WorldWideScience

Sample records for test development progress

  1. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system testing and development progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Pedersen, Kevin; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter

    2001-02-01

    Successful development of space fission systems will require an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. Testing can be divided into two categories, non-nuclear tests and nuclear tests. Full power nuclear tests of space fission systems are expensive, time consuming, and of limited use, even in the best of programmatic environments. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. Non-nuclear tests are affordable and timely, and the cause of component and system failures can be quickly and accurately identified, MSFC is leading a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system using non-nuclear testing. This test series is carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities. If SAFE-related nuclear tests are desired, they will have a high probability of success and can be performed at existing nuclear facilities. The paper describes the SAFE non-nuclear test series, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans. .

  2. Cascade Distillation Subsystem Development: Progress Toward a Distillation Comparison Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, M. R.; Lubman, A.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2009-01-01

    Recovery of potable water from wastewater is essential for the success of long-duration manned missions to the Moon and Mars. Honeywell International and a team from NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing a wastewater processing subsystem that is based on centrifugal vacuum distillation. The wastewater processor, referred to as the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS), utilizes an innovative and efficient multistage thermodynamic process to produce purified water. The rotary centrifugal design of the system also provides gas/liquid phase separation and liquid transport under microgravity conditions. A five-stage subsystem unit has been designed, built, delivered and integrated into the NASA JSC Advanced Water Recovery Systems Development Facility for performance testing. A major test objective of the project is to demonstrate the advancement of the CDS technology from the breadboard level to a subsystem level unit. An initial round of CDS performance testing was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2008. Based on FY08 testing, the system is now in development to support an Exploration Life Support (ELS) Project distillation comparison test expected to begin in early 2009. As part of the project objectives planned for FY09, the system will be reconfigured to support the ELS comparison test. The CDS will then be challenged with a series of human-gene-rated waste streams representative of those anticipated for a lunar outpost. This paper provides a description of the CDS technology, a status of the current project activities, and data on the system s performance to date.

  3. Recent Progress in the Development of Diagnostic Tests for Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis D. Krampa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of malaria on global health has continually prompted the need to develop effective diagnostic strategies. In malaria endemic regions, routine diagnosis is hampered by technical and infrastructural challenges to laboratories. These laboratories lack standard facilities, expertise or diagnostic supplies; thus, therapy is administered based on clinical or self-diagnosis. There is the need for accurate diagnosis of malaria due to the continuous increase in the cost of medication, and the emergence and spread of drug resistant strains. However, the widely utilized Giemsa-stained microscopy and immunochromatographic tests for malaria are liable to several drawbacks, including inadequate sensitivity and false-positive outcomes. Alternative methods that offer improvements in performance are either expensive, have longer turnaround time or require a level of expertise that makes them unsuitable for point-of-care (POC applications. These gaps necessitate exploration of more efficient detection techniques with the potential of POC applications, especially in resource-limited settings. This minireview discusses some of the recent trends and new approaches that are seeking to improve the clinical diagnosis of malaria.

  4. Serologic test systems development. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, G.C.; Clinard, E.H.; Bartlett, M.L.; Petersen, P.M.; Sanders, W.M.; Payne, R.J.; Martinez, E.

    1978-01-01

    Work has continued on the development and application of the Enzyme-Labeled Antibody (ELA) test to the USDA needs. Results on trichinosis, brucellosis, and staphylococcal enterotoxin A detection are very encouraging. A field test for trichinosis detection is being worked out in cooperation with Food Safety and Quality Service personnel. Work is in progress with the Technicon Instrument Corporation to develop a modification of their equipment to automatically process samples by the ELA procedure. An automated ELA readout instrument for 96-well trays has been completed and is being checked out.

  5. Progress in the development of a SiC{sub f}/SiC creep test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Lewinsohn, C.A.; Jones, R.H.; Youngblood, G.E.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hecht, S.L.

    1996-10-01

    An effort is now underway to design an experiment that will allow the irradiation creep behavior of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites to be quantified. Numerous difficulties must be overcome to achieve this goal, including determining an appropriate specimen geometry that will fit their radiation volumes available and developing a fabrication procedure for such a specimen. A specimen design has been selected, and development of fabrication methods is proceeding. Thermal and stress analyses are being performed to evaluate the viability of the specimen and to assist with determining the design parameters. A possible alternate type of creep test is also being considered. Progress in each of these areas is described in this report.

  6. The European ITER test blanket modules: Progress in development of fabrication technologies towards standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zmitko, Milan, E-mail: milan.zmitko@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla 2, Barcelona (Spain); Thomas, Noël [ATMOSTAT, F-94815 Villejuif (France); LiPuma, Antonella; Forest, Laurent [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cogneau, Laurence [CEA-DRT, 38000 Grenoble (France); Rey, Jörg; Neuberger, Heiko [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, Karlsruhe (Germany); Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla 2, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Significant progress on the development of welding procedures for European TBM achieved. • Fabrication processes feasibility based on diffusion and fusion welding demonstrated. • An optimized welding scenario/sequence for TBM box assembly identified. • Future qualification of pF/WPS proposed through realization of a number of QMUs. - Abstract: The paper reviews progress achieved in development of fabrication technologies and procedures applied for manufacturing of the TBM sub-components, like, HCLL and HCPB cooling plates, HCLL/HCPB stiffening plates, and HCLL/HCPB first wall and side caps. The used technologies are based on fusion and diffusion welding techniques taking into account specificities of the EUROFER97 steel. Development of a standardized procedure complying with professional codes and standards (RCC-MRx), a preliminary fabrication/welding procedure specification (pF/WPS), is described based on fabrication and non-destructive and destructive characterization of feasibility mock-ups (FMU) aimed at assessing the suitability of a fabrication process for fulfilling the design and fabrication specifications. The main FMUs characterization results are reported (e.g. pressure resistance and helium leak tightness tests, mechanical properties and microstructure at the weld joints, geometrical characteristics of the sub-components and internal cooling channels) and the key pF/WPS steps and parameters are outlined. Also, fabrication procedures for the TBM box assembly are presently under development for the establishment of an optimized assembly sequence/scenario and development of standardized welding procedure specifications. In conclusions, further steps towards the pF/WPS qualification are briefly discussed.

  7. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

  8. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, E N; Grim, G P; Wilde, C; Wilson, D C; Morgan, G; Wilke, M; Tregillis, I; Merrill, F; Clark, D; Finch, J; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-10-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  9. Serologic test systems development. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seawright, G.L.; Sanders, W.M.; Hollstein, U.; Butler, J.E.; Mills, K.W.; Despommier, D.D.; Zimmerman, W.J.; Martinez, E.; Hindman, K.R.; Payne, R.J.

    1980-12-01

    Work has continued on the development and automation of enzyme immunoassays (EIA) for detecting diseases and toxic agents in food animals. Further evaluations were made of the Technicon Autoanalyzer II(AAII) for conducting totally automated EIAs. The problems investigated were machine carryover and assay variation. Modifications greatly reduced or eliminated carryover and produced acceptable levels of test variation. The EIA for swine trichinosis was significantly improved by the use of a new, partially purified antigen preparation. The result was improved detection of early seroconversions and reduced probability for false negatives and false positives. The amplified EIA was adapted as a diagnostic test for bovine brucellosis and studies were initiated for differentiating vaccinated and infected animals. Preliminary data indicate that the IgG/sub 1/ response may be diagnostic but further studies are necessary. Development of the EIA for detecting low molecular weight contaminants and residues in food products was also initiated. Compounds studied were the antibiotics chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamicin; the mycotoxin, aflatoxin, and the shale oil toxin, 2-aminofluorene. Results indicate that chloramphenicol nonspecifically binds to antibody and interferes with antibody activity. Thus, the test is not yet satisfactory. Initial attempts to automate the gentamicin test were unsuccessful because of machine carryover but modifications of the AAII have produced encouraging preliminary data. Work is continuing on the development of EIAs for all of the compounds mentioned above. (ERB)

  10. Final Progress Report: Developing Ethical Practices for Genetics Testing in the Workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Roberts, MD; Teddy Warner, PhD

    2008-05-14

    Our multidisciplinary research team for this project involved collaboration between the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC). Our research team in Wisconsin was led by Laura Roberts, M.D., Principal Investigator, and included Scott Helberg, MLS (Project Coordinator), Kate Green Hammond, Ph.D. (Consultant), Krisy Edenharder (Research Coordinator), and Mark Talatzko (Research Assistant). Our New Mexico-based team was led by Teddy Warner, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator and UNM Site Principal Investigator, and included Suzanne Roybal (Project Assistant), Darlyn Mabon (Project Assistant), Kate Green Hammond, PhD (Senior Research Scientist on the UNM team from 2004 until January, 2007), and Paulette Christopher (Research Assistant). In addition, computer technical and web support for the web-based survey conducted on a secure server at the University of New Mexico was provided by Kevin Wiley and Kim Hagen of the Systems and Programming Team of the Health Sciences Center Library and Information Center. We stated 3 aims in the grant proposal: (1) To collect web survey reports of the ethical perspectives, concerns, preferences and decision-making related to genetic testing using surveys from employees at: (a) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); (b) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); and (c) the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNMHSC); (2) To perform an extensive literature search and the extant survey data to develop evidence-based policy recommendations for ethically sound genetic testing associated with research and occupational health activities in the workplace; and, (3) To host a conference at the Medical College of Wisconsin to provide employers, workers, health professionals, researchers, the public, and the media an opportunity to consider ethical issues involved in genetic

  11. Tracking development of clinical reasoning ability across five medical schools using a progress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reed G; Klamen, Debra L; White, Christopher B; Petrusa, Emil; Fincher, Ruth-Marie E; Whitfield, Carol F; Shatzer, John H; McCarty, Teresita; Miller, Bonnie M

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about the acquisition of clinical reasoning skills in medical school, the development of clinical reasoning over the medical curriculum as a whole, and the impact of various curricular methodologies on these skills. This study investigated (1) whether there are differences in clinical reasoning skills between learners at different years of medical school, and (2) whether there are differences in performance between students at schools with various curricular methodologies. Students (n = 2,394) who had completed zero to three years of medical school at five U.S. medical schools participated in a cross-sectional study in 2008. Students took the same diagnostic pattern recognition (DPR) and clinical data interpretation (CDI) tests. Percent correct scores were used to determine performance differences. Data from all schools and students at all levels were aggregated for further analysis. Student performance increased substantially as a result of each year of training. Gains in DPR and CDI performance during the third year of medical school were not as great as in previous years across the five schools. CDI performance and performance gains were lower than DPR performance and gains. Performance gains attributable to training at each of the participating medical schools were more similar than different. Years of training accounted for most of the variation in DPR and CDI performance. As a rule, students at higher training levels performed better on both tests, though the expected larger gains during the third year of medical school did not materialize.

  12. Development of cognitive processing and judgments of knowledge in medical students : Analysis of progress test results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario; Kerdijk, Wouter; Jaarsma, A. D. (Debbie) C.; Tio, Rene A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beside acquiring knowledge, medical students should also develop the ability to apply and reflect on it, requiring higher-order cognitive processing. Ideally, students should have reached higher-order cognitive processing when they enter the clinical program. Whether this is the case, is

  13. Development of a competency-based formative progress test with student-generated MCQs: Results from a multi-centre pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Stefan; Möltner, Andreas; Tımbıl, Sevgi; Gornostayeva, Maryna; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Brüstle, Peter; Mohr, Daniela; Vander Beken, Anna; Better, Julian; Fries, Martin; Gottschalk, Marc; Günther, Janine; Herrmann, Laura; Kreisel, Christian; Moczko, Tobias; Illg, Claudius; Jassowicz, Adam; Müller, Andreas; Niesert, Moritz; Strübing, Felix; Jünger, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Progress tests provide students feedback on their level of proficiency over the course of their medical studies. Peer-assisted learning and competency-based education have become increasingly important in medical education. Although progress tests have been proven to be useful as a longitudinal feedback instrument, there are currently no progress tests that have been created in cooperation with students or that focus on competency in medical education. In this study, we investigated the extent to which students can be included in the development of a progress test and demonstrated that aspects of knowledge related to competency can be represented on a competency-based progress test. Methods: A two-dimensional blueprint for 144 multiple-choice questions (MCQs) covering groups of medical subjects and groups of competency areas was generated by three expert groups for developing the competency-based progress test. A total of 31 students from seven medical schools in Germany actively participated in this exercise. After completing an intensive and comprehensive training programme, the students generated and reviewed the test questions for the competency-based progress test using a separate platform of the ItemManagementSystem (IMS). This test was administered as a formative test to 469 students in a pilot study in November 2013 at eight medical schools in Germany. The scores were analysed for the overall test and differentiated according to the subject groups and competency areas. Results: A pool of more than 200 MCQs was compiled by the students for pilot use, of which 118 student-generated MCQs were used in the progress test. University instructors supplemented this pool with 26 MCQs, which primarily addressed the area of scientific skills. The post-review showed that student-generated MCQs were of high quality with regard to test statistic criteria and content. Overall, the progress test displayed a very high reliability. When the academic years were

  14. Development of a competency-based formative progress test with student-generated MCQs: Results from a multi-centre pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progress tests provide students feedback on their level of proficiency over the course of their medical studies. Peer-assisted learning and competency-based education have become increasingly important in medical education. Although progress tests have been proven to be useful as a longitudinal feedback instrument, there are currently no progress tests that have been created in cooperation with students or that focus on competency in medical education.In this study, we investigated the extent to which students can be included in the development of a progress test and demonstrated that aspects of knowledge related to competency can be represented on a competency-based progress test.Methods: A two-dimensional blueprint for 144 multiple-choice questions (MCQs covering groups of medical subjects and groups of competency areas was generated by three expert groups for developing the competency-based progress test. A total of 31 students from seven medical schools in Germany actively participated in this exercise. After completing an intensive and comprehensive training programme, the students generated and reviewed the test questions for the competency-based progress test using a separate platform of the ItemManagementSystem (IMS. This test was administered as a formative test to 469 students in a pilot study in November 2013 at eight medical schools in Germany. The scores were analysed for the overall test and differentiated according to the subject groups and competency areas.Results: A pool of more than 200 MCQs was compiled by the students for pilot use, of which 118 student-generated MCQs were used in the progress test. University instructors supplemented this pool with 26 MCQs, which primarily addressed the area of scientific skills. The post-review showed that student-generated MCQs were of high quality with regard to test statistic criteria and content. Overall, the progress test displayed a very high reliability. When the

  15. Development and preliminary testing of PROGRESS: a Web-based education program for prostate cancer survivors transitioning from active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Suzanne M; Hudson, Shawna V; Hui, Siu-Kuen Azor; Diefenbach, Michael A; Fleisher, Linda; Raivitch, Stephanie; Belton, Tanisha; Roy, Gem; Njoku, Anuli; Scarpato, John; Viterbo, Rosalia; Buyyounouski, Mark; Denlinger, Crystal; Miyamoto, Curtis; Reese, Adam; Baman, Jayson

    2015-09-01

    This formative research study describes the development and preliminary evaluation of a theory-guided, online multimedia psycho-educational program (PROGRESS) designed to facilitate adaptive coping among prostate cancer patients transitioning from treatment into long-term survivorship. Guided by the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing Model (C-SHIP) and using health communications best practices, we conducted a two-phase, qualitative formative research study with early stage prostate cancer patients (n = 29) to inform the Web program development. Phase 1 included individual (n = 5) and group (n = 12) interviews to help determine intervention content and interface. Phase 2 employed iterative user/usability testing (n = 12) to finalize the intervention. Interview data were independently coded and collectively analyzed to achieve consensus. Survivors expressed interest in action-oriented content on (1) managing treatment side effects, (2) handling body image and comorbidities related to overweight/obesity, (3) coping with emotional and communication issues, (4) tips to reduce disruptions of daily living activities, and (5) health skills training tools. Patients also desired the use of realistic and diverse survivor images. Incorporation of an established theoretical framework, application of multimedia intervention development best practices, and an evidence-based approach to content and format resulted in a psycho-educational tool that comprehensively addresses survivors' needs in a tailored fashion. The results suggest that an interactive Web-based multimedia program is useful for survivors if it covers the key topics of symptom control, emotional well-being, and coping skills training; this tool has the potential to be disseminated and implemented as an adjunct to routine clinical care.

  16. Progress Letter Report on Bending Fatigue Test System Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study (Out-of-cell fatigue testing development - Task 2.4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Cox, Thomas S [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    Vibration integrity of high burn-up spent nuclear fuel in transportation remains to be a critical component of US nuclear waste management system. The structural evaluation of package for spent fuel transportation eventually will need to see if the content or spent fuel is in a subcritical condition. However, a system for testing and characterizing such spent fuel is still lacking mainly due to the complication involved with dealing radioactive specimens in a hot cell environment. Apparently, the current state-of-the-art in spent fuel research and development is quite far away from the delivery of reliable mechanical property data for the assessment of spent fuels in the transport package evaluation. Under the sponsorship of US NRC, ORNL has taken the challenge in developing a robust testing system for spent fuel in hot cell. An extensive literature survey was carried out and unique requirements of such testing system were identified. The U-frame setup has come to the top among various designs examined for reverse bending fatigue test of spent fuel rod. The U-frame has many features that deserve mentioned here: Easy to install spent fuel rod in test; Less linkages than in conventional bending test setup such as three-point or four-point bending; Target the failure mode relevant to the fracture of spent fuel rod in transportation by focusing on pure bending; The continuous calibrations and modifications resulted in the third generation (3G) U-frame testing setup. Rigid arms are split along the LBB axis at rod sample ends. For each arm, this results in a large arm body and an end piece. Mating halves of bushings were modified into two V-shaped surfaces on which linear roller bearings (LRB) are embedded. The rod specimen is installed into the test fixture through opening and closing slide end-pieces. The 3G apparently has addressed major issues of setup identified in the previous stage and been proven to be eligible to be further pursued in this project. On the other

  17. Solar Heating Systems: Progress Checks & Tests Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joanne; And Others

    This manual contains Progress Checks and Tests for use in a Solar Heating Systems curriculum (see note). It contains master copies of all Progress Checks and Unit Tests accompanying the curriculum, organized by unit. (The master copies are to be duplicated by each school so that adequate copies are available for student use in a self-paced student…

  18. Biodiversity trends in Europe: development and testing of a species trend indicator for evaluating progress towards the 2010 target

    OpenAIRE

    de Heer, M; Kapos, V; ten Brink, B.J.E

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a trial of a species population trend indicator for evaluating progress towards the 2010 biodiversity target in Europe, using existing data. The indicator integrates trends on different species (groups), and can be aggregated across habitats and countries. Thus, the indicator can deliver both headline messages for high-level decision-making and detailed information for in-depth analysis, using data from different sources, collected with different methods.

  19. Generation speed in Raven's Progressive Matrices Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verguts, T.; Boeck, P. De; Maris, E.G.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of response fluency on a well-known intelligence test, Raven's (1962) Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) test. Critical in solving this test is finding rules that govern the items. Response fluency is conceptualized as generation speed or the speed at which a

  20. Biodiversity trends in Europe: development and testing of a species trend indicator for evaluating progress towards the 2010 target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, M; Kapos, V; ten Brink, B J E

    2005-02-28

    This paper presents a trial of a species population trend indicator for evaluating progress towards the 2010 biodiversity target in Europe, using existing data. The indicator integrates trends on different species (groups), and can be aggregated across habitats and countries. Thus, the indicator can deliver both headline messages for high-level decision-making and detailed information for in-depth analysis, using data from different sources, collected with different methods. International non-governmental organizations mobilized data on over 2800 historical trends in national populations of birds, butterflies and mammals, for a total of 273 species. These were combined by habitat and biogeographical region to generate a pilot pan-European scale indicator. The trial indicator suggests a decline of species populations in nearly all habitats, the largest being in farmland, where species populations declined by an average of 23% between 1970 and 2000. The indicator is potentially useful for monitoring progress towards 2010 biodiversity targets, but constraints include: the limited sensitivity of the historical data, which leads to conservative estimates of species decline; a potential danger of ambiguity because increases in opportunistic species can mask the loss of other species; and failure to account for pre-1970 population declines. We recommend mobilizing additional existing data, particularly for plants and fishes, and elaborating further the criteria for compiling representative sets of species. For a frequent, reliable update of the indicator, sound, sensitive and harmonized biodiversity monitoring programmes are needed in all pan-European countries.

  1. FY16 Progress Report on Test Results In Support Of Integrated EPP and SMT Design Methods Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jetter, Robert I. [RI Jetter Consulting, Pebble Beach, CA (United States); Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The proposed integrated Elastic Perfectly-Plastic (EPP) and Simplified Model Test (SMT) methodology consists of incorporating an SMT data-based approach for creep-fatigue damage evaluation into the EPP methodology to avoid using the creep-fatigue interaction diagram (the D diagram) and to minimize over-conservatism while properly accounting for localized defects and stress risers. To support the implementation of the proposed code rules and to verify their applicability, a series of thermomechanical tests have been initiated. This report presents the recent test results for Type 2 SMT specimens on Alloy 617, Pressurization SMT on Alloy 617, Type 1 SMT on Gr. 91, and two-bar thermal ratcheting test results on Alloy 617 with a new thermal loading profile.

  2. Evaluating Test Validity: Reprise and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    2016-01-01

    The AERA, APA, NCME Standards define validity as "the degree to which evidence and theory support the interpretations of test scores for proposed uses of tests". A century of disagreement about validity does not mean that there has not been substantial progress. This consensus definition brings together interpretations and use so that it…

  3. Heat Melt Compactor Development Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.; Fisher, John W.; Pace, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    The status of the Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) development project is reported. HMC Generation 2 (Gen 2) has been assembled and initial testing has begun. A baseline mission use case for trash volume reduction, water recovery, trash sterilization, and the venting of effluent gases and water vapor to space has been conceptualized. A test campaign to reduce technical risks is underway. This risk reduction testing examines the many varied operating scenarios and conditions needed for processing trash during a space mission. The test results along with performance characterization of HMC Gen 2 will be used to prescribe requirements and specifications for a future ISS flight Technology Demonstration. We report on the current status, technical risks, and test results in the context of an ISS vent-to-space Technology Demonstration.

  4. Drug progression model: a social control test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, A C; Bahr, S J

    1995-09-01

    A social control drug progression model was delineated and tested using a sample of 2,626 high school students from the southwestern United States. Along with the social control constructs of parental attachment, educational attachment, religious attachment, and conventional values, we incorporated alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use into the model as intervening variables. The model explains 39% of the variation in the self-reported amphetamine use and 24% of the variation in "hard drug" use (cocaine, heroin, LSD, and PCP). The findings suggest that the integration of social control theory and drug progression improves the predictive power of the model of adolescent drug use.

  5. Standard setting for progress tests: combining external and internal standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Chris; Freeman, Adrian C; Coombes, Lee R

    2009-06-01

    There has been little work on standard setting for progress tests and it is common practice to use normative standards. This study aimed to develop a new approach to standard setting for progress tests administered at the point when students approach graduation. In this study we obtained performance data from newly qualified doctors and used this information to set the standard for the last progress test in the final year of undergraduate medical education. This external reference was validated against projections of student performance data based upon normative grading, and other published results. A simple linear growth model was used to set pass scores for progress tests earlier in the final year and this was also validated by published data. There was good agreement between standards set using the data from newly qualified doctors, the standard expected from extrapolation of the student progression data, and published performance data from another medical school. We have demonstrated that a combination of data from independent sources can be used to triangulate standard-setting decisions for progress tests. Performance data from successive cohorts of medical students could provide a fruitful source of information for standard setting for progress tests.

  6. Progress in Brucella vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANG, Xinghong; SKYBERG, Jerod A.; CAO, Ling; CLAPP, Beata; THORNBURG, Theresa; PASCUAL, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp. are zoonotic, facultative intracellular pathogens, which cause animal and human disease. Animal disease results in abortion of fetuses; in humans, it manifests flu-like symptoms with an undulant fever, with osteoarthritis as a common complication of infection. Antibiotic regimens for human brucellosis patients may last several months and are not always completely effective. While there are no vaccines for humans, several licensed live Brucella vaccines are available for use in livestock. The performance of these animal vaccines is dependent upon the host species, dose, and route of immunization. Newly engineered live vaccines, lacking well-defined virulence factors, retain low residual virulence, are highly protective, and may someday replace currently used animal vaccines. These also have possible human applications. Moreover, due to their enhanced safety and efficacy in animal models, subunit vaccines for brucellosis show great promise for their application in livestock and humans. This review summarizes the progress of brucellosis vaccine development and presents an overview of candidate vaccines. PMID:23730309

  7. Tuberculosis vaccine development: recent progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, I M; McMurray, D N; Belisle, J T

    2001-03-01

    Recent years have seen a renewed effort to develop new vaccines against tuberculosis. As a result, several promising avenues of research have developed, including the production of recombinant vaccines, auxotrophic vaccines, DNA vaccines and subunit vaccines. In this article we briefly review this work, as well as consider the pros and cons of the animal models needed to test these new vaccines. Screening to date has been carried out in mouse and guinea pig models, which have been used to obtain basic information such as the effect of the vaccine on bacterial load, and whether the vaccine can prevent or reduce lung pathology. The results to date lead us to be optimistic that new candidate vaccines could soon be considered for evaluation in clinical trials.

  8. Individual Moral Development and Moral Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Anders; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2017-01-01

    At first glance, one of the most obvious places to look for moral progress is in individuals, in particular in moral development from childhood to adulthood. In fact, that moral progress is possible is a foundational assumption of moral education. Beyond the general agreement that moral progress is

  9. Progress Toward Replacing Animals in Toxicity Testing for Cosmetics

    OpenAIRE

    Nye, Marisa B.

    2006-01-01

    In the 1980’s, animal rights activists successfully motivated the cosmetic industry to begin researching alternatives to animal tests. The European Union has taken action to stimulate development and validation of alternatives to animal testing through the Sixth and Seventh Amendments to the Cosmetics Directive. In this paper, I will briefly describe the history of the search for alternatives to animal testing for cosmetics. I will then discuss the progress that has been ma...

  10. NASA's SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM: Development and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, John; Lyles, Garry

    2016-01-01

    NASA is embarked on a new era of space exploration that will lead to new capabilities, new destinations, and new discoveries by both human and robotic explorers. Today, the International Space Station (ISS) and robotic probes are yielding knowledge that will help make this exploration possible. NASA is developing both the Orion crew vehicle and the Space Launch System (SLS) (Figure 1), that will carry out a series of increasingly challenging missions leading to human exploration of Mars. This paper will discuss the development and progress on the SLS. The SLS architecture was designed to be safe, affordable, and sustainable. The current configuration is the result of literally thousands of trade studies involving cost, performance, mission requirements, and other metrics. The initial configuration of SLS, designated Block 1, will launch a minimum of 70 metric tons (mT) (154,324 pounds) into low Earth orbit - significantly greater capability than any current launch vehicle. It is designed to evolve to a capability of 130 mT (286,601 pounds) through the use of upgraded main engines, advanced boosters, and a new upper stage. With more payload mass and volume capability than any existing rocket, SLS offers mission planners larger payloads, faster trip times, simpler design, shorter design cycles, and greater opportunity for mission success. Since the program was officially created in fall 2011, it has made significant progress toward launch readiness in 2018. Every major element of SLS continued to make significant progress in 2015. Engineers fired Qualification Motor 1 (QM-1) in March 2015 to test the 5-segment motor, including new insulation, joint, and propellant grain designs. More than 70 major components of test article and flight hardware for the Core Stage have been manufactured. Seven test firings have been completed with an RS-25 engine under SLS operating conditions. The test article for the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) has also been completed

  11. Development Studies: Work in Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the establishment of Development Studies at several European universities at the end of the 1960s, these institutes evolved from an amalgam of left-inclined students and professors towards representatives of an established academic discipline. The author critically reflects upon the

  12. Evaluating Youth Development Programs: Progress and Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jodie L.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Advances in theories of adolescent development and positive youth development have greatly increased our understanding of how programs and practices with adolescents can impede or enhance their development. In this article the authors reflect on the progress in research on youth development programs in the last two decades, since possibly the…

  13. Progress in HIV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Denise C; O'Connell, Robert J

    2017-05-04

    An HIV-1 vaccine is needed to curtail the HIV epidemic. Only one (RV144) out of the 6 HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials performed showed efficacy. A potential mechanism of protection is the induction of functional antibodies to V1V2 region of HIV envelope. The 2 main current approaches to the generation of protective immunity are through broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAb) and induction of functional antibodies (non-neutralizing Abs with other potential anti-viral functions). Passive immunization using bnAb has advanced into phase II clinical trials. The induction of bnAb using mimics of the natural Env trimer or B-cell lineage vaccine design is still in pre-clinical phase. An attempt at optimization of protective functional antibodies will be assessed next with the efficacy trial (HVTN702) about to start. With on-going optimization of prime/boost strategies, the development of mosaic immunogens, replication competent vectors, and emergence of new strategies designed to induce bnAb, the prospects for a preventive HIV vaccine have never been more promising.

  14. Factors of progress in reading literacy test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vitomir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to identify the factors which are most associated with the progress in reading literacy assessed in the PISA survey. In the preliminary sample, students from ten schools (N=235 were retested two years after the 2009 PISA original study. There were measured intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, school self-efficacy, epistemological beliefs, metacognitive strategies, socio-economic status, enjoyment and preference for reading and motivation and self-regulation. The examined factors explain 27% of the variance in reading literacy progress. Factors that contribute most to this progress are school self-efficacy, proper use of metacognitive strategies and low extrinsic motivation. Socio-economic status explained a negligible amount of variance, while some effect of type of school on progress in reading literacy (η2=7% was observed. Achievement in reading literacy is correlated with school marks. Students who attend secondary schools are more likely to make progress in reading literacy than those who attend vocational schools. An attempt was made to formulate the implications for education policy based on this research.

  15. Development and progression of colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Upender; Shanmugam, Chandrakumar; Katkoori, Venkat R; Bumpers, Harvey L; Grizzle, William E

    2010-01-01

    A variety of genetic and molecular alterations underlie the development and progression of colorectal neoplasia (CRN). Most of these cancers arise sporadically due to multiple somatic mutations and genetic instability. Genetic instability includes chromosomal instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MSI), which is observed in most hereditary non-polyposis colon cancers (HNPCCs) and accounts for a small proportion of sporadic CRN. Although many biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis and prediction of the clinical outcomes of CRNs, no single marker has established value. New markers and genes associated with the development and progression of CRNs are being discovered at an accelerated rate. CRN is a heterogeneous disease, especially with respect to the anatomic location of the tumor, race/ethnicity differences, and genetic and dietary interactions that influence its development and progression and act as confounders. Hence, efforts related to biomarker discovery should focus on identification of individual differences based on tumor stage, tumor anatomic location, and race/ethnicity; on the discovery of molecules (genes, mRNA transcripts, and proteins) relevant to these differences; and on development of therapeutic approaches to target these molecules in developing personalized medicine. Such strategies have the potential of reducing the personal and socio-economic burden of CRNs. Here, we systematically review molecular and other pathologic features as they relate to the development, early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, progression, and prevention of CRNs, especially colorectal cancers (CRCs).

  16. SMRT-STEPS: School Mastery of Reading Test System to Enhance Progress of Schools. Fall, 1986 Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippel, Gary M.; Forehand, Garlie A.

    This progress report describes the development and field testing of the School Mastery of Reading Test (SMRT). The SMRT was administered in May 1986 to 889 fourth graders in nine schools in Brooklyn, New York. Counts of students tested in each school and school profile data are provided. Machine scoring procedures are detailed, and results…

  17. Factors of progress in reading literacy test

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović, Vitomir

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to identify the factors which are most associated with the progress in reading literacy assessed in the PISA survey. In the preliminary sample, students from ten schools (N=235) were retested two years after the 2009 PISA original study. There were measured intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, school self-efficacy, epistemological beliefs, metacognitive strategies, socio-economic status, enjoyment and preference for reading and motivation and self-regulation. Th...

  18. Complex fold patterns developed by progressive deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Jordi; Druguet, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Folds arise from shortening instabilities in rocks containing layers with contrasting viscosities or bearing mechanical anisotropies. A complete understanding of this fact requires a three-dimensional approach, because of the variable geometrical relations between strain and kinematic tensors and the surfaces subjected to folding. This is especially common in progressive non-coaxial flow, under which folds become unstable, leading to fold hinge curvature, axial surface curvature or both. The resulting complex fold patterns generated by progressive folding can be morphologically indistinguishable from interference patterns produced by the superposition of two fold systems, and a detailed 3-D analysis is needed to distinguish between them. This study is focused on complex fold shapes arisen from progressive single deformations. Examples can be grouped into: (i) non-cylindrical (or non-cylindroidal) folds and (ii) folds with non-planar axial surfaces (or non-plane folds). In both cases, hinge lines and axial surfaces can display up to a 180° curvature. Hinge line curvature leads to the development of sheath folds, while axial surface curvature leads to the development of polyclinal folds, being these cylindroidal if the hinges remain straight. The two end-member situations (sheath folds and polyclinal folds) are illustrated using examples from the Variscan Cap de Creus massif (Eastern Pyrenees). Fold Hinge rotation and development of sheath folds In simple shear zones, folds commonly nucleate with hinges at a high angle to the shear direction and progressively rotate towards parallelism with the shear/extension direction, giving rise to sheath folds. Axial surfaces also change in attitude with increasing strain, becoming parallel to the shear plane. Development of polyclinal folds with strongly curved axial surfaces A peculiar complex fold pattern consists of strongly curved axial surfaces but straight hinges. This folding type is opposed to sheath folds where axial

  19. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3, industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report number 12, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States). Power Plant Labs.; Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1994-11-18

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. During this reporting period, data reduction/evaluation and interpretation from the long term four hundred hours Proof-of-Concept System Test under Task 3 were completed. Cumulatively, a total of approximately 563 hours of coal testing was performed with 160 hrs on 100% coal and over 400 hours with co-firing coal and gas. The primary objectives of this testing were to: (1) obtain steady state operation consistently on 100% coal; (2) increase carbon conversion efficiency from 95% to the project goal of 98%; and (3) maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lbs/MBtu. The following specific conclusions are based on results of coal-fired testing at Penn State and the initial economic evaluation of the HEACC system: a coal handling/preparation system can be designed to meet the technical requirements for retrofitting microfine coal combustion to a gas/oil-designed boiler; the boiler thermal performance requirements were met; the NOx emission target of was met; combustion efficiencies of 95% could be met on a daily average basis, somewhat below the target of 98%; the economic playback is very sensitive to fuel differential cost, unit size, and annual operating hours; continuous long term demonstration is needed to quantify ash effects and how to best handle ashes. The following modifications are recommended prior to the 1,000 hour demonstration phase testing: (1) coal feeding improvements--improved raw coal/storage and transport, installation of gravimetric feeder, and redesign/installation of surge bin bottom; (2) burner modification--minor modification to the tip of the existing HEACC burner to prevent change of flame shapes for no apparent reason.

  20. Flexible electronic feedback using the virtues of progress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijtjens, Arno M M; Timmermans, Ilske; Donkers, Jeroen; Peperkamp, Robert; Medema, Harro; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Thoben, Arnold; Wenink, Arnold C G; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2010-01-01

    The potential richness of the feedback for learners and teachers is one of the educational advantages of progress tests (PTs). Every test administration yields information on a student's knowledge level in each sub-domain of the test (cross-sectional information), and it adds a next point to the corresponding knowledge growth curve (longitudinal information). Traditional paper-based feedback has severe limitations and requires considerable effort from the learners to give meaning to the data. We reasoned that the PT data should be flexibly accessible in all pathways and with any available comparison data, according to the personal interest of the learner. For that purpose, a web-based tool (Progress test Feedback, the ProF system) was developed. This article presents the principles and features of the generated feedback and shows how it can be used. In addition to enhancement of the feedback, the ProF database of longitudinal PT-data also provides new opportunities for research on knowledge growth, and these are currently being explored.

  1. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, R.; Borio, R. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States). Power Plant Labs.; Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)

    1994-09-23

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the tenth quarter of the program. The four hundred hours ``Proof-of-Concept System Test`` under Task 3 was completed during this quarter. The primary objectives were to obtain steady state operation consistently on coal only and increase carbon conversion efficiency from {approximately}95% to the project goal of 98%. This was to be obtained without increasing NO{sub x} emission above the project goal level of 0.6 lbs/MBtu ({approximately}425 ppM). The testing was also designed to show that consistent, reliable operation could be achieved as another prerequisite to the demonstration. The data were gathered and analyzed for both economic and technical analysis prior to committing to the long term demonstration. The Economic Evaluation was completed and work started on commercialization plan. During this reporting period, activities included sample analysis, data reduction and interpretation from all the testing during March and April. Following preliminary conclusions are drawn based on results evaluated: coal handling/preparation system can be designed to meet technical requirements for retrofitting microfine coal combustion; boiler thermal performance met requirement; NO{sub x} Emission can meet target of 0.6 lb/MBtu; combustion efficiencies of 95% could be met on a daily average basis, somewhat below target of 98%; economic playback very sensitive to fuel differential cost, unit size, and annual operating hours; and continuous long term demonstration needed to quantify ash effect and how to best handle.

  2. Financial system development progress in Western Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emira Kozarević

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Financial system supports economic growth, while its regulatory framework provides stability for investors. Develo-ping countries with bank-oriented financial systems are not attractive to investors, so prolonged status quo leads to economic deterioration. This is particularly the case with some of the most underdeveloped areas in Europe: Western Balkans. It is essential the developing countries in this region consider steps towards financial liberalization, which will help open the borders for capital flows and attract new investments. The main goal of this paper is to review and present the available information related to the banking system development in Western Balkans in terms of ownership structure, capital adequacy, loan and asset performance, return on investment and liquidity. These indicators should provide a clearer picture of the current financial systems in Western Balkans economies and their development progress – useful for comparison with other developing regions and financial transformation and liberalization efforts.

  3. Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program ninth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, C.E.

    1975-01-31

    Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. NASA completed the first phase of their baseline engine heat balance tests, and an upgraded engine compressor is being scaled for test. EPA completed their report on vehicle tests including emissions and vehicle performance, and a new endurance engine is on test. Significant development progress was made on both fixed and variable geometry combustors. After 45 hours of engine operation with Vendor A ceramic regenerator, no significant deterioration of the matrix, seals, or elastomeric mount was encountered. Ceramic regenerator stress analysis has commenced. Additional developments in non-nickel oxide regenerator rubbing seals are encouraging. The first preprototype integrated control system is in vehicle operation. Control adaptation for variable inlet guide vanes and water injection is progressing. AiRefrac turbine wheels were verified dimensionally and are being processed for engine testing. Water injection tests with a four nozzle system were run, and additional performance documentation of variable inlet guide vanes was obtained. Linerless insulation is on test in the free rotor engine, the new endurance engine, and a performance engine. The free rotor engine completed test cell checkout and was installed in a vehicle. Vehicle checkout, including a preprototype integrated control, is underway. Detailed specifications of the upgraded engine were written.

  4. [Recent progress in HIV screening tests and nucleic acid tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Mitsunobu; Kato, Shingo

    2010-03-01

    HIV testing plays a crucial role in detecting and monitoring HIV infection. Diagnosis of HIV infection is basically made by sequential two tests: a screening test with an enzyme immunoassay(EIA) and a confirmatory test with Western blot. The most recent EIAs, used in commercial laboratories, identify HIV infection earlier because they detect both HIV-1 antibody and antigen. Rapid tests represent another advance for HIV screening. They are widely used in voluntary counselling and testing at public health centers and private clinics. An assay for detection of HIV-1 RNA was approved as a confirmatory test of reactive screening tests to diagnose early infection. These new testing technologies offer more accurate, reliable, and convenient diagnosis of HIV infection.

  5. Flexible electronic feedback using the virtues of progress testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijtjens, A.M.; Timmermans, I.; Donkers, J.; Peperkamp, R.; Medema, H.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; Thoben, A.; Wenink, A.C.; van der Vleuten, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    The potential richness of the feedback for learners and teachers is one of the educational advantages of progress tests (PTs). Every test administration yields information on a student's knowledge level in each sub-domain of the test (cross-sectional information), and it adds a next point to the

  6. Progress and controversies in developing cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speiser Daniel E

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapy has become a standard approach for cancer management, through the use of cytokines (eg: interleukin-2 and monoclonal antibodies. Cancer vaccines hold promise as another form of immunotherapy, and there has been substantial progress in identifying shared antigens recognized by T cells, in developing vaccine approaches that induce antigen-specific T cell responses in cancer patients, and in developing new technology for monitoring immune responses in various human tissue compartments. Dramatic clinical regressions of human solid tumors have occurred with some cancer vaccines, but the rate of those responses remains low. This article is part of a 2-part point:counterpoint series on peptide vaccines and adoptive therapy approaches for cancer. The current status of cancer vaccination, and associated challenges, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need to increase our knowledge of cancer immunobiology, as well as to improve monitoring of cellular immune function after vaccination. Progress in both areas will facilitate development of effective cancer vaccines, as well as of adoptive therapy. Effective cancer vaccines promise to be useful for treatment and prevention of cancer at low cost and with low morbidity.

  7. Development and testing of industrial scale, coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Seventeenth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauderer, B.

    1996-04-07

    In the first quarter of calendar year 1996, 9 days of combust-boiler tests were performed. Between these tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. In January and early February, the modifications and installations indicated by the 6 days of testing in December 1995 were implemented. This was followed by 6 additional consecutive test days in mid- February. This was in turn followed by additional modifications, followed by a series of 3 one day, coal fired tests at end of March. These latter tests were the first ones in which slagging conditions were achieved in the combustor. The maximum thermal input was 13 MMBtu/hr, which equals two-thirds of the rated boiler heat input. The measured thermal, combustion, and slagging performance achieved in the combustor was superior to that achieved in the final series of tests conducted in Williamsport in 1993. The combustor-boiler facility is now ready for implementation of the task 5 site demonstration.

  8. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, P.; Borio, R. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the ninth quarter of the program. During this quarter, the natural gas baseline testing at the Penn State demonstration boiler was completed, results were analyzed and are presented here. The burner operates in a stable manner over an 8/1 turndown, however due to baghouse temperature limitations (300{degrees}F for acid dewpoint), the burner is not operated for long periods of time below 75% load. Boiler efficiency averaged 83.1% at the 100 percent load rate while increasing to 83.7% at 75% load. NO{sub x} emissions ranged from a low of 0.17 Lbs/MBtu to a high of 0.24 Lbs/MBtu. After the baseline natural gas testing was completed, work continued on hardware optimization and testing with the goal of increasing carbon conversion efficiency on 100% coal firing from {approx}95% to 98%. Several coal handling and feeding problems were encountered during this quarter and no long term testing was conducted. While resolving these problems several shorter term (less than 6 hour) tests were conducted. These included, 100% coal firing tests, 100% natural gas firing tests, testing of air sparges on coal to simulate more primary air and a series of cofiring tests. For 100% coal firing, the carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) obtained this quarter did not exceed the 95-96% barrier previously reached. NO{sub x} emissions on coal only ranged from {approx} 0.42 to {approx} 0.78 Lbs/MBtu. The burner has not been optimized for low NO{sub x} yet, however, due to the short furnace residence time, meeting the goals of 98% CCE and <0.6 Lbs/MBtu NO{sub x} simultaneously will be difficult. Testing on 100% natural gas in the boiler after coal firing indicated no changes in efficiency due to firing in a `dirty` boiler. The co-firing tests showed that increased levels of natural gas firing proportionately decreased NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO.

  9. Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program: Develop and test sorbents. Fiscal year 1996 annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.

    1997-01-01

    Ion exchange removal of Cs, Sr, Tc, TRU, etc. has been proposed for minimizing the amount of HLW at Hanford. Purpose of this project is to test sequestering agents and substrates in representative physical/chemical/radiation environments. A small pilot-scale skid system was built. 7 ion exchange materials (CS-100, R-F, SuperLig 644, IE-911, TIE-96, NaTi) were evaluated for pretreatment of actual/simulated Hanford DSSF tank waste. An onsite technology demonstration was done at Hanford 100-N Area N-Springs. A second PADU test demonstrated the 3M web technology for radioactive Cs and Sr decontamination of 105-N-Reactor basin. Other collaborative efforts between PNNL and industry/university participants are reported.

  10. Recent Progress in the Sinoprobe Datacenter Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y.; Dong, S.; Zhang, G.; Liu, D.; Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    Sinoprobe datacenter development is to build new IT infrastructures needed to store, visualize and manage all the data acquired by SinoProbe program. The hardware and network infrastructures of the datacenter have been built including computer servers and storage facilities. The software system is developed using service-oriented architecture (SOA) principles and realizes major service functionalities such as including the security infrastructure services (user authentication and authorization), metadata services, data warehouse stores, data services, GIS services, and web portal through integrating various advanced technologies. These service functionalities serve three types of users, data managers, data consumers, and data providers. User management and access control, application administration, system support functionalities are mainly used by data managers. Extract, transform, and load (ETL) services are provided for data providers to upload their data into the data warehouse. Data consumers can search and download data through data search and download services. A virtual web-based globe is developed to facilitate data search and visualization. Strong support of GIS functionalities is provided including layered Geological and tectonic maps on topographic data. This poster displays the latest progress of the SinoProbe data center development and overall system functionalities.

  11. Schistosomiasis vaccine development: progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NR Bergquist

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The undisputed, worldwide success of chemotherapy notwithstanding, schistosomiasis continues to defy control efforts in as much rapid reinfection demands repeated treatment, sometimes as often as once a year. There is thus a need for a complementary tool with effect for the longer term, notably a vaccine. International efforts in this direction have been ongoing for several decades but, until the recombinant DNA techniques were introduced, antigen production remained an unsurmountable bottleneck. Although animal experiments have been highly productive and are still much needed, they probably do not reflect the human situation adequately and real progress can not be expected until more is known about human immune responses to schistosome infection. It is well-known that irradiated cercariae consistently produce high levels of protection in experimental animals but, for various reasons, this proof of principle cannot be directly exploited. Research has instead been focussed on the identification and testing of specific schistosome antigens. This work has been quite successful and is already at the stage where clinical trials are called for. Preliminary results from coordinated in vitro laboratory and field epidemiological studies regarding the protective potential of several antigens support the initiation of such trials. A series of meetings, organized earlier this year in Cairo, Egypt, reviewed recent progress, selecteded suitable vaccine candidates and made firm recommendations for future action including pledging support for large-scale production according to good manufacturing practice (GMP and Phase I trials. Scientists at the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC have drawn up a detailed research plan. The major financial support will come from USAID, Cairo, which has established a scientific advisory group of Egyptian scientists and representatives from current and previous international donors such as WHO, NIAID, the

  12. Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

  13. The development of in vitro mutagenicity testing systems using T-lymphocytes. Research progress report, November 1, 1989--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertini, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    This work has focused on the development of in vitro T-cell mutation assays. Conditions have been defined to measure the in vitro induction of mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in human T-lymphocytes. This assay is a parallel to our in vivo hprt assay, in that the same cells are utilized. However, the in vitro assay allows for carefully controlled dose response studies. 21 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Development & testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, phase 3. Eighth quarterly technical progress report, 1 October, 1993--31 December, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauderer, B.

    1994-01-31

    The primary objective of the present Phase 3 effort is to perform the final testing at a 20 MMBtu/hr commercial scale of an air cooled, slagging coal combustor for application to industrial steam boilers and power plants. The focus of the test effort will be on combustor durability, automatic control of the combustor`s operation, and optimum environmental control of emissions inside the combustor. In connection with the latter, the goal is to achieve 0.4 lb/MMBtu of SO{sub 2} emissions, 0.2 lb/MMBtu of NO{sub x} emissions, and 0.02 lb particulates/MMBtu. Meeting the particulate goal will require the use of a baghouse or electrostatic precipitator to augment the nominal slag retention in the combustor. The NO{sub x} emission goal will require a modest improvement over maximum reduction achieved to date in the combustor to a level of 0.26 lb/MMBtu. To reach the SO{sub 2} emissions goal may require a combination of sorbent injection inside the combustor and sorbent injection inside the boiler, especially in high (>3.5%) sulfur coals. Prior to the initiation of the project, SO{sub 2} levels as low as 0.6 lb/MMBtu, equal to 81% reduction in 2% sulfur coals, were measured with boiler injection of calcium hydrate. The final objective is to define suitable commercial power or steam generating systems to which the use of the air cooled combustor offers significant technical and economic benefits. In implementing this objective both simple steam generation and combined gas turbine-steam generation systems will be considered.

  15. Progress in quantitative GPR development at CNDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, F. J.; Chiou, C.-P.; Roberts, Ron; Wendt, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) uses electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses to locate and map embedded objects. Commercial GPR instruments are generally geared toward producing images showing the location and extent of buried objects, and often do not make full use of available absolute amplitude information. At the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE) at Iowa State University efforts are underway to develop a more quantitative approach to GPR inspections in which absolute amplitudes and spectra of measured signals play a key role. Guided by analogous work in ultrasonic inspection, there are three main thrusts to the effort. These focus, respectively, on the development of tools for: (1) analyzing raw GPR data; (2) measuring the EM properties of soils and other embedding media; and (3) simulating GPR inspections. This paper reviews progress in each category. The ultimate goal of the work is to develop model-based simulation tools that can be used assess the usefulness of GPR for a given inspection scenario, to optimize inspection choices, and to determine inspection reliability.

  16. Progress in quantitative GPR development at CNDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, F. J.; Chiou, C.-P.; Roberts, Ron; Wendt, Scott [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011-3042 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) uses electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses to locate and map embedded objects. Commercial GPR instruments are generally geared toward producing images showing the location and extent of buried objects, and often do not make full use of available absolute amplitude information. At the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE) at Iowa State University efforts are underway to develop a more quantitative approach to GPR inspections in which absolute amplitudes and spectra of measured signals play a key role. Guided by analogous work in ultrasonic inspection, there are three main thrusts to the effort. These focus, respectively, on the development of tools for: (1) analyzing raw GPR data; (2) measuring the EM properties of soils and other embedding media; and (3) simulating GPR inspections. This paper reviews progress in each category. The ultimate goal of the work is to develop model-based simulation tools that can be used assess the usefulness of GPR for a given inspection scenario, to optimize inspection choices, and to determine inspection reliability.

  17. The 20-Minute Version as a Predictor of the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Ronald; Schmittmann, Verena D.

    2006-01-01

    The Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test (APM) is a well-known measure of higher order general mental ability. The time to administer the test, 40 to 60 minutes, is sometimes regarded as a drawback. To meet efficiency needs, the APM can be administered as a 30-or 40-minute timed test, or one of two developed short versions could be used. In…

  18. Progress on development of SPIDER diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, R.; Agostini, M.; Barbisan, M.; Bernardi, M.; Brombin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Croci, G.; Palma, M. Dalla; Delogu, R. S.; Gorini, G.; Lotto, L.; Muraro, A.; Peruzzo, S.; Pimazzoni, A.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Zaniol, B.; Zaupa, M.

    2017-08-01

    SPIDER experiment, the full size prototype of the beam source for the ITER heating neutral beam injector, has to demonstrate extraction and acceleration to 100 kV of a large negative ion hydrogen or deuterium beam with co-extracted electron fraction e-/D- cost effective implementations. Thermocouples used to measure the power load distribution in the source and over the beam dump front surface will be efficiently fixed with proven technique and acquired through commercial and custom electronics. Spectroscopy needs to use well collimated lines of sight and will employ novel design spectrometers with higher efficiency and resolution and filtered detectors with custom built amplifiers. The electrostatic probes will be operated through electronics specifically developed to cope with the challenging environment of the RF source. The instrumented calorimeter STRIKE will use new CFC tiles, still under development. Two linear cameras, one built in house, have been tested as suitable for optical beam tomography. Some diagnostic components are off the shelf, others are custom developed: some of these are being prototyped or are under test before final production and installation, which will be completed before start of SPIDER operation.

  19. Progress in hot dry rock technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchane, D.V.; Brown, D.W.; House, L.; Robinson, B.R.; Ponden, R.

    1990-01-01

    The hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy program at Los Alamos is directed toward demonstrating the viability of HDR as a practical energy source. Recently, reservoir characterization experiments have been carried out to evaluate water loss and reservoir inflation under pressurized conditions over a long time period. In addition, advances have been made in reservoir engineering, seismic modeling, and tracer development. Preparations are being made to conduct a long term flow test (LTFT) to evaluate the thermal power potential of the existing Phase 2 reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The reservoir is located 12,000 ft below the surface and has an estimated capacity of about a million gallons. The LTFT is scheduled to start in 1991 and will run for 1--2 years. This paper summarizes recent developments in all of the above areas. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Using a Progressive Paper to Develop Students' Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bramer, Scott E.; Bastin, Loyd D.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a progressive paper in a capstone course to develop students' writing skills. A progressive paper is one that students write one section at a time: as they add each new section, they go back and revise the previous parts based on actionable feedback from the instructor. In this course, the progressive paper takes…

  1. Progress in CPI Microwave Tube Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.; Bohlen, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    CPI continues its role as a leading supplier of state-of-the-art, high-power microwave tubes; from linear beam, velocity- and density-modulated devices, to high frequency gyro-devices. Klystrons are the device-of-choice for many high-power microwave applications, and can provide multi-megawatts to multi-kilowatts of power from UHF to W-band, respectively. A number of recent and on-going developments will be described. At UHF frequencies, the inductive output tube (IOT) has replaced the klystron for terrestrial NTSC and HDTV broadcast, due to its high efficiency and linearity, and is beginning to see use in scientific applications requiring 300 kW or less. Recent advances have enabled use well into L-band. CPI has developed a number of multiple-beam amplifiers. The VKL-8301 multiple-beam klystron (MBK) was built for the TESLA V/UV and x-ray FEL projects, and is a candidate RF source for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We have also contributed to the development of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) high-power fundamental-mode S-band MBK. The VHP-8330B multiple-beam, high-order mode (HOM) IOT shows great promise as a compact, CW UHF source for high power applications. These topics will be discussed, along with CPI's development capabilities for new and novel applications. Most important is our availability to provide design and fabrication services to organizations requiring CPI's manufacturing and process control infrastructure to build and test state-of-the-art devices.

  2. A progressive shuttle run test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsbottom, R; Brewer, J; Williams, C

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the validity of using a 20 m progressive shuttle run test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake. Running ability was described as the final level attained on the shuttle run test and as time on a 5 km run. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was determined directly for seventy-four volunteers (36 men, 38 women) who also completed the shuttle run test. Maximal oxygen uptake values were 58.5 +/- 7.0 and 47.4 +/- 6.1 ml.kg-1.min-1 for the men and women respectively (mean +/- SD, P less than 0.01). The levels attained on the shuttle run test were 12.6 +/- 1.5 (men) and 9.6 +/- 1.8 (women; P less than 0.01). The correlation between VO2 max and shuttle level was 0.92. The correlation between VO2 max and the 5 km run was -0.94 and the correlation between both field tests was -0.96. The results of this study suggest that a progressive shuttle run test provides a valid estimate of VO2 max and indicates 5 km running potential in active men and women.

  3. Baseline gas turbine development program. Sixteenth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

    1976-10-31

    Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental ungraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Initial running of the upgraded engine took place on July 13, 1976. The engine proved to be mechanically sound but was also seriously deficient in power. Principal program effort has therefore been in the area of diagnostic testing and corrective development. To date, three upgraded engines were assembled and two were run in the test cell. Special diagnostic instrumentation was installed on Engine 3 to evaluate the compressor, turbine, and hot engine leakage. Engine airflow, starting characteristics, oil flow/heat rejection/blowby, emissions, leakage, and component performance tests were conducted in this quarter.

  4. Progress and Strategies for Testing of Materials for Solar Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2017-04-25

    Accelerated testing is key to confident launch of a new product. However, for new products like solar panels, the best approach is not always clear. The challenge for materials manufacturers is that test times can be long. Also, small-coupon testing may not predict the behavior in the full-size module, but testing of the full-size module is too expensive. As a result, solar panel test standards like IEC 61215 are useful, but are not sufficient. Material manufacturers have needed to define their own test protocols. This presentation will review some historical data (e.g., data show that manufacturers are making great progress toward reducing encapsulant discoloration) and describe advances in material testing (for example, new techniques are being demonstrated on how to more quantitatively assess adhesion, detect tendency for delamination, and understand how encapsulant properties affect other properties like cracking of cells). The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force has been researching climate-specific weathering tests toward the goal of defining international standards that would simplify qualification and quality assurance testing for materials. The status of these tests and the strategies for how to organize these standards to best meet the needs of the industry will be discussed.

  5. Influence of PBL with open-book tests on knowledge retention measured with progress tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne-Penninga, M.; Kuks, J. B. M.; Hofman, W. H. A.; Muijtjens, A. M. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    The influence of problem-based learning (PBL) and open-book tests on long-term knowledge retention is unclear and subject of discussion. Hypotheses were that PBL as well as open-book tests positively affect long-term knowledge retention. Four progress test results of fifth and sixth-year medical

  6. Recent progress in nuclear test detection using infrasound technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, E.; LE Pichon, A.; Ceranna, L.; Brachet, N.

    2016-12-01

    The high performances of the International Monitoring System infrasound network were very well demonstrated by the detection and analysis of many Ground Truth Events in various environmental conditions. This presentation highlights recent progresses based on an improved description of both signal and atmosphere. Firstly, progress concerns observations and data analysis of big data sets. The infrasound sensors provide broadband signals in the interest frequency range. However, signals are generally analyzed in several parallel frequency bands. The currently used Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation algorithm (PMCC) is now evolving to process the useful information in a broad standardized frequency range, leading to a more accurate characterization of both source and noise which could benefit to operational monitoring purposes. Secondly, progress concerns the development of experimental infrasound stations which form a dense infrasound network, especially in Europe, enhancing the detectability of infrasound events. Thirdly, progress concerns an improved representation of the atmosphere. Systematic processing highlights the necessity to improve propagation modeling in the wave guide between ground and stratosphere-mesosphere-thermosphere system to interpret the observations. The predicted detection periods of volcano eruptions using near field observations and propagation models are shorter than the periods observed in the far field. The lack of representation in the models of large scale atmospheric disturbances such as gravity, planetary waves and sudden stratospheric warming events, is at the origin of these differences. New methods are developed to parameterize these disturbances for further assimilation in atmospheric models, as planned in the framework of the Atmospheric dynamics Research InfraStructure in Europe (ARISE) project. One application is the improvement of the detection capability simulations used for the evaluation of the performances of existing

  7. HIV and Hepatitis Testing: Global Progress, Challenges, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Philippa; Johnson, Cheryl; Figueroa, Carmen; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and viral hepatitis due to HBV and HCV infection are major causes of chronic disease worldwide, and share some common routes of transmission, epidemiology, initial barriers faced in treatment access, and in strategies for a global public health response. Testing and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, and HCV infection is the gateway for access to both care and treatment and prevention services, and crucial for an effective HIV and hepatitis epidemic response. In this review article, we first summarize the common goals and guiding principles in a public health approach to HIV and hepatitis testing. We summarize the impressive global progress in HIV testing scale-up and evolution of approaches, with expansion of provider-initiated testing and counseling in clinical settings (particularly antenatal and tuberculosis clinics), the introduction of more community based testing services, and use of rapid diagnostic tests enabling provision of same-day test results. However, 46% of all people living with HIV are still unaware of their serostatus, and many continue to be diagnosed and start antiretroviral therapy late. As testing and treatment scale-up accelerates for an "treat all" approach, other challenges to address include how to better focus testing and reach those yet undiagnosed and most at risk, especially key populations, men, adolescents, and children. We summarize future directions in HIV testing to speed scale-up and close gaps that are addressed in the WHO 2015 consolidated HIV testing guidelines. In contrast to HIV, action in hepatitis testing and treatment has been fragmented and limited to a few countries, and there remains a large burden of undiagnosed cases globally. We summarize key challenges in the hepatitis testing response, including lack of simple, reliable, and low-cost diagnostic tests, laboratory capacity, and testing facilities; inadequate data to guide country specific hepatitis testing approaches and who to screen; stigmatization and social

  8. Preliminary study of the behavioral and biological effects of high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report, No. 1. [Development and testing of experimental protocols and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The major objective of this preliminary study is to develop and thoroughly test the experimental protocols and apparatus, which are planned for a major study of the behavioral and biological effects of high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. The behavior of baboons will be observed before, during, and after exposure to 60 Hz electric fields at a maximum intensity of 60 kV/m. Both individual performance (operant conditioning) and social behavior will be examined. The preliminary study will differ from the planned major study as follows: subjects will be used as their own controls; a smaller number of subjects will be run; field intensity will not be varied; the electric field should be non-uniform; the preliminary study exposure facility will be basically an outdoor facility; to avoid deterioration of plastic materials, the high intensity fields will not be turned on during or just after rainfall; and in the preliminary study the biological work will be restricted to the clinical determination of the health of subjects before and after exposure. The present report is the first of three quarterly technical progress reports. It covers approximately the first two and one-half months of activity and, therefore, consists primarily of plans. The report addresses four major areas: the high intensity field exposure facility; the field measurement instrumentation; the operation conditioning equipment; and experimental methods including experimental design and data analysis.

  9. Baseline gas turbine development program. Eighteenth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E [comps.

    1977-04-30

    Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental upgraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Initial running of the upgraded engine took place on July 13, 1976. The engine proved to be mechanically sound, but was also 43% deficient in power. A continuing corrective development effort has to date reduced the power deficiency to 32%. Compressor efficiency was increased 2 points by changing to a 28-channel diffuser and tandem deswirl vanes; improved processing of seals has reduced regenerator leakage from about 5 to 2.5% of engine flow; a new compressor turbine nozzle has increased compressor turbine stage efficiency by about 1 point; and adjustments to burner mixing ports has reduced pressure drop from 2.8 to 2.1% of engine pressure. Key compressor turbine component improvements are scheduled for test during the next quarterly period. During the quarter, progress was also made on development of the Upgraded Vehicle control system; and instrumentation of the fourth program engine was completed by NASA. The engine will be used for development efforts at NASA LeRC.

  10. Using the cumulative deviation method for cross-institutional benchmarking in the Berlin progress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauber, Stefan; Nouns, Zineb M

    2010-01-01

    The Berlin Progress Test has grown to a cooperation of 13 universities. Recently, comparisons between the participating schools became an area of high interest. Muijtjens et al. [Muijtjens AM, Schuwirth LWT, Cohen-Schotanus J, Thoben AJNM, van der Vleuten CPM. 2008a. Benchmarking by cross-institutional comparison of student achievement in a progress test. Med Educ 41(1):82-88; Muijtjens AM, Schuwirth LWT, Cohen-Schotanus J, van der Vleuten CPM. 2008b. Differences in knowledge development exposed by multi-curricular progress test data. Adv Health Sci Educ 13:593-605] proposed a method for cross-institutional benchmarking based on progress test data. Progress testing has some major advantages as it delivers longitudinal information about student's growth of knowledge. By adopting the procedure of Muijtjens et al. ( 2008a , b), we were able to replicate the basic characteristics of the cumulative deviation method. Besides the advantages of the method, there are some difficulties as errors of measurement are not independent, which violates the premises of testing statistical differences.

  11. Progress in Mirror-Based Fusion Neutron Source Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeev, A. V.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Beklemishev, A. D.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kolesnikov, E. Yu.; Korzhavina, M. S.; Korobeinikova, O. A.; Lizunov, A. A.; Maximov, V. V.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Pinzhenin, E. I.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Soldatkina, E. I.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.; Yakovlev, D. V.; Yurov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in worldwide collaboration has developed a project of a 14 MeV neutron source for fusion material studies and other applications. The projected neutron source of the plasma type is based on the gas dynamic trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Essential progress in plasma parameters has been achieved in recent experiments at the GDT facility in the Budker Institute, which is a hydrogen (deuterium) prototype of the source. Stable confinement of hot-ion plasmas with the relative pressure exceeding 0.5 was demonstrated. The electron temperature was increased up to 0.9 keV in the regime with additional electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of a moderate power. These parameters are the record for axisymmetric open mirror traps. These achievements elevate the projects of a GDT-based neutron source on a higher level of competitive ability and make it possible to construct a source with parameters suitable for materials testing today. The paper presents the progress in experimental studies and numerical simulations of the mirror-based fusion neutron source and its possible applications including a fusion material test facility and a fusion-fission hybrid system. PMID:28793722

  12. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT: MARCH 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.

    1969-04-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(4S-l)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during March 1969.

  13. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT MAY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-06-06

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during May 1969 .

  14. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT SEPTEMBER 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astely, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-10-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during September 1969.

  15. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FEBRUARY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.

    1969-03-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT (45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during February 1969.

  16. Sustainable development in Cameroon's forestry sector: Progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    This paper examines initiatives formulated by the government of Cameroon to promote sustainable development within its forestry sector, and proffers a series of policy recommendations for advancing sustainable forest management in Cameroon. Since the enactment of Cameroon's comprehensive forestry law (Law N0.

  17. Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program twelfth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

    1975-10-31

    Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. The endurance engine was modified to incorporate a power turbine drive to the regenerators in order to simulate free rotor (upgraded) conditions. A portable baseline engine fixture complete with controls, intake, exhaust, and transmission is being assembled for odor evaluation. An additional 502 engine hours were accumulated on ceramic regenerators and seals. No core or seal failures were experienced during engine test. Initial fixture tests of zirconia seals show torque levels comparable with nickle oxide seals against the same matrix. An ambient compensation schedule was devised for the upgraded engine integrated control, and the integrated control system specifications were updated. A proposed hydromechanical automotive continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT) was evaluated and approved for preliminary development. Tests of heat rejection to the oil for lined versus linerless insulated engine assemblies indicated no heat loss penalty in omitting the metal liners. A study was made of various power turbine rotor assemblies and a final design was selected. Optimization studies of the two-stage power turbine reduction gears and regenerator spur and worm gears were completed. Initial tests on the fixture for simulating the scaled S-26 upgraded burner have begun.

  18. Recent Progress toward Microfluidic Quality Control Testing of Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel S. Ha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals labeled with short-lived positron-emitting or gamma-emitting isotopes are injected into patients just prior to performing positron emission tomography (PET or single photon emission tomography (SPECT scans, respectively. These imaging modalities are widely used in clinical care, as well as in the development and evaluation of new therapies in clinical research. Prior to injection, these radiopharmaceuticals (tracers must undergo quality control (QC testing to ensure product purity, identity, and safety for human use. Quality tests can be broadly categorized as (i pharmaceutical tests, needed to ensure molecular identity, physiological compatibility and that no microbiological, pyrogenic, chemical, or particulate contamination is present in the final preparation; and (ii radioactive tests, needed to ensure proper dosing and that there are no radiochemical and radionuclidic impurities that could interfere with the biodistribution or imaging. Performing the required QC tests is cumbersome and time-consuming, and requires an array of expensive analytical chemistry equipment and significant dedicated lab space. Calibrations, day of use tests, and documentation create an additional burden. Furthermore, in contrast to ordinary pharmaceuticals, each batch of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals must be manufactured and tested within a short period of time to avoid significant losses due to radioactive decay. To meet these challenges, several efforts are underway to develop integrated QC testing instruments that automatically perform and document all of the required tests. More recently, microfluidic quality control systems have been gaining increasing attention due to vastly reduced sample and reagent consumption, shorter analysis times, higher detection sensitivity, increased multiplexing, and reduced instrumentation size. In this review, we describe each of the required QC tests and conventional testing methods, followed by a

  19. Recent progress in development of radioisotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Byung Mok [HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    The Korea multipurpose research reactor, HANARO(Hi-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) is designed and constructed to obtain high density neutron flux (max. 5x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec) with relatively low thermal output (30 MW) in order to utilize for various studies such as fuel and material test, radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiment, neutron transmutation doping, etc. HANARO has 32 vertical channels (3 in-core, 4 out-core, 25 reflector) and 7 horizontal channels. KAERI has constructed 4 concrete hot cells for production of Co-60, Ir-192, etc. and 6 lead hot cells for production of medical RIs(I-131, Mo-99, etc.). Other 11 lead hot cells will be completed by Feb. 1998 for production of Sm-153, Dy-165, Ho-166, etc. Clean room facilities were installed for production of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  20. Progress in developing technologies to domesticate the cultivation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progress in developing technologies to domesticate the cultivation of shea tree ( Vitellaria paradoxa L.) in Ghana Progres realises dans le developpement des technologies pour domestiquel la cultivation du karitier ( Vitelleria paradoxa L.) au Ghana.

  1. Energy technology progress for sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvizu, D.E.; Drennen, T.E.

    1997-03-01

    Energy security is a fundamental part of a country`s national security. Access to affordable, environmentally sustainable energy is a stabilizing force and is in the world community`s best interest. The current global energy situation however is not sustainable and has many complicating factors. The primary goal for government energy policy should be to provide stability and predictability to the market. This paper differentiates between short-term and long-term issues and argues that although the options for addressing the short-term issues are limited, there is an opportunity to alter the course of long-term energy stability and predictability through research and technology development. While reliance on foreign oil in the short term can be consistent with short-term energy security goals, there are sufficient long-term issues associated with fossil fuel use, in particular, as to require a long-term role for the federal government in funding research. The longer term issues fall into three categories. First, oil resources are finite and there is increasing world dependence on a limited number of suppliers. Second, the world demographics are changing dramatically and the emerging industrialized nations will have greater supply needs. Third, increasing attention to the environmental impacts of energy production and use will limit supply options. In addition to this global view, some of the changes occurring in the US domestic energy picture have implications that will encourage energy efficiency and new technology development. The paper concludes that technological innovation has provided a great benefit in the past and can continue to do so in the future if it is both channels toward a sustainable energy future and if it is committed to, and invested in, as a deliberate long-term policy option.

  2. Technology development, evaluation, and application (TDEA) FY 1997 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, L.G.

    1998-05-01

    The public expects that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will operate in a manner that prevents negative impacts to the environment and protects the safety and health of its employees and the public. To achieve this goal within budget, the Department of Energy (DOE) and LANL must develop new and improved environment, safety, and health (ES and H) technologies and implement innovative, more cost-effective ES and H approaches to operations. In FY95, the Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division initiated a Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) program. The purpose of this unique program is to test and develop technologies that solve LANL ES and H problems and improve the safety of LANL operations. This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded in FY97 by the TDEA Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY97 included implementation of radiation worker dosimetric monitoring systems (two); evaluation and validation of cost-effective animal-tracking systems for environmental studies (two); evaluation of personal protective equipment (two); and development of a method for optimal placement of continuous air monitors in the workplace.

  3. Progress of Multi-Beam Long Trace-Profiler Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kester, Thomas; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2012-01-01

    The multi-beam long trace profiler (LTP) under development at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center[1] is designed to increase the efficiency of metrology of replicated X-ray optics. The traditional LTP operates on a single laser beam that scans along the test surface to detect the slope errors. While capable of exceptional surface slope accuracy, the LTP single beam scanning has slow measuring speed. As metrology constitutes a significant fraction of the time spent in optics production, an increase in the efficiency of metrology helps in decreasing the cost of fabrication of the x-ray optics and in improving their quality. Metrology efficiency can be increased by replacing the single laser beam with multiple beams that can scan a section of the test surface at a single instance. The increase in speed with such a system would be almost proportional to the number of laser beams. A collaborative feasibility study has been made and specifications were fixed for a multi-beam long trace profiler. The progress made in the development of this metrology system is presented.

  4. Development Of Maneuvering Autopilot For Flight Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Walker, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes recent efforts to develop automatic control system operating under supervision of pilot and making airplane follow prescribed trajectories during flight tests. Report represents additional progress on this project. Gives background information on technology of control of test-flight trajectories; presents mathematical models of airframe, engine and command-augmentation system; focuses on mathematical modeling of maneuvers; addresses design of autopilots for maneuvers; discusses numerical simulation and evaluation of results of simulation of eight maneuvers under control of simulated autopilot; and presents summary and discussion of future work.

  5. Influence of PBL with open-book tests on knowledge retention measured with progress tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijne-Penninga, M; Kuks, J B M; Hofman, W H A; Muijtjens, A M M; Cohen-Schotanus, J

    2013-08-01

    The influence of problem-based learning (PBL) and open-book tests on long-term knowledge retention is unclear and subject of discussion. Hypotheses were that PBL as well as open-book tests positively affect long-term knowledge retention. Four progress test results of fifth and sixth-year medical students (n = 1,648) of three medical schools were analyzed. Two schools had PBL driven curricula, and the third one had a traditional curriculum (TC). One of the PBL schools (PBLob) used a combination of open-book (assessing backup knowledge) and closed-book tests (assessing core knowledge); the other two schools (TC and PBLcb) only used closed-book tests. The items of the progress tests were divided into core and backup knowledge. T tests (with Bonferroni correction) were used to analyze differences between curricula. PBL students performed significantly better than TC students on core knowledge (average effect size (av ES) = 0.37-0.74) and PBL students tested with open-book tests scored somewhat higher than PBL students tested without such tests (av ES = 0.23-0.30). Concerning backup knowledge, no differences were found between the scores of the three curricula. Students of the two PBL curricula showed a substantially better long-term knowledge retention than TC students. PBLob students performed somewhat better on core knowledge than PBLcb students. These outcomes suggest that a problem-based instructional approach in particular can stimulate long-term knowledge retention. Distinguishing knowledge into core and backup knowledge and using open-book tests alongside closed-book tests could enhance long-term core knowledge retention.

  6. Perl Testing A Developer's Notebook

    CERN Document Server

    Langworth, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Is there any sexier topic in software development than software testing? That is, besides game programming, 3D graphics, audio, high-performance clustering, cool websites, et cetera? Okay, so software testing is low on the list. And that's unfortunate, because good software testing can increase your productivity, improve your designs, raise your quality, ease your maintenance burdens, and help to satisfy your customers, coworkers, and managers. Perl has a strong history of automated tests. A very early release of Perl 1.0 included a comprehensive test suite, and it's only improved from th

  7. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  8. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2015 Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Education, Division of Community Colleges, will annually provide the State Board of Education with The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund Annual Progress Report. Administration and oversight responsibility for the fund was transferred from the Iowa Economic Development Authority to the Iowa Department of…

  9. Development of science imperative for progress: Pervez Butt

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Mr. Parvez Butt, chairman of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, has said that development of science and technology is imperative for progress and prosperity of any country. He was addressing a meeting on "CERN Data Grid and its Application" an opportunity for learning for scientists of developing countries (1/2 page).

  10. Developing test materials for dyscalculia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Bent, Lindhardt,

    Aims, requirements and context for the development of test materials for dyscalculia are analyzed. The test materials are to be used for Grade 4 pupils in Danish primary schools. Preliminary results are presented from focus group interview with adolescents and adults, who see themselves as being...

  11. Test System for Node Efficiency of Progressive Cavity Pump Based on Wireless Communication Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tingjun Yan; Haoqiang Ti; Xianmin Wu

    2013-01-01

      In order to acquire the data of the energy consumption and operation efficiency of progressive cavity pump wells, a new test system for node efficiency of progressive cavity pump based on wireless...

  12. RURAL DEVELOPMENT POLICIES IN URUGUAY PROGRESSIVE: 2007-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Cabrera Cabral

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the rural development policies adopted by the Uruguayan government progressive in the period 2007-2011. The research investigated the new development model driven by progressive government. The central hypothesis is that progressive Uruguayan government implemented a new model of rural development to benefit the agroexporters sector and international capital. The analysis was conducted from documents prepared by the Uruguayan government in the period 2007-2011. The results indicate four basic themes: the first relates to a new configuration of rural development policies in the country based on a "new" institutionality created by the government for rural development, the second focuses on the logic of spatial planning as legitimizing element of the new development model, and the third shows how the leftist government focuses its development policy on the logic of economic development and territorial; fourth theme as historical issues regarding the use of property and land ownership not only remain unsolved, but also gain a new dimension.

  13. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Notched Specimen Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurtrey, Michael David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Richard Neil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lillo, Thomas Martin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Creep behavior of Alloy 617 has been extensively characterized to support the development of a draft Code Case to qualify Alloy 617 in Section III division 5 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This will allow use of Alloy 617 in construction of nuclear reactor components at elevated temperatures and longer periods of time (up to 950°C and 100,000 hours). Prior to actual use, additional concerns not considered in the ASME code need to be addressed. Code Cases are based largely on uniaxial testing of smooth gage specimens. In service conditions, components will generally be under multi axial loading. There is also the concern of the behavior at discontinuities, such as threaded components. To address the concerns of multi axial creep behavior and at geometric discontinuities, notched specimens have been designed to create conditions representative of the states that service components experience. Two general notch geometries have been used for these series of tests: U notch and V notch specimens. The notches produce a tri axial stress state, though not uniform across the specimen. Characterization of the creep behavior of the U notch specimens and the creep rupture behavior of the V notch specimens provides a good approximation of the behavior expected of actual components. Preliminary testing and analysis have been completed and are reported in this document. This includes results from V notch specimens tested at 900°C and 800°C. Failure occurred in the smooth gage section of the specimen rather than at the root of the notch, though some damage was present at the root of the notch, where initial stress was highest. This indicates notch strengthening behavior in this material at these temperatures.

  14. Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Fourteenth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

    1976-04-30

    Progress is reported for a Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program sponsored by the Heat Engine Systems Branch, Division of Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). Structurally, this program is made up of three parts: (1) documentation of the existing automotive gas turbine state-of-the-art; (2) conduction of an extensive component improvement program; and (3) utilization of the improvements in the design, and building of an Upgraded Engine capable of demonstrating program goals.

  15. Developing and scoring essay tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, M

    1999-01-01

    The need to prepare nursing students for the licensing examination has resulted in a predominance of multiple-choice testing in nursing courses. But what about evaluating students' ability to present ideas in their own words and develop creative responses to questions posed by the teacher? Essay items provide an effective means of assessing higher levels of learning and ability to organize and present ideas in writing. The author describes how to develop essay items and score responses.

  16. Simulant Development for LAWPS Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burns, Carolyn A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-23

    This report describes simulant development work that was conducted to support the technology maturation of the LAWPS facility. Desired simulant physical properties (density, viscosity, solids concentration, solid particle size), sodium concentrations, and general anion identifications were provided by WRPS. The simulant recipes, particularly a “nominal” 5.6M Na simulant, are intended to be tested at several scales, ranging from bench-scale (500 mL) to full-scale. Each simulant formulation was selected to be chemically representative of the waste streams anticipated to be fed to the LAWPS system, and used the current version of the LAWPS waste specification as a formulation basis. After simulant development iterations, four simulants of varying sodium concentration (5.6M, 6.0M, 4.0M, and 8.0M) were prepared and characterized. The formulation basis, development testing, and final simulant recipes and characterization data for these four simulants are presented in this report.

  17. Design and development of progressive tool for manufacturing washer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Ulhas K.; Raghavendra Ravi Kiran, K.; Deepthi, Y. P.

    2017-07-01

    In a progressive tool the raw material is worked at different station to finally fabricate the component. A progressive tool is a lucrative tool for mass production of components. A lot of automobile and other transport industries develop progressive tool for the production of components. The design of tool involves lot of planning and the same amount of skill of process planning is required in the fabrication of the tool. The design also involves use of thumb rules and standard elements as per experience gained in practice. Manufacturing the press tool is a laborious task as special jigs and fixtures have to be designed for the purpose. Assembly of all the press tool elements is another task where use of accurate measuring instruments for alignment of various tool elements is important. In the present study, design and fabrication of progressive press tool for production of washer has been developed and the press tool has been tried out on a mechanical type of press. The components produced are to dimensions.

  18. Development Tread and NDT Progress of Metal Additive Manufacture Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Ping-hua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The application and new development trend of metal additive manufacture technique were introduced, as well as the characteristic and NDT difficulty of metal additive manufacture products. The research progress of NDT was analyzed in emphasis, including the classification of metal additive manufacture technique, the characteristics of defect and microstructure, the influence of defects on mechanical properties, the latest development of NDT methods and standards. Based on that, the key issues that will be focused were summarized at last, that is the application of new NDT methods, on-line monitoring technology, numerical simulation, measurement and characterization of stress, as well as the establishment and development of NDT standards.

  19. Bionic balance organs: progress in the development of vestibular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-09-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that is critically important in humans for gaze and image stability as well as postural control. Patients with complete bilateral vestibular loss are severely disabled and experience a poor quality of life. There are very few effective treatment options for patients with no vestibular function. Over the last 10 years, rapid progress has been made in developing artificial 'vestibular implants' or 'prostheses', based on cochlear implant technology. As of 2017, 13 patients worldwide have received vestibular implants and the results are encouraging. Vestibular implants are now becoming part of an increasing effort to develop artificial, bionic sensory systems, and this paper provides a review of the progress in this area.

  20. Student Experiences of High-Stakes Testing for Progression in One Undergraduate Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenny, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes testing in undergraduate nursing education are those assessments used to make critical decisions for student progression and graduation. The purpose of this study was to explore the different ways students experience multiple high-stakes tests for progression in one undergraduate BSN program. Research participants were prelicensure…

  1. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests; Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; LaTorre, V.R.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Nitao, J.J.; Towse, D.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Watwood, D.; Wilder, D.

    1989-07-26

    This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  2. The scorecard on development: 25 years of diminished progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrot, Mark; Baker, Dean; Rosnick, David

    2006-01-01

    This article looks at the available data on economic growth and various social indicators-including health outcomes and education-and compares the past 25 years (1980-2005 or latest available year) with the prior two decades (1960-1980). The past 25 years have seen a sharp slowdown in the rate of economic growth for the vast majority of low- and middle-income countries. For the health indicators, there is a marked decrease in progress for life expectancy and for infant, child, and adult mortalities. For education, there is a reduction in progress in secondary school enrollment and in public spending on education, and reduced progress in primary school enrollment for the bottom two quintiles of countries. The results are discussed in the context of a number of economic reforms implemented over the past 25 years, with the intention of promoting growth and development. The authors conclude that economists and policymakers should devote more effort to determining the causes of the economic and development failure of the last quarter-century.

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  4. [Progress on cervical muscle strength and soft tissue stiffness testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Zhang, Shi-min

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical evaluation of neck muscles has important significance in the diagnosis and treatment for cervical spondylosis, the neck muscle strength and soft tissue stiffness test is two aspects of biomechanical testing. Isometric muscle testing operation is relatively simple, the cost is lower, which can evaluate the muscle force below grade 3. However, isokinetic muscle strength testing can assess the muscle strength of joint motion in any position. It is hard to distinguish stiffness difference in different soft tissues when the load-displacement curve is used to evaluate the local soft tissue stiffness. Elasticity imaging technique can not only show the elastic differences of different tissues by images, but also quantify the elastic modulus of subcutaneous tissues and muscles respectively. Nevertheless, it is difficult to observe the flexibility of the cervical spine by means of the analysis of the whole neck stiffness. In a word, a variety of test method will conduce not only the biomechanical evaluation of neck muscles, but also making an effective biomechanics mathematical model of neck muscles. Besides, isokinetic muscle testing and the elasticity imaging technology still need further validation and optimization before they are better applied to neck muscles biomechanical testing.

  5. Chemistry research and development. Progress report, July 1977--May 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, F.J.

    1979-03-30

    Studies were continued to determine the compatibility of non-nuclear weapons metals with various production processing materials. The corrosion resistance of 304L stainless steel in mixed acid environment was tested. Intergranular corrosion tests were performed on welded 21-6-9 and 304L stainless steels. A laboratory scale fast fluidized bed incineration system was installed and operating techniques developed. A new uranium chip burning process is being developed. Component development, pilot plant development, and instrumentation and statistical systems development are briefly discussed.

  6. Alternative Water Processor Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Mitchell, Julie; Vega, Leticia; Adam, Niklas; Flynn, Michael; Wjee (er. Rau); Lunn, Griffin; Jackson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Next Generation Life Support Project is developing an Alternative Water Processor (AWP) as a candidate water recovery system for long duration exploration missions. The AWP consists of biological water processor (BWP) integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). The basis of the BWP is a membrane aerated biological reactor (MABR), developed in concert with Texas Tech University. Bacteria located within the MABR metabolize organic material in wastewater, converting approximately 90% of the total organic carbon to carbon dioxide. In addition, bacteria convert a portion of the ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrogen and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system is expected to produce water with a total organic carbon less than 50 mg/l and dissolved solids that meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. This paper describes the test definition, the design of the BWP and FOST subsystems, and plans for integrated testing.

  7. Alternative Water Processor Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Mitchell, Julie L.; Adam, Niklas M.; Barta, Daniel; Meyer, Caitlin E.; Pensinger, Stuart; Vega, Leticia M.; Callahan, Michael R.; Flynn, Michael; Wheeler, Ray; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Life Support Project is developing an Alternative Water Processor (AWP) as a candidate water recovery system for long duration exploration missions. The AWP consists of biological water processor (BWP) integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). The basis of the BWP is a membrane aerated biological reactor (MABR), developed in concert with Texas Tech University. Bacteria located within the MABR metabolize organic material in wastewater, converting approximately 90% of the total organic carbon to carbon dioxide. In addition, bacteria convert a portion of the ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrification and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system is expected to produce water with a total organic carbon less than 50 mg/l and dissolved solids that meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. This paper describes the test definition, the design of the BWP and FOST subsystems, and plans for integrated testing.

  8. Developing Tests of Visual Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindrat, Alexandra N.

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts develop neural adaptive responses to microgravity during space flight. Consequently these adaptive responses cause maladaptive disturbances in balance and gait function when astronauts return to Earth and are re-exposed to gravity. Current research in the Neuroscience Laboratories at NASA-JSC is focused on understanding how exposure to space flight produces post-flight disturbances in balance and gait control and developing training programs designed to facilitate the rapid recovery of functional mobility after space flight. In concert with these disturbances, astronauts also often report an increase in their visual dependency during space flight. To better understand this phenomenon, studies were conducted with specially designed training programs focusing on visual dependency with the aim to understand and enhance subjects ability to rapidly adapt to novel sensory situations. The Rod and Frame test (RFT) was used first to assess an individual s visual dependency, using a variety of testing techniques. Once assessed, subjects were asked to perform two novel tasks under transformation (both the Pegboard and Cube Construction tasks). Results indicate that head position cues and initial visual test conditions had no effect on an individual s visual dependency scores. Subjects were also able to adapt to the manual tasks after several trials. Individual visual dependency correlated with ability to adapt manual to a novel visual distortion only for the cube task. Subjects with higher visual dependency showed decreased ability to adapt to this task. Ultimately, it was revealed that the RFT may serve as an effective prediction tool to produce individualized adaptability training prescriptions that target the specific sensory profile of each crewmember.

  9. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  10. Comparison of wood preservatives in stake tests : 2011 progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessie M. Woodward; Cherilyn A. Hatfield; Stan T. Lebow

    2011-01-01

    This report covers stake test results primarily from Southern Pine 2- by 4- by 18-in. sapwood, treated by pressure and nonpressure processes and installed by Forest Products Laboratory employees and cooperators in decay and termite exposure sites at various times since 1938 at Saucier, Mississippi; Madison, Wisconsin; Bogalusa, Louisiana; Lake Charles, Louisiana;...

  11. [Current progress in the development of mucosal vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Mucosal vaccination has several advantages compared with that of injection-type vaccination. Secretory IgA(SIgA) produced at mucosal surface plays a key role for inactivation of toxins and inhibition of pathogen invasion. Although oral or nasal vaccination with attenuated live microorganisms have been shown to be effective in the induction of protective immunity, these types of vaccine have the ability to infect transiently to the host. For the development of safe and effective mucosal vaccine, an obvious strategy is the preparation of inactivated subunit-type mucosal vaccine. Here we introduce our frontier technology for the development of rice-based oral vaccines, as a new generation of mucosal vaccine. Further, we also discuss recent progress in the development of other types of mucosal vaccine and adjuvant.

  12. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  14. Progress in sensor performance testing, modeling and range prediction using the TOD method: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, Piet; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Toet, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    The Triangle Orientation Discrimination (TOD) methodology includes i) a widely applicable, accurate end-to-end EO/IR sensor test, ii) an image-based sensor system model and iii) a Target Acquisition (TA) range model. The method has been extensively validated against TA field performance for a wide variety of well- and under-sampled imagers, systems with advanced image processing techniques such as dynamic super resolution and local adaptive contrast enhancement, and sensors showing smear or noise drift, for both static and dynamic test stimuli and as a function of target contrast. Recently, significant progress has been made in various directions. Dedicated visual and NIR test charts for lab and field testing are available and thermal test benches are on the market. Automated sensor testing using an objective synthetic human observer is within reach. Both an analytical and an image-based TOD model have recently been developed and are being implemented in the European Target Acquisition model ECOMOS and in the EOSTAR TDA. Further, the methodology is being applied for design optimization of high-end security camera systems. Finally, results from a recent perception study suggest that DRI ranges for real targets can be predicted by replacing the relevant distinctive target features by TOD test patterns of the same characteristic size and contrast, enabling a new TA modeling approach. This paper provides an overview.

  15. Creating a test blueprint for a progress testing program: A paired-comparisons approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, HsingChi; Childs, Ruth A

    2017-11-24

    Creating a new testing program requires the development of a test blueprint that will determine how the items on each test form are distributed across possible content areas and practice domains. To achieve validity, categories of a blueprint are typically based on the judgments of content experts. How experts judgments are elicited and combined is important to the quality of resulting test blueprints. Content experts in dentistry participated in a day-long faculty-wide workshop to discuss, refine, and confirm the categories and their relative weights. After reaching agreement on categories and their definitions, experts judged the relative importance between category pairs, registering their judgments anonymously using iClicker, an audience response system. Judgments were combined in two ways: a simple calculation that could be performed during the workshop and a multidimensional scaling of the judgments performed later. Content experts were able to produce a set of relative weights using this approach. The multidimensional scaling yielded a three-dimensional model with the potential to provide deeper insights into the basis of the experts' judgments. The approach developed and demonstrated in this study can be applied across academic disciplines to elicit and combine content experts judgments for the development of test blueprints.

  16. Development of GENOA Progressive Failure Parallel Processing Software Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Frank; Minnetyan, Levon

    1999-01-01

    A capability consisting of software development and experimental techniques has been developed and is described. The capability is integrated into GENOA-PFA to model polymer matrix composite (PMC) structures. The capability considers the physics and mechanics of composite materials and structure by integration of a hierarchical multilevel macro-scale (lamina, laminate, and structure) and micro scale (fiber, matrix, and interface) simulation analyses. The modeling involves (1) ply layering methodology utilizing FEM elements with through-the-thickness representation, (2) simulation of effects of material defects and conditions (e.g., voids, fiber waviness, and residual stress) on global static and cyclic fatigue strengths, (3) including material nonlinearities (by updating properties periodically) and geometrical nonlinearities (by Lagrangian updating), (4) simulating crack initiation. and growth to failure under static, cyclic, creep, and impact loads. (5) progressive fracture analysis to determine durability and damage tolerance. (6) identifying the percent contribution of various possible composite failure modes involved in critical damage events. and (7) determining sensitivities of failure modes to design parameters (e.g., fiber volume fraction, ply thickness, fiber orientation. and adhesive-bond thickness). GENOA-PFA progressive failure analysis is now ready for use to investigate the effects on structural responses to PMC material degradation from damage induced by static, cyclic (fatigue). creep, and impact loading in 2D/3D PMC structures subjected to hygrothermal environments. Its use will significantly facilitate targeting design parameter changes that will be most effective in reducing the probability of a given failure mode occurring.

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photo, taken July 13, 1961, progress is made with the excavation and preparation of the S-IC test stand site.

  18. Cellular and molecular characterization of gametogenic progression in ex vivo cultured prepuberal mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoler-Alcaraz, J; Fernández-Pérez, D; Larriba, E; Del Mazo, J

    2017-10-18

    Recently, an effective testis culture method using a gas-liquid interphase, capable of differentiate male germ cells from neonatal spermatogonia to spermatozoa has been developed. Nevertheless, this methodology needs deep analyses that allow future experimental approaches in basic, pathologic and/or reprotoxicologic studies. Because of this, we characterized at cellular and molecular levels the entire in vitro spermatogenic progression, in order to understand and evaluate the characteristics that define the spermatogenic process in ex vivo cultured testes compared to the in vivo development. Testicular explants of CD1 mice aged 6 and 10 days post-partum were respectively cultured during 55 and 89 days. Cytological and molecular approaches were performed, analyzing germ cell proportion at different time culture points, meiotic markers immunodetecting synaptonemal complex protein SYCP3 by immunocytochemistry and the relative expression of different marker genes along the differentiation process by Reverse Transcription - quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. In addition, microRNA and piwi-interactingRNA profiles were also evaluated by Next Generation Sequencing and bioinformatic approaches. The method promoted and maintained the spermatogenic process during 89 days. At a cytological level we detected spermatogenic development delays of cultured explants compared to the natural in vivo process. The expression of different spermatogenic stages gene markers correlated with the proportion of different cell types detected in the cytological preparations. In vitro progression analysis of the different spermatogenic cell types, from both 6.5 dpp and 10.5 dpp testes explants, has revealed a relative delay in relation to in vivo process. The expression of the genes studied as biomarkers correlates with the cytologically and functional detected progression and differential expression identified in vivo. After a first analysis of deep sequencing data it has been observed

  19. Autonomic nerve development contributes to prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnon, Claire; Hall, Simon J; Lin, Juan; Xue, Xiaonan; Gerber, Leah; Freedland, Stephen J; Frenette, Paul S

    2013-07-12

    Nerves are a common feature of the microenvironment, but their role in tumor growth and progression remains unclear. We found that the formation of autonomic nerve fibers in the prostate gland regulates prostate cancer development and dissemination in mouse models. The early phases of tumor development were prevented by chemical or surgical sympathectomy and by genetic deletion of stromal β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors. Tumors were also infiltrated by parasympathetic cholinergic fibers that promoted cancer dissemination. Cholinergic-induced tumor invasion and metastasis were inhibited by pharmacological blockade or genetic disruption of the stromal type 1 muscarinic receptor, leading to improved survival of the mice. A retrospective blinded analysis of prostate adenocarcinoma specimens from 43 patients revealed that the densities of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers in tumor and surrounding normal tissue, respectively, were associated with poor clinical outcomes. These findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for prostate cancer.

  20. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety in nursing students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zargarzadeh, Maryam; Shirazi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Concerning the prevalence of test anxiety among nursing students and presence of stress in nursing education years, this study was conducted to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation...

  1. Genotoxicity testing: progress and prospects for the next decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkez, Hasan; Arslan, Mehmet E; Ozdemir, Ozlem

    2017-10-01

    Genotoxicity and mutagenicity analyses have a significant role in the identification of hazard effects of therapeutic drugs, cosmetics, agrochemicals, industrial compounds, food additives, natural toxins and nanomaterials for regulatory purposes. To evaluate mutagenicity or genotoxicity, different in vitro and in vivo methodologies exert various genotoxicological endpoints such as point mutations, changes in number and structure of chromosomes. Areas covered: This review covered the basics of genotoxicity and in vitro/in vivo methods for determining of genetic damages. The limitations that have arisen as a result of the common use of these methods were also discussed. Finally, the perspectives of further prospects on the use of genotoxicity testing and genotoxic mode of action were emphasized. Expert opinion: The solution of actual and practical problems of genetic toxicology is inarguably based on the understanding of DNA damage mechanisms at molecular, subcellular, cellular, organ, system and organism levels. Current strategies to investigate human health risks should be modified to increase their performance for more reliable results and also new techniques such as toxicogenomics, epigenomics and single cell approaches must be integrated into genetic safety evolutions. The explored new biomarkers by the omic techniques will provide forceful genotoxicity assessment to reduce the cancer risk.

  2. Aircraft wire system laboratory development : phase I progress report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinallo, Michael Anthony; Lopez, Christopher D.

    2003-08-01

    An aircraft wire systems laboratory has been developed to support technical maturation of diagnostic technologies being used in the aviation community for detection of faulty attributes of wiring systems. The design and development rationale of the laboratory is based in part on documented findings published by the aviation community. The main resource at the laboratory is a test bed enclosure that is populated with aged and newly assembled wire harnesses that have known defects. This report provides the test bed design and harness selection rationale, harness assembly and defect fabrication procedures, and descriptions of the laboratory for usage by the aviation community.

  3. Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program fourth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, C.E.

    1973-10-31

    Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1976 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. Reasonably firm delivery schedules were arranged for all of the critical Task 1 engine parts. However, the program will likely have to continue to function with loaner turbine wheels for the next few months. Vehicle A was built and utilized for running demonstrations at both EPA and NASA. Engine 5 (Vehicle B) was built and is being checked out. Upgraded Engine design guidelines were jointly worked out and agreed to with EPA and NASA. Life testing on the loaner endurance engine was extended beyond the 3500-hour milestone. Improvements are being made to extend low emissions Baseline burner life, currently under 300 hours. State-of-the-art ceramic regenerator cores were received from two sources and are being bench checked. Drive and seal system procurement is delaying hot rig testing. Analytical studies were made to determine suitability for the upgraded engine. AiResearch was awarded the integrated control system subcontract. They have initiated work on a simulation model. An elasto-plastic turbine wheel disc analysis program, required for analysis of a ''Gatorized'' non-ribbed turbine wheel disc, was checked out and is being refined to improve convergence. Free-rotor low speed fuel flow tests showed negligible difference from a normal geared rotor arrangement. Preparations are being made for vehicle evaluations. Design of a variable inlet guide vane test rig installation was completed. An initial upgraded engine layout has commenced.

  4. Regional odontodysplasia: A case of progressive tooth development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ganguly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional odontodysplasia (RO is considered a relatively rare dental anomaly despite increasing numbers of case reports in recent years. It usually presents as a localized anomaly in tooth development affecting a few adjacent teeth in a single maxillary or mandibular quadrant. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncommon case of regional odotodysplasia involving noncontiguous mandibular teeth, crossing the midline in a male patient, and showing progressive normalization of tooth anatomy over a period of 6 years. Typically, teeth affected with RO become pulpally involved early on and are either extracted or endodontically treated. Such reports of automatic normalization over time in RO is supportive of a more conservative treatment approach.

  5. The Progressive Development of Early Embodied Algebraic Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Luis

    2014-06-01

    In this article I present some results from a 5-year longitudinal investigation with young students about the genesis of embodied, non-symbolic algebraic thinking and its progressive transition to culturally evolved forms of symbolic thinking. The investigation draws on a cultural-historical theory of teaching and learning—the theory of objectification. Within this theory, thinking is conceived of as a form of reflection and action that is simultaneously material and ideal: It includes inner and outer speech, sensuous forms of imagination and visualisation, gestures, rhythm, and their intertwinement with material culture (symbols, artifacts, etc.). The theory articulates a cultural view of development as an unfolding dialectic process between culturally and historically constituted forms of mathematical knowing and semiotically mediated classroom activity. Looking at the experimental data through these theoretical lenses reveals a developmental path where embodied forms of thinking are sublated or subsumed into more sophisticated ones through the mediation of properly designed classroom activity.

  6. Progress on the development of automated data analysis algorithms and software for ultrasonic inspection of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin, John C.; Coughlin, Chris; Forsyth, David S.; Welter, John T.

    2014-02-01

    Progress is presented on the development and implementation of automated data analysis (ADA) software to address the burden in interpreting ultrasonic inspection data for large composite structures. The automated data analysis algorithm is presented in detail, which follows standard procedures for analyzing signals for time-of-flight indications and backwall amplitude dropout. ADA processing results are presented for test specimens that include inserted materials and discontinuities produced under poor manufacturing conditions.

  7. Bcl-2 expression in pancreas development and pancreatic cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, D; Esposito, I; Boggi, U; Cecchetti, D; Menicagli, M; De Negri, F; Colizzi, L; Del Chiaro, M; Mosca, F; Fornaciari, G; Bevilacqua, G

    2001-08-01

    Apoptosis is important for both tissue development and differentiation; its deregulation may contribute to tumourigenesis. In order to clarify the role of Bcl-2, an apoptosis-inhibiting protein, in pancreatic morphogenesis and tumour progression, its immunohistochemical expression was evaluated in 12 samples of fetal pancreas, in 10 samples of adult pancreas with ductal hyperplastic lesions, in 120 cases of primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 43 synchronous metastatic lymph nodes. To evaluate the role of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer, p53 expression was also studied in tumour samples. Bcl-2 cytoplasmic acinar and ductal immunostaining was found in all fetal and adult tissue samples; ductal hyperplastic lesions were constantly negative. Thirty out of 120 (25%) tumours and 3 out of 43 (7%) lymph nodes expressed Bcl-2, whereas 67 out of 120 (56%) expressed nuclear p53. Well-differentiated tumours (G1) were more frequently Bcl-2-positive (p=0.002); furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between Bcl-2 and p53 expression in primary tumours (p=0.02). Neither Bcl-2 nor p53 influenced patients' prognosis, which was instead affected by N (p=0.02) and M (p<0.0001) status and stage of the disease (p=0.002). It is concluded that Bcl-2 regulates pancreatic morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis from early fetal to adult life and can be considered a phenotypic marker of normal exocrine pancreas. On the other hand, the lack of expression in preneoplastic lesions and the low positivity found in primary tumours and lymph node metastases suggest that Bcl-2 does not play a centralrole in pancreatic tumourigenesis and cancer progression. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Development Path for Agricultural Modernization of Shaanxi Province from the Perspective of Technological Progress

    OpenAIRE

    DUAN, Lufeng

    2013-01-01

    The lag in technological innovation is a bottleneck for modern agricultural development, so technological progress is an inevitable path to break this bottleneck. On the basis of introducing theory of technological progress, this study presents 4 paths for promoting agricultural modernization development in line with current situations of agricultural development and technological progress in Shaanxi Province.

  9. Sleep Problems are Associated with Development and Progression of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Results from REDUCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branche, Brandee L; Howard, Lauren E; Moreira, Daniel M; Roehrborn, Claus; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L; Hopp, Martin L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    Although lower urinary tract symptoms and sleep problems often develop together, to our knowledge it is unknown whether sleep disturbances are linked to lower urinary tract symptoms development and progression. As measured by the 6-item MOS-Sleep (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale) survey we examined the relationship between sleep problems, and the development and progression of lower urinary tract symptoms in the REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) study. REDUCE was a randomized trial testing prostate cancer chemoprevention with dutasteride in men with prostate specific antigen 2.5 to 10 ng/ml and a negative biopsy. At baseline men completed MOS-Sleep and a scaled average was used to calculate the sleep score. Men were followed for 4 years and I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) was completed at baseline and every 6 months. Asymptomatic men had I-PSS less than 8 while symptomatic men had I-PSS 8 or greater. In the placebo arm of 2,588 men not receiving α-blockers or 5α-reductase inhibitors at baseline we tested the association between sleep problems and lower urinary tract symptom development and progression using Cox models. During followup lower urinary tract symptoms developed in 209 of 1,452 asymptomatic men (14%) and 580 of 1,136 (51%) with lower urinary tract symptoms demonstrated progression. On multivariable analysis higher sleep scores were suggestively associated with increased lower urinary tract symptoms in asymptomatic men (quartile 4 vs 1 HR 1.41, 95% CI 0.92-2.17, p = 0.12) and with lower urinary tract symptom progression in symptomatic men (per 10 points of sleep score HR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, p = 0.029). Among men with lower urinary tract symptoms worse sleep scores were associated with the progression of lower urinary tract symptoms and among asymptomatic men worse sleep scores were suggestively associated with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms. If confirmed, these data suggest that sleep

  10. Examination of fast reactor fuels, FBR analytical quality assurance standards and methods, and analytical methods development: irradiation tests. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1976, and FY 1976. [UO/sub 2/; PuO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.D. (comp.)

    1976-08-01

    Characterization of unirradiated and irradiated LMFBR fuels by analytical chemistry methods will continue, and additional methods will be modified and mechanized for hot cell application. Macro- and microexaminations will be made on fuel and cladding using the shielded electron microprobe, emission spectrograph, radiochemistry, gamma scanner, mass spectrometers, and other analytical facilities. New capabilities will be developed in gamma scanning, analyses to assess spatial distributions of fuel and fission products, mass spectrometric measurements of burnup and fission gas constituents and other chemical analyses. Microstructural analyses of unirradiated and irradiated materials will continue using optical and electron microscopy and autoradiographic and x-ray techniques. Analytical quality assurance standards tasks are designed to assure the quality of the chemical characterizations necessary to evaluate reactor components relative to specifications. Tasks include: (1) the preparation and distribution of calibration materials and quality control samples for use in quality assurance surveillance programs, (2) the development of and the guidance in the use of quality assurance programs for sampling and analysis, (3) the development of improved methods of analysis, and (4) the preparation of continuously updated analytical method manuals. Reliable analytical methods development for the measurement of burnup, oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio, and various gases in irradiated fuels is described.

  11. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Progress report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  12. Efficient tests development inspired by mathematical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Developing short tests for knowledge and skills evaluation is definitely easier and faster than developing larger ones. Larger tests however provide much more information than the short ones. In the era of global digitalization the question of effective test construction arises quite naturally. Reuse of short tests for constructing larger ones is one way to find an optimal solution to the problems related to tests development.

  13. A first report of East Asian students' perception of progress testing: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Yasushi; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Kikukawa, Makoto; Stalmeijer, Renee; Murakami, Reiko; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Okazaki, Hitoaki

    2016-09-22

    Progress testing (PT) is used in Western countries to evaluate students' level of functional knowledge, and to enhance meaning-oriented and self-directed learning. However, the use of PT has not been investigated in East Asia, where reproduction-oriented and teacher-centered learning styles prevail. Here, we explored the applicability of PT by focusing on student perceptions. Twenty-four students from Years 2, 3, and 5 at Jichi Medical University in Japan attended a pilot PT session preceded by a brief introduction of its concept and procedures. Variations in obtained test scores were analyzed by year, and student perceptions of PT were explored using focus groups. Formula scores (mean ± standard deviation) in Years 2, 3, and 5 were 12.63 ± 3.53, 35.88 ± 14.53, and 71.00 ± 18.31, respectively. Qualitative descriptive analysis of focus group data showed that students disfavored testing of medical knowledge without tangible goals, but instead favored repetitive assessment of knowledge that had been learned and was tested on a unit basis in the past in order to achieve deep learning. Further, students of all school years considered that post-test explanatory lectures by teachers were necessary. East Asian students' perceptions indicated that, in addition to their intensive memorization within narrow test domains compartmentalized by end-of-unit tests, the concept of PT was suitable for repetitive memorization, as it helped them to integrate their knowledge and to increase their understanding. Post-test explanatory lectures might lessen their dislike of the intangible goals of PT, but at the expense of delaying the development of self-directed learning. Key issues for the optimization of PT in East Asia may include administration of PT after completed end-of-unit tests and a gradual change in feedback methodology over school years from test-oriented post-test lectures to the provision of literature references only, as a means of enhancing test self

  14. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  15. Test-driven development with Django

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This book is for Django developers with little or no knowledge of test-driven development or testing in general. Familiarity with the command line, setting up a Python virtual environment, and starting a Django project are assumed.

  16. Applying the Rule Space Model to Develop a Learning Progression for Thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Zhang, Shanshan; Guo, Yanfang; Xin, Tao

    2017-12-01

    We used the Rule Space Model, a cognitive diagnostic model, to measure the learning progression for thermochemistry for senior high school students. We extracted five attributes and proposed their hierarchical relationships to model the construct of thermochemistry at four levels using a hypothesized learning progression. For this study, we developed 24 test items addressing the attributes of exothermic and endothermic reactions, chemical bonds and heat quantity change, reaction heat and enthalpy, thermochemical equations, and Hess's law. The test was administered to a sample base of 694 senior high school students taught in 3 schools across 2 cities. Results based on the Rule Space Model analysis indicated that (1) the test items developed by the Rule Space Model were of high psychometric quality for good analysis of difficulties, discriminations, reliabilities, and validities; (2) the Rule Space Model analysis classified the students into seven different attribute mastery patterns; and (3) the initial hypothesized learning progression was modified by the attribute mastery patterns and the learning paths to be more precise and detailed.

  17. SMRT-STEPS: School Mastery of Reading Test System To Enhance Progress of Schools. Fall 1987, Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippel, Gary M.; Forehand, Garlie A.

    The School Mastery of Reading Test (SMRT) program was designed to give administrators and teachers information about reading performance and recommendations for improving the instructional program. The project includes development of a valid and reliable reading test based on the New York City curriculum in order to assess the potential linkage…

  18. Examination of fast reactor fuels, FBR analytical quality assurance standards and methods, and analytical methods development: irradiation tests. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1977. [UO/sub 2/; PuO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.D. (comp.)

    1977-05-01

    This project is directed toward the examination and comparison of the effects of neutron irradiation on LMFBR Program fuel materials. Characterization of unirradiated and irradiated fuels by analytical chemistry methods will continue, and additional methods will be modified and mechanized for hot cell application. Macro- and microexaminations will be made on fuel and cladding, using the shielded electron microprobe, emission spectrograph, radiochemistry, gamma scanner, mass spectrometers, and other analytical facilities. New capabilities will be developed in gamma scanning, analyses to assess spatial distributions of fuel and fission products, mass spectrometric measurements of burnup and fission gas constituents and other chemical analyses. Microstructural analyses of unirradiated and irradiated materials will continue, using optical and electron microscopy and autoradiographic and x-ray techniques. Special emphasis will be placed on numerical representation of microstructures and its relationship to fabrication and irradiation parameters. New etching and mounting techniques will be developed for high burnup materials.

  19. Comparison of Individual Performance in Intelligence Tests WAIS III and RPM (Raven's Progressive Matrices)

    OpenAIRE

    Petrů, Vít

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with replacement of performative scale of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd revision) through Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices and Advanced Progressive Matrices. In the theoretical part introduces the concepts of intelligence, approaches to its exploration and intelligence tests. The theoretical part is also devoted to the description of the used methods and presents an overview of the research on a similar theme as this work. In the empirical part of the thesis is...

  20. Proposed Special Issue: Progress of cancer research in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Jong

    2016-10-01

    % growth in the same period, with two consecutive years of decline between 2012 and 2014. This steady upward trend of publication output from developing countries shows that researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the values of evidence-based research, without which would limit funding opportunities and restrict international collaborations, as well as partnerships.Advances in Modern Oncology Research is an Open Access journal aimed at increasing the accessibility of peer-reviewed information among researchers worldwide. The journal emphasizes on equal opportunity in scientific publishing, and is committed towards bridging the existing knowledge gap in cancer research between developed and developing countries. AMOR is keen to highlight the current challenges and opportunities of cancer research in developing countries, and the creation of a special issue dedicated to this subject is especially relevant and urgent to the broad community of cancer researchers because:(i It provides a much-needed platform to clinicians and researchers from developing countries to share important region-specific data, statistics, observations, and findings with the international community. This will not only improve the visibility of researchers from developing countries, but also enrich existing medical literature with updated information on the progress of cancer research in the developing world.(ii It gives clinicians, researchers, and policy makers from developed nations the opportunity to assess the existing and projected capability of developing countries in coping with the disease burden of cancer. Moreover, it is expected to equip stakeholders with key data and information to better manage vital resources, i.e. the allocation of funding and creation of knowledge transfer programs, moving forward.It takes collective efforts to address the escalating threat of cancer mortality and morbidity in the developing world. In order to introduce effective long-term solutions, it is

  1. Developing Indonesian Language Tests for College Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djiwandono, M. Soenardi

    In Indonesia, Bahasa Indonesian (BI) is the designated national and official language. However, deficiencies in Indonesian proficiency are found in a wide range of individuals. A test battery to measure proficiency level was developed, consisting of a writing test, a grammar test, and a cloze test. The writing test was an essay, in which five…

  2. Quantitative Reasoning Learning Progressions for Environmental Science: Developing a Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Mayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reasoning is a complex concept with many definitions and a diverse account in the literature. The purpose of this article is to establish a working definition of quantitative reasoning within the context of science, construct a quantitative reasoning framework, and summarize research on key components in that framework. Context underlies all quantitative reasoning; for this review, environmental science serves as the context.In the framework, we identify four components of quantitative reasoning: the quantification act, quantitative literacy, quantitative interpretation of a model, and quantitative modeling. Within each of these components, the framework provides elements that comprise the four components. The quantification act includes the elements of variable identification, communication, context, and variation. Quantitative literacy includes the elements of numeracy, measurement, proportional reasoning, and basic probability/statistics. Quantitative interpretation includes the elements of representations, science diagrams, statistics and probability, and logarithmic scales. Quantitative modeling includes the elements of logic, problem solving, modeling, and inference. A brief comparison of the quantitative reasoning framework with the AAC&U Quantitative Literacy VALUE rubric is presented, demonstrating a mapping of the components and illustrating differences in structure. The framework serves as a precursor for a quantitative reasoning learning progression which is currently under development.

  3. An Evolving Role for DEPTOR in Tumor Development and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway has been found in a variety of human cancers. However, the exact molecular mechanism how the mTOR signaling pathway is regulated remains largely elusive. Recently, DEPTOR was identified as an endogenous mTOR inhibitor that could suppress mTOR activity in vivo. More importantly, accumulated evidence has implicated that DEPTOR plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of human malignances, which could in part be mediated through its inhibitory role toward mTOR. Furthermore, three independent laboratories including our own have demonstrated that the stability of DEPTOR is controlled by the SCFβ-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase and deregulated DEPTOR destruction might contribute to hyperactivation of mTOR in pathologic conditions including cancer. This review discusses the recent literature regarding the function of DEPTOR involved in cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance, all of which are associated with the pathogenesis of human cancers. Moreover, we also summarize that targeting DEPTOR may be a novel strategy for achieving better anticancer treatments.

  4. Diabetic nephropathy: Time to withhold development and progression - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama A.A. Sharaf El Din

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent discoveries in the fields of pathogenesis and management of diabetic nephropathy have revolutionized the knowledge about this disease. Little was added to the management of diabetic nephropathy after the introduction of renin angiotensin system blockers. The ineffective role of the renin- angiotensin system blockers in primary prevention of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus necessitated the search for other early therapeutic interventions that target alternative pathogenic mechanisms. Among the different classes of oral hypoglycemic agents, recent studies highlighted the distinguished mechanisms of sodium glucose transporter 2 blockers and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors that settle their renoprotective actions beyond the hypoglycemic effects. The introduction of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents to this field had also added wealth of knowledge. However, many of these agents are still waiting well-designed clinical studies in order to prove their beneficial therapeutic role. The aim of this review of literature is to highlight the recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, the established and the potential renoprotective therapeutic agents that would prevent the development or the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Nuclear-Powered Artificial Heart Prototype System Development Program: Phase III. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Technical progress and accomplishments on the active program tasks 49 through 62 on the development of a nuclear-powered artificial heart are reported. The tasks include waste heat rejection, systems studies, IVBM modification design, IVBM fabrication, IVBM performance testing, IVBM system life testing, field support, reliability and quality assurance, Mark I thermal insulation design, and Mark I thermal converter design. (TFD)

  6. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Mueller, C J

    2009-12-09

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and n-dodecane that are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For two-ring compounds, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multi-dimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real

  7. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J

    2009-09-04

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and do-decane which are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For the cycloalkanes, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multidimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel

  8. Progression of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome According to Electrodiagnostic Testing in Nonoperatively Treated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark van Suchtelen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  This study tested the null hypothesis that nonoperatively treated patients would not show disease progression of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS over time according to median nerve distal motor latency (DML on two electrodiagnostic tests.   Methods:  This retrospective study analyzed sixty-two adult nonoperatively treated patients who were diagnosed with CTS confirmed by a minimum of two electrodiagnostic tests at our institution between December 2006 and  tober 2012. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was conducted to test the difference between electrodiagnostic measurements between the first and last test. Results: The mean time between the first and last electrodiagnostic test was 26±12 months (range, 12 to 55 months. The only electrodiagnostic measurement that increased significantly was the difference between median and ulnar DML on the same side (r=0.19, P =0.038. The time between the electrodiagnostic tests was significantly longer for patients with at least 10% worsening of the DML at the second test compared to cases of which the DML did not worsen or improve a minimum of 10% (P =0.015.  Conclusions: There is evidence that—on average—idiopathic median neuropathy at the carpal tunnel slowly progresses over time, and this can be measured with electrodiagnostics, but studies with a much longer interval between lectrodiagnostic tests may be needed to determine if it always progresses.

  9. Progressive MS Alliance Industry Forum: Maximizing Collective Impact To Enable Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaratin, P; Comi, G; Coetzee, T; Ramsey, K; Smith, K; Thompson, A; Panzara, M

    2016-10-01

    The Progressive MS Alliance Industry Forum describes a new approach to address barriers to developing treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). This innovative model promises to facilitate robust collaboration between industry, academia, and patient organizations and accelerate research towards the overarching goal of developing safe and effective treatments for progressive MS. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Progress towards developing neutron tolerant magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard; Rempe, Joy; Daw, Joshua; Kohse, Gordon; Carpenter, David; Ames, Michael; Ostrovsky, Yakov; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hualte; Wernsman, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Current generation light water reactors (LWRs), sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), small modular reactors (SMRs), and next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs) produce harsh environments in and near the reactor core that can severely tax material performance and limit component operational life. To address this issue, several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) research programs are evaluating the long duration irradiation performance of fuel and structural materials used in existing and new reactors. In order to maximize the amount of information obtained from Material Testing Reactor (MTR) irradiations, DOE is also funding development of enhanced instrumentation that will be able to obtain in-situ, real-time data on key material characteristics and properties, with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Such data are required to validate new multi-scale, multi-physics modeling tools under development as part of a science-based, engineering driven approach to reactor development. It is not feasible to obtain high resolution/microscale data with the current state of instrumentation technology. However, ultrasound-based sensors offer the ability to obtain such data if it is demonstrated that these sensors and their associated transducers are resistant to high neutron flux, high gamma radiation, and high temperature. To address this need, the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) is funding an irradiation, led by PSU, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor to test the survivability of ultrasound transducers. As part of this effort, PSU and collaborators have designed, fabricated, and provided piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are optimized to perform in harsh, high flux, environments. Four piezoelectric transducers were fabricated with either aluminum nitride, zinc oxide, or bismuth titanate as the active element that were coupled to either Kovar or aluminum waveguides and two

  11. Firmware development for VMM testing

    CERN Document Server

    Amayuelas Fernandez, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    The collaboration has been carried out within the ATLAS Detector Systems area, in the Electronics Department for the muon spectrometer. This includes the team from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The project involves the firmware development of the FPGAs for the configuration of the readout chip used in the detector (known as VMM). Some changes in the firmware were needed in order to check the configuration was correctly sent and the chip configured. The aim of this report is to describe the project in detail, how it has been developed and which problems have been encountered during the process.

  12. US Progress on Property Characterization to Support LEU U-10 Mo Monolithic Fuel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Laboratory; Rabin, Barry H [Idaho National Laboratory; Smith, James Arthur [Idaho National Laboratory; Scott, Clark Landon [Idaho National Laboratory; Benefiel, Bradley Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Larsen, Eric David [Idaho National Laboratory; Lind, Robert Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Sell, David Alan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The US High Performance Research Reactor program is pursuing development and qualification of a new high density monolithic LEU fuel to facilitate conversion of five higher power research reactors located in the US (ATR, HFIR, NBSR, MIT and MURR). In order to support fabrication development and fuel performance evaluations, new testing capabilities are being developed to evaluate the properties of fuel specimens. Residual stress and fuel-cladding bond strength are two characteristics related to fuel performance that are being investigated. In this overview, new measurement capabilities being developed to assess these characteristics in both fresh and irradiated fuel are described. Progress on fresh fuel testing is summarized and on-going hot-cell implementation efforts to support future PIE campaigns are detailed. It is anticipated that benchmarking of as-fabricated fuel characteristics will be critical to establishing technical bases for specifications that optimize fuel fabrication and ensure acceptable in-reactor fuel performance.

  13. Progress in the Development of the TOP Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Picardi, L

    2004-01-01

    The TOP Linac (Oncological Therapy with Protons), under development by ENEA and ISS is a sequence of three pulsed (5 msec, 300 Hz) linear accelerators: a 7 MeV, 425 MHz RFQ+DTL (AccSys Model PL-7), a 7–65 MeV, 2998 MHz Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) and a 65–200 MeV, variable energy 2998 MHz Side Coupled Linac (SCL). The first SCDTL module is composed by 11 DTL tanks coupled by 10 side cavities. The tanks has modified to overcome vacuum leakage that occurred during brazing, and now the module has been completed, and is ready to be tested with protons. The 7 MeV injector has been recently installed in the ENEA Frascati laboratories for preliminary test, before being transferred to the main Oncologycal Hospital in Rome, Istituto Regina Elena.

  14. Test-driven development with Mockito

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Sujoy

    2013-01-01

    This book is a hands-on guide, full of practical examples to illustrate the concepts of Test Driven Development.If you are a developer who wants to develop software following Test Driven Development using Mockito and leveraging various Mockito features, this book is ideal for you. You don't need prior knowledge of TDD, Mockito, or JUnit.It is ideal for developers, who have some experience in Java application development as well as a basic knowledge of unit testing, but it covers the basic fundamentals of TDD and JUnit testing to get you acquainted with these concepts before delving into them.

  15. Progress towards developing neutron tolerant magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Brian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics; Tittmann, Bernhard [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics; Rempe, Joy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daw, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kohse, Gordon [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Carpenter, David [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Ames, Micheal [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Ostrovsky, Yakov [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chien, Hualte [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wernsman, Bernard [Bettis Atomic Power Lab. (BAPL), West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corp.

    2014-07-01

    Current generation light water reactors (LWRs), sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), small modular reactors (SMRs), and next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs) provide harsh environments in and near the core that can severely test material performance and limit their operational life. To address this issue, several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) research programs are evaluating the long duration radiation performance of fuels and materials. In To reduce the amount of Material and Test Reactor (MTR) irradiations required, DOE is also funding development of enhanced instrumentation that will be able to obtain data, with unprecedented accuracy and resolution, that are required to validate new multi-scale multiphysics modeling tools . It is not feasible to obtain such data with the current state of instrumentation technology. To address this need, PSU and collaborators have started an experiment to test the potential for utilizing ultrasonic instruments in-pile. Ultrasonic sensors must be resistant to high neutron flux, high gamma radiation, and high temperature. PSU and collaborators have designed, fabricated, and started to irradiate piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers designed to perform in such harsh environments. Three piezoelectric transducers were fabricated with aluminum nitride, zinc oxide, and bismuth titanate as the active element. The transducers are coupled kovar and aluminum waveguides of which pulse-echo ultrasonic measurements are made in-situ. Two magnetostrictive transducers were fabricated with Remendur and Arnokrome as the active elements. These devices will be pulsed and monitored in-situ. (1) Selection of candidate sensor materials as well as optimization of test assembly parameters (2) High temperature benchmark testing and (3) initial data from the irradiation will be reported.

  16. US Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The assessment, which was conducted from July 20 through August 4, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and progress of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices; the DOE Nevada Field Office (NV); and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. This report presents a summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management.

  17. Molecular Testing in Myelodysplastic Syndromes for the Practicing Oncologist: Will the Progress Fulfill the Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Gore, Steven D; Zeidan, Amer M

    2015-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms that are driven by somatically acquired genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations. Accurate risk stratification is essential for delivery of risk-adaptive therapeutic interventions. The current prognostic tools sum the impact of clinical, pathologic, and laboratory parameters. Newer technologies with next-generation targeted deep sequencing and whole-genome and -exome sequencing have identified several recurrent mutations that play a vital role in the pathophysiology of MDS and the impact of these genetic changes on disease phenotype. Equally important, well-annotated databases of MDS patients with paired clinicopathologic and genetic data have enabled better understanding of the independent prognostic impact of several molecular mutations on important clinical endpoints such as overall survival and probability of leukemic progression. Cumulative evidence suggests that genomic data can also be used clinically to aid with the diagnosis, prognosis, prediction of response to specific therapies, and the development of novel and rationally targeted therapies. However, the optimal use of this mutational profiling remains a work in progress and currently there is no standard set of genes or techniques that are recommended for routine use in the clinic. In this review, we discuss the genomic revolution and its impact on our understanding of MDS biology and risk stratification. We also discuss the current role and the challenges of the application of genetic mutational data into daily clinical practice and how future research could help improve the prognostication precision and specific therapy selection for patients with MDS. Heterogeneity in clinical outcomes of MDS is partly related to interpatient variability of recurrent somatic mutations that drive disease phenotype and progression. Although clinical risk stratification tools have functioned well in prognostication for patients with MDS

  18. Prolaris Cell Cycle Progression Test for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaink, Alexis; Li, Chunmei; Wells, David; Holubowich, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is very common and many localized tumours are non-aggressive. Determining which cancers are aggressive is important for choosing the most appropriate treatment (e.g., surgery, radiation, active surveillance). Current clinical risk stratification is reliable in forecasting the prognosis of groups of men with similar clinical and pathologic characteristics, but there is residual uncertainty at the individual level. The Prolaris cell cycle progression (CCP) test, a genomic test that estimates how fast tumour cells are proliferating, could potentially be used to improve the accuracy of individual risk assessment. This health technology assessment sought to determine the clinical utility, economic impact, and patients' perceptions of the value of the CCP test in low- and intermediate-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the clinical and economic evidence of the CCP test in low-and intermediate-risk, localized prostate cancer. Medical and health economic databases were searched from 2010 to June or July 2016. The critical appraisal of the clinical evidence included risk of bias and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. We also analyzed the potential budget impact of adding the CCP test into current practice, from the perspective the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Finally, we conducted qualitative interviews with men with prostate cancer, on the factors that influenced their treatment decision-making. Results For the review of clinical effectiveness, we screened 3,021 citations, and two before–after studies met our inclusion criteria. In one study, the results of the CCP test appeared to change the treatment plan (from initial to final plan) in 64.9% of cases overall (GRADE rating of the quality of evidence: Very low). In the other study, the CCP test changed the treatment received in nearly half of cases overall, compared

  19. Test Marketing in New Product Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompmaker, Jay E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the role of test marketing in new product development, based on interviews with marketing executives. Attempts to clarify when a test market should be done, what its aims should be, and how it should be used. (JG)

  20. Design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for an automotive vehicle, Phase IV. Quarterly progress report, December 1977--February 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-02-28

    Progress in developing and testing a continuously variable ratio hydraulic transmission unit for automobiles is reported. Major emphasis was placed on the development of a co-axial hydrostatic module.

  1. Proinflammatory Cytokines in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression Promoted by High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to examine whether proinflammatory cytokines participated in prostate cancer (PCa development and progression promoted by high-fat diet (HFD. Methods. TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate mice were randomly divided into two groups: normal diet group and HFD group. Mortality rate and tumor formation rate were examined. TRAMP mice were sacrificed and sampled on the 20th, 24th, and 28th week, respectively. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, were tested by FlowCytomix. Prostate tissue of TRAMP mice was used for histology study. Results. A total of 13 deaths of TRAMP mice were observed, among which 3 (8.33% were from the normal diet group and 10 (27.78% from the HFD group. The mortality rate of TRAMP mice from HFD group was significantly higher than that of normal diet group (P=0.032. Tumor formation rate at 20th week of age of HFD group was significantly higher than that of normal diet group (P=0.045. Proinflammatory cytokines levels, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, were significantly higher in HFD TRAMP mice. Conclusions. HFD could promote TRAMP mouse PCa development and progression with elevated proinflammatory cytokines levels. Proinflammatory cytokines could contribute to PCa development and progression promoted by HFD.

  2. Safeguard: Progress and Test Results for a Reliable Independent On-Board Safety Net for UAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven D.; Dill, Evan T.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Gilabert, Russell V.

    2017-01-01

    As demands increase to use unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for a broad spectrum of commercial applications, regulatory authorities are examining how to safely integrate them without compromising safety or disrupting traditional airspace operations. For small UAS, several operational rules have been established; e.g., do not operate beyond visual line-of-sight, do not fly within five miles of a commercial airport, do not fly above 400 feet above ground level. Enforcing these rules is challenging for UAS, as evidenced by the number of incident reports received by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This paper reviews the development of an onboard system - Safeguard - designed to monitor and enforce conformance to a set of operational rules defined prior to flight (e.g., geospatial stay-out or stay-in regions, speed limits, and altitude constraints). Unlike typical geofencing or geo-limitation functions, Safeguard operates independently of the off-the-shelf UAS autopilot and is designed in a way that can be realized by a small set of verifiable functions to simplify compliance with existing standards for safety-critical systems (e.g. for spacecraft and manned commercial transportation aircraft systems). A framework is described that decouples the system from any other devices on the UAS as well as introduces complementary positioning source(s) for applications that require integrity and availability beyond what can be provided by the Global Positioning System (GPS). This paper summarizes the progress and test results for Safeguard research and development since presentation of the design concept at the 35th Digital Avionics Systems Conference (DASC '16). Significant accomplishments include completion of software verification and validation in accordance with NASA standards for spacecraft systems (to Class B), development of improved hardware prototypes, development of a simulation platform that allows for hardware-in-the-loop testing and fast-time Monte Carlo

  3. Progress of resonant ionization laser ion source development at GANIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henares, J. L., E-mail: henares@ganil.fr; Huguet, Y.; Lecesne, N.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Sjödin, A. M. [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Kron, T.; Schneider, F.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    SPIRAL2 (Système de Production d’Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne) is a research facility under construction at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds) for the production of radioactive ion beams by isotope separation on-line methods and low-energy in-flight techniques. A resonant ionization laser ion source will be one of the main techniques to produce the radioactive ion beams. GISELE (GANIL Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation) is a test bench developed to study a fully operational laser ion source available for Day 1 operations at SPIRAL2 Phase 2. The aim of this project is to find the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results about the new ion source geometry will be presented.

  4. Progress of resonant ionization laser ion source development at GANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henares, J. L.; Huguet, Y.; Kron, T.; Lecesne, N.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Schneider, F.; Sjödin, A. M.; Wendt, K.

    2014-02-01

    SPIRAL2 (Système de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne) is a research facility under construction at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds) for the production of radioactive ion beams by isotope separation on-line methods and low-energy in-flight techniques. A resonant ionization laser ion source will be one of the main techniques to produce the radioactive ion beams. GISELE (GANIL Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation) is a test bench developed to study a fully operational laser ion source available for Day 1 operations at SPIRAL2 Phase 2. The aim of this project is to find the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results about the new ion source geometry will be presented.

  5. Progress and perspectives on HIV-1 microbicide development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, KB

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available is the use of microbicides. In this review we provide a summary of the progress made toward the discovery of affordable and effective HIV-1 microbicides and suggest future directions. We show that there is a wide range of compounds that have been proposed...

  6. Technical Entrepreneurship and Technological Progress in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Procel, Jose

    This paper describes the Mexican economic environment in terms of general economic conditions from the 1940s to the present, the role of science and technology in industrial progress, and the promotion and support of small companies. The technical entrepreneur is identified as the missing link that would play an important part in the technological…

  7. Testing Infrastructure for Operating System Kernel Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Maxwell; Karlsson, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Testing is an important part of system development, and to test effectively we require knowledge of the internal state of the system under test. Testing an operating system kernel is a challenge as it is the operating system that typically provides access to this internal state information. Multi......-core kernels pose an even greater challenge due to concurrency and their shared kernel state. In this paper, we present a testing framework that addresses these challenges by running the operating system in a virtual machine, and using virtual machine introspection to both communicate with the kernel...... and obtain information about the system. We have also developed an in-kernel testing API that we can use to develop a suite of unit tests in the kernel. We are using our framework for for the development of our own multi-core research kernel....

  8. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  9. AngularJS test-driven development

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This book is for developers who want to learn about AngularJS development by applying testing techniques. You are assumed to have a basic knowledge and understanding of HTML, JavaScript, and AngularJS.

  10. Test Driven Development of Scientific Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Test-Driven Development (TDD), a software development process that promises many advantages for developer productivity and software reliability, has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD practitioners alternate between writing short automated tests and producing code that passes those tests. Although this overly simplified description will undoubtedly sound prohibitively burdensome to many uninitiated developers, the advent of powerful unit-testing frameworks greatly reduces the effort required to produce and routinely execute suites of tests. By testimony, many developers find TDD to be addicting after only a few days of exposure, and find it unthinkable to return to previous practices.After a brief overview of the TDD process and my experience in applying the methodology for development activities at Goddard, I will delve more deeply into some of the challenges that are posed by numerical and scientific software as well as tools and implementation approaches that should address those challenges.

  11. Structured approach to design of diagnostic test evaluation studies for chronic progressive infections in animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils; Gardner, Ian Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic test evaluations (DTEs) for chronic infections are challenging because a protracted incubation period has to be considered in the design of the DTE, and the adverse effects of infection may be widespread and progressive over an animal's entire life. Frequently, the specific purpose......) than originally intended. The objective of this paper is to outline a structured approach to the design and conduct of a DTE for diagnostic tests used for chronic infections in animals, and intended for different purposes. We describe the process from reflections about test purpose and the underlying...... of the test is not formally considered when a test is evaluated. Therefore, the result is often a DTE where test sensitivity and specificity estimates are biased, either because of problems with establishing the true infection status or because the test detects another aspect of the infection (and analyte...

  12. What One Intelligence Test Measures: A Theoretical Account of the Processing in the Raven Progressive Matrices Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-03

    4428017.---0: 11. TITLE (include Security Clasification ) What One Intelligence Test Measures: A Theoretical Account of the Processing in the Raven...that is widely used for adults of higher ability, the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices. Sets I and II. Set I. consisting of 12 problems, is often...them in their difficulty. The magnitude of the variation is apparent from the error rates (shown in Figure 3) of 2256 British adults . including

  13. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarzadeh, Maryam; Shirazi, Maryam

    2014-11-01

    Concerning the prevalence of test anxiety among nursing students and presence of stress in nursing education years, this study was conducted to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety among nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in three stages on 49 male and female nursing students divided into two groups (study and control). In the pre-test stage, demographic data and Sarason anxiety questionnaires were filled by 94 students (of terms 3 and 4). Then, in the intervention stage, the students having test anxiety were assigned to two groups (study and control), and the progressive muscle relaxation method was performed in the experiment group in four sessions. Then, the students did this method two times a day until final exams, immediately following which they filled the self-reported checklists. On the first day of the final exams, test anxiety questionnaire was filled by the two groups again. The collected data were analyzed by the statistical tests, i.e. χ(2), paired t-test, independent sample t-test, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, using SPSS 18. Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety after intervention between the two groups of study and control (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant before intervention (P = 0.76). Also, in the study group, there was a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety before and after intervention (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant in the control group (P = 0.09). Mann-Whitney test showed no significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores before intervention in the study and control groups (P = 0.60), but the difference was significant after intervention (P = 0.00). Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores in the study group before and after intervention (P = 0.00), but

  14. Integrated Language Definition Testing : Enabling Test-Driven Language Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, L.C.L.; Vermaas, R.; Visser, E.

    2011-01-01

    The reliability of compilers, interpreters, and development environments for programming languages is essential for effective software development and maintenance. They are often tested only as an afterthought. Languages with a smaller scope, such as domain-specific languages, often remain untested.

  15. Development of a Danish speech intelligibility test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A Danish speech intelligibility test for assessing the speech recognition threshold in noise (SRTN) has been developed. The test consists of 180 sentences distributed in 18 phonetically balanced lists. The sentences are based on an open word-set and represent everyday language....... The sentences were equalized with respect to intelligibility to ensure uniform SRTN assessments with all lists. In contrast to several previously developed tests such as the hearing in noise test (HINT) where the equalization is based on scored (objective) measures of word intelligibility, the present test used...

  16. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report, [October 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blythe, G.

    1993-01-20

    Baseline testing at the ``base`` site. Tampa Electric Company`s (TECo`s) Big Bend Station, commenced on September 28 and was completed on October 2. Initial results from this testing were presented in the previous Technical Progress Report, but a more complete discussion is provided in this report. Parametric testing was conducted at the Big Bend site during this quarter to evaluate the effects of dibasic acid (DBA) addition on system SO{sub 2} removal performance. The parametric tests were conducted from November 2 through 19. A DBA consumption rate test was also conducted, after the parametric tests were completed. The DBA consumption test was conducted from November 21 through 25. Options I and II to the base program were exercised by DOE/PETC at the end of the previous quarter. These options involve testing at Hoosier Energy Rural Electric Cooperative Inc.`s Merom Station and Southwestern Electric Power Company`s Pirkey Station, respectively. Testing was conducted at Merom Station during November. Previously, Radian Corporation was the test contractor for EPRI-funded performance additive testing at this site. This EPRI-funded testing involved the equivalent of baseline testing, parametric testing with both DBA and sodium formate performance additives, and an additive consumption test with the DBA additive. The results of the prior testing will be available to support the objectives of this DOE project Consequently, the only testing required at the Merom site was to conduct consumption tests with the sodium formate additive. After a brief baseline repeat test, two sodium formate consumption tests were conducted during the time period from November 11 through 23. Results from the consumption tests are presented and discussed in this report.

  17. Development of a Sensitive Outcome for Economical Drug Screening for Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosa, Peter; Ghazali, Danish; Tanigawa, Makoto; Barbour, Chris; Cortese, Irene; Kelley, William; Snyder, Blake; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Lehky, Tanya; Wu, Tianxia; Greenwood, Mark; Nair, Govind; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic advance in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) has been very slow. Based on the transformative role magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast-enhancing lesions had on drug development for relapsing-remitting MS, we consider the lack of sensitive outcomes to be the greatest barrier for developing new treatments for progressive MS. The purpose of this study was to compare 58 prospectively acquired candidate outcomes in the real-world situation of progressive MS trials to select and validate the best-performing outcome. The 1-year pre-treatment period of adaptively designed IPPoMS (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00950248) and RIVITaLISe (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01212094) Phase II trials served to determine the primary outcome for the subsequent blinded treatment phase by comparing 8 clinical, 1 electrophysiological, 1 optical coherence tomography, 7 MRI volumetric, 9 quantitative T1 MRI, and 32 diffusion tensor imaging MRI outcomes. Fifteen outcomes demonstrated significant progression over 1 year (Δ) in the predetermined analysis and seven out of these were validated in two independent cohorts. Validated MRI outcomes had limited correlations with clinical scales, relatively poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and recorded overlapping values between healthy subjects and MS patients with moderate-severe disability. Clinical measures correlated better, even though each reflects a somewhat different disability domain. Therefore, using machine-learning techniques, we developed a combinatorial weight-adjusted disability score (CombiWISE) that integrates four clinical scales: expanded disability status scale (EDSS), Scripps neurological rating scale, 25 foot walk and 9 hole peg test. CombiWISE outperformed all clinical scales (Δ = 9.10%; p = 0.0003) and all MRI outcomes. CombiWISE recorded no overlapping values between healthy subjects and disabled MS patients, had high SNR, and predicted changes in EDSS in a longitudinal assessment of 98 progressive MS

  18. Progress in design development and research activity on LLCB TBM in Russian Federation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, V.G.; Leshukov, A.Yu; Tomilov, S.N.; Razmerov, A.V.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Sviridenko, M.N. [JSC “NIKIET”, Malaya Krasnoselskaya str. 2/8, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirillov, I.R. [JSC “NIIEFA” (D.V. Efremov Institute), Doroga na Metallostroy, 3, 196641 S. Peterburg (Russian Federation); Obukhov, D.M., E-mail: obukhov@sintez.niiefa.spb.su [JSC “NIIEFA” (D.V. Efremov Institute), Doroga na Metallostroy, 3, 196641 S. Peterburg (Russian Federation); Pertsev, D.A.; Vitkovsky, I.V. [JSC “NIIEFA” (D.V. Efremov Institute), Doroga na Metallostroy, 3, 196641 S. Peterburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Progress in RF LLCB TBM design and supporting R&D since conceptual design activity is presented. • Hydrodynamic, transient thermal and structural analysis of TBM casing and optimization of tritium breeding zone were performed. • Results of MHD, buoyancy and corrosion tests are presented. - Abstract: This paper gives the results of design development, analysis and R&D in support of the IN LLCB TBM-concept in Russian Federation. The main results of design activity on LLCB TBM during the period of 2013–2014 are the following: (1) improved design of the TBM load-bearing casing taking into account new dimensions of the available space in the ITER Test Port; (2) tritium-breeding zone design for the TBM casing new dimensions (including its optimization to minimize the MHD-pressure drop in lead-lithium coolant and to increase the tritium generation rate); (3) TBM attachment system proposal; (4) thermal analysis (in both stationary and transient conditions) of the TBM new design; (5) TBM safety analysis. R&D in support of the LLCB TBM design includes: (1) MHD tests of round pipe in non-uniform magnetic field; (2) MHD tests of the TBM mock-up containing manifold and poloidal ducts; (3) MHD tests of buoyancy flow in rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field; (4) corrosion tests of EUROFER samples in PbLi. The further plans on LLCB TBM development are also presented.

  19. Progress In Developing Laser Based Post Irradiation Examination Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James A.; Scott, Clark L.; Benefiel, Brad C.

    2016-09-01

    To be able to understand the performance of reactor fuels and materials, irradiated materials must be characterized effectively and efficiently in a high rad environment. The characterization work must be performed remotely and in an environment hostile to instrumentation. Laser based characterization techniques provide the ability to be remote and robust in a hot-cell environment. Laser based instrumentation also can provide high spatial resolution suitable for scanning and imaging large areas. The INL is currently developing three laser based Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) stations for the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at the INL. These laser based systems will characterize irradiated materials and fuels. The characterization systems are the following: Laser Shock Laser based ultrasonic C-scan system Gas Assay, Sample, and Recharge system (GASR, up-grade to an existing system). The laser shock technique will characterize material properties and failure loads/mechanisms in various materials such as LWR fuel, plate fuel, and next generation fuel forms, for PIE in high radiation areas. The laser shock-technique induces large amplitude shock waves to mechanically characterize interfaces such as the fuel-clad bond. The shock wave travels as a compression wave through the material to the free (unconfined) back surface and reflects back through the material under test as a rarefaction (tensile) wave. This rarefaction wave is the physical mechanism that produces internal de-lamination failure. As part of the laser shock system, a laser-based ultrasonic C-scan system will be used to detect and characterize debonding caused by the laser shock technique. The laser ultrasonic system will be fully capable of performing classical non-destructive evaluation testing and imaging functions such as microstructure characterization, flaw detection and dimensional metrology in complex components. The purpose of the GASR is to measure the pressure/volume of the plenum of an

  20. The Development and Validation of an Assessment Instrument for Use with the Deaf Blind: The Severely Handicapped Progress Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, William C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment instrument developed for use with both deaf-blind children and adults. Designed to assist in individual program planning and to measure progress, the 199 item inventory is organized in six major categories with 19 subsections. It has been field tested using 271 deaf-blind persons. (Author/BS)

  1. Progress on the Development of Future Airport Surface Wireless Communications Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Budinger, James M.; Brooks, David E.; Franklin, Morgan; DeHart, Steve; Dimond, Robert P.; Borden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Continuing advances in airport surface management and improvements in airport surface safety are required to enable future growth in air traffic throughout the airspace, as airport arrival and departure delays create a major system bottleneck. These airport management and safety advances will be built upon improved communications, navigation, surveillance, and weather sensing, creating an information environment supporting system automation. The efficient movement of the digital data generated from these systems requires an underlying communications network infrastructure to connect data sources with the intended users with the required quality of service. Current airport surface communications consists primarily of buried copper or fiber cable. Safety related communications with mobile airport surface assets occurs over 25 kHz VHF voice and data channels. The available VHF spectrum, already congested in many areas, will be insufficient to support future data traffic requirements. Therefore, a broadband wireless airport surface communications network is considered a requirement for the future airport component of the air transportation system. Progress has been made on defining the technology and frequency spectrum for the airport surface wireless communications network. The development of a test and demonstration facility and the definition of required testing and standards development are now underway. This paper will review the progress and planned future work.

  2. Controlled environmental radioiodine tests at the national reactor testing station. 1965 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.R.; Bunch, D.F.; Gammill, W.P.; Hawley, C.A. Jr.; Markee, E.H.; Tiernan, M.W.

    1966-02-01

    The CERT project consists of a series of planned releases of radioiodine over different vegetation and during various meteorological conditions, with the prime objective being to measure the relationships involved in the passage of radioiodine through the air-vegetation-cow-milk-human chain. The results of the first five tests in the series, which started in the spring of 1963 and is continuing, are reported. Each test was conducted under measured meteorological conditions and over prepared sampling and grazing courses. Two tests were made over open-range type vegetation, two over irrigated pastures, and one over snow-covered ground. Two tests were conducted under lapse conditions, two under inversion conditions, and one under neutral conditions. In each case, known quantities of elemental /sup 131/I/sub 2/ were released. Relationships determined included air-grass ratios (deposition velocities) which ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 cm/sec; effective half life of /sup 131/I on grass of 3.5 days and 5.5 days; the time of peak activity in milk at two days following a release; milk-grass ratio (C/1:C/g); total /sup 131/I secreted in milk by cows to that ingested by cows; adult human thyroid uptake fraction (inhalation); and based on a breathing rate of 20 m/sup 3//24 hours, the ratio between infinity mills ingestion dose and infinity inhalation dose for a single release was calculated. Data, descriptions of methods, and calculations are reported. Discussions of resuspension factors and particle sizes and behavior are also included.

  3. Test and Behaviour Driven Development with Python

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Experience has taught us that bugs are impossible to avoid when programming. Specially on continuous delivery processes where there are new versions that refactor or incorporate new modules to the project. Although, there are different tools which help us to ensure code quality by enabling developers to catch bugs while still in the development stage. In this talk, I will talk about Test-driven development(TDD) and Behaviour-Driven development (BDD) methodologies focused on web development. Also, I will present an overview of unit testing tools as Selenium or Behave, which help us to produce working software, with fewer bugs, quickly and consistently.

  4. A3 TEST STAND DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    THIS IMAGE DOCUMENTS THE DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION OF THE A3 TEST STAND IN SUPPORT OF THE ARES/CLV UPPER STAGE ENGINE DEVELOPMENT AT STENNIS SPACE CENTER, MISSIPPI IN SUPPORT OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONSTELLATION/ARES PROJECT. THIS IMAGE IS EXTRACTED FROM A HIGH DEFINITION VIDEO FILE AND IS THE HIGHEST RESOLUTION AVAILABLE

  5. Fuels Development Operation. Quarterly progress report, July, August, September, 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-10-15

    The present quarterly report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development Operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations.

  6. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilat Amos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012, and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  7. An application of parity progression ratios to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, M P; Tsui, S W; Vogel, R C

    1982-07-01

    that a woman will have another birth for any given vector of socioeconomic variables was very similar for tobit and OLS. The results implied considerable differences in fertility. Changes in location, education, and the wife's age all exerted substantial influences on completed parity. An increase in the husband's and wife's education of 5 years each implied a reduction of .1 in each parity progression ratio. Differences between urban and rural locations implied a reduction of more than .1 in parity progression ratios. An increase of just 3 years in the wife's age reduced parity progression ratios by .05.

  8. Development of a flight software testing methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccluskey, E. J.; Andrews, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The research to develop a testing methodology for flight software is described. An experiment was conducted in using assertions to dynamically test digital flight control software. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters. In addition, a prototype watchdog task system was built to evaluate the effectiveness of executing assertions in parallel by using the multitasking features of Ada.

  9. Advancing the development of diagnostic tests and biomarkers for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasinskaya, Y; Plikaytis, B; Sizemore, C; Sacks, L

    2011-07-01

    High costs and limited returns on investment have hampered progress in developing new diagnostic tests and treatments for tuberculosis (TB). We need new biomarkers to develop assays that can rapidly, efficiently and reliably detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease, identify drug resistance and expedite drug and vaccine development. This can only be accomplished through cross-disciplinary collaborations to facilitate access to human specimens. The Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, the industry and academia experts came together in a June 2010 workshop to examine the field of TB diagnostic test development and biomarker discovery, identify areas of most urgent need and formulate strategies to address those needs.

  10. Development and validation of rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging inflammation thresholds associated with lack of damage progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Østergaard, Mikkel; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine thresholds for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) magnetic resonance imaging scores (RAMRIS) associated with a low risk of structural damage progression. METHODS: MRI of the dominant hand was performed and RAMRIS scores determined at weeks 0, 24, and 52. X-rays were performed......% sensitivity for imaging progression over the 24 to 52-week interval. The performance of these cut-offs was tested in a validation cohort (n=217). RESULTS: In the development cohort, synovitis or osteitis scores ≤3 by 24 weeks were associated with a low probability of progression on MRI and x-ray....... The coefficient for osteitis was stronger than that of synovitis in models predicting x-ray and MRI progression. Therefore, a total inflammation score was weighted on osteitis (x2). An inflammation score ≤9 was more frequently attained than DAS28 remission (64 vs. 38) and was associated with low probability...

  11. Testbed For Aerothermal Test Technique Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed that a very low cost wind tunnel could be developed at JSC to provide engineers with the ability to directly run small tests focused on improving...

  12. Developing a Clinician-Friendly Aphasia Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Robert C.; Wright, Heather Harris

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The Kentucky Aphasia Test (KAT) is an objective measure of language functioning for persons with aphasia. This article describes materials, administration, and scoring of the KAT; presents the rationale for development of test items; reports information from a pilot study; and discusses the role of the KAT in aphasia assessment. Method:…

  13. Embryo culture in teratological surveillance and serum proteins in development. Progress report, 1979-1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, N.W.

    1980-07-01

    Research progress for the period 1979-1980 is reported. The feasibility of using rat embryo cultures to test the teratogenic activity of serum was studied. The mechanisms regulating the synthesis of serum proteins were investigated. (ACR)

  14. Fidelity of test development process within a national science grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, Teresa E.

    In 2002, a math-science partnership (MSP) program was initiated by a national science grant. The purpose of the MSP program was to promote the development, implementation, and sustainability of promising partnerships among institutions of higher education, K-12 schools and school systems, as well as other important stakeholders. One of the funded projects included a teacher-scientist collaborative that instituted a professional development system to prepare teachers to use inquiry-based instructional modules. The MSP program mandated evaluations of its funded projects. One of the teacher-scientist collaborative project's outcomes specifically focused on teacher and student science content and process skills. In order to provide annual evidence of progress and to measure the impact of the project's efforts, and because no appropriate science tests were available to measure improvements in content knowledge of participating teachers and their students, the project contracted for the development of science tests. This dissertation focused on the process of test development within an evaluation and examined planned (i.e., expected) and actual (i.e., observed) test development, specifically concentrating on the factors that affected the actual test development process. Planned test development was defined as the process of creating tests according to the well-established test development procedures recommended by the AERA/APA/NCME 1999 Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Actual test development was defined as the process of creating tests as it actually took place. Because case study provides an in-depth, longitudinal examination of an event (i.e., case) in a naturalistic setting, it was selected as the appropriate methodology to examine the difference between planned and actual test development. The case (or unit of analysis) was the test development task, a task that was bounded by the context in which it occurred---and over which this researcher had

  15. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: July - September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Wallace, W. P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1957-10-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  16. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: January - March 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1959-04-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  17. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: October - December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1960-01-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  18. Development of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    induced TBI causes progressive tau pathology in 2 lines of transgenic mice. First, we commissioned construction , shipping and assembly of a CHIMERA...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0016 TITLE: Development of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic...of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0016 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  19. Smart Sensor Node Development, Testing and Implementation for ISHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengers, Timothy; Shipley, John; Merrill, Richard; Eggett, Mark; Lemon, Leon; Johnson, Mont; Morris, Jonathan; Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Turowski, Mark

    2007-01-01

    A main design criterion for a robust Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) system is summed up best by the statement "No data is better than bad data". Traditional data acquisition systems are calibrated in a controlled environment and guaranteed to perform bounded by their tested conditions. To successfully design and implement a real world ISHM system, the data acquisition and signal conditioning needs to function in an uncontrolled environment. Development and testing focuses on a design with the ability to self check in order to extend calibration times, report internal faults and drifts and notify the overall system when the data acquisition is not performing as it should. All of this will be designed in a system that is flexible, requiring little redesign to be deployed on a wide variety of systems. Development progress and testing results will be reported.

  20. Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry and Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess, Stella, Ed.; Thomas, Alexander, Ed.

    Selected studies of infant development concern biological rhythms, pattern preferences, sucking, and Negro-white comparisons. Sex, age, state, eye to eye contact, and human symbiosis are considered in mother-infant interaction. Included in pediatrics are child development and the relationship between pediatrics and psychiatry. Environmental…

  1. The Use of a Formative Assessment in Progressive Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ira H.; Goulet, Laurel; Martin, JennyMae K.; Owens, Jake

    2015-01-01

    As institutions continue to place value on developing leaders, it becomes increasingly important to effectively assess students' leadership skills. The development and subsequent use of a formative competency based leader assessment was used with (N = 124) sophomore students at a small military college in the Northeast United States with a mission…

  2. Making Progress: A Case Study of Academic Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Naoko

    2013-01-01

    The processes by which unprepared freshmen are able to develop their academic literacy are overlooked by those in the academy. The author will describe a case study of the development of a student's academic literacy in the 1st 3 semesters of college. The information for this project was obtained through interviews with the student and her…

  3. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2014 Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund was established in 2003 as part of the Grow Iowa Values Fund and is currently funded through the Iowa Skilled Worker and Job Creation Fund. This fund has become an important source of financing for community college new program innovation, development, and capacity building, particularly…

  4. Baseline gas turbine development program. First quarterly progress report, January 31, 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-01-01

    Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine-powered automobile which meets the 1976 Federal Emission Standards and which is competitive in fuel economy, performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine-powered, standard size American automobile. Procurement and assembly of parts for seven engines plus spares is basically on schedule, although some areas are requiring intensive follow-up. A partial engine (including regenerators) was assembled for shipment to Solar. It will be incorporated into their combustor test rig, where it will provide both pre-heat and a proper physical environment for their combustor evaluation and development. Of the two test cells being refurbished for use on this program, one was completed and the other is underway. Two engines loaned to start the program were checked out, qualified, and delivered. Vehicle installation design is nearly complete. The cars were ordered. Vehicle engineering to provide hydraulic power boost braking, heating and air conditioning, and transmission is underway. Procurement arrangements for basic body and chassis changes were completed. In support to the Government, an engine characterization was prepared and assistance given in developing a combustor test procedure. Work was initiated on developing a control system for a variable geometry combustor. A request for proposal for an upgraded engine control system was prepared and issued. Preparations are being made for a free rotor concept evaluation. A plan of performance was prepared and submitted. Included were program plan charts and estimated cumulative manpower graphs.

  5. Accelerating Progress: A New Era of Research on Character Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Sarah; Bollinger, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Adolescent character development is a high priority for educators, policymakers, and front-line youth workers. To meet this growing demand, and as exemplified in the five articles in this special section, character development scholars are drawing from a range of academic disciplines to push beyond the traditional boundaries of the science of character development. These articles highlight important trends in character research, including the co-development of a subset of character strengths, the articulation of developmental trajectories of character, the use of advanced methodological approaches, and the implications for education. Studies such as these are critically important for establishing the research base that will be used to design the character development programs of tomorrow.

  6. Benchtop Energetics: Research Progress, Concept Evaluation, and Apparatus Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    spin coater and drying oven. FY05 Objectives: In FY05 we will complete the assembly and testing of the permanent version of the main...Preparation ....................................................... 21 1. Spin Coating of Energetic Thin Films...will produce nanometric energetic film coatings on metal coated substrates via spin coating and spray coating methods. Teflon AF is an amorphous

  7. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies ("differentiating competencies") must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make comprehensive leadership development widely accessible to a greater number of potential health care leaders. This paper addresses the skills that health care leaders should develop, the optimal leadership development

  8. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies (“differentiating competencies”) must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make comprehensive leadership development widely accessible to a greater number of potential health care leaders. This paper addresses the skills that health care leaders should develop, the optimal leadership

  9. QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH, 1968 REACTOR FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR FUELS AND MATERIALS BRANCH OF USAEC DIVISION OF REACTOR DEVELOPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J.; de Halas, D. R.; Nightingale, R. E.; Worlton, D. C.

    1968-06-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: nuclear graphite; fuel development for gas-cooled reactors; HTGR graphite studies; nuclear ceramics; fast-reactor nitrides research; non-destructive testing; metallic fuels; basic swelling studies; ATR gas and water loop operation and maintenance; reactor fuels and materials; fast reactor dosimetry and damage analysis; and irradiation damage to reactor metals.

  10. Progression and Regression of Cervical Pap Test Lesions in an Urban AIDS Clinic in the Combined Antiretroviral Therapy Era: A Longitudinal, Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Talaat; Herring-Bailey, Gina; Birdsong, George; Mosunjac, Marina; Flowers, Lisa; Nguyen, Minh Ly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to evaluate the progression and regression of cervical dysplasia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women during the late antiretroviral era. Risk factors as well as outcomes after treatment of cancerous or precancerous lesions were examined. This is a longitudinal retrospective review of cervical Pap tests performed on HIV-infected women with an intact cervix between 2004 and 2011. Subjects needed over two Pap tests for at least 2 years of follow-up. Progression was defined as those who developed a squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL), atypical glandular cells (AGC), had low-grade SIL (LSIL) followed by atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H) or high-grade SIL (HSIL), or cancer. Regression was defined as an initial SIL with two or more subsequent normal Pap tests. Persistence was defined as having an SIL without progression or regression. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing started in 2006 on atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) Pap tests. AGC at enrollment were excluded from progression analysis. Of 1,445 screened, 383 patients had over two Pap tests for a 2-year period. Of those, 309 had an intact cervix. The median age was 40 years and CD4+ cell count was 277 cells/mL. Four had AGC at enrollment. A quarter had persistently normal Pap tests, 64 (31%) regressed, and 50 (24%) progressed. Four developed cancer. The only risk factor associated with progression was CD4 count. In those with treated lesions, 24 (59%) had negative Pap tests at the end of follow-up. More studies are needed to evaluate follow-up strategies of LSIL patients, potentially combined with HPV testing. Guidelines for HIV-seropositive women who are in care, have improved CD4, and have persistently negative Pap tests could likely lengthen the follow-up interval. PMID:25693769

  11. Development of phytotoxicity tests using wetland species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M.K.; Fairchild, J.F. [National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Laboratory phytotoxicity tests used to assess contaminant effects may not effectively protect wetland communities. The authors are developing routine culture and testing methods for selected fresh water plants, that can be used in risk assessments and monitoring of existing wetland systems. Utility of these tests includes evaluating the effects of point or non-point source contamination that may cause water or sediment quality degradation. Selected species include algae (blue-green, green), phytoflagellates (Chlamydomonas, Euglena), and floating or submerged vascular plants (milfoil, coontail, wild celery, elodea, duckweed). Algae toxicity tests range from 2-d, 4-d, and 7 day tests, and macrophyte tests from 10-d to 14 days. Metribuzin and boron are the selected contaminants for developing the test methods. Metribuzin, a triazinone herbicide, is a photosystem 11 inhibitor, and is commonly used for control of grass and broad-leaf plants. As a plant micronutrient, boron is required in very small amounts, but excessive levels can result in phytotoxicity or accumulation. The investigations focus on the influence of important factors including the influence of light quality and quantity, and nutrient media. Reference toxicant exposures with potassium chloride are used to establish baseline data for sensitivity and vitality of the plants. These culture and test methods will be incorporated into recommendations for standard phytotoxicity test designs.

  12. Recent progress in mucosal vaccine development: potential and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycke, Nils

    2012-07-25

    Most pathogens access the body through the mucosal membranes. Therefore, effective vaccines that protect at these sites are much needed. However, despite early success with the live attenuated oral polio vaccine over 50 years ago, only a few new mucosal vaccines have been subsequently launched. This is partly due to problems with developing safe and effective mucosal adjuvants. In the past decade, however, the successful development of live attenuated mucosal vaccines against influenza virus and rotavirus infections has boosted interest in this field, and great expectations for new mucosal vaccines lie ahead. Here, I discuss the expanding knowledge and strategies used in the development of mucosal vaccines.

  13. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  14. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation October - December 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Last, G. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    1961-01-13

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development Operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections.

  15. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnino RE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Roberta E Sonnino1,2 1Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA; 2RES Coaching LLC, Locust Hill, VA, USA Abstract: Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies (“differentiating competencies” must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make

  16. Status of the Flooding Fragility Testing Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, C. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Savage, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bhandari, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kamerman, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Muchmore, C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Roberts, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ryan, E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Suresh, S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tahhan, A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wells, A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report provides an update on research addressing nuclear power plant component reliability under flooding conditions. The research includes use of the Component Flooding Evaluation Laboratory (CFEL) where individual components and component subassemblies will be tested to failure under various flooding conditions. The resulting component reliability data can then be incorporated with risk simulation strategies to provide a more thorough representation of overall plant risk. The CFEL development strategy consists of four interleaved phases. Phase 1 addresses design and application of CFEL with water rise and water spray capabilities allowing testing of passive and active components including fully electrified components. Phase 2 addresses research into wave generation techniques followed by the design and addition of the wave generation capability to CFEL. Phase 3 addresses methodology development activities including small scale component testing, development of full scale component testing protocol, and simulation techniques including Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) based computer codes. Phase 4 involves full scale component testing including work on full scale component testing in a surrogate CFEL testing apparatus.

  17. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.J. (comp.)

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  18. Biofuels feedstock development program. Annual progress report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Martin, S.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) leads the nation in the research, development, and demonstration of environmentally acceptable and commercially viable dedicated feedstock supply systems (DFSS). The purpose of this report is to highlight the status and accomplishments of the research that is currently being funded by the BFDP. Highlights summarized here and additional accomplishments are described in more detail in the sections associated with each major program task. A few key accomplishments include (1) development of a methodology for doing a cost-supply analysis for energy crops and the application of that methodology to looking at possible land use changes around a specific energy facility in East Tennessee; (2) preliminary documentation of the relationship between woody crop plantation locations and bird diversity at sites in the Midwest, Canada, and the pacific Northwest supplied indications that woody crop plantations could be beneficial to biodiversity; (3) the initiation of integrated switchgrass variety trials, breeding research, and biotechnology research for the south/southeast region; (4) development of a data base management system for documenting the results of herbaceous energy crop field trials; (5) publication of three issues of Energy Crops Forum and development of a readership of over 2,300 individuals or organizations as determined by positive responses on questionnaires.

  19. Progressive Development of Creative Design Skills from Kindergarden Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Yalcin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article offers an alternative view of design education, emphasising on its introduction in kindergarten and proposing a curriculum that covers design issues for introduction in kinder­gar­ten. This approach is suited to developing creative thinking skills. In an environ­ment where children imagine, create, practice, modify, recognise, manipulate and share knowl­edge, experiences and objects are crucial in design education. Early childhood education should be advanced based on basic design issues—such as design principles, conceptuali­zation, 2D/3D spatial allocation and composition—more comprehensively, which will enable children to construct perceptual, critical and analytic view points at an early age and develop these perspectives in the future. Based on this argument, the study model for design education in kindergarten, which will instil in children strong design knowledge, as well as stimulate their cognitive development

  20. Research progress in live attenuated Brucella vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Qingmin

    2013-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, which is a globally occurring zoonotic disease that is characterized by abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever, arthritis, endocarditis, and meningitis in humans. There are currently no licensed vaccines against brucellosis for human use, and only a few licensed live Brucella vaccines are available for use in animals. However, the available animal vaccines may cause abortion and are associated with lower protection rates in animals and higher virulence in humans. Much research has been performed recently to develop novel Brucella vaccines for the prevention and control of animal brucellosis. This article discusses the approaches and strategies for novel live attenuated vaccine development.

  1. Biofuels Feedstock Development Program annual progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1992-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the ongoing research funded in 1991 by the Department of Energy's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP). The BFDP is managed by the Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and encompasses the work formerly funded by the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. The combined program includes crop development research on both woody and herbaceous energy crop species, cross-cutting energy and environmental analysis and integration, and information management activities. Brief summaries of 26 different program activities are included in the report.

  2. Biofuels Feedstock Development Program annual progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1992-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the ongoing research funded in 1991 by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP). The BFDP is managed by the Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and encompasses the work formerly funded by the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. The combined program includes crop development research on both woody and herbaceous energy crop species, cross-cutting energy and environmental analysis and integration, and information management activities. Brief summaries of 26 different program activities are included in the report.

  3. Sonaravni razvoj (napredek in geografija = Sustainable development (progress and geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Plut

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent and intensity of different forms of degradation of geographical environment andits constituents prove the need for such economic development which will take account ofenvironmental features. In order to increase the environmental component of human welfare,only passively devised protection of geographical environment is not sufficient. Geographyof sustainable development both as an area of research and as a subject in the curriculum,lays emphasis on the significance of landscape features and on the processes of sustainablepattern of settling, economy, infrastructure and landscape use, as well adjusted as possible.

  4. Progressive development of a digital cadastral data base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    A Digital Cadastral Data Base (DCDB) is a big investment for a jurisdiction tasked with the administration of land boundaries. In the past, the development of such a database produced no real pay-back on investment until many years, and millions of dollars had been committed. The Land Administration

  5. Progress made by the South African light metals development network

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Damm, O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available , with the latter growing in prominence over the past three years. Since 2009 the titanium-related research and development activities have been consolidated in a Titanium Centre of Competence. This paper provides an overview of the current status of the programme...

  6. Partners in Progress: A Marketing Prototype for Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Charles W.

    The community networking model presented in this report was prepared to aid community members in strenthening and developing the networking process among business, community service agencies, government, churches, arts, recreation, and education. The model is designed to be used in a workshop in which participants are grouped in teams of…

  7. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  8. Progress and perspectives on HIV-1 microbicide development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of HIV-1 infections occur via sexual intercourse. Women are the most affected by the epidemic, particularly in developing countries, due to their socio-economic dependence on men and the fact that they are often victims of gender based...

  9. Technical Progress Report on Single Pass Flow Through Tests of Ceramic Waste Forms for Plutonium Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P; Roberts, S; Bourcier, W

    2000-12-01

    This report updates work on measurements of the dissolution rates of single-phase and multi-phase ceramic waste forms in flow-through reactors at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Previous results were reported in Bourcier (1999). Two types of tests are in progress: (1) tests of baseline pyrochlore-based multiphase ceramics; and (2) tests of single-phase pyrochlore, zirconolite, and brannerite (the three phases that will contain most of the actinides). Tests of the multi-phase material are all being run at 25 C. The single-phase tests are being run at 25, 50, and 75 C. All tests are being performed at ambient pressure. The as-made bulk compositions of the ceramics are given in Table 1. The single pass flow-through test procedure [Knauss, 1986 No.140] allows the powdered ceramic to react with pH buffer solutions traveling upward vertically through the powder. Gentle rocking during the course of the experiment keeps the powder suspended and avoids clumping, and allows the system to behave as a continuously stirred reactor. For each test, a cell is loaded with approximately one gram of the appropriate size fraction of powdered ceramic and reacted with a buffer solution of the desired pH. The buffer solution compositions are given in Table 2. All the ceramics tested were cold pressed and sintered at 1350 C in air, except brannerite, which was sintered at 1350 C in a CO/CO{sub 2} gas mixture. They were then crushed, sieved, rinsed repeatedly in alcohol and distilled water, and the desired particle size fraction collected for the single pass flow-through tests (SPFT). The surface area of the ceramics measured by BET ranged from 0.1-0.35 m{sup 2}/g. The measured surface area values, average particle size, and sample weights for each ceramic test are given in the Appendices.

  10. Advanced Development of the rF1V and rBV A/B Vaccines: Progress and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Mary Kate; Saviolakis, George A; Welkos, Susan L; House, Robert V

    2012-01-01

    The development of vaccines for microorganisms and bacterial toxins with the potential to be used as biowarfare and bioterrorism agents is an important component of the US biodefense program. DVC is developing two vaccines, one against inhalational exposure to botulinum neurotoxins A1 and B1 and a second for Yersinia pestis, with the ultimate goal of licensure by the FDA under the Animal Rule. Progress has been made in all technical areas, including manufacturing, nonclinical, and clinical development and testing of the vaccines, and in assay development. The current status of development of these vaccines, and remaining challenges are described in this chapter.

  11. Advanced Development of the rF1V and rBV A/B Vaccines: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kate Hart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of vaccines for microorganisms and bacterial toxins with the potential to be used as biowarfare and bioterrorism agents is an important component of the US biodefense program. DVC is developing two vaccines, one against inhalational exposure to botulinum neurotoxins A1 and B1 and a second for Yersinia pestis, with the ultimate goal of licensure by the FDA under the Animal Rule. Progress has been made in all technical areas, including manufacturing, nonclinical, and clinical development and testing of the vaccines, and in assay development. The current status of development of these vaccines, and remaining challenges are described in this chapter.

  12. Development of test methods for textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.; Ifju, Peter G.; Fedro, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program was initiated in 1990 with the purpose of developing less costly composite aircraft structures. A number of innovative materials and processes were evaluated as a part of this effort. Chief among them are composite materials reinforced with textile preforms. These new forms of composite materials bring with them potential testing problems. Methods currently in practice were developed over the years for composite materials made from prepreg tape or simple 2-D woven fabrics. A wide variety of 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit preforms were suggested for application in the ACT program. The applicability of existing test methods to the wide range of emerging materials bears investigation. The overriding concern is that the values measured are accurate representations of the true material response. The ultimate objective of this work is to establish a set of test methods to evaluate the textile composites developed for the ACT Program.

  13. Raven's progressive matrices test: scale construction and verification of "Flynn effect"

    OpenAIRE

    Lopetegui, María Susana; Neer, Rosa Haydée; Rossi Casé, Lilia Elba

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the scales of Raven's Progressive Matrices Test, General Scale and Advanced Scale, Series II, for the student population (third cycle of EGB and Polimodal ) in the city of La Plata are presented. Considerations are made as regards both the increase in scores (Flynn effect) observed in relation to the previous scale (1964) and the different mean scores according to two age groups (13-16 and 17-18 years of age) and education mode. The findings enabled inferences related to the si...

  14. Recent progress on cathode development from Nagoya and KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, T.; Aoyagi, H.; Nakamura, S.; Okumi, S.; Suzuki, C.; Takahashi, C.; Tanimoto, Y.; Tawada, M.; Togawa, K.; Tsubata, M. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464 (Japan); Kurihara, Y.; Omori, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yoshioka, M. [KEK, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba 305 (Japan); Kato, T.; Saka, T. [New Research Laboratory, Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya 457 (Japan); Baba, T.; Mizuta, M. [Fundamental Research Laboratory, NEC Corp., Tsukuba 305 (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Recently the high electron spin polarization (ESP) photocathodes which have also high quantum efficiencies (QE) have been developed in Japan. These improvements were achieved using new techniques of a resonant absorption and a modulated doping, which are applied to a strained GaAs grown on GaAsP and an AlGaAs-GaAs superlattice, respectively. The former photocathode provides the QE of 1.0{percent} with the ESP of 85{percent} at the laser wavelength of 866 nm. The latter one does the QE of 0.5{percent} with the ESP of 71{percent} at 757 nm. Using a new type of strained-layer superlattice cathode, the ESP of 83{percent} which is higher than that of our previous superlattices was observed. The development of photocathodes not only with a high ESP but also with a high QE are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Current Progress in Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Rajeev; Jones, Bart G.; Sealy, Robert; Surman, Sherri L.; Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the etiological agent for a serious lower respiratory tract disease responsible for close to 200,000 annual deaths worldwide. The first infection is generally most severe, while re-infections usually associate with a milder disease. This observation and the finding that re-infection risks are inversely associated with neutralizing antibody titers suggest that immune responses generated toward a first RSV exposure can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality throughout life. For more than half a century, researchers have endeavored to design a vaccine for RSV that can mimic or improve upon natural protective immunity without adverse events. The virus is herein described together with the hurdles that must be overcome to develop a vaccine and some current vaccine development approaches. PMID:23385470

  16. A process for developing and revising a learning progression on sea level rise using learners' explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert Christopher

    The purpose of this study was to explore the process of developing a learning progression (LP) on constructing explanations about sea level rise. I used a learning progressions theoretical framework informed by the situated cognition learning theory. During this exploration, I explicitly described my decision-making process as I developed and revised a hypothetical learning progression. Correspondingly, my research question was: What is a process by which a hypothetical learning progression on sea level rise is developed into an empirical learning progression using learners' explanations? To answer this question, I used a qualitative descriptive single case study with multiple embedded cases (Yin, 2014) that employed analytic induction (Denzin, 1970) to analyze data collected on middle school learners (grades 6-8). Data sources included written artifacts, classroom observations, and semi-structured interviews. Additionally, I kept a researcher journal to track my thinking about the learning progression throughout the research study. Using analytic induction to analyze collected data, I developed eight analytic concepts: participant explanation structures varied widely, global warming and ice melt cause sea level rise, participants held alternative conceptions about sea level rise, participants learned about thermal expansion as a fundamental aspect of sea level rise, participants learned to incorporate authentic scientific data, participants' mental models of the ocean varied widely, sea ice melt contributes to sea level rise, and participants held vague and alternative conceptions about how pollution impacts the ocean. I started with a hypothetical learning progression, gathered empirical data via various sources (especially semi-structured interviews), revised the hypothetical learning progression in response to those data, and ended with an empirical learning progression comprising six levels of learner thinking. As a result of developing an empirically based LP

  17. Development of an automated ultrasonic testing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuxiang, Jiao; Wong, Brian Stephen

    2005-04-01

    Non-Destructive Testing is necessary in areas where defects in structures emerge over time due to wear and tear and structural integrity is necessary to maintain its usability. However, manual testing results in many limitations: high training cost, long training procedure, and worse, the inconsistent test results. A prime objective of this project is to develop an automatic Non-Destructive testing system for a shaft of the wheel axle of a railway carriage. Various methods, such as the neural network, pattern recognition methods and knowledge-based system are used for the artificial intelligence problem. In this paper, a statistical pattern recognition approach, Classification Tree is applied. Before feature selection, a thorough study on the ultrasonic signals produced was carried out. Based on the analysis of the ultrasonic signals, three signal processing methods were developed to enhance the ultrasonic signals: Cross-Correlation, Zero-Phase filter and Averaging. The target of this step is to reduce the noise and make the signal character more distinguishable. Four features: 1. The Auto Regressive Model Coefficients. 2. Standard Deviation. 3. Pearson Correlation 4. Dispersion Uniformity Degree are selected. And then a Classification Tree is created and applied to recognize the peak positions and amplitudes. Searching local maximum is carried out before feature computing. This procedure reduces much computation time in the real-time testing. Based on this algorithm, a software package called SOFRA was developed to recognize the peaks, calibrate automatically and test a simulated shaft automatically. The automatic calibration procedure and the automatic shaft testing procedure are developed.

  18. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-01-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  19. Progressive chorion morphology during egg development in Samia ricini (Donovan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renthlei, Collin Z; Raghuvarman, Arumugam; Kharbuli, Besterwell; Dey, Sudip

    2010-03-01

    The egg of Samia ricini (Donovan), is oval or laterally flattened ellipsoid, freshly laid eggs are candid white while the chorion is colorless and semi-transparent. The surface of the chorion is covered with network patterns of polygons and their shapes are common in the whole surface region. The boundaries between polygons made ridges had distinct acropyles at three-cell junctions. The numbers of aeropyles are variable according to their structures both in the lateral flat and marginal regions. During the course of egg development, no significant structural changes were observed in either the polygonal structures or the overall morphology of the egg. However, the size of the aeropyles kept on changing as the egg matures. The aeropyle increases initially upto day-9 of egg development and then decreases as it approach hatching. Lines of weaknesses were not observed at time of hatching or close to it. Hatching process of the newly emerge larvae are through gnawing. The larva eats their way out through the chorion membrane mostly from the anterior region. Egg buster or spine which aid in hatching are not present in the newly emerge larvae.This article was published online on 25 September 2009. An error was subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online and print versions to indicate that both have been corrected 6 January 2010.

  20. INTERNAL COMMUNICATION, THE PROGRESS OF TECHNOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA ANDREI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development involves the broad public participation including the national, regional and local authorities, business and industry, civil society, all major groups – women, children and youth, all workers, trade unions and families. Not only organizations but also employees have a role to play in applying sustainable development in their jobs because their decisions taken every day have an environmental impact. Communication within organization is used as a means to coordinate information exchange and to establish effective coordination of activities between the members of organization. Internet, e-mail, mobile phones, satellite and wireless have had an effect on the way in which information is exchanged and on how people communicate not only in their day-to-day life but also within in the organizations they belong to. New communication technologies have increased the possibilities for a better access to information for employees and made possible to have their voices heard from their colleagues to superior levels, offering the possibility of a two-way communication and creating the potential for greater understanding and dialogue between them. Besides increasing profits, saving time and costs, the use of e-communication within organizations, offer the convenience of combating environmental damage through cutting back on paper and ink usage

  1. Development of the Integrated Environmental Control Model. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.S.; Berkenpas, M.B.; Kalagnanam, J.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this contract is to develop and refine the Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) created and enhanced by Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) under contract Numbers FG22-83PC60271 and AC22-87PC79864. In its current configuration, the IECM provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integrated into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of different costs and performance results. The work in this contract is divided into two phases. Phase I deals with further developing the existing version of the IECM and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the model. Phase II deals with creating new technology modules, linking the IECM with PETC databases, and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the updated model.

  2. Fan Atomized Burner design advances & commercial development progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, B. [Heat-Wise, Inc., Ridge, NY (United States); Butcher, T.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01

    As a part of the Oil Heat Research and Development program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has an on-going interest in advanced combustion technologies. This interest is aimed at: improving the initial efficiency of heating equipment, reducing long term fouling and efficiency degradation, reducing air pollutant emissions, and providing practical low-firing rate technologies which may lead to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The Fan-Atomized Burner (FAB) technology is being developed at BNL as part of this general goal. The Fan-Atomized Burner uses a low pressure, air atomizing nozzle in place of the high pressure nozzle used in conventional burners. Because it is air-atomized the burner can operate at low firing rates without the small passages and reliability concerns of low input pressure nozzles. Because it uses a low pressure nozzle the burner can use a fan in place of the small compressor used in other air-atomized burner designs. High initial efficiency of heating equipment is achieved because the burner can operate at very low excess air levels. These low excess air levels also reduce the formation of sulfuric acid in flames. Sulfuric acid is responsible for scaling and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces.

  3. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  4. Development of the ORCA nonsense syllable test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Francis; Lau, Chi-Chuen; Korhonen, Petri; Crose, Bryan; Peeters, Heidi; Keenan, Denise

    2010-12-01

    Many new processing features in hearing aids have their primary effects on information located in the high frequencies. Speech perception tests that are optimized for evaluating high-frequency processing are needed to adequately study its effects on speech identification. The goal of the current research was to develop a medium for evaluating the effects of high-frequency processing in hearing aids. A list of 115 consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel-consonant nonsense syllables with American English consonants in all word positions was created in an open-set phoneme identification format. The source material was spoken by a male and a female speaker. A custom computer program was developed for administration of the test and automatic analysis of the test results. Nine normal-hearing listeners were employed in the collection of the normative data. The test was presented to the listeners in quiet (at 68 dB SPL), in noise at five signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs; -10, -5, 0, 5, and 10), and in a low-pass filter condition with cutoff frequencies at 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, and 4000 Hz. The data were examined to evaluate the psychometric properties of the test for different phoneme positions and phoneme classes. In addition, a shortened version of the test was developed based on the data from normal-hearing listeners. The test-retest reliability was verified at 0 dB SNR. The full and shortened versions of the test were repeated in 10 hearing-impaired listeners at their most comfortable listening level in quiet and in noise at various SNRs. The availability of high-frequency output was verified with acoustic analysis. The performance intensity functions for both versions of the test (i.e., male and female speakers) showed expected monotonic growth with SNR and cutoff frequencies. High reliability was seen between test and retest identification scores in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. The current nonsense syllable test provided a reliable and efficient means for

  5. Emergency medicine development in Ethiopia: Challenges, progress and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikre Germa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethiopia does not have the facilities, equipment and human resource with the essential skills to support a coordinated emergency medical care system and as such lacks the basic infrastructure for delivering emergency care. The country has made significant improvements in the last two decades, particularly with regard to training of key Emergency Medical personnel. Nevertheless, much remains to be done, and numerous opportunities exist to make additional improvements in both the short and long term. This article provides a historical overview of the development of emergency medicine in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, critically examines the specific challenges faced and presents the various efforts over the past several years by national and international partners trying to address these challenges. It describes what has been achieved and proposes key recommendations for further improvement and scaling-up of Addis Ababa, emergency medical services initiative to other regional states of Ethiopia.

  6. Progress in Developing Virus-like Particle Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recombinant vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) or nanoparticles have been successful in their safety and efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. The technology of expressing enveloped VLP vaccines has combined with molecular engineering of proteins in membrane-anchor and immunogenic forms mimicking the native conformation of surface proteins on the enveloped viruses. This review summarizes recent developments in influenza VLP vaccines against seasonal, pandemic, and avian influenza viruses from the perspective of use in humans. The immunogenicity and efficacies of influenza VLP vaccine in the homologous and cross-protection were reviewed. Discussions include limitations of current influenza vaccination strategies and future directions to confer broadly cross protective new influenza vaccines as well as vaccination. PMID:27058302

  7. Role of autophagy in development and progression of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Shuli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is considered an autodigestive disorder in which inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells leads to the development of pancreatitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily preserved degradation process of cytoplasmic cellular constituents, and it is one of the early pathological processes in acute pancreatitis. Autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis, which mediates the key pathologic responses of this disease. Impaired autophagy, dysfunction of lysosomes, and dysregulation of autophagy suggest a disorder of the endolysosomal pathway in acute pancreatitis. The role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis is discussed from the aspects of autophagic process, autophagy and activation of trypsinogen, impaired autophagy and acute pancreatitis, and defective autophagy promoting inflammation.

  8. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashdown, B.G. (comp.)

    1980-04-01

    Progress is reported concerning preparation of a materials handbook for fusion, creep-fatigue of first-wall structural materials, test results on miniature compact tension fracture toughness specimens, austenitic stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, iron-base alloys with long-range crystal structure, ferritic steels, irradiation experiments, corrosion testing, and hydrogen permeation studies. (FS)

  9. Development of the Russian matrix sentence test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzybok, Anna; Zokoll, Melanie; Wardenga, Nina; Ozimek, Edward; Boboshko, Maria; Kollmeier, Birger

    2015-01-01

    To develop the Russian matrix sentence test for speech intelligibility measurements in noise. Test development included recordings, optimization of speech material, and evaluation to investigate the equivalency of the test lists and training. For each of the 500 test items, the speech intelligibility function, speech reception threshold (SRT: signal-to-noise ratio, SNR, that provides 50% speech intelligibility), and slope was obtained. The speech material was homogenized by applying level corrections. In evaluation measurements, speech intelligibility was measured at two fixed SNRs to compare list-specific intelligibility functions. To investigate the training effect and establish reference data, speech intelligibility was measured adaptively. Overall, 77 normal-hearing native Russian listeners. The optimization procedure decreased the spread in SRTs across words from 2.8 to 0.6 dB. Evaluation measurements confirmed that the 16 test lists were equivalent, with a mean SRT of -9.5 ± 0.2 dB and a slope of 13.8 ± 1.6%/dB. The reference SRT, -8.8 ± 0.8 dB for the open-set and -9.4 ± 0.8 dB for the closed-set format, increased slightly for noise levels above 75 dB SPL. The Russian matrix sentence test is suitable for accurate and reliable speech intelligibility measurements in noise.

  10. Stuck and Frustrated or In Flow and Happy: Sensing Developers' Emotions and Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Sebastian; Fritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Software developers working on change tasks commonly experience a broad range of emotions, ranging from happiness all the way to frustration and anger. Research, primarily in psychology, has shown that for certain kinds of tasks, emotions correlate with progress and that biometric measures, such as electro-dermal activity and electroencephalography data, might be used to distinguish between emotions. In our research, we are building on this work and investigate developers' emotions, progress ...

  11. Automated Vision Test Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The design of instruments used to measure visual acuity (VA), color vision, and muscle balance in military clinical settings remains unchanged...AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2016-0020 Automated Vision Test Development and Validation Steve Wright, Darrell Rousse, Alex van Atta...James Gaska, Marc Winterbottom, Steven Hadley, Lt Col Dan Lamothe November 2016 Air Force Research Laboratory 711th Human Performance

  12. Developing a solar panel testing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árpád Rácz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is increasingly used togenerate electricity for individual households. There isa wide variety of solar panel technologies, whichshould be tested at an individual level during theirlifetime. In this paper, the development of a testingstation at the University of Debrecen is presented. Thetesting system can be used for research andeducational purposes and for in field applicationsequally well.

  13. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  14. Development of Magnetorheological Engine Mount Test Rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Yunos Mohd Razali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ride comfort is an important factor in any road vehicle performance. Nonetheless, passenger ride comfort is sometimes affected by the vibrations resulting from the road irregularities. Vehicle ride comfort is also often compromised by engine vibration. Engine mount is one of the devices which act as vibration isolator from unwanted vibration from engine to the driver and passengers. This paper explains the development of the test rig used for laboratory testing of Magnetorheological (MR engine mount characterization. MR engine mount was developed to investigate the vibration isolation process. An engine mount test machine was designed to measure the displacement, relative velocity and damper force with respect to current supply to characterize the hysteresis behavior of the damper and as force tracking control of the MR engine mount.

  15. The 5-minute Apgar Score as a Prognostic Factor for Development and Progression of Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Vasil G; Koleva-Georgieva, Desislava N; Sivkova, Nelly P; Krasteva, Maya B

    2017-03-01

    A low Apgar score at 5 minutes has been shown to be a risk factor for development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). To examine the prognostic value of Apgar score at 5 minutes for development and progression of ROP. The study included 132 preterm infants who were screened from 4th week of life onward. Of these, 118 newborns were given Apgar score at 5 minutes. The prognostic significance of this index was studied as an absolute value and as a value ≤ 6. The patients were divided into two groups: group I had no evidence of ROP (n=82) and group II had some signs of ROP (n = 36). Group II was further divided into group IIA - spontaneously regressed cases (n=22), and group IIB with cases which progressed to treatment stages (n=14). We investigated 15 maternal and 20 newborn presumable risk factors for development and progression of ROP. Mann-Whitney U test, χ2 or Fisher's exact test were used in the statistical analysis. Logistic regression was performed to find significant and independent risk factors for manifestation and progression of ROP. A low 5-minute Apgar score and an Apgar score of 6 or less at 5 minutes were not statistically significant risk factors of ROP (р=0.191, р=0.191, respectively), but were significant risk factors for the manifested ROP to progress to stages requiring treatment (p=0.046, р=0.036, respectively). An Apgar score at 5 minutes of 6 or less was a significant and independent risk factor for progression of ROP to stages requiring treatment.

  16. Progressive failure of composite wind blades with a shear-web spar subjected to static testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, T. Y.; Chiu, Y. H.

    2017-06-01

    Composite wind blades of 1m long comprising glass-fabric/epoxy skins and a sandwich plate-type spar were designed and fabricated for static testing. In the composite wind blades, the spar supports the top and bottom skins to form the airfoil shape of NACA4418. The blades were tested to failure and the failure modes were identified at different loading stages. A structural failure analysis method which consists of a geometrically nonlinear finite element (FE) model and appropriate phenomenological failure criteria is used to study the progressive failure behaviours of the blades subjected to different types of quasi-static loads. The experimental load-displacement curves as well as failure loads and locations for different failure modes are used to validate the suitability of the proposed failure analysis method.

  17. Progress in hardware development for the SAFE heatpipe reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, P. J.; Sayre, E. D.; van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Advanced Methods & Materials Company (AMM) previously fabricated the stainless steel modules for the SAFE 30 system. These earlier modules consisting of five fuel pins surrounding a heat pipe, were brazed together using a tricusp insert in the gaps between tubes to ensure maximum braze coverage. It was decided that if possible the next generations of modules, both stainless steel and refractory alloy, would be diffusion bonded together using a Hot Issostatic Pressing (HIP) process. This process was very successfully used in producing the bonded rhenium Nb-lZr fuel cladding and the heat exchanger for the SP-100 Nuclear Space System Ref. 1 & 2. In addition AMM have since refined the technology enabling them to produce very high temperature rocket thrust chambers. Despite this background the complex geometry required for the SAFE module was quite challenging. It was necessary to develop a method which could be applied for both stainless steel and refractory alloy systems. In addition the interstices between tubes had to be completely filled with the tricusp insert to avoid causing distortion of the tube shape during HIPing and provide thermal conductivity from the fuel tubes to the heat pipes. Nevertheless it was considered worth the effort since Hot Isostatic Pressing, if successful, will produce an assembly with the heat pipe completely embedded within the module such that the diffusion bonded assembly has the thermal conduction and strength equivalent to a solid structure. .

  18. Progress towards Millennium Development Goals with women empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Chaturvedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women empowerment is a powerful determinant of their own, children’s and their families’ health. Perhaps, due to this fact, promotion of gender equality and empowering women was kept as one of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs.Objective: The present analysis was undertaken to study the effect of women empowerment on health of women, family planning and various health indicators of children.Methods: Available data from National Surveys in India, various research studies and evidences from published global studies were gathered and further analyzed.Results: Census 2011 (India have shown that states having higher women literacy, like Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra (75%, have better positive indicators of health than states like Rajasthan with 53 % literacy. NFHS -3 (India showed that empowered women had better access to maternal services (76 %, more use of contraception (66.6% and resultantly, had lower neonatal mortality (36%. As against this, for less empowered women, access to maternal services (72 % is low, lesser use of contraception (44% and relatively higher neonatal mortality (43%. A systematic analysis of 175 countries (Lancet, 2010 has established that increase in women education decreases under five child mortality.Conclusions: Investments in women’s employment, health and education, are correlated with a range of positive outcomes, including greater economic growth and children’s health and survival.

  19. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1991-12-01

    The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

  20. Herbaceous energy crop development: recent progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Emily A; Flavell, Richard B; Mascia, Peter N; Thomas, Steven R; Dohleman, Frank G; Long, Stephen P

    2008-06-01

    Oil prices and government mandates have catalyzed rapid growth of nonfossil transportation fuels in recent years, with a large focus on ethanol from energy crops, but the food crops used as first-generation energy crops today are not optimized for this purpose. We show that the theoretical efficiency of conversion of whole spectrum solar energy into biomass is 4.6-6%, depending on plant type, and the best year-long efficiencies realized are about 3%. The average leaf is as effective as the best PV solar cells in transducing solar energy to charge separation (ca. 37%). In photosynthesis, most of the energy that is lost is dissipated as heat during synthesis of biomass. Unlike photovoltaic (PV) cells this energetic cost supports the construction, maintenance, and replacement of the system, which is achieved autonomously as the plant grows and re-grows. Advances in plant genomics are being applied to plant breeding, thereby enabling rapid development of next-generation energy crops that capitalize on theoretical efficiencies while maintaining environmental and economic integrity.

  1. Progress in the development of shallow-water mapping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, E.; Worley, C.R.; O'Brien, T.

    2007-01-01

    The USGS (US Geological Survey) Coastal and Marine Geology has deployed an advance autonomous shallow-draft robotic vehicle, Iris, for shallow-water mapping in Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The vehicle incorporates a side scan sonar system, seismic-reflection profiler, single-beam echosounder, and global positioning system (GPS) navigation. It is equipped with an onboard microprocessor-based motor controller, delivering signals for speed and steering to hull-mounted brushless direct-current thrusters. An onboard motion sensor in the Sea Robotics vehicle control system enclosure has been integrated in the vehicle to measure the vehicle heave, pitch, roll, and heading. Three water-tight enclosures are mounted along the vehicle axis for the Edgetech computer and electronics system including the Sea Robotics computer, a control and wireless communications system, and a Thales ZXW real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS receiver. The vehicle has resulted in producing high-quality seismic reflection and side scan sonar data, which will help in developing the baseline oyster habitat maps.

  2. Cancer Development, Progression, and Therapy: An Epigenetic Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenna Longacre

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis involves uncontrolled cell growth, which follows the activation of oncogenes and/or the deactivation of tumor suppression genes. Metastasis requires down-regulation of cell adhesion receptors necessary for tissue-specific, cell–cell attachment, as well as up-regulation of receptors that enhance cell motility. Epigenetic changes, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and DNA hydroxymethylation, can modify these characteristics. Targets for these epigenetic changes include signaling pathways that regulate apoptosis and autophagy, as well as microRNA. We propose that predisposed normal cells convert to cancer progenitor cells that, after growing, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. This process, which is partially under epigenetic control, can create a metastatic form of both progenitor and full-fledged cancer cells, after which metastasis to a distant location may occur. Identification of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms has provided potential therapeutic avenues. In particular, epigenetic drugs appear to potentiate the action of traditional therapeutics, often by demethylating and re-expressing tumor suppressor genes to inhibit tumorigenesis. Epigenetic drugs may inhibit both the formation and growth of cancer progenitor cells, thus reducing the recurrence of cancer. Adopting epigenetic alteration as a new hallmark of cancer is a logical and necessary step that will further encourage the development of novel epigenetic biomarkers and therapeutics.

  3. Progress in the Development of Edge Scatter Control for Starshades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casement, L. Suzanne; Warwick, Steve; Smith, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In the field of ExoPlanet detection and characterization, the use of a Starshade, an external occulter in front of a telescope at large separations, has been identified as one of the highly promising methods to achieve the goals. In the last major review (Lawson, JPL D-72279, 2013), the control of scattered sunlight from the edges of the starshade into the telescope was identified as one of the key technology development areas in order to make the starshade feasible. Modeling of the scattered light has resulted in very different results (Casement et al., SPIE Vol. 8442, 4H, 2012, Martin et al., SPIE Vol. 8864, 88641A, 2013) so a campaign of experimentation with edge samples was undertaken to attempt to resolve the discrepancies.Here, we present our latest results from both modeling efforts and measurement of samples of materials which would be suitable for manufacturing the starshade edge. We have focused on coating metallic samples for ease of fabrication, including measuring the sharpness of an edge that can be fabricated using standard machine shop methods of a variety of materials that are suitable for space application. We then had these samples coated by two suppliers to evaluate how well these coating types would conform to the edge and provide scatter suppression. The results of scatter measurements of these coated edge samples are presented. In addition, we have subjected these samples to a limited set of environments to evaluate their durability and followed up by remeasuring a portion of these exposed samples to compare the scatter suppression before and after environmental exposure.

  4. Progress in Development of Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay L.; White, Victor E.; Maurer, Joshua A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2008-01-01

    Further improvements have recently been made in the development of the devices described in Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors (NPO-30710), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 30. As discussed in more detail in that article, these sensors offer advantages of greater stability, greater lifetime, and individual electrical addressability, relative to prior ion-channel biosensors. In order to give meaning to a brief description of the recent improvements, it is necessary to recapitulate a substantial portion of the text of the cited previous article. The figure depicts one sensor that incorporates the recent improvements, and can be helpful in understanding the recapitulated text, which follows: These sensors are microfabricated from silicon and other materials compatible with silicon. Typically, the sensors are fabricated in arrays in silicon wafers on glass plates. Each sensor in the array can be individually electrically addressed, without interference with its neighbors. Each sensor includes a well covered by a thin layer of silicon nitride, in which is made a pinhole for the formation of a lipid bilayer membrane. In one stage of fabrication, the lower half of the well is filled with agarose, which is allowed to harden. Then the upper half of the well is filled with a liquid electrolyte (which thereafter remains liquid) and a lipid bilayer is painted over the pinhole. The liquid contains a protein that forms an ion channel on top of the hardened agarose. The combination of enclosure in the well and support by the hardened agarose provides the stability needed to keep the membrane functional for times as long as days or even weeks. An electrode above the well, another electrode below the well, and all the materials between the electrodes together constitute a capacitor. What is measured is the capacitive transient current in response to an applied voltage pulse. One notable feature of this sensor, in comparison with prior such sensors, is a

  5. Progress on standardization and automation in software development on W7X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehner, Georg, E-mail: kuehner@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bluhm, Torsten [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Heimann, Peter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hennig, Christine [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Kroiss, Hugo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Krom, Jon; Laqua, Heike; Lewerentz, Marc [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Maier, Josef [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schacht, Joerg; Spring, Anett; Werner, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Zilker, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For W7X software development the use of ISO/IEC15504-5 is further extended. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The standard provides a basis to manage software multi-projects for a large system project. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adoption of a scrum-like management allows for quick reaction on priority changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high degree of software build automation allows for quick responses to user requests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It provides additional resources to concentrate work on product quality (ISO/IEC 25000). - Abstract: For a complex experiment like W7X being subject to changes all along its projected lifetime the advantages of a formalized software development method have already been stated. Quality standards like ISO/IEC-12207 provide a guideline for structuring of development work and improving process and product quality. A considerable number of tools has emerged supporting and automating parts of development work. On W7X progress has been made during the last years in exploiting the benefit of automation and management during software development: -Continuous build, integration and automated test of software artefacts. Ring-Operator Syntax checks and code quality metrics. Ring-Operator Documentation generation. Ring-Operator Feedback for developers by temporal statistics. -Versioned repository for build products (libraries, executables). -Separate snapshot and release repositories and automatic deployment. -Semi-automatic provisioning of applications. -Feedback from testers and feature requests by ticket system. This toolset is working efficiently and allows the team to concentrate on development. The activity there is presently focused on increasing the quality of the existing software to become a dependable product. Testing of single functions and qualities must be simplified. So a restructuring is underway which relies more on small, individually testable components with standardized

  6. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier

  7. Bug Localization in Test-Driven Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ficco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Software development teams that use agile methodologies are increasingly adopting the test-driven development practice (TDD. TDD allows to produce software by iterative and incremental work cycle, and with a strict control over the process, favouring an early detection of bugs. However, when applied to large and complex systems, TDD benefits are not so obvious; manually locating and fixing bugs introduced during the iterative development steps is a nontrivial task. In such systems, the propagation chains following the bugs activation can be unacceptably long and intricate, and the size of the code to be analyzed is often too large. In this paper, a bug localization technique specifically tailored to TDD is presented. The technique is embedded in the TDD cycle, and it aims to improve developers' ability to locate bugs as soon as possible. It is implemented in a tool and experimentally evaluated on newly developed Java programs.

  8. Progress in Development of the ITER Plasma Control System Simulation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael; Humphreys, David; Sammuli, Brian; Ambrosino, Giuseppe; de Tommasi, Gianmaria; Mattei, Massimiliano; Raupp, Gerhard; Treutterer, Wolfgang; Winter, Axel

    2017-10-01

    We report on progress made and expected uses of the Plasma Control System Simulation Platform (PCSSP), the primary test environment for development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS). PCSSP will be used for verification and validation of the ITER PCS Final Design for First Plasma, to be completed in 2020. We discuss the objectives of PCSSP, its overall structure, selected features, application to existing devices, and expected evolution over the lifetime of the ITER PCS. We describe an archiving solution for simulation results, methods for incorporating physics models of the plasma and physical plant (tokamak, actuator, and diagnostic systems) into PCSSP, and defining characteristics of models suitable for a plasma control development environment such as PCSSP. Applications of PCSSP simulation models including resistive plasma equilibrium evolution are demonstrated. PCSSP development supported by ITER Organization under ITER/CTS/6000000037. Resistive evolution code developed under General Atomics' Internal funding. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization.

  9. Recent progress on test evidence, standardization and design of protection for exterior openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strøm Ruth Astrid

    2016-01-01

    A number of different fire scenarios that elements in vented facades/constructions can be exposed to have been studied. New test standards have been developed for the last few years and are explained. Finally, this paper evaluate how different fire stop products perform in different fire scenarios and which test standards are applicable.

  10. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidt J.D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen’s stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC. The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s−1 to 200 s−1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing.

  11. Use of the NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Examination as a Progress Test in the Preclerkship Curriculum of a New Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Teresa R.; Khalil, Mohammed K.; Peppler, Richard D.; Davey, Diane D.; Kibble, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe the innovative use of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (CBSE) as a progress test during the preclerkship medical curriculum. The main aim of this study was to provide external validation of internally developed multiple-choice assessments in a new medical…

  12. Progress of medical students after open admission or admission based on knowledge tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibnegger, Gilbert; Caluba, Hans-Christian; Ithaler, Daniel; Manhal, Simone; Neges, Heide Maria; Smolle, Josef

    2010-02-01

    Although admission to university in Austria is generally open for applicants who have successfully completed secondary school, in some areas of study, including human medicine and dentistry, the selection of students by additional criteria has become legally possible as a result of a decision by the European Court in 2005. We studied the impact of this important change on the temporal pattern of medical students' progress through the study programme. All 2532 regular students admitted to the diploma programme in human medicine at the Medical University of Graz during the academic years 2002/03-2007/08 were included in the analysis. Non-parametric and semi-parametric survival analysis techniques were employed to compare the time required to complete the first two study semesters (first part of the curriculum) before and after the implementation of admission tests. Temporal patterns of dropout before this goal was achieved were also investigated. Sex, age and nationality of students were assessed as potential confounding variables. The cumulative probability of study success was dramatically better in selected students versus those who were admitted openly (P students completed the first two study semesters within the scheduled time of 1 year, this percentage rose to 75.6-91.9% for those selected by admission tests. Similarly, the cumulative probability for dropping out of study was also significantly lower in selected students (P student nationality, age and sex were also identified as partly significant, albeit weak, predictors. The analysis convincingly demonstrates that, by contrast with open admission, performance-based selection of medical students significantly raises the probability of successful study progress. Additionally, the proportion of dropouts is significantly reduced. Thus, admission tests save considerable costs, in terms of both student time and public resources.

  13. Clinical value of MRI and acute madopar responsiveness test in diagnosing progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiao-hong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the MRI abnormalities and acute madopar responsiveness test in diagnosing progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and Parkinson's disease (PD. Methods Seventeen patients with PSP and 17 gender and age matched patients with PD were studied with cranial MRI examinations and results of acute madopar responsiveness test, and the clinical manifestations of PSP were summarized. Results The atrophy of the midbrain tegmentum and hummingbird sign was demonstrated in all of the PSP patients in our study, but was not observed in the PD patients. The areas of the midbrain on mid-sagittal MRI in PSP patients [(77.35 ± 15.30 mm2] were significantly smaller than that in those with PD [(142.35 ± 31.49 mm2]. The average ratio of the area of the midbrain to the area of pons in the patients with PSP [(14.31 ± 2.47%] was significantly smaller than that in those with PD [(24.08 ± 4.73%; P = 0.000, for all]. According to the result of acute madopar responsiveness test, the maximum Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS Ⅲ improvement rate of 2 patients with PSP and 16 patients with PD was more than 30% (χ2 = 23.142, P = 0.000. Conclusion The assessment of the mid-sagittal MRI and acute madopar responsiveness test may be a useful method to differentiate PSP from PD.

  14. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, July 1 through September 30, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  15. Thermal Protection Test Bed Pathfinder Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Cooper

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase thermal protection capabilities for future reentry vehicles, a method to obtain relevant test data is required. Although arc jet testing can be used to obtain some data on materials, the best method to obtain these data is to actually expose them to an atmospheric reentry. The overprediction of the Orion EFT-1 flight data is an example of how the ground test to flight traceability is not fully understood. The RED-Data small reentry capsule developed by Terminal Velocity Aerospace is critical to understanding this traceability. In order to begin to utilize this technology, ES3 needs to be ready to build and integrate heat shields onto the RED-Data vehicle. Using a heritage Shuttle tile material for the heat shield will both allow valuable insight into the environment that the RED-Data vehicle can provide and give ES3 the knowledge and capability to build and integrate future heat shields for this vehicle.

  16. Development and Testing of Active Groundwater Samplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Bertel; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Andersen, Lars Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Active groundwater sampling techniques are methods where the aquifer is flushed by pumping. The methods developed and tested represent non-dedicated methods for use in existing water wells. This paper describes two different sampling techniques: the Separation Pumping Technique (SP) and the Packer...... on numerical modelling and controlled laboratory experiments. Active groundwater sampling techniques can be used for remedial pumping optimization and in obtaining hydraulic data and represent a fast operational and reliable sampling tool, also under heterogeneous and low permeability conditions....

  17. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  18. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  19. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-05-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  20. Diurnal tension curves for assessing the development or progression of glaucoma: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    reading in the office may not reveal the peak IOP and fluctuation that a patient experiences. Furthermore, because of diurnal and nocturnal variation in IOP, 24-hour monitoring may reveal higher peaks and wider fluctuations than those found during office-hours and may better determine risk of glaucoma progression than single or office-hour diurnal curve measurements. There is discrepancy in the literature regarding which parameter of IOP measurement (e.g., mean IOP or fluctuation/range of IOP) is most important as an independent risk factor for progression or development of glaucoma. The potential for increased rates or likelihood of worsening glaucoma among those with larger IOP swings within defined time periods has received increasing attention in the literature. According to an expert consultant: The role of a diurnal tension curves is to assess IOP in relationship to either a risk factor for the development or progression of glaucoma or achievement of a target pressure which may direct a therapeutic change.Candidates for a diurnal curve are usually limited to glaucoma suspects (based on optic disc changes or less commonly visual field changes) to assess the risk for development of glaucoma or in patients with progressive glaucoma despite normal single office IOP measurements.Clinically diurnal tension curves are used to determine the peak IOP and range. Intraocular pressure fluctuation as a risk factor for progression of glaucoma has also been examined without the use of diurnal curves. In these cases, single IOP measurements were made every 3-6 months over several months/years. The standard deviation (SD) of the mean IOP was used as a surrogate for fluctuation since no diurnal tension curves were obtained. To determine whether the use of a diurnal tension curve (multiple IOP measurements over a minimum 8 hour duration) is more effective than not using a diurnal tension curve (single IOP measurements) to assess IOP fluctuation as a risk factor for the development or

  1. Small Payload Integration and Testing Project Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Tait R.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has mainly focused on large payloads for space flight beginning with the Apollo program to the assembly and resupply of the International Space Station using the Space Shuttle. NASA KSC is currently working on contracting manned Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to commercial providers, developing Space Launch System, the Orion program, deep space manned programs which could reach Mars, and providing technical expertise for the Launch Services Program for science mission payloads/satellites. KSC has always supported secondary payloads and smaller satellites as the launch provider; however, they are beginning to take a more active role in integrating and testing secondary payloads into future flight opportunities. A new line of business, the Small Payload Integration and Testing Services (SPLITS), has been established to provide a one stop shop that can integrate and test payloads. SPLITS will assist high schools, universities, companies and consortiums interested in testing or launching small payloads. The goal of SPLITS is to simplify and facilitate access to KSC's expertise and capabilities for small payloads integration and testing and to help grow the space industry. An effort exists at Kennedy Space Center to improve the external KSC website. External services has partnered with SPLITS as a content test bed for attracting prospective customers. SPLITS is an emerging effort that coincides with the relaunch of the website and has a goal of attracting external partnerships. This website will be a "front door" access point for all potential partners as it will contain an overview of KSC's services, expertise and includes the pertinent contact information.

  2. Development and preliminary tests of resistive microdot and microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Peskov, V; Nappi, E; Martinengo, P; Oliveira, R; Pietropaolo, F; Picchi, P

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years our group have focused on developing various designs of spark-protected micropattern gaseous detectors featuring resistive electrodes instead of the traditional metallic ones: resistive microstrip counters, resistive GEM, resistive MICROMEGAS. These detectors combine in one design the best features of RPCs (spark-protection) and micropattern detectors (a high position resolution). In this paper we report the progress so far made in developing other types of resistive micropattern detectors: a microdot-microhole detector and a microgap-microstrip detector. The former detector is an optimal electron amplifier for some special designs of dual phase noble liquid TPCs, for example with a CsI photocathode immersed inside the noble liquid. Preliminary tests of such a detector, for the first time built and investigated, are reported in this paper. The latter detector is mainly orientated towards medical imaging applications such as X-ray scanners. However, we believe that after a proper gas opti...

  3. The Development and Application of Intelligence Tests for the Blind: A Research Utilization Conference. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. for Exceptional Children.

    Reported are the proceedings and recommendations of a research conference to improve the development and utilization of intelligence tests for use with blind adults in social and vocational rehabilitation. The following tests are considered: A Haptic Intelligence Scale for the Adult Blind, the Raven Progressive Matrices for Presentation to the…

  4. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Static CIRFT Testing Curvature Data Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2016-10-10

    Since the CIRFT tests reported in NUREG-7198 were generated, a number of factors that influence the recorded curvature measurement data were identified. In 2016, a data reanalysis task was undertaken to implement the lessons learned. This letter report provides the revised results of previous CIRFT tests, after implementing the following data reanalysis procedures: (A) experimental data smoothing and LVDT reset, (B) LVDT probe contact and sensor spacing correction for curvature data, and (C) LVDT probe dynamic vibration adjustment procedure development.

  5. Chemistry research and development. Progress report, December 1978-May 1979. [Component, pilot plant, instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, F. J.

    1980-06-30

    Progress and activities are reported on component development, pilot plant development, and instrumentation and statistical systems. Specific items studied include processing of pond sludge, transport of radioactive materials and wastes, corrosion, decontamination and cleaning, fluidized-bed incineration, Pu contamination of soils, chemical analysis, radiometric analysis, security. (DLC)

  6. Progressive Modularization: Reframing Our Understanding of Typical and Atypical Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Dean; Filippi, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The ability to acquire language is a critical part of human development. Yet there is no consensus on how the skill emerges in early development. Does it constitute an innately-specified, language-processing module or is it acquired progressively? One of Annette Karmiloff-Smith's (1938-2016) key contributions to developmental science addresses…

  7. Development of Career Progression Systems for Employees in the Foodservice Industry. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Restaurant Association, Chicago, IL.

    Firms representing four segments of the foodservice industry (institutional foodservice (9 jobs), commercial restaurants (19 jobs), hotel foodservice (100 jobs), and airline foodservice (10 jobs), participated in a career and training study to test the feasibility of designing and implementing career progression (c.p.) systems within these…

  8. Nurse competence scale: development and psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meretoja, Riitta; Isoaho, Hannu; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2004-07-01

    Self-assessment assists nurses to maintain and improve their practice by identifying their strengths and areas that may need to be further developed. Professional competence profiles encourage them to take an active part in the learning process of continuing education. Although competence recognition offers a way to motivate practising nurses to produce quality care, few measuring tools are available for this purpose. This paper describes the development and testing of the Nurse Competence Scale, an instrument with which the level of nurse competence can be assessed in different hospital work environments. The categories of the Nurse Competence Scale were derived from Benner's From Novice to Expert competency framework. A seven-step approach, including literature review and six expert groups, was used to identify and validate the indicators of nurse competence. After a pilot test, psychometric testing of the Nurse Competence Scale (content, construct and concurrent validity, and internal consistency) was undertaken with 498 nurses. The 73-item scale consists of seven categories, with responses on a visual analogy scale format. The frequency of using competencies was additionally tested with a four-point scale. Self-assessed overall scores indicated a high level of competence across categories. The Nurse Competence Scale data were normally distributed. The higher the frequency of using competencies, the higher was the self-assessed level of competence. Age and length of work experience had a positive but not very strong correlation with level of competence. According to the item analysis, the categories of the Nurse Competence Scale showed good internal consistency. The results provide strong evidence of the reliability and validity of the Nurse Competence Scale.

  9. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Sixth Quarter of the First Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. The major emphasis during this reporting period was expanding the test facility to address system integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced power generation systems. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include additional modules for the expansion of the test facility, which is referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSOF). A letter agreement was negotiated between Southern Company Services (SCS) and Foster Wheeler (FW) for the conceptual design of the Advanced Pressurized Fluid-Bed Combustion (APFBC)/Topping Combustor/Gas Turbine System to be added to the facility. The expanded conceptual design also included modifications to the existing conceptual design for the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility (HGCTF), facility layout and balance of plant design for the PSOF. Southern Research Institute (SRI) began investigating the sampling requirements for the expanded facility and assisted SCS in contacting Particulate Control Device (PCD) vendors for additional information. SCS also contacted the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and two molten carbonate fuel cell vendors for input on the fuel cell module for the PSDF.

  10. Penetration Testing Curriculum Development in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Li

    2015-04-01

    report for the management team to aid in strengthening the system, never to cause any real damages. This paper introduces the development of a penetration testing curriculum as a core class in an undergraduate cybersecurity track in Information Technology. The teaching modules are developed based on the professional penetration testing life cycle. The concepts taught in the class are enforced by hands-on lab exercises. This paper also shares the resources that are available to institutions looking for teaching materials and grant opportunities to support efforts when creating a similar curriculum in cybersecurity.

  11. FY2014 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    The Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to advancing light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle systems to help maximize the number of electric miles driven and increase the energy efficiency of transportation vehicles.

  12. Performance testing of HEPA filters: Progress towards a European standard procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyment, J.

    1997-08-01

    Proposals for a future European testing procedure for {open_quotes}High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters (HEPA and ULPA){close_quotes} are being developed by CEN (Comite Europeen de Normalisation). The new standard will be given the status of national standard in participating countries, conflicting national standards being withdrawn. The standard will comprise 5 parts covering the grouping and classification of HEPA and ULPA filters according to their efficiency, fundamental principles of testing, marking etc (in part 1). Part 2 will cover aerosol production, measurement principles, counting equipment and statistics. Parts 3-5 will cover testing flat sheet media, leak testing of filter elements and the efficiency testing of filter elements respectively. The efficiency test methods allow the use of either homogeneous monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols for the determination of particulate filtration efficiencies as a function of particle size. The particle size at which maximum penetration occurs is first determined in flat sheet media tests; tests on filter elements (constructed using the same filter medium) may be carried out using either a homogeneous monodisperse aerosol of the size at which maximum penetration occurs (MPPS) or a polydisperse aerosol whose median size is close to the MPPS. Tests with monodisperse aerosols may be conducted using condensation nucleus counting equipment; tests using polydisperse test aerosols require the use of optical sizing particle counters. When determining the efficiency of filter elements the downstream aerosol concentrations may be determined from air samples obtained using either an overall method (single point sampling after mixing) or a scan method. The scan method also allows {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} efficiency values to be determined. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Role of liver immunological inflammation in development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Juanjuan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a common liver disease in clinical practice and has a complex pathogenesis. At present, the "two- or three-hit" theory is still widely acknowledged as the major pathogenesis of NAFLD. However, in recent years, the role of liver immunological inflammation in the development and progression of NAFLD has been taken more and more seriously. This article elaborates on the mechanism of liver immunological inflammation in the development and progression of NAFLD from the perspective of liver immunological inflammation.

  15. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q98.

  16. Launch Control System Software Development System Automation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    ) tool to Brandon Echols, a fellow intern, and I. The purpose of the OCR tool is to analyze an image and find the coordinates of any group of text. Some issues that arose while installing the OCR tool included the absence of certain libraries needed to train the tool and an outdated software version. We eventually resolved the issues and successfully installed the OCR tool. Training the tool required many images and different fonts and sizes, but in the end the tool learned to accurately decipher the text in the images and their coordinates. The OCR tool produced a file that contained significant metadata for each section of text, but only the text and coordinates of the text was required for our purpose. The team made a script to parse the information we wanted from the OCR file to a different file that would be used by automation functions within the automated framework. Since a majority of development and testing for the automated test cases for the GUI in question has been done using live simulated data on the workstations at the Launch Control Center (LCC), a large amount of progress has been made. As of this writing, about 60% of all of automated testing has been implemented. Additionally, the OCR tool will help make our automated tests more robust due to the tool's text recognition being highly scalable to different text fonts and text sizes. Soon we will have the whole test system automated, allowing for more full-time engineers working on development projects.

  17. Progress, innovation and regulatory science in drug development: the politics of international standard-setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John; Reed, Tim

    2002-06-01

    This paper examines international standard-setting in the toxicology of pharmaceuticals during the 1990s, which has involved both the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies in an organization known as the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The analysis shows that the relationships between innovation, regulatory science and 'progress' may be more complex and controversial than is often assumed. An assessment of the ICH's claims about the implications of 'technical' harmonization of drug-testing standards for the maintenance of drug safety, via toxicological testing, and the delivery of therapeutic progress, via innovation, is presented. By demonstrating that there is not a technoscientific validity for these claims, it is argued that, within the ICH, a discourse of technological innovation and scientific progress has been used by regulatory agencies and prominent parts of the transnational pharmaceutical industry to legitimize the lowering and loosening of toxicological standards for drug testing. The mobilization and acceptance of this discourse are shown to be pivotal to the ICH's transformation of reductions in safety standards, which are apparently against the interests of patients and public health, into supposed therapeutic benefits derived from promises of greater access to more innovative drug products. The evidence suggests that it is highly implausible that these reductions in the standards of regulatory toxicology are consistent with therapeutic progress for patients, and highlights a worrying aspect embedded in the 'technical trajectories' of regulatory science.

  18. Research and development on geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste; First progress report

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The "first progress report of research and development ongeological disposal of high level radioactive waste", h3 in short, isintended for the japanese authorities. In accordance with the "overallprogram for high level radioactive waste management" set forth byatomic energy commission, h3 is designed to clarify the current status ofthe research and development work performed by power reactor and nuclearfuel development corporation(pnc) up to the year 1991. H3 presents the updated knowledge on...

  19. Monitoring Training Progress During Exercise Training in Cancer Survivors : A Submaximal Exercise Test as an Alternative for a Maximal Exercise Test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Zonderland, Maria L.; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J.

    May AM, van Weert E, Korstjens 1, Hoekstra-Weebers JE, van der Schans CP, Zonderland ML, Mesters 1, van den Borne B, Ros WJ. Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors: a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test? Arch Phys Med Rehabil

  20. Mollusc reproductive toxicity tests - Development and validation of test guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrot, Virginie; Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund

    . Draft standard operating procedures (SOPs) have been designed based upon literature and expert knowledge from project partners. Pre-validation studies have been implemented to validate the proposed test conditions and identify issues in performing the SOPs and analyzing test results. Pre-validation work...... for P. antipodarum consisted in a comparative 28-day study between four laboratories and with two test substances: cadmium (Cd) and bisphenol A (BPA). For L. stagnalis, pre-validation consisted in a comparative 56-day study between six laboratories and with two test substances: Cd and tributyltin (TBT...... in partner laboratories and exhibited homogenous age and size at the beginning of the tests. All laboratories found a concentration-dependent decrease of fecundity in both species under Cd exposure. Values of NOECs and LOECs were generally homogenous among laboratories. Results of the pre-validation studies...

  1. The development of Business Ethics in front of the progress of organizational neuroscience and neuroethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa González Esteban

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Organizational neuroscience and neuroethics are proving to have already made a number of advances in the discovery of both cognition and human behaviour. Those progresses invite us to rethink some of the classical assumptions on which have been developed applied ethics. This article focuses on the analysis about how the progresses of the neurosciences affect our understanding of business ethics and its future development, specially in its organizational level. In order to achieve this objective, the paper is structured in two steps. On the one hand, it considers whether such developments undermine or erode normative foundations of business ethics. On the other hand, it tries to discover the implications of such developments have for business ethics in its practical development.

  2. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-25

    Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

  3. The Twenty Statement Test in Teacher Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Aypay

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe teacher characteristics using Twenty Statements Test (TST. Study group includes a total of thirty-five individuals, including teachers, guidance and counselors and research assistants. The study used a qualitative approach on teacher identity. TST is one of the qualitative methods that were used to determine individual self-conceptualization. Study group were requested to write twenty statements that describe themselves responding to the question “Who I am?” in a free format. The findings indicated that teachers were overwhelmingly in group c (reflective. No differences were found in terms of gender and profession. Only few significant differences have been found based on marital status. The utility of TST in teacher training and development was discussed

  4. The Twenty Statement Test in Teacher Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Aypay

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe teacher characteristics using Twenty Statements Test (TST. Study group includes a total of thirty-five individuals, including teachers, guidance and counselors and research assistants. The study used a qualitative approach on teacher identity. TST is one of the qualitative methods that were used to determine individual self-conceptualization. Study group were requested to write twenty statements that describe themselves responding to the question “Who I am?” in a free format. The findings indicated that teachers were overwhelmingly in group c (reflective. No differences were found in terms of gender and profession. Only few significant differences have been found based on marital status. The utility of TST in teacher training and development was discussed.

  5. Development and characterization of a preclinical model of breast cancer lung micrometastatic to macrometastatic progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora C Bailey-Downs

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients die with metastatic disease, thus, good models that recapitulate the natural process of metastasis including a dormancy period with micrometastatic cells would be beneficial in developing treatment strategies. Herein we report a model of natural metastasis that balances time to complete experiments with a reasonable dormancy period, which can be used to better study metastatic progression. The basis for the model is a 4T1 triple negative syngeneic breast cancer model without resection of the primary tumor. A cell titration from 500 to 15,000 GFP tagged 4T1 cells implanted into fat pad number four of immune proficient eight week female BALB/cJ mice optimized speed of the model while possessing metastatic processes including dormancy and beginning of reactivation. The frequency of primary tumors was less than 50% in animals implanted with 500-1500 cells. Although implantation with over 10,000 cells resulted in 100% primary tumor development, the tumors and macrometastases formed were highly aggressive, lacked dormancy, and offered no opportunity for treatment. Implantation of 7,500 cells resulted in >90% tumor take by 10 days; in 30-60 micrometastases in the lung (with many animals also having 2-30 brain micrometastases two weeks post-implantation, with the first small macrometastases present at five weeks; many animals displaying macrometastases at five weeks and animals becoming moribund by six weeks post-implantation. Using the optimum of 7,500 cells the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer, doxorubicin, given at its maximal tolerated dose (MTD; 1 mg/kg weekly was tested for an effect on metastasis. Doxorubicin treatment significantly reduced primary tumor growth and lung micrometastases but the number of macrometastases at experiment end was not significantly affected. This model should prove useful for development of drugs to target metastasis and to study the biology of metastasis.

  6. Specimen aspect ratio and progressive field strain development of sandstone under uniaxial compression by three-dimensional digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Munoz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The complete stress–strain characteristics of sandstone specimens were investigated in a series of quasi-static monotonic uniaxial compression tests. Strain patterns development during pre- and post-peak behaviours in specimens with different aspect ratios was also examined. Peak stress, post-peak portion of stress–strain, brittleness, characteristics of progressive localisation and field strain patterns development were affected at different extents by specimen aspect ratio. Strain patterns of the rocks were obtained by applying three-dimensional (3D digital image correlation (DIC technique. Unlike conventional strain measurement using strain gauges attached to specimen, 3D DIC allowed not only measuring large strains, but more importantly, mapping the development of field strain throughout the compression test, i.e. in pre- and post-peak regimes. Field strain development in the surface of rock specimen suggests that strain starts localising progressively and develops at a lower rate in pre-peak regime. However, in post-peak regime, strains increase at different rates as local deformations take place at different extents in the vicinity and outside the localised zone. The extent of localised strains together with the rate of strain localisation is associated with the increase in rate of strength degradation. Strain localisation and local inelastic unloading outside the localised zone both feature post-peak regime.

  7. Somatotype and intellectual ability (Raven Progressive Matrices Test) in Chilean school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Liliana U; Lizana, Pablo A; Orellana, Yasna Z; Villagrán, Francisca S; Arias, Vanessa F; Almagià, Atilio F; Burrows, Raquel A; Ivanovic, Daniza M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between somatotype and intellectual ability (IA) in 11-12 and 15-16 year-old students (n = 1,015) in the Chile's Metropolitan Region from a representative sample of 33 educational establishments chosen at random. The Heath-Carter somatotype and the IA assessed through the Raven Progressive Matrices Test were measured. The endomorph was observed in 59% of the students; 28% had a mesomorph and 13% ectomorph. The IA was distributed in: 11.2% Grade I, 26.8% Grade II, 41% Grade III, 17.6% Grade IV and 3.2% Grade V. A positive and significant correlation of IA with the endomorphic component (r = 0.074, p = 0.02) was found in the total sample and only in females (r = 0.109, p = 0.02); at the same time, a positive and significant correlation with the ectomorph component was also observed (r = 0.067, p < 0.05). This suggests that other variables would influence more strongly the IA for which further research is needed to quantitate this multifactorial problem. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report No. 24, Third quarter, CY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This is the twenty-fourth and final Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1995. All activity this quarter was directed toward the completion of the program final report. A draft copy of the final report was forwarded to DOE during this quarter, and DOE submitted their comments on the report to AEPSC. DOE requested that Westinghouse write an appendix to the report covering the performance of the fail-safe regenerator devices during Tad operation, and Westinghouse subsequently prepared the appendix. Additional DOE comments were incorporated into the report, and it will be issued in camera-ready form by the end of October, 1995, which is the program end date. Appendix 1 presents the results of filter candle posttest examination by Westinghouse performed on selected filter candles following final shutdown of the system.

  9. Factors that Determine the Development and Progression of Gastroesophageal Varices in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Robert J.; Sanyal, Arun J.; Ghany, Marc G.; Lee, William M.; Reid, Andrea E.; Naishadham, Deepa; Everson, Gregory T.; Kahn, Jeffrey A.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Szabo, Gyongyi; Morgan, Timothy R.; Everhart, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims We aimed to identify the incidence and predictors of de novo gastroesophageal variceal formation and progression in a large cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and advanced fibrosis. Methods All participants in the HALT-C Trial were offered an endoscopy before treatment and again after 4 years. Patients with varices at baseline also had a endoscopy at 2 years. Baseline laboratory and clinical parameters were analyzed as predictors of de novo variceal formation and variceal progression. Results De novo varices developed in 157 of the 598 (26.2%) patients. Most of the new varices were small (76.4%) and only 1% of patients developed variceal hemorrhage. The likelihood of developing varices was associated with subject race (Hispanic > Caucasian > African American, p= 0.0005), lower baseline levels of albumin (P=0.051), and higher levels of hyaluronic acid (P< 0.001) with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve=0.70. Among 210 patients with existing gastroesophageal varices, 74 (35.2%) had variceal progression or bleeding during follow-up. Patients with a higher baseline ratios of serum aspartate /alanine aminotransferase (P=0.028) and lower platelet counts (P=0.0002) were at greatest risk of variceal progression (AUROC = 0.72). Prolonged, low-dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers did not influence the risk of developing new or enlarging varices. Conclusion Development of varices in patients with CHC is associated with patient race/ethnicity and laboratory markers of disease severity. Prolonged low dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers do not reduce the risk of variceal development nor progression. PMID:20211180

  10. Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffhauser, A.C.

    1977-06-01

    Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat source containment materials; (3) /sup 144/Cm fuel development; (4) terrestrial radioisotope applications; (5) selenide isotope generator system support; (6) isotope Brayton system materials support; and (7) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

  11. Accuracy of progress ratios determined from experience curves: the case of photovoltaic technology development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Alsema, E.A.; Junginger, H.M.; de Moor, H.H.C.; Schaeffer, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Learning curves are extensively used in policy and scenario studies. Progress ratios (PRs) are derived from historical data and are used for forecasting cost development of many technologies, including photovoltaics (PV). Forecasts are highly sensitive to uncertainties in the PR. A PR usually is

  12. A Learning Progression Should Address Regression: Insights from Developing Non-Linear Reasoning in Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovardas, Tasos

    2016-01-01

    Although ecological systems at varying scales involve non-linear interactions, learners insist thinking in a linear fashion when they deal with ecological phenomena. The overall objective of the present contribution was to propose a hypothetical learning progression for developing non-linear reasoning in prey-predator systems and to provide…

  13. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram supporting the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  14. Development of an Empirically-Based Conditional Learning Progression for Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslyn, Wayne; Drewes, Andrea; McGinnis, J. Randy; Hestness, Emily; Mouza, Chrystalla

    2017-01-01

    Climate change encompasses a broad and complex set of concepts that is often challenging for students and educators. Using a learning progressions (LPs) knowledge system, we developed a LP that described student learning of climate change. In this exploratory study, we present findings from written assessments of climate change (n = 294) and…

  15. Developing a Learning Progression for Number Sense Based on the Rule Space Model in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Yan, Yue; Xin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The current study focuses on developing the learning progression of number sense for primary school students, and it applies a cognitive diagnostic model, the rule space model, to data analysis. The rule space model analysis firstly extracted nine cognitive attributes and their hierarchy model from the analysis of previous research and the…

  16. Development of a definition for Rapid Progression (RP) of renal function in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamara, David A; Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Ross, Michael

    2014-01-01

    No consensus exists on how to define abnormally rapid deterioration in renal function (Rapid Progression, RP). We developed an operational definition of RP in HIV-positive persons with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >90ml/min/1.73m2 (using Cockcroft Gault) in the Data Collec...

  17. The Effect of Progressive Sentence Development Activities on 5th Graders' Description Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzadayi, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of progressive sentence development activities on 5th graders' description skills. The study was conducted based on the pretest-posttest quasi-experimental model with a control group. A total of 58 students participated in the study; 29 in the control group, and 29 in the experimental group. The…

  18. Current Progress of a Finite Element Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of Flutter for the AeroStructures Test Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report focuses on the use of the STructural Analysis RoutineS suite program, SOLIDS, input for the AeroStructures Test Wing. The AeroStructures Test Wing project as a whole is described. The use of the SOLIDS code to find the mode shapes of a structure is discussed. The frequencies, and the structural dynamics to which they relate are examined. The results of the CFD predictions are compared to experimental data from a Ground Vibration Test.

  19. Recent Progress in the Development of Capsule Targets for the Nation Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R; Anthamatten, M; Armstrong, J P; Letts, S A; McEachern, R L; McQuillan, B W; Takagi, M

    2002-11-26

    The capsule targets for ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility must meet very exacting requirements. Primary among them is an extremely high degree of symmetry at all length scales for the 2-mm-diameter 150-{micro}m-walled capsule. At LLNL work is in progress to produce both polyimide and sputtered beryllium targets that meet these specifications. Both of these targets require a thin-walled spherical-shell plastic mandrel upon which the beryllium or polyimide ablator is deposited. In this paper we report on recent progress in developing NIF capsules that meet the demanding design requirements.

  20. Progress on Test EBIS and the Design of an EBIS-Based RHIC Preinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Alessi, James; Gould, Omar; Kponou, Ahovi; Lockey, Robert; Pikin, Alexander I; Prelec, Krsto; Raparia, Deepak; Ritter, John; Snydstrup, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Following the successful development of the Test EBIS at BNL,* we now have a design for an EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector which would serve as an alternative to the Tandem Van de Graaffs in providing beams for RHIC and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. This baseline design includes an EBIS producing mA-level currents of heavy ions (ex. Au 32+) in ~ 10-20

  1. A nationwide quality improvement project to accelerate Ghana's progress toward Millennium Development Goal Four: design and implementation progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twum-Danso, Nana A Y; Akanlu, George B; Osafo, Enoch; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi; Boadu, Richard O; Atinbire, Solomon; Adondiwo, Ane; Amenga-Etego, Isaac; Ashagbley, Francis; Boadu, Eric A; Dasoberi, Ireneous; Kanyoke, Ernest; Yabang, Elma; Essegbey, Ivan T; Adjei, George A; Buckle, Gilbert B; Awoonor-Williams, J Koku; Nang-Beifubah, Alexis; Twumasi, Akwasi; McCannon, C Joseph; Barker, Pierre M

    2012-12-01

    The gap between evidence-based guidelines and practice of care is reflected, in low- and middle-income countries, by high rates of maternal and child mortality and limited effectiveness of large-scale programing to decrease those rates. We designed a phased, rapid, national scale-up quality improvement (QI) intervention to accelerate the achievement of Millennium Development Goal Four in Ghana. Our intervention promoted systems thinking, active participation of managers and frontline providers, generation and testing of local change ideas using iterative learning from transparent district and local data, local ownership and sustainability. After 50 months of implementation, we have completed two prototype learning phases and have begun regional spread phases to all health facilities in all 38 districts of the three northernmost regions and all 29 Catholic hospitals in the remaining regions of the country. To accelerate the spread of improvement, we developed 'change packages' of rigorously tested process changes along the continuum of care from pregnancy to age 5 in both inpatient and outpatient settings. The primary successes for the project so far include broad and deep adoption of QI by local stakeholders for improving system performance, widespread capacitation of leaders, managers and frontline providers in QI methods, incorporation of local ideas into change packages and successful scale-up to approximately 25% of the country's districts in 3 years. Implementation challenges include variable leadership uptake and commitment at the district level, delays due to recruiting and scheduling barriers, weak data systems and repeated QI training due to high staff turnover.

  2. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  3. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO

  4. Mechanisms Linking Obesity and Thyroid Cancer Development and Progression in Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Gu; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2018-01-19

    Recent compelling epidemiological studies indicate a strong association of obesity with thyroid cancer. Obesity has been shown to promote thyroid cancer progression and exacerbate poor outcome in thyroid cancer patients. However, the molecular mechanisms by which obesity increases thyroid cancer risk and facilitates cancer progression are not completely understood. Obesity induces complex pathological changes including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress, adipokines, and inflammatory responses. These changes can affect the development and progression of cancer through highly complex interactions in vivo. The deleterious effect of obesity may differ according to the different cancer types. In view of the increased incidence of thyroid cancer in parallel with the widespread occurrence of obesity in the past decades, it is imperative to clarify how obesity affects thyroid carcinogenesis. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which obesity aggravates thyroid carcinogenesis as elucidated by mouse models of thyroid cancer.

  5. Development of laser-ion beam photodissociation methods. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on developing the tandem magnetic sector (EB)/reflection-time-of-flight (TOF) instrument, preliminary experiments with tandem TOF/TOF instruments, developing method for performing photodissociation with pulsed lasers, experiments with laser ionization of aerosol particles, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and ion-molecule reaction chemistry of ground and excited state transition metal ions. This progress report is divided into: photodissociation, MALDI (including aerosols), and ion chemistry fundamentals.

  6. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, Alice; Luu, Chi D; Guymer, Robyn H; Ayton, Lauren N

    2016-01-01

    Vision prostheses, or "bionic eyes", are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field.

  7. A murine model for the development of melanocytic nevi and their progression to melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nasti, Tahseen H.; Cochran, J. Barry; Tsuruta, Yuko; Yusuf, Nabiha; McKay, Kristopher M.; Athar, Mohammad; Timares, Laura; Elmets, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired melanocytic nevi are commonly found in sun exposed and unexposed human skin, but the potential for their transformation into invasive melanoma is not clear. Therefore, a mouse model of nevus initiation and progression was developed in C3H/HeN mice using a modified chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Nevi develop due to DNA damage initiated by dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) followed by chronic promotion with 12?O?tetradecanoyl?phorbol?13?acetate (TPA). Dysplastic pigmented skin lesio...

  8. Assessing Progress towards Public Health, Human Rights, and International Development Goals Using Frontier Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jeanne; Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Indicators to measure progress towards achieving public health, human rights, and international development targets, such as 100% access to improved drinking water or zero maternal mortality ratio, generally focus on status (i.e., level of attainment or coverage) or trends in status (i.e., rates of change). However, these indicators do not account for different levels of development that countries experience, thus making it difficult to compare progress between countries. We describe a recently developed new use of frontier analysis and apply this method to calculate country performance indices in three areas: maternal mortality ratio, poverty headcount ratio, and primary school completion rate. Frontier analysis is used to identify the maximum achievable rates of change, defined by the historically best-performing countries, as a function of coverage level. Performance indices are calculated by comparing a country's rate of change against the maximum achievable rate at the same coverage level. A country's performance can be positive or negative, corresponding to progression or regression, respectively. The calculated performance indices allow countries to be compared against each other regardless of whether they have only begun to make progress or whether they have almost achieved the target. This paper is the first to use frontier analysis to determine the maximum achievable rates as a function of coverage level and to calculate performance indices for public health, human rights, and international development indicators. The method can be applied to multiple fields and settings, for example health targets such as cessation in smoking or specific vaccine immunizations, and offers both a new approach to analyze existing data and a new data source for consideration when assessing progress achieved.

  9. Genomics and premalignant breast lesions: clues to the development and progression of lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Teresa L; Boulos, Fouad I; Andrulis, Irene L; Lam, Wan L

    2007-01-01

    Advances in genomic technology have improved our understanding of the genetic events that parallel breast cancer development. Because almost all mammary carcinomas develop in the terminal duct lobular units of the breast, understanding the events involved in mammary gland development make it possible to recognize those events that, when altered, contribute to breast neoplasia. In this review we focus on lobular carcinomas, discussing the pathology, development, and progression of premalignant lobular lesions from a genomic point of view. We highlight studies utilizing genomic approaches and describe how these investigations have furthered our understanding of the complexity of premalignant breast lesions.

  10. Oxygen uptake of overweight and obese children at different stages of a progressive treadmill test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-Ortega, Agustín; Lucy Davis, Catherine; Barbeau, Paule; Boyle, Colleen Ann

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic risks but it is difficult to assess in obese children. The objective of this study was to develop an equation to estimate VO2 (mL/kg/min) and to check the % of tests that were maximal according to recommended criteria. Methods Stress tests were analyzed of 222 subjects (94 male and 128 female with a BMI above the 85 percentile for age and sex), and repeated 4 months later. Mean age was 9.4 ± 1.1 years and weighed 52.4 ± 13.3 kg. Body fat % (40.5 + 6.2) was determined by DXA (Hologic QDR 4500W). The protocol on the treadmill started with a warm up at 2.5 and 3 mph with a slope of 0% and 2%. The speed was kept at 3 mph for all the stages and the slope was increased 2% every 2 minutes. Statistical analysis (descriptive, t-test and ANOVAS 2×2×2) was done with SPSS 15.0. Results Only 35% of the tests were maximal. The equation calculates was Y = 2.6x + 22.3 (x = protocol stage). Data pre and post treatment were not statistically different Discussion Increments in VO2 were consistent despite subject diversity (sex, % body fat, physical fitness, treatment). Conclusion To be able to estimate VO2 at the different stages of the test without complex equipment or specialized staff, will facilitate the performance of stress tests on a daily basis. PMID:21218170

  11. Development of Dissolution Test Method for Drotaverine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Sink conditions, drug stability and specificity in different dissolution media were tested to optimize a dissolution test method using a USP paddle type dissolution test apparatus set at a speed of. 50 rpm. The dissolution medium consisted of 900 ml of phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) containing 0.25% w/v cetrimide at 37 ...

  12. Progress testing in the medical curriculum: students' approaches to learning and perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Henning, Marcus; Yielder, Jill; Jones, Rhys; Wearn, Andy; Weller, Jennifer

    2015-09-11

    Progress Tests (PTs) draw on a common question bank to assess all students in a programme against graduate outcomes. Theoretically PTs drive deep approaches to learning and reduce assessment-related stress. In 2013, PTs were introduced to two year groups of medical students (Years 2 and 4), whereas students in Years 3 and 5 were taking traditional high-stakes assessments. Staged introduction of PTs into our medical curriculum provided a time-limited opportunity for a comparative study. The main purpose of the current study was to compare the impact of PTs on undergraduate medical students' approaches to learning and perceived stress with that of traditional high-stakes assessments. We also aimed to investigate the associations between approaches to learning, stress and PT scores. Undergraduate medical students (N = 333 and N = 298 at Time 1 and Time 2 respectively) answered the Revised Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) at two time points to evaluate change over time. The R-SPQ-2F generated a surface approach and a deep approach score; the PSS generated an overall perceived stress score. We found no significant differences between the two groups in approaches to learning at either time point, and no significant changes in approaches to learning over time in either cohort. Levels of stress increased significantly at the end of the year (Time 2) for students in the traditional assessment cohort, but not in the PT cohort. In the PT cohort, surface approach to learning, but not stress, was a significant negative predictor of students' PT scores. While confirming an association between surface approaches to learning and lower PT scores, we failed to demonstrate an effect of PTs on approaches to learning. However, a reduction in assessment-associated stress is an important finding.

  13. Development of molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1-July 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. R.

    1980-09-04

    The major objective of this program for development of a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant is to establish and demonstrate readiness for fabrication and test of full-scale prototype stacks. This will be accomplished by a heavy emphasis upon resolution of remaining technology problems, including materials, processes and contaminant effects research, development and testing of cell components to 10,000 hours endurance life and scaleup of laboratory hardware to commercial size. A detailed design for a prototype stack will be defined and a tenth-size of full-scale cells will be tested. Component and manufacturing processes will be developed based upon commercial cost goals. Coal-fired utility central station and industrial cogeneration power plant requirements will be defined and plant options evaluated, leading to selection of a single reference design. Cell and stack design and development will be guided by requirements based upon the reference plant design. The specific program objectives derived from the contract work statement are as follows: (1) to define a reference power plant design for a coal-fired molten carbonate power plant; (2) to develop and verify cell and stack design based upon the requirements of the reference power plant design; (3) to establish and demonstrate readiness to fabricate and test full-length stacks of full-scale cells, hereafter called prototype stacks; and (4) to quantify contaminant effects and establish a program to verify performance of molten carbonate fuel cells operating on products of coal gasification. Progress is reported.

  14. Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-07

    The results of work performed from July 1, 1979 through September 30, 1979 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

  15. Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, April 1, 1979-June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-25

    The results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

  16. Keratoconus Progression in Patients With Allergy and Elevated Surface Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Point-of-Care Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Traversi, Claudio; Mellace, Pierfrancesco; Bagaglia, Simone A; Zuccarini, Silvio; Mencucci, Rita; Jacob, Soosan

    2017-10-04

    To assess keratoconus (KC) progression in patients with allergies who also tested positive to surface matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) point-of-care test. Prospective comparative study including 100 stage I-II keratoconic patients, mean age 16.7±4.6 years. All patients underwent an anamnestic questionnaire for concomitant allergic diseases and were screened with the MMP-9 point-of-care test. Patients were divided into two groups: patients KC with allergies (KC AL) and patients KC without allergies (KC NAL). Severity of allergy was established by papillary subtarsal response grade and KC progression assessed by Scheimpflug corneal tomography, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) measurement in a 12-month follow-up. The KC AL group included 52 patients and the KC NAL group 48. In the KC AL group, 42/52 of patients (81%) were positive to MMP-9 point-of-care test versus two positive patients in the KC NAL group (4%). The KC AL group data showed a statistically significant decrease of average CDVA, from 0.155±0.11 to 0.301±0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (Paverage. The KC NAL group revealed a slight KC progression without statistically significant changes. Pearson correlation test showed a high correlation between Kmax worsening and severity of PSR in the KC AL group. The study demonstrated a statistically significant progression of KC in patients with concomitant allergies, positive to MMP-9 point-of-care test versus negative. A high correlation between severity of allergy and KC progression was documented.

  17. Design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for an automotive vehicle. Phase IV. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-31

    Progress in the design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for an automotive vehicle is reported. The Major automotive hydromechanical transmission development problem continues to be the reduction of hydrostatic noise and the project plan, therefore, concentrated on the new hydrostatic module. The potential for achieving acceptably low noise levels in the second generation hydromechanical transmission is to be assessed by comparing the noise levels of the hydrostatic modules for the first and second generation transmissions. A set of twelve test points was selected comprising of road load steady state and wide-open-throttle acceleration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mph. The module operating conditions for the two transmissions at each of these twelve points were calculated. Baseline noise data was measured on the first generation module. The results are given testing of co-axial hydrostatic module for second generation hydromechanical transmission will be emphasized. (LCL)

  18. Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of Computerized Adaptive Testing: Application to Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shudong; McCall, Marty; Jiao, Hong; Harris, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are twofold. First, to investigate the construct or factorial structure of a set of Reading and Mathematics computerized adaptive tests (CAT), "Measures of Academic Progress" (MAP), given in different states at different grades and academic terms. The second purpose is to investigate the invariance of test…

  19. The Influence of HLA and KIR Genes on Malignant Melanoma Development and Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandilarova, Snezhina Mihailova; Paschen, Annette; Mihaylova, Anastassia; Ivanova, Milena; Schadendorf, Dirk; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2016-12-01

    Many studies have described the role of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their cognate human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands in the immune protection against melanoma, but the effect of these markers on intra-individual variations in tumor development and progression has remained less clear. We performed KIR, HLA, and KIR/ligand analysis in 283 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate their integrated influence on disease stage and progression. The patients were grouped according to AJCC staging, histological type of the primary tumor, progression, and survival rate. Analysis of HLA class I alleles revealed positive association of HLA-C*14 (Pc = 0.026, OR = 5.99) and negative association of HLA-C*02 (Pc = 0.026, OR = 0.43) with the disease. Decreased frequency of KIR2DS5 was observed in patients with rapid progression, as compared to those with slow progression. KIR BB genotype was prevalent in patients with metastasis (p = 0.004, OR = 0.025). KIR AA genotype was nearly twice as frequent in rapidly progressive cases, but without statistical relevance (p = 0.055, OR = 2.6). Significantly increased frequency of KIR2DL2 in the presence of C1 ligand (strong inhibition) was found in patients with AJCC III and IV, as compared to individuals with AJCC I stage (p = 0.045, OR = 1.93). In summary, our data imply that KIR/ligand gene content in patients could modulate the disease course towards unfavorable tumor behavior.

  20. Use of the NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Examination as a progress test in the preclerkship curriculum of a new medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Teresa R; Khalil, Mohammed K; Peppler, Richard D; Davey, Diane D; Kibble, Jonathan D

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we describe the innovative use of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (CBSE) as a progress test during the preclerkship medical curriculum. The main aim of this study was to provide external validation of internally developed multiple-choice assessments in a new medical school. The CBSE is a practice exam for the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and is purchased directly from the NBME. We administered the CBSE five times during the first 2 yr of medical school. Student scores were compared with scores on newly created internal summative exams and to the USMLE Step 1. Significant correlations were observed between almost all our internal exams and CBSE scores over time as well as with USMLE Step 1 scores. The strength of correlations of internal exams to the CBSE and USMLE Step 1 broadly increased over time during the curriculum. Student scores on courses that have strong emphasis on physiology and pathophysiology correlated particularly well with USMLE Step 1 scores. Student progress, as measured by the CBSE, was found to be linear across time, and test performance fell behind the anticipated level by the end of the formal curriculum. These findings are discussed with respect to student learning behaviors. In conclusion, the CBSE was found to have good utility as a progress test and provided external validation of our new internally developed multiple-choice assessments. The data also provide performance benchmarks both for our future students to formatively assess their own progress and for other medical schools to compare learning progression patterns in different curricular models. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  1. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program: Analytical methods development. Progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this task are to develop and document extraction and analysis methods for organics in waste tanks, and to extend these methods to the analysis of actual core samples to support the Waste Tank organic Safety Program. This report documents progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (a) during FY 1994 on methods development, the analysis of waste from Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) and T-111, and the transfer of documented, developed analytical methods to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) and 222-S laboratory. This report is intended as an annual report, not a completed work.

  2. Men's shoes and knee joint torques relevant to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, D Casey; Karvosky, Mark E; Lelas, Jennifer L; Riley, Patrick O

    2003-03-01

    To determine if men's dress shoes and sneakers increase knee joint torques and play the same role in the development and/or progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) as women's high-heeled dress shoes. Three-dimensional data regarding lower extremity torques and motion were collected during walking in 22 healthy men while (1) wearing dress shoes, (2) wearing sneakers, and (3) barefoot. Data were plotted and qualitatively compared; major peak values were statistically compared between conditions. The external knee varus torque in early stance was slightly greater with the dress shoes and sneakers, but this slight increase can be explained by the faster walking speed with shoes. No significant increases were found in any other of the sagittal, coronal, or transverse knee torques when walking with dress shoes and sneakers compared to barefoot. Men's dress shoes and sneakers do not significantly affect knee joint torques that may have relevance to the development and/or progression of knee OA.

  3. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2007-03-23

    This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

  4. SLAC physicists develop test for string theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Yajnik, Juhi

    2006-01-01

    "Under certain conditions, string theory solves many of the questions wracking the minds of physicists, but until recently it had one major flaw - it could not be tested. SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) scientists have found a way to test this revolutionary theory, which posits that there are 10 or 11 dimensions in our universe" (1 page)

  5. Complex Regression Functional And Load Tests Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Andreevich Krasnopevtsev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes practical approaches for realization of automatized regression functional and load testing on random software-hardware complex, based on «MARSh 3.0» sample. Testing automatization is being realized for «MARSh 3.0» information security increase.

  6. Drivers of inequality in Millennium Development Goal progress: a statistical analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stuckler

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many low- and middle-income countries are not on track to reach the public health targets set out in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. We evaluated whether differential progress towards health MDGs was associated with economic development, public health funding (both overall and as percentage of available domestic funds, or health system infrastructure. We also examined the impact of joint epidemics of HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, which may limit the ability of households to address child mortality and increase risks of infectious diseases.We calculated each country's distance from its MDG goals for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and infant and child mortality targets for the year 2005 using the United Nations MDG database for 227 countries from 1990 to the present. We studied the association of economic development (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita in purchasing-power-parity, the relative priority placed on health (health spending as a percentage of GDP, real health spending (health system expenditures in purchasing-power-parity, HIV/AIDS burden (prevalence rates among ages 15-49 y, and NCD burden (age-standardised chronic disease mortality rates, with measures of distance from attainment of health MDGs. To avoid spurious correlations that may exist simply because countries with high disease burdens would be expected to have low MDG progress, and to adjust for potential confounding arising from differences in countries' initial disease burdens, we analysed the variations in rates of change in MDG progress versus expected rates for each country. While economic development, health priority, health spending, and health infrastructure did not explain more than one-fifth of the differences in progress to health MDGs among countries, burdens of HIV and NCDs explained more than half of between-country inequalities in child mortality progress (R(2-infant mortality = 0.57, R(2-under 5 mortality = 0.54. HIV/AIDS and NCD burdens were

  7. Drivers of inequality in Millennium Development Goal progress: a statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin

    2010-03-02

    Many low- and middle-income countries are not on track to reach the public health targets set out in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We evaluated whether differential progress towards health MDGs was associated with economic development, public health funding (both overall and as percentage of available domestic funds), or health system infrastructure. We also examined the impact of joint epidemics of HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which may limit the ability of households to address child mortality and increase risks of infectious diseases. We calculated each country's distance from its MDG goals for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and infant and child mortality targets for the year 2005 using the United Nations MDG database for 227 countries from 1990 to the present. We studied the association of economic development (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita in purchasing-power-parity), the relative priority placed on health (health spending as a percentage of GDP), real health spending (health system expenditures in purchasing-power-parity), HIV/AIDS burden (prevalence rates among ages 15-49 y), and NCD burden (age-standardised chronic disease mortality rates), with measures of distance from attainment of health MDGs. To avoid spurious correlations that may exist simply because countries with high disease burdens would be expected to have low MDG progress, and to adjust for potential confounding arising from differences in countries' initial disease burdens, we analysed the variations in rates of change in MDG progress versus expected rates for each country. While economic development, health priority, health spending, and health infrastructure did not explain more than one-fifth of the differences in progress to health MDGs among countries, burdens of HIV and NCDs explained more than half of between-country inequalities in child mortality progress (R(2)-infant mortality = 0.57, R(2)-under 5 mortality = 0.54). HIV/AIDS and NCD burdens were also

  8. Developments in Molecular Testing and Biosimilars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckworth-Prejsnar, Katy; Nardi, Elizabeth A; Lentz, Lisa Korin; Crawford, Jeffrey A; Fitzgerald, C Lyn; Carlson, Robert W

    2017-06-01

    Molecular testing and biosimilars offer the potential for increased access to targeted treatment options and reduction in healthcare costs, but come with significant challenges in ensuring patient access to innovation in cancer care while maintaining safe, effective, ethical, and affordable treatment options. As providers, payers, patients, and the larger healthcare systems become inundated with a wide variety of molecular diagnostics and an increased number of biosimilars coming to market, it will be important to understand regulatory guidance and policy implications relating to the appropriateness of molecular testing and the clinical use of biosimilars in cancer care. In September 2016, NCCN hosted the Molecular Testing and Biosimilars Policy Summit to address the challenges, issues, and opportunities in both the molecular testing and biosimilar landscapes. Keynote presentations and panelists further discussed the status and future of molecular testing and biosimilars within the oncology space, as well as patient access and education needs moving forward. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  9. RTS,S malaria vaccine development: progress and considerations for postapproval introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Asante KP; Adjei G; Enuameh Y; Owusu-Agyei S

    2016-01-01

    Kwaku Poku Asante, George Adjei, Yeetey Enuameh, Seth Owusu-Agyei Kintampo Health Research Centre, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana Abstract: Though the burden of malaria has decreased in the last decade in some sub-Saharan African countries, it is still high in others, and there is no malaria vaccine in use. The development of malaria vaccines in combination with current control programs could be effective in reducing the malaria burden. In this paper, we review and discuss the progress ...

  10. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reduce Progression of Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease but Develop Wilms’ Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Cristina Caldas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effect of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs on the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we sought to assess whether treatment with iPSs retards progression of CKD when compared with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. Untreated 5/6 nephrectomized rats were compared with CKD animals receiving BMSCs or iPSs. Renal function, histology, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression were studied. Implanted iPSs were tracked by the SRY gene expression analysis. Both treatments minimized elevation in serum creatinine, significantly improved clearance, and slowed down progression of disease. The proteinuria was reduced only in the iPS group. Both treatments reduced glomerulosclerosis, iPSs decreased macrophage infiltration, and TGF-β was reduced in kidneys from the BMSC group. Both types of treatments increased VEGF gene expression, TGF-β was upregulated only in the iPS group, and IL-10 had low expression in both groups. The SRY gene was found in 5/8 rats treated with iPSs. These 5 animals presented tumors with histology and cells highly staining positive for PCNA and Wilms’ tumor protein antibody characteristics of Wilms’ tumor. These results suggest that iPSs may be efficient to retard progression of CKD but carry the risk of Wilms’ tumor development.

  11. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  12. Late-Onset Development of Eyelid Ptosis in Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia: A 30-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Jennifer; Thyparampil, Preeti J; Yen, Michael T

    2016-02-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a mitochondrial myopathy with slowly progressive, often symmetric blepharoptosis and limitation of ocular motility in all directions of gaze. The authors present an unusual case of CPEO that initially presented with the unique features of markedly asymmetric facial weakness and the lack of blepharoptosis. However, over the subsequent three decades, the patient developed progressive facial and eyelid dysfunction more consistent with a classical description of CPEO. The authors present the 30-year progression of this patient to emphasise the chronic and progressive nature of the condition.

  13. Review of progresses on clinical applications of ion selective electrodes for electrolytic ion tests: from conventional ISEs to graphene-based ISEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongguo Yan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There exist several positively and negatively charged electrolytes or ions in human blood, urine, and other body fluids. Tests that measure the concentration of these ions in clinics are performed using a more affordable, portable, and disposable potentiometric sensing method with few sample volumes, which requires the use of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs and reference electrodes. This review summarily descriptively presents progressive developments and applications of ion selective electrodes in medical laboratory electrolytic ion tests, from conventional ISEs, solid-contact ISEs, carbon nanotube based ISEs, to graphene-based ISEs.

  14. Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. D.; Lepman, S. R.; Leung, K. N.; Phillips, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described as well as the structure of the database.

  15. Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.; Leung, K.; Phillips, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described here. Appendices describe the structure of the database in detail.

  16. Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area FY 1999 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D K; Eaton, G F; Rose, T P; Moran, J E; Brachmann, A; McAninch, J E; Kersting, A B; Romanovski, V V; Martinelli, R E; Werner, J K Jr

    2000-07-01

    This report presents the results from fiscal year (FY) 1999 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) work-for-others project. This report is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL to document the migration of radionuclides and controls of radionuclide movement at the Nevada Test Site. The FY 1999 studies highlighted in this report are: (1) Chapter 1 provides the results from flow-through leaching of nuclear melt glasses at 25 C and near-neutral pH using dilute bicarbonate groundwaters. (2) Chapter 2 reports on a summary of the size and concentration of colloidal material in NTS groundwaters. (3) Chapter 3 discusses the collaboration between LLNL/ANCD (Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division) and the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) to develop a technique for analyzing NTS groundwater for 99-Technicium ({sup 99}Tc) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Since {sup 99}Tc is conservative like tritium in groundwater systems, and is not sorbed to geologic material, it has the potential for being an important tool for radionuclide migration studies. (4) Chapter 4 presents the results of secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements of the in-situ distribution of radionuclides in zeolitized tuffs from cores taken adjacent to nuclear test cavities and chimneys. In-situ measurements provide insight to the distribution of specific radionuclides on a micro-scale, mineralogical controls of radionuclide sorption, and identification of migration pathways (i.e., matrix diffusion, fractures). (5) Chapter 5 outlines new analytical techniques developed in LLNL/ANCD to study hydrologic problems at the NTS using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With costs for thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) increasing relative to sample preparation time and facility support, ICP-MS technology

  17. Retrieval process development and enhancements project Fiscal year 1995: Simulant development technology task progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golcar, G.R.; Bontha, J.R.; Darab, J.G. [and others

    1997-01-01

    The mission of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) project is to develop an understanding of retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, gather data on these technologies, and relate the data to specific tank problems such that end-users have the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. The development of waste simulants is an integral part of this effort. The work of the RPD&E simulant-development task is described in this document. The key FY95 accomplishments of the RPD&E simulant-development task are summarized below.

  18. Measurability of Social Development. Reflections on the Applicability of Social Progress Indices with Reference to Brexit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanyos János

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The question is how the global and local economic actors’ innovation-based local social and environmental objectives and results can modify the social cohesion strategies, how the disparities in economic and social development can be measured and evaluated at regional level in addition to a comparison across countries. We have seen that any one indicator in itself is not enough since it does not provide sufficient explanation for either the development disparities or their reasons. Anyway, in addition to GDP per capita, it is worth applying - and it is important to apply - such indicators as SPI and Well-Being, and various indices of social progress.

  19. Severity score system for progressive myelopathy: development and validation of a new clinical scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilhos, R.M.; Blank, D.; Netto, C.B.O.; Souza, C.F.M.; Fernandes, L.N.T.; Schwartz, I.V.D.; Giugliani, R.; Jardim, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Progressive myelopathies can be secondary to inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) such as mucopolysaccharidosis, mucolipidosis, and adrenomyeloneuropathy. The available scale, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, was validated only for degenerative vertebral diseases. Our objective is to propose and validate a new scale addressing progressive myelopathies and to present validating data for JOA in these diseases. A new scale, Severity Score System for Progressive Myelopathy (SSPROM), was constructed covering motor disability, sphincter dysfunction, spasticity, and sensory losses. Inter-and intra-rater reliabilities were measured. External validation was tested by applying JOA, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), the Barthel index, and the Osame Motor Disability Score. Thirty-eight patients, 17 with adrenomyeloneuropathy, 3 with mucopolysaccharidosis I, 3 with mucopolysaccharidosis IV, 2 with mucopolysaccharidosis VI, 2 with mucolipidosis, and 11 with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy participated in the study. The mean ± SD SSPROM and JOA scores were 74.6 ± 11.4 and 12.4 ± 2.3, respectively. Construct validity for SSPROM (JOA: r = 0.84, P myelopathies. PMID:22570090

  20. Querschnittevaluation des Medizinischen Curriculums München (MeCuM mit Hilfe des Progress Tests Medizin (PTM [Using the Progress Test Medizin (PTM for evaluation of the Medical Curriculum Munich (MeCuM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reincke, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: The Medical Curriculum Munich (MeCuM has been implemented since 2004 and was completely established in 2007. In this study the clinical part of MeCuM was evaluated with respect to retention of the knowledge in internal medicine (learning objectives of the 6th/7th semester. Methods: In summer of 2009 and winter of 2009/2010 1065 students participated in the Progress Test Medizin (PTM from Charité Medical School Berlin. Additionally the students answered a questionnaire regarding the acceptance and rating of the progress test and basic demographic data. Results: The knowledge of internal medicine continuously increases during the clinical part of the medical curriculum in Munich. However, significant differences between the sub-disciplines of internal medicine could be observed. The overall acceptance of the PTM was high and increased further with the study progress. Interestingly, practical experiences like clinical clerkships positively influenced the test score. Conclusions: The PTM is a useful tool for the evaluation of knowledge retention in a specific curriculum. [german] Zielsetzung: Das Medizinische Curriculum München (MeCuM wurde seit 2004 implementiert. Seit 2007 ist MeCuM im klinischen Studienabschnitt voll etabliert (Ende der Übergangsregelungen. Aktuell sollte MeCuM bezüglich der Nachhaltigkeit des im Modul 2 „Konservative Medizin“ (6./7. Semester vermittelten Wissens evaluiert werden.Methodik: Im Sommersemester 2009 und Wintersemester 2009/2010 absolvierten 1065 Studierende den Progress Test Medizin (PTM. Zusätzlich beantworteten die Studierenden einen Fragebogen zur Akzeptanz und Bewertung des PTM sowie zu demographischen Basisdaten.Ergebnisse: Das Wissen „Konservative Medizin“ nimmt im klinischen Studienabschnitt kontinuierlich zu, wobei sich deutliche Unterschiede in den internistischen Subdisziplinen zeigen. Die Akzeptanz des PTM ist sehr hoch und nimmt im Studienverlauf zu. Praktische Erfahrungen

  1. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, September 23, 1976--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This report presents the results of work performed from September 23, 1976 through December 31, 1976 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the affect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed.

  2. Development of a low-noise 10 K J-T refrigeration system. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, W.A.

    1990-02-15

    This report summarizes work done on the development of a low noise Joule-Thomson, microminiature refrigeration system design for 10K operation. Good progress has been made on the compressor and on the waterknife to be used for the fabrication of the refrigerators. Work on the refrigerator itself is progressing well. Difficulties which had been experienced previously resulting in the warming of the nitrogen stage precooler appear to be due to inefficiency of the final stage laminar flow heat exchanger. This inefficiency is strongly dependent upon the mass flow through this stage, and difficulty in controlling this to the required precision caused the wide range of variations in the performance of otherwise similar coolers.

  3. Developing E-Governance in the Eurasian Economic Union: Progress, Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Vidiasova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available he article provides an overview of e-governance development in the members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU. There is a lack of integrated research on e-governance in the EEU countries, although given the strengthening of this regional bloc, new information and communication technologies (ICT could serve as significant growth driver. Given the history and specifics of regional cooperation in the post-Soviet space and international best practices in ICT use in regional blocs, this article reviews the development of e-governance in the EEU members The research methodology was based on a three-stage concept of regionalism [Van Langenhov, Coste, 2005]. The study examines three key components: progress in developing e-governance, barriers to that development and future prospects. It used qualitative and quantitative methods. Data sources included the results of the United Nations E-Government rating, EEU countries’ regulations based on 3,200 documents and the authors’ expert survey, in which 18 experts (12 EEU representatives and six international experts participated. The study revealed the progress made by EEU countries in improving technological development and reducing human capital development indicators. The survey identified key barriers to e-governance development in the EEU: low motivation and information technology skills among civil servants, and citizens’ low computer literacy. The analysis of EEU members’ national economic priorities revealed a common focus on ICT development. The authors concluded that prospects for e-governance in the EEU were associated with strengthening regional cooperation in standardizing information systems, implementing one-stop-shop services, managing electronic documents and expanding online services. The authors presented two areas for developing e-governance within the EEU. The first is external integration, which, if strengthened, would affect the economy positivelyand optimize business processes

  4. THE PROGRESS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN INDONESIA A COMPARISON OF SOCIAL ECONOMIC INDICATORS BETWEEN REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Akyuwen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Global awareness and concept on the environmental friendly development has been emerged since early 1970s. However, the progress on its implementation was varied across countries. In Indonesia, sustainable development indicators have been studied and published by the Central Statistics Board (BPS since 2002. Based on the recommendation of the United Na-tions Commission on Sustainable Development, those indicators were classified into two groups, i.e. environment indicators and social economic indicators. This paper is aimed to compare the progress of social economic indicators among provinces in Indonesia by using descriptive ap-proach. Observed indicators were including population, per capita gross domestic product (GDP, open unemployment, poverty, energy consumption, transportation, and agriculture. In addition, regional fiscal capacity and human development index among provinces were also analyzed. Although the fund transfer from central to local governments has increased signifi-cantly since the implementation of local autonomy and fiscal decentralization in 2001, however, in general, the improvement of social economic indicators were varied between provinces. Sev-eral provinces with high fiscal capacity were not able to improve its social economic indicators significantly. On the contrary, the other provinces with low fiscal capacity have achieved better social economic indicators. This phenomenon has proved the importance of having appropriate capability in managing local economic development.

  5. Google Charts Testing | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Google Charts Testing. The following item is a demo of Google GeoChart. Please note that geo chart can only recognize country name or city name rather than location or address (that is google my map's expertise). Additionally, Geo chart does support title and legend. To render geo chart properly, please get a ...

  6. DTU PMU Laboratory Development - Testing and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Yang, Guang-Ya; Martin, Kenneth E.

    2010-01-01

    . In a nutshell, having 2 PMUs that observe same signals provides validation of the operation and flags questionable results with more certainty. Moreover, the performance and accuracy of the DTU-PMU is tested acquiring good and precise results, when compared with a commercial phasor measurement device, PMU-1....

  7. National SCADA Test Bed: FY05 Progress on Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Erik J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Networked Systems Survivability and Assurance; Michalski, John M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Networked Systems Survivability and Assurance; Van Leeuwen, Brian P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Networked Systems Survivability and Assurance

    2006-07-01

    This document provides the status of the Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE) under development at Sandia National Laboratories. This development effort is funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program. Specifically the document presents a Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and software interface capability that supports the analysis of Process Control Systems (PCS) used in critical infrastructures. This document describes the development activities performed through June 2006 and the current status of the VCSE development task. Initial activities performed by the development team included researching the needs of critical infrastructure systems that depend on PCS. A primary source describing the security needs of a critical infrastructure is the Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector. A literature search of PCS analysis tools was performed and we identified a void in system-wide PCS M&S capability. No existing tools provide a capability to simulate control system devices and the underlying supporting communication network. The design team identified the requirements for an analysis tool to fill this void. Since PCS are comprised of multiple subsystems, an analysis framework that is modular was selected for the VCSE. The need for a framework to support the interoperability of multiple simulators with a PCS device model library was identified. The framework supports emulation of a system that is represented by models in a simulation interacting with actual hardware via a System-in-the-Loop (SITL) interface. To identify specific features for the VCSE analysis tool the design team created a questionnaire that briefly described the range of potential capabilities the analysis tool could include and requested feedback from potential industry users. This initial industry outreach was also intended to identify several industry users that are willing to participate in a dialog through the development process so that

  8. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  9. Using Rasch models to develop and validate an environmental thinking learning progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Martell, Erin A.

    Environmental understanding is highly relevant in today's global society. Social, economic, and political structures are connected to the state of environmental degradation and exploitation, and disproportionately affect those in poor or urban communities (Brulle & Pellow, 2006; Executive Order No. 12898, 1994). Environmental education must challenge the way we live, and our social and ecological quality of life, with the goal of responsible action. The development of a learning progression in environmental thinking, along with a corresponding assessment, could provide a tool that could be used across environmental education programs to help evaluate and guide programmatic decisions. This study sought to determine if a scale could be constructed that allowed individuals to be ordered along a continuum of environmental thinking. First, I developed the Environmental Thinking Learning Progression, a scale of environmental thinking from novice to advanced, based on the current available research and literature. The scale consisted of four subscales, each measuring a different aspect of environmental thinking: place consciousness, human connection, agency, and science concepts. Second, a measurement instrument was developed, so that the data appropriately fit the model using Rasch analysis. A Rasch analysis of the data placed respondents along a continuum, given the range of item difficulty for each subscale. Across three iterations of instrument revision and data collection, findings indicated that the items were ordered in a hierarchical way that corresponded to the construct of environmental thinking. Comparisons between groups showed that the average score of respondents who had participated in environmental education programs was significantly higher than those who had not. A comparison between males and females showed no significant difference in average measure, however, there were varied significant differences between how racial/ethnic groups performed. Overall

  10. Development of an Emotional Intelligence test

    OpenAIRE

    Escurra Mayaute, Luis M.; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Delgado Vásquez, Ana E.; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Quesada Murillo, María Rosario; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Rivera Benavides, José C.; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Santos Islas, Julio; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Rivas Castro, Gerardo; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Pequeña Constantino, Juan; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Under the theoretical framework of Salovey and Moyer a psychometric test has been created to measure Emotional Intelligence. Five domains have been considered for items elaboration: a) Emotional Self-knowledge; b) Emotional Control; c) Self motivation; d) Empathy and e) Interpersonal relations. A randomly sample of 489 first level students was selected from 19 different University Programs which belong to five Academic Areas. The psychometric item analysis permited to take not statistically s...

  11. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the last quarter of the Second Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1994, entitled {open_quotes}Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.{close_quotes} The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particulate control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size.

  12. Adapting the Assessing British Sign Language Development: Receptive Skills Test into American sign language

    OpenAIRE

    Enns, C. J.; Herman, R.

    2011-01-01

    Signed languages continue to be a key element of deaf education programs that incorporate a bilingual approach to teaching and learning. In order to monitor the success of bilingual deaf education programs, and in particular to monitor the progress of children acquiring signed language, it is essential to develop an assessment tool of signed language skills. Although researchers have developed some checklists and experimental tests related to American Sign Language (ASL) assessment, at this t...

  13. Axonal loss and neurofilament phosphorylation changes accompany lesion development and clinical progression in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Lucas; Antel, Jack P; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Neuroaxonal damage and loss are increasingly recognized as disability determining features in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. However, little is known about the long-term sequelae of inflammatory demyelination on neurons and axons. Spinal cord tissue of 31 MS patients was compared to three amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 10 control subjects. MS lesions were staged according to the density of KiM-1P positive macrophages and microglia and the presence of myelin basic protein (MBP) positive phagocytes. T cells were quantified in the parenchyma and meninges. Neuroaxonal changes were studied by immunoreactivity (IR) for amyloid precursor protein (APP) and variably phosphorylated neurofilaments (SMI312, SMI31, SMI32). Little T cell infiltration was still evident in chronic inactive lesions. The loss of SMI32 IR in ventral horn neurons correlated with MS lesion development and disease progression. Similarly, axonal loss in white matter (WM) lesions correlated with disease duration. A selective reduction of axonal phosphorylated neurofilaments (SMI31) was observed in WM lesions. In ALS, the loss of neuronal SMI32 IR was even more pronounced, whereas the relative axonal reduction resembled that found in MS. Progressive neuroaxonal neurofilament alterations in the context of chronic inflammatory demyelination may reflect changes in neuroaxonal metabolism and result in chronic neuroaxonal dysfunction as a putative substrate of clinical progression. © 2011 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2011 International Society of Neuropathology.

  14. Biomedical Progress Rates as New Parameters for Models of Economic Growth in Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Zhavoronkov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available While the doubling of life expectancy in developed countries during the 20th century can be attributed mostly to decreases in child mortality, the trillions of dollars spent on biomedical research by governments, foundations and corporations over the past sixty years are also yielding longevity dividends in both working and retired population. Biomedical progress will likely increase the healthy productive lifespan and the number of years of government support in the old age. In this paper we introduce several new parameters that can be applied to established models of economic growth: the biomedical progress rate, the rate of clinical adoption and the rate of change in retirement age. The biomedical progress rate is comprised of the rejuvenation rate (extending the productive lifespan and the non-rejuvenating rate (extending the lifespan beyond the age at which the net contribution to the economy becomes negative. While staying within the neoclassical economics framework and extending the overlapping generations (OLG growth model and assumptions from the life cycle theory of saving behavior, we provide an example of the relations between these new parameters in the context of demographics, labor, households and the firm.

  15. Biomedical Progress Rates as New Parameters for Models of Economic Growth in Developed Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhavoronkov, Alex; Litovchenko, Maria

    2013-01-01

    While the doubling of life expectancy in developed countries during the 20th century can be attributed mostly to decreases in child mortality, the trillions of dollars spent on biomedical research by governments, foundations and corporations over the past sixty years are also yielding longevity dividends in both working and retired population. Biomedical progress will likely increase the healthy productive lifespan and the number of years of government support in the old age. In this paper we introduce several new parameters that can be applied to established models of economic growth: the biomedical progress rate, the rate of clinical adoption and the rate of change in retirement age. The biomedical progress rate is comprised of the rejuvenation rate (extending the productive lifespan) and the non-rejuvenating rate (extending the lifespan beyond the age at which the net contribution to the economy becomes negative). While staying within the neoclassical economics framework and extending the overlapping generations (OLG) growth model and assumptions from the life cycle theory of saving behavior, we provide an example of the relations between these new parameters in the context of demographics, labor, households and the firm. PMID:24217179

  16. Social, economic, and political factors in progress towards improving child survival in developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykens, Kristine; Singh, Karan P; Ndukwe, Elewichi; Bae, Sejong

    2009-01-01

    Child mortality is a persistent health problem faced by developing nations. In 2000 the United Nations (UN) established a set of high priority goals to address global problems of poverty and health, the Millennium Development Goals, which address extreme poverty, hunger, primary education, child mortality, maternal health, infectious diseases, environmental sustainability, and partnerships for development. Goal 4 aims to reduce by two thirds, between 2000 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate in developing countries. In sub-Saharan Africa from 2000 to 2006 these rates have only been reduced from 167 per 1,000 live births to 157, and 27 nations in this region have made no progress towards the goal. A country-specific database was developed from the UN Millennium Development Goal tracking project and other international sources which include age distribution, under-nutrition, per capita income, government expenditures on health, external resources for health, civil liberties, and political rights. A multiple regression analysis examined the extent to which these factors explain the variance in child mortality rates in developing countries. Nutrition, external resources, and per capita income were shown to be significant factors in child survivability. Policy options include developed countries' renewed commitment of resources, and developing nations' commitments towards governance, development, equity, and transparency.

  17. Using the Progress Test Medizin (PTM) for evaluation of the Medical Curriculum Munich (MeCuM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidmaier, Ralf; Holzer, Matthias; Angstwurm, Matthias; Nouns, Zineb; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    The Medical Curriculum Munich (MeCuM) has been implemented since 2004 and was completely established in 2007. In this study the clinical part of MeCuM was evaluated with respect to retention of the knowledge in internal medicine (learning objectives of the 6th/7th semester). In summer of 2009 and winter of 2009/2010 1065 students participated in the Progress Test Medizin (PTM) from Charité Medical School Berlin. Additionally the students answered a questionnaire regarding the acceptance and rating of the progress test and basic demographic data. The knowledge of internal medicine continuously increases during the clinical part of the medical curriculum in Munich. However, significant differences between the sub-disciplines of internal medicine could be observed. The overall acceptance of the PTM was high and increased further with the study progress. Interestingly, practical experiences like clinical clerkships positively influenced the test score. The PTM is a useful tool for the evaluation of knowledge retention in a specific curriculum.

  18. Developing and testing attitude scales around IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Rod; Glogowska, Margaret; Pollard, Katherine; Moule, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Information technology (IT) is an integral component of the healthcare delivery arsenal. However, not all professionals are happy or comfortable with such technology. To assess professionals' attitudes to IT-use in the workplace, a new questionnaire, the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health (ITASH). which comprises three scales that can be used to measure the attitudes of UK health professionals, has been developed. Here, the authors describe existing scales, why a new scale was required, and how analysing data from a questionnaire using exploratory factor analysis determined the components of the three scales: efficiency of care; education, training and development; and control.

  19. Activation of Notch3 in Glomeruli Promotes the Development of Rapidly Progressive Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Machhour, Fala; Keuylian, Zela; Kavvadas, Panagiotis; Dussaule, Jean-Claude; Chatziantoniou, Christos

    2015-07-01

    Notch3 expression is found in the glomerular podocytes of patients with lupus nephritis or focal segmental GN but not in normal kidneys. Here, we show that activation of the Notch3 receptor in the glomeruli is a turning point inducing phenotypic changes in podocytes promoting renal inflammation and fibrosis and leading to disease progression. In a model of rapidly progressive GN, Notch3 expression was induced by several-fold in podocytes concurrently with disease progression. By contrast, mice lacking Notch3 expression were protected because they exhibited less proteinuria, uremia, and inflammatory infiltration. Podocyte outgrowth from glomeruli isolated from wild-type mice during the early phase of the disease was higher than outgrowth from glomeruli of mice lacking Notch3. In vitro studies confirmed that podocytes expressing active Notch3 reorganize their cytoskeleton toward a proliferative/migratory and inflammatory phenotype. We then administered antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting Notch3 or scramble control oligodeoxynucleotides in wild-type mice concomitant to disease induction. Both groups developed chronic renal disease, but mice injected with Notch3 antisense had lower values of plasma urea and proteinuria and inflammatory infiltration. The improvement of renal function was accompanied by fewer deposits of fibrin within the glomeruli and by decreased peritubular inflammation. Finally, abnormal Notch3 staining was observed in biopsy samples of patients with crescentic GN. These results demonstrate that abnormal activation of Notch3 may be involved in the progression of renal disease by promoting migratory and proinflammatory pathways. Inhibiting Notch3 activation could be a novel, promising approach to treat GN. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Guide to good practices for the development of test items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    While the methodology used in developing test items can vary significantly, to ensure quality examinations, test items should be developed systematically. Test design and development is discussed in the DOE Guide to Good Practices for Design, Development, and Implementation of Examinations. This guide is intended to be a supplement by providing more detailed guidance on the development of specific test items. This guide addresses the development of written examination test items primarily. However, many of the concepts also apply to oral examinations, both in the classroom and on the job. This guide is intended to be used as guidance for the classroom and laboratory instructor or curriculum developer responsible for the construction of individual test items. This document focuses on written test items, but includes information relative to open-reference (open book) examination test items, as well. These test items have been categorized as short-answer, multiple-choice, or essay. Each test item format is described, examples are provided, and a procedure for development is included. The appendices provide examples for writing test items, a test item development form, and examples of various test item formats.

  1. DEVELOPING COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TESTS FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harsono

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Communicative Approach of teaching English in senior high school in Indonesia has been adopted since the implementation of The 1984 Curriculum, but the tests–the communicative language tests–(CL Tests have not been developed and used properly. The objective of the study is to develop CL Tests for senior high school. The procedure of conducting the study consists of three major steps, that is, identifying the objectives, developing the test specification, and developing the CL Tests. The development of the CL Tests in detail consists of fifteen sub-steps from determining what language skills tested, selecting the suitable source materials, up to rewriting the CL Tests to be used as CL Tests alternative for senior high school. The results of the test development reveal that there are fifteen CL Tests consisting of three tests of listening, three reading, three speaking, and three writing tests. The whole tests have construct and content validity, no complete evidence of concurrent validity with report marks and semester test scores, high to very high inter-rater reliability, and no complete practicality.

  2. Testing ARO newsletter | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Using smartphones to improve animal health and food security. A smartphone application developed with IDRC support is helping primary animal health workers in Laos to quickly and accurately answer questions and treat poultry. The app is also helping farmers raise healthier animals and improve their own food security.

  3. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Harris, L J; Hudson, G B; Smith, D K; Williams, R W; Loewen, D R; Nelson, E J; Allen, P G; Ryerson, F J; Pawloski, G A; Laue, C A; Moran, J E

    2003-08-15

    This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work emphasizes the Defense Programs goal of responsible management of natural resources at the NTS, while UGTA-funded work focuses on defining the extent of radionuclide contamination in NTS groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing. The report is organized on a topical basis, and contains eight chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-ANCD in support of HRMP and UGTA. Chapter 1 describes recent hot well sampling efforts at the NTS, and presents the results of chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples from six near-field wells. These include the Cambric (UE-5n), Bilby (U-3cn PS No.2), Bourbon (UE-7nS), Nash (UE-2ce), Tybo/Benham (ER-20-5 No.3), and Almendro (U-19v PS No.1ds) sites. The data generated by the hot well program is vital to the development and validation of contaminant transport models at the NTS. Chapter 2 discusses the results of xenon isotope measurements of groundwater samples from the six near-field wells described in Chapter 1. This work demonstrates that fission xenon is present in the water at levels that are readily measurable and highlights the significant differences in xenon concentrations and isotopic abundances at different sites. These differences provide insight into the early cooling history of nuclear test cavities, and may assist in predicting the distribution of the source term in the near-field environment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the distribution

  4. DRAGON, the Durham real-time, tomographic adaptive optics test bench: progress and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard M.; Morris, Timothy J.; Basden, Alastair G.; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Rolt, Stephen; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Younger, Edward J.

    2014-08-01

    DRAGON is a real-time, tomographic Adaptive Optics test bench currently under development at Durham University. Optical and mechanical design work for DRAGON is now complete, and the system is close to becoming fully operational. DRAGON emulates current 4.2 m and 8 m telescopes, and can also be used to investigate ELT scale issues. The full system features 4 Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wavefront Sensors (WFS), 3 Natural Guide Star (NGS) WFSs and one Truth Sensor, all of which are 31 × 31 sub-aperture Shack-Hartmann WFS. Two Deformable Mirrors (DMs), a Boston MEMS Kilo DM and a Xinetics 97 actuator DM, correct for turbulence induced aberrations and these can be configured to be either open or closed loop of the WFS. A novel method of LGS emulation is implemented which includes the effects of uplink turbulence and elongation in real-time. The atmosphere is emulated by 4 rotating phase screens which can be translated in real-time to replicate altitude evolution of turbulent layers. DRAGON will be used to extensively study tomographic AO algorithms, such as those required for Multi-Object AO. As DRAGON has been designed to be compatible with CANARY, the MOAO demonstrator, results can be compared to those from the CANARY MOAO demonstrator on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. We present here an overview of the current status of DRAGON and some early results, including investigations into the validity of the LGS emulation method.

  5. FY 2014 Annual Progress Report - Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  6. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 2001 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.G. Hoffman; K. Alvar; T. Buhl; E. Foltyn; W. Hansen; B. Erdal; P. Fresquez; D. Lee; B. Reinert

    2002-05-01

    This progress report presents the results of 11 projects funded ($500K) in FY01 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division (ESH). Five projects fit into the Health Physics discipline, 5 projects are environmental science and one is industrial hygiene/safety. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published sixteen papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplement funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and workspace, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Divisions.

  7. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-12-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the VTP program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  8. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Hoffman

    2000-12-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division.

  9. The role of intestinal bacteria in the development and progression of gastrointestinal tract neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mima, Kosuke; Ogino, Shuji; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Sawayama, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Krashima, Ryuichi; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Imai, Katsunori; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Yoshida, Naoya; Chikamoto, Akira; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-12-01

    More than 100 trillion microorganisms inhabit the human intestinal tract and play important roles in health conditions and diseases, including cancer. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that specific bacteria and bacterial dysbiosis in the gastrointestinal tract can potentiate the development and progression of gastrointestinal tract neoplasms by damaging DNA, activating oncogenic signaling pathways, producing tumor-promoting metabolites such as secondary bile acids, and suppressing antitumor immunity. Other bacterial species have been shown to produce short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate, which can suppress inflammation and carcinogenesis in the gastrointestinal tract. Consistent with these lines of evidence, clinical studies using metagenomic analyses have shown associations of specific bacteria and bacterial dysbiosis with gastrointestinal tract cancers, including esophageal, gastric, and colorectal cancers. Emerging data demonstrate that intestinal bacteria can modulate the efficacy of cancer chemotherapies and novel targeted immunotherapies such as anti-CTLA4 and anti-CD274 therapies, the process of absorption, and the occurrence of complications after gastrointestinal surgery. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota influence tumor development and progression in the intestine would provide opportunities to develop new prevention and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal tract cancers by targeting the intestinal microflora. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Detection of acquired deficits in general intelligence using the National Adult Reading Test and Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M D; Bradshaw, C M

    1994-11-01

    A multiple regression equation for estimating premorbid Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (RSPM) scores on the basis of age and the National Adult Reading Test (NART) was derived. A sample of patients with confirmed cerebral lesions was examined to determine the proportion of patients with significant discrepancies between their predicted and obtained RSPM performance. The sensitivity of the procedure was modest (52 per cent), although a comparison with discrepancies between premorbid and current performance on the Wechsler scales indicated that the RSPM was more sensitive to neuropathology. These findings suggest that when NART-intelligence test comparisons are used to diagnose cerebral impairment, the likelihood of a false-negative diagnosis is high.

  11. Psychometric Study of the advanced form of the Raven’s Progressive Matrices Test in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado Vasquez, Ana; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Escurra Mayaute, Luis M.; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Bulnes Bedón, Mario; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Quesada Murillo, María Rosario; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    It is analized the psychometric properties of Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices. The participants were 501 Freshmen students of 5 professional careers of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (U.N.M.S.M.), a public university located at Lima, Perú. The reliability analysis shows that the test is reliable. Also, the construct validity analysis meets the requirements of test making. The norms were elaborated considering the professional careers of the U.N.M.SM. students. It was find ...

  12. POISON RESISTANT CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2001-03-29

    The Alternative Fuels Field Test Unit (AFFTU) is a portable laboratory designed specifically to provide on-site evaluation of potential feedstocks for processes that produce alternative fuels from indigenous raw materials such as coal, natural gas or environmentally disadvantaged carbonaceous feedstocks. Since conversion of these raw materials into feed gas streams can produce a variety of bulk gas compositions, which furthermore can contain a myriad of trace components, it is necessary to evaluate each new feedstock on an individual basis. While it is possible to prepare blended gas mixtures to simulate the bulk composition of a known feedstock, it is neither possible nor cost-effective to simulate adequately the variety of trace chemicals present in that feedstock--some of which may not even be detected by routine analysis. Additionally, the transient composition of the gas during upsets or routine process changes may have an impact on the proposed process that is not foreseen in standard design. To address these concerns, the AFFTU was constructed with the following experimental capabilities: (1) A state-of-the-art gas chromatograph system to perform semi-continuous monitoring of both bulk composition and the concentration of key trace poisons down to one part per billion (ppb). (2) A 30-mL reactor system that can accept up to two feed streams from the customer, allowing a true life test with the actual gas projected for use in the proposed facility. (3) A manifold of four adsorbent beds, located upstream of the reactor, which permits the testing of adsorbents for the removal of contaminants from the feed stream. The effectiveness of these adsorbents may be evaluated either by analysis of the gas upstream and downstream of the bed (or at an intermediate point within the bed) or by observing the impact of the presence or absence of that bed on the actual stability of the catalyst activity. To achieve portability, the AFFTU was constructed in a commercial 48-foot

  13. Testing Software Development Project Productivity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Ilya

    Software development is an increasingly influential factor in today's business environment, and a major issue affecting software development is how an organization estimates projects. If the organization underestimates cost, schedule, and quality requirements, the end results will not meet customer needs. On the other hand, if the organization overestimates these criteria, resources that could have been used more profitably will be wasted. There is no accurate model or measure available that can guide an organization in a quest for software development, with existing estimation models often underestimating software development efforts as much as 500 to 600 percent. To address this issue, existing models usually are calibrated using local data with a small sample size, with resulting estimates not offering improved cost analysis. This study presents a conceptual model for accurately estimating software development, based on an extensive literature review and theoretical analysis based on Sociotechnical Systems (STS) theory. The conceptual model serves as a solution to bridge organizational and technological factors and is validated using an empirical dataset provided by the DoD. Practical implications of this study allow for practitioners to concentrate on specific constructs of interest that provide the best value for the least amount of time. This study outlines key contributing constructs that are unique for Software Size E-SLOC, Man-hours Spent, and Quality of the Product, those constructs having the largest contribution to project productivity. This study discusses customer characteristics and provides a framework for a simplified project analysis for source selection evaluation and audit task reviews for the customers and suppliers. Theoretical contributions of this study provide an initial theory-based hypothesized project productivity model that can be used as a generic overall model across several application domains such as IT, Command and Control

  14. Association between Hemoglobin Concentration and the Progression or Development of Albuminuria in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okada

    Full Text Available Anemia, which might contribute to pathogenesis of kidney dysfunction, is a common finding in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate if hemoglobin concentration is associated with the degree of change in urinary albumin-creatinine ratio or the development of albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes.We measured hemoglobin concentration in 470 (296 men and 174 women consecutive type 2 diabetic patients without albuminuria. We performed a follow-up study to assess the progression or development of albuminuria, the interval of which was 3.0 years. Then we evaluated relationships between hemoglobin concentration and albuminuria, using multivariate linear regression analyses and logistic regression analyses.Eighty four patients developed albuminuria during follow-up duration. In multivariate analyses, hemoglobin concentration was negatively associated with a change in urinary albumin-creatinine ratio in men (ß = -0.259, P = 0.0002 and women (ß = -0.194, P = 0.030. Moreover, multivariate adjusted odds ratio associated with 1 g/L in hemoglobin for the development of albuminuria was 0.93 (95% confidence interval; 0.89-0.96 in men and 0.94 (95% confidence interval; 0.88-0.99 in women, respectively. And, multivariate analyses revealed that adjusted odds ratios for the development of albuminuria were 4.78 (95% confidence interval; 1.65-13.91 in men and 4.62 (95% confidence interval; 1.34-16.68 in women with anemia (hemoglobin < 130 g/L for men and < 120 g/L for women, which were higher than those without anemia.Low hemoglobin concentration could be a predictor for the progression and development of albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  15. An exploratory study into the effect of time-restricted internet access on face-validity, construct validity and reliability of postgraduate knowledge progress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksterhuis, Marja G K; Jozwiak, Izabela; Braat, Didi D M; Scheele, Fedde

    2013-11-06

    Yearly formative knowledge testing (also known as progress testing) was shown to have a limited construct-validity and reliability in postgraduate medical education. One way to improve construct-validity and reliability is to improve the authenticity of a test. As easily accessible internet has become inseparably linked to daily clinical practice, we hypothesized that allowing internet access for a limited amount of time during the progress test would improve the perception of authenticity (face-validity) of the test, which would in turn improve the construct-validity and reliability of postgraduate progress testing. Postgraduate trainees taking the yearly knowledge progress test were asked to participate in a study where they could access the internet for 30 minutes at the end of a traditional pen and paper test. Before and after the test they were asked to complete a short questionnaire regarding the face-validity of the test. Mean test scores increased significantly for all training years. Trainees indicated that the face-validity of the test improved with internet access and that they would like to continue to have internet access during future testing. Internet access did not improve the construct-validity or reliability of the test. Improving the face-validity of postgraduate progress testing, by adding the possibility to search the internet for a limited amount of time, positively influences test performance and face-validity. However, it did not change the reliability or the construct-validity of the test.

  16. An exploratory study into the effect of time-restricted internet access on face-validity, construct validity and reliability of postgraduate knowledge progress testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Yearly formative knowledge testing (also known as progress testing) was shown to have a limited construct-validity and reliability in postgraduate medical education. One way to improve construct-validity and reliability is to improve the authenticity of a test. As easily accessible internet has become inseparably linked to daily clinical practice, we hypothesized that allowing internet access for a limited amount of time during the progress test would improve the perception of authenticity (face-validity) of the test, which would in turn improve the construct-validity and reliability of postgraduate progress testing. Methods Postgraduate trainees taking the yearly knowledge progress test were asked to participate in a study where they could access the internet for 30 minutes at the end of a traditional pen and paper test. Before and after the test they were asked to complete a short questionnaire regarding the face-validity of the test. Results Mean test scores increased significantly for all training years. Trainees indicated that the face-validity of the test improved with internet access and that they would like to continue to have internet access during future testing. Internet access did not improve the construct-validity or reliability of the test. Conclusion Improving the face-validity of postgraduate progress testing, by adding the possibility to search the internet for a limited amount of time, positively influences test performance and face-validity. However, it did not change the reliability or the construct-validity of the test. PMID:24195696

  17. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 5, for period October 1 - December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Dr., Donald L.

    1981-01-15

    Progress is reported in the peat biogasification development program. The objective of the research is to compile the necessary data for the design and operation of a peat anaerobic digestion process development unit. Five areas are addressed: pretreatment information; anaerobic digestion; evaluation of waste streams; process model development and economic analysis; and planning for the process development unit. During the reporting period extensive data was taken for the development of the predictive process model. A number of batch and continuous pretreatment experiments were completed and analyzed. The four samples being analyzed through solvent extration were completed, and the results are presented. Work on High Pressure Liquid Chromatography continued, and the development of the gradient elution solvent system was completed with encouraging results. Pretreated peat has been batch fermented; the continuously oxidized peat has shown conversions of close to 30%. This is significantly higher than the conversions for the batch oxidized peat. Continuous digesters have been in operation for approximately one month. Development of a predictive process model for the three phases of peat biogasification, solubilization, oxidation, and fermentation, continued with very good results. The models for solubilization and oxidation were developed and experimental data are being gathered for the fermentation phase of the process model. (DMC)

  18. Process development studies on the bioconversion of cellulose and production of ethanol. Progress report, September 1, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, C.R.

    1978-09-01

    Progress is reported in studies on the pretreatment of cellulosic materials to facilitate enzymatic hydrolysis, sulfuric acid hydrolysis, investigation of the Purdue processing scheme including an economic analysis, and the fermentability of the enzymatic hydrolyzate. Progress is also reported on enzyme fermentation studies, hydrolysis reactor development, and utilization of hemicellulose sugars. (JSR)

  19. Severity score system for progressive myelopathy: development and validation of a new clinical scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Castilhos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Progressive myelopathies can be secondary to inborn errors of metabolism (IEM such as mucopolysaccharidosis, mucolipidosis, and adrenomyeloneuropathy. The available scale, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA score, was validated only for degenerative vertebral diseases. Our objective is to propose and validate a new scale addressing progressive myelopathies and to present validating data for JOA in these diseases. A new scale, Severity Score System for Progressive Myelopathy (SSPROM, covering motor disability, sphincter dysfunction, spasticity, and sensory losses. Inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were measured. External validation was tested by applying JOA, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS, the Barthel index, and the Osame Motor Disability Score. Thirty-eight patients, 17 with adrenomyeloneuropathy, 3 with mucopolysaccharidosis I, 3 with mucopolysaccharidosis IV, 2 with mucopolysaccharidosis VI, 2 with mucolipidosis, and 11 with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1-associated myelopathy participated in the study. The mean ± SD SSPROM and JOA scores were 74.6 ± 11.4 and 12.4 ± 2.3, respectively. Construct validity for SSPROM (JOA: r = 0.84, P < 0.0001; EDSS: r = -0.83, P < 0.0001; Barthel: r = 0.56, P < 0.002; Osame: r = -0.94, P < 0.0001 and reliability (intra-rater: r = 0.83, P < 0.0001; inter-rater: r = 0.94, P < 0.0001 were demonstrated. The metric properties of JOA were similar to those found in SSPROM. Several clinimetric requirements were met for both SSPROM and JOA scales. Since SSPROM has a wider range, it should be useful for follow-up studies on IEM myelopathies.

  20. The Role of DNA Methylation in the Development and Progression of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Kerr

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, caused by smoking in ∼87% of cases, is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and Western Europe. Adenocarcinoma is now the most common type of lung cancer in men and women in the United States, and the histological subtype most frequently seen in never-smokers and former smokers. The increasing frequency of adenocarcinoma, which occurs more peripherally in the lung, is thought to be at least partially related to modifications in cigarette manufacturing that have led to a change in the depth of smoke inhalation. The rising incidence of lung adenocarcinoma and its lethal nature underline the importance of understanding the development and progression of this disease. Alterations in DNA methylation are recognized as key epigenetic changes in cancer, contributing to chromosomal instability through global hypomethylation, and aberrant gene expression through alterations in the methylation levels at promoter CpG islands. The identification of sequential changes in DNA methylation during progression and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma, and the elucidation of their interplay with genetic changes, will broaden our molecular understanding of this disease, providing insights that may be applicable to the development of targeted drugs, as well as powerful markers for early detection and patient classification.

  1. Progress and Challenges in the Design and Clinical Development of Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Almagro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable progress in engineering and clinical development of therapeutic antibodies in the last 40 years, after the seminal work by Köhler and Milstein, has led to the approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA of 21 antibodies for cancer immunotherapy. We review here these approved antibodies, with emphasis on the methods used for their discovery, engineering, and optimization for therapeutic settings. These methods include antibody engineering via chimerization and humanization of non-human antibodies, as well as selection and further optimization of fully human antibodies isolated from human antibody phage-displayed libraries and immunization of transgenic mice capable of generating human antibodies. These technology platforms have progressively led to the development of therapeutic antibodies with higher human content and, thus, less immunogenicity. We also discuss the genetic engineering approaches that have allowed isotype switching and Fc modifications to modulate effector functions and bioavailability (half-life, which together with the technologies for engineering the Fv fragment, have been pivotal in generating more efficacious and better tolerated therapeutic antibodies to treat cancer.

  2. Chemokines in Cancer Development and Progression and Their Potential as Targeting Molecules for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Mukaida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines were initially identified as bioactive substances, which control the trafficking of inflammatory cells including granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Moreover, chemokines have profound impacts on other types of cells associated with inflammatory responses, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. These observations would implicate chemokines as master regulators in various inflammatory responses. Subsequent studies have further revealed that chemokines can regulate the movement of a wide variety of immune cells including lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells in both physiological and pathological conditions. These features endow chemokines with crucial roles in immune responses. Furthermore, increasing evidence points to the vital effects of several chemokines on the proliferative and invasive properties of cancer cells. It is widely acknowledged that cancer develops and progresses to invade and metastasize in continuous interaction with noncancerous cells present in cancer tissues, such as macrophages, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. The capacity of chemokines to regulate both cancerous and noncancerous cells highlights their crucial roles in cancer development and progression. Here, we will discuss the roles of chemokines in carcinogenesis and the possibility of chemokine targeting therapy for the treatment of cancer.

  3. CUTIN SYNTHASE 2 Maintains Progressively Developing Cuticular Ridges in Arabidopsis Sepals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lilan; Brown, Joel; Segerson, Nicholas A; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2017-04-03

    The cuticle is a crucial barrier on the aerial surfaces of land plants. In many plants, including Arabidopsis, the sepals and petals form distinctive nanoridges in their cuticles. However, little is known about how the formation and maintenance of these nanostructures is coordinated with the growth and development of the underlying cells. Here we report the characterization of the Arabidopsis cutin synthase 2 (cus2) mutant, which causes a great reduction in cuticular ridges on the mature sepal epidermis, but only a moderate effect on petal cone cell ridges. Using scanning electron microscopy and confocal live imaging combined with quantification of cellular growth, we find that cuticular ridge formation progresses down the sepal from tip to base as the sepal grows. pCUS2::GFP-GUS reporter expression coincides with cuticular ridge formation, descending the sepal from tip to base. Ridge formation also coincides with the reduction in growth rate and termination of cell division of the underlying epidermal cells. Surprisingly, cuticular ridges at first form normally in the cus2 mutant, but are lost progressively at later stages of sepal development, indicating that CUS2 is crucial for the maintenance of cuticular ridges after they are formed. Our results reveal the dynamics of both ridge formation and maintenance as the sepal grows. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RAGE-Aptamer Blocks the Development and Progression of Experimental Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takanori; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Nishino, Yuri; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) plays a central role in diabetic nephropathy. We screened DNA aptamers directed against RAGE (RAGE-aptamers) in vitro and examined the effects on the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. RAGE-aptamer bound to RAGE with a K d of 5.68 nmol/L and resultantly blocked the binding of AGEs to RAGE. When diabetic rats received continuous intraperitoneal injection of RAGE-aptamer from week 7 to 11 of diabetes, the increases in renal NADPH oxidase activity, oxidative stress generation, AGE, RAGE, inflammatory and fibrotic gene and protein levels, macrophage and extracellular matrix accumulation, and albuminuria were significantly suppressed, which were associated with improvement of podocyte damage. Two-week infusion of RAGE-aptamer just after the induction of diabetes also inhibited the AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress system and MCP-1 levels in the kidneys of 8-week-old diabetic rats and simultaneously ameliorated podocyte injury and albuminuria. Moreover, RAGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the AGE-induced oxidative stress generation and inflammatory and fibrotic reactions in human cultured mesangial cells. The findings suggest that continuous infusion of RAGE-aptamer could attenuate the development and progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the AGE-RAGE axis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Plurality in understandings of innovation, sociotechnical progress and sustainable development: An analysis of OECD expert narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaget, Paulo; Acero, Liliana

    2017-03-01

    Deterministic theory and discourse on sociotechnical progress ignore the existence of multiple and equally viable pathways towards progress, obscure socioeconomic and environmental conflicting interests and values, and overshadow socially inclusive deliberative choices about policy strategies. Demystifying techno-determinism, by incorporating a plurality of understandings to policy appraisal, becomes a matter of not only democratic accountability but also of analytical rigour. This article analyses the normative and ontological understandings on scientific and technological pathways among a group of experts interviewed at one key Directorate of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, using Q-methodology. The three main framings detected do not correspond exclusively to any single innovation and development theoretical framework - namely Innovation Systems, Learning Systems, Catch-Up models or the science, technology and society approach. Each narrative organizes an array of policy understandings based upon different theories and practices. As these forms of discourse highly influence global policy recommendations, their plurality should be made explicit, negotiated and integrated into policymaking.

  6. Expression of transforming growth factor β1 promotes cholangiocarcinoma development and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Aihara, Arihiro; Iwagami, Yoshifumi; Yu, Tunan; Carlson, Rolf; Koga, Hironori; Kim, Miran; Zou, Jing; Casulli, Sarah; Wands, Jack R

    2016-09-28

    The role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) initiation and growth requires further definition. We employed pharmacological and genetic approaches to inhibit or enhance TGFβ1 signaling, respectively, and determine the cellular mechanisms involved. It was observed that inhibiting TGFβ1 activity with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or pharmaceutical agents suppressed CCA development and growth, whereas overexpression of TGFβ1 enhanced CCA tumor size and promoted intrahepatic metastasis in a rat model. Suppression of TGFβ1 activity inhibits downstream target gene expression mediated by miR-34a that includes cyclin D1, CDK6, and c-Met. In addition, "knockdown" of TGFβ1 expression revealed a miR-34a positive feedback mechanism for enhanced p21 expression in CCAs. A miR-34a inhibitor reversed the effects of "knocking down" TGFβ1 on cell growth, migration, cyclin D1, CDK6 and c-Met expression, suggesting that TGFβ1 mediated effects occur, in part, through this miR-34a signaling pathway. Overexpression of TGFβ1 was associated with CCA tumor progression. This study suggests that TGFβ1 is involved in CCA tumor progression and participates through miR-34a mediated downstream cascades, and is a target to inhibit CCA development and growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Large animal models for vaccine development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Volker; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, Francois; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Wilson, Don; Walker, Stewart; Wheler, Colette; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    The development of human vaccines continues to rely on the use of animals for research. Regulatory authorities require novel vaccine candidates to undergo preclinical assessment in animal models before being permitted to enter the clinical phase in human subjects. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in reducing and replacing the number of animals used for preclinical vaccine research through the use of bioinformatics and computational biology to design new vaccine candidates. However, the ultimate goal of a new vaccine is to instruct the immune system to elicit an effective immune response against the pathogen of interest, and no alternatives to live animal use currently exist for evaluation of this response. Studies identifying the mechanisms of immune protection; determining the optimal route and formulation of vaccines; establishing the duration and onset of immunity, as well as the safety and efficacy of new vaccines, must be performed in a living system. Importantly, no single animal model provides all the information required for advancing a new vaccine through the preclinical stage, and research over the last two decades has highlighted that large animals more accurately predict vaccine outcome in humans than do other models. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of large animal models for human vaccine development and demonstrate that much of the success in bringing a new vaccine to market depends on choosing the most appropriate animal model for preclinical testing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Transcription and the IELTS Speaking Test: Facilitating Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stones, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a transcription task cycle that was designed to facilitate the development of skills for the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) speaking test at a language school in Japan. The cycle involved practice test, transcription, student correction, teacher correction, and retrial of the original test and…

  9. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  10. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandli A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alice Brandli, Chi D Luu, Robyn H Guymer, Lauren N Ayton Centre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology, The University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Vision prostheses, or “bionic eyes”, are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field. Keywords: vision prostheses, bionic eye, vision restoration, blindness, medical bionics, retinitis pigmentosa

  11. Morphogenesis of the liver fibrosis development and progression in chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shishkin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The paper contains the results of pathohistological integrated computer-morphometric and immunohistochemical liver bioptates research of the patients with chronic viral hepatitis C to upgrade the most significant microscopic features of the liver fibrosis development and progression. Methods and results. As a result of the research, histological activity index of chronic viral hepatitis C didn’t correlate in all the patients with liver fibrosis, found in histological preparations colored by Masson’s trichrome Stain or van Gieson’s Stain. Conclusion. It has been stated that the prognostic signs of probability of liver fibrosis development in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C are hyperplasia of the activated positive A-SMA Ito cells in the liver perisinusoidal spaces and segmental collagenization of the intralobular venous sinusoids walls, availability of A-SMA positive fibroblasts in immunocellular «piecemeal necrosis» and in portal paths.

  12. The role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha in development and progression of liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jinlian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has a high expression level in mature hepatocytes. HNF4α can regulate hepatocyte-specific gene expression at a transcriptional level, promote hepatocyte development and differentiation, participate in establishment and maintenance of hepatocyte polarity, and enhance the synthetic, metabolic, and detoxifying functions of the liver. Through inhibiting the activation of hepatic stellate cells, reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inhibiting the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of hepatoma cells, HNF4α may be involved in the development and progression of various liver diseases including liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. This paper elaborates on the biological functions of HNF4α, and summarizes and analyzes the research advances in the mechanisms of action of HNF4α in the pathological process of liver diseases, in order to provide references for further investigation of the potential targeted therapies for liver diseases.

  13. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakovič, Milan; Švitel, Juraj; Bučko, Marek; Filip, Jaroslav; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; Gemeiner, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Viable microbial cells are important biocatalysts in the production of fine chemicals and biofuels, in environmental applications and also in emerging applications such as biosensors or medicine. Their increasing significance is driven mainly by the intensive development of high performance recombinant strains supplying multienzyme cascade reaction pathways, and by advances in preservation of the native state and stability of whole-cell biocatalysts throughout their application. In many cases, the stability and performance of whole-cell biocatalysts can be highly improved by controlled immobilization techniques. This review summarizes the current progress in the development of immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts, the immobilization methods as well as in the bioreaction engineering aspects and economical aspects of their biocatalytic applications.

  14. Facilitating Progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals through Open Scientific Data and Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. S.; Levy, M. A.; de Sherbinin, A. M.; Fischer, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent an unprecedented international commitment to a shared future encompassing sustainable management of the planet and significant improvement in the human condition around the world. The scientific community has both an ethical responsibility and substantial self-interest—as residents of this planet—to help the world community to better understand the complex, interlinked behavior of human and environmental systems and to elucidate pathways to achieve long-term sustainability. Critical to making progress towards the SDGs is the open availability of timely, reliable, usable, and well integrated data and indicators relevant to all SDGs and associated targets. Such data and indicators will not only be valuable in monitoring and evaluation of progress, but also in developing policies and making decisions on environmental and societal issues affecting sustainability from local to global scales. The open availability of such data and indicators can help motivate performance, promote accountability, and facilitate cooperation. A range of scientific, technical, organizational, political, and resource challenges need to be addressed in developing a coherent SDG monitoring and indicator framework. For example, assembling and integrating diverse data on consistent spatial and temporal scales across the relevant natural, social, health, and engineering sciences pose both scientific and technical difficulties, and may require new ways to interlink and organize existing cyberinfrastructure, reconcile different data policy regimes, and fund integration efforts. New information technologies promise more timely and efficient ways of collecting many types of data, but may also raise privacy, control, and equity issues. Scientific review processes to ensure data quality need to be coordinated with the types of quality control and review employed by national statistical agencies for trusted economic and social statistics. Although

  15. Pathogenic role of calcium-sensing receptors in the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiyang; Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Song, Shanshan; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Chen, Jiwang; Gu, Yali; Pohl, Nicole M; Zhou, Tong; Jiménez-Pérez, Laura; Ayon, Ramon J; Desai, Ankit A; Goltzman, David; Rischard, Franz; Khalpey, Zain; Black, Stephan M; Garcia, Joe G N; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X J

    2016-05-01

    An increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a critical stimulation for PASMC proliferation and migration. Previously, we demonstrated that expression and function of calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) in PASMC from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and animals with experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) were greater than in PASMC from normal subjects and control animals. However, the mechanisms by which CaSR triggers Ca(2+) influx in PASMC and the implication of CaSR in the development of PH remain elusive. Here, we report that CaSR functionally interacts with TRPC6 to regulate [Ca(2+)]cyt in PASMC. Downregulation of CaSR or TRPC6 with siRNA inhibited Ca(2+)-induced [Ca(2+)]cyt increase in IPAH-PASMC (in which CaSR is upregulated), whereas overexpression of CaSR or TRPC6 enhanced Ca(2+)-induced [Ca(2+)]cyt increase in normal PASMC (in which CaSR expression level is low). The upregulated CaSR in IPAH-PASMC was also associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation, whereas blockade of CaSR in IPAH-PASMC attenuated cell proliferation. In in vivo experiments, deletion of the CaSR gene in mice (casr(-/-)) significantly inhibited the development and progression of experimental PH and markedly attenuated acute hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. These data indicate that functional interaction of upregulated CaSR and upregulated TRPC6 in PASMC from IPAH patients and animals with experimental PH may play an important role in the development and progression of sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Blockade or downregulation of CaSR and/or TRPC6 with siRNA or miRNA may be a novel therapeutic strategy to develop new drugs for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Pathogenic role of calcium-sensing receptors in the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiyang; Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Song, Shanshan; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Chen, Jiwang; Gu, Yali; Pohl, Nicole M.; Zhou, Tong; Jiménez-Pérez, Laura; Ayon, Ramon J.; Desai, Ankit A.; Goltzman, David; Rischard, Franz; Khalpey, Zain; Black, Stephan M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Makino, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    An increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a critical stimulation for PASMC proliferation and migration. Previously, we demonstrated that expression and function of calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) in PASMC from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and animals with experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) were greater than in PASMC from normal subjects and control animals. However, the mechanisms by which CaSR triggers Ca2+ influx in PASMC and the implication of CaSR in the development of PH remain elusive. Here, we report that CaSR functionally interacts with TRPC6 to regulate [Ca2+]cyt in PASMC. Downregulation of CaSR or TRPC6 with siRNA inhibited Ca2+-induced [Ca2+]cyt increase in IPAH-PASMC (in which CaSR is upregulated), whereas overexpression of CaSR or TRPC6 enhanced Ca2+-induced [Ca2+]cyt increase in normal PASMC (in which CaSR expression level is low). The upregulated CaSR in IPAH-PASMC was also associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation, whereas blockade of CaSR in IPAH-PASMC attenuated cell proliferation. In in vivo experiments, deletion of the CaSR gene in mice (casr−/−) significantly inhibited the development and progression of experimental PH and markedly attenuated acute hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. These data indicate that functional interaction of upregulated CaSR and upregulated TRPC6 in PASMC from IPAH patients and animals with experimental PH may play an important role in the development and progression of sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Blockade or downregulation of CaSR and/or TRPC6 with siRNA or miRNA may be a novel therapeutic strategy to develop new drugs for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:26968768

  17. Evaluation of new binders using newly developed fracture energy test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated a total of seven asphalt binders with various additives : using the newly developed binder fracture energy test. The researchers prepared and : tested PAV-aged and RTFO-plus-PAV-aged specimens. This study confirmed previous : res...

  18. Towards the Development of African Psychometric Tests | Zindi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards the Development of African Psychometric Tests. ... tests, perform item analysis on the data, and calculate the instruments' reliability and validity. ... further adaptations of other psychometric instruments such as Personality, Aptitude and ...

  19. Development of a Flammability Test Method for Aircraft Blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Flammability testing of aircraft blankets was conducted in order to develop a fire performance test method and performance criteria for blankets supplied to commercial aircraft operators. Aircraft blankets were subjected to vertical Bunsen burner tes...

  20. Developing VTM-51 into an ASTM test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    In 1980, the Virginia Transportation Research Council developed a procedure to test silt fence installations (VTM-51). The test determines the filtering efficiency (amount of soil removed) and the flow rate of a geotextile. A known concentration and ...

  1. Antimicrobial Testing Methods & Procedures Developed by EPA's Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    We develop antimicrobial testing methods and standard operating procedures to measure the effectiveness of hard surface disinfectants against a variety of microorganisms. Find methods and procedures for antimicrobial testing.

  2. Progress in model development to quantify High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) to mechancial insult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-07-29

    The rapid release of chemical energy has found application for industrial and military purposes since the invention of gunpowder. Black powder, smokeless powder of various compositions, and pyrotechnics all exhibit the rapid release of energy without detonation when they are being used as designed. The rapidity of energy release for these materials is controlled by adjustments to the particle surface area (propellant grain configuration or powder particle size) in conjunction with the measured pressure-dependent burning rate, which is very subsonic. In this way a manufacturing process can be used to engineer the desired violence of the explosion. Detonations in molecular explosives, in contrast, propagate with a supersonic velocity that depends on the loading density, but is independent of the surface area. In ideal detonations, the reaction is complete within a small distance of the propagating shock front. Non-ideal detonations in molecular and composite explosives proceed with a slower velocity, and the reaction may continue well behind the shock front. We are developing models to describe the circumstances when molecular and composite explosives undergo a rapid release of energy without detonating. The models also apply to the behavior of rocket propellants subject to mechanical insult, whether for accidents (Hazards) or the suite of standardized tests used to assess whether the system can be designated an Insensitive Munition (IM). In the application described here, we are studying an HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane) explosive developed in the UK, which is 91% by weight HMX and 9% binder-plasticizer. Most explosives and propellants, when subjected to a mechanical insult, drop or impact that is well below the threshold for detonation have been observed to react violently. This behavior is known as High Explosive Violent Reaction (HEVR). The basis of our model is the observation that the mechanical insult produces damage in a volume of the

  3. Objectives and Progress on Ground Vibration Testing for the Ares Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated vehicle ground vibration testing (IVGVT) will be a vital component for ensuring the safety of NASA s next generation of exploration vehicles to send human beings to the Moon and beyond. A ground vibration test (GVT) measures the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. The Ares Flight & Integrated Test Office (FITO) will be conducting the IVGVT for the Ares I crew launch vehicle at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from 2012 to 2014 using Test Stand (TS) 4550. MSFC conducted similar GVT for the Saturn V and Space Shuttle vehicles. FITO will perform the IVGVT on the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which will lift the Orion crew exploration vehicle to low Earth orbit, and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which can launch the lunar lander into orbit and send the combined Orion/lander vehicles toward the Moon. Ares V consists of a six-engine core stage with two solid rocket boosters and an Earth departure stage (EDS). The same engine will power the EDS and the Ares I second stage. The current plan is to test six configurations in three unique test positions inside TS 4550. Four Ares I second stage test configurations will be tested in Position 3, consisting of the Upper Stage and Orion crew module in four nominal conditions: J-2X engine ignition, post Launch Abort System (LAS) jettison, critical slosh mass, and J-2X burn-out. Position 2 consists of the entire launch stack at first stage burn-out (using empty first stage segments). Position 1 represents the entire launch stack at lift-off (using inert first stage segments). Because of long disuse, TS 4550 is being repaired and modified for reactivation to conduct the Ares I IVGVT. The Shuttle-era platforms have been removed and are being replaced with mast climbers that provide ready access to the test articles and can be moved easily to support different positions within the test stand. Two new cranes will help move test articles at the test stand and at the

  4. The progress of funnelling gun high voltage condition and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gassner, D. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rahman, O. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sheehy, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pietz, J. [Transfer Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Ackeret, M. [Transfer Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Yeckel, C. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Miller, R. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Dobrin, E. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Thompson, K. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A prototype of a high average current polarized electron funneling gun as an eRHIC injector has been built at BNL. The gun was assembled and tested at Stangenes Incorporated. Two beams were generated from two GaAs photocathodes and combined by a switched combiner field. We observed the combined beams on a YAG crystal and measured the photocurrent by a Faraday cup. The gun has been shipped to Stony Brook University and is being tested there. In this paper we will describe the major components of the gun and recent beam test results. High voltage conditioning is discussed as well.

  5. Assessing Progress and Pitfalls of the Millennium Development Goals in Zimbabwe: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Mutangabende

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe adopted the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs at their inception in 2000 and it has trends of its progress in its attempt to attain these MDGs as indicated in progress reports since 2004, 2010, 2012 and 2015. In these reports optimistic trends are chiefly found in MDG2 on universal primary education which is Zimbabwe’s pride in Africa, MDG3 regarding gender parity in schools and MDG6 on HIV and AIDS. The country continues to face its biggest challenges in attaining MDG1 which is eliminating extreme poverty and hunger and MDG5 which is increase nurturing mortality, whereas all the objectives under these goals are dubious that would be attained at the cut-off date. It was unfortunate that, the inception of the MDGs coincided with the deepening of socioeconomic, political and environmental crisis in the country which made it very difficult for Zimbabwe to accomplish all of its MDGs. The focal motive of this study was to check the progress, policies, programmes and strategies which were in place to promote the attainment of the MDGs from 2000-2015 and other strategies or policies in place to attain the SDGs 2016-2030. This paper recommended that there is need for institutionalisation of SDGs that is aligning them with Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socioeconomic Transformation (Zim-Asset cluster; for instance, value accumulation and beneficiation, nourishment security, poverty extermination, social services and strengthening partnership with all stakeholders. The research uses intensive secondary data analysis from various sources including government gazette, journal articles, e-books, and government website, reports, published and unpublished books.

  6. Podoplanin expression in the development and progression of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresno Manuel F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podoplanin expression is attracting interest as a marker for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. We therefore investigated the expression pattern and clinical significance of podoplanin during the development and progression of laryngeal carcinomas. Results Podoplanin expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 84 patients with laryngeal premalignancies and 53 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. We found podoplanin expression extending from the basal to the suprabasal layer of the epithelium in 37 (44% of 84 dysplastic lesions, whereas normal epithelium showed negligible expression. Patients carrying podoplanin-positive lesions had a higher laryngeal cancer incidence than those with negative expression reaching borderline statistical significance (51% versus 30%, P = 0.071. Podoplanin expression in laryngeal carcinomas exhibited two distinct patterns. 20 (38% cases showed diffuse expression in most tumour cells and 33 (62% focal expression at the proliferating periphery of tumour nests. High podoplanin expression was inversely correlated with T classification (P = 0.033, disease stage (P = 0.006, and pathological grade (P = 0.04. There was a trend, although not significant, towards reduced disease-specific survival for patients with low podoplanin levels (P = 0.31 and diffuse expression pattern (P = 0.08. Conclusions Podoplanin expression increases in the early stages of laryngeal tumourigenesis and it seems to be associated with a higher laryngeal cancer risk. Podoplanin expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas, however, diminishes during tumour progression. Taken together, these data support a role for podoplanin expression in the initiation but not in the progression of laryngeal cancers.

  7. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The APF was shut down on September 23, 1993 and no operation was performed during this quarter. This report summarizes inspection, candle reinstallation, retrofit and accelerometer testing conducted during this three month outage.

  8. Thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation mechanisms evaluation. Progress report No. 35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, A.; Shields, V.

    1980-05-01

    The n-type selenide legs after 14,000 hours continue to show reasonable agreement with the 3M Co. published data. In the ingradient testing after 14,700 hours the n-legs show serious degradation in power to load. Weight loss measurements on the first samples of material produced by G.E. match the results previously obtained on R.C.A. material from the MHW program. The remaining MHW generator on test Q1-A has accumulated 22,519 hours and performance remains stable. The 18 couple modules S/N-1 and -3 previously tested at RCA show no significant change in operation during the current JPL testing. No changes in the trends of degradation of LES 8 and 9 and the Voyager RTGs have been observed.

  9. Progress and Challenges of Ultrasonic Testing for Stress in Remanufacturing Laser Cladding Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Ling; Dong, Shi-Yun; Xu, Bin-Shi; Cao, Yong

    2018-02-13

    Stress in laser cladding coating is an important factor affecting the safe operation of remanufacturing components. Ultrasonic testing has become a popular approach in the nondestructive evaluation of stress, because it has the advantages of safety, nondestructiveness, and online detection. This paper provides a review of ultrasonic testing for stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. It summarizes the recent research outcomes on ultrasonic testing for stress, and analyzes the mechanism of ultrasonic testing for stress. Remanufacturing laser cladding coating shows typical anisotropic behaviors. The ultrasonic testing signal in laser cladding coating is influenced by many complex factors, such as microstructure, defect, temperature, and surface roughness, among others. At present, ultrasonic testing for stress in laser cladding coating can only be done roughly. This paper discusses the active mechanism of micro/macro factors in the reliability of stress measurement, as well as the impact of stress measurement on the quality and safety of remanufacturing components. Based on the discussion, this paper proposes strategies to nondestructively, rapidly, and accurately measure stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating.

  10. Progress of statistical analysis in biomedical research through the historical review of the development of the Framingham score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović, Aleksandra; Stojanović, Miodrag; Milošević, Zoran; Anđelković Apostolović, Marija

    2017-12-02

    The interest in developing risk models in medicine not only is appealing, but also associated with many obstacles in different aspects of predictive model development. Initially, the association of biomarkers or the association of more markers with the specific outcome was proven by statistical significance, but novel and demanding questions required the development of new and more complex statistical techniques. Progress of statistical analysis in biomedical research can be observed the best through the history of the Framingham study and development of the Framingham score. Evaluation of predictive models comes from a combination of the facts which are results of several metrics. Using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, the calibration test, and the ROC curve analysis should be mandatory and eliminatory, and the central place should be taken by some new statistical techniques. In order to obtain complete information related to the new marker in the model, recently, there is a recommendation to use the reclassification tables by calculating the net reclassification index and the integrated discrimination improvement. Decision curve analysis is a novel method for evaluating the clinical usefulness of a predictive model. It may be noted that customizing and fine-tuning of the Framingham risk score initiated the development of statistical analysis. Clinically applicable predictive model should be a trade-off between all abovementioned statistical metrics, a trade-off between calibration and discrimination, accuracy and decision-making, costs and benefits, and quality and quantity of patient's life.

  11. Developing a TTCN-3 Test Harness for Legacy Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okika, Joseph C.; Ravn, Anders Peter; Siddalingaiah, Lokesh

    2006-01-01

    We describe a prototype test harness for an embedded system which is the control software for a modern marine diesel engine. The operations of such control software requires complete certification. We adopt Testing and Test Control Notation (TTCN-3) to define test cases for this purpose. The main...... challenge in developing the test harness is to interface a generic test driver to the legacy software and provide a suitable interface for test engineers. The main contribution of this paper is a demonstration of a suitable design for such a test harness. It includes: a TTCN-3 test driver in C++, the legacy...... control software in C, a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the connectors in Java. Our experience shows that it is feasible to use TTCN-3 in developing a test harness for a legacy software for an embedded system, even when it involves different heterogeneous components....

  12. THE CONCEPTION OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AS A NEW PARADIGM OF SOCIAL PROGRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kazhuro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern economic growth, accompanied by a stratification of society into rich and poor, contributes to the prosperity of the wealth’s cult and power of that wealth. It leads to wasteful use of natural resources, doesn’t solve and can’t solve the problem of mass poverty. In 1992, in Rio de Janeiro held the OUN Conference on environment and development, dedicated to the development of strategies for sustainable environmentally sound economic development of the world civilization. It stated the impossibility of developing countries’ movement in the way that came to their welfare developed countries. This model is recognized as a leading disaster and therefore proclaimed the need to move the world community on a sustainable path. Principles of sustainable development suggest that the current generation of people in the world should meet their needs so that in the age of our children and grandchildren ran out of resources too. So live allowing yourself to the constant growth of consumption is no longer possible today. The conference in Rio de Janeiro marked the beginning of a conscious turn of human civilization on a new path of development, in which a person restrain its consumer selfishness and try to live in harmony with Nature. Its over-exploitation today threatens retaliation, disastrous for humanity reactions. The essence of the global problem is how to ensure progress in solving a common problem based on two fundamental positions – development and the environment. It is believed that the ultimate aim of the world’s community development should be not an economic growth by itself, not the pace and size of the material wealths’ accumulation but the man himself. With this approach the production’s goal should be not in uncontrolled growth of the social product in order to satisfy the constantly growing people’s needs but to ensure rational (reasonable, vitally important material and spiritual man’s needs.

  13. Effects of Honey and Its Mechanisms of Action on the Development and Progression of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotayo O. Erejuwa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Honey is a natural product known for its varied biological or pharmacological activities—ranging from anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, antihypertensive to hypoglycemic effects. This review article focuses on the role of honey in modulating the development and progression of tumors or cancers. It reviews available evidence (some of which is very recent with regards to the antimetastatic, antiproliferative and anticancer effects of honey in various forms of cancer. These effects of honey have been thoroughly investigated in certain cancers such as breast, liver and colorectal cancer cell lines. In contrast, limited but promising data are available for other forms of cancers including prostate, bladder, endometrial, kidney, skin, cervical, oral and bone cancer cells. The article also underscores the various possible mechanisms by which honey may inhibit growth and proliferation of tumors or cancers. These include regulation of cell cycle, activation of mitochondrial pathway, induction of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, induction of apoptosis, modulation of oxidative stress, amelioration of inflammation, modulation of insulin signaling and inhibition of angiogenesis. Honey is highly cytotoxic against tumor or cancer cells while it is non-cytotoxic to normal cells. The data indicate that honey can inhibit carcinogenesis by modulating the molecular processes of initiation, promotion, and progression stages. Thus, it may serve as a potential and promising anticancer agent which warrants further experimental and clinical studies.

  14. Powertrain instrumentation and test systems development, hybridization, electrification

    CERN Document Server

    Paulweber, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The book deals with the increasingly complex test systems for powertrain components and systems giving an overview of the diverse types of test beds for all components of an advanced powertrain focusing on specific topics such as instrumentation, control, simulation, hardware-in-the-loop, automation or test facility management. This book is intended for powertrain (component) development engineers, test bed planners, test bed operators and beginners.

  15. A murine model for the development of melanocytic nevi and their progression to melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasti, Tahseen H.; Cochran, J. Barry; Tsuruta, Yuko; Yusuf, Nabiha; McKay, Kristopher M.; Athar, Mohammad; Elmets, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired melanocytic nevi are commonly found in sun exposed and unexposed human skin, but the potential for their transformation into invasive melanoma is not clear. Therefore, a mouse model of nevus initiation and progression was developed in C3H/HeN mice using a modified chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Nevi develop due to DNA damage initiated by dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) followed by chronic promotion with 12‐O‐tetradecanoyl‐phorbol‐13‐acetate (TPA). Dysplastic pigmented skin lesions appeared in 7–9 wk with 100% penetrance. Nests of melanocytic cells appeared in a subset of skin draining lymph nodes (dLN) by 25 wk, but not in age matched controls. Immunohistochemistry, real‐time PCR, and flow cytometric analyses confirmed their melanocytic origin. Transformed cells were present in a subset of nevi and dLNs, which exhibited anchorage‐independent growth, tumor development, and metastasis in nude mice. Approximately 50% of the cell lines contained H‐Ras mutations and lost tumor suppressor p16Ink4a expression. While most studies of melanoma focus on tumor progression in transgenic mouse models where the mutations are present from birth, our model permits investigation of acquired mutations at the earliest stages of nevus initiation and promotion of nevus cell transformation. This robust nevus/melanoma model may prove useful for identifying genetic loci associated with nevus formation, novel oncogenic pathways, tumor targets for immune‐prevention, screening therapeutics, and elucidating mechanisms of immune surveillance and immune evasion. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25788145

  16. A murine model for the development of melanocytic nevi and their progression to melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasti, Tahseen H; Cochran, J Barry; Tsuruta, Yuko; Yusuf, Nabiha; McKay, Kristopher M; Athar, Mohammad; Timares, Laura; Elmets, Craig A

    2016-05-01

    Acquired melanocytic nevi are commonly found in sun exposed and unexposed human skin, but the potential for their transformation into invasive melanoma is not clear. Therefore, a mouse model of nevus initiation and progression was developed in C3H/HeN mice using a modified chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Nevi develop due to DNA damage initiated by dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) followed by chronic promotion with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Dysplastic pigmented skin lesions appeared in 7-9 wk with 100% penetrance. Nests of melanocytic cells appeared in a subset of skin draining lymph nodes (dLN) by 25 wk, but not in age matched controls. Immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR, and flow cytometric analyses confirmed their melanocytic origin. Transformed cells were present in a subset of nevi and dLNs, which exhibited anchorage-independent growth, tumor development, and metastasis in nude mice. Approximately 50% of the cell lines contained H-Ras mutations and lost tumor suppressor p16(Ink4a) expression. While most studies of melanoma focus on tumor progression in transgenic mouse models where the mutations are present from birth, our model permits investigation of acquired mutations at the earliest stages of nevus initiation and promotion of nevus cell transformation. This robust nevus/melanoma model may prove useful for identifying genetic loci associated with nevus formation, novel oncogenic pathways, tumor targets for immune-prevention, screening therapeutics, and elucidating mechanisms of immune surveillance and immune evasion. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of Applicable Test Scenario by the Grid Simulator of a Functional Test Bench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farajzadehbibalan, Saber

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, a data-driven testing procedure for wind turbine generators is developed. The procedure generates a data set for a hardware-in-the-loop testing setup at a test facility. The goal is to shorten validation process, prevent damage from highly dangerous grid tests, and conduct differe...

  19. Development of hardware configuration and testing tools for the FELIX project.

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This document contains a report about the work I have been doing during my stay as a summer student at CERN. The work described here is part of the FELIX project, a new system that will be progressively integrated in the ATLAS Data Acquisition System during Long Shutdowns 2 and 3. Specifically, my task consisted of the development of testing and configuration software for FELIX.

  20. Applicability of a progressive jump load test to assess the force-velocity-power relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Naclerio Ayllón, Fernando José

    2008-01-01

    El objetivo del estudio fue analizar las diferencias entre las alturas o potencias producidas en un test de saltos con pesos crecientes utilizando distintos porcentajes de 1 Repetición Máxima (RM), así como identificar las zonas de pesos donde se alcanzan las potencias altas y aquellos donde no es posible saltar. 14 deportistas de diferentes especialidades realizaron un test de saltos con pesos crecientes, determinando el nivel de sobrecarga en base al valor de 1RM, medido previamente en el e...

  1. Development and validation of a predictive model for Chronic Kidney Disease progression in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus based on a 13-year study in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Serena; Lim, Su Chi; Zhang, Xiao; Zhou, Shiyi; Yeoh, Lee Ying; Liu, Yan Lun; Tavintharan, Subramaniam; Sum, Chee Fang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to develop and validate a predictive model for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) progression in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a prospective study on 1582 patients with T2DM from a Diabetes Centre in regional hospital in 2002-2014. CKD progression was defined as deterioration across eGFR categories with ⩾25% drop from baseline. The dataset was randomly split into development (70%) and validation (30%) datasets. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used to identify baseline predictors for model development. Model performance in the two datasets was assessed. During median follow-up of 5.5years, 679 (42.9%) had CKD progression. Progression occurred in 467 (42.2%) and 212 patients (44.6%) in development and validation datasets respectively. Systolic blood pressure, HbA1c, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio were associated with progression. Areas under receiving-operating-characteristics curve for the training and test datasets were 0.80 (95%CI, 0.77-0.83) and 0.83 (95%CI, 0.79-0.87). Observed and predicted probabilities by quintiles were not statistically different with Hosmer-Lemeshow χ2 0.65 (p=0.986) and 1.36 (p=0.928) in the two datasets. Sensitivity and specificity were 71.4% and 72.2% in development dataset, and 75.6% and 72.3% in the validation dataset. A model using routinely available clinical measurements can accurately predict CKD progression in T2DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a psychological test to diagnose abilities required for successful learning medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Gessmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We substantiate the necessity of psychological tools aimed at diagnostics of the capabilities for successful learning in medical university, and show the progress of its development. The questionnaire is developed based on the U.S. and European success tests, and its design meets the famous “test for medical professions” (TMS. “Kostroma test for medical professions” (KTMP is not a translation or adaptation of TMS to Russian conditions. It will be re-designed with new test items based on the principles of classical test construction. Creating scientifically based methods of psychological diagnosis of general cognitive ability is a prerequisite for the successful solution of a wide range of research and practical issues related to improving the effectiveness of education and training programs.

  3. Development and validation of a theoretical test in basic laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Maagaard, Mathilde; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Testing of knowledge is an important component in a successful skills curriculum. Nonetheless, structured testing of basic procedure-relevant knowledge in the surgical domains is not ordinary practice. A regional need assessment showed insufficient knowledge regarding basic laparoscopy...... for first-year residents in obstetrics and gynecology. This study therefore aimed to develop and validate a framework for a theoretical knowledge test, a multiple-choice test, in basic theory related to laparoscopy. METHODS: The content of the multiple-choice test was determined by conducting informal...... of a theoretical test could potentially be used for any topics that require structured testing of knowledge....

  4. Audio Development Laboratory (ADL) User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ADL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Advanced fuel cell development. Progress report for January--March 1977.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J P; Kinoshita, K; Sim, J W; Swaroop, R; Nelson, P A

    1977-06-01

    Advanced fuel cell research and development activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the period January to March 1977 is described. Efforts have been directed toward understanding and improvement of molten carbonate electrolyte fuel cells operating at temperatures near 650/sup 0/C. A primary focus of the work has been on developing electrolyte structures which have high strength and conductivity, as well as good electrolyte retention, and on developing methods of synthesis for electrolyte structures that are amenable to mass production. Several synthesis methods have been investigated, and at least one appears to yield a highly desirable product and to greatly simplify production. Cell testing is essential for understanding and evaluating individual component behavior and the interactions of the components under realistic operating conditions. Most of the testing to date has been conducted in a 2/sup 3///sub 4/-in.-dia cylindrical cell with Type 316 stainless steel housings and current collectors, a nickel anode, and a nickel oxide cathode. Reproducible cell operation has been achieved in these cells, and operational parameters have been brought under control. Necessary improvements in cell components have been defined, and a systematic program of optimization has begun. Components evaluation and development include post-test analysis and evaluation of all the cell components and materials as well as development of out-of-cell diagnostic tests for the individual components. Particular attention is being paid to evaluation of the physical properties of the electrolyte and to corrosion of metallic materials in the cell housings.

  6. Thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation mechanisms evaluation. Progress report No. 37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, A.; Shields, V.

    1980-09-01

    The n-type selenide legs after 16,500 hours continue to show reasonable agreement with the 3M Co. published thermal conductivity data. In the ingradient testing after 17,000 hours the 3 surviving n-legs (out of 5) show serious degradation in power to load. Small scale ratcheting has been observed on the four p-legs but no large scale effects. Weight loss for both coated and uncoated material produced by G.E. are reported. No significant discrepancies with the results previously obtained on R.C.A. material from the MHW program have been found. Thermal conductivity measurements are also in agreement. The remaining MHW generator on test, Q1-A, has accumulated 25,600 hours and performance remains stable. The 18 couple modules S/N-1 and -3 previously tested at RCA show no significant change in operation during the current JPL testing. No changes in the trends of degradation of LES 8 and 9 and the Voyager RTGs have been observed.

  7. Thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation mechanisms evaluation. Progress report No. 36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, A.; Shields, V.

    1980-07-01

    The n-type selenide legs after 15,000 hours continue to show reasonable agreement with the 3M Co. published thermal conductivity data. In the ingradient testing after 16,500 hours the 3 surviving n-legs (out of 5) show serious degradation in power to load. Weight loss and thermoelectricity property measurements on the first samples of material produced by G.E. continue to correspond to the results previously obtained on R.C.A. material from the MHW program. The remaining MHW generator on test, Q1-A, has accumulated 23,679 hours and performance remains stable. The 18 couple modules S/N-1 and -3 previously tested at RCA show no significant change in operation during the current JPL testing. A comparison of LES 8/9 RTG's with an improved version of DEGRA is shown. No changes in the trends of degradation of LES 8 and 9 and the Voyager RTGs have been observed.

  8. Benchmarking by cross-institutional comparison of student achievement in a progress test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Schuwirth, Lambert W. T.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Thoben, Arnold J. N. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; van, der

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of single-point benchmarking and longitudinal benchmarking for inter-school educational evaluation. METHODS We carried out a mixed, longitudinal, cross-sectional study using data from 24 annual measurement moments (4 tests x 6 year groups) over 4 years for 4

  9. Progress in sensor performance testing, modeling and range prediction using the TOD method : An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Triangle Orientation Discrimination (TOD) methodology includes i) a widely applicable, accurate end-to-end EO/IR sensor test, ii) an image-based sensor system model and iii) a Target Acquisition (TA) range model. The method has been extensively validated against TA field performance for a wide

  10. RTS,S malaria vaccine development: progress and considerations for postapproval introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asante KP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kwaku Poku Asante, George Adjei, Yeetey Enuameh, Seth Owusu-Agyei Kintampo Health Research Centre, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana Abstract: Though the burden of malaria has decreased in the last decade in some sub-Saharan African countries, it is still high in others, and there is no malaria vaccine in use. The development of malaria vaccines in combination with current control programs could be effective in reducing the malaria burden. In this paper, we review and discuss the progress made in the RTS,S malaria vaccine development and considerations for its postapproval process. We conclude that the development of malaria vaccines has been a long process confronted with challenges of funding, difficulty in identifying malaria antigens that correlate with protection, and development of adjuvant systems among others. The scientific approval of the vaccine by the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 and subsequent recommendations for pilot implementation studies by the World Health Organization made history as the first human parasite vaccine. It is also a major public health achievement as the vaccine has the potential to prevent thousands of malaria cases. However, there are implementation challenges such as cold chain systems, community acceptance, and monitoring of adverse events post-licensure that need to be carefully addressed. Keywords: malaria, vaccines, challenges, introduction, Africa, implementation considerations 

  11. Progress in Materials and Component Development for Advanced Lithium-ion Cells for NASA's Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha, M.; Reid, Concha M.

    2011-01-01

    Vehicles and stand-alone power systems that enable the next generation of human missions to the Moon will require energy storage systems that are safer, lighter, and more compact than current state-of-the- art (SOA) aerospace quality lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. NASA is developing advanced Li-ion cells to enable or enhance the power systems for the Altair Lunar Lander, Extravehicular Activities spacesuit, and rovers and portable utility pallets for Lunar Surface Systems. Advanced, high-performing materials are required to provide component-level performance that can offer the required gains at the integrated cell level. Although there is still a significant amount of work yet to be done, the present state of development activities has resulted in the synthesis of promising materials that approach the ultimate performance goals. This report on interim progress of the development efforts will elaborate on the challenges of the development activities, proposed strategies to overcome technical issues, and present performance of materials and cell components.

  12. J-2X Gas Generator Development Testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Hormonzian, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for upper stage and trans-lunar applications of the Ares vehicles for the Constellation program. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. Development was contracted to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, two phases of testing have been completed on the development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine. The hardware has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations. Several of these configurations have resulted in combustion instability of the gas generator assembly. Development of the final configuration of workhorse hardware (which will ultimately be used to verify critical requirements on a component level) has required a balance between changes in the injector and chamber hardware in order to successfully mitigate the combustion instability without sacrificing other engine system requirements. This paper provides an overview of the two completed test series, performed at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The requirements, facility setup, hardware configurations, and test series progression are detailed. Significant levels of analysis have been performed in order to provide design solutions to mitigate the combustion stability issues, and these are briefly covered. Also discussed are the results of analyses related to either anomalous readings or off-nominal testing throughout the two test series.

  13. Progress of ITER and JT-60SA Magnet Development in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, N.; Nunoya, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Barabaschi, P.

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), as the Japan Domestic Agency (JADA), has the responsibility to procure 9 ITER toroidal field (TF) coils, 19 TF coil (TFC) structures, 25% of the TF conductors and 100% of the central solenoid (CS) conductors in ITER and, in addition, CS and equilibrium field (EF) coils including their conductors in JT-60SA, which is being developed as a satellite facility for ITER. In ITER, more than 90% of TF conductor fabrication was completed and finalization of the manufacturing procedure of TF coils is in progress through full-scale trials, such as trial fabrication of dummy double pancakes (DPs). In JT-60SA, fabrication of the EF4 coil was completed and the EF5 and EF6 coils are being assembled.

  14. Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitzner, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the first 3 months effort of the Ford/DOE Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program, specifically Task I which is Fuel Economy Assessment. At the beginning of this contract effort the projected fuel economy of the 4-215 Stirling engine was 21.16 MPG with a confidence level of 29 percent. Since that date, the fuel economy improvement projection of the 4-215 Stirling engine has been increased to 22.11 MPG, with a confidence level of 29 percent. Collection of fuel economy improvement data is directly related to engine durability. Engine durability has been limited. Since September 19, 1977 a total of 47.7 hours of engine running time has been accumulated using two engine builds. Progress is reported in sub-task studies of burners, preheaters, engine drive, blower system, power control, air-fuel ratio control, cooling system, and cycle control. (LCL)

  15. Primary progressive multiple sclerosis developing in the context of young onset Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadnicka, Anna; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Kaplan, Charles; Molloy, Sophie; Muraro, Paolo A

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with young onset Parkinson's disease (PD) and a heterozygous point mutation in parkin (c.1000C>T; p.Arg334Cys). After 8 years he developed pyramidal signs and reinvestigation demonstrated MRI and laboratory findings supportive of a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) with a primary progressive (PP) clinical course. This is a previously un-described association of young onset PD with PPMS. Imaging clearly dates the occurrence of each disease as chronologically separate phenomena. There is not currently evidence for shared causation or pathogenesis between the two neurological disorders but we will follow with interest the emerging genetic characterization of parkin in both PD and MS.

  16. Development and application of the electrochemical etching technique. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    This annual progress report documents further advances in the development and application of electrochemical etching of polycarbonate foils (ECEPF) for fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron dosimetry as well as alpha particle dosimetry. The fast (> 1.1 MeV) and thermal neutron dosimetry techniques were applied to a thorough investigation of the neutron contamination inherent in and about the primary x-ray beam of several medical therapy electron accelerators. Because of the small size of ECEPF dosimeters in comparison to other neutron meters, they have an unusually low perturbation of the radiation field under measurement. Due to this small size and the increased sensitivity of the ECEPF dosimeter over current techniques of measuring neutrons in a high photon field, the fast neutron contamination in the primary x-ray beam of all the investigated accelerators was measured with precision and found to be greater than that suggested by the other, more common, neutron dosimetry methods.

  17. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

  18. Catalytic Upgrading of Ethanol to n-Butanol: Progress in Catalyst Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianyuan; Fang, Geqian; Tong, Yuqin; Jiang, Dahao; Liang, Zhe; Leng, Wenhua; Liu, Liu; Tu, Pengxiang; Wang, Hongjing; Ni, Jun; Li, Xiaonian

    2018-01-10

    Because n-butanol as a fuel additive has more advantageous physicochemical properties than those of ethanol, ethanol valorization to n-butanol through homo- or heterogeneous catalysis has received much attention in recent decades in both scientific and industrial fields. Recent progress in catalyst development for upgrading ethanol to n-butanol, which involves homogeneous catalysts, such as iridium and ruthenium complexes, and heterogeneous catalysts, including metal oxides, hydroxyapatite (HAP), and, in particular, supported metal catalysts, is reviewed herein. The structure-activity relationships of catalysts and underlying reaction mechanisms are critically examined, and future research directions on the design and improvement of catalysts are also proposed. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1998 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Hoffman; Kenneth Alvar; Thomas Buhl; Bruce Erdal; Philip Fresquez; Elizabeth Foltyn; Wayne Hansen; Bruce Reinert

    1999-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($504K) in FY98 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Nine projects are new for this year; two projects were completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published 19 papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space were also provided to the TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY98 included a new extremity dosimeter that replaced the previously used finger-ring dosimeters, a light and easy-to-use detector to measure energy deposited by neutron interactions, and a device that will allow workers to determine the severity of a hazard.

  20. Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2006-06-30

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

  1. Development of a low-noise 10 K J-T refrigeration system. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paugh, R.L.

    1989-09-15

    The purpose of this contract extension is the continuation of the development of a compact, microminiature, low-noise, closed-cycle, Joule-Thomson refrigeration system for 10K operation for use in infrared sensing, low noise microwave signal detection and high speed superconducting electronic data processing. Work is continuing in the following areas: (a) Ongoing refrigerator design and development; (b) Compressor assembly and test, (c) Implementation of gas cleansing techniques, and (d) System integration.

  2. Installation Progress at the PIP-II Injector Test at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffes, C. [Fermilab; Alvarez, M. [Fermilab; Andrews, R. [Fermilab; Chen, A. [Fermilab; Czajkowski, J. [Fermilab; Derwent, P. [Fermilab; Edelen, J. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. [Fermilab; Kendziora, K. [Fermilab; Mitchell, D. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Scarpine, V. [Fermilab; Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab; Steimel, J. [Fermilab; Zuchnik, T. [Fermilab; Edelen, A. [Colorado State U.

    2016-10-04

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting linac “PIP-II” is being planned to upgrade Fermilab's injection complex. To validate the front-end concept, a test acceler-ator (The PIP-II Injector Test, formerly known as "PXIE") is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2 m-long Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 2.1 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) capable of operation in Con-tinuous Wave (CW) mode, and a 10 m-long Medium En-ergy Beam Transport (MEBT). The paper will report on the installation of the RFQ and the first sections of the MEBT and related mechanical design considerations.

  3. Interactive test tool for interoperable C-ITS development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voronov, A.; Englund, C.; Bengtsson, H.H.; Chen, L.; Ploeg, J.; Jongh, J.F.C.M. de; Sluis, H.J.D. van de

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the architecture of an Interactive Test Tool (ITT) for interoperability testing of Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS). Cooperative systems are developed by different manufacturers at different locations, which makes interoperability testing a tedious task. Up until

  4. Development of a Valid Volleyball Skills Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jackie; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development of the North Carolina State University Volleyball Skills Test Battery which offers accurate measurement of three volleyball skills (serve, forearm pass, and set). When physical educators tested 313 students, the battery objectively measured their abilities, providing a gamelike means of teaching, testing, grouping, and…

  5. Test Set Development for Cache Memory in Modern Microprocessors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Ars, Z.; Hamdioui, S.; Gaydadjiev, G.; Vassiliadis, S.

    2008-01-01

    Up to 53% of the time spent on testing current Intel microprocessors is needed to test on-chip caches, due to the high complexity of memory tests and to the large amount of transistors dedicated to such memories. This paper discusses the methodology used to develop effective and efficient cache

  6. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

    2001-07-01

    This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

  7. "Rekindle and Recapture the Love": Establishing System-Wide Indicators of Progress in Community Engagement and Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Emily M.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2012, University of North Carolina (UNC) President Tom Ross simultaneously commissioned two task forces to develop indicators that all UNC campuses could use to measure "progress in community engagement and economic development." The charge to the Community Engagement Task Force and the Economic Development Task Force was to…

  8. Development of computer simulation models for pedestrian subsystem impact tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, R.; Konosu, A.; Ishikawa, H.

    2000-01-01

    The European Enhanced Vehicle-safety Committee (EEVC/WG10 and WG17) proposed three component subsystem tests for cars to assess pedestrian protection. The objective of this study is to develop computer simulation models of the EEVC pedestrian subsystem tests. These models are available to develop a

  9. Evaluation of Test-Driven Development : An Industrial Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasmus, H.; Gross, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    Test-driven development is a novel software development practice and part of the Extreme Programming paradigm. It is based on the principle that tests should be designed and written for a module iteratively, while the code of the module is devised. This is the opposite of what is usual in current

  10. Synchronized Progression of Prestin Expression and Auditory Brainstem Response during Postnatal Development in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Hang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prestin is the motor protein expressed in the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs of mammalian inner ear. The electromotility of OHCs driven by prestin is responsible for the cochlear amplification which is required for normal hearing in adult animals. Postnatal expression of prestin and activity of OHCs may contribute to the maturation of hearing in rodents. However, the temporal and spatial expression of prestin in cochlea during the development is not well characterized. In the present study, we examined the expression and function of prestin from the OHCs in apical, middle, and basal turns of the cochleae of postnatal rats. Prestin first appeared at postnatal day 6 (P6 for basal turn, P7 in middle turn, and P9 for apical turn of cochlea. The expression level increased progressively over the next few days and by P14 reached the mature level for all three segments. By comparison with the time course of the development of auditory brainstem response for different frequencies, our data reveal that prestin expression synchronized with the hearing development. The present study suggests that the onset time of hearing may require the expression of prestin and is determined by the mature function of OHCs.

  11. 94-1 Research and Development Project lead laboratory support: Fiscal year 1997. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, S.D. [comp.

    1996-12-01

    On May 26, 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which expressed the board`s concern about nuclear materials left in the manufacturing pipeline after the US halted its nuclear weapons production activities. The DNFSB emphasized the need for remediation of these materials. As part of Recommendation 94-1, the DNFSB defined research objectives as follows: that a research program be established to fill any gaps in the information base needed for choosing among the alternate processes to be used in safe conversion of various types of fissile materials to optimal forms for safe interim storage and the longer-term disposition. To achieve this objective a research and technology development program with two elements is needed: a technology-specific program that is focused on treating and storing materials safety, with concomitant development of storage criteria and surveillance requirements, centered around 3- and 8-year targets; and a core technology program to augment the knowledge base about general chemical and physical processing and storage behavior and to assure safe interim material storage until disposition policies are formulated. The paper reports the progress on the following: materials identification and surveillance; stabilization process development; surveillance and monitoring; core technologies; and project management.

  12. Stages of development in Arabic philosophical nomenclature: Emergence, progression and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigani M. A. Zaid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the creation of a technical language within an existing natural language reveals to us both the internal and external dynamics of this complex phenomenon. The history of Arabic lexical definitions of different disciplines in the historical Islamic civilization provides us with a wealth of information on how these processes take place at each level of development. In this article while we will be highlighting on the history of Arabic intellectual lexical definitions we will focus on the development of the disciplines that constitute the Arabic philosophical technical languages i.e. Kalām and falsafah. In each discipline we closely followed the three conventional phases of development i.e. emergence, progression and stability. It should be remarked that though there are distinctive features of each phase, yet there are equally overlaps among these phases. This study brought to our attention the significant place of al-Taʿrifat of al-Jurjānī as the most sophisticated dictionary of sciences in the historical Islamic civilization.

  13. DOE research and development report. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Carleton D.

    1982-03-01

    The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is the US Government's Nuclear Materials Standards and Measurement Laboratory. NBL is assigned the mission to provide and maintain, as an essential part of federal statutory responsibilities related to national and international safeguards of nuclear materials for USA defense and energy programs, an ongoing capability for: the development, preparation, certification, and distribution of reference materials for the calibration and standardization of nuclear materials measurements; the development, improvement, and evaluation of nuclear materials measurement technology; the assessment and evaluation of the practice and application of nuclear materials measurement technology; expert and reliable specialized nuclear materials measurement services for the government; and technology exchange and training in nuclear materials measurement and standards. Progress reports for this fiscal year are presented under the following sections: (1) development or evaluation of measurement technology (elemental assay of uranium plutonium; isotope composition); (2) standards and reference materials (NBL standards and reference materials; NBS reference materials); and (3) evaluation programs (safeguards analytical laboratory evaluation; general analytical evaluation program; other evaluation programs).

  14. Geother evaluation and improvement: A progress report including test cases for two-dimensional BWIP (Basalt Waste Isolation Project) analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, S.H.; Budden, M.J.; Bartley, C.L.; Yung, S.C.

    1988-03-01

    The objective of the work is to evaluate the GEOTHER code and peform necessary improvements to make it specifically suitable for predicting the environmental conditions of the waste package for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP); and to perform resaturation analyses, that is, the analyses of steam formation and condensation, for the repository and waste package using the improved GEOTHER code. This is a progress report to BWIP documenting the status of GEOTHER code testing, evaluation, and improvements. The computational results documented in this report reflect the current condition of the code and the condition before code improvements. The test cases used are intended for examining the code features in sufficient detail and are not intended to be taken as final conclusions for BWIP applications.

  15. Unidimensionality study about Raven's Coloured Standard Progressive Matrices / Estudo sobre a unidimensionalidade do teste Matrizes Progressivas Coloridas de Raven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermino Fernandes Sisto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the adjustment of the Rasch model concerning unidimensionality of Raven's Colored Standard Progressive Matrices. Four hundred and forty-one (441 elementary school children, of both genders, attending first to fourth grade were investigated. Considering that residuals may be enough to violate the intrinsic unidimensionality of the items, residual principal component analysis was used to assess the possibility of this violation. Items with higher factorial loading relating to the positive and negative dimensions on the first factor were selected, in respect to the test as a whole and to each subset in particular. These items were re-analyzed with the Rasch model within each data group. Then the positive and negative factor measures were correlated. Results suggested the possibility of other dimensions besides those extracted by Rasch model based on the test and subset B, though the correlation coefficients of the other subsets were close to rejection.

  16. HTGR fuel recycle development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    The work reported includes the development of unit processes and equipment for reprocessing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel, the design and development of an integrated pilot line to demonstrate the head end of HTGR reprocessing using unirradiated fuel materials, and design work in support of Hot Engineering Tests (HET). Work is also described on tradeoff studies concerning the required design of facilities and equipment for the large-scale recycle of HTGR fuels in order to guide the development activities for HTGR fuel recycle.

  17. Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report 4, October--December, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, K.

    1994-01-25

    This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

  18. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-12-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC10 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC10 in air- (mainly for transitions and problematic operations) and oxygen-blown mode. Test Run TC10 was started on November 16, 2002, and completed on December 18, 2002. During oxygen-blown operations, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures from 150 to 180 psig. After initial adjustments were made to reduce the feed rate, operations with the new fluidized coal feeder were stable with about half of the total coalfeed rate through the new feeder. However, the new fluidized-bed coal feeder proved to be difficult to control at low feed rates. Later the coal mills and original coal feeder experienced difficulties due to a high moisture content in the coal from heavy rains. Additional operational difficulties were experienced when several of the pressure sensing taps in the gasifier plugged. As the run progressed, modifications to the mills (to address processing the wet coal) resulted in a much larger feed size. This eventually resulted in the accumulation of large particles in the circulating solids causing operational instabilities in the standpipe and loop seal. Despite problems with the coal mills, coal feeder, pressure tap nozzles and the standpipe, the gasifier did experience short periods of stability during oxygenblown operations. During these periods, the syngas quality was high. During TC10, the gasifier gasified over 609 tons of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and

  19. Testing of selected pharmacological agents for capturing waterfowl [Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, D.R.

    1970-01-01

    The response of game-farm mallards (Frost strain) to seven pharmacological immobilizing agents was evaluated in Phase I of a planned four-phase study. A limited amount of testing was also done with wild mallards. Single dosages were administered to determine the mean effective dose (ED50) and mean lethal dose (LD50), The therapeutic index, or safety factor (LD50/ED50), and palatability were also established. Optimum dosage rates of compounds administered orally on baits were not considered in this phase of the study. Compounds were-administered by intubation and calculated in terms of mg/kg. All except one compound produced narcosis within 5 minutes at the effective dose rate.Immobilization periods for the seven compounds ranged from 7-24 minutes, and recovery periods from 1.0-6.5 hours. Such wide variations in actions of the compounds can be attributed to a compound's rate of absorption, the ease with which it passes the blood-brain barrier, its solubility in tissues, and its rate of metabolism in the liver and kidneys. Length of both the immobilization and recovery periods were extended when dosages were increased. There was no delayed mortality among survivors with any of the seven compounds at either the ED50 or LD50. Females were generally more sensitive to the anesthetizing agents than males. The ED50 for wild mallards was substantially higher than that for the experimental game-farm birds for the two compounds on which this was tested.Tribromoethanol (Avertin of Winthrop Laboratories) satisfied all test criteria an Phase I and will be subjected to more intensive investigation in ensuing tests. Thiopental sodium (Pentothal of Amdal Company) and pentobarbital sodium (Nembutal of Abbott Laboratories) were judged to be marginal. Although their therapeutic indexes were good (5.00), recovery periods were prolonged and toxic convulsions occurred at medium to high dose rates as the LD50 was approached.Alpha-chloralose (Fisher Scientific) proved least promising of

  20. Development of a MELCOR Sodium Chemistry (NAC) Package - FY17 Progress.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, David; Humphries, Larry L.

    2018-02-01

    This report describes the status of the development of MELCOR S odium Chemistry (NAC) package. This development is based on the CONTAIN-LMR so dium physics and chemistry models to be implemented in MELCOR. In the past three years, the sodium equation of state as a working fluid from the nuclear fu sion safety research and from the SIMMER code has been implemented into MELCOR. The chem istry models from the CONTAIN-LMR code, such as the spray and pool fire mode ls, have also been implemented into MELCOR. This report describes the implemented models and the issues encountered. Model desc riptions and input descriptions are provided. Development testing of the spray and pool fire models is descri bed, including the code- to-code comparison with CONTAIN-LMR. The report ends with an e xpected timeline for the remaining models to be implemented, such as the atmosph ere chemistry, sodium-concrete interactions, and experimental validation tests .

  1. Progress In Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Cassibry, Jason T.; Griffin, Steven; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a coaxial pulsed plasma thruster (Figure 1). It has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approx.50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet has been photographed with 10-ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure (Figure 2). Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes and magnetic probes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma and current transit respectively at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  2. Prototype space erectable radiator system ground test article development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, Joseph P.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype heat rejecting system is being developed by NASA-JSC for possible space station applications. This modular system, the Space-Erectable Radiator System Ground Test Article (SERS-GTA) with high-capacity radiator panels, can be installed and replaced on-orbit. The design, fabrication and testing of a representative ground test article are discussed. Acceptance test data for the heat pipe radiator panel and the whiffletree clamping mechanism have been presented.

  3. Development of the integrated environmental control model: Performance model for the NOXSO process. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalagnanam, J.R.; Rubin, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    In its current configuration, the IECM provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integrated into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of different costs and performance results. The most recent version of the IECM, implemented on a MacIntosh II computer, was delivered to DOE/PETC at the end of the last contract in May 1991. The current contract will continue the model development effort to provide DOE/PETC with improved model capabilities, including new software developments to facilitate model use and new technical capabilities for analysis of environmental control technologies. Integrated environmental control systems involving pre-combustion, combustion, and post-combustion control methods will be considered. Phase I involves developing the existing modules of the IECM. Phase II deals with creating new technology modules, linking the IECM with PETC databases, and training PETC personnel on the use of the updated models. The present report summarizes recent progress on the Phase I effort during the period January 1 - March 31, 1995. A preliminary summary is given of the new performance model developed for the NOXSO process. The performance model is developed from first principles and parametrized based on experimental data from pilot plants.

  4. Association between Hemoglobin Concentration and the Progression or Development of Albuminuria in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Goji; Tanaka, Muhei; Osaka, Takafumi; Shiotsu, Yayoi; Narumiya, Hiromichi; Inoue, Mamoru; Nakano, Koji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Anemia, which might contribute to pathogenesis of kidney dysfunction, is a common finding in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate if hemoglobin concentration is associated with the degree of change in urinary albumin-creatinine ratio or the development of albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. We measured hemoglobin concentration in 470 (296 men and 174 women) consecutive type 2 diabetic patients without albuminuria. We performed a follow-up study to assess the progression or development of albuminuria, the interval of which was 3.0 years. Then we evaluated relationships between hemoglobin concentration and albuminuria, using multivariate linear regression analyses and logistic regression analyses. Eighty four patients developed albuminuria during follow-up duration. In multivariate analyses, hemoglobin concentration was negatively associated with a change in urinary albumin-creatinine ratio in men (ß = -0.259, P = 0.0002) and women (ß = -0.194, P = 0.030). Moreover, multivariate adjusted odds ratio associated with 1 g/L in hemoglobin for the development of albuminuria was 0.93 (95% confidence interval; 0.89-0.96) in men and 0.94 (95% confidence interval; 0.88-0.99) in women, respectively. And, multivariate analyses revealed that adjusted odds ratios for the development of albuminuria were 4.78 (95% confidence interval; 1.65-13.91) in men and 4.62 (95% confidence interval; 1.34-16.68) in women with anemia (hemoglobin albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Methodological developments in US state-level Genuine Progress Indicators: toward GPI 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Berik, Günseli; Gaddis, Erica J. Brown

    2014-01-01

    The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) has emerged as an important monetary measure of economic well-being. Unlike mainstream economic indicators, primarily Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the GPI accounts for both the benefits and costs of economic production across diverse economic, social, and environmental domains in a more comprehensive manner. Recently, the GPI has gained traction in subnational policy in the United States, with GPI studies being conducted in a number of states and with their formal adoption by several state governments. As the GPI is applied in different locations, new methods are developed, different data sources are available, and new issues of policy relevance are addressed using its component indicators. This has led to a divergence in methods, reducing comparability between studies and yielding results that are of varying methodological sophistication. In this study, we review the “state of the art” in recent US state-level GPI studies, focusing on those from Hawaii, Maryland, Ohio, Utah, and Vermont. Through adoption of a consistent approach, these and future GPI studies could utilize a framework that supports more uniform, comparable, and accurate measurements of progress. We also identify longer-term issues, particularly related to treatment of nonrenewable resource depletion, government spending, income inequality, and ecosystem services. As these issues are successfully addressed and disseminated, a “GPI 2.0” will emerge that better measures economic well-being and has greater accuracy and policy relevance than past GPI measurements. As the GPI expands further into mainstream policy analysis, a more formal process by which methods could be updated, standardized, and applied is needed.

  6. Heterogeneous Contributing Factors in MPM Disease Development and Progression: Biological Advances and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolani, Bhairavi; Acevedo, Luis A.; Hoang, Ngoc T.; He, Biao

    2018-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors are remarkably aggressive and most patients only survive for 5–12 months; irrespective of stage; after primary symptoms appear. Compounding matters is that MPM remains unresponsive to conventional standards of care; including radiation and chemotherapy. Currently; instead of relying on molecular signatures and histological typing; MPM treatment options are guided by clinical stage and patient characteristics because the mechanism of carcinogenesis has not been fully elucidated; although about 80% of cases can be linked to asbestos exposure. Several molecular pathways have been implicated in the MPM tumor microenvironment; such as angiogenesis; apoptosis; cell-cycle regulation and several growth factor-related pathways predicted to be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Furthermore, the availability of genomic data has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of MPM. The MPM genomic landscape is dominated by inactivating mutations in several tumor suppressor genes; such as CDKN2A; BAP1 and NF2. Given the complex heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment in MPM; a better understanding of the interplay between stromal; endothelial and immune cells at the molecular level is required; to chaperone the development of improved personalized therapeutics. Many recent advances at the molecular level have been reported and several exciting new treatment options are under investigation. Here; we review the challenges and the most up-to-date biological advances in MPM pertaining to the molecular pathways implicated; progress at the genomic level; immunological progression of this fatal disease; and its link with developmental cell pathways; with an emphasis on prognostic and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:29342862

  7. Tracking the progress of HIV: the impact of point-of-care tests on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid SD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Steven D Reid, Sarah J Fidler, Graham S Cooke Department of Infectious Diseases, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: It is now around 30 years since the discovery of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. More than 70 million people have been infected in that time and around 35 million have died. The majority of those currently living with HIV/AIDS are in low- and middle-income countries, with sub-Saharan Africa bearing a disproportionate burden of the global disease. In high-income countries, the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART has drastically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. Patients on ART are now predicted to have near-normal life expectancy and the role of treatment is increasingly recognized in preventing new infections. In low- and middle-income countries, treatment is now more widely available and around half of those who need ART are currently receiving it. Early diagnosis of HIV is essential if ART is to be optimally implemented. Lab-based diagnostics for screening, diagnosis, treatment initiation, and the monitoring of treatment efficacy are critical in managing the disease and reducing the number of new infections each year. The introduction of point-of-care HIV rapid tests has transformed the epidemic, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. For the first time, these point-of-care tests allow for the rapid identification of infected individuals outside the laboratory who can undergo counseling and treatment and, in the case of pregnant women, allow the timely initiation of ART to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. Although survival is markedly improved with ART even in the absence of laboratory monitoring, long-term management of people living with HIV on ART, and their partners, is essential to ensure successful viral suppression. The burden of disease in many resource-poor settings with high HIV prevalence has challenged the ability of local laboratories

  8. Testing and Debugging Techniques for Answer Set Solver Development

    OpenAIRE

    Brummayer, Robert; Järvisalo, Matti

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops automated testing and debugging techniques for answer set solver development. We describe a flexible grammar-based black-box ASP fuzz testing tool which is able to reveal various defects such as unsound and incomplete behavior, i.e. invalid answer sets and inability to find existing solutions, in state-of-the-art answer set solver implementations. Moreover, we develop delta debugging techniques for shrinking failure-inducing inputs on which solvers exhibit defective behavi...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A SPORTS SPECIFIC AEROBIC CAPACITY TEST FOR KARATE - A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Nunan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to develop an aerobic fitness assessment test for competitive Karate practitioners and describe the preliminary findings. Five well-trained, competitive Karate practitioners participated in this study. A protocol simulating common attack strikes used in competition Karate sparring was developed from video analysis. In addition, pilot testing established a specific sequence of strikes and timings to be used in the test. The time to perform the strike sequence remained the same, whilst the time between strike sequence performances was progressively reduced. The aim of the test was to increase intensity of exercise through a decrease in recovery. On two separate occasions, absolute and relative peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak, peak ventilation (VEpeak, maximum heart rate (HRM, and time to exhaustion (TE obtained during the test were recorded. Subjective feedback provided by the participants was positive in that participants felt the test accurately simulated actions of a competitive sparring situation, and as a result athletes felt more motivated to perform well on this test. There was no significant between test difference in absolute VO2peak, relative VO2peak, HRM and TE (p > 0.05, indicating a potentially high reproducibility with the new test for these variables (test 1-test 2 difference of 0.04 L·min-1, 1 ml·kg-1·min-1, -3 beats·min-1, and 28 s; respectively. However, VEpeak displayed potentially less reproducibility due to a significant difference observed between tests (test 1- test 2 difference of -2.8 L·min-1, p < 0.05. There was a significant relationship between TE and relative VO2peak (R2 = 0.77, p < 0.001. Further developments to the test will need to address issues with work rate/force output assessment/monitoring. The new test accurately simulates the actions of competitive Karate sparring

  10. Development Of Teal Ruby Experiment Radiometric Test Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtley, W. B.; Kowallis, O. K.; Molnar, L. A.; Wright, T. J.

    1981-12-01

    The Teal Ruby Experiment (TRE) sensor presents unique problems to radiometric performance testing and calibration of a mosaic infrared sensor because of the large number of resolution elements; the wide range of spectral, temporal, and flux level operating regions; and the cryogenic operating conditions. This paper contains a summary of the Teal Ruby test facilities and requirements at the infrared charge-coupled device (IRCCD) detector array, zone assembly, focal plane assembly, and sensor levels. Automated test facilities and capabilities are presented to highlight the development requirements and approaches to testing. Key issues concern the complexity of testing, selection of test parameters, commonality of test algorithms and data presentation, data needs for acceptance testing, optimization and integration, and test equipment standards for accuracy, operating range, and contamination control.

  11. Program of thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation mechanisms evaluation. Progress report No. 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, A.; Shields, V.

    1980-11-01

    The n-type gadolinium selenide legs after 17,500 hours continue to show reasonable agreement with the 3M Co. published thermal conductivity data. Weight loss for both coated and uncoated Si-Ge material produced by G.E. are reported. No significant discrepancies with the results previously obtained on R.C.A. material from the MHW program have been found. Thermal conductivity measurements are also in agreement. The remaining MHW generator on test, Q1-A, has accumulated 26,800 hours and performance remains stable. The performance of the 18 couple modules S/N-1, S/N-2, and S/N-3 to date is summarized. Telemetry data indicate no changes in the trends of degradation of LES 8 and 9 and the Voyager RTGs.

  12. Development of molten carbonate fuel cell power plant technology. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The overall objective of this 29-month program is to develop and verify the design of a prototype molten carbonate fuel cell stack which meets the requirements of a 1990's-competitive coal-fired electrical utility central station or industrial cogeneration power plants. During this quarter, activity continued in three of the four task areas: Task 2-cell and stack design, development and verification; Task 3 - preparation for fabrication and testing of the full-scale prototype stack; and Task 4 - development of the capability to operate stacks on coal-derived gas. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  13. Development and Standardization of a Furosemide Stress Test to Predict the Severity of Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the setting of early acute kidney injury (AKI), no test has been shown to definitively predict the progression to more severe stages. Methods We investigated the ability of a furosemide stress test (FST) (one-time dose of 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg depending on prior furosemide-exposure) to predict the development of AKIN Stage-III in 2 cohorts of critically ill subjects with early AKI. Cohort 1 was a retrospective cohort who received a FST in the setting of AKI in critically ill patients as part of Southern AKI Network. Cohort 2 was a prospective multicenter group of critically ill patients who received their FST in the setting of early AKI. Results We studied 77 subjects; 23 from cohort 1 and 54 from cohort 2; 25 (32.4%) met the primary endpoint of progression to AKIN-III. Subjects with progressive AKI had significantly lower urine output following FST in each of the first 6 hours (p<0.001). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for the total urine output over the first 2 hours following FST to predict progression to AKIN-III was 0.87 (p = 0.001). The ideal-cutoff for predicting AKI progression during the first 2 hours following FST was a urine volume of less than 200mls(100ml/hr) with a sensitivity of 87.1% and specificity 84.1%. Conclusions The FST in subjects with early AKI serves as a novel assessment of tubular function with robust predictive capacity to identify those patients with severe and progressive AKI. Future studies to validate these findings are warranted. PMID:24053972

  14. Progress in the Development of the Wuhan High Magnetic Field Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Peng, T.; Ding, H. F.; Han, X. T.; Xia, Z. C.; Ding, T. H.; Wang, J. F.; Xie, J. F.; Wang, S. L.; Huang, Y.; Duan, X. Z.; Yao, K. L.; Herlach, F.; Vanacken, J.; Pan, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Since April 2008 the Wuhan High Magnetic Field Center (WHMFC) has been under development at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) at Wuhan, China. It is funded by the Chinese National Development and Reformation Committee. Magnets with bore sizes from 12 to 34 mm and peak fields in the range of 50 to 80 T have been designed. The power supplies for these magnets are a capacitor bank with 12 modules of 1 MJ, 25 kV each and a 100 MVA/100 MJ flywheel pulse generator. The objective of the facility is to accommodate external users for extensive experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields. Up to seven measurement stations will be available at temperatures in the range from 50 mK to 400 K. The first prototype 1 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank with thyristors, crowbar diodes and a mechanical switch has been developed and successfully tested. For the protection of the thyristor switch, a toroidal inductor is developed to limit the current at 40 kA. Five magnets have been wound with CuNb and copper wires and internal reinforcement by Zylon fiber; external reinforcement is a stainless steel shell encased by carbon fiber composite. Two Helium flow cryostats have been successfully tested and reached temperatures down to 4.2 K. Measurement stations for magneto-transport and magnetization are in operation. The design, construction and testing of the prototype system are presented.

  15. EVALUATION OF STEROID HORMONES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Bennett

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones and their receptors have important roles in normal kidney biology, and alterations in their expression and function help explain the differences in development of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. The distinct gender difference in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, with males having almost twice the incidence as females globally, also suggests a role for sex hormones or their receptors in RCC development and progression. There was a peak in interest in evaluating the roles of androgen and estrogen receptors in RCC pathogenesis in the late 20th century, with some positive outcomes for RCC therapy that targeted estrogen receptors, especially for metastatic disease. Since that time, however, there have been few studies that look at use of steroid hormone modulators for RCC, especially in the light of new therapies such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and new immune therapies, which are having some success for treatment of metastatic RCC. This review summarises past and current literature and attempts to stimulate renewed interest in research into the steroid hormones and their receptors, which might be used to effect, for example, in combination with the other newer targeted therapies for RCC.

  16. The Multifunctional Protein Kinase C-ε in Cancer Development and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular and Medical Genetics, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Institute for Cancer Research, and Focused on Resources for her Health Education and Research, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family proteins are important signal transducers and have long been the focus of cancer research. PKCε, a member of this family, is overexpressed in most solid tumors and plays critical roles in different processes that lead to cancer development. Studies using cell lines and animal models demonstrated the transforming potential of PKCε. While earlier research established the survival functions of PKCε, recent studies revealed its role in cell migration, invasion and cancer metastasis. PKCε has also been implicated in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which may be the underlying mechanism by which it contributes to cell motility. In addition, PKCε affects cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions by direct regulation of the cytoskeletal elements. Recent studies have also linked PKCε signaling to cancer stem cell functioning. This review focuses on the role of PKCε in different processes that lead to cancer development and progression. We also discussed current literatures on the pursuit of PKCε as a target for cancer therapy.

  17. Progress in the development of semiconducting metal oxide gas sensors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Patrick T.

    2017-08-01

    Since the first suggestion, during the 1950s, that high-surface-area metal oxides could be used as conductometric gas sensors enormous efforts have been made to enhance both the selectivity and the sensitivity of such devices, and to reduce their operational power requirements. This development has involved the exploration of response mechanisms, the selection of the most appropriate oxide compositions, the fabrication of two-phase ‘hetero-structures’, the addition of metallic catalyst particles and the optimisation of the manner in which the materials are presented to the gas—the structure and the nanostructure of the sensing elements. Far more of the scientific literature has been devoted to seeking such improvements in metal oxide gas sensors than has been directed at all other solid-state gas sensors together. Recent progress in the research and development of metal oxide gas sensor technology is surveyed in this invited review. The advances that have been made are quite spectacular and the results of individual pieces of work are drawn together here so that trends can be seen. Emerging features include: the significance of n-type/p-type switching, the enhancement of sensing performance of materials through the incorporation of secondary components and the advantages of interrogating sensors with alternating current rather than direct current.

  18. Association of Immunosuppression with DR6 Expression during the Development and Progression of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer in Laying Hen Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa’Rah McNeal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer (OVCA mainly disseminates in the peritoneal cavity. Immune functions are important to prevent OVCA progression and recurrence. The mechanism of immunosuppression, a hallmark of tumor progression, is not well understood. The goal of this study was to determine the immune system’s responses and its suppression during OVCA development and progression in hens. Frequencies of CD8+ T cells and IgY-containing cells and expression of immunosuppressors including IRG1 and DR6 in OVCA at early and late stages in hens were examined. Frequencies of stromal but not the intratumoral CD+8 T cells and IgY-containing cells increased significantly (P<0.01 during OVCA development and progression. Tumor progression was associated with increased expression of IRG1 and DR6 and decreased infiltration of immune cells into the tumor. Frequency of stromal but not intratumoral immune cells increases during OVCA development and progression. Tumor-induced IRG1 and DR6 may prevent immune cells from invading the tumor.

  19. The Graduate Management Admission Test: Technical Report on Test Development and Score Interpretation for GMAT Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, William B.

    This report provides information on test development, test administration, and score interpretation for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). The GMAT, first administered in 1954, provides objective measures of an applicant's abilities for use in admissions decisions by graduate management schools. It is currently composed of five…

  20. Downregulated NLRP3 and NLRP1 inflammasomes signaling pathways in the development and progression of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huawei; Xu, Ruiying; Kong, Qingyu; Liu, Jiling; Yu, Zhen; Zhao, Cuifen

    2017-10-01

    NLRP3 and NLRP1 inflammasomes signaling pathways may play an important role in the development and progression of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, relative research is rare. The blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and granulocytes (GCs) were collected from T1DM patients. The mRNA and protein expression levels were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The NLRP3/NLRP1was knocked down by transfected with siRNA, or ovexpressed by infected with lentiviral vectors in PBMCs and GCs from non obese diabetic (NOD) mice, respectively. The occurrence of diabetes was evaluated and the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance was tested in NOD mice with IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M deficiency (IRAK-M -/- ). The pancreas and lymphonodus of IRAK-M -/- NOD mice were also collected for detection of NLRP3/NLRP1 expression. NLRP3, NLRP1, Caspase-1and IL-1β were significantly downregulated in the PBMCs and GCs of patients with T1DM, and NLRP3 and NLRP1 were markedly downregulated in T1DM patients with DKA compared to that with ND and CC. Further study indicated that IL-1β mRNA expression level was positively correlated with the expression levels of NLRP3, NLRP1 and Caspase-1. Besides, NLRP3/NLRP1 knockdown decreased the expression levels of Caspase-1 and IL-1β; whereas NLRP3/NLRP1 overexpression increased the expression levels of Caspase-1 and IL-1β in vitro. IRAK-M -/- NOD mice had early onset and rapid progression of T1DM, and weak glucose tolerance, which was regarded as an early T1D mouse model. The mRNA expression levels of NLRP3, NLRP1, Caspase-1and IL-1β in the pancreas and lymphonodus of IRAK-M -/- NOD mice were significantly higher compared to that of IRAK-M +/+ NOD mice. NLRP3 and NLRP1 inflammasomes signaling pathways were associated with the development and progression of T1DM, which response as protective factors in the early stage of T1DM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.