncertainty about the penetrance of mutations in people without a family history of disease and the appropriate threshold of absolute disease risk for clinical action, which impacts on judgements about the clinical

  8. Estimation of stature using hand and foot dimensions in Slovak adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrová, Petra; Beňuš, Radoslav; Masnicová, Soňa; Obertová, Zuzana; Kramárová, Daniela; Kyselicová, Klaudia; Dörnhöferová, Michaela; Bodoriková, Silvia; Neščáková, Eva

    2015-03-01

    Hand and foot dimensions used for stature estimation help to formulate a biological profile in the process of personal identification. Morphological variability of hands and feet shows the importance of generating population-specific equations to estimate stature. The stature, hand length, hand breadth, foot length and foot breadth of 250 young Slovak males and females, aged 18-24 years, were measured according to standard anthropometric procedures. The data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test for sex and bilateral differences. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for assessing relationship between stature and hand/foot parameters, and subsequently linear regression analysis was used to estimate stature. The results revealed significant sex differences in hand and foot dimensions as well as in stature (pstature and all measurements in both sexes (pstature prediction ranged from ±4.6 to ±6.1cm. The results of this study indicate that hand and foot dimension can be used to estimate stature for Slovak for the purpose of forensic field. The regression equations can be of use for stature estimation particularly in cases of dismembered bodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Do bimanual coordination, tool use, and body posture contribute equally to hand preferences in bonobos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardo, Ameline; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Meunier, Hélène

    2015-05-01

    Approximately 90% of the human population is right-handed. The emergence of this hand preference in humans is thought to be linked to the ability to execute complex tasks and habitual bipedalism. In order to test these hypotheses, the present study explored, for the first time, hand preference in relation to both body posture (seated and bipedal) and task complexity (bimanual coordination and two tool use tasks of different complexity) in bonobos (Pan paniscus). Few studies have explored the effects of both posture and task complexity on handedness, and investigations with bonobos are scarce, particularly studies on tool use. Our study aims to overcome such a gap by addressing two main questions: 1) Does a bipedal posture increase the strength of hand preference and/or create a directional bias to the use of the right hand? 2) Independent of body posture, does task complexity increase the strength of the hand preference and/or create a directional bias to the use of the right hand? Our results show that independent of body posture, the more complex the task, the more lateralization occurred. Moreover, subjects tended to be right-handed for tasks involving tool use. However, posture had no significant effect on hand preference in the tasks tested here. Therefore, for a given task, bonobos were not more lateralized in a bipedal posture than in a seated one. Task complexity might thus have contributed more than bipedal posture to the emergence of human lateralization and the preponderance of right-handedness, although a larger sample size and more data are needed to be conclusive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of task-oriented activities on hand functions, cognitive functions and self-expression of elderly patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Bo-Young; Bang, Yo-Soon; Hwang, Min-Ji; Oh, Eun-Ju

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] This study investigates the effects of task-oriented activities on hand function, cognitive function, and self-expression of the elderly with dementia, and then identify the influencing factors on self-expression in sub-factors of dependent variables. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly persons were divided into two groups: intervention group (n=20) and control group (n=20). The interventions were applied to the subjects 3 times a week, 50 minutes per each time, for a total of five weeks. We measured the jamar hand dynamometer test for grip strength, the jamar hydraulic pinch gauge test for prehension test, nine-hole pegboard test for coordination test, and Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment-Geriatric Population for cognitive function, and self-expression rating scale for self-expression test. [Results] The task-oriented activities promoted hand function, cognitive function (visual perception, spatial perception, visuomotor organization, attention & concentration) and self-expression of the elderly with early dementia, and the factors influencing the self-expression were cognitive function (visual perception) and hand function (coordination). The study showed that the task-oriented program enabled self-expression by improving hand function and cognitive function. [Conclusion] This study suggested that there should be provided the task-oriented program for prevention and treatment of the elderly with early dementia in the clinical settings and it was considered that results have a value as basic data that can be verified relationship of hand function, cognitive function, and self-expression.

  11. Racial disparities in BRCA testing and cancer risk management across a population-based sample of young breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragun, Deborah; Weidner, Anne; Lewis, Courtney; Bonner, Devon; Kim, Jongphil; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Pal, Tuya

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer (BC) disparities may widen with genomic advances. The authors compared non-Hispanic white (NHW), black, and Hispanic BC survivors for 1) cancer risk-management practices among BRCA carriers and 2) provider discussion and receipt of genetic testing. A population-based sample of NHW, black, and Hispanic women who had been diagnosed with invasive BC at age 50 years or younger from 2009 to 2012 were recruited through the state cancer registry. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare cancer risk-management practices in BRCA carriers and associations of demographic and clinical variables with provider discussion and receipt of testing. Of 1622 participants, 159 of 440 (36.1%) black women, 579 of 897 (64.5%) NHW women, 58 of 117 (49.6%) Spanish-speaking Hispanic women, and 116 of 168 (69%) English-speaking Hispanic women underwent BRCA testing, of whom 90 had a pathogenic BRCA mutation identified. Among BRCA carriers, the rates of risk-reducing mastectomy and risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy were significantly lower among black women compared with Hispanic and NHW women after controlling for clinical and demographic variables (P = .025 and P = .008, respectively). Compared with NHW women, discussion of genetic testing with a provider was 16 times less likely among black women (P testing arise from cancer risk-management practice options. Furthermore, lower BRCA testing rates among blacks may partially be because of a lower likelihood of provider discussion. Future studies are needed to improve cancer risk identification and management practices across all populations to prevent the widening of disparities. Cancer 2017;123:2497-05. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Cross cultural equivalence testing of the Prosthetic Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ) for an Arabic speaking population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Sarah Jane; Buis, Arjan

    2012-06-01

    There are currently no published prosthetic-related outcome measurement tools (OMT) available in the Arabic language. The aim of this study was to translate the Prosthetic Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ) into Arabic, ensuring cross-cultural equivalence with the original English language version. Psychometric property testing. The PEQ was culturally and linguistically adapted from English to Arabic using a process of forward translation, backward translation, committee review and pre-testing. Pre-testing was carried out in a clinical trial where subjects each completed the questionnaire in Arabic and English, and underwent random probe questioning. The data were compared and analysed, using intraclass correlation (ICC) and Bland Altman plots. Seven patients gave consent and completed the study. For all nine PEQ scales, the ICC point estimate scores were above 0.8, indicating a good degree of correlation. However, for some scales, the 95% confidence interval was wide, indicating a large level of variation. The Bland Altman plots displayed a good distribution around the mean for most of the scales, although the results were affected by the small sample size. The results of the analysis showed that the Arabic version of the PEQ was linguistically equivalent to the original version, although further testing with a larger sample group is recommended. The availability of a prosthetic outcome measurement tool in Arabic will enable clinicians to collect evidence that can be used to monitor and improve patient care. As there is currently little information available about amputees in the Gulf region, this tool will be a useful resource to both clinicians and decision makers.

  13. Testing the circadian gene hypothesis in prostate cancer: a population-based case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong; Stevens, Richard G.; Hoffman, Aaron E.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kwon, Erika M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Davis, Scott; Zheng, Tongzhang; Stanford, Janet L

    2009-01-01

    Circadian genes are responsible for maintaining the ancient adaptation of a 24-hour circadian rhythm and influence a variety of cancer-related biological pathways, including the regulation of sex hormone levels. However, few studies have been undertaken to investigate the role of circadian genes in the development of prostate cancer, the most common cancer type among men (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer). The current genetic association study tested the circadian gene hypothesis in relatio...

  14. Noninvasive prenatal testing in routine clinical practice for a high-risk population

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Guijie; Yi, Jianping; HAN Baosheng; Liu, Heng; Guo, Wanru; Shi, Chong; Yin, Lirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to summarize the effects of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) on aneuploidy among high-risk participants in Tangshan Maternal and Children Health Hospital. NIPT or invasive prenatal diagnosis was recommended to patients with a high risk of fetal aneuploidy from February 2013 to February 2014. Patients who exhibited eligibility and applied for NIPT from January 2012 to January 2013 were included in a comparison group. The rates of patients who underwent invasive tes...

  15. Waking up the alien hand: rubber hand illusion interacts with alien hand syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Galazky, Imke

    2013-08-01

    It has been shown that combinations of visual, tactile, and proprioceptive manipulations in healthy subjects may elicit illusory feelings of embodiment (the rubber hand illusion and the somatic rubber hand illusion). We report a case of alien hand syndrome in which the alien hand interacted with the somatic rubber hand illusion to provoke a very strong movement of the alien hand. This effect could be reliably replicated at every application of the experimental procedure. Thus, the illusion seemed to wake up the alien hand. The results demonstrate that the alien hand syndrome can be affected by experimentally induced bodily illusions, which are based on the manipulation of touch and proprioceptive information.

  16. User-Centered Design of a Controller-Free Game for Hand Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, Rachel; Sevick, Marisa; Chang, Chien-Yen; Lange, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a hand therapy game using the Microsoft (Redmond, WA) Kinect(®) sensor with a customized videogame. Using the Microsoft Kinect sensor as an input device, a customized game for hand rehabilitation was developed that required players to perform various gestures to accomplish a virtual cooking task. Over the course of two iterative sessions, 11 participants with different levels of wrist, hand, and finger injuries interacted with the game in a single session, and user perspectives and feedback were obtained via a questionnaire and semistructured interviews. Participants reported high levels of enjoyment, specifically related to the challenging nature of the game and the visuals. Participant feedback from the first iterative round of testing was incorporated to produce a second prototype for the second round of testing. Additionally, participants expressed the desire to have the game adapt and be customized to their unique hand therapy needs. The game tested in this study has the potential to be a unique and cutting edge method for the delivery of hand rehabilitation for a diverse population.

  17. Risk Factors Associated with False Positive HIV Test Results in a Low-Risk Urban Obstetric Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara T. Chao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine risk factors for false positive HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA testing at delivery. Study Design. A review of pregnant women who delivered at Parkland Hospital between 2005 and 2008 was performed. Patients routinely received serum HIV EIA testing at delivery, with positive results confirmed through immunofluorescent testing. Demographics, HIV, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, and rapid plasma reagin (RPR results were obtained. Statistical analyses included Pearson's chi-square and Student's t-test. Results. Of 47,794 patients, 47,391 (99% tested negative, 145 (0.3% falsely positive, 172 (0.4% positive, and 86 (0.2% equivocal or missing HIV results. The positive predictive value of EIA was 54.3%. Patients with false positive results were more likely nulliparous (43% versus 31%, <0.001 and younger (23.9±5.7 versus 26.2±5.9 years, <0.001. HIV positive patients were older than false positive patients and more likely positive for HBsAg and RPR. Conclusion. False positive HIV testing at delivery using EIA is associated with young maternal age and nulliparity in this population.

  18. Risk factors associated with false positive HIV test results in a low-risk urban obstetric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tamara T; Sheffield, Jeanne S; Wendel, George D; Ansari, M Qasim; McIntire, Donald D; Roberts, Scott W

    2012-01-01

    To examine risk factors for false positive HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing at delivery. A review of pregnant women who delivered at Parkland Hospital between 2005 and 2008 was performed. Patients routinely received serum HIV EIA testing at delivery, with positive results confirmed through immunofluorescent testing. Demographics, HIV, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) results were obtained. Statistical analyses included Pearson's chi-square and Student's t-test. Of 47,794 patients, 47,391 (99%) tested negative, 145 (0.3%) falsely positive, 172 (0.4%) positive, and 86 (0.2%) equivocal or missing HIV results. The positive predictive value of EIA was 54.3%. Patients with false positive results were more likely nulliparous (43% versus 31%, P HIV positive patients were older than false positive patients and more likely positive for HBsAg and RPR. False positive HIV testing at delivery using EIA is associated with young maternal age and nulliparity in this population.

  19. Interventions for preventing occupational irritant hand dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Andrea; Schmitt, Jochen; Bennett, Cathy; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Elsner, Peter; English, John; Williams, Hywel C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Occupational irritant hand dermatitis (OIHD) is an important cause of discomfort in the working population. Different preventive measures are in place but it is not clear how effective these are. Objectives To assess the effect of interventions for preventing OIHD in healthy people who

  20. The Spectrum of Hand Dysfunction After Hemodialysis Fistula Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Rehfuss, Jonathan P.; Berceli, Scott A.; Sarah M. Barbey; He, Yong; Kubilis, Paul S.; Beck, Adam W.; Huber, Thomas S.; Salvatore T Scali

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary dogma has classically attributed hand dysfunction following hemodialysis arteriovenous fistula (AVF) placement to regional ischemia. We hypothesize that hemodynamic perturbations alone do not entirely explain the postoperative changes in hand function and, furthermore, that various elements of hand function are differentially affected following surgery. Methods: Bilateral wrist and digital pressures and upper extremity nerve conduction tests were recorded preoperatively and at...