WorldWideScience

Sample records for test beam silicon

  1. Beam test of CSES silicon strip detector module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da-Li; Lu, Hong; Wang, Huan-Yu; Li, Xin-Qiao; Xu, Yan-Bing; An, Zheng-Hua; Yu, Xiao-xia; Wang, Hui; Shi, Feng; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Xiao-Yun

    2017-05-01

    The silicon-strip tracker of the China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite (CSES) consists of two double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) which provide incident particle tracking information. A low-noise analog ASIC VA140 was used in this study for DSSD signal readout. A beam test on the DSSD module was performed at the Beijing Test Beam Facility of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) using a 400-800 MeV/c proton beam. The pedestal analysis results, RMSE noise, gain correction, and intensity distribution of incident particles of the DSSD module are presented. Supported by the XXX Civil Space Programme

  2. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campabadal, F.; Fleta, C.; Key, M.; Böhm, Jan; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Šťastný, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 538, - (2005), s. 384-407 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04LA212 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : ATLAS * silicon * micro-strip * beam * test Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2005

  3. Beam test of a large area silicon drift detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Chinnici, S.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Palma, F.; Sampietro, M.; Rehak, P.; Ballocchi, G.; Kemmer, J.; Holl, P.; Cox, P.T.; Giacomelli, P.; Vacchi, A.

    1992-01-01

    The results from the tests of the first large area (4 x 4 cm 2 ) planar silicon drift detector prototype in a pion beam are reported. The measured position resolution in the drift direction is (σ=40 ± 10)μm

  4. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Campabadal, F; Key, M; Lozano, M; Martínez, C; Pellegrini, G; Rafí, J M; Ullán, M; Johansen, L; Pommeresche, B; Stugu, B; Ciocio, A; Fadeev, V; Gilchriese, M G D; Haber, C; Siegrist, J; Spieler, H; Vu, C; Bell, P J; Charlton, D G; Dowell, John D; Gallop, B J; Homer, R J; Jovanovic, P; Mahout, G; McMahon, T J; Wilson, J A; Barr, A J; Carter, J R; Fromant, B P; Goodrick, M J; Hill, J C; Lester, C G; Palmer, M J; Parker, M A; Robinson, D; Sabetfakhri, A; Shaw, R J; Anghinolfi, F; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Chouridou, S; Fortin, R; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwé, M; Ferrari, P; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; MacPherson, A; Niinikoski, T O; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Rudge, A; Ruggiero, G; Wallny, R; Weilhammer, P; Bialas, W; Dabrowski, W; Grybos, P; Koperny, S; Blocki, J; Brückman, P; Gadomski, S; Godlewski, J; Górnicki, E; Malecki, P; Moszczynski, A; Stanecka, E; Stodulski, M; Szczygiel, R; Turala, M; Wolter, M; Ahmad, A; Benes, J; Carpentieri, C; Feld, L; Ketterer, C; Ludwig, J; Meinhardt, J; Runge, K; Mikulec, B; Mangin-Brinet, M; D'Onofrio, M; Donega, M; Moêd, S; Sfyrla, A; Ferrère, D; Clark, A G; Perrin, E; Weber, M; Bates, R L; Cheplakov, A P; Saxon, D H; O'Shea, V; Smith, K M; Iwata, Y; Ohsugi, T; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Terada, S; Ujiie, N; Ikegami, Y; Unno, Y; Takashima, R; Brodbeck, T; Chilingarov, A G; Hughes, G; Ratoff, P; Sloan, T; Allport, P P; Casse, G L; Greenall, A; Jackson, J N; Jones, T J; King, B T; Maxfield, S J; Smith, N A; Sutcliffe, P; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Beck, G A; Carter, A A; Lloyd, S L; Martin, A J; Morris, J; Morin, J; Nagai, K; Pritchard, T W; Anderson, B E; Butterworth, J M; Fraser, T J; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; Postranecky, M; Warren, M R M; Cindro, V; Kramberger, G; Mandic, I; Mikuz, M; Duerdoth, I P; Freestone, J; Foster, J M; Ibbotson, M; Loebinger, F K; Pater, J; Snow, S W; Thompson, R J; Atkinson, T M; Bright, G; Kazi, S; Lindsay, S; Moorhead, G F; Taylor, G N; Bachindgagyan, G; Baranova, N; Karmanov, D; Merkine, M; Andricek, L; Bethke, Siegfried; Kudlaty, J; Lutz, Gerhard; Moser, H G; Nisius, R; Richter, R; Schieck, J; Cornelissen, T; Gorfine, G W; Hartjes, F G; Hessey, N P; de Jong, P; Muijs, A J M; Peeters, S J M; Tomeda, Y; Tanaka, R; Nakano, I; Dorholt, O; Danielsen, K M; Huse, T; Sandaker, H; Stapnes, S; Bargassa, Pedrame; Reichold, A; Huffman, T; Nickerson, R B; Weidberg, A; Doucas, G; Hawes, B; Lau, W; Howell, D; Kundu, N; Wastie, R; Böhm, J; Mikestikova, M; Stastny, J; Broklová, Z; Broz, J; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Kubík, P; Reznicek, P; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I; Chren, D; Horazdovsky, T; Linhart, V; Pospísil, S; Sinor, M; Solar, M; Sopko, B; Stekl, I; Ardashev, E N; Golovnya, S N; Gorokhov, S A; Kholodenko, A G; Rudenko, R E; Ryadovikov, V N; Vorobev, A P; Adkin, P J; Apsimon, R J; Batchelor, L E; Bizzell, J P; Booker, P; Davis, V R; Easton, J M; Fowler, C; Gibson, M D; Haywood, S J; MacWaters, C; Matheson, J P; Matson, R M; McMahon, S J; Morris, F S; Morrissey, M; Murray, W J; Phillips, P W; Tyndel, M; Villani, E G; Dorfan, D E; Grillo, A A; Rosenbaum, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Booth, P; Buttar, C M; Dawson, I; Dervan, P; Grigson, C; Harper, R; Moraes, A; Peak, L S; Varvell, K E; Chu Ming Lee; Hou Li Shing; Lee Shih Chang; Teng Ping Kun; Wan Chang Chun; Hara, K; Kato, Y; Kuwano, T; Minagawa, M; Sengoku, H; Bingefors, N; Brenner, R; Ekelöf, T J C; Eklund, L; Bernabeu, J; Civera, J V; Costa, M J; Fuster, J; García, C; García, J E; González-Sevilla, S; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Martí i García, S; Modesto, P; Sánchez, J; Sospedra, L; Vos, M; Fasching, D; González, S; Jared, R C; Charles, E

    2005-01-01

    The design and technology of the silicon strip detector modules for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment have been finalised in the last several years. Integral to this process has been the measurement and verification of the tracking performance of the different module types in test beams at the CERN SPS and the KEK PS. Tests have been performed to explore the module performance under various operating conditions including detector bias voltage, magnetic field, incidence angle, and state of irradiation up to 3 multiplied by 1014 protons per square centimetre. A particular emphasis has been the understanding of the operational consequences of the binary readout scheme.

  5. Test of an amorphous silicon detector in medical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martisikova, M., E-mail: m.martisikova@dkfz.de [Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hesse, B.M. [Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Nairz, O. [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum HIT am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, O [Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum HIT am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Ion beam radiation therapy for cancer treatment allows for improved dose confinement to the target in comparison with the standard radiation therapy using high energy photons. Dose delivery to the patient using focused ion beam scanning over the target volume is going to be increasingly used in the upcoming years. The high precision of the dose delivery achieved in this way has to be met by practical methods for beam monitoring with sufficient spatial resolution in two dimensions. Flat panel detectors, used for photon portal imaging at the newest medical linear accelerators, are an interesting candidate for this purpose. Initial detector tests presented here were performed using proton beams with the highest available energy. The investigations include measurements of beam profiles at different beam intensities and for different beam width, as well as the signal linearity. Radiation damage was also investigated. The obtained results show that the detector is a promising candidate to be used in the therapeutic proton beams.

  6. Innovative thin silicon detectors for monitoring of therapeutic proton beams: preliminary beam tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, A.; Monaco, V.; Attili, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Donetti, M.; Fadavi Mazinani, M.; Fausti, F.; Ferrero, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Hammad Ali, O.; Mandurrino, M.; Manganaro, L.; Mazza, G.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Staiano, A.; Cirio, R.; Boscardin, M.; Paternoster, G.; Ficorella, F.

    2017-12-01

    To fully exploit the physics potentials of particle therapy in delivering dose with high accuracy and selectivity, charged particle therapy needs further improvement. To this scope, a multidisciplinary project (MoVeIT) of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) aims at translating research in charged particle therapy into clinical outcome. New models in the treatment planning system are being developed and validated, using dedicated devices for beam characterization and monitoring in radiobiological and clinical irradiations. Innovative silicon detectors with internal gain layer (LGAD) represent a promising option, overcoming the limits of currently used ionization chambers. Two devices are being developed: one to directly count individual protons at high rates, exploiting the large signal-to-noise ratio and fast collection time in small thicknesses (1 ns in 50 μm) of LGADs, the second to measure the beam energy with time-of-flight techniques, using LGADs optimized for excellent time resolutions (Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors, UFSDs). The preliminary results of first beam tests with therapeutic beam will be presented and discussed.

  7. Beam test results of a drift velocity monitoring system for silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A; Mazza, G; Nissinen, J; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2002-01-01

    We report results on drift velocity monitoring using MOS charge injectors in silicon drift detectors obtained in beam test conditions. The correction of velocity variations as small as 0.03% caused by temperature variations of the order of 0.04 K allowed to get an average space resolution along all the drift path of 28 mu m. Preliminary result demonstrating the possibility to correct for temperature gradients along the anode axis are also presented.

  8. The Silicon Tracker of the Beam Test Engineering Model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    do Couto e Silva, Eduardo

    2000-06-01

    The silicon tracker for the engineering model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope(LAT) has at least two unique features: it employs self triggering readout electronics, dissipating less than 200 mu-W per channel and to date represents the largest surface of silicon microstrip detectors assembled in a tracker (2.7 m{sup 2}). It demonstrates the feasibility of employing this technology for satellite based experiments, in which low power consumption, large effective areas and high reliability are required. This note describes the construction of this silicon tracker, which was installed in a beam test of positrons, hadrons and tagged photons at SLAC in December of 1999 and January of 2000.

  9. An Architecture Proposal for the ILC Test Beam Silicon Telescope at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turqueti, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The requirements for an ILC Test Beam silicon telescope system are foreseen to be very stringent. Resolution, noise, and throughput must be carefully managed in order to provide a useful instrument for the high energy physics community to develop detector technologies for the ILC. Since the ILC Test Beam is meant to test a wide variety of different detectors, it must employ universally accepted software techniques, hardware standards and protocols as well as easy integration of hardware and software with the various clients using the system. In this paper, we describe an open modular architecture to achieve these goals, including an analysis of the entire chain of software and hardware needed to meet the requirements.

  10. Use of Silicon Carbide as Beam Intercepting Device Material: Tests, Issues and Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delonca, M; Gil Costa, M; Vacca, A

    2014-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) stands as one of the most promising ceramic material with respect to its thermal shock resistance and mechanical strengths. It has hence been considered as candidate material for the development of higher performance beam intercepting devices at CERN. Its brazing with a metal counterpart has been tested and characterized by means of microstructural and ultrasound techniques. Despite the positive results, its use has to be evaluated with care, due to the strong evidence in literature of large and permanent volumetric expansion, called swelling, under the effect of neutron and ion irradiation. This may cause premature and sudden failure, and can be mitigated to some extent by operating at high temperature. For this reason limited information is available for irradiation below 100°C, which is the typical temperature of interest for beam intercepting devices like dumps or collimators. This paper describes the brazing campaign carried out at CERN, the results, and the theoretical and numeric...

  11. Testing of the effect of the entry beam tube windows of the silicon detectors of the ionisation radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopestansky, J.; Tykva, R.; Stanek, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with testing of the entry beam tube windows of the silicon detectors of the ionisation radiation with surface barrier.The influence of the parameters of basic material and modified technologic preparation on the size and homogeneity of the windows was tested

  12. Laboratory and test beam results from a large-area silicon drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; Giubellino, P; Gregorio, A; Idzik, M; Kolojvari, A A; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nouais, D; Petta, C; Rashevsky, A; Randazzo, N; Reito, S; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A very large-area (6.75*8 cm/sup 2/) silicon drift detector with integrated high-voltage divider has been designed, produced and fully characterised in the laboratory by means of ad hoc designed MOS injection electrodes. The detector is of the "butterfly" type, the sensitive area being subdivided into two regions with a maximum drift length of 3.3 cm. The device was also tested in a pion beam (at the CERN PS) tagged by means of a microstrip detector telescope. Bipolar VLSI front-end cells featuring a noise of 250 e/sup -/ RMS at 0 pF with a slope of 40 e/sup -//pF have been used to read out the signals. The detector showed an excellent stability and featured the expected characteristics. Some preliminary results will be presented. (12 refs).

  13. Pulse Shape Characterization of Silicon Diodes for HGCal with data from Beam Test at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, Malinda

    2016-01-01

    The High Luminosity phase of the LHC (starting operation in 2025) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosity, with 25 ns bunch crossing intervals and up to 140 pileup events. A challenge is to provide excellent physics performance in such a harsh environment to fully exploit the HL-LHC potentialities and explore new physics frontiers. In this context, the High Granularity Calorimeter is the detector designed to provide electromagnetic and hadronic energy coverage and reconstruction in the forward direction of the upgraded CMS. In April 2016 and June 2016, a set of 36 diodes were tested in order to understand various characteristics of its performance, in order to use them in the upgraded HG Calorimeter. Here, the silicon diodes were mounted onto a test bench at CERN’s beam test area and exposed to electron showers. Data received from these diodes were acquired and analysed separately. The objective of this report is to show the variation of Time Rise, Time Over Threshold with various...

  14. Test beam demonstration of silicon microstrip modules with transverse momentum discrimination for the future CMS tracking detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Hoch, M.; Hrubec, J.; König, A.; Steininger, H.; Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Alderweireldt, S.; Beaumont, W.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Beghin, D.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Postiau, N.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; De Visscher, S.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Cabrera Jamoulle, J.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Michotte, D.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Szilasi, N.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Härkönen, J.; Lampén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Eerola, P.; Baulieu, G.; Boudoul, G.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Dupasquier, T.; Gallbit, G.; Lumb, N.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Viret, S.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bonnin, C.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.; Chanon, N.; Charles, L.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-Ch.; Gross, L.; Hosselet, J.; Jansova, M.; Tromson, D.; Autermann, C.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Kiesel, K. M.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pierschel, G.; Preuten, M.; Rauch, M.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Schwering, G.; Wlochal, M.; Zhukov, V.; Pistone, C.; Fluegge, G.; Kuensken, A.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Bertsche, D.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Hansen, K.; Haranko, M.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Keaveney, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kleinwort, C.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Maser, H.; Mittag, G.; Muhl, C.; Mussgiller, A.; Pitzl, D.; Reichelt, O.; Savitskyi, M.; Schuetze, P.; Walsh, R.; Zuber, A.; Biskop, H.; Buhmann, P.; Centis-Vignali, M.; Garutti, E.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Klanner, R.; Matysek, M.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, Ch.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Vormwald, B.; Wellhausen, J.; Abbas, M.; Amstutz, C.; Barvich, T.; Barth, Ch.; Boegelspacher, F.; De Boer, W.; Butz, E.; Casele, M.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Freund, B.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S.; Husemann, U.; Kornmeyer, A.; Kudella, S.; Muller, Th.; Printz, M.; Simonis, H. J.; Steck, P.; Weber, M.; Weiler, Th.; Anagnostou, G.; Asenov, P.; Assiouras, P.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Paspalaki, L.; Siklér, F.; Veszprémi, V.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Jain, G.; Ranjan, K.; Dutta, S.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Bakhshiansohl, H.; Behnamian, H.; Khakzad, M.; Naseri, M.; Cariola, P.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Loddo, F.; Sala, G.; Silvestris, L.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Brianzi, M.; Ciaranfi, R.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Latino, G.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Scarlini, E.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Dall'Osso, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Tosi, M.; De Canio, F.; Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Nodari, B.; Riceputi, E.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Comotti, D.; Ratti, L.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Cecchi, C.; Checcucci, B.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Gentsos, C.; Ionica, M.; Leonardi, R.; Manoni, E.; Mantovani, G.; Marconi, S.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Modak, A.; Morozzi, A.; Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Placidi, P.; Postolache, V.; Rossi, A.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Storchi, L.; Spiga, D.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Arezzini, S.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; Ciampa, A.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Magazzu, G.; Martini, L.; Mazzoni, E.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Morsani, F.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Bellan, R.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monteil, E.; Pacher, L.; Ravera, F.; Solano, A.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Jaramillo Echeverria, R.; Moya, D.; Gonzalez Sanchez, F. J.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, I.; Albert, E.; Auzinger, G.; Berruti, G.; Bianchi, G.; Blanchot, G.; Bonnaud, J.; Caratelli, A.; Ceresa, D.; Christiansen, J.; Cichy, K.; Daguin, J.; D'Auria, A.; Detraz, S.; Deyrail, D.; Dondelewski, O.; Faccio, F.; Frank, N.; Gadek, T.; Gill, K.; Honma, A.; Hugo, G.; Jara Casas, L. M.; Kaplon, J.; Kornmayer, A.; Kottelat, L.; Kovacs, M.; Krammer, M.; Lenoir, P.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Marconi, S.; Mersi, S.; Martina, S.; Michelis, S.; Moll, M.; Onnela, A.; Orfanelli, S.; Pavis, S.; Peisert, A.; Pernot, J.-F.; Petagna, P.; Petrucciani, G.; Postema, H.; Rose, P.; Tropea, P.; Troska, J.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Vichoudis, P.; Verlaat, B.; Zwalinski, L.; Bachmair, F.; Becker, R.; di Calafiori, D.; Casal, B.; Berger, P.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M.; Perozzi, L.; Roeser, U.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D.; Amsler, C.; Bösiger, K.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Maier, R.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H.-C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Chen, P.-H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Lu, R.-S.; Moya, M.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Jacob, J.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Cole, J.; Hoad, C.; Hobson, P.; Morton, A.; Reid, I. D.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Dauncey, P.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; James, T.; Magnan, A.-M.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Uchida, K.; Braga, D.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Jones, L.; Ilic, J.; Murray, P.; Prydderch, M.; Tomalin, I. R.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Narain, M.; Nelson, J.; Sagir, S.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Tersegno, D.; Watson-Daniels, J.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Flores, C.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Squires, M.; Thomson, J.; Yohay, R.; Burt, K.; Ellison, J.; Hanson, G.; Olmedo, M.; Si, W.; Yates, B. R.; Gerosa, R.; Sharma, V.; Vartak, A.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Dutta, V.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Kyre, S.; Mullin, S.; Qu, H.; White, D.; Dominguez, A.; Bartek, R.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Apresyan, A.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chramowicz, J.; Christian, D.; Cooper, W. E.; Deptuch, G.; Derylo, G.; Gingu, C.; Grünendahl, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Hoff, J.; Howell, J.; Hrycyk, M.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Kahlid, F.; Lei, C. M.; Lipton, R.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Liu, T.; Los, S.; Matulik, M.; Merkel, P.; Nahn, S.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Schneider, B.; Sellberg, G.; Shenai, A.; Spiegel, L.; Tran, N.; Uplegger, L.; Voirin, E.; Berry, D. R.; Chen, X.; Ennesser, L.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Makauda, S.; Mills, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L. J.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C. S.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bubna, M.; Hinton, N.; Jones, M.; Miller, D. H.; Shi, X.; Tan, P.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Wilson, G.; Ivanov, A.; Mendis, R.; Mitchell, T.; Skhirtladze, N.; Taylor, R.; Anderson, I.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J.; Hahn, K.; Sevova, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Bartz, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Walker, M.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; McDermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Zientek, M.; Akgün, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Covarelli, R.; Demina, R.; Hindrichs, O.; Petrillo, G.; Eusebi, R.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Delannoy, A. G.; D'Angelo, P.; Johns, W.

    2018-03-01

    A new CMS Tracker is under development for operation at the High Luminosity LHC from 2026 onwards. It includes an outer tracker based on dedicated modules that will reconstruct short track segments, called stubs, using spatially coincident clusters in two closely spaced silicon sensor layers. These modules allow the rejection of low transverse momentum track hits and reduce the data volume before transmission to the first level trigger. The inclusion of tracking information in the trigger decision is essential to limit the first level trigger accept rate. A customized front-end readout chip, the CMS Binary Chip (CBC), containing stub finding logic has been designed for this purpose. A prototype module, equipped with the CBC chip, has been constructed and operated for the first time in a 4 GeemVem/emc positron beam at DESY. The behaviour of the stub finding was studied for different angles of beam incidence on a module, which allows an estimate of the sensitivity to transverse momentum within the future CMS detector. A sharp transverse momentum threshold around 2 emVem/emc was demonstrated, which meets the requirement to reject a large fraction of low momentum tracks present in the LHC environment on-detector. This is the first realistic demonstration of a silicon tracking module that is able to select data, based on the particle's transverse momentum, for use in a first level trigger at the LHC . The results from this test are described here.

  15. Test-Beam Results on <100> Silicon Prototype Detectors with APV6 Front-End Chip Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Matthias

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented using data collected during the X5 test-beam performed in August 1999. To achieve a good estimate of signal and noise values, the raw data are processed off-line by a dedicated reconstruction program. In particular, an efficient algorithm for pedestal, noise and common mode calculation was developed and tested. The intrinsic performances of an AC-coupled CMS silicon micro-strip multi-geometry prototype detector, with a <100> crystal orientation and a low resistivity ( 1~k Omega cm), are investigated. This detector was exposed to an irradiation fluence of 3 imes10^{14} p/cm ^2 , equivalent to 10 years of operation at LHC. The signal-to-noise ratio and the ghost rates per strip and per cm ^2 are presented, as a function of the bias voltage.

  16. Test-beam evaluation of heavily irradiated silicon strip modules for ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Blue, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC with 10 years of operation at instantaneous luminosities of 7.5x1034cm−2s−1. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1x1015 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2 in the ATLAS Strips system. The silicon strip tracker exploits the concept of modularity. Fast readout electronics, deploying 130nm CMOS front-end electronics are glued on top of a silicon sensor to make a module. The radiation hard n-in-p micro-strip sensors used have been developed by the ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. A series of tests were performed at the DESY-II and CERN SPS test beam facilities to investigate the detailed performance of a strip module with both 2.5cm and 5cm length strips before and after irradiation with 8x1014neqcm−2 protons and a total ionising dose of 37.2MRad. The DURA...

  17. GTK beam test 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Vostinic, Snezana

    2017-01-01

    The GTK is in operation at NA62 since 2014 and is among the few silicon pixel detectors performing 4D tracking. This summer, a beam test was conducted to study the phenomena determining the detector time resolution. The project described here contributed to the beam test preparation, data taking and data analyses. One of the main goals of the test was to understand the weight field contribution to the detector time resolution. This field is distorting the signal pulse shape at the edge of the pixel. Hence, to study this effect, the position of the hits inside the pixel has to be determined. An external telescope was therefore used for this purpose.

  18. Heavy ion beam test results of the silicon charge detector for the CREAM cosmic ray balloon mission

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I H; Bok, J B; Ganel, O; Hahn, J H; Han, W; Hyun, H J; Kim, H J; Kim, M Y; Kim, Y J; Lee, J K; Lutz, L; Malinine, A; Min, K W; Nam, S W; Nam, W; Park, H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Seon, K I; Sone, J H; Yang, J; Zinn, S Y

    2004-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is designed to measure cosmic ray elemental spectra to help understand the source and acceleration mechanisms of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The payload is planned to launch in December 2004 from McMurdo Station, Antarctica as a balloon mission. A Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) was designed and constructed for the CREAM experiment to provide precision charge measurements of incident cosmic rays with a resolution of 0.2 charge unit or better. The SCD was exposed to heavy ion beams at CERN's H2 beam line in November 2003. The results reported here show the SCD performs as designed.

  19. Heavy ion beam test results of the silicon charge detector for the CREAM cosmic ray balloon mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I.H.; Ahn, H.S.; Bok, J.B.; Ganel, O.; Hahn, J.H.; Han, W.; Hyun, H.J.; Kim, H.J.; Kim, M.Y.; Kim, Y.J.; Lee, J.K.; Lee, M.H.; Lutz, L.; Min, K.W.; Malinine, A.; Nam, S.W.; Nam, W.; Park, H.; Park, N.H.; Seo, E.S.; Seon, K.I.; Sone, J.H.; Yang, J.; Zinn, S.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is designed to measure cosmic ray elemental spectra to help understand the source and acceleration mechanisms of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The payload is planned to launch in December 2004 from McMurdo Station, Antarctica as a balloon mission. A Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) was designed and constructed for the CREAM experiment to provide precision charge measurements of incident cosmic rays with a resolution of 0.2 charge unit or better. The SCD was exposed to heavy ion beams at CERN's H2 beam line in November 2003. The results reported here show the SCD performs as designed

  20. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Thorben

    2018-02-01

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5–1.0 cm2 interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front-end ASIC (designed by the CALICE collaboration for ILC). In 2017, the setup has been extended with CALICE's AHCAL prototype, a scinitillator based sampling calorimeter, and it was further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end ASIC was used for the first time. We highlight final results from our studies in 2016, including position resolution as well as precision timing-measurements. Furthermore, the extended setup in 2017 is discussed and first results from beam tests with electrons and pions are shown.

  1. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten and scintillator-SiPM modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yung-wei

    2018-01-01

    A High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is being designed to replace the existing endcap calorimeters in CMS for the HL-LHC era. It features unprecedented transverse and longitudinal segmentation for both electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) compartments, with silicon sensors being chosen for the high-pseudorapidity regions due to their radiation tolerance. The remainder of the HGCAL, in the lower radiation environment, will use plastic scintillator with on-tile SiPM readout. Prototype hexagonal silicon modules, featuring a new Skiroc2-CMS front-end chip, together with a modified version of the scintillator-SiPM CALICE AHCAL, have been built and tested in beams at CERN in 2017. In this poster, we present measurements of noise, calibration, shower shapes and performance with electrons, pions and muons.

  2. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, Thorben

    2017-01-01

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5 - 1.0 cm$^2$ interspersed with absorbers.Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front-end chip (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). This year, the setup is extended with CALICE's AHCAL prototype and it is further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end chip is used for the first time.We present final results from our studies in 2016, including noise performance, calibration with MIPs, energy and p...

  3. arXiv Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00664095

    2018-02-26

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5–1.0 cm2 interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front-end ASIC (designed by the CALICE collaboration for ILC). In 2017, the setup has been extended with CALICE's AHCAL prototype, a scinitillator based sampling calorimeter, and it was further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end ASIC was used for the first time. We highlight final results from our studies in 2016, including ...

  4. First results from a beam test of a high-granularity silicon-based calorimeter for CMS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan

    2016-01-01

    A prototype of the electromagnetic calorimeter for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter that is being designed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) was tested in a test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF). The detector consisted of 16 sampling layers of silicon sensors interspersed withtungsten plates for a total thickness of 15.3 X$_{0}$. Each of the hexagonal sensors were sub-divided into 128 cells, predominantly hexagonal in shape, of area ~1.1 cm$^2$. The analog signal from the 2048 cells was readout using the 64-channel SKIROC2 ASIC, developed by the LLR OMEGA group for the CALICE collaboration. Data were collected with a custom data acquisition system developed for these tests. The detector was calibrated using signals obtained with 120 GeV protons.We report here the design of the prototype detector and the results obtained from analyzing the data collected in July 2016, with electron beams at energies ranging from 4 to 32 GeV.

  5. Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozzi, L.; Bandi, Y.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-01

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with 30 ps time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below 600 e‑ RMS and a pulse rise time of less than 2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of 0.8 pF were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than 99% and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately 200 ps .

  6. Construction and first beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is the technology choice of the CMS collaboration for the endcap calorimetry upgrade planned to cope with the harsh radiation and pileup environment at the High Luminosity-LHC. The HGCAL is realized as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5 - 1.0 square centimetres interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on hexagonal silicon pad sensors, with 128 channels, have been constructed and tested in beams at FNAL and at CERN. The modules include many of the features required for this challenging detector, including a PCB glued directly to the sensor, using through-hole wire-bonding for signal readout and ~5mm spacing between layers - including the front-end electronics and all services. Tests in 2016 have used an existing front-end chip - Skiroc2 (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). We present results from first tests of these modules both in the laboratory and ...

  7. Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

    2014-01-01

    This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

  8. Laser tests of silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezal, Zdenek; Escobar, Carlos; Gadomski, Szymon; Garcia, Carmen; Gonzalez, Sergio; Kodys, Peter; Kubik, Petr; Lacasta, Carlos; Marti, Salvador; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Moorhead, Gareth F.; Phillips, Peter W.; Reznicek, Pavel; Slavik, Radan

    2007-01-01

    This paper collects experiences from the development of a silicon sensor laser testing setup and from tests of silicon strip modules (ATLAS End-cap SCT), pixel modules (DEPFET) and large-area diodes using semiconductor lasers. Lasers of 1060 and 680 nm wavelengths were used. A sophisticated method of focusing the laser was developed. Timing and interstrip properties of modules were measured. Analysis of optical effects involved and detailed discussion about the usability of laser testing for particle detectors are presented

  9. Final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  10. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  11. Beam test performance of the SKIROC2 ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Frisson, T; Anduze, M; Augustin, J.E; Bonis, J; Boudry, V; Bourgeois, C; Brient, J.C; Callier, S; Cerutti, M; Chen, S; Cornat, R; Cornebise, P; Cuisy, D; David, J; De la Taille, C; Dulucq, F; Frotin, M; Gastaldi, F; Ghislain, P; Giraud, J; Gonnin, A; Grondin, D; Guliyev, E; Hostachy, J.Y; Jeans, D; Kamiya, Y; Kawagoe, K; Kozakai, C; Lacour, D; Lavergne, L; Lee, S.H; Magniette, F; Ono, H; Poeschl, R; Rouëné, J; Seguin-Moreau, N; Song, H.S; Sudo, Y; Thiebault, A; Tran, H; Ueno, H; Van der Kolk, N; Yoshioka, T

    2015-01-01

    Beam tests of the first layers of CALICE silicon tungsten ECAL technological prototype were performed in April and July 2012 using 1–6 GeV electron beam at DESY. This paper presents an analysis of the SKIROC2 readout ASIC performance under test beam conditions.

  12. Structuring of silicon with low energy focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The defect production in silicon induced by focused ion beam irradiation as a function of energy and projectile mass has been investigated and compared to the measured sputter yield. The aim was to find optimal beam parameters for the structuring of semiconductors with a minimum amount of defects produced per removed atom. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  13. Silicon nitride films deposited with an electron beam created plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D. C.; Emery, K. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Thompson, L. R.; Zamani, H.; Collins, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The electron beam assisted chemical vapor deposition (EBCVD) of silicon nitride films using NH3, N2, and SiH4 as the reactant gases is reported. The films have been deposited on aluminum, SiO2, and polysilicon film substrates as well as on crystalline silicon substrates. The range of experimental conditions under which silicon nitrides have been deposited includes substrate temperatures from 50 to 400 C, electron beam currents of 2-40 mA, electron beam energies of 1-5 keV, total ambient pressures of 0.1-0.4 Torr, and NH3/SiH4 mass flow ratios of 1-80. The physical, electrical, and chemical properties of the EBCVD films are discussed.

  14. Ion beam studied of silicon oxynitride and silicon nitroxide thin layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oude Elferink, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    In this the processes occurring during high temperature treatments of silicon oxynitride and silicon oxide layers are described. Oxynitride layers with various atomic oxygen to nitrogen concentration ration (O/N) are considered. The high energy ion beam techniques Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection and nuclear reaction analysis have been used to study the layer structures. A detailed discussion of these ion beam techniques is given. Numerical methods used to obtain quantitative data on elemental compositions and depth profiles are described. The electrical compositions and depth profiles are described. The electrical properties of silicon nitride films are known to be influenced by the behaviour of hydrogen in the film during high temperature anneling. Investigations of the behaviour of hydrogen are presented. Oxidation of silicon (oxy)nitride films in O 2 /H 2 0/HCl and nitridation of silicon dioxide films in NH 3 are considered since oxynitrides are applied as an oxidation mask in the LOCOS (Local oxidation of silicon) process. The nitridation of silicon oxide layers in an ammonia ambient is considered. The initial stage and the dependence on the oxide thickness of nitrogen and hydrogen incorporation are discussed. Finally, oxidation of silicon oxynitride layers and of silicon oxide layers are compared. (author). 76 refs.; 48 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Laser and electron beam processing of silicon and gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-10-01

    Laser (photon) and electron beams provide a controlled source of heat by which surface layers of silicon and gallium arsenide can be rapidly melted and cooled with rates exceeding 10/sup 80/C/sec. The melting process has been used to remove displacement damage in ion implanted Si and GaAs, to remove dislocations, loops and precipitates in silicon and to study impurity segregation and solubility limits. The mechanisms associated with various phenomena will be examined. The possible impact of laser and electron beam processing on device technology, particularly with respect to solar cells is discussed.

  16. Acoustic mode converters micromachined in silicon by proton beam writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, U.; Menzel, F.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.; Butz, T.

    2011-01-01

    Proton beam writing is a powerful tool for the production of microstructures for acoustic applications because it allows to create structures inclined to the original sample surface which therefore can act as acoustic mode converters. We report on experiments, finding optimal structure sizes in p-type 12 Ω cm silicon for this purpose. For the creation of the structures the proton beam at the LIPSION laboratory was used. Furthermore, by investigating the micromachined silicon with a phase sensitive acoustic microscope we give evidence that inclined structures such as rods and walls can be used to change the mode of acoustic waves in the crystal.

  17. The 2003 Tracker Inner Barrel Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Carrone, Enzo; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; De Filippis, Nicola; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Drouhin, Frédéric; Dutta, Suchandra; Giammanco, Andrea; Giassi, Alessandro; Giordano, Domenico; Kaminski, A; Macchiolo, Anna; Marchettini, Cristiano; Meschini, Marco; Mirabito, Laurent; My, Salvatore; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Paoletti, Simone; Radicci, Valeria; Ranieri, Riccardo; Segneri, Gabriele; Siegrist, Patrice; Silvestris, Lucia; Tricomi, Alessia; Tsirou, Andromachi; Verdini, Piero Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Before starting the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker (SST) mass production, where the quality control tests can only be done on single components, an extensive collection of activities aiming at validating the tracker system functionality has been performed. In this framework, a final component prototype of the Inner Barrel part (TIB) of the SST has been assembled and tested in the INFN laboratories and then moved to CERN to check its behaviour in a 25~ns LHC-like particle beam. A set of preproduction single-sided silicon microstrip modules was mounted on a mechanical structure very similar to a sector of the third layer of the TIB and read out using a system functionally identical to the final one. In this note the system setup configuration is fully described and the results of the test, concerning both detector performance and system characteristics, are presented and discussed.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the damage potential of electron beam and tests of beam loss detector based on quartz Cherenkov radiator read out by a silicon photomultiplier on CLIC Test Facility 3(CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Styliani; Gazis, E

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at the development of an electron/positron linear collider with a centre of mass energy in the multi-TeV energy range. Each Linac will have a length of 21 km, which means that very high accelerating gradients (>100 MV/m) are required. To achieve the high accelerating gradients, a novel two-beam acceleration scheme, in which RF power is transferred from a high-current, low-energy drive beam to the low-current, high energy main accelerating beam is designed. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system will be designed for CLIC to meet the requirements of the accelerator complex. Its main role as part of the machine protection scheme will be to detect potentially dangerous beam instabilities and prevent subsequent injection into the main beam or drive beam decelerators. The first part of this work describes the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the damage potential of high energy electron beams impacting a copper target. The second...

  19. Tests of timing properties of silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Byrum, K.; /Argonne; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; /Fermilab; May, E.; /Argonne; Ramberg, A.; /Fermilab; Va' vra, J.; /SLAC; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2010-03-01

    Timing measurements of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) [1] and [2] at the picosecond level were performed at Fermilab. The core timing resolution of the electronic measurement technique is approximately 2 ps. The single photoelectron time resolution (SPTR) was measured for the signals coming from the SiPM's. A SPTR of about one hundred picoseconds was obtained for SiPM's illuminated by laser pulses. The dependence of the SPTR on applied bias voltage and on the wavelength of the light was measured. A simple model is proposed to explain the difference in the SPTR for blue and red light. A time of flight system based on the SiPM's, with quartz Cherenkov radiators, was tested in a proton beam at Fermilab. The time resolution obtained is 35 ps per SiPM. Finally, requirements for the SiPM's temperature and bias voltage stability to maintain the time resolution are discussed.

  20. Silicon detectors for the n-TOF neutron beams monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cosentino, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Damone, L.; Pappalardo, A.; Piscopo, M.; Finocchiaro, P.

    2015-01-01

    During 2014 the second experimental area EAR2 was completed at the n-TOF neutron beam facility at CERN. As the neutrons are produced via spallation, by means of a high-intensity 20 GeV pulsed proton beam impinging on a thick target, the resulting neutron beam covers an enormous energy range, from thermal to several GeV. In this paper we describe two beam diagnostic devices, designed and built at INFN-LNS, both exploiting silicon detectors coupled with neutron converter foils containing 6Li. The first one is based on four silicon pads and allows to monitor the neutron beam flux as a function of the neutron energy. The second one, based on position sensitive silicon detectors, is intended for the reconstruction of the beam profile, again as a function of the neutron energy. Several electronic setups have been explored in order to overcome the issues related to the gamma flash, namely a huge pulse present at the start of each neutron bunch which may blind the detectors for some time. The two devices have been ch...

  1. Object oriented reconstruction and analysis for Helsinki Silicon Beam Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Haapakorpi, M; Heinonen, J; Karimäki, V; Klem, J T; Lampen, T

    2000-01-01

    Object oriented programming and related new software technologies have been applied to the reconstruction and analysis of events recorded by Helsinki silicon beam telescope (SiBT) in the CERN H2 testbeam. Experience obtained on these new tools and methods is reported. (4 refs).

  2. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, R.; Asano, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Honda, R.; Ichikawa, Y.; Imai, K.; Joo, C. W.; Nakazawa, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Shirotori, K.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Watabe, T.

    2014-11-01

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 108 Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009-2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved.

  3. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, R. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asano, H. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hasegawa, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Honda, R. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ichikawa, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Joo, C.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Nakazawa, K. [Physics Department, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Sako, H.; Sato, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shirotori, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Sugimura, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tanida, K., E-mail: tanida@phya.snu.ac.kr [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Watabe, T. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 10{sup 8} Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009–2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved.

  4. Test Beam Results of a 3D Diamond Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dunser, Marc

    2015-01-01

    3D pixel technology has been used successfully in the past with silicon detectors for tracking applications. Recently, a first prototype of the same 3D technology has been produced on a chemical vapour deposited single-crystal diamond sensor. This device has been subsequently tested in a beam test at CERN’s SPS accelerator in a beam of 120 GeV protons. Details on the production and results of testbeam data are presented.

  5. Ga+ beam lithography for nanoscale silicon reactive ion etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, M. D.; Shearn, M. J.; Chhim, B.; Scherer, A.

    2010-06-01

    By using a dry etch chemistry which relies on the highly preferential etching of silicon, over that of gallium (Ga), we show resist-free fabrication of precision, high aspect ratio nanostructures and microstructures in silicon using a focused ion beam (FIB) and an inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etcher (ICP-RIE). Silicon etch masks are patterned via Ga + ion implantation in a FIB and then anisotropically etched in an ICP-RIE using fluorinated etch chemistries. We determine the critical areal density of the implanted Ga layer in silicon required to achieve a desired etch depth for both a Pseudo Bosch (SF6/C4F8) and cryogenic fluorine (SF6/O2) silicon etching. High fidelity nanoscale structures down to 30 nm and high aspect ratio structures of 17:1 are demonstrated. Since etch masks may be patterned on uneven surfaces, we utilize this lithography to create multilayer structures in silicon. The linear selectivity versus implanted Ga density enables grayscale lithography. Limits on the ultimate resolution and selectivity of Ga lithography are also discussed.

  6. Calorimetry of ion beam damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roorda, S.; Kajrys, G.; Graham, J.

    1994-01-01

    Annealing of ion-beam damage in crystalline Si has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Si discs of 100 μm thickness have been bombarded with 3.4 MeV protons. Scanning calorimetry reveals a sharp peak riding on a broad background signal. From infrared absorption, this peak is tentatively identified as heat release associated with divacancy annihilation. (orig.)

  7. On the evening of June 15, 2008, ALICE physicists saw the first tracks at LHC during the first injection test in transfer line TI 2. The Silicon Pixel detector recorded muon tracks produced in the beam dump near Point 2 of the LHC.

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, Vito

    2008-01-01

    On the evening of June 15, 2008, ALICE physicists saw the first tracks at LHC during the first injection test in transfer line TI 2. The Silicon Pixel detector recorded muon tracks produced in the beam dump near Point 2 of the LHC

  8. Fabrication of smooth silicon optical devices using proton beam writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E.J.; Bettiol, A.A.; Xiong, B.Q.

    2011-01-01

    This work gives a brief review of proton beam writing and electrochemical etching process for the fabrication of smooth optical devices in bulk silicon. Various types of structures such as silicon-on-oxidized porous silicon waveguides, waveguide grating and disk resonators have been produced. Optical characterization has been carried out on the waveguides for both TE and TM polarization using free space coupling at 1.55 μm. Various fabrication and processing parameters have been optimized in order to reduce the propagation loss to approximately 1 dB/cm. A surface smoothening technique based on controlled oxidation has also been used to achieve an RMS roughness better than 3 nm.

  9. Fabrication of smooth silicon optical devices using proton beam writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, E. J.; Bettiol, A. A.; Xiong, B. Q.

    2011-10-01

    This work gives a brief review of proton beam writing and electrochemical etching process for the fabrication of smooth optical devices in bulk silicon. Various types of structures such as silicon-on-oxidized porous silicon waveguides, waveguide grating and disk resonators have been produced. Optical characterization has been carried out on the waveguides for both TE and TM polarization using free space coupling at 1.55 μm. Various fabrication and processing parameters have been optimized in order to reduce the propagation loss to approximately 1 dB/cm. A surface smoothening technique based on controlled oxidation has also been used to achieve an RMS roughness better than 3 nm.

  10. Test Beam Coordination: 2003 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Girolamo, B.

    The 2003 Test Beam Period The 2003 Test Beam period has been very fruitful for ATLAS. In spite of several days lost because of the accelerator problems, ATLAS has been able to achieve many results: FCAL has completed the calibration program in H6 Tilecal has completed the calibration program in H8 Pixel has performed extensive studies with normal and high intensity beams (up to 1.4*108 hadrons/spill) SCT has completed a variety of studies with quite a high number of modules operated concurrently TRT has performed several studies at high, low and very low energy (first use of the new H8 beam in the range 1 to 9 GeV) Muons (MDT,RPC and TGC) have been operating a large setup for about 5 months. The almost final MDT ROD (MROD) has been integrated in the readout and the final trigger electronics for TGC and RPC has been tested and certified with normal beam and during dedicated 40 MHz beam periods. The TDAQ has exploited a new generation prototype successfully and the new Event Filter infrastructure f...

  11. Inverse design engineering of all-silicon polarization beam splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the inverse design engineering method of topology optimization, we have realized high-performing all-silicon ultra-compact polarization beam splitters. We show that the device footprint of the polarization beam splitter can be as compact as similar to 2 µm2 while performing experimentally...... with a polarization splitting loss lower than similar to 0.82 dB and an extinction ratio larger than similar to 15 dB in the C-band. We investigate the device performance as a function of the device length and find a lower length above which the performance only increases incrementally. Imposing a minimum feature...

  12. Structural defects in laser- and electron-beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Laser and electron beam pulses provide almost an ideal source of heat by which thin layers of semiconductors can be rapidly melted and solidified with heating and cooling rates exceeding 10 80 C/sec. Microstructural modifications obtained as a function of laser parameters are examined and it is shown that both laser and electron beam pulses can be used to remove displacement damage, dislocations, dislocation loops and precipitates. Annealing of defects underneath the oxide layers in silicon is possible within a narrow energy window. The formation of cellular structure provides a rather clear evidence of melting which leads to segregation and supercooling, and subsequent cell formation

  13. High resolution silicon detectors for colliding beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.

    1984-01-01

    Resolution and linearity of the position measurement of Pisa multi-electrode silicon detectors are presented. The detectors are operated in slightly underdepleted mode and take advantage of their intrinsic resistivity for resistive charge partition between adjacent strips. 22 μm resolution is achieved with readout lines spaced 300 μm. Possible applications in colliding beam experiments for the detection of secondary vertices are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Direct deposition of gold on silicon with focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Irradiation with ions at very low energies (below 500 eV) no longer induces a removal of substrate material, but the ions are directly deposited on the surface. In this way, gold has been deposited on silicon with focused ion beam exposure and the properties of the film have been investigated with atomic force microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  15. Design and Test Beam Performance of Substructures of the CMS Tracker End Caps

    CERN Document Server

    Brauer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    With its total active silicon area of about 200 squaremetres and more than 15000 silicon modules the silicon strip tracker of the CMS experiment at the LHC will be the largest silicon strip detector ever built. While the performance of single silicon modules has already been tested extensively in various test beam experiments, the performance of larger integrated substructures also had to be studied with a particle beam before launching mass production, in order to ensure the envisaged performance of the overall system. In May/June 2004 the performance of a system of two petals of the tracker end caps (TEC), which represents about 1% of the full TEC and forms an autonomous unit in terms of data acquisition, has been studied in a test beam experiment at CERN. In this document the test beam experiment is described and results are presented.

  16. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Fleury Frenette, K.; Jamar, C.

    2017-11-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms . Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC . Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 ≠m was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  17. Combined Silicon and Gallium Arsenide Solar Cell UV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willowby, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The near and long-term effect of UV on silicon solar cells is relatively understood. In an effort to learn more about the effects of UV radiation on the performance of GaAs/Ge solar cells, silicon and gallium arsenide on germanium (GaAs/Ge) solar cells were placed in a vacuum chamber and irradiated with ultraviolet light by a Spectrolab XT 10 solar simulator. Seventeen GaAs/Ge and 8 silicon solar cells were mounted on an 8 inch copper block. By having all the cells on the same test plate we were able to do direct comparison of silicon and GaAs/Ge solar cell degradation. The test article was attached to a cold plate in the vacuum chamber to maintain the cells at 25 degrees Celsius. A silicon solar cell standard was used to measure beam uniformity and any degradation of the ST-10 beam. The solar cell coverings tested included cells with AR-0213 coverglass, fused silica coverglass, BRR-0213 coverglass and cells without coverglass. Of interest in the test is the BRR-0213 coverglass material manufactured by OCLI. It has an added Infrared rejection coating to help reduce the solar cell operating temperature. This coverglass is relatively new and of interest to several current and future programs at Marshall. Due to moves of the laboratory equipment and location only 350 hours of UV degradation have been completed. During this testing a significant leveling off in the rate of degradation was reached. Data from the test and comparisons of the UV effect of the bare cells and cells with coverglass material will be presented.

  18. Electron and ion beam degradation effects in AES analysis of silicon nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransen, F.; Vanden Berghe, R.; Vlaeminck, R.; Hinoul, M.; Remmerie, J.; Maes, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Silicon nitride films are currently investigated by AES combined with ion profiling techniques for their stoichiometry and oxygen content. During this analysis, ion beam and primary electron effects were observed. The effect of argon ion bombardment is the preferential sputtering of nitrogen, forming 'covalent' silicon at the surface layer (AES peak at 91 eV). The electron beam irradiation results in a decrease of the covalent silicon peak, either by an electron beam annealing effect in the bulk of the silicon nitride film, or by an ionization enhanced surface diffusion process of the silicon (electromigration). By the electron beam annealing, nitrogen species are liberated in the bulk of the silicon nitride film and migrate towards the surface where they react with the covalent silicon. The ionization enhanced diffusion originates from local charging of the surface, induced by the electron beam. (author)

  19. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2010-12-16

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  20. CLAS12 Silicon Vertex Tracker Module Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Eng, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gotra, Yuri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Boiarinov, Sergei [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-09-11

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the experimenters of CLAS12 collaboration who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program.

  1. arXiv Charge reconstruction study of the DAMPE Silicon-Tungsten Tracker with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Rui; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Huan-Yu; Gong, Ke; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Xin; Azzarello, Phillip; Tykhonov, Andrii; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Gallo, Valentina; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Mazziotta, Nicola; De Mitri, Ivan

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is one of the four satellites within Strategic Pioneer Research Program in Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). DAMPE can detect electrons, photons in a wide energy range (5 GeV to 10 TeV) and ions up to iron (100GeV to 100 TeV). Silicon-Tungsten Tracker (STK) is one of the four subdetectors in DAMPE, providing photon-electron conversion, track reconstruction and charge identification for ions. Ion beam test was carried out in CERN with 60GeV/u Lead primary beams. Charge reconstruction and charge resolution of STK detectors were investigated.

  2. A probe station for testing silicon sensors

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    A probe station for testing silicon sensors. The probe station is located inside a dark box that can keep away light during the measurement. The set-up is located in the DSF (Department Silicon Facility). The golden plate is the "chuck" where the sensor is usually placed on. With the help of "manipulators", thin needles can be precisely positioned that can contact the sensor surface. Using these needles and the golden chuck, a high voltage can be applied to the sensor to test its behaviour under high voltage. We will use the silicon sensors that we test here for building prototypes of a highly granular sandwich calorimeter, the CMS HGC (Highly granular Calorimeter) upgrade for High-Luminosity LHC.

  3. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  4. Test-beam with Python

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The talk will show the current implementation of the software tool developed by Silab (Bonn) and Oxford University to analyze test beam data with Mimosa telescope. Data collected from the telescope are merged with hits recorded on pixel detectors with a FE-I4 chips, the official read-out chip of the Atlas Pixel Detector. The software tool used to collect data, pyBAR, is developed with Python as well. The test-beam analysis tool parses the data-sets, recreates the tracks, aligns the telescope planes and allows to investigate the detectors spatial properties with high resolution. This has just allowed to study the properties of brand new devices that stand as possible candidate to replace the current pixel detector in Atlas.

  5. Beam test results for the SuperB-SVT thin striplet detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, L.; Comotti, D.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Pellegrini, G.; Sbarra, C.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Bevan, A.; Wilson, F.; Beck, G.; Morris, J.; Ganaway, F.; Cenci, R.; Bombelli, L.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fiorini, C.; Liberali, V.; Monti, M.; Nasri, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stabile, A.; Balestri, G.; Batignani, G.; Bernardelli, A.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morsani, F.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Petragnani, G.; Profeti, A.; Rizzo, G.; Soldani, A.; Walsh, J.; Gaioni, L.; Manazza, A.; Quartieri, E.; Ratti, L.; Zucca, S.; Alampi, G.; Cotto, G.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fontana, G.; Pancheri, L.; Povoli, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cristaudo, P.; Lanceri, L.; Liberti, B.; Rashevskaya, I.; Stella, C.; Vitale, L.

    2013-08-01

    The baseline detector option for the first layer of the SuperB Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is a high resistivity double-sided silicon device with short strips (striplets) at 45° angle to the detector's edge. A prototype was tested with a 120 GeV/c pion beam in September 2011 at the SPS-H6 test-beam line at CERN. In this paper studies on efficiency, resolution and cluster size are reported.

  6. Electrical Characterisation of electron beam exposure induced Defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danga, Helga T., E-mail: helga.danga@up.ac.za; Auret, Francois D.; Coelho, Sergio M.M.; Diale, Mmantsae

    2016-01-01

    The defects introduced in epitaxially grown p-type silicon (Si) during electron beam exposure were electrically characterised using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high resolution Laplace-DLTS. In this process, Si samples were first exposed to the conditions of electron beam deposition (EBD) without metal deposition. This is called electron beam exposure (EBE) herein. After 50 minutes of EBE, nickel (Ni) Schottky contacts were fabricated using the resistive deposition method. The defect level observed using the Ni contacts had an activation energy of H(0.55). This defect has an activation energy similar to that of the I-defect. The defect level is similar to that of the HB4, a boron related defect. DLTS depth profiling revealed that H(0.55) could be detected up to a depth of 0.8 μm below the junction. We found that exposing the samples to EBD conditions without metal deposition introduced a defect which was not introduced by the EBD method. We also observed that the damage caused by EBE extended deeper into the material compared to that caused by EBD.

  7. The 2002 Test Beam DAQ

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L.

    The ATLAS Tilecal group has been the first user of the Test Beam version of the DAQ/EF-1 prototype in 2000. The prototype was successfully tested in lab in summer 1999 and it has been officially adopted as baseline solution for the Test Beam DAQ at the end of 1999. It provides the right solution for users who need to have a modern data acquisition chain for final or almost final front-end and off-detector electronics (RODs and ROD emulators). The typical architecture for the readout and the DAQ is sketched in the figure below. A number of detector crates can send data over the Read Out Link to the Read Out System. The Read Out System sends data over an Ethernet link to a SubFarm PC that provides to send the data to Central Data Recording. In 2001 also the Muon MDT group has adopted this modern DAQ where for the first time a PC-based ReadOut System has been used, instead of the VME based implementation used in 2000, and for the Tilecal DAQ in 2001. In 2002 also Tilecal has adopted the PC-based implement...

  8. Monolithic beam splitter in silicon-on-insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjin; Cheng, Xinli; Lin, Zhilang; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Feng

    2004-10-18

    Inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching is used to fabricate the monolithic beam splitter in silicon-on-insulator wafer. The near-field image shows that the symmetric 1x2 T-branch works well. The rms roughness of the corner mirror surfaces is measured by atomic force microscope, and the sidewall surface roughness of rib waveguide is evaluated by the corner mirror rms roughness. The scattering losses from the rough sidewall surfaces and the rough mirror surfaces are evaluated to be 0.5 dB/cm and 0.2 dB/mirror, respectively. And the fiber-waveguide insertion loss is measured approximately 5.0 dB.

  9. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.; Marechal, F.; Ottini, S.; Alamanos, N.; Barbier, A.; Beaumel, D.; Bonnereau, B.; Charlet, D.; Clavelin, J.F.; Courtat, P.; Delbourgo-Salvador, P.; Douet, R.; Engrand, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Gillibert, A.; Khan, E.; Lapoux, V.; Lagoyannis, A.; Lavergne, L.; Lebon, S.; Lelong, P.; Lesage, A.; Le Ven, V.; Lhenry, I.; Martin, J.M.; Musumarra, A.; Pita, S.; Petizon, L.; Pollacco, E.; Pouthas, J.; Richard, A.; Rougier, D.; Santonocito, D.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Sida, J.L.; Soulet, C.; Stutzmann, J.S.; Suomijaervi, T.; Szmigiel, M.; Volkov, P.; Voltolini, G.

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and analog channels of the array in one crate placed adjacent to the reaction chamber and fully remote controlled, including pulse visualization on oscilloscopes. A stand alone data acquisition system devoted to the MUST array has been developed. Isotope identification of light charged particles over the full energy range has been achieved, and the capability of the system to measure angular distributions of states populated in inverse kinematics reactions has been demonstrated

  10. The space telescope NINA: results of a beam test calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Bidoli, V; Pascale, M P D; Morselli, A; Furano, G; Picozza, P; Scoscini, A; Sparvoli, R; Barbiellini, G; Bonvicini, W; Cirami, R; Schiavon, Paolo; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Ambriola, M; Bellotti, R; Cafagna, F; Ciacio, F; Castellano, M; Circella, M; Marzo, C D; Bartalucci, S; Giuntoli, S; Ricci, M; Papini, P; Piccardi, S; Spillantini, P; Bakaldin, A; Batishev, A; Galper, A M; Koldashov, S; Korotkov, M; Mikhailov, V; Murashov, A; Voronov, S; Boezio, M

    1999-01-01

    In June 1998 the telescope NINA will be launched in space on board of the Russian satellite Resource-01 n.4. The main scientific objective of the mission is the study of the anomalous, galactic and solar components of the cosmic rays in the energy interval 10-200 MeV/n. The core of the instrument is a silicon detector whose performances have been tested with a particle beam at the GSI Laboratory in Germany in 1997; we report here on the results obtained during the beam calibration.

  11. Thermal endurance tests on silicone rubber specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warburton, C.

    1977-07-01

    Thermal endurance tests have been performed on a range of silicone rubber specimens at temperature above 300 0 C. It is suggested that the rubber mix A2426, the compound from which Wylfa sealing rings are manufactured, will fail at temperatures above 300 0 C within weeks. Hardness measurements show that this particular rubber performs in a similar manner to Walker's S.I.L./60. (author)

  12. Test-beam results of a SOI pixel detector prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Bugiel, Roma; Dannheim, Dominik; Fiergolski, Adrian; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Kapusta, P; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Munker, Ruth Magdalena; Nurnberg, Andreas Matthias

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the test-beam results of a monolithic pixel-detector prototype fabricated in 200 nm Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS technology. The SOI detector was tested at the CERN SPS H6 beam line. The detector is fabricated on a 500 μm thick high-resistivity float- zone n-type (FZ-n) wafer. The pixel size is 30 μm × 30 μm and its readout uses a source- follower configuration. The test-beam data are analysed in order to compute the spatial resolution and detector efficiency. The analysis chain includes pedestal and noise calculation, cluster reconstruction, as well as alignment and η-correction for non-linear charge sharing. The results show a spatial resolution of about 4.3 μm.

  13. Results of Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Dieter R

    2003-06-13

    The beam experiments of Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) started in September 1993 at SLAC, and have produced a 1.7 {micro}m x 75 nm spot of 46 GeV electron beam. A number of new techniques involving two nanometer spot-size monitors have been developed. Several beam diagnostic/tuning schemes are applied to achieve and maintain the small spot. This experiment opens the way toward the nanometer world for future linear colliders.

  14. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  15. Planar Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS Upgrade: Beam Tests results

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, J

    2012-01-01

    The performance of planar silicon pixel sensors, in development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, has been examined in a series of beam tests at the CERN SPS facilities since 2009. Salient results are reported on the key parameters, including the spatial resolution, the charge collection and the charge sharing between adjacent cells, for different bulk materials and sensor geometries. Measurements are presented for n+-in-n pixel sensors irradiated with a range of fluences and for p-type silicon sensors with various layouts from different vendors. All tested sensors were connected via bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel read-out chip. The tests reveal that both n-type and p-type planar sensors are able to collect significant charge even after the lifetime fluence expected at the HL-LHC.

  16. Proceedings of the 2. International Linear Collider Test-beam workshop - LCTW'09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.; Poeschl, R.; Takeshi, M.; Yu, J.; Hauptman, J.; Jeans, D.; Velthuis, J.; Repond, J.; Stanitzki, M.; Chefdeville, M.; Pauletta, G.; Hauptman, J.; Kulis, S.; Charpy, A.; Rivera, R.; Turchetti, M.; Vos, M.; Dehmelt, K.; Settles, R.; Decotigny, D.; Killenberg, M.; Haas, D.; Gaede, F.; Graf, N.; Wing, M.; Gaede, F.; Karstensen, S.; Meyners, N.; Hast, C.; Vrba, V.; Takeshita, T.; Kawagoe, K.; Linssen, L.; Ramberg, E.; Demarteau, M.; Fisk, H.E.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Videau, H.; Boudry, V.; Hauptman, J.; Lipton, R.; Nelson, T.

    2009-01-01

    At this workshop detector and simulation experts have described and discussed the necessary ILC (International Linear Collider) detector research and development program in view of its need for test beams. This workshop has provided an opportunity to evaluate the capabilities and shortcomings of existing facilities in the context of planned test beam activities. This document gathers together the slides of the presentations. The presentations have been classified into 4 topics: -) plans of sub-detectors - calorimetry, silicon and gaseous tracking, -) data acquisition, -) test beam facilities, and -) resources and infrastructure for future test beams

  17. The tensile effect on crack formation in single crystal silicon irradiated by intense pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guoying; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yu, Xiao; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-10-01

    Improving antifatigue performance of silicon substrate is very important for the development of semiconductor industry. The cracking behavior of silicon under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation was studied by numerical simulation in order to understand the mechanism of induced surface peeling observed by experimental means. Using molecular dynamics simulation based on Stillinger Weber potential, tensile effect on crack growth and propagation in single crystal silicon was investigated. Simulation results reveal that stress-strain curves of single crystal silicon at a constant strain rate can be divided into three stages, which are not similar to metal stress-strain curves; different tensile load velocities induce difference of single silicon crack formation speed; the layered stress results in crack formation in single crystal silicon. It is concluded that the crack growth and propagation is more sensitive to strain rate, tensile load velocity, stress distribution in single crystal silicon.

  18. Improvement of surface roughness in silicon-on-insulator wafer fabrication using a neutral beam etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, T. H.; Park, B. J.; Kang, S. K.; Gweon, G. H.; Kim, Y. Y.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-08-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers were etched by an energetic chlorine neutral beam obtained by the low-angle forward reflection of an ion beam, and the surface roughness of the etched wafers was compared with that of the SOI wafers etched by an energetic chlorine ion beam. When the ion beam was used to etch the silicon layer of the SOI wafers, the surface roughness was not significantly changed even though the use of higher ion bombardment energy slightly decreased the surface roughness of the SOI wafer. However, when the chlorine neutral beam was used instead of the chlorine ion beam having a similar beam energy, the surface roughness of the SOI wafer was significantly improved compared with that etched by the chlorine ion beam. By etching about 150 nm silicon from the SOI wafer having a 300 nm-thick top silicon layer with the chlorine neutral beam at the energy of 500 eV, the rms surface roughness of 1.5 Å could be obtained with the etch rate of about 750 Å min-1.

  19. Micro-scale testing of ductile and brittle cantilever beam specimens in situ with a dual beam workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnbrough, J E; Liu, D; Flewitt, P E J

    2013-01-01

    Micro-scale cantilever beam specimens created by focused ion beam milling have been mechanically loaded in situ at room temperature to observe the deformation and fracture of single crystal silicon, nanocrystalline nickel and thermal barrier coatings with a multilayer structure. The micro-scale preparation technique allows cantilever beams to be selected from preferred positions in the samples so that specific mechanical properties can be evaluated. As a consequence these microstructural specific properties can be combined with direct observation of the response of the test specimen throughout the period of the test. The measured mechanical properties and response for the materials given above are discussed and compared with previously published data. (paper)

  20. Beam Profile Measurement in MTA Beam Line for High Pressure RF Cavity Beam Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, M.R.; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Greer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwartz, T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent High Pressure RF (HPRF) cavity experiment at MuCool Test Area (MTA) has used 400 MeV Linac proton beam to study the beam loading effect. When the energetic proton beam passes through the cavity, it ionizes the inside gas and produces the electrons. These electrons consume RF power inside the cavity. Number of electrons produced per cm inside the cavity (at 950 psi Hydrogen gas) per incident proton is ∼ 1200. The measurement of beam position and profile are necessary. MTA is flammable gas (Hydrogen) hazard zone so we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrument using Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper presents quantitative information about beam position and beam profile. Neutral density filter was used to avoid saturation of CCD camera. Image data is filtered and fitted with Gaussian function to compute the beam size. The beam profile obtained from scintillation screen shall be compared with multi-wire beam profile.

  1. Characterization of a tagged $\\gamma$-ray beam line at the DAFNE Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Cattaneo, P W; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Buonomo, B; Chen, A W; D’Ammando, F; FoggettA, L; Froysland, T; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Marisaldi, M; Mazzitelli, G; Pellizzoni, A; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Quintieri, L; Rappoldi, A; Tavani, M; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Valente, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cocco, V; Costa, E; De Paris, G; Del Monte, E; Di Cocco, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mastropietro, M; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Porrovecchio, G; Rapisarda, M; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vittorini, V; Zanello, D; Colafrancesco, S; Giommi, P; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L

    2012-01-01

    At the core of the AGILE scientific instrument, designed to operate on a satellite, there is the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) consisting of a Silicon Tracker (ST), a Cesium Iodide Mini-Calorimeter and an Anti-Coincidence system of plastic scintillator bars. The ST needs an on-ground calibration with a γ-ray beam to validate the simulation used to calculate the energy response function and the effective area versus the energy and the direction of the γ rays. A tagged γ-ray beam line was designed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali of Frascati (LNF), based on an electron beam generating γ-rays through bremsstrahlung in a position-sensitive target. The γ-ray energy is deduced by difference with the post-bremsstrahlung electron energy [1] and [2]. The electron energy is measured by a spectrometer consisting of a dipole magnet and an array of position sensitive silicon strip detectors, the Photon Tagging System (PTS). The use of the combined BTF-PTS system as tagged photon be...

  2. Appendix B : small beam tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications (2007) require that confinement : reinforcement be placed around prestressing strands in the bottom bulb of pretensioned concrete : beams. Although the AASHTO specifications contain prescriptive requiremen...

  3. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-01

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test

  4. Development and Testing of the AMEGO Silicon Tracker System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Sean; Amego Team

    2018-01-01

    The All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO) is a probe-class mission in consideration for the 2020 decadal review designed to operate at energies from ˜ 200 keV to > 10 GeV. Operating a detector in this energy regime is challenging due to the crossover in the interaction cross-section for Compton scattering and pair production. AMEGO is made of four major subsystems: a plastic anticoincidence detector for rejecting cosmic-ray events, a silicon tracker for measuring the energies of Compton scattered electrons and pair-production products, a CZT calorimeter for measuring the energy and location of Compton scattered photons, and a CsI calorimeter for measuring the energy of the pair-production products at high energies. The tracker comprises layers of dual-sided silicon strip detectors which provide energy and localization information for Compton scattering and pair-production events. A prototype tracker system is under development at GSFC; in this contribution we provide details on the verification, packaging, and testing of the prototype tracker, as well as present plans for the development of the front-end electronics, beam tests, and a balloon flight.

  5. Construction, Test And Calibration of the GLAST Silicon Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgro, C.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Bonamente, E.; Borden, T.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cecchi, C.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; De Angelis, A.; Drell, P.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Trieste /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /SLAC /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Udine U. /Hiroshima U. /Maryland U., JCA /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /JAXA, Sagamihara /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /NASA, Goddard

    2009-06-05

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope represents a great advance in space application of silicon detectors. With a surface of 80 m{sup 2} and about 1 M readout channels it is the largest silicon tracker ever built for a space experiment. GLAST is an astro-particle mission that will study the mostly unexplored, high energy (20 MeV-300 GeV) spectrum coming from active sources or diffused in the Universe. The detector integration and test phase is complete. The full instrument underwent environmental testing and the spacecraft integration phase has just started: the launch is foreseen in late 2007. In the meanwhile the spare modules are being used for instrument calibration and performance verification employing the CERN accelerator complex. A Calibration Unit has been exposed to photon, electron and hadron beams from a few GeV up to 300 GeV. We report on the status of the instrument and on the calibration campaign.

  6. Fabrication of low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon strip waveguide using focused proton-beam irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Teo, EJ; Bettiol, AA; Yang, P; Breese, MBH; Xiong, BQ; Mashanovich, GZ; Headley, WR; Reed, GT

    2009-01-01

    we have successfully fabricated low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon (SOPS) strip waveguides with high-index contrast using focused proton-beam irradiation and electrochemical etching. Smooth surface quality with rms roughness of 3.1 nm is achieved for a fluence of 1 x 10(15)/cm(2) after postoxidation treatment. Optical characterization at a wavelength of 1550 nm shows a loss of 1.1 +/- 0.4 dB/cm and 1.2 +/- 0.4 dB/cm in TE and TM polarization respectively, which we believe is the lowe...

  7. Damage production in silicon carbide by dual ion beams irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Yanwen; Han, Dong; Zhao, Yunbiao; Zhao, Ziqiang; Zhang, Ming

    2018-02-01

    Lattice damage and evolution in single crystalline 6H-SiC under Si + He successively dual ion beams irradiation is studied by using Raman spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and nano-indentation tests. Single Si and He ion irradiations are also performed for the comparison. The results of Raman spectra reveal that the damage level increases with the fluence. A normal strain profile along the ion path is generated due to ion irradiation induced dilation of lattices, contributing mainly by interstitial related defects. Moreover, Si and He ion implantation produced different types of defects. The damage and chemical bonding states are significantly changed after He atoms implanted in Si pre-irradiated samples. Si + He dual ion irradiations increase the damage level further, resulting in changes of the damage states because of complex defects interactions. The nano-hardness of irradiated SiC is combined results of hardening effects of some kinds of defects and the breakdown of covalent-bonds. The mechanical properties present significant differences between single Si, He and Si + He successively dual ion beam irradiations, due to defects evolution during the irradiation process.

  8. Fabrication of low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon strip waveguide using focused proton-beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, E J; Bettiol, A A; Yang, P; Breese, M B H; Xiong, B Q; Mashanovich, G Z; Headley, W R; Reed, G T

    2009-03-01

    We have successfully fabricated low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon (SOPS) strip waveguides with high-index contrast using focused proton-beam irradiation and electrochemical etching. Smooth surface quality with rms roughness of 3.1 nm is achieved for a fluence of 1x10(15)/cm(2) after postoxidation treatment. Optical characterization at a wavelength of 1550 nm shows a loss of 1.1+/-0.4 dB/cm and 1.2+/-0.4 dB/cm in TE and TM polarization respectively, which we believe is the lowest reported loss for SOPS waveguides. This opens up new opportunities for all-silicon-based optoelectronics applications.

  9. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013–2014). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing Pixel Detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase in the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the Pixel Detector. An overview of the sensor technologies' qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests is presented.

  10. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013-14). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase of the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the pixel detector. An overview of the sensor technologies’ qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests are presented.

  11. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin; Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm 2 , 495 mJ/cm 2 , and 637 mJ/cm 2 , the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications

  12. Alignment of the Pixel and SCT Modules for the 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Ahmad, A.; Andreazza, A.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Barr, A.J.; Beccherle, R.; Bell, P.J.; Bernabeu, J.; Broklova, Z.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Cauz, D.; Chevalier, L.; Chouridou, S.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cobal, M.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Darbo, G.; de Vivie, J.B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drohan, J.; Einsweiler, K.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Facius, K.; Ferrari, P.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrere, D.; Flick,, T.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagliardi, G.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B.J.; Gan, K.K.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorfine, G.; Gottfert, T.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Hansen, P.H.; Hara, K.; Hartel, R.; Harvey, A.; Hawkings, R.J.; Heinemann, F.E.W.; Henss, T.; Hill, J.C.; Huegging, F.; Jansen, E.; Joseph, J.; Unel, M. Karagoz; Kataoka, M.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kostyukhin, V.; Lacasta, C.; Lari, T.; Latorre, S.; Lester, C.G.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lourerio, K.F.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Mathes, M.; Meroni, C.; Mikulec, B.; Mindur, B.; Moed, S.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Moyse, E.W.J.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Nikolaev, K.; Parodi, F.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pater, J.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P.W.; Pinto, B.; Poppleton, A.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Reznicek, P.; Risso, P.; Robinson, D.; Roe, S.; Rozanov, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santi, L.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schultes, J.; Sfyrla, A.; Shaw, C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Toczek, B.; Troncon, C.; Tyndel, M.; Vernocchi, F.; Virzi, J.; Anh, T. Vu; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Wellsf, P.S.; Zhelezkow, A.

    2008-06-02

    A small set of final prototypes of the ATLAS Inner Detector silicon tracking system(Pixel Detector and SemiConductor Tracker), were used to take data during the 2004 Combined Test Beam. Data were collected from runs with beams of different flavour (electrons, pions, muons and photons) with a momentum range of 2 to 180 GeV/c. Four independent methods were used to align the silicon modules. The corrections obtained were validated using the known momenta of the beam particles and were shown to yield consistent results among the different alignment approaches. From the residual distributions, it is concluded that the precision attained in the alignmentof the silicon modules is of the order of 5 mm in their most precise coordinate.

  13. Design, fabrication, testing and packaging of a silicon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication, wafer level test- ing and packaging of a silicon on glass based RF MEMS switch fabricated using DRIE. The device is a SPST direct contact series switch. The silicon on glass fabrication process has been suc- cessfully adapted by a number of groups to fabricate MEMS devices such ...

  14. Six-beam homodyne laser Doppler vibrometry based on silicon photonics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanlu; Zhu, Jinghao; Duperron, Matthieu; O'Brien, Peter; Schüler, Ralf; Aasmul, Soren; de Melis, Mirko; Kersemans, Mathias; Baets, Roel

    2018-02-05

    This paper describes an integrated six-beam homodyne laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) system based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) full platform technology, with on-chip photo-diodes and phase modulators. Electronics and optics are also implemented around the integrated photonic circuit (PIC) to enable a simultaneous six-beam measurement. Measurement of a propagating guided elastic wave in an aluminum plate (speed ≈ 909 m/s @ 61.5 kHz) is demonstrated.

  15. Test Beam Measurements on Picosec Gaseous Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Sohl, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    In the Picosec project micro pattern gaseous detectors with a time resolution of some ten picoseconds are developed. The detectors are based on Micromegas detectors. With a cherenkov window and a photocathode the time jitter from different position of the primary ionization clusters can be substituted. This reports describes the beam setup and measurements of different Picosec prototypes. A time resolution of under 30 ps has been measured during the test beam. This report gives an overview of my work as a Summer Student. I set up and operated a triple-GEM tracker and a trigger system for the beam. During the beam I measured different prototypes of Picosec detectors and analysed the data.

  16. Test Beam Data Analysis for a Timepix3 Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Morag

    2016-01-01

    The vertex and tracker detector R&D for a future linear collider (CLICdp) aims at developing new silicon sensor technologies. The EP-LCD group has been helping develop a novel pixel detector chip called the Timepix3 with a very thick active silicon layer (675 μm). This thick detector can be used to reconstruct the track incidence angle using the charge drift-time information. To evaluate the principle, test beam data was taken in October 2015 and June 2016 with the Timepix3 at various angles to the beam. The data was analysed to evaluate the sensors performance in calculating the track incidence angle. The device angle was determined using three methods: the first using the cluster size information, secondly using the timing information, and finally using a multivariate analysis technique. The timing method proved the principle of the Timepix3 track angle measurements but the MVA method was found to give much better results, especially for smaller angles, than the other two methods and requires fewer cal...

  17. Silicon-based photonic crystals fabricated using proton beam writing combined with electrochemical etching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Zhiya; Breese, Mark Bh; Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Azimi, Sara; Song, Jiao; Liang, Haidong; Banas, Agnieszka; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raúl José

    2012-07-23

    A method for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) silicon nanostructures based on selective formation of porous silicon using ion beam irradiation of bulk p-type silicon followed by electrochemical etching is shown. It opens a route towards the fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D silicon-based photonic crystals with high flexibility and industrial compatibility. In this work, we present the fabrication of 2D photonic lattice and photonic slab structures and propose a process for the fabrication of 3D woodpile photonic crystals based on this approach. Simulated results of photonic band structures for the fabricated 2D photonic crystals show the presence of TE or TM gap in mid-infrared range.

  18. Effect of helium ion beam treatment on wet etching of silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Grigoryev, E. A.; Sharov, T. V.; Baraban, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the effect of helium ion beam treatment on the etching rate of silicon dioxide in a water based solution of hydrofluoric acid. A 460-nm-thick silicon dioxide film on silicon was irradiated with helium ions having energies of 20 keV and 30 keV with ion fluences ranging from 1014 cm-2 to 1017 cm-2. The dependence of the etching rate on depth was obtained and compared with the depth distribution of ion-induced defects, which was obtained from numerical simulation. Irradiation with helium ions results in an increase of the etching rate of silicon dioxide. The dependence of the etching rate on the calculated concentration of ion-induced defects is described.

  19. Test beam results of LHCb scintillating fibre tracker prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Sebastian; Comerma, Albert; Gerick, David; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Kecke, Matthieu; Leverington, Blake; Mazorra de Cos, Jose; Mitzel, Dominik; Neuner, Max; Uwer, Ulrich; Han, Xiaoxue [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb detector will undergo a major upgrade to meet the challenges of running at a higher luminosity. The current Inner and Outer Tracking system will not be sufficient to deal with the envisaged increased detector occupancy and higher radiation levels and will be replaced by a single tracking detector based on 0.250 mm diameter plastic scintillating fibres. The fibres are wound to multilayer ribbons 2.4 m long and read out by 128 channel silicon photomultiplier arrays. The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) tracker will cover a total active area of 360 m{sup 2}, arranged in 12 layers. The performances of prototype modules having 6 and 8 layers of fibre have been tested at the SPS at CERN. This talk focuses on basic properties of the prototype modules such as spatial resolution, single hit efficiency and light yield measured during the test beam campaigns in 2015.

  20. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  1. Ion beam synthesis of Mn/Sb clusters in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinert, M; Wesch, W [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Undisz, A; Rettenmayr, M [Institut fuer Materialwissenschaft und Werkstofftechnologie, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nunes, W C; Borges, R P; Godinho, M [Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Rubinger, R M; Carmo, M C; Sobolev, N A, E-mail: michael.steinert@uni-jena.d, E-mail: werner.wesch@uni-jena.d [Departamento de Fisica and I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2009-02-07

    In order to investigate the formation of Mn/Sb clusters embedded in crystalline silicon, sequential ion implantation with fluences of 1 x 10{sup 16} at cm{sup -2} and 2 x 10{sup 16} at cm{sup -2}, respectively, was used to incorporate Mn and Sb ions at high concentrations into Si(0 0 1). Based on investigations with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and corresponding channelling measurements (RBS/c), we report on a temperature dependent redistribution of the implanted species during the rapid thermal annealing process governed by the radiation-induced defects. Additionally performed cross-sectional TEM analyses, including EDX measurements, clearly show the presence of hexagonal shaped elementary Sb precipitates as well as compound clusters consisting of Mn and Sb, which are aligned to the crystal structure of the host silicon. In electron magnetic resonance measurements many samples exhibit broad resonance bands persisting up to approximately 60 K. For out-of-plane rotations, the bands show a weak angular dependence of the resonance field but a strong angular dependence of the intensity. Zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetization curves were measured on selected samples with a SQUID magnetometer between 10 and 400 K at different applied fields. The curves show a weak magnetic signal generated by different magnetic phases while at least one can be ascribed to superparamagnetic nanoparticles of MnSb.

  2. Anisotropy effect of crater formation on single crystal silicon surface under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Shahid, Ijaz; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yan, Sha; Le, Xiaoyun

    2018-04-01

    Due to the induced extremely fast thermal and dynamic process, Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB) is widely applied in material processing, which can bring enhanced material performance and surface craters as well. To investigate the craters' formation mechanism, a specific model was built with Finite Element Methods (FEM) to simulate the thermal field on irradiated single crystal silicon. The direct evidence for the existence of the simulated 6-fold rotational symmetric thermal distribution was provided by electron microscope images obtained on single crystal silicon. The correlation of the experiment and simulation is of great importance to understand the interaction between IPIB and materials.

  3. Growth of Gold-assisted Gallium Arsenide Nanowires on Silicon Substrates via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon M. delos Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium arsenide nanowires were grown on silicon (100 substrates by what is called the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism using a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE system. Good quality nanowires with surface density of approximately 108 nanowires per square centimeter were produced by utilizing gold nanoparticles, with density of 1011 nanoparticles per square centimeter, as catalysts for nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the nanowires are epitaxially grown on the silicon substrates, are oriented along the [111] direction and have cubic zincblende structure.

  4. Beam loss studies on silicon strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The large beam energy of the LHC demands for a save beam abort system. Nevertheless, failures cannot be excluded with last assurance and are predicted to occur once per year. As the CMS experiment is placed in the neighboured LHC octant, it is affected by such events. The effect of an unsynchronized beam abort on the silicon strip modules of the CMS tracking detector has been investigated in this thesis by performing one accelerator and two lab experiments. The dynamical behaviour of operational parameters of modules and components has been recorded during simulated beam loss events to be able to disentangle the reasons of possible damages. The first study with high intensive proton bunches at the CERN PS ensured the robustness of the module design against beam losses. A further lab experiment with pulsed IR LEDs clarified the physical and electrical processes during such events. The silicon strip sensors on a module are protected against beam losses by a part of the module design that originally has not been...

  5. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  6. Study on Size-Dependent Young’s Modulus of a Silicon Nano beam by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.; Sun, C.; Zhang, W.W.; Lei, S.Y.; Huang, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Young’s modulus of a silicon nano beam with a rectangular cross-section is studied by molecular dynamics method. Dynamic simulations are performed for doubly clamped silicon nano beams with lengths ranging from 4.888 to 12.491 nm and cross-sections ranging from 1.22 nm ×1.22 nm to 3.39 nm × 3.39 nm. The results show that Young’s moduli of such small silicon nano beams are much higher than the value of Young’s modulus for bulk silicon. Moreover, the resonant frequency and Young’s modulus of the Si nano beam are strongly dependent not only on the size of the nano beam but also on surface effects. Young’s modulus increases significantly with the decreasing of the thickness of the silicon nano beam. This result qualitatively agrees with one of the conclusions based on a semi continuum model, in which the surface relaxation and the surface tension were taken into consideration. The impacts of the surface reconstruction with (2 ×1) dimmers on the resonant frequency and Young’s modulus are studied in this paper too. It is shown that the surface reconstruction makes the silicon nano beam stiffer than the one without the surface reconstruction, resulting in a higher resonant frequency and a larger Young’s modulus

  7. Influence of oxygen on the ion-beam synthesis of silicon carbide buried layers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamanov, V.V.; Valakh, M.Ya.; Klyui, N.I.; Mel'nik, V.P.; Romanyuk, A.B.; Romanyuk, B.N.; Yukhimchuk, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of silicon structures with silicon carbide (SiC) buried layers produced by high-dose carbon implantation followed by a high-temperature anneal are investigated by Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The influence of the coimplantation of oxygen on the features of SiC buried layer formation is also studied. It is shown that in identical implantation and post-implantation annealing regimes a SiC buried layer forms more efficiently in CZ Si wafers or in Si (CZ or FZ) subjected to the coimplantation of oxygen. Thus, oxygen promotes SiC layer formation as a result of the formation of SiO x precipitates and accommodation of the volume change in the region where the SiC phase forms. Carbon segregation and the formation of an amorphous carbon film on the SiC grain boundaries are also discovered

  8. Limitations to laser machining of silicon using femtosecond micro-Bessel beams in the infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grojo, David; Mouskeftaras, Alexandros; Delaporte, Philippe; Lei, Shuting

    2015-01-01

    We produce and characterize high-angle femtosecond Bessel beams at 1300-nm wavelength leading to nonlinearly ionized plasma micro-channels in both glass and silicon. With microjoule pulse energy, we demonstrate controlled through-modifications in 150-μm glass substrates. In silicon, strong two-photon absorption leads to larger damages at the front surface but also a clamping of the intensity inside the bulk at a level of ≈4 × 10 11  W cm −2 which is below the threshold for volume and rear surface modification. We show that the intensity clamping is associated with a strong degradation of the Bessel-like profile. The observations highlight that the inherent limitation to ultrafast energy deposition inside semiconductors with Gaussian focusing [Mouskeftaras et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 191103 (2014)] applies also for high-angle Bessel beams

  9. Fracture analysis of surface exfoliation on single crystal silicon irradiated by intense pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Shahid, Ijaz; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Zhang, Xiaofu; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-12-01

    Surface exfoliation was observed on single crystal silicon surface irradiated by Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB). As the strong transient thermal stress impact induced by IPIB was mainly attributed to the exfoliation, a micro scale model combined with thermal conduction and linear elastic fracture mechanics was built to analyze the thermal stress distribution along the energy deposition process. After computation with finite element method, J integral parameter was applied as the criterion for crack development. It was demonstrated that the exfoliation initiation calls for specific material, crack depth and IPIB parameter. The results are potentially valuable for beam/target selection and IPIB parameter optimization.

  10. Development of silicon monolithic arrays for dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisello, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.bisello@iba-group.com [IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Schwarzenbruck (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen—Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Menichelli, David [IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Schwarzenbruck (Germany); Scaringella, Monica [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); INFN—Florence Division, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Talamonti, Cinzia; Zani, Margherita; Bucciolini, Marta [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Unversitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, Mara [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); INFN—Florence Division, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    New tools for dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy have been developed during last years in the framework of the collaboration among the University of Florence, INFN Florence and IBA Dosimetry. The first step (in 2007) was the introduction in dosimetry of detector solutions adopted from high energy physics, namely epitaxial silicon as the base detector material and a guard ring in diode design. This allowed obtaining state of the art radiation hardness, in terms of sensitivity dependence on accumulated dose, with sensor geometry particularly suitable for the production of monolithic arrays with modular design. Following this study, a 2D monolithic array has been developed, based on 6.3×6.3 cm{sup 2} modules with 3 mm pixel pitch. This prototype has been widely investigated and turned out to be a promising tool to measure dose distributions of small and IMRT fields. A further linear array prototype has been recently design with improve spatial resolution (1 mm pitch) and radiation hardness. This 24 cm long device is constituted by 4×64 mm long modules. It features low sensitivity changes with dose (0.2%/kGy) and dose per pulse (±1% in the range 0.1–2.3 mGy/pulse, covering applications with flattened and unflattened photon fields). The detector has been tested with very satisfactory results as a tool for quality assurance of linear accelerators, with special regards to small fields, and proton pencil beams. In this contribution, the characterization of the linear array with unflattened MV X-rays, {sup 60}Co radiation and 226 MeV protons is reported. - Highlights: • A silicon monolithic 1D array with 1 mm pixel pitch was developed. • The detector was characterized with {sup 60}Co, unflattened MV X-rays, 226 MeV protons. • Dose linearity in clinical relevance range and dose profiles were measured. • The detector performs good agreement with reference detectors. • The technology is suitable in dose profiling in MV X-ray and proton therapy.

  11. Silicon telescope for prototype sensor characterisation using particle beam and cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Fu, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and the performance of a silicon strip telescope that we have built and recently used as reference tracking system for prototype sensor characterisation. The telescope was operated on beam at the CERN SPS and also using cosmic rays in the laboratory. We will describe the data acquisition system, based on a custom electronic board that we have developed, and the online monitoring system to control the quality of the data in real time.

  12. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Tanoue, H.; Takahashi, H.; Shimoyama, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar + ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge + implantation, followed by B + implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Snydstrup, L.

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the electron beam test stand (EBTS) project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory is to build a versatile device to develop technologies that are relevant for a high intensity electron beam ion source (EBIS) and to study the physics of ion confinement in a trap. The EBTS will have all the main attributes of EBIS: a 1-m-long, 5 T superconducting solenoid, electron gun, drift tube structure, electron collector, vacuum system, ion injection system, appropriate control, and instrumentation. Therefore it can be considered a short prototype of an EBIS for a relativistic heavy ion collider. The drift tube structure will be mounted in a vacuum tube inside a open-quotes warmclose quotes bore of a superconducting solenoid, it will be at room temperature, and its design will employ ultrahigh vacuum technology to reach the 10 -10 Torr level. The first gun to be tested will be a 10 A electron gun with high emission density and magnetic compression of the electron beam. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  14. Pixel-Tilecal-MDT Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Di Girolamo

    A test with many expectations When an additional week of running (from September 11th to 18th) was allocated for the test-beam, it was decided to give priority to a combined run with the participation of the Pixel, Tilecal and MDT sub-detectors. The integration of these three sub-detectors was possible as they all use the baseline (DAQ-1/EF based) DAQ for test beams (as reported in a previous e-news). The tests and the addition of a common trigger and busy were organized in a short timescale by experts from the three sub-detectors and DAQ/EF. The expectations were many; both looking for problems and finding solutions. The setup The setup, shown in the figure, consisted of the Pixel telescope normally used during the sub-detector tests, two Tilecal barrel modules, two Tilecal extended barrel modules, and six MDT barrel chambers. This fully occupied a length of some 30 meters in the H8 line of the SPS North Area. Each sub-detector used their own specialized front-end electronics. The data collected by modu...

  15. Effect of Ion Beam Irradiation on Silicon Carbide with Different Microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyeong Hwan; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju; Jung, Choong Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2006-01-01

    SiC and SiC/SiC composites are one of promising candidates for structural materials of the next generation energy systems such as the gas-cooled reactors and fusion reactors. This anticipation yields many material issues, and radiation effects of silicon carbide are recognized as an important research subject. Silicon carbide has diverse crystal structures (called polytypes), such as α-SiC (hexagonal structure), β-SiC (cubic structure) and amorphous SiC. Among these polytypes, β-SiC has been studied as matrix material in SiC/SiC composites. Near-stoichiometric β-SiC with high crystallinity and purity is considered as suitable material in the next generation energy system and matrix material in SiC/SiC composites because of its excellent radiation resistance. Highly pure and crystalline β-SiC and SiC/SiC composites could be obtained by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and Infiltration (CVI) process using a gas mixture of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 , MTS) and purified H 2 . SiC produced by the CVD method has different grain size and microstructural morphology depended on the process conditions such as temperature, pressure and the input gas ratio. In this work, irradiation effects of silicon carbide were investigated using ion beam irradiation with emphasis on the influence of grain size and grain boundary. MeV ion irradiation at low temperature makes amorphous phase in silicon carbide. The microstructures and mechanical property changes of silicon carbide with different structures were analyzed after ion beam irradiation

  16. Effect of ion species on apatite-forming ability of silicone elastomer substrates irradiated by cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashita, Masakazu [Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1306-1 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: m-kawa@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Araki, Rei; Takaoka, Gikan H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Indwelling catheters made of silicone elastomers sometimes cause serious infections owing to their poor biocompatibility. It is believed that these infections can be prevented by coating the silicone surface with apatite, which has excellent biocompatibility. If the surface of the silicone elastomer is in advance modified to have an apatite-forming ability, apatite can be coated on the modified silicone surface by soaking it in an aqueous solution such as a simulated body fluid (SBF) supersaturated with respect to apatite. In this study, silicone substrates were irradiated by four types of ion beams (Ar cluster, Ar cluster and monomer (Ar CM), O{sub 2} cluster, and O{sub 2} cluster and monomer (O{sub 2} CM) ion beams) at an acceleration voltage of 7 kV and a dose of 1 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and subsequently soaked in CaCl{sub 2} solution. The apatite-forming abilities of the substrates were examined using a metastable calcium phosphate solution whose ion concentration was 1.5 times that of SBF (1.5 SBF). Silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) clusters were formed on the silicone surface and the hydrophilicity of the substrates was improved by the irradiation, irrespective of the ion species used. The irradiation with O{sub 2} CM ion beams resulted in the highest apatite-forming ability among the analyzed ion beams.

  17. Polarization Beam Splitter Based on a Self-Collimation Michelson Interferometer in a Silicon Photonic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xi-Yao; Lin Gui-Min; Li Jun-Jun; Xu Xiao-Fu; Jiang Jun-Zhen; Qiang Ze-Xuan; Qiu Yi-Shen; Li Hui

    2012-01-01

    A polarization beam splitter based on a self-collimation Michelson interferometer (SMI) in a hole-type silicon photonic crystal is proposed and numerically demonstrated. Utilizing the polarization dependence of the transmission spectra of the SMI and polarization peak matching method, the SMI can work as a polarization beam splitter (PBS) by selecting an appropriate path length difference in the structure. Based on its novel polarization beam splitting mechanics, the polarization extinction ratios (PERs) for TM and TE modes are as high as 18.4 dB and 24.3 dB, respectively. Since its dimensions are only several operating wavelengths, the PBS may have practical applications in photonic integrated circuits. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  18. Four-quadrant silicon and silicon carbide photodiodes for beam position monitor applications: electrical characterization and electron irradiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafí, J. M.; Pellegrini, G.; Godignon, P.; Quirion, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Matilla, O.; Fontserè, A.; Molas, B.; Takakura, K.; Tsunoda, I.; Yoneoka, M.; Pothin, D.; Fajardo, P.

    2018-01-01

    Silicon photodiodes are very useful devices as X-ray beam monitors in synchrotron radiation beamlines, as well as other astronomy and space applications. Owing to their lower susceptibility to variable temperature and illumination conditions, there is also special interest in silicon carbide devices for some of these applications. Moreover, radiation hardness of the involved technologies is a major concern for high-energy physics and space applications. This work presents four-quadrant photodiodes produced on ultrathin (10 μm) and bulk Si, as well as on SiC epilayer substrates. An extensive electrical characterization has been carried out by using current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques. The impact of different temperature (from ‑50oC to 175oC) and visible light conditions on the electrical characteristics of the devices has been evaluated. Radiation effects caused by 2 MeV electron irradiation up to 1×1014, 1×1015 and 1×1016 e/cm2 fluences have been studied. Special attention has been devoted to the study of charge build-up in diode interquadrant isolation, as well as its impact on interquadrant resistance. The study of these electrical properties and its radiation-induced degradation should be taken into account for device applications.

  19. Characterisation of edgeless technologies for pixellated and strip silicon detectors with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Christophersen, M.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gimenez, E.; Kachkanov, V.; Kalliopuska, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Maneuski, D.; Phlips, B. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Zain, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced edge or ``edgeless'' detector design offers seamless tileability of sensors for a wide range of applications from particle physics to synchrotron and free election laser (FEL) facilities and medical imaging. Combined with through-silicon-via (TSV) technology, this would allow reduced material trackers for particle physics and an increase in the active area for synchrotron and FEL pixel detector systems. In order to quantify the performance of different edgeless fabrication methods, 2 edgeless detectors were characterized at the Diamond Light Source using an 11 μm FWHM 15 keV micro-focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were: a 150 μm thick silicon active edge pixel sensor fabricated at VTT and bump-bonded to a Medipix2 ROIC; and a 300 μm thick silicon strip sensor fabricated at CIS with edge reduction performed by SCIPP and the NRL and wire bonded to an ALiBaVa readout system. Sub-pixel resolution of the 55 μm active edge pixels was achieved. Further scans showed no drop in charge collection recorded between the centre and edge pixels, with a maximum deviation of 5% in charge collection between scanned edge pixels. Scans across the cleaved and standard guard ring edges of the strip detector also show no reduction in charge collection. These results indicate techniques such as the scribe, cleave and passivate (SCP) and active edge processes offer real potential for reduced edge, tiled sensors for imaging detection applications.

  20. Design, fabrication, testing and packaging of a silicon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Design, fabrication, testing and packaging of a silicon micromachined radio frequency microelectromechanical series (RF MEMS) switch. M S Giridhar Ashwini Jambhalikar Jiju John R Islam Ananda Behera C L Nagendra George Thachil M P Srikanth Shailesh Somani B H M Darukesha Srinivasarao Bollu. Volume 38 Issue ...

  1. Quality Tests of Double-Sided Silicon Strip Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cambon, T; CERN. Geneva; Fintz, P; Guillaume, G; Jundt, F; Kuhn, C; Lutz, Jean Robert; Pagès, P; Pozdniakov, S; Rami, F; Sparavec, K; Dulinski, W; Arnold, L

    1997-01-01

    The quality of the SiO2 insulator (AC coupling between metal and implanted strips) of double-sided Silicon strip detectors has been studied by using a probe station. Some tests performed on 23 wafers are described and the results are discussed. Remark This note seems to cause problems with ghostview but it can be printed without any problem.

  2. Study of the thermal effect on silicon surface induced by ion beam from plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Z., E-mail: pscientific5@aec.org.sy [Scientific Service Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Ahmad, M. [IBA Laboratory, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hawat, Sh.; Akel, M. [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box: 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2017-04-01

    Structural modifications in form of ripples and cracks are induced by nitrogen ions from plasma focus on silicon surface. The investigation of such structures reveals correlation between ripples and cracks formation in peripheral region of the melt spot. The reason of such correlation and structure formation is explained as result of thermal effect. Melting and resolidification of the center of irradiated area occur within one micro second of time. This is supported by a numerical simulation used to investigate the thermal effect induced by the plasma focus ion beams on the silicon surface. This simulation provides information about the temperature profile as well as the dynamic of the thermal propagation in depth and lateral directions. In accordance with the experimental observations, that ripples are formed in latter stage after the arrival of last ion, the simulation shows that the thermal relaxation takes place in few microseconds after the end of the ion beam arrival. Additionally, the dependency of thermal propagation and relaxation on the distance of the silicon surface from the anode is presented.

  3. Measurement of neutron spectra in a silicon filtered neutron beam using stilbene detectors at the LVR-15 research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Viererbl, Ladislav; Matěj, Zdeněk; Cvachovec, František; Rypar, Vojtěch; Losa, Evžen

    2017-10-01

    A well-defined neutron spectrum is an essential tool for calibration and tests of spectrometry and dosimetry detectors, and evaluation methods for spectra processing. Many of the nowadays used neutron standards are calibrated against a fission spectrum which has a rather smooth energy dependence. In recent time, at the LVR-15 research reactor in Rez, an alternative approach was tested for the needs of fast neutron spectrometry detector calibration. This process comprises detector tests in a neutron beam, filtered by one meter of single-crystalline silicon, which contains several significant peaks in the fast neutron energy range. Tests in such neutron field can possibly reveal specific problems in the deconvolution matrix of the detection system, which may stay hidden in fields with a smooth structure and can provide a tool for a proper energy calibration. Test with several stilbene scintillator crystals in two different beam configurations supplemented by Monte-Carlo transport calculations have been carried out. The results have shown a high level of agreement between the experimental data and simulation, proving thus the accuracy of used deconvolution matrix. The chosen approach can, thus, provide a well-defined neutron reference field with a peaked structure for further tests of spectra evaluation methods and scintillation detector energy calibration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Raman study of localized recrystallization of amorphous silicon induced by laser beam

    KAUST Repository

    Tabet, Nouar A.

    2012-06-01

    The adoption of amorphous silicon based solar cells has been drastically hindered by the low efficiency of these devices, which is mainly due to a low hole mobility. It has been shown that using both crystallized and amorphous silicon layers in solar cells leads to an enhancement of the device performance. In this study the crystallization of a-Si prepared by PECVD under various growth conditions has been investigated. The growth stresses in the films are determined by measuring the curvature change of the silicon substrate before and after film deposition. Localized crystallization is induced by exposing a-Si films to focused 532 nm laser beam of power ranging from 0.08 to 8 mW. The crystallization process is monitored by recording the Raman spectra after various exposures. The results suggest that growth stresses in the films affect the minimum laser power (threshold power). In addition, a detailed analysis of the width and position of the Raman signal indicates that the silicon grains in the crystallized regions are of few nm diameter. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. Laser and Electron Beam Processing of Semiconductors: CW Beam Processing of Ion Implanted Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-31

    distribution (8) expected for the indicated As+ dose and impantation energy. The total number of electrons/cm2 calculated from this figure is 9.6 x 1014...impurity trapping centers. For typical electron-beam dwell diated surface, over the investigated range, with the mini - times of the order of I msec, we solve

  6. Electron beam irradiation after reconstruction with silicone gel implant in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, L.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation for breast cancer in the presence of a silicone gel breast prosthesis is sometimes necessary. There is a concern among radiation and other oncologists as to whether the presence of the prosthetic implant would interfere with delivery of the needed irradiation doses. Electron beams, with their finite penetration and rapid fall-off, offer a mode of adequately treating the recurrence and minimizing the radiation to the underlying normal structures, such as the lung and the heart. The dose distribution using 9-20 MeV electrons in the presence of a breast prosthesis is compared to the dose distribution without the implant in a tissue equivalent water phantom. The results reveal no significant difference in the dose delivered due to the presence of the prosthesis. Clinical verification of the dosimetry in the presence of the prosthesis confirmed that the presence of the silicone gel implant does not compromise treatment by irradiation in the management of breast cancer

  7. Ion-beam doping of amorphous silicon with germanium isovalent impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, A.F.; Mashin, A.I.; Ershov, A.V.; Mashin, N.I.; Ignat'eva, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data on ion-beam doping of amorphous silicon containing minor germanium additions by donor and acceptor impurity are presented. Doping of a-Si:Ge films as well as of a-Si layers was performed by implantation of 40 keV energy B + ions or 120 keV energy phosphorus by doses from 3.2x10 13 up to 1.3x10 17 cm -2 . Ion current density did not exceed 1 μA/cm 2 . Radiation defect annealing was performed at 400 deg C temperature during 30 min. Temperature dependences of conductivity in the region of 160-500 K were studied. It is shown that a-Si:Ge is like hydrogenized amorphous silicon in relation to doping

  8. Beam tests of prototype fiber detectors for the H1 forward proton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, J.; Hiller, K.; Hoffmann, B.; Luedecke, H.; Menchikov, A.; Nahnhauer, R.; Roloff, H.E.; Tonisch, F.; Voelkert, R.

    1994-07-01

    Different prototypes of fiber detectors with an internal trigger system were tested in a 5 GeV electron beam at DESY. A silicon microstrip telescope was used for an external reference measurement of the beam to study the spatial resolution of the fiber detectors. On average 75% of all crossing electron tracks could be reconstructed with a precision better than 150 μm. These successful methodical investigations led to the installation of similar detectors in the proton beamline 81 m downstream of the central H1-detector at HERA as part of a forward proton spectrometer in spring 1994. (orig.)

  9. A test beam upgrade based on the BEPC-LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiacai; Wu Yuanming; Cui Xiangzong; Zhang Liangsheng; Zhou Baoqing; Liu Zhengquan; Zhang Shaoping; Sun Changchun; Zhang Zhuxiang; Zhang Caidi; Zheng Linsheng; Liu Shixing; Shen Ji; Yin Zejie; Zhang Yongming; Chen Ziyu

    2004-01-01

    A total of three beam lines, E1, E2 and E3 have based on the LINAC of BEPC. The E1 beam is to be used for intense slow-positron facility. The E2 is a primary positron or electron beam with an energy of 1.3-1.5 GeV. The E3 is a secondary electron or pion test beam with a momentum can be adjustable continuously. The position accuracy of a detected particle is 0.2-0.4 mm with an event rate of 3 - 4 Hz. This beam has been successfully used for some detectors beam test. (author)

  10. Computer simulations of X-ray six-beam diffraction in a perfect silicon crystal. I

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohn, V.G.; Khikhlukha, Danila

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, May (2016), s. 349-356 ISSN 2053-2733 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : X-ray diffraction * silicon crystal * six-beam diffraction * section topography * computer simulations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 5.725, year: 2016

  11. BEAM LINE DESIGN FOR THE CERN HIRADMAT TEST FACILITY

    CERN Document Server

    Hessler, C; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Weterings, W

    2009-01-01

    The LHC phase II collimation project requires beam shock and impact tests of materials used for beam intercepting devices. Similar tests are also of great interest for other accelerator components such as beam entrance/exit windows and protection devices. For this purpose a dedicated High Radiation Material test facility (HiRadMat) is under study. This facility may be installed at CERN at the location of a former beam line. This paper describes the associated beam line which is foreseen to deliver a 450 GeV proton beam from the SPS with an intensity of up to 3×1013 protons per shot. Different beam line designs will be compared and the choice of the beam steering and diagnostic elements will be discussed, as well as operational issues.

  12. Beam Line Design for the CERN Hiradmat Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Hessler, C; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Weterings, W

    2010-01-01

    The LHC phase II collimation project requires beam shock and impact tests of materials used for beam intercepting devices. Similar tests are also of great interest for other accelerator components such as beam entrance/exit windows and protection devices. For this purpose a dedicated High Radiation Material test facility (HiRadMat) is under study. This facility may be installed at CERN at the location of a former beam line. This paper describes the associated beam line which is foreseen to deliver a 450 GeV proton beam from the SPS with an intensity of up to 3×10**13 protons per shot. Different beam line designs will be compared and the choice of the beam steering and diagnostic elements will be discussed, as well as operational issues.

  13. Deflection of 400  GeV/c proton beam with bent silicon crystals at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter; Della Mea, Gianantonio; De Salvador, Davide; Milan, Riccardo; Vomiero, Alberto; Baricordi, Stefano; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Guidi, Vincenzo; Martinelli, Giuliano; Mazzolari, Andrea; Milan, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Azzarello, Philipp; Battiston, Roberto; Bertucci, Bruna; Burger, William J; Ionica, Maria; Zuccon, Paolo; Cavoto, Gianluca; Santacesaria, Roberta; Valente, Paolo; Vallazza, Erik; Afonin, Alexander G; Baranov, Vladimir T; Chesnokov, Yury A; Kotov, Vladilen I; Maisheev, Vladimir A; Yazynin, Igor A; Afanasiev, Sergey V; Kovalenko, Alexander D; Taratin, Alexander M; Denisov, Alexander S; Gavrikov, Yury A; Ivanov,Yuri M; Ivochkin, Vladimir G; Kosyanenko, Sergey V; Petrunin, Anatoli A; Skorobogatov, Vyacheslav V; Suvorov, Vsevolod M; Bolognini, Davide; Foggetta, Luca; Hasan, Said; Prest, Michela

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of the deflection phenomena of a 400  GeV/c proton beam impinging on a new generation of bent silicon crystals; the tests have been performed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron H8 beam line. Channeling and volume reflection angles are measured with an extremely precise goniometer and with high resolution silicon microstrip detectors. Volume reflection has been observed and measured for the first time at this energy, with a single-pass efficiency as large as 98%, in good agreement with the simulation results. This efficiency makes volume reflection a possible candidate for collimation with bent crystals at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Test-to-Failure of Crystalline Silicon Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Trudell, D.; Bosco, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    Accelerated lifetime testing of five crystalline silicon module designs was carried out according to the Terrestrial Photovoltaic Module Accelerated Test-to-Failure Protocol. This protocol compares the reliability of various module constructions on a quantitative basis. The modules under test are subdivided into three accelerated lifetime testing paths: 85..deg..C/85% relative humidity with system bias, thermal cycling between ?40..deg..C and 85..deg..C, and a path that alternates between damp heat and thermal cycling. The most severe stressor is damp heat with system bias applied to simulate the voltages that modules experience when connected in an array. Positive 600 V applied to the active layer with respect to the grounded module frame accelerates corrosion of the silver grid fingers and degrades the silicon nitride antireflective coating on the cells. Dark I-V curve fitting indicates increased series resistance and saturation current around the maximum power point; however, an improvement in junction recombination characteristics is obtained. Shunt paths and cell-metallization interface failures are seen developing in the silicon cells as determined by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves in the case of negative 600 V bias applied to the active layer. Ability to withstand electrolytic corrosion, moisture ingress, and ion drift under system voltage bias are differentiated.

  15. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2009-01-01

    by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model...... catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally......, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 mu m(2) are conveniently characterized with the device. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3270191]...

  16. The CMS Inner Tracker Silicon Microstrip Modules: production and test

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, Alessia

    2006-01-01

    The Silicon Microstrip Tracker is a key element for the discovery potential of the CMS detectors at LHC. The layout of the Tracker and the main components are described. The status of the construction of the Inner part of the CMS Tracker is reviewed. The construction of such a large scale detector requires an industrial and distributed approach. The procedures followed at each step of the production chain are described and finally the test performed on this subsystem are shown.

  17. Negative e-beam resists using for nano-imprint lithography and silicone mold fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shy, S. L.; T. V., Anil Kumar; Sheu, Gene; Yang, Shao-Ming; Chen, M. C.; Hong, C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Nano-imprinting technology, as one of the most promising fabrication technologies, has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for large-area replication up to wafer-level, with features down to nanometer scale. This study aims to develop capabilities in patterning nano structure using thermal nano-imprint lithography (NIL). 30nm Si molds are patterned by electron-beam lithography (EBL) using NEB22 A2 negative e-beam resist. The NEB22 A2 negative e-beam resist possess a variety of characteristics desirable for NIL, such as low viscosity, low bulk-volumetric shrinkage, high Young's modulus, high thermal stability, and excellent dry-etch resistance. The excellent oxygenetch resistance of the barrier material enables a final transfer pattern that is about three times higher than that of the original NIL mold. Based on these imprint on negative electron beam resist approach is used for pattern transfer into silicon substrates. The result is a high-resolution pattern with feature sizes in the range of nanometer to several microns.

  18. Optimization of electron beam patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane mask edge roughness for low-loss silicon waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael G.; Chen, Li; Burr, Justin R.; Reano, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a multiparameter fabrication study designed to reduce the line edge roughness (LER) of electron beam (e-beam) patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane resist for the purpose of producing low-loss silicon strip waveguides. Reduced mask roughness was achieved for 50°C pre-exposure baking, 5000 μC/cm2 dose with a beam spot size more than twice as large as the electron beam step size, development in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide and postdevelopment baking with rapid thermal annealing in an O2 ambient at 1000°C. The LER caused by pattern fracturing and stage stitches was reduced with multipass writing and per-pass linear and rotational offsets. Si strip waveguides patterned with the optimized mask have root-mean-square sidewall roughness of 2.1 nm with a correlation length of 94 nm, as measured by three-dimensional atomic force microscopy. Measured optical propagation losses of these waveguides across the telecommunications C-band were 2.5 and 2.8 dB/cm for the transverse magnetic and transverse electric modes, respectively. These reduced loss waveguides enable the fabrication of advanced planar lightwave circuit topologies.

  19. Characterization of electron beam evaporated carbon films and compound formation on titanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthin, J.; Linsmeier, C.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of carbon-based mixed materials is unavoidable on the plasma-facing components (e.g. first wall and divertor) of fusion devices when carbon is used together with other materials. On the surfaces of these components very different conditions with respect to particle and energy impact occur. To predict the mixed material formation under these conditions the precise knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms governing these interactions is essential. In this paper we present the results of carbon interaction with titanium and silicon, as model substances for metallic and covalent carbides, during thermal treatment. To perform basic studies of the reactions of carbon with different elements, thin carbon films are produced by electron beam evaporation on the different substrates under UHV conditions. All measurements for chemical analysis are performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We discuss first the properties of the deposited carbon films. The carbon films are characterized on inert gold surfaces and are compared to bulk graphite. Annealing of the carbon films up to 970 K leads to a transition from a disordered carbon network into a graphitic structure. Preparation of carbon films at room temperature on titanium or silicon leads to a limited carbide formation at the carbon/substrate interface. Carbon deposited in excess of several monolayers is present in elementary form. Annealing of the samples leads to complete carbidization consuming the available carbon in both cases. Titanium reacts to TiC and additional substoichiometric carbide, silicon forms SiC with exact stoichiometry. (orig.)

  20. Synthesis and analysis of gold nanoclusters on silicon substrates by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.K.; Venkatachalam, D.K.; Bhargava, S.K.; Evans, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate the growth of silica nanowires on silicon substrates, two different seeding techniques: 1) ion implantation and 2) chemical deposition of as-synthesised gold colloids have been compared for the formation of catalysing gold nanoclusters. The prepared substrates of both types were analysed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at ANSTO to determine the amount of gold and its depth distribution. The topography of the substrates deposited with chemically synthesised gold nanoparticles were studied under SEM. The preliminary ion beam (RBS) analysis has shown ion implantation as a novel technique for seeding Au nanoclusters on silicon substrates facilitating growth of nanowires. This method holds a great potential for using any metal across the periodic table that can act as catalysing seed nanoclusters for nanowire growth. The use of chemical deposition as a seeding technique to deposit as-synthesised gold nanoparticles requires further investigations. RBS results show significant difference in the depth distribution of the gold nanoparticles on silicon substrates seeded by two different techniques. (author). 6 refs., 4 figs

  1. Charge collection mapping of a novel ultra-thin silicon strip detector for hadrontherapy beam monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouterfa, Mohamed, E-mail: mohamed.bouterfa@uclouvain.be [ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Alexandre, Geoffrey; Cortina Gil, Eduardo [IRPM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Flandre, Denis [ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2013-12-21

    In precise hadrontherapy treatments, the particle beam must be monitored in real time without being degraded. Silicon strip detectors have been fabricated over an area as large as 4.5×4.5 cm{sup 2} with ultra low thickness of 20μm. These offer the following considerable advantages: significantly reduced beam scattering, higher radiation hardness which leads to improved detector lifetime, and much better collection efficiency. In a previous work, the novel sensor has been described and a global macroscopic dosimetry characterization has been proposed. This provides practical information for the detector daily use but not about the local microscopic knowledge of the sensor. This work therefore presents a micrometric-accuracy charge-collection characterization of this new generation of ultra-thin silicon strip detectors. This goal is reached thanks to a 1060 nm-wavelength micrometric-sized laser that can be positioned relatively to the sensor with a submicron precision for the three different axes. This study gives a much better knowledge of the inefficient areas of the sensor and allows therefore optimization for future designs.

  2. Measurement of the nTOF beam profile in the second experimental area (EAR2) using a silicon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Suljik, Fidan

    2017-01-01

    A new beam line and a second experimental area (EAR2) have been recently built at the neutron Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) facility at CERN. The characterization of the neutron beam in terms of spatial profile is a prerequisite for high accuracy cross-sections measurements. A silicon strip detector equipped with a neutron converter has been used to determine the beam profile as a function of incident neutron energy, in particular neutron beam profile has been measured from thermal energy up to 10 eV. Preliminary results have been compared with those collected with a MicroMegas detector also installed during the measurement.

  3. Comparison of proton microbeam and gamma irradiation for the radiation hardness testing of silicon PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, M.; Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Majer, M.; Jung, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, N. H.

    2013-09-01

    Simple and cost-effective solutions using Si PIN diodes as detectors are presently utilized in various radiation-related applications in which excessive exposure to radiation degrades their charge transport properties. One of the conventional methods for the radiation hardness testing of such devices is time-consuming irradiation with electron beam or gamma-ray irradiation facilities, high-energy proton accelerators, or with neutrons from research reactors. Recently, for the purpose of radiation hardness testing, a much faster nuclear microprobe based approach utilizing proton irradiation has been developed. To compare the two different irradiation techniques, silicon PIN diodes have been irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source and with a 6 MeV proton microbeam. The signal degradation in the silicon PIN diodes for both irradiation conditions has been probed by the IBIC (ion beam induced charge) technique, which can precisely monitor changes in charge collection efficiency. The results presented are reviewed on the basis of displacement damage calculations and NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) concept.

  4. The 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    The ATLAS CTB Team, .

    2004-01-01

    In the year 2004, ATLAS has been involved in a huge combined test beam (CTB) effort in H8. A complete slice of the barrel detector and of the Muon End-cap has been tested, with the following clear goals: pre-commission the final elements and study the detector performance in a realistic combined data taking. Thanks to this experience, a lot of expertise in the operations has been acquired and much data (~ 4.6 TB of data, ~ 90 million events on castor) has been collected and is already under analysis. The CTB has been characterized by different phases with an incremental presence of sub-detectors modules and associated DAQ infrastructure, as well as incremental improvement of analysis tools for prompt data certification. The physics goals of the CTB have been defined in consultation with the physics coordinator, all the sub-detector representatives and the combined performance group representative. With all these indications, a detailed run plan day-by-day schedule was defined before the CTB start and was foll...

  5. ATLAS TRT Barrel in Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Luehring, F

    In July, the TRT group made a highly successful test of 6 Barrel TRT modules in the ATLAS H8 testbeam. Over 3000 TRT straw tubes (4 mm diameter gas drift tubes) were instrumented and found to operate well. The prototype represents 1/16 of the ATLAS TRT barrel and was assembled from TRT modules produced as spares. This was the largest scale test of the TRT to this date and the measured detector performance was as good as or better than what was expected in all cases. The 2004 TRT testbeam setup before final cabling was attached. The readout chain and central DAQ system used in the TRT testbeam is a final prototype for the ATLAS experiment. The TRT electronics used to read out the data were: The Amplifier/Shaper/Discriminator with Baseline Restoration (ASDBLR) chip is the front-end analog chip that shapes and discriminates the electronic pulses generated by the TRT straws. The Digital Time Measurement Read Out Chip (DTMROC) measures the time of the pulse relative to the beam crossing time. The TRT-ROD ...

  6. Test beam results of a heavily irradiated Current Injected Detector (CID)

    CERN Document Server

    Harkonen, J; Tuominen, E; Moilanen, H; Maenpaa, T; Verbitskaya, E; Eremin, V; Czellar, S; Dierlamm, A; Tuovinen, E; Lampen, T; Frey, M; Li, Z; Luukka, P

    2010-01-01

    A heavily irradiated (3 x 10(15) 1 MeV n(eq)/cm(2)) Current Injected Detector (CID) was tested with 225 GeV muon beam at CERN H2 beam line. In the CID concept the current is limited by the space charge. The injected carriers will be trapped by the deep levels and this induces a stable electric field through the entire bulk regardless of the irradiation fluence the detector has been exposed to. The steady-state density of the trapped charge is defined by the balance between the trapping and the emission rates of charge carriers (detrapping). Thus, the amount of charge injection needed for the electric field stabilization depends on the temperature. AC-coupled 16 cm(2) detector was processed on high resistivity n-type magnetic Czochralski silicon, and it had 768 strips, 50 mu m pitch, 10 mu m strip width and 3.9 cm strip length. The beam test was carried out using a silicon beam telescope that is based on the CMS detector readout prototype components, APV25 readout chips, and eight strip sensors made by Hamamat...

  7. 3D-FBK Pixel sensors: recent beam tests results with irradiated devices

    CERN Document Server

    Micelli, A; Sandaker, H; Stugu, B; Barbero, M; Hugging, F; Karagounis, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kruger, H; Tsung, J W; Wermes, N; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Susinno, G; Gallrapp, C; Di Girolamo, B; Dobos, D; La Rosa, A; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Slavicek, T; Pospisil, S; Jakobs, K; Kohler, M; Parzefall, U; Darbo, G; Gariano, G; Gemme, C; Rovani, A; Ruscino, E; Butter, C; Bates, R; Oshea, V; Parker, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Grinstein, S; Korokolov, I; Pradilla, C; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Borri, M; Da Via, C; Freestone, J; Kolya, S; Lai, C H; Nellist, C; Pater, J; Thompson, R; Watts, S J; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, S; Bolle, E; Gjersdal, H; Sjobaek, K N; Stapnes, S; Rohne, O; Su, D; Young, C; Hansson, P; Grenier, P; Hasi, J; Kenney, C; Kocian, M; Jackson, P; Silverstein, D; Davetak, H; DeWilde, B; Tsybychev, D; Dalla Betta, G F; Gabos, P; Povoli, M; Cobal, M; Giordani, M P; Selmi, L; Cristofoli, A; Esseni, D; Palestri, P; Fleta, C; Lozano, M; Pellegrini, G; Boscardin, M; Bagolini, A; Piemonte, C; Ronchin, S; Zorzi, N; Hansen, T E; Hansen, T; Kok, A; Lietaer, N; Kalliopuska, J; Oja, A

    2011-01-01

    The Pixel detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary and secondary vertices of short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration (VLSI) and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradi...

  8. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-01-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley® 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus® linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX®) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX® the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm 2 , with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  9. On the behavior of ion implanted silicon strip detectors in high intensity low energy heavy ion beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bradfield, W; Parker, P D; Visser, D W

    2002-01-01

    In a recent investigation of the development of leakage currents in Silicon Strip Detectors used in experiments with high intensity stable beams, anomalous behavior was observed. Over a very short period of time the leakage current rose to levels that could be damaging to the detectors. A discussion of this evidence and how the problem was solved, with a viable model, will be given, leading to guidelines for use of such detectors in a stable beam environment.

  10. Personal extrapolation of CDF test beam use to the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.

    1986-01-01

    The author's personal experience in test beam usage at CDF is used to predict SSC needs at the point of turn-on. It is concluded that the test beam demand will reflect the scale of effort involved in SSC detectors rather than the total number of them. Provision for later expansion is recommended. It is also recommended that the test beam facilities, as well as detector electronics, should reflect the available dynamic range; particularly, a single high energy beam derived from the SSC could be shared by several groups

  11. Data acquisition system for medium power neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R. Jr.; Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1978-06-01

    The Medium Power Neutral Beam Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed in order to develop, test, and condition powerful neutral beam lines for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors source performance, beam characteristics, and power deposition profiles to determine if the beam line is operating up to its design specifications. The speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. Analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  12. Data acquisition system for PLT Neutral Beam Test Stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The PLT Neutral Beam Test Stand at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed to test and condition powerful neutral beam sources for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors the beam characteristics and power output to determine if the beam is operating at its design specifications. The high speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. The analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  13. Commissioning of the LHCb Silicon Tracker using data from the LHC injection tests

    CERN Document Server

    Knecht, M; Blanc, F; Bettler, M-O; Conti, G; Fave, V; Frei, R; Gauvin, N; Haefeli, G; Keune, A; Luisier, J; Muresan, R; Nakada, T; Needham, M; Nicolas, L; Perrin, A; Potterat, C; Schneider, O; Tran, M; Bauer, C; Britsch, M; Hofmann, W; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Anderson, J; Buechler, A; Chiapolini, N; Hangartner, V; Salzmann, C; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Van Tilburg, J; Tobin, M; Vollhardt, A; Adeva, B; Fungueiri no Pazos, J; Gallas, A; Pazos-Alvarez, A; Pérez-Trigo, E; Pló-Casasus, M; Rodriguez Perez, P; Saborido, J; Vázquez, P; Iakovenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2011-01-01

    LHCb is a single-arm forward spectrometer dedicated to the study of the CP-violation and rare decays in the b-quark sector. An efficient and high precision tracking system is a key requirement of the experiment. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project consists of two sub-detectors that make use of silicon micro-strip technology: the Tracker Turicensis located upstream of the spectrometer magnet and the Inner Tracker which covers the innermost part of the tracking stations after the magnet. In total an area of 12 m^2 is covered by silicon. In September 2008 and June 2009, injection tests from the SPS to the LHC were performed. Bunches of order 5x10^9 protons were dumped onto a beam stopper (TED) located upstream of LHCb. This produced a spray of ~10 GeV muons in the LHCb detector. Though the occupancy in this environment is relatively large, these TED runs have allowed a first space and time alignment of the tracking system. Results of these studies together and the overall detector performance obtained in the TED ru...

  14. Fabrication and nuclear reactor tests of ultra-thin 3D silicon neutron detectors with a boron carbide converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleta, C.; Guardiola, C.; Esteban, S.; Jumilla, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Rodríguez, J.; Lousa, A.; Martínez-de-Olcoz, L.; Lozano, M.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the design, fabrication process and characterization of a thermal neutron detector based on ultra-thin silicon PIN diodes with 3D electrodes and a 10B4C neutron converter layer. The sensors were fabricated on SOI silicon with an active thickness of 20 μm which allows for a low gamma sensitivity, while the 3D structure of the electrodes results in a lower capacitance that in the equivalent planar sensor. The 2.7 μm 10B4C converter layer was deposited through RF magnetron sputtering on a whole silicon wafer, opening the path for mass-production. The detectors were tested in a thermal neutron beam at the nuclear reactor at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon and their intrinsic detection efficiency for themal neutrons and the gamma sensitivity as a function of the energy threshold were obtained.

  15. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal's photo multiplier tube (PMT)

  16. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  17. Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Test Beam Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanski, R.; Anderson, D.; Childress, S.

    1989-01-01

    This document was developed at the request of the Physics Advisory Committee of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to review the general subject of test beams with the purpose of establishing general policy and guidelines for consideration of future test beam requests. The recommendations stated here should be subject to periodic review, since the Laboratory position must change as needs and available resources change

  18. A beam test of prototype time projection chamber using micro ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We conducted a series of beam tests of prototype TPCs for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment, equipped with an MWPC, a MicroMEGAS, or GEMs as a readout device. The prototype operated successfully in a test beam at KEK under an axial magnetic field of up to 1 T. The analysis of data is now in ...

  19. A beam test of prototype time projection chamber using micro ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We conducted a series of beam tests of prototype TPCs for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment, equipped with an MWPC, a MicroMEGAS, or GEMs as a readout device. The prototype operated successfully in a test beam at KEK under an axial magnetic field of up to 1 T. The analysis of data is now in progress ...

  20. Substrate bias effect on crystallinity of polycrystalline silicon thin films prepared by pulsed ion-beam evaporation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Fazlat; Gunji, Michiharu; Yang, Sung-Chae; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films has been tried by a pulsed ion-beam evaporation method, where high crystallinity and deposition rate have been achieved without heating the substrate. The crystallinity and the deposition rate were improved by applying bias voltage to the substrate, where instantaneous substrate heating might have occurred by ion-bombardment. (author)

  1. Formation of crystalline silicon in kaolinite by electron beam irradiation and in situ heating in the HVEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sujeong; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Youn-Joong

    2007-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation can change the bulk structure of a specimen permanently. The crystallizations of amorphous phases in the 900degC-heated kaolinite by electron beam irradiation and natural kaolinite by in situ heating are observed in a 1250 keV HVEM in this study. Crystalline silicon was formed in both cases. The lack of the parent structure and the aluminum loss are obstacles to the formation of the spinel-type phase. Amorphous silica is segregated instead and silicon crystals are progressively formed through Si-O bond breakage and Si-Si bond formation. Irradiation damage and element loss are considered to contribute to the crystallization of silicon under ultra high vacuum. (author)

  2. TEM study of the ion beam induced damage during 14 kev P+ implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Tamanyan, G.; Hudson, F.; Jamieson, D.N.; McCallum, J.C.; Prawer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed silicon-based quantum computer architecture comprises an array of phosphorus donor atoms (qubits) positioned with nanometre accuracy beneath the surface of a semiconductor host, using a single ion implantation technique. The average depth of the implanted ions (the projected range R p ), lateral range R p 1, and the distribution of ions about that depth can be approximated as two-dimensional Gaussian with standard deviation ΔR p and ΔR p 1 (lateral straggle). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we studied ion beam induced damage after 14 keV P + implantation in Si. The TEM images allowed us to compare the depth of the amorphous cluster formation to R p , R p 1, ΔR p 1 calculated from SRIM and hence determine evidence for the limitation on the accuracy of the position of the implanted ions imposed by straggling. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  3. First 3D measurements of proton beams in a deformable silicone-based dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, E. M.; Sadel, M.; Kaplan, L.; Skyt, P. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Swakoń, J.; Mierzwińska, G.; Rydygier, M.; Malinowski, L.; Balling, P.

    2017-05-01

    3D dosimetry provides high-resolution dose information of radiation therapy (RT), and is explored to enable and secure high-quality delivery of advanced RT modalities, including proton therapy. We present the first 3D measurements of spot-scanning proton plans in a silicone-based, radiochromic dosimeter with deformation properties. The dose information was read-out by optical CT-scanning. We found that the dosimeter signal was quenched close to the Bragg peak, and that this had a large impact on a measured spread-out Bragg peak. The dose response was linear both in the entrance region and in the Bragg peak, however, the dose response significantly reduced in the Bragg peak. Quenching was attributed to a linear-energy-transfer dependent dose response. Linear energy transfer distributions for each proton treatment plan will provide a means for calibrating the optical measurement to linear energy transfer, as well as dose. This might enable use of the silicone-dosimeter in quality assurance of proton beams.

  4. Development of picoseconds Time of Flight systems in Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; /Fermilab; Malik, S.; /Rockefeller U.; Pronko, S.; Ramberg, E.; /Fermilab; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2010-11-01

    The goal of the work is to develop time of flight (TOF) system with about 10 picosecond time resolution in real beam line when start and stop counters separated by some distance. We name the distance as 'base' for the TOF. This 'real' TOF setup is different from another one when start and stop counters located next to each other. The real TOF is sensitive to beam momentum spread, beam divergence, etc. Anyway some preliminary measurements are useful with close placement of start and stop counter. We name it 'close geometry'. The work started about 2 years ago at Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF). The devices tested in 'close geometry' were Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers (MCP PMT) with Cherenkov radiators. TOF counters based on Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPms) with Cherenkov radiators also in 'close geometry' were tested. We report here new results obtained with the counters in the MTBF at Fermilab, including beam line data.

  5. Critical Dispersion-Theory Tests of Silicon's IR Refractive Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, William; Smith, D. Y.

    Silicon strongly absorbs both visible and UV light, but is highly transparent in the IR. Hence, it is a common choice for infrared windows and lenses. However, optical design is hindered by literature index values that disagree by up to 1%. In contrast optical-glass indices are known to 0.01% or better. The most widely available silicon IR indices are based on bulk measurements using either Snell's-Law refraction by a prism or channel-spectra interference of front- and backsurface reflections from a planar sample. To test the physical acceptability of these data, we have developed criteria based on a Taylor expansion of the Kramers-Kronig relation for the index at energies below strong inter-band transitions. These tests require that the coefficients of the series in powers of energy squared must be positive within the region of transparency. This is satisfied by essentially all prism measurements; their small scatter arises primarily from impurities and doping. In contrast, channel-spectra data fail in the second and third coefficients. A review of the experimental analysis indicates three problems besides purity: incorrect channel number arising from a channel-spectra model that neglects spectrum distortion by the weak lattice absorption; use of a series expansion of mixed parity in photon energy to describe the even-parity index; and use of an incorrect absorption energy in the Li-Sellmeier dispersion formula. Recommendations for IR index values for pure silicon will be discussed. Supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Theoretical and experimental comparison of proton and helium-beam radiography using silicon pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, T.; Amato, C.; Berke, S.; Martišíková, M.

    2018-02-01

    Ion-beam radiography (iRAD) could potentially improve the quality control of ion-beam therapy. The main advantage of iRAD is the possibility to directly measure the integrated stopping power. Until now there is no clinical implementation of iRAD. Topics of ongoing research include developing dedicated detection systems to achieve the desired spatial resolution (SR) and investigating different ion types as imaging radiation. This work focuses on the theoretical and experimental comparison of proton (pRAD) and helium-beam radiography (αRAD). The experimental comparison was performed with an in-house developed detection system consisting of silicon pixel detectors. This system enables the measurement of energy deposition of single ions, their tracking, and the identification of the ion type, which is important for αRAD due to secondary fragments. A 161 mm-thick PMMA phantom with an air gap of 1 mm placed at different depths was imaged with a 168 MeV u-1 proton/helium-ion beam at the Heidelberg ion-beam therapy center. The image quality in terms of SR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated. After validating MC simulations against experiments, pRAD and αRAD were compared to carbon-beam radiography (cRAD) in simulations. The theoretical prediction that the CNR of pRAD and αRAD is equal at similar imaging doses was experimentally confirmed. The measured SR of αRAD was 55% better compared to pRAD. The simulated cRads showed the expected improvement in SR and the decreased CNR at the same dose compared to the αRads, however only at dose levels exceeding typical doses of diagnostic x-ray projections. For clinically applicable dose levels, the cRads suffered from an insufficient number of carbon ions per pixel (220 μm  ×  220 μm). In conclusion, it was theoretically and experimentally shown that αRAD provides a better SR than pRAD without any disadvantages concerning the CNR. Using carbon ions instead of helium ions leads to a better SR at the

  7. Formation of hexagonal silicon carbide by high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, H; Favre, M; Valderrama, E; Avaria, G; Chuaqui, H; Mitchell, I; Wyndham, E; Saavedra, R; Paulraj, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrates at room temperature using a low energy plasma focus (PF) device operating in methane gas. The unexposed and ion exposed substrates were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photothermal beam deflection, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the results are reported. The interaction of the pulsed PF ion beams, with characteristic energy in the 60-450 keV range, with the Si surface, results in the formation of a surface layer of hexagonal silicon carbide. The SEM and AFM analyses indicate clear step bunching on the silicon carbide surface with an average step height of 50 nm and a terrace width of 800 nm

  8. Preliminary results from the GLAST silicon tracker beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germani, Stefano [INFN sez.Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123, Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: stefano.germani@pg.infn.it

    2007-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a pair-conversion gamma-ray detector designed to explore the gamma-ray universe in the 20 MeV-300 GeV energy band. The Tracker subsystem of the LAT will perform tracking of electrons and positrons to determine the origin of the gamma-ray. The LAT instrument, the Calibration Unit (CU) and the beamtest performed at CERN during the summer 2006 are described in this paper.

  9. Preliminary Results From the GLAST Silicon Tracker Beam Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germani, Stefano; /INFN, Perugia

    2009-05-12

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a pair-conversion gamma-ray detector designed to explore the gamma-ray universe in the 20 MeV-300 GeV energy band. The Tracker subsystem of the LAT will perform tracking of electrons and positrons to determine the origin of the gamma-ray. The LAT instrument, the Calibration Unit (CU) and the beamtest performed at CERN during the summer 2006 are described in this paper.

  10. CMS Silicon Tracker Module Assembly and Testing at FNAL

    CERN Document Server

    Coppage, Don; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Kahl, William E; Medel, E; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Sogut, Kenan; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Spiegel, Leonard; Ten, Timour Borisovich

    2005-01-01

    This note is intended to provide details on a recent activity at FNAL in which CMS Tracker Outer Barrel modules were assembled and tested as part of a qualification of some of the sensor fabrication lines. At the same time the note serves to document the assembly and testing operations at FNAL for CMS silicon tracker modules. Of the 88 modules produced fo the qualification study at FNAL, one module was outside the mechanical alignment specification. For module bonding an introduced failure rate of 4.0x10^-4 faults per channel was observed. Eighty-five of the modules passed the full set of electrical tests. Two of the failures could be attributed to the sensors and one to a problem with the front-end hybrid. Additionally, a couple of the passed modules drew unusually high leakage currents. The high current modules are discussed in some detail.

  11. V0 production with 14.5 GeV/c silicon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Roberts, J.B.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    This talk deals with Λ, K s 0 and bar Λ production with 14.5 GeV/c Silicon beams. Why study Λ 0 production? Because the study of strangeness is an important part of the search for Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Many models predict an enhancement of strangeness in a QGP as compared to the amount of strangeness produced in a superposition of nucleon-nucleon interactions. The amount of enhancement varies from model to model. Even if no QGP is detected at AGS energies using Si beams, it is important to understand the production mechanisms in quantitative detail so that standard nucleon-nucleon production mechanism can be distinguished from QGP formation. The advantage of measuring strangeness production by measuring V 0 production is that V 0 's can be identified by kinematics without the use of any special particle ID detectors. The disadvantage is that usually large aperture detectors are required. Experiment 810 has the needed large aperture. This talk describes the technique and results of V 0 production from ∼9000 interactions of Si in a 1 mil (25 micron) Au target recorded in June 1989. 13 figs., 1 tab

  12. VO production with 14.5 GeV/c silicon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulys, A.C.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Roberts, J.B.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Lindebaum, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    This talk deals with Λ, Κ s O and bar Λ production with 14.5 GeV/c silicon beams. Why study V O production? Because the study of strangeness is an important part of the search for Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Many models predict an enhancement of strangeness in a QGP as compared to the amount of strangeness produced in a superposition of nucleon-nucleon interactions. The amount of enhancement varies from model to model. Even if no QGP is detected at AGS energies using Si beams, it is important to understand the production mechanisms in quantitative detail so that standard nucleon-nucleon production mechanism can be distinguished from QGP formation. The advantage of measuring strangeness production by measuring V O production is that V O 's can be identified by kinematics without the use of any special particle ID detectors. The disadvantage is that usually large aperture detectors are required. Experiment 810 has the needed large aperture. This talk describes the technique and results of V O production from ∼ 9,000 interactions of Si in a 1 mil (25 micron) Au target recorded in June, 1989

  13. Beam test performance of the APV5 chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Fez-Laso, M.D.M.; Gill, K.; MacEvoy, B.; Millmore, M.; Potts, A.; Raymond, M.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of the latest prototype of the radiation hard front end chip to be used by the CMS collaboration for analogue readout of the microstrip tracker has been evaluated with a silicon microstrip detector in a beam at CERN. The circuit, developed by the RD20 collaboration, consists of 128 channels of amplifier, pipeline memory, analogue signal processor and a serial multiplexer. As a result of these studies improvements in the circuit design have been devised which will be implemented in the next version. (orig.)

  14. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injection system vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the components of the Neutral Beam Lines of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be enclosed in a 50 cubic meter box-shaped vacuum chamber. The chamber will have a number of unorthodox features to accomodate both neutral beam and TFTR requirements. The design constraints, and the resulting chamber design, are presented

  15. Review of tolerances at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Roy, G.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-01-01

    The authors review the tolerances associated with the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). The authors have computed the acceptability window of the input beam for orbit jitter, emittance beta functions mismatch, incoming dispersion and coupling; tolerances on magnet alignment, strength and multipole content; and the initial tuneability capture of the line

  16. Review of tolerances at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Roy, G.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-05-01

    We review the tolerances associated with the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). We have computed the acceptability window of the input beam for orbit jitter, emittance beta functions mismatch, incoming dispersion and coupling; tolerances on magnet alignment, strength and multipole content; and the initial tuneability capture of the line. 2 refs., 1 fig

  17. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  18. Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors: Simulation of Signal Formation & Irradiation Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091318; Stamoulis, G; Vavougios, D

    The Beam Loss Monitoring system of the Large Hadron Collider is responsible for the pro- tection of the machine from damage and for the prevention of a magnet quench. Near the interaction points of the LHC, in the triplet magnets area, the BLMs are sensitive to the collision debris, limiting their ability to distinguish beam loss signal from signal caused due to the collision products. Placing silicon & diamond detectors inside the cold mass of the mag- nets, in liquid helium temperatures, would provide significant improvement to the precision of the measurement of the energy deposition in the superconducting coil of the magnet. To further study the signal formation and the shape of the transient current pulses of the aforementioned detectors in cryogenic temperatures, a simulation application has been developed. The application provides a fast way of determining the electric field components inside the detectors bulk and then introduces an initial charge distribution based on the properties of the radiat...

  19. Strip defect recognition in electrical tests of silicon microstrip sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentan, Manfred, E-mail: valentan@mpp.mpg.de

    2017-02-11

    This contribution describes the measurement procedure and data analysis of AC-coupled double-sided silicon microstrip sensors with polysilicon resistor biasing. The most thorough test of a strip sensor is an electrical measurement of all strips of the sensor; the measured observables include e.g. the strip's current and the coupling capacitance. These measurements are performed to find defective strips, e.g. broken capacitors (pinholes) or implant shorts between two adjacent strips. When a strip has a defect, its observables will show a deviation from the “typical value”. To recognize and quantify certain defects, it is necessary to determine these typical values, i.e. the values the observables would have without the defect. As a novel approach, local least-median-of-squares linear fits are applied to determine these “would-be” values of the observables. A least-median-of-squares fit is robust against outliers, i.e. it ignores the observable values of defective strips. Knowing the typical values allows to recognize, distinguish and quantify a whole range of strip defects. This contribution explains how the various defects appear in the data and in which order the defects can be recognized. The method has been used to find strip defects on 30 double-sided trapezoidal microstrip sensors for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector, which have been measured at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Vienna (Austria).

  20. Structural Integrity of Flat Silicon Panels for Nanosatellites : Modeling and Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hugo; Thorslund, Robert; Thornell, Greger; Köhler, Johan; Stenmark, Lars

    2006-01-01

    To utilize the high mass fraction of silicon material in a nanosatellite based on micro-electro-mechanical systems, part of the structural function has been assigned to the flat silicon stacks embracing these systems. Three modules for destructive testing in bending, warping and shearing cases were built with 68x68x1 mm silicon stacks bonded in aluminium frames by in-situ casting of silicone rubber. The rubber served as the deformation zone between the stiff and brittle silicon stacks and the...

  1. Characterization using ion beam analysis of In(Ga)As quantum dots grown by epitaxy on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloux-Gervais, D.

    2012-01-01

    The integration on silicon of direct band gap materials such as some semiconductors from the III-V group is of a rising interest for tomorrow's optoelectronic devices. Although silicon is the raw material for many microelectronic devices, it has a poor light emitting efficiency due to his indirect band gap. Among the III-V family, the In(Ga)As compounds present the advantage of a smaller band gap than silicon, which encourage the confinement of electron-hole pairs. However, the large lattice mismatch between silicon and In(Ga)As is a serious limitation for the epitaxial integration. This PhD work has been focused on the ion beam study of In(Ga)As quantum dots (QDs) grown by epitaxy on silicon and of the QD capping by silicon. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) has been used to quantify composition of both QDs and cap layer. Exo-diffusion and excess issues of some elements have been pointed out. The epitaxial relation between QDs and substrate have been investigated by ion channelling (RBS-C). Medium Energy Ion Scattering (MEIS) has also been used to obtain high resolution profiles of composition, defects and strain for both the QD plane and the capping layer. Direct space mapping of both crystals has also been achieved by MEIS thanks to the blocking effect. (author)

  2. SSC detector muon sub-system beam tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, R.; Errede, S.; Gauthier, A.; Haney, M.; Karliner, I.; Liss, T.; O'Halloran, T.; Sheldon, P.; Simiatis, V.; Thaler, J.; Wiss, J.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Davisson, R.; Liang, G.; Lubatti, H.; Wilkes, R.; Zhao, T.; Carlsmith, D.

    1993-01-01

    We propose to start a test-beam experiment at Fermilab studying the problems associated with tracking extremely high energy muons through absorbers. We anticipate that in this energy range the observation of the muons will be complicated by associated electromagnetic radiation Monte Carlo simulations of this background need to be tuned by direct observations. These beam tests are essential to determine important design parameters of a SSC muon detector, such as the choice of the tracking, geometry, hardware triggering schemes, the number of measuring stations, the amount of iron between measuring stations, etc. We intend to begin the first phase of this program in November of 1990 utilizing the Tevatron muon beam. We plan to measure the multiplicity, direction, and separation of secondary particles associated with the primary muon track as it emerges from an absorber. The second phase of beam test in 1992 or later will be a full scale test for the final design chosen in our muon subsystem proposal

  3. Beam tests with microstrip gas counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, M.R.; Birchall, J.; Crow, K.; Davis, C.A.; Faszer, W.; Gan, L.; Lee, L.; van Oers, W.T.H.; Page, S.A.; Ramsay, W.D.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We have measured the efficiency, timing and pulse heights in several types of microstrip Gas Chambers with plastic substrates passivated with a thin Nickel layer. We used as active gas mixtures Argon/Isobutane and CF 4 /Isobutane. We placed the detectors in a secondary beam at TRIUMF tuned to a momentum of 100 MeV/c of pions, muons and electrons. Preliminary results indicate good efficiency for minimum ionizing particles in Argon/Isobutane mixtures but lesser efficiency in CF 4 based gases indicating the importance of high quality preamplifiers to increase the signal to noise ratio. (author). 20 refs., 6 figs

  4. Postal dosimetry audit test for small photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, María del Mar; Núñez, Luis; Muñiz, José Luis; Lagares, Juan Ignacio; Embid, Miguel; Gómez-Ros, José María

    2012-01-01

    Small radiation beams (advanced techniques as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). Dose measurements in small beams present challenges not encountered for larger beams. A postal audit with Thermoluminiscent Dosimeters (TLD) was developed to check the doses in small photon beams. A validation test in real conditions was carried out in fourteen centres. The TLD postal audit employs very small chips (1×1×1 mm(3)) of TLD-100 inserted at 5 and 10 cm of depth in a cylindrical PMMA phantom designed for this purpose. This experimental system is mailed to the audited centres to be irradiated with beams of 1 and 3 cm of side or diameter. The prescribeddose is 1.5 Gy at 10 cm. The properties of this system were studied experimentally and by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, before the external test. Deviations between the prescribed and measured absorbed doses are below 5% for 69% (1×1 cm(2) beam) and 64% (3×3 cm(2) beam) of the audited centres. When deviations are above 5%, their causes have been investigated and led to corrections. The developed postal audit is suitable to verify the absorbed doses in small photon beams with an accuracy of 2.9% (1 s). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Simulation and test of 3D silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleta, C.; Pennicard, D.; Bates, R.; Parkes, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Wright, V.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2007-01-01

    The work presented here is the result of the collaborative effort between the University of Glasgow, ITC-IRST (Trento) and IMB-CNM (Barcelona) in the framework of the CERN-RD50 Collaboration to produce 3D silicon radiation detectors and study their performance. This paper reports on two sets of 3D devices. IRST and CNM have fabricated a set of single-type column 3D detectors, which have columnar electrodes of the same doping type and an ohmic contact located at the backplane. Simulations of the device behaviour and electrical test results are presented. In particular, current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and charge collection efficiency measurements are reported. Other types of structures called double-sided 3D detectors are currently being fabricated at CNM. In these detectors the sets of n and p columns are made on opposite sides of the device. Electrical and technological simulations and first processing results are presented

  6. The Fabrication and Test of 64-Channel Silicon Photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. Y.; Jeon, Jin-A.; Park, Il H.; Lee, Jik

    2017-11-01

    A silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a highly sensitive photo sensor, and it consists of many micropixels that operated in Geiger mode. The SiPM has various preferable characteristics, such as low voltage operation compactness and lightweight. Additionally, the SiPM is robust and insensitive to magnetic fields, and it is capable of the counting of single photons due to the high gain of 105 ∼ 106. The developments of UV enhanced SiPMs and large area matrices of SiPMs have been actively pursued in the world. The technology can be utilized for applications such as radiation detection, medical science, cameras, and telescopes. In this study, we present the design, fabrication, and test result of the 64-channel SiPM sensor as the first step toward the development of a large matrix of SiPMs.

  7. Overview of the Beam diagnostics in the Medaustron Accelerator:Design choices and test Beam commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Osmic, F; Gyorgy, A; Kerschbaum, A; Repovz, M; Schwarz, S; Neustadt, W; Burtin, G

    2012-01-01

    The MedAustron centre is a synchrotron based accelerator complex for cancer treatment and clinical and non-clinical research with protons and light ions, currently under construction in Wiener Neustadt, Austria. The accelerator complex is based on the CERN-PIMMS study [1] and its technical implementation by the Italian CNAO foundation in Pavia [2]. The MedAustron beam diagnostics system is based on sixteen different monitor types (153 devices in total) and will allow measuring all relevant beam parameters from the source to the irradiation rooms. The monitors will have to cope with large intensities and energy ranges. Currently, one ion source, the low energy beam transfer line and the RFQ are being commissioned in the Injector Test Stand (ITS) at CERN. This paper gives an overview of all beam monitors foreseen for the MedAustron accelerator, elaborates some of the design choices and reports the first beam commissioning results from the ITS.

  8. Formation of (100)-oriented large polycrystalline silicon thin films with multiline beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Hiraiwa, Mitsuhisa; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Yasuno, Satoshi; Kuroki, Shin-Ichiro

    2018-03-01

    Low-temperature crystallization to (100)-oriented polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films is a key requirement for high-performance low-temperature poly-Si thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs). Biaxially (100)-oriented poly-Si thin films were formed by multiline beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization in single scans. By overlapping scanning, the (100) preferential orientation was stable and (100) silicon crystals were developed over a large area. The crystallinities of the poly-Si films were precisely characterized, especially by two-dimensional X-ray diffraction. It was found that the poly-Si thin films predominantly had (100)-surface-oriented crystals. The crystallinity of the laser-crystallized poly-Si films was dependent on the scanning speed and overlapping condition. The (100) poly-Si films were formed at scanning speeds below the threshold for lateral-crystallized silicon.

  9. Fabricating a silicon nanowire by using the proximity effect in electron beam lithography for investigation of the Coulomb blockade effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangao; Fang Zhonghui; Chen Kunji; Xu Jun; Huang Xinfan

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to fabricate a silicon nanowire relying on the proximity effect in electron beam lithography with a low acceleration voltage system by designing the exposure patterns with a rhombus sandwiched between two symmetric wedges. The reproducibility is investigated by changing the number of rhombuses. A device with a silicon nanowire is constructed on a highly doped silicon-on-insulator wafer to measure the electronic transport characteristics. Significant nonlinear behavior of current-voltage curves is observed at up to 150 K. The dependence of current on the drain voltage and back-gate voltage shows Coulomb blockade oscillations at 5.4 K, revealing a Coulomb island naturally formed in the nanowire. The mechanism of formation of the Coulomb island is discussed.

  10. Measurement of surface recombination velocity for silicon solar cells using a scanning electron microscope with pulsed beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of surface recombination velocity in the design and fabrication of silicon solar cells is discussed. A scanning electron microscope with pulsed electron beam was used to measure this parameter of silicon surfaces. It is shown that the surface recombination velocity, s, increases by an order of magnitude when an etched surface degrades, probably as a result of environmental reaction. A textured front-surface-field cell with a high-low junction near the surface shows the effect of minority carrier reflection and an apparent reduction of s, whereas a tandem-junction cell shows an increasing s value. Electric fields at junction interfaces in front-surface-field and tandem-junction cells acting as minority carrier reflectors or sinks tend to alter the value of effective surface recombination velocity for different beam penetration depths. A range of values of s was calculated for different surfaces.

  11. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, B.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, P.

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 x 10 10 , tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders

  12. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  13. Postal dosimetry audit test for small photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, María del Mar; Núñez, Luis; Muñiz, José Luis; Lagares, Juan Ignacio; Embid, Miguel; Gómez-Ros, José María

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Small radiation beams ( 3 ) of TLD-100 inserted at 5 and 10 cm of depth in a cylindrical PMMA phantom designed for this purpose. This experimental system is mailed to the audited centres to be irradiated with beams of 1 and 3 cm of side or diameter. The prescribeddose is 1.5 Gy at 10 cm. The properties of this system were studied experimentally and by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, before the external test. Results: Deviations between the prescribed and measured absorbed doses are below 5% for 69% (1 × 1 cm 2 beam) and 64% (3 × 3 cm 2 beam) of the audited centres. When deviations are above 5%, their causes have been investigated and led to corrections. Conclusion: The developed postal audit is suitable to verify the absorbed doses in small photon beams with an accuracy of 2.9% (1s).

  14. FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Petr; Kohoutková, Alena; Jedlinský, Petr

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with a FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam. Omega beam is a precast prestressed high-performance concrete element with the shape of Greek letter omega. Omega beam was designed as a self-supporting permanent formwork member for construction of girder bridges. FEM program ATENA Science was exploited for simulation of load-bearing test of the beam. The numerical model was calibrated using the data from both static loading test and tests of material properties. Comparison of load-displacement diagrams obtained from the experiment and the model was conducted. Development of cracks and crack patterns were compared. Very good agreement of experimental data and the FEM model was reached. The calibrated model can be used for design of optimized Omega beams in the future without the need of expensive loading tests. The calibrated material model can be also exploited in other types of FEM analyses of bridges constructed with the use of Omega beams, such as limit state analysis, optimization of shear connectors, prediction of long-term deflections or prediction of crack development.

  15. Contrast of HOLZ lines in energy-filtered convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmpfuhl, G.; Krahl, D.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Higher-order Laue-zone (HOLZ) lines were investigated in convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon near the low-indexed zone axes [100], [110] and [111]. The visibility of these lines depends on the effective structure potentials of the reflections from the first Laue zone depending on their Debye-Waller factor. The contrast of the HOLZ lines is strongly reduced by inelastically scattered electrons. They can be excluded by an imaging Ω filter for energy losses above 2 eV. The diffraction patterns were compared with many-beam calculations. Without absorption, an excellent agreement could be achieved for the [111] and [100] zone axes, while the simulation of the [110] zone-axis pattern needed a calculation with absorption. The reason for this observation is explained in the Bloch-wave picture. Calculations with absorption, however, lead to artefacts in the intensity distribution of the [100] HOLZ pattern. In order to obtain agreement with the experiment, the Debye-Waller factor had to be modified in different ways for the different zone axes. This corresponds to a strong anisotropy of the Debye-Waller factor. To confirm this observation, the temperature dependence of the itensity distributions of the HOLZ patterns was investigated between 50 and 680 K. At room temperature, the parameter D in the Debye-Waller factor exp(-Ds 2 ) was determined as 0.13, 0.26 and 0.55 A 2 for the zone axes [100], [111] and [110], respectively. The reliability of the conclusions is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Arrays of suspended silicon nanowires defined by ion beam implantation: mechanical coupling and combination with CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, J.; Rius, G.; Chuquitarqui, A.; Borrisé, X.; Koops, R.; van Veghel, M.; Perez-Murano, F.

    2018-04-01

    We present the fabrication, operation, and CMOS integration of arrays of suspended silicon nanowires (SiNWs). The functional structures are obtained by a top-down fabrication approach consisting in a resistless process based on focused ion beam irradiation, causing local gallium implantation and silicon amorphization, plus selective silicon etching by tetramethylammonium hydroxide, and a thermal annealing process in a boron rich atmosphere. The last step enables the electrical functionality of the irradiated material. Doubly clamped silicon beams are fabricated by this method. The electrical readout of their mechanical response can be addressed by a frequency down-mixing detection technique thanks to an enhanced piezoresistive transduction mechanism. Three specific aspects are discussed: (i) the engineering of mechanically coupled SiNWs, by making use of the nanometer scale overhang that it is inherently-generated with this fabrication process, (ii) the statistical distribution of patterned lateral dimensions when fabricating large arrays of identical devices, and (iii) the compatibility of the patterning methodology with CMOS circuits. Our results suggest that the application of this method to the integration of large arrays of suspended SiNWs with CMOS circuitry is interesting in view of applications such as advanced radio frequency band pass filters and ultra-high-sensitivity mass sensors.

  17. Porous silicon carbide and aluminum oxide with unidirectional open porosity as model target materials for radioisotope beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Czapski, M; Tardivat, C; Stora, T; Bouville, F; Leloup, J; Luis, R Fernandes; Augusto, R Santos

    2013-01-01

    New silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) of a tailor-made microstructure were produced using the ice-templating technique, which permits controlled pore formation conditions within the material. These prototypes will serve to verify aging of the new advanced target materials under irradiation with proton beams. Before this, the evaluation of their mechanical integrity was made based on the energy deposition spectra produced by FLORA codes. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ion-beam assisted deposition of C-, Ti-, Zr-, Mo-based thin films on silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashlykov, I.S.; Vesh, V.; Vendler, Eh.

    2004-01-01

    With the help pf RBS/channeling method and scattering spectrum computer simulation C-, Ti-, Zr- and Mo-based coatings deposited by ion beam assisted deposition technique on Si substrate have been investigated. Si, O, C, and H atoms were found to be incorporated into the coatings composition. Radiation damage of silicon near the coating-substrate interface region does not depend on the mass of bombarding ions [ru

  19. Flexural Test of Fly Ash based Geopolimer Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindyawati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is a by-product from the coal industry, which is widely available in Indonesia. Fly ash contains quite high silicate and alumina. Silica and alumina reacts with alkaline solution to produce alumina silicate gel which binds the aggregate to produce geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer concrete is introduced as an environmental concrete with high compressive strength. The use of geopolymer concrete beams is a solution to reduce the effects of greenhouse gases. This research uses experimental designs. The data are obtained from the testing of 4 pieces of reinforced geopolymer concrete beams and reinforced ordinary concrete beams with a / d of 1.11 and 2.24. The results are obtained from the maximum load that can be accepted by the beam. The results of this study are: (1 Geopolymer concrete cylinder has 26.78% higher compressive strength than ordinary concrete cylinders (2 Ordinary concrete beams can withstand 34.8% load higher compared to the geopolymer concrete beam (3 Reinforced ordinary concrete beams experience bending shear collapse while reinforced geopolymer concrete beam experience pure bending collapse.

  20. Testing long range beam-beam compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rijoff, Tatiana; Caracciolo, Sergio

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its minimum crossing angle are limited by long-range beam-beam collisions. A wire compensators can mitigate part of the long-range effects and may allow for smaller crossing angles, or higher beam intensity. A prototype long-range wire compensator should be installed in the LHC by 2014/15. The originally reserved position for the wire compensator (named BBC) seems not available in this first step, we need so to test other possibilities. The performed tests consider various longitudinal and transverse locations, different wire shapes, different optics configuration and trying several crossing angles between the beam. Simulation are done with the weak-strong code BBtrack developed by U. Dorda. New postprocessing tools were used to analyse tune footprints and particle stability In particular for particle stability was implemented a new method for the Lyapunov coefficient calculation.

  1. Testing of the KRI-developed Silicon PIN Radioxenon Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxe, Michael P.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2015-01-01

    Radioxenon detectors are used for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) in a network of detectors throughout the world called the International Monitoring System (IMS). The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with testing a V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and Lares Ltd-developed Silicon PIN detector for radioxenon detection. PNNL measured radioxenon with the silicon PIN detector and determined its potential compared to current plastic scintillator beta cells. While the PNNL tested Si detector experienced noise issues, a second detector was tested in Russia at Lares Ltd, which did not exhibit the noise issues. Without the noise issues, the Si detector produces much better energy resolution and isomer peak separation than a conventional plastic scintillator cell used in the SAUNA systems in the IMS. Under the assumption of 1 cm 3 of Xe in laboratory-like conditions, 24-hr count time (12-hr count time for the SAUNA), with the respective shielding the minimum detectable concentrations for the Si detector tested by Lares Ltd (and a conventional SAUNA system) were calculated to be: 131m Xe - 0.12 mBq/m 3 (0.12 mBq/m 3 ); 133 Xe - 0.18 mBq/m 3 (0.21 mBq/m 3 ); 133m Xe - 0.07 mBq/m 3 (0.15 mBq/m 3 ); 135 Xe - 0.45 mBq/m 3 (0.67 mBq/m 3 ). Detection limits, which are one of the important factors in choosing the best detection technique for radioxenon in field conditions, are significantly better than for SAUNA-like detection systems for 131m Xe and 133m Xe, but similar for 133 Xe and 135 Xe. Another important factor is the amount of ''memory effect'' or carry over signal from one radioxenon measurement to the subsequent sample. The memory effect is reduced by a factor of 10 in the Si PIN detector compared to the current plastic scintillator cells. There is potential for further reduction with the

  2. Controlled ion-beam transformation of silicon bipolar microwave power transistor's characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodukha, V.A.; Snitovskij, Yu.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a method for changing the silicon bipolar microwave power transistor's characteristics in a direct and deliberate manner by modifying the chemical composition at the molybdenum - silicon boundary, the electro-physical properties of molybdenum - silicon contacts, and the electrophysical characteristics of transistor structure areas by the phosphorus ions irradiation of generated ohmic molybdenum - silicon contacts to the transistor emitters is proposed for the first time. The possibilities of this method are investigated and confirmed experimentally. (authors)

  3. Echelle grating for silicon photonics applications: integration of electron beam lithography in the process flow and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschel, Mathias; Letzkus, Florian; Butschke, Jörg; Skwierawski, Piotr; Schneider, Marc; Weber, Marc

    2016-05-01

    We present the technology steps to integrate an Echelle grating in the process flow of silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) modulators or related active devices. The CMOS-compatible process flow on SOI substrates uses a mix of optical i-line lithography and electron beam lithography (EBL). High speed optical data communication depends on wavelength divisions multiplexing and de-multiplexing devices like Echelle gratings. The minimum feature sizes vary from device to device and reach down to 60 nm inside a modulator, while the total area of a single Echelle grating is up to several mm2 of unprocessed silicon. Resist patterning using a variable shape beam electron beam pattern generator allows high resolution. An oxide hard mask is deposited, patterns are structured threefold by EBL and are later transferred to the silicon. We demonstrate a 9-channel multiplexer featuring a 2 dB on-chip loss and an adjacent channel crosstalk better than -22 dB. Additionally a 45-channel Echelle multiplexer is presented with 5 dB on chip loss and a channel crosstalk better than -12 dB. The devices cover an on-chip area of only 0.08 mm2 and 0.5 mm2 with a wavelength spacing of 10.5 nm and 2.0 nm, respectively.

  4. Characterisation of Medipix3 Silicon Detectors in a Charged-Particle Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, K.; Aoude, R.Tourinho; van Beuzekom, M.; Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dumps, R.; Gallas, A.; Hombach, C.; Hynds, D.; John, M.; Leflat, A.; Li, Y.; Pérez-Trigo, E.; Plackett, R.; Reid, M.M.; Rodríguez Pérez, P.; Schindler, H.; Tsopelas, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Velthuis, J.J.; Wysokiński, M.

    2016-01-21

    While designed primarily for X-ray imaging applications, the Medipix3 ASIC can also be used for charged-particle tracking. In this work, results from a beam test at the CERN SPS with irradiated and non-irradiated sensors are presented and shown to be in agreement with simulation, demonstrating the suitability of the Medipix3 ASIC as a tool for characterising pixel sensors.

  5. Beam position determination for the Test Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The Test Storage Ring (TSR) for heavy ions, currently under design and construction at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, requires an extensive beam diagnostics system in order to enable it to operate without friction. This thesis concerns the beam position determination sub-system of this diagnostics system which is intended to determine the beam center of gravity of a bunched beam inside the cross section of the beam tube in a non-destructive manner. An electrostatic pickup is used to sense the location of the beam; the mode of operation of this device will be explained in detail. The signals go to a preamplifier from where they are then sent via a multiplex system to the measuring unit. This point also represents the interface to the computer system that controls the TSR. The prototype developed here was tested with the aid of a particle beam, as well as with other measurement methods. Resolutions of better than 1 mm about the center have been measured. In order to achieve or even improve such resolutions later in actual operation, it is possible to determine the properties of the preamplifiers with the aid of calibration signals and to take these into account in the course of the signal evaluation in the computer. The differences between the individual electrodes of a given pickup must also be compensated. These procedures and their associated electronic circuits are also described in this paper.

  6. Development and operation of a novel PC-based high speed beam telescope for particle tracking using double sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treis, J.

    2002-08-01

    A PC based high speed silicon microstrip beam telescope consisting of several independent modules is presented. Every module contains an AC-coupled double sided silicon microstrip sensor and a complete set of analog and digital signal processing electronics. A digital bus connects the modules with the DAQ PC. A trigger logic unit coordinates the operation of all modules of the telescope. The system architecture allows easy integration of any kind of device under test into the data acquisition chain. Signal digitization, pedestal correction, hit detection and zero suppression are done by hardware inside the modules, so that the amount of data per event is reduced by a factor of 80 compared to conventional readout systems. In combination with a two level data acquisition scheme, this allows event rates up to 7.6 kHz. This is a factor of 40 faster than conventional VME based beam telescopes while comparable analog performance is maintained achieving signal to noise ratios of up to 70:1. The telescope has been tested in the SPS testbeam at CERN. It has been adopted as the reference instrument for testbeam studies for the ATLAS pixel detector development. (orig.)

  7. Design, test, and calibration of an electrostatic beam position monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Cohen-Solal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The low beta of proton or ion beams favors an electrostatic pickup to measure the transverse beam centroid position. Often papers on beam position monitors (BPM are focused on a particular aspect of the problem; however, it is important to consider all various issues of a position measurement system. Based on our experience at the IPHI (high intensity injector proton facility at CEA-Saclay, this paper will address all aspects to design, test, and calibrate a BPM for proton linear accelerators, while emphasizing the determination of the absolute beam position. We present details of the readout electronics, and describe the calibration of the BPM using a test station. For calculation and simulation of the electrical signals we developed a Mathematica script. The error analysis presented, on the basis of six BPMs installed in the high energy section of IPHI, demonstrates the expected accuracy of the position measurement. These studies also identify the parameters that could improve the performance of the beam position control. The experience from these developments is currently being used for the BPM design and test stand dedicated to the Spiral2 accelerator at Ganil-Caen which will deliver heavy ion beams.

  8. TEST BEAM COORDINATION: Major upgrade of the ATLAS Test Beam network infrastructure

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Girolamo, B; Pasqualucci, E

    Based on the positive experience gained last year by the Muon group with the adoption of a completely isolated private network for the data acquisition, already last year for the 2002 Combined Pixel-Tilecal-Muon Test Beam, we adopted the private network solution. The main advantage of the isolation from the common CERN network infrastructure is the complete independence from possible problems that could affect the network in the area, intended to serve many other users, and the possibility to have a completely independent management of the IP addresses assignment. Moreover the presence of a firewall in the private network allows a better protection against possible external hackers, allowing users to transparently access the external word. A Fast Ethernet network has been set up as a control network. It relies on a backbone 24-port Fast Ethernet switch on which, in a tree structure, are connected several smaller switches dedicated to each sub-detector. In this way each sub-detector produces its own traffic...

  9. Testing fundamental symmetries using radioactive ion beams at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ISAC Facility at TRIUMF, Canada's national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics, provides rare isotope beams for a diverse research program. In this paper we summarize some recent experimental developments at TRIUMF pertaining to fundamental symmetry tests. These tests use the atomic nucleus as a probe ...

  10. Performance Testing using Silicon Devices - Analysis of Accuracy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-06-01

    Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires accurate measurements of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel (i.e., Plane-of-Array - POA Irradiance) with known measurement uncertainty. Pyranometers are commonly based on thermopile or silicon photodiode detectors. Silicon detectors, including PV reference cells, are an attractive choice for reasons that include faster time response (10 us) than thermopile detectors (1 s to 5 s), lower cost and maintenance. The main drawback of silicon detectors is their limited spectral response. Therefore, to determine broadband POA solar irradiance, a pyranometer calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under clear-sky conditions with respect to a broadband reference radiometer. The pyranometer is then used for various scenarios including varying airmass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not be an issue if all irradiance wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately, the scattering and absorption signature varies widely with wavelength and the calibration factor for the silicon photodiode pyranometer is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper reviews the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field based on measurements from a group of pyranometers mounted on a 1-axis solar tracker. Also we will present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

  11. Development of a beam test telescope based on the Alibava readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco-Hernandez, R

    2011-01-01

    A telescope for a beam test have been developed as a result of a collaboration among the University of Liverpool, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (CNM) of Barcelona and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC) of Valencia. This system is intended to carry out both analogue charge collection and spatial resolution measurements with different types of microstrip or pixel silicon detectors in a beam test environment. The telescope has four XY measurement as well as trigger planes (XYT board) and it can accommodate up to twelve devices under test (DUT board). The DUT board uses two Beetle ASICs for the readout of chilled silicon detectors. The board could operate in a self-triggering mode. The board features a temperature sensor and it can be mounted on a rotary stage. A peltier element is used for cooling the DUT. Each XYT board measures the track space points using two silicon strip detectors connected to two Beetle ASICs. It can also trigger on the particle tracks in the beam test. The board includes a CPLD which allows for the synchronization of the trigger signal to a common clock frequency, delaying and implementing coincidence with other XYT boards. An Alibava mother board is used to read out and to control each XYT/DUT board from a common trigger signal and a common clock signal. The Alibava board has a TDC on board to have a time stamp of each trigger. The data collected by each Alibava board is sent to a master card by means of a local data/address bus following a custom digital protocol. The master board distributes the trigger, clock and reset signals. It also merges the data streams from up to sixteen Alibava boards. The board has also a test channel for testing in a standard mode a XYT or DUT board. This board is implemented with a Xilinx development board and a custom patch board. The master board is connected with the DAQ software via 100M Ethernet. Track based alignment software has also been developed for the data obtained with the DAQ software.

  12. Structural testing of the technology integration box beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    A full-scale section of a transport aircraft wing box was designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested. The wing box section, which was called the technology integration box beam, contained blade stiffened covers and T-stiffened channel spars constructed using graphite/epoxy materials. Covers, spars, and the aluminum ribs were assembled using mechanical fasteners. The box beam was statically tested for several loading conditions to verify the stiffness and strength characteristics of the composite wing design. Failure of the box beam occurred at 125 percent of design limit load during the combined upbending and torsion ultimate design load test. It appears that the failure initiated at a stiffener runout location in the upper cover which resulted in rupture of the upper cover and portions of both spars.

  13. Hadron-therapy beam monitoring: Towards a new generation of ultra-thin p-type silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouterfa, M.; Aouadi, K. [Inst. of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics ICTEAM, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bertrand, D. [Particle Therapy Dept., Ion Beam Application IBA, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Olbrechts, B.; Delamare, R. [Inst. of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics ICTEAM, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Raskin, J. P.; Gil, E. C. [Institut de Recherche en Mathematique et Physique IRMP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Flandre, D. [Inst. of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics ICTEAM, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    Hadron-therapy has gained increasing interest for cancer treatment especially within the last decade. System commissioning and quality assurance procedures impose to monitor the particle beam using 2D dose measurements. Nowadays, several monitoring systems exist for hadron-therapy but all show a relatively high influence on the beam properties: indeed, most devices consist of several layers of materials that degrade the beam through scattering and energy losses. For precise treatment purposes, ultra-thin silicon strip detectors are investigated in order to reduce this beam scattering. We assess the beam size increase provoked by the Multiple Coulomb Scattering when passing through Si, to derive a target thickness. Monte-Carlo based simulations show a characteristic scattering opening angle lower than 1 mrad for thicknesses below 20 {mu}m. We then evaluated the fabrication process feasibility. We successfully thinned down silicon wafers to thicknesses lower than 10 {mu}m over areas of several cm{sup 2}. Strip detectors are presently being processed and they will tentatively be thinned down to 20 {mu}m. Moreover, two-dimensional TCAD simulations were carried out to investigate the beam detector performances on p-type Si substrates. Additionally, thick and thin substrates have been compared thanks to electrical simulations. Reducing the pitch between the strips increases breakdown voltage, whereas leakage current is quite insensitive to strips geometrical configuration. The samples are to be characterized as soon as possible in one of the IBA hadron-therapy facilities. For hadron-therapy, this would represent a considerable step forward in terms of treatment precision. (authors)

  14. Hadron-therapy beam monitoring: Towards a new generation of ultra-thin p-type silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouterfa, M.; Aouadi, K.; Bertrand, D.; Olbrechts, B.; Delamare, R.; Raskin, J. P.; Gil, E. C.; Flandre, D.

    2011-01-01

    Hadron-therapy has gained increasing interest for cancer treatment especially within the last decade. System commissioning and quality assurance procedures impose to monitor the particle beam using 2D dose measurements. Nowadays, several monitoring systems exist for hadron-therapy but all show a relatively high influence on the beam properties: indeed, most devices consist of several layers of materials that degrade the beam through scattering and energy losses. For precise treatment purposes, ultra-thin silicon strip detectors are investigated in order to reduce this beam scattering. We assess the beam size increase provoked by the Multiple Coulomb Scattering when passing through Si, to derive a target thickness. Monte-Carlo based simulations show a characteristic scattering opening angle lower than 1 mrad for thicknesses below 20 μm. We then evaluated the fabrication process feasibility. We successfully thinned down silicon wafers to thicknesses lower than 10 μm over areas of several cm 2 . Strip detectors are presently being processed and they will tentatively be thinned down to 20 μm. Moreover, two-dimensional TCAD simulations were carried out to investigate the beam detector performances on p-type Si substrates. Additionally, thick and thin substrates have been compared thanks to electrical simulations. Reducing the pitch between the strips increases breakdown voltage, whereas leakage current is quite insensitive to strips geometrical configuration. The samples are to be characterized as soon as possible in one of the IBA hadron-therapy facilities. For hadron-therapy, this would represent a considerable step forward in terms of treatment precision. (authors)

  15. Si Micro-turbine by Proton BeamWriting and Porous Silicon Micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajta, I.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Fekete, Z.

    2008-01-01

    aspect ratio, completely or partially released microelements embedded in a cavity or a channel, thereby enabling us to form mobile components in the microfluidic MEMS. Although the process opens a new way in micromachining, the widening of the implanted regions around the projected range limits the dimensions and the geometry of the processed devices. The described technique can be exploited in fabrication of various MEMS with embedded mobile elements. This work is the first demonstration of a silicon device containing a moving part made by proton beam writing. Acknowledgements The support of the Hungarian National Research Found (OTKA) via grants T047002, A080, M041939, M36324 and F042474; and EU co-funded Economic Competitiveness Operative Programme (GVOP-3.2.1.-2004-04-0402/3.0) is gratefully acknowledged. The authors also thank the contribution of Dr. A.L. Toth with SEM analysis and Mr. B. Forgacs with design and fabrication of plastic encapsulation of the microturbine chip

  16. 10 μ m-thick four-quadrant transmissive silicon photodiodes for beam position monitor application: electrical characterization and gamma irradiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafí, J. M.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Godignon, P.; Matilla, O.; Juanhuix, J.; Fontserè, A.; Molas, B.; Pothin, D.; Fajardo, P.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon photodiodes are very useful devices as X-ray beam monitors in synchrotron radiation beamlines. Owing to Si absorption, devices thinner than 10 μ m are needed to achieve transmission over 90% for energies above 10 keV . In this work, new segmented four-quadrant diodes for beam alignment purposes are fabricated on both ultrathin (10 μ m-thick) and bulk silicon substrates. Four-quadrant diodes implementing different design parameters as well as auxiliary test structures (single diodes and MOS capacitors) are studied. An extensive electrical characterization, including current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques, is carried out on non-irradiated and gamma-irradiated devices up to 100 Mrad doses. Special attention is devoted to the study of radiation-induced charge build-up in diode interquadrant isolation dielectric, as well as its impact on device interquadrant resistance. Finally, the devices have been characterized with an 8 keV laboratory X-ray source at 108 ph/s and in BL13-XALOC ALBA Synchroton beamline with 1011 ph/s and energies from 6 to 16 keV . Sensitivity, spatial resolution and uniformity of the devices have been evaluated.

  17. Pulsed beam tests at the SANAEM RFQ beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turemen, G.; Akgun, Y.; Alacakir, A.; Kilic, I.; Yasatekin, B.; Ergenlik, E.; Ogur, S.; Sunar, E.; Yildiz, V.; Ahiska, F.; Cicek, E.; Unel, G.

    2017-07-01

    A proton beamline consisting of an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source, two solenoid magnets, two steerer magnets and a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is developed at the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority’s (TAEA) Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SNRTC-SANAEM) in Ankara. In Q4 of 2016, the RFQ was installed in the beamline. The high power tests of the RF power supply and the RF transmission line were done successfully. The high power RF conditioning of the RFQ was performed recently. The 13.56 MHz ICP source was tested in two different conditions, CW and pulsed. The characterization of the proton beam was done with ACCTs, Faraday cups and a pepper-pot emittance meter. Beam transverse emittance was measured in between the two solenoids of the LEBT. The measured beam is then reconstructed at the entrance of the RFQ by using computer simulations to determine the optimum solenoid currents for acceptance matching of the beam. This paper will introduce the pulsed beam test results at the SANAEM RFQ beamline. In addition, the high power RF conditioning of the RFQ will be discussed.

  18. Construction and testing of a large scale prototype of a silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for a future lepton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rouëné,J

    2013-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes of highly granular calorimeters for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. After several beam campaigns at DESY, CERN and FNAL, the CALICE collaboration has demonstrated the principle of highly granular electromagnetic calorimeters with a first prototype called physics prototype. The next prototype, called technological prototype, addresses the engineering challenges which come along with the realisation of highly granular calorimeters. This prototype will comprise 30 layers where each layer is composed of four 9_9 cm2 silicon wafers. The front end electronics is integrated into the detector layers. The size of each pixel is 5_5 mm2. This prototype enter sits construction phase. We present results of the first layers of the technological prototype obtained during beam test campaigns in spring and summer 2012. According to these results the signal over noise ratio of the detector exceeds the R&D goal of10:1.

  19. Construction and testing of a large scale prototype of a silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for a future lepton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouëné, Jérémy

    2013-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes of highly granular calorimeters for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. After several beam campaigns at DESY, CERN and FNAL, the CALICE collaboration has demonstrated the principle of highly granular electromagnetic calorimeters with a first prototype called physics prototype. The next prototype, called technological prototype, addresses the engineering challenges which come along with the realisation of highly granular calorimeters. This prototype will comprise 30 layers where each layer is composed of four 9×9 cm 2 silicon wafers. The front end electronics is integrated into the detector layers. The size of each pixel is 5×5 mm 2 . This prototype enters its construction phase. We present results of the first layers of the technological prototype obtained during beam test campaigns in spring and summer 2012. According to these results the signal over noise ratio of the detector exceeds the R and D goal of 10:1

  20. Testing of the KRI-developed Silicon PIN Radioxenon Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McIntyre, Justin I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Radioxenon detectors are used for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) in a network of detectors throughout the world called the International Monitoring System (IMS). The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with testing a V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and Lares Ltd-developed Silicon PIN detector for radioxenon detection. PNNL measured radioxenon with the silicon PIN detector and determined its potential compared to current plastic scintillator beta cells. While the PNNL tested Si detector experienced noise issues, a second detector was tested in Russia at Lares Ltd, which did not exhibit the noise issues. Without the noise issues, the Si detector produces much better energy resolution and isomer peak separation than a conventional plastic scintillator cell used in the SAUNA systems in the IMS. Under the assumption of 1 cm3 of Xe in laboratory-like conditions, 24-hr count time (12-hr count time for the SAUNA), with the respective shielding the minimum detectable concentrations for the Si detector tested by Lares Ltd (and a conventional SAUNA system) were calculated to be: 131mXe – 0.12 mBq/m3 (0.12 mBq/m3); 133Xe – 0.18 mBq/m3 (0.21 mBq/m3); 133mXe – 0.07 mBq/m3 (0.15 mBq/m3); 135Xe – 0.45 mBq/m3 (0.67 mBq/m3). Detection limits, which are one of the important factors in choosing the best detection technique for radioxenon in field conditions, are significantly better than for SAUNA-like detection systems for 131mXe and 133mXe, but similar for 133Xe and 135Xe. Another important factor is the amount of “memory effect” or carry over signal from one radioxenon measurement to the subsequent sample. The memory effect is

  1. QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The author presents a measurement of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s} derived from multijet rates using data collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC and find that {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2}) = 0.118 {+-} 0.002(stat.) {+-} 0.003(syst.) {+-} 0.010(theory). He presents tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions via preliminary measurements of the ratios {alpha}{sub s}(b)/{alpha}{sub s}(udsc) and {alpha}{sub s}(uds)/{alpha}{sub s}(bc). In addition, the group has measured the difference in charged particle multiplicity between Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} and Z{sup 0} {yields} u{bar u}, d{bar d}, s{bar s} events, and find that it supports the prediction of perturbative QCD that the multiplicity difference be independent of center-of-mass energy. Finally, the group has made a preliminary study of jet polarization using the jet handedness technique.

  2. Testing of a nuclear-reactor-based positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; De Roode, J.; Heijenga, T.; Mijnarends, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the testing of a positron beam which is primarily based on copper activation near the core of a nuclear reactor and extraction of the positrons through a beam guide tube. An out-of-core test with a 22 Na source and an in-core test with the reactor at reduced power have been performed. Both tests indicated a high reflectivity of moderated positrons at the tungsten surfaces of the moderation discs which enhanced the expected yield. Secondary electrons generated in the source materials during the in-core test caused electrical field distortions in the electrode system of the system by charging of the insulators. At 100 kW reactor power during one hour, positrons were observed with an intensity of 4.4x10 4 e + s -1 of which 90% was due to positrons created by pair formation and 10% by copper activation

  3. Effects of space exposure on ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide and boron-carbide coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Kuha, R A; Blumenstock, G M; Fleetwood, C M; Schmitt, D R

    1998-12-01

    Two recently developed optical coatings, ion-beam-deposited silicon carbide and ion-beam-deposited boron carbide, are very attractive as coatings on optical components for instruments for space astronomy and earth sciences operating in the extreme-UV spectral region because of their high reflectivity, significantly higher than any conventional coating below 105 nm. To take full advantage of these coatings in space applications, it is important to establish their ability to withstand exposure to the residual atomic oxygen and other environmental effects at low-earth-orbit altitudes. The first two flights of the Surface Effects Sample Monitor experiments flown on the ORFEUS-SPAS and the CRISTA-SPAS Shuttle missions provided the opportunity to study the effects of space exposure on these materials. The results indicate a need to protect ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide-coated optical components from environmental effects in a low-earth orbit. The boron-carbide thin-film coating is a more robust coating able to withstand short-term exposure to atomic oxygen in a low-earth-orbit environment.

  4. Development of a Silicon Based Electron Beam Transmission Window for Use in a KrF Excimer Laser System

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, C A; Hartfield, J W; Hawryluk, R J; Hegeler, F; Heitzenroeder, P J; Jun, C H; Ku, L P; Lamarche, P H; Myers, M C; Parker, J J; Parsells, R F; Payen, M; Raftopoulos, S; Sethian, J D

    2002-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is currently investigating various novel materials (single crystal silicon, , and ) for use as electron-beam transmission windows in a KrF excimer laser system. The primary function of the window is to isolate the active medium (excimer gas) from the excitation mechanism (field-emission diodes). Chosen window geometry must accommodate electron energy transfer greater than 80% (750 keV), while maintaining structural integrity during mechanical load (1.3 to 2.0 atm base pressure differential, approximate 0.5 atm cyclic pressure amplitude, 5 Hz repetition rate) and thermal load across the entire hibachi area (approximate 0.9 W centre dot cm superscript ''-2''). In addition, the window must be chemically resistant to attack by fluorine free-radicals (hydrofluoric acid, secondary). In accordance with these structural, functional, and operational parameters, a 22.4 mm square silicon prototype window, coated w...

  5. The judgment of the All-melted-moment during using electron beam melting equipment to purify silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaojie; Meng, Jianxiong; Wang, Shuaiye; Jiang, Tonghao; Wang, Feng; Tan, Yi; Jiang, Dachuan

    2017-06-01

    Experiment has proved that the rate of impurity removal depends on the pressure and the temperature of the vacuum chamber during using electron beam to smelt silicon, and the amount of removed-impurity depends on time when other conditions are the same. In the actual production process, smelting time is a decisive factor of impurity removal amount while pressure and temperature of the vacuum chamber is certain due to a certain melting power. To avoiding the influence of human control and improving the quality of production, thinking of using cooling water temperature to estimate the state of material during metal smelting is considered. We try to use the change of cooling water temperature to judge that when silicon is all melted and to evaluate the effectiveness of this method.

  6. Beam test of Cherenkov counter prototype for ZDF setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacharava, A.K.; Macharashvili, G.G.; Nioradze, M.S.; Komarov, V.I.; Sopov, V.S.; Chernyshev, V.P.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a Cherenkov counter of total internal reflection for particle separation in the momentum range where all types of particles radiate Cherenkov light. The Cherenkov counter prototype with the lucite radiator was tested on the secondary beam of the ITEP (Moscow) accelerator. Dependence of the photomultiplier pulse height on the particle entrance angle was clearly observed. 4 refs., 4 figs

  7. Optimal Filtering applied to 1998 Test Beam of Module 0

    CERN Document Server

    Camarena, F; Fullana, E

    2002-01-01

    Optimal filtering is an algorithm that allows the reconstruction of energy and time for a photomultiplier multiple sampled signal, minimazing the noise coming from electronics and Minimum Bias events. This is anticipated to be the method used in ATLAS. This note treat upon the application of optimal filtering technic to real data from test beam and the comparison with the method used until now.

  8. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  9. New x-ray parallel beam facility XPBF 2.0 for the characterization of silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrey, Michael; Müller, Peter; Cibik, Levent; Collon, Max; Barrière, Nicolas; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric

    2016-07-01

    A new X-ray parallel beam facility (XPBF 2.0) has been installed in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin to characterize silicon pore optics (SPOs) for the future X-ray observatory ATHENA. As the existing XPBF which is operated since 2005, the new beamline provides a pencil beam of very low divergence, a vacuum chamber with a hexapod system for accurate positioning of the SPO to be investigated, and a vertically movable CCD-based camera system to register the direct and the reflected beam. In contrast to the existing beamline, a multilayer-coated toroidal mirror is used for beam monochromatization at 1.6 keV and collimation, enabling the use of beam sizes between about 100 μm and at least 5 mm. Thus the quality of individual pores as well as the focusing properties of large groups of pores can be investigated. The new beamline also features increased travel ranges for the hexapod to cope with larger SPOs and a sample to detector distance of 12 m corresponding to the envisaged focal length of ATHENA.

  10. Modify beam transversal test to evaluate hemiparkinsonian rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Lezcano, Lissette; Lorigados Pedre, Lourdes del C; Fernandez Verdecia, Caridad I; Serrano Sanchez, Teresa; Pavon Fuentes, Nancy; Turner, Liliana Francis

    2010-01-01

    The nigrostriatal degeneration underlying Parkinson's disease (PD) is commonly studied in experimental animals by injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. the present study describes a modified version of a beam traversal test which allows the quantification of the motor deficit through the time spent to arrive to the platform once all four paws of the animals are in contact with the beam (escape latency, el), the time spent before falling (tumbled down latency, TDL) and the number of errors (NE) committed for the animals in each beam. The shape and the diameter of the cross section of the beams were modified from rectangular and circular cross section with 2.5 cm of diameter to the same shape with 1 cm of diameter, which induced a high difficulty to the execution of the test. Three groups of Wistar rats were examined: untreated (n=15), lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (n=14), and sham-operated (n=14). All variables studied showed significant differences between control and hemiparkinsonian rats. The EL and the NE were increased and the TDL was decreased in hemiparkinsonian rats for all beams in comparison with control rats. In TDL the significant differences between groups were more evident (p<0.001) for the beams with high cross section irrespective of the shape of the cross section. BTT is a convenient sensorimotor test that does not need to be trained extensively, and require adverse motivation or food deprivation and appears to be very useful in evaluating the motor deficits in established unilateral model of PD and also other experimental models.

  11. Muon catalyzed fusion beam window mechanical strength testing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A thin aluminum window [0.127 mm (0.005-inch) thick x 146 mm (5 3/4-inch diameter] of 2024-T6 alloy was modeled and analyzed using the ABACUS non-linear finite element analysis code. A group of windows was fabricated, heat-treated and subsequently tested. Testing included both ultimate burst pressure and fatigue. Fatigue testing cycles involved oil-canning behavior representing vacuum purge and reversal to pressure. Test results are compared to predictions and the mode of failure is discussed. Operational requirements, based on the above analysis and correlational testing for the actual beam window are discussed

  12. Results from the 1999 Beam Test of a Preshower Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Aspell, Paul; Bloch, Philippe; Bourotte, Jean; Domeniconi, Jacques; Peisert, Anna; Evangelou, Ioannis; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loos, Robert; Loukas, Demetrios; Mousa, Jehad; Peron, Franck; Reynaud, Serge; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tournefier, Edwige; Van Hove, Alain; Zamiatin, Nikolai

    2000-01-01

    At the end of June 1999 a test of a preshower prototype, equipped with real-size detectors and LHC-style electronics, was tested in the H4 beam at CERN in front of a matrix of "Endcap" crystals. Data were taken with a variety of incident electron energies, and three angles of incidence ( to simulate different regions of the CMS endcaps). The prototype functioned well, with a very small startup period and operated successfully for the duration of the test ( ~ 1 week) without intervention. Good agreement has been found between data and a GEANT-3 based simulation, and the absolute results are promising. Plans are presented for a further test of the prototype in 2000 in the H2 beam inside the 3T magnet.

  13. Beam Diagnostics for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Dawson, William; Degen, Chris; DellaPenna, Al; Gassner, David; Kesselman, Martin; Kewish, Jorg; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Mead, Joseph; Oerter, Brian; Russo, Tom; Vetter, Kurt; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2004-01-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL. The goals of this test facility are first to demonstrate stable intense CW electron beam with parameters typical for the RHIC e-cooling project (and potentially for eRHIC), second to test novel elements of the ERL (high current CW photo-cathode, superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers, and feedback systems), and finally to test lattice dependence of stability criteria. Planned diagnostics include position monitors, loss monitors, transverse profile monitors (both optical and wires), scrapers/halo monitors, a high resolution differential current monitor, phase monitors, an energy spread monitor, and a fast transverse monitor (for beam break-up studies and the energy feedback system). We discuss diagnostics challenges that are unique to this project, and present preliminary system specifications. In addition, we include a brief discussion of the timing system

  14. Test setup for long term reliability investigation of Silicon Carbide MOSFETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2013-01-01

    Silicon Carbide MOSFETs are now widely available and have frequently been demonstrated to offer numerous advantages over Silicon based devices. However, reliability issues remain a significant concern in their realisation in commercial power electronic systems. In this paper, a test bench......-state resistance is routinely monitored online through the use of an innovative voltage measurement system. The packaged Silicon Carbide MOSFET is shown to exhibit a 25% increase in on-state resistance as the device ages throughout its lifetime, with the test still on-going....

  15. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm 2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given

  16. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  17. Novel technique for reliability testing of silicon integrated circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Wallinga, Hans; Woerlee, P.H.; van den Berg, Albert; Holleman, J.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a simple, inexpensive technique with high resolution to identify the weak spots in integrated circuits by means of a non-destructive photochemical process in which photoresist is used as the photon detection tool. The experiment was done to localize the breakdown link of thin silicon

  18. Test beam results from the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Brunelière, R

    2004-01-01

    A precision lead tungstate crystal calorimeter is being constructed by the CMS collaboration. As a key part of the future CMS detector at the LHC, the electromagnetic calorimeter will play a major role in probing electroweak symmetry-breaking and searches for new physics. In order to check that the required performance of the electromagnetic calorimeter is attainable, every prototype is tested in real conditions within a beam of particles. In 2003 two modules of the electromagnetic calorimeter featuring the final mechanical design and electronic architecture have been tested with two different versions of the front-end electronics. In this paper a review of the main results of test beam campaigns in 2002 and 2003 are given. (7 refs).

  19. Wide-bandwidth test fixture for electromagnetic-beam sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Sherwood, B.A.; Hahn, J.; Chamberlin, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator will supply the neutron flux required for studying materials that may be used in a fusion environment. The diagnostic measurement instrumentation, which will characterize the accelerator beam, must be noninterceptive because of the beam's power density. Instrumentation also must be fully functional for start up of the FMIT accelerator. To this end, three types of test facility were proposed: (1) a low-energy electron accelerator, (2) a large electron-gun assembly, and (3) a coaxial structure that produces electromagnetic fields similar to that of the proposed FMIT accelerator. The third type was chosen. This paper describes the design and some experimental results of the coaxial test fixture

  20. Analysis of test beam data of ALPIDE, the final Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) prototype for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Emriskova, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration is currently preparing a major upgrade of its apparatus, planned for installation during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider in 2019-20. The main pillar of the upgrade is the replacement of the current Inner Tracking System (ITS) with a new, low-material, high resolution silicon pixel detector, made of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This technology, combining front-end circuitry and sensitive layer in a single device, will lead to a higher granularity of the detector and therefore a better pointing resolution. The silicon pixel chips, called ALPIDEs, developed specifically for the new ITS, are currently characterized using test beams. A part of this characterization is presented in this work. The project involves the very first analysis of test beam data with inclined tracks. The tested ALPIDE is rotated with respect to the beam, hence the particles cross the chip with an inclined incidence angle. The influence of these rotations on the efficiency profile...

  1. Laterally Driven Resonant Pressure Sensor with Etched Silicon Dual Diaphragms and Combined Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel structure of the resonant pressure sensor is presented in this paper, which tactfully employs intercoupling between dual pressure-sensing diaphragms and a laterally driven resonant strain gauge. After the resonant pressure sensor principle is introduced, the coupling mechanism of the diaphragms and resonator is analyzed and the frequency equation of the resonator based on the triangle geometry theory is developed for this new coupling structure. The finite element (FE simulation results match the theoretical analysis over the full scale of the device. This pressure sensor was first fabricated by dry/wet etching and thermal silicon bonding, followed by vacuum-packaging using anodic bonding technology. The test maximum error of the fabricated sensor is 0.0310%F.S. (full scale in the range of 30 to 190 kPa, its pressure sensitivity is negative and exceeding 8 Hz/kPa, and its Q-factor reaches 20,000 after wafer vacuum-packaging. A novel resonant pressure sensor with high accuracy is presented in this paper.

  2. Beam Transport Testing for the Production Accelerator Arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-02-14

    The beam transport system is designed to deliver an electron beam from the accelerator to the target. The design of the beam line depends on beam parameter (energy, energy spread, etc.) and target geometry. Elements of the beam transport system should provide transportation, focusing, and positioning of the beam onto the target surface.

  3. Status and Prospect of Test Methods of Quality Silicone Water Repellent for Protecting Reinforced Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, H. Y.; Yuan, Z. Y.; Yang, Z.; Shan, G. L. [Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Nanjing (China); Shen, M. X. [Hehai University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-06-15

    Impregnating with quality silicone water repellent on the concrete surface is an effective method of protecting concrete. Quality silicone water repellent has been widely used in the engineering profession because of its desirable properties such as hydrophobicity, keeping concrete breathable and preserving the original appearance of the concrete. The companies in China that produce silicone water repellent are listed. Test methods in the specifications or standards about silicone water repellent in China are summed. The test methods relative to durability of concrete impregnated with silicone water repellent (such as resistant to chloride ion penetration, resistant to alkali, resistance to freezing and thawing and weather ability etc.) and the constructive quality (such as water absorption rate, impregnating depth and the dry velocity coefficient etc.) are compared and analyzed. The results indicate that there are differences among test methods relative to different specifications with the same index and therefore, confusion has ensued when selecting test methods. All test methods with the exception of the method of water absorption rate by using a Karsten flask are not non-destructive methods or conducted in a laboratory. Finally, further research on silicone water repellent during application is proposed.

  4. Test~of~Beam~Extraction~by~Crystal~Channeling~at~the~SPS: A First Step towards a LHC Extracted Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD22 \\\\ \\\\ The availability of a beam extracted out of the LHC accelerator would open up very interesting possibilities for B-physics, in particular for the study of CP-violation. Channeling in bent crystals appears to be the most promising method to produce an extracted beam of intensity $\\sim$~10$^{8}$ p/sec. This would provide as many as 10$^{10}$ $ B \\bar{B} $ pairs per year of run, two orders of magnitude more than could be produced by an e$^+$e$^-$ B-factory with L~=~10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ We propose a R\\&D program to study beam extraction at the CERN SPS, using a silicon bent crystal to be installed in the SPS beam pipe and placed next to the beam in such a way as to intercept the beam halo. Transverse excitation of the beam in presence of non-linearities will be used to create halo conditions similar to what are expected for LHC.

  5. Beam tests of ionization chambers for the NuMI neutrino beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Zwaska et al.

    2003-09-25

    We have conducted tests at the Fermilab Booster of ionization chambers to be used as monitors of the NuMI neutrino beamline. The chambers were exposed to proton fluxes of up to 10{sup 12} particles/cm{sup 2}/1.56 {micro}s. We studied space charge effects which can reduce signal collection from the chambers at large charged particle beam intensities.

  6. Study of ECAL Energy Reconstruction Algorithms in Test Beam Data

    CERN Document Server

    Seez, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    The well understood data set taken in the test beam in August 1997, which has previously been used to study lateral uniformity of energy response, is used to investigate the performance of different sized summation areas for energy reconstruction. Results for 5x5, 4x4 and 3x3 areas are presented and compared with shower simulation results. The correction of the energy response as a function of position is also investigated.

  7. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report FY17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominsky, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmidt, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rivera, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Uplegger, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Asaadi, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freeman, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Price, J. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Casey, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ehrlich, R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Belmont, R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Boose, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Conners, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Haggerty, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, K. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hodges, A. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Huang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kistenev, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lajoie, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Mannel, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Osborn, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pontieri, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sarsour, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Sen, A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Skoby, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Stoll, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toldo, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ujvari, B. [Debrecen Univ., Debrecen (Hungary); Woody, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ronzhin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hanagaki, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Apresyan, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bose, T. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Canepa, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Demina, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Gershtein, Y. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Halkiadakis, E. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haytmyradov, M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hazen, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Hindrichs, O. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Korjenevski, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Nachtman, J. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Narain, M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Nash, K. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Onel, Y. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Osherson, M. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Rankin, D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Schneider, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stone, B. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Metcalfe, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benoit, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Vicente, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); di Bello, F. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Cavallaro, E. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Chakanov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frizzell, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Kiehn, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Meng, L. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Miucci, A. [Univ. of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Nodulman, L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Terzo, S. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Wang, Rui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weston, T. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Xie, Junqie [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Xu, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaffaroni, E. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Zhang, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Argelles, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Axani, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Katori, T. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Noulai, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Mandalia, S. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Sandstrom, P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Kryemadhi, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Barner, L. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Grove, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Mohler, J. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Roth, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Beuzekom, M. van [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dall' Occo, E. [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schindler, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Paley, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Badgett, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Denisov, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lukic, S. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Ujic, P. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Lebrun, P. L.G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Fields, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Christian, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zaki, R. [Radboud Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2018-01-23

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab Test Beam operations for FY2017. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF and are listed in Table 1. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  8. Trigger and DAQ in the Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Dobson, M; Padilla, C

    2004-01-01

    Introduction During the Combined Test Beam the latest prototype of the ATLAS Trigger and DAQ system is being used to support the data taking of all the detectors. Further development of the TDAQ subsystems benefits from the direct experience given by the integration in the beam test. Support of detectors for the Combined Test Beam All ATLAS detectors need their own detector-specific DAQ development. The readout electronics is controlled by a Readout Driver (ROD), custom-built for each detector. The ROD receives data for events that are accepted by the first level trigger. The detector-specific part of the DAQ system needs to control the ROD and to respond to commands of the central DAQ (e.g. to "Start" a run). The ROD module then sends event data to a Readout System (ROS), a PC with special receiver modules/buffers. At this point the data enters the realm of the ATLAS DAQ and High Level Trigger system, constructed from Linux PCs connected with gigabit Ethernet networks. Most ATLAS detectors, representing s...

  9. Beam tests on a proton linac booster for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    De Martinis, C; Berra, P; Birattari, C; Calabretta, L; Crandall, K; Giove, D; Masullo, M R; Mauri, M; Rosso, E; Rovelli, A; Serafini, L; Szeless, Balázs; Toet, D Z; Vaccaro, Vittorio G; Weiss, M; Zennaro, R

    2002-01-01

    LIBO is a 3 GHz modular side-coupled proton linac booster designed to deliver beam energies up to 200 MeV, as required for the therapy of deep seated tumours. The injected beam of 50 to 70 MeV is produced by a cyclotron like those in several hospitals and research institutes. A full-scale prototype of the first module with an input/output energy of 62/74 MeV, respectively, was designed and built in 1999 and 2000. Full power RF tests were carried out successfully at CERN using a test facility at LIL at the end of the year 2000. In order to prove the feasibility of the acceleration process, an experimental setup with this module was installed at the INFN Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud (LNS) in Catania during 2001. The superconducting cyclotron provided the 62 MeV test beam. A compact solid-state RF modulator with a 4 MW klystron, made available by IBA-Scanditronix, was put into operation to power the linac. In this paper the main features of the accelerator are reviewed and the experimental results obtained duri...

  10. Thermal shock tests of carbon materials with high power beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, M.; Araki, M.; Ando, T.; Jinbou, R.; Saidoh, M.; Suzuki, S.; Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, S.

    1992-01-01

    In tokamak machines, not only present machine but also future tokamak devices, off-normal events, so called plasma disruption, is considered as unavoidable phenomena. During the plasma disruption, plasma energy will deposit onto the surface of plasma facing components (PFC). Erosion induced by the disruption will be considered as primary limitation factor of life time of the PFCs. To evaluate erosion rate during the disruption, high power beam facilities have strongly been required. JAERI constructed an electron beam test facility to simulate the disruption heat load. The facility can produce an intense electron beam at a heat flux of up to 2000 MW/m 2 from 1 ms. Many carbon based materials, which have regarded at most promising armor materials, have been tested at the facility at a heat flux range from 300 MW/m 2 to 2000 MW/m 2 . The erosion depth of carbon-fiber-carbon composites (C/C composites) is ∼ 3 times larger than that of numerical prediction. Carbon based B 4 C-coated and B 4 C converted materials which have been developed at JAERI have also tested in the facility. The B 4 C converted C/C composites show high thermal shock resistance. (author)

  11. Design and Tests of the Silicon Sensors for the ZEUS Micro Vertex Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Dannheim, D.; Koetz, U.; Coldewey, C.; Fretwurst, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Klanner, R.; Martens, J.; Koffeman, E.; Tiecke, H.; Carlin, R.

    2002-01-01

    To fully exploit the HERA-II upgrade,the ZEUS experiment has installed a Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) using n-type, single-sided, silicon micro-strip sensors with capacitive charge division. The sensors have a readout pitch of 120 micrometers, with five intermediate strips (20 micrometer strip pitch). The designs of the silicon sensors and of the test structures used to verify the technological parameters, are presented. Results on the electrical measurements are discussed. A total of 1123 sen...

  12. The data acquisition system of the SuperB-SVT beam test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarra, C.; Fabbri, L.; Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Lusiani, A.; Paoloni, E.; Pellegrini, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.

    2013-08-01

    Prototypes of a new hybrid pixel detector and a high resistivity detector with short strips, developed by the VIPIX Collaboration and aimed at equipping the layer-0 of the SuperB vertex detector, have been tested in September 2011 with a 120 GeV pion beam at the SPS H6 beam line at CERN. They are placed at the center of a reference telescope consisting of six planes of silicon detector with a double-sided strip readout. Both the telescope and the detectors under test (DUT) are equipped with a custom-design, data-push digital readout. The main elements of the trigger and data acquisition system are two VME boards (EDRO) organized in a master-slave configuration and responsible for programming the front-end chips of both the telescope and the DUT. The master board distributes a global synchronization clock and the triggers to all devices, including two 3×3 analog-maps matrices placed behind the DUT and supplied with an independent readout. Both EDROs act as event-fragment builders. These are sent out to a remote PC for event building, buffering and storage.

  13. Beam tests of an integrated prototype of the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00397348

    2016-09-19

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is intended to measure protons scattered at small angles from the ATLAS interaction point. To this end, a combination of 3D Silicon pixel tracking modules and Quartz-Cherenkov time-of-flight (ToF) detectors is installed 210m away from the interaction point at both sides of ATLAS. Beam tests with an AFP prototype detector combining tracking and timing sub-detectors and a common readout have been performed at the CERN-SPS test-beam facility in November 2014 and September 2015 to complete the system integration and to study the detector performance. The successful tracking-timing integration was demonstrated. Good tracker hit efficiencies above 99.9% at a sensor tilt of 14{\\deg}, as foreseen for AFP, were observed. Spatial resolutions in the short pixel direction with 50 {\\mu}m pitch of 5.5 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m per pixel plane and of 2.8 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m for the full four-plane tracker at 14{\\deg} were found, largely surpassing the AFP requirement of 10 {\\mu}m. The timing detector...

  14. Test-beam measurements and simulation studies of thin pixel sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00574329; Dannheim, Dominik

    The multi-$TeV$ $e^{+}e^{-}$ Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is one of the options for a future high-energy collider for the post-LHC era. It would allow for searches of new physics and simultaneously offer the possibility for precision measurements of standard model processes. The physics goals and experimental conditions at CLIC set high precision requirements on the vertex detector made of pixel detectors: a high pointing resolution of 3 $\\mu m$, very low mass of 0.2% $X_{0}$ per layer, 10 ns time stamping capability and low power dissipation of 50 mW/$cm^{2}$ compatible with air-flow cooling. In this thesis, hybrid assemblies with thin active-edge planar sensors are characterised through calibrations, laboratory and test-beam measurements. Prototypes containing 50 $\\mu m$ to 150 $\\mu m$ thin planar silicon sensors bump-bonded to Timepix3 readout ASICs with 55 $\\mu m$ pitch are characterised in test beams at the CERN SPS in view of their detection efficiency and single-point resolution. A digitiser for AllP...

  15. Experimental testing on free vibration behaviour for silicone rubbers proposed within lumbar disc prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Iuliana; Bujoreanu, Carmen; Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Olaru, Dumitru

    2014-01-01

    This research was focused on the damping capacity study of two types of silicone rubbers proposed as layers within total lumbar disc prostheses of ball-and-socket model. In order to investigate the damping capacity, the two silicone rubber types mainly differing by the molecular mass of polymeric matrix and the filler content, as was emphasized by scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, were subjected to free vibration testing. Using an adapted experimental installation, three kinds of damping testing were realised: tests without samples and tests with three samples of each type of silicone rubber (69 ShA and 99 ShA). The free vibration tests were performed at a frequency of about 6 Hz using a weight of 11.8 kg. The relative damping coefficient was determined by measuring of two successive amplitudes on the vibrogram and calculating of the logarithmic decrement. The test results with silicone rubber samples showed a relative damping coefficient of 0.058 and respectively 0.077, whilst test results without samples showed a relative damping coefficient of 0.042. These silicone rubbers were found to have acceptable damping properties to be used as layers placed inside the prosthetic components. - Highlights: • Two types of silicone rubber were proposed within the total lumbar disc prostheses. • The filler content of elastomers was highlighted by microscopy investigation. • Damping capacity of the two elastomers was evaluated using free vibration analysis. • The logarithmic decrement and the relative damping coefficient were determined. • The silicone rubbers prepared in our work showed acceptable damping properties

  16. Experimental testing on free vibration behaviour for silicone rubbers proposed within lumbar disc prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotaru, Iuliana, E-mail: rotaruiuliana2000@gmail.com [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics and Robotics, 61-63 Bd. Dimitrie Mangeron, 700050 Iasi (Romania); “Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Iasi, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, Department of Biomedical Sciences, 9-13 M. Kogalniceanu Street, 700454 Iasi (Romania); Bujoreanu, Carmen [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics and Robotics, 61-63 Bd. Dimitrie Mangeron, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41 A, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Olaru, Dumitru [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics and Robotics, 61-63 Bd. Dimitrie Mangeron, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2014-09-01

    This research was focused on the damping capacity study of two types of silicone rubbers proposed as layers within total lumbar disc prostheses of ball-and-socket model. In order to investigate the damping capacity, the two silicone rubber types mainly differing by the molecular mass of polymeric matrix and the filler content, as was emphasized by scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, were subjected to free vibration testing. Using an adapted experimental installation, three kinds of damping testing were realised: tests without samples and tests with three samples of each type of silicone rubber (69 ShA and 99 ShA). The free vibration tests were performed at a frequency of about 6 Hz using a weight of 11.8 kg. The relative damping coefficient was determined by measuring of two successive amplitudes on the vibrogram and calculating of the logarithmic decrement. The test results with silicone rubber samples showed a relative damping coefficient of 0.058 and respectively 0.077, whilst test results without samples showed a relative damping coefficient of 0.042. These silicone rubbers were found to have acceptable damping properties to be used as layers placed inside the prosthetic components. - Highlights: • Two types of silicone rubber were proposed within the total lumbar disc prostheses. • The filler content of elastomers was highlighted by microscopy investigation. • Damping capacity of the two elastomers was evaluated using free vibration analysis. • The logarithmic decrement and the relative damping coefficient were determined. • The silicone rubbers prepared in our work showed acceptable damping properties.

  17. Beam tests of the 12 MHz RFQ RIB injector for ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifft, B. E.; Kaye, R. A.; Kedzie, M.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-06

    Beam tests of the ANL 12 MHz Radio-Frequency Quadruple (RFQ), designed for use as the initial element of an injector system for radioactive beams into the existing ATLAS accelerators, are in progress. Recent high-voltage tests of the RFQ without beam achieved the design intervane voltage of 100 kV CW, enabling beam tests with A/q as large as 132 using beams from the ANL Physics Division 4 MV Dynamitron accelerator facility. Although the RFQ was designed for bunched beams, initial tests have been performed with unbunched beams. Experiments with stable, unbunched beams of singly-charged {sup 132}Xe and {sup 84}Kr measured the output beam energy distribution as a function of the RFQ operating voltage. The observed energies are in excellent agreement with numerical beam simulations.

  18. Beam tests of the 12 MHz RFQ RIB injector for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifft, B. E.; Kaye, R. A.; Kedzie, M.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Beam tests of the ANL 12 MHz Radio-Frequency Quadruple (RFQ), designed for use as the initial element of an injector system for radioactive beams into the existing ATLAS accelerators, are in progress. Recent high-voltage tests of the RFQ without beam achieved the design intervane voltage of 100 kV CW, enabling beam tests with A/q as large as 132 using beams from the ANL Physics Division 4 MV Dynamitron accelerator facility. Although the RFQ was designed for bunched beams, initial tests have been performed with unbunched beams. Experiments with stable, unbunched beams of singly-charged 132 Xe and 84 Kr measured the output beam energy distribution as a function of the RFQ operating voltage. The observed energies are in excellent agreement with numerical beam simulations

  19. Performance of CREAM Calorimeter Results of Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, H S; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Castellina, A; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; Duvernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Hyun, H J; Kang, T G; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, M Y; Kim, T; Kim, Y J; Lee, J K; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Mognet, S I; Nam, S W; Nutter, S; Park, N H; Park, H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Syed, S; Song, C; Swordy, S; Wu, J; Yang, J; Zhang, H Q; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM), a balloon-borne experiment, is under preparation for a flight in Antarctica at the end of 2004. CREAM is planned to measure the energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays directly at energies between 1 TeV and 1000 TeV. Incident particle energies will be measured by a transition radiation detector and a sampling calorimeter. The calorimeter was constructed at the University of Maryland and tested at CERN in 2003. Performance of the calorimeter during the beam tests is reported.

  20. Characterisation of silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poley, Luise [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Blue, Andrew; Bates, Richard [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy; and others

    2016-03-15

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity, totalling 1 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb{sup -1}, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1 x 10{sup 16} 1 MeV neutrons per cm{sup 2}. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (Endcap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). Sub-strip resolution of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. Investigation of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips is shown in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stops regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch. The collected signal allowed for the identification of operating thresholds for both devices, making it possible to compare signal response between different versions of silicon strip detector modules.

  1. Characterisation of silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, Luise; Blue, Andrew; Bates, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity, totalling 1 x 10 35 cm -2 s -1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb -1 , requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1 x 10 16 1 MeV neutrons per cm 2 . With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (Endcap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). Sub-strip resolution of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. Investigation of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips is shown in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stops regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch. The collected signal allowed for the identification of operating thresholds for both devices, making it possible to compare signal response between different versions of silicon strip detector modules.

  2. The ATLAS inner detector semiconductor tracker (Si and GaAs strips) review of the 1995 beam tests at the CERN SPS H8 beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Moorhead, G F

    1995-01-01

    This talk will consist of a brief review of the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) strip detector (both silicon and gallium arsenide) beam tests conducted at the ATLAS test beam facility at the CERN SPS H8 beamline. It will include a brief overview of the H8 facilities, the experimental layout of the SCT/Strip apparatus, the data acquisition system, some of the online software tools and the high precision silicon hodoscope and timing modules used. A very brief indication of some of the main varieties of detector systems tested and the measurements performed will be given. Throughout some emphasis will be placed on the contributions and-interests of members of the Melbourne group. (author).

  3. Application of multiwire proportional chamber in BEPC test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Ji; Chen Ziyu; Ye Yunxiu; Cuiu Xiangzong; Li Jiacai

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) for the Test Beam on BEPC (Beijing Electron Positron Colider). The distance between the anode surface and the cathode surface of the MWPC is 6 mm. Both surfaces are made of gold-plated tungsten wires, the anode wires are 20 μm in diameter and 2 mm apart, and the cathode wires are 50 μm indiameter and 0.7 mm apart. Six adjacent wires are connected together to form a 4.2 mm wide cathode strip. The MWPC can localize the particles of e, π by cathode-induced charge centre-of-gravity read-out. For 5.9 keV γ photon, the positional resolution is less than 0.3 mm (FWHM) and for 1.1 GeV beam electron, 0.224 mm (FWHM) positional resolution is attained. (authors)

  4. Beam Test of the First Production Forward RPC

    CERN Document Server

    Ban, Yong; Liu, Haidong; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Quanjin; Ye, Yan-Lin; Ying, Y; Hong, Byung-Sik; Wang, Quanjin; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sangnam; Sim, Kwang Souk; Ball, Austin; Chatelain, Jean-Paul; Crotty, Ian; Sharma, Abhishek; Whitaker, William; Van Doninck, Walter; Akimenko, Sergey; Litov, Leander; Marinov, Andrey; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Ahmed, Ijaz; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Colaleo, Anna; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, Flavio; Maggi, Marcello

    2004-01-01

    The production of the first set of forward Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) for the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has started at CERN since June 2004. The detectors are assembled with gas gaps made in Korea, mechanics made in China and are equipped with the final front-end electronics, high/low-voltage distribution and threshold control. After testing and validating one of the preseries RE1/2 chambers, it was coupled to the corresponding Cathode Strips Chamber (CSC), ME1/2 and exposed to muons at the X5A beam area at CERN. Its performance in terms of detection efficiency, noise and cluster size in this beam with 25 ns bunch structure is presented.

  5. Design and test of a prototype silicon detector module for ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker endcaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.G.; Donega, M.; D'Onofrio, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) will be a central part of the tracking system of the ATLAS experiment. The SCT consists of four concentric barrels of silicon detectors as well as two silicon endcap detectors formed by nine disks each. The layout of the forward silicon detector module presented in this paper is based on the approved layout of the silicon detectors of the SCT, their geometry and arrangement in disks, but uses otherwise components identical to the barrel modules of the SCT. The module layout is optimized for excellent thermal management and electrical performance, while keeping the assembly simple and adequate for a large scale module production. This paper summarizes the design and layout of the module and present results of a limited prototype production, which has been extensively tested in the laboratory and testbeam. The module design was not finally adopted for series production because a dedicated forward hybrid layout was pursued

  6. Silicon nitride and silicon etching by CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} plasma beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaler, Sanbir S.; Lou, Qiaowei; Donnelly, Vincent M., E-mail: vmdonnelly@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J., E-mail: economou@uh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Plasma Processing Laboratory, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Silicon nitride (SiN, where Si:N ≠ 1:1) films low pressure-chemical vapor deposited on Si substrates, Si films on Ge on Si substrates, and p-Si samples were exposed to plasma beams emanating from CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} or CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas. Conditions within the plasma beam source were maintained at power of 300 W (1.9 W/cm{sup 3}), pressure of 10 mTorr, and total gas flow rate of 10 sccm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the thicknesses of Si/Ge in addition to hydrofluorocarbon polymer films formed at low %O{sub 2} or %CO{sub 2} addition on p-Si and SiN. Polymer film thickness decreased sharply as a function of increasing %O{sub 2} or %CO{sub 2} addition and dropped to monolayer thickness above the transition point (∼48% O{sub 2} or ∼75% CO{sub 2}) at which the polymer etchants (O and F) number densities in the plasma increased abruptly. The C(1s) spectra for the polymer films deposited on p-Si substrates appeared similar to those on SiN. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to measure the thickness of SiN films etched using the CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} plasma beams. SiN etching rates peaked near 50% O{sub 2} addition and 73% CO{sub 2} addition. Faster etching rates were measured in CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} plasmas above 70% O{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} addition. The etching of Si stopped after a loss of ∼3 nm, regardless of beam exposure time and %O{sub 2} or %CO{sub 2} addition, apparently due to plasma assisted oxidation of Si. An additional GeO{sub x}F{sub y} peak was observed at 32.5 eV in the Ge(3d) region, suggesting deep penetration of F into Si, under the conditions investigated.

  7. Status of the realization of the neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toigo, Vanni

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are required to deliver 16.5 MW of additional heating power to the plasma, accelerating negative ions up to -1 MV with a beam current of 40A lasting up to 1 hour. Since these outstanding requirements were never achieved all together so far, the realization of a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), called PRIMA, currently under construction in Padova, was launched with the aim to test the operation of the NB injector and to study the relevant physical and technological issues, in advance to the implementation in ITER. Two projects are under development: MITICA and SPIDER. MITICA is a full scale prototype of the ITER NB injector; the design is based on a similar scheme and layout, with the same power supply system and also the control and protection systems are being designed according to the ITER rules and constraints. The HV components are procured by JADA; the low voltage ones and the injector are procured by F4E. SPIDER project is an ion source with the same characteristics of the ITER one, specifically addressed to study the issues related to the RF operation; for this reason, the beam energy is limited to 100keV. It can generate both Hydrogen and Deuterium Ions; the design includes provisions to filter electrons and also to allow the use of cesium to attain the high values of current density required. SPIDER is procured by F4E and INDA. The construction of PRIMA buildings and auxiliaries, started in autumn 2008, was completed in summer 2015. SPIDER plant systems procurement is well advanced and some systems are under installation or site acceptance tests. In 2016 integrated commissioning and power supply integrated tests will be performed followed by the beginning of the first experimental phase. MITICA design was completed; many procurement contracts have been signed or will be launched in the next months. Installation activity will start in December 2015 with the installation of the first HV power supply components provided

  8. Beam Tests of the Balloon-Borne ATIC Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganel, O.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, E. J.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Ellison, S.; Fazely, A.; Gould, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurement from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide crucial hints about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATTIC'S design centers on an 18 radiation length (X(sub Omnicron)) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75 lambda(sub int) graphite target. In September 1999 the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator, within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000 - January 2001, ATIC flew on the first of a series of long duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam-tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 GeV to 375 GeV, as well as signal linearity and collection efficiency estimates. We show how these results compare with expectations based on simulations, and their expected impacts on mission performance.

  9. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccaria, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Coniglio, A.; Antoni, V.; Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Jones, T.; Di Pietro, E.; Mondino, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER International Team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D - ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimize the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring. (authors)

  10. Beam tests of the balloon-borne ATIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ganel, O; Ahn, H S; Ampe, J; Bashindzhagian, G L; Case, G; Chang, H; Ellison, S; Fazely, A; Gould, R; Granger, D; Gunasingha, R M; Guzik, T G; Han, Y J; Isbert, J; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, S K; Kwon, Y; Panasyuk, M Y; Panov, A; Price, B; Samsonov, G; Schmidt, W K H; Sen, M; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Sokolskaya, N; Stewart, M; Voronin, A; Wagner, D; Wang, J Z; Wefel, J P; Wu, J; Zatsepin, V

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurements from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide information about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATIC's design centers on an 18 radiation length (X0) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75λint graphite target. In September 1999, the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000–January 2001 and again in December 2002–January 2003, ATIC flew on the first two of a series of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 to 375 G...

  11. The investigation of the depth profile of the beam damage in silicon after ion implantation by means of the MOS-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferretti, R.

    1980-01-01

    The depth profile of the beam damage and the ion profile was measured in Silicon after ion implantation by MOS structures. For helium implantation deep acceptor-like centers are found. The damage range is determined for all samples and the theory is discussed. (BHO)

  12. Combined binary collision and continuum mechanics model applied to focused ion beam milling of a silicon membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Many experiments indicate the importance of stress and stress relaxation upon ion implantation. In this paper, a model is proposed that is capable of describing ballistic effects as well as stress relaxation by viscous flow. It combines atomistic binary collision simulation with continuum mechanics. The only parameters that enter the continuum model are the bulk modulus and the radiation-induced viscosity. The shear modulus can also be considered but shows only minor effects. A boundary-fitted grid is proposed that is usable both during the binary collision simulation and for the spatial discretization of the force balance equations. As an application, the milling of a slit into an amorphous silicon membrane with a 30 keV focused Ga beam is studied, which demonstrates the relevance of the new model compared to a more heuristic approach used in previous work

  13. Characteristics of AlN/GaN nanowire Bragg mirror grown on (001) silicon by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Heo, Junseok

    2013-10-01

    GaN nanowires containing AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) heterostructures have been grown on (001) silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A peak reflectance of 70% with normal incidence at 560 nm is derived from angle resolved reflectance measurements on the as-grown nanowire DBR array. The measured peak reflectance wavelength is significantly blue-shifted from the ideal calculated value. The discrepancy is explained by investigating the reflectance of the nanoscale DBRs with a finite difference time domain technique. Ensemble nanowire microcavities with In0.3Ga 0.7N nanowires clad by AlN/GaN DBRs have also been characterized. Room temperature emission from the microcavity exhibits considerable linewidth narrowing compared to that measured for unclad In0.3Ga0.7N nanowires. The resonant emission is characterized by a peak wavelength and linewidth of 575 nm and 39 nm, respectively. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  14. Testing Boron Carbide and Silicon Carbide under Triaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles; Chocron, Sidney; Nicholls, Arthur

    2011-06-01

    Boron Carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC-N) are extensively used as armor materials. The strength of these ceramics depends mainly on surface defects, hydrostatic pressure and strain rate. This article focuses on the pressure dependence and summarizes the characterization work conducted on intact and predamaged specimens by using compression under confinement in a pressure vessel and in a thick steel sleeve. The techniques used for the characterization will be described briefly. The failure curves obtained for the two materials will be presented, although the data are limited for SiC. The data will also be compared to experimental data from Wilkins (1969), and Meyer and Faber (1997). Additionally, the results will be compared with plate-impact data.

  15. Successful beam tests for ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Another round of beam tests of prototypes for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for ALICE has been completed and there are already some good results. Mass production of the components of the detector will start early next year.   Top view of the setup for the Transition Radiation Detector prototype tests at CERN.On the left, can be seen the full-scale TRD prototype together with four smaller versions. These are busy days for the TRD (Transition Radiation Detector) team of ALICE. Twenty people - mainly from Germany, but also from Russia and Japan - were working hard during the beam tests this autumn at CERN to assess the performance of their detector prototypes. Analysis of the data shows that the TRD can achieve the desired physics goal even for the highest conceivable multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In its final configuration in the ALICE experiment, the TRD will greatly help in identifying high-momentum electrons, which are 'needles in a haystack' that consists mostly of...

  16. Detection and characterization of stacking faults by light beam induced current mapping and scanning infrared microscopy in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vève-Fossati, C.; Martinuzzi, S.

    1998-08-01

    Non destructive techniques like scanning infrared microscopy and light beam induced current mapping are used to reveal the presence of stacking faults in heat treated Czochralski grown silicon wafers. In oxidized or contaminated samples, scanning infrared microscopy reveals that stacking faults grow around oxygen precipitates. This could be due to an aggregation of silicon self-interstitials emitted by the growing precipitates in the (111) plane. Light beam induced current maps show that the dislocations which surround the stacking faults are the main source of recombination centers, especially when they are decorated by a fast diffuser like copper. Des techniques non destructives telles que la microscopie infrarouge à balayage et la cartographie de photocourant induit par un spot lumineux ont été utilisées pour révéler la présence de fautes d'empilement après traitements thermiques, dans des plaquettes de silicium préparées par tirage Czochralski. Dans des échantillons oxydés ou contaminés, la microscopie infrarouge à balayage révèle des fautes d'empilement qui se développent autour des précipités d'oxygène. Cela peut être dû à la formation d'un agglomérat d'auto-interstitiels de silicium émis par la croissance des précipités dans les plans (111). Les cartographies de photocourant montrent que les dislocations qui entourent les fautes d'empilement sont la principale source de centres de recombinaison, et cela tout particulièrement quand ces fautes sont décorées par un diffuseur rapide tel que le cuivre.

  17. Large-size high-performance transparent amorphous silicon sensors for laser beam position detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Luque, J.M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C.; Koehler, C.; Lutz, B.; Schubert, M.B.; Werner, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparent amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30x30mm 2 ) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20mA/W), an intrinsic position resolution better than 3μm, a spatial-point reconstruction precision better than 10μm, deflection angles smaller than 10μrad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of the ion beam induced crystallization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, L.A.; Caturla, M.J.; Huang, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the ion bombardment induced amorphous-to-crystal transition in silicon using molecular dynamics techniques. The growth of small crystal seeds embedded in the amorphous phase has been monitored for several temperatures in order to get information on the effect of the thermal temperature increase introduced by the incoming ion. The role of ion-induced defects on the growth has been also studied

  19. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  20. ESP – Data from Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicon Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jim

    2010-10-06

    Current funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until funding allowed the restart in FY97. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  1. Tests of Silicon Detector Modules for the Tracker End Cap with the ARC System

    CERN Document Server

    Axer, Markus; Flügge, Günter; Franke, Torsten; Kasselmann, Stefan; Mnich, Joachim; Poettgens, Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Schulte, Reiner

    2003-01-01

    During the production phase of the CMS silicon strip detector modules the ARC (APV Readout Controller) system will be used as a readout system for testing purposes. The first ten TEC (tracker end cap) modules built have been tested using the ARC system. After a description of the test environment and the test procedures the results for the so-called expressline modules are summarized.

  2. Results of 2007 test beam of AMS-02 Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Falco, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The AMS-02 experiment will be delivered by the Space Shuttle Discovery to the ISS in summer 2010. The main goals of the experiment are search for antimatter and dark matter, high precision measurement of charged cosmic ray spectra and fluxes and study of gamma rays, in the GeV to TeV energy range. In AMS-02 the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) is required to measure e+,e- and gamma energy and to discriminate electromagnetic showers from hadronic cascades. ECAL is based on a lead/scintillating fiber sandwich, providing a 3D imaging reconstruction of the showers. The electronics equipping the detector has low power consumption, low noise, large dynamic range readout and full double redundancy. The calorimeter successfully got through several space qualification tests concerning the mechanical and thermal stability, the electromagnetic compatibility and radiation hardness. The ECAL Flight Model was calibrated during Summer 2007 in a test beam at CERN, using 6-250 GeV electron and proton beams: angular and energy resolutions, obtained from these data, are reported.

  3. Numerical simulation of impact tests on reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Xiaowo; He, Shuanhai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Predictions using advanced concrete model compare well with the impact test results. ► Several important behavior of concrete is discussed. ► Two mesh ways incorporating rebar into concrete mesh is also discussed. ► Gives a example of using EPDC model and references to develop new constitutive models. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on numerical simulation of impact tests of reinforced concrete (RC) beams by the LS-DYNA finite element (FE) code. In the FE model, the elasto-plastic damage cap (EPDC) model, which is based on continuum damage mechanics in combination with plasticity theory, is used for concrete, and the reinforcement is assumed to be elasto-plastic. The numerical results compares well with the experimental values reported in the literature, in terms of impact force history, mid-span deflection history and crack patterns of RC beams. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, several important behavior of concrete material is investigated, which includes: damage variable to describe the strain softening section of stress–strain curve; the cap surface to describe the plastic volume change; the shape of the meridian and deviatoric plane to describe the yield surface as well as two methods of incorporating rebar into concrete mesh. This study gives a good example of using EPDC model and can be utilized for the development new constitutive models for concrete in future.

  4. LArIAT: Liquid Argon TPC in a Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Phil [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-02-28

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of the LArIAT collaboration who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out starting during the 2013 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The TSW is intended primarily for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocation for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. It reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this TSW to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. This TSW fulfills Article 1 (facilities and scope of work) of the User Agreements signed (or still to be signed) by an authorized representative of each institution collaborating on this experiment. Precision neutrino physics has entered a new era both with pressing questions to be addressed at short and long baselines, and with increasing interest and development of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs). These open volume liquid argon TPCs drift ionization electrons from passing charged particles to readout wire chamber planes at the edge of the detector. The Signals are then combined to form 2D and 3D pho-quality like millimeter scale images of the charged particles tracks and to provide calorimetric measurements of the deposited energy in the detector.

  5. TEST BEAM COORDINATION: The 2004 Test Beam Calorimetry set-up in H8

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M; Di Girolamo, B; Ferrari, C; Giugni, D; Santoni, C; Wingerter, I

    A new table has been designed, built and finally mounted to position the LAr cryostat in front of the Tilecal modules. The new table has been connected to the existing Tilecal table to be able to move the full set-up along eta values between 0 and 1.2. The table has been conceived by D. Giugni (INFN Milano and now CERN PH) and modeled by G. Braga (INFN Milano) in spring-summer 2003. The realization of the table has been done by an Italian firm (MatecImpianti, Fenegrò, Como) under the supervision of S. Coelli (INFN Milano) starting August 2003. Figure 1 shows the table assembled at the firm (left). Figure 1: The Tilecal-LAr table: in Fenegro (left) and at CERN (right). In November 2003 the table has been delivered to CERN and put in temporary storage to be assembled after the preparation of the Tilecal zone. In February 2004 two technicians from the firm and the team of technician coordinated by C. Ferrari (CERN AB/ATB), assembled, tested and commissioned the table under the supervision of S. Coelli...

  6. Proposal for PS beam tests of a fast rich detector

    CERN Document Server

    Séguinot, Jacques; Ypsilantis, Thomas; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1993-01-01

    A full scale prototype Fast RICH detector with pad readout for unambiguous imaging has been constructed for operation in a high luminosity environment. It uses the best photosensitive gas capable of fast response (TEA) or the intrinsically fast solid photocathode (CsI/TMAE), developed specifically for this purpose. It can be used at e+e- or hadron colliders as well as at fixed target facilities. It has time resolution of 20 ns with a 1.3 microsecond pipeline and parallel readout of 4000 pad sectors. Fast digital VLSI electronics has been developed for readout and 24000 channels have been tested. The prototype device (12000 pad channels) is assembled and ready for beam tests in 1993.

  7. The optics of the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Brown, K.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Oide, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), currently under construction at the end of the SLAC Linac, is being built by an international collaboration as a test bed for ideas and methods required in the design and construction of final focus systems for next generation e + e - linear colliders. The FFTB lattice shown is based on the previously developed principle of using sextupole pairs in a dispersive region to compensate chromaticity. The linear lattice was optimized for length, and implementation of diagnostic procedures. The transformations between sextupole pairs (CCX and CCY) are exactly -I, the matrix for the intermediate transformer (BX) is exactly diagonal, and the dispersion function has zero slope at the sextupoles and is thus zero at the minimum of the β x function in the intermediate transformer

  8. Challenges of arbitrary waveform signal detection by Silicon Photomultipliers as readout for Cherenkov fibre based beam loss monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vinogradov, Sergey; Nebot del Busto, Eduardo; Kastriotou, Maria; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are well recognised as very competitive photodetectors due to their exceptional photon number and time resolution, room-temperature low-voltage operation, insensitivity to magnetic fields, compactness, and robustness. Detection of weak light pulses of nanosecond time scale appears to be the best area for SiPM applications because in this case most of the SiPM drawbacks have a rather limited effect on its performance. In contrast to the more typical scintillation and Cherenkov detection applications, which demand information on the number of photons and/or the arrival time of the light pulse only, beam loss monitoring (BLM) systems utilising Cherenkov fibres with photodetector readout have to precisely reconstruct the temporal profile of the light pulse. This is a rather challenging task for any photon detector especially taking into account the high dynamic range of incident signals (100K – 1M) from a few photons to a few percents of destructive losses in a beam line and pre...

  9. Modified Mode-I Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) Fracture Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    2001-01-01

    Five composite sandwich panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Four of these panels had E-glass/vinylester facesheets and one had carbon/epoxy facesheets. The sandwich panels had different density PVC foam cores. The four E-glass panels had core densities of 80, 100, 130, 200 kg/cu m. The sandwich with carbon/epoxy 3 facesheets had a core with density of 100 kg/cu m. Fracture tests were conducted using a modified Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) test configuration. Load displacement curves were obtained for loading and unloading of the specimens during crack growth. Various increments of crack growth were monitored. Critical Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) were determined from the tests using the area method. The critical values of SERR can be considered the fracture toughness of the sandwich material. The fracture toughness ranged 367 J/sq m to 1350 J/sq m over the range of core densities. These results are compared to the Mode-I fracture toughness of the PVC foam core materials and values obtained for foam-cored sandwiches using the TSD specimen. Finite-element analyses (FEA) were performed for the test configuration and Strain Energy Release Rates were calculated using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). The SERR values determined from the FEA were scaled to the fracture loads, or critical loads, obtained from the modified CSB tests. These critical loads were in close agreement with the test values.

  10. A Test-Bench for Measurement of Electrical Static Parameters of Strip Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Golutvin, I A; Danilevich, V G; Dmitriev, A Yu; Elsha, V V; Zamiatin, Y I; Zubarev, E V; Ziaziulia, F E; Kozus, V I; Lomako, V M; Stepankov, D V; Khomich, A P; Shumeiko, N M; Cheremuhin, A E

    2003-01-01

    An automated test-bench for electrical parameters input control of the strip silicon detectors, used in the End-Cap Preshower detector of the CMS experiment, is described. The test-bench application allows one to solve a problem of silicon detectors input control in conditions of mass production - 1800 detectors over 2 years. The test-bench software is realized in Delphi environment and contains a user-friendly operator interface for measurement data processing and visualization as well as up-to-date facilities for MS-Windows used for the network database. High operating characteristics and reliability of the test-bench were confirmed while more than 800 detectors were tested. Some technical solutions applied to the test-bench could be useful for design and construction of automated facilities for electrical parameters measurements of the microstrip detectors input control.

  11. A test-bench for measurement of electrical static parameters of strip silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, I.A.; Dmitriev, A.Yu.; Elsha, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    An automated test-bench for electrical parameters input control of the strip silicon detectors, used in the End-Cap Preshower detector of the CMS experiment, is described. The test-bench application allows one to solve a problem of silicon detectors input control in conditions of mass production - 1800 detectors over 2 years. The test-bench software is realized in Delphi environment and contains a user-friendly operator interface for data processing and visualization as well as up-to-date facilities for MS-Windows used for the network database. High operating characteristics and reliability of the test-bench were confirmed while more than 800 detectors were tested. Some technical solutions applied to the test-bench could be useful for design and construction of automated facilities for electrical parameters measurements of the microstrip detectors input control. (author)

  12. Large Size High Performance Transparent Amorphous Silicon Sensors for Laser Beam Position Detection and Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, A.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Kohler, C.; Lutz, B.; Schubert, M. B.

    2006-01-01

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparente amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30 x 30 mm2) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20 mA/W), an intinsic position resolution better than 3 m, a spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 m, deflection angles smaller than 10 rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition, multipoint alignment monitoring, using up to five sensors lined along a light path of about 5 meters, can be achieved with a resolution better than 20m. (Author)

  13. Neutral V production with 14.6 x A GeV/c silicon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Roberts, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of a measurement of neutral V production with 14.6xA GeV/c Si beams on Au and Cu targets. The Λ and K s 0 yields were measured as a function of negative particle multiplicity. Effective temperatures were determined from an exponential fit to the transverse mass distributions. (orig.)

  14. Performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring tested with clinical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piliero, M.A., E-mail: piliero@pi.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Bisogni, M.G. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Cerello, P. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino (Italy); Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Fiorina, E. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino (Italy); Liu, B.; Morrocchi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Pennazio, F. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino (Italy); Pirrone, G. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Wheadon, R. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    In this work we present the performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring during the irradiation of a PMMA phantom with a clinical proton beam. The experimental set-up was based on 4 independent detection modules. Two detection modules were placed at one side of a PMMA phantom and the other two modules were placed at the opposite side of the phantom. One detection module was composed of a Silicon Photon Multiplier produced by AdvanSiD coupled to a single scintillating LYSO crystal. The read-out system was based on the TOFPET ASIC managed by a Xilinx ML605 FPGA Evaluation Board (Virtex 6). The irradiation of the PMMA phantom was performed at the CNAO hadrontherapy facility (Pavia, Italy) with a 95 MeV pulsed proton beam. The pulsed time structure of the proton beam was reconstructed by each detection module. The β{sup +} annihilation peak was successfully measured and the production of β{sup +} isotopes emitters was observed as increasing number of 511 keV events detected during irradiation. Finally, after the irradiation, the half lives of the {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O radioactive isotopes were estimated.

  15. Deployment Testing of Flexible Composite Hinges in Bi-Material Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Jonathan F.; Trease, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Composites have excellent properties for strength, thermal stability, and weight. However, they are traditionally highly rigid, and when used in deployable structures require hinges bonded to the composite material, which increases complexity and opportunities for failure. Recent research in composites has found by adding an elastomeric soft matrix, often silicone instead of an epoxy, the composite becomes flexible. This work explores the deployment repeatability of silicone matrix composite hinges which join rigid composite beams. The hinges were found to have sub-millimeter linear deployment repeatability, and sub-degree angular deployment repeatability. Also, an interesting relaxation effect was discovered, as a hinges deployment error would decrease with time.

  16. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  17. Silicone fluids for aquarium test. Quarterly report, January--March 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichte, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    A group of silicone fluids is presented from which a specific fluid (7 ctsk dimethylpolysiloxane tri-methyl end-blocked) was chosen for use in the aquarium test. Data is extracted from current publications to indicate trends in physical properties due to changing conditions.

  18. Synthesis and corrosion properties of silicon nitride films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.; Emmerich, R.; Enders, B.; Wolf, G. K.

    1995-12-01

    Silicon nitride films SiN x were deposited on 316L austenitic stainless steel substrates by silicon evaporation and simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation with an acceleration voltage of 2 kV. In order to study the influence of the nitrogen content on changes in stoichiometry, structure, morphology, thermal oxidation behaviour and corrosion behaviour, the atom to ion transport ratio was systematically varied. The changes of binding states and the stoichiometry were evaluated with XPS and AES analysis. A maximum nitrogen content was reached with a {Si}/{N} transport ratio lower than 2. The films are chemically inert when exposed to laboratory atmosphere up to a temperature of more than 1000°C. XRD and SEM measurements show amorphous and featureless films for transport ratios {Si}/{N} from 1 up to 10. The variation of the corrosion behaviour of coated stainless steel substrates in sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid shows a minimum at medium transport ratios. This goes parallel with changes in porosity and adhesion. Additional investigations showed that titanium implantation as an intermediate step improves the corrosion resistance considerably.

  19. Electrical properties and surface morphology of electron beam evaporated p-type silicon thin films on polyethylene terephthalate for solar cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, P. C.; Ibrahim, K.; Pakhuruddin, M. Z.

    2015-04-01

    One way to realize low-cost thin film silicon (Si) solar cells fabrication is by depositing the films with high-deposition rate and manufacturing-compatible electron beam (e-beam) evaporation onto inexpensive foreign substrates such as glass or plastic. Most of the ongoing research is reported on e-beam evaporation of Si films on glass substrates to make polycrystalline solar cells but works combining both e-beam evaporation and plastic substrates are still scarce in the literature. This paper studies electrical properties and surface morphology of 1 µm electron beam evaporated Al-doped p-type silicon thin films on textured polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate for application as an absorber layer in solar cells. In this work, Si thin films with different doping concentrations (including an undoped reference) are prepared by e-beam evaporation. Energy dispersion X-ray (EDX) showed that the Si films are uniformly doped by Al dopant atoms. With increased Al/Si ratio, doping concentration increased while both resistivity and carrier mobility of the films showed opposite relationships. Root mean square (RMS) surface roughness increased. Overall, the Al-doped Si film with Al/Si ratio of 2% (doping concentration = 1.57×1016 atoms/cm3) has been found to provide the optimum properties of a p-type absorber layer for fabrication of thin film Si solar cells on PET substrate.

  20. Test system for charge collection efficiency measurement (SYCOC) for neutron irradiated silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, L. S.; Pin, A.; Militaru, O.; Cortina, E.; De Callatay, B.; Cabrera, J.; Michotte, D. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    One of the constraints in using standard Float Zone silicon layer as base material for tracking in particle physics is its radiation hardness. The detection efficiency is degraded by the introduction of defects in the silicon crystal and charge trapping becomes the main problem. The Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) is a relevant parameter in order to determine the detection performance of such devices. A state-of-the-art test system named 'Systeme de mesure de collection de charge' (SYCOC) has been developed for the characterization of diode and microstrip silicon sensors before and after irradiation. The system is designed to perform Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) and Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements with laser and radioactive sources in a controlled environment. Initial measurements on diodes are presented. (authors)

  1. Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.; Sluss, F.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed

  2. Beam test of ferrite absorber in TRISTAN MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Asano, K.; Furuya, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kijima, Y.; Mitsunobu, S.; Sennyu, K.; Takahashi, T.

    1996-06-01

    A study on the effect of beams on the ferrite absorber was performed using TRISTAN MR. The tested absorber consists of a 300 mm-diam. copper pipe with 4 mm-thick ferrite inner layer, which was fabricated with Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) technique. No spark, damage, or degradation were observed up to the highest available single bunch current of 4.4 mA, i.e. 2.8x10 11 electrons per bunch, which is 8.5 times higher than that of KEKB low energy ring. The loss factor showed significant increase with bunch shortening, e.g. 2.6 V/pC at 4 mm was about 40% higher than the value predicted by the calculation assuming Gaussian bunch and no incoming power from outside of the chamber. (author)

  3. Test Beam Results with a Full Size sTGC

    CERN Document Server

    Rettie, Sebastien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The forthcoming LHC upgrade to high luminosity will increase the background rate in the forward region of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer (composed of three Big Wheels (BW) and a Small Wheel (SW) on each side of the detector) by approximately a factor of five. With such a rate some of the present Muon Spectrometer detectors in the SW region will produce fake triggers and will therefore be replaced by a New Small Wheel (NSW) composed of small Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) and Micromegas planes. The aim of the detectors is to reach 100 micrometers position resolution and an online muon track reconstruction with better than 1 mrad precision. A full size sTGC quadruplet has been constructed and equipped with the first prototype of the dedicated front end electronics (VMM1). The performance of the sTGC quadruplet at the Fermilab test beam facility is presented here.

  4. Collimation: a silicon solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Silicon crystals could be used very efficiently to deflect high-energy beams. Testing at CERN has produced conclusive results, which could pave the way for a new generation of collimators. The set of five crystals used to test the reflection of the beams. The crystals are 0.75 mm wide and their alignment is adjusted with extreme precision. This figure shows the deflection of a beam by channelling and by reflection in the block of five crystals. Depending on the orientation of the crystals: 1) The beam passes without "seeing" the crystals and is not deflected 2) The beam is deflected by channelling (with an angle of around 100 μrad) 3) The beam is reflected (with an angle of around 50 μrad). The intensity of the deflected beam is illustrated by the intensity of the spot. The spot of the reflected beam is clearly more intense than that one of the channelled beam, demonstrating the efficiency of t...

  5. Stress in ion-beam assisted silicon dioxide and tantalum pentoxide thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Sirotkina, N

    2003-01-01

    Ta sub 2 O sub 5 and SiO sub 2 thin films, deposited at room temperature by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) and dual ion-beam sputtering (DIBS), and SiO sub 2 films, deposited by reactive e-beam evaporation and ion-assisted deposition, were studied. The energy (150-600 eV) and ion-to-atom arrival ratio (0.27-2.0) of assisting argon and oxygen ions were varied. Influence of deposition conditions (deposition system geometry, nature and amount of gas in the chamber, substrate cleaning and ion-assistance parameters) on films properties (stress, composition, refractive index n sub 5 sub 0 sub 0 sub n sub m and extinction coefficient k sub 5 sub 0 sub 0 sub n sub m) was investigated. A scanning method, based on substrate curvature measurements by laser reflection and stress calculation using the Stoney equation, was employed. RBS showed that stoichiometric Ta sub 2 O sub 5 films contain impurities of Ar, Fe and Mo. Stoichiometric SiO sub 2 films also contain Ta impurity. Argon content increases with ion bombardment and, ...

  6. Characterisation of strip silicon detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, L.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Fernandez-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Gallop, B.; Greenall, A.; Gregor, I.-M.; Hara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lohwasser, K.; Maneuski, D.; Nagorski, S.; Pape, I.; Phillips, P. W.; Sperlich, D.; Sawhney, K.; Soldevila, U.; Ullan, M.; Unno, Y.; Warren, M.

    2016-07-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity up to 6·1034 cm-2s-1. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb-1 after ten years of operation, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand fluences to over 1·1016 1 MeV neq/cm2. In order to cope with the consequent increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (end-cap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). A resolution better than the inter strip pitch of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. The effect of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips was investigated in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stop regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch.

  7. High-silicon 238PuO2 fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously

  8. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed

  9. Work plan for testing silicone impression material and fixture on pool cell capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundeen, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work plan is to provide a safe procedure to test a cesium capsule impression fixture at Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The impression will be taken with silicone dental impression material pressed down upon the capsule using the impression fixture. This test will evaluate the performance of the fixture and impression material under high radiation and temperature conditions on a capsule in a WESF pool cell

  10. Development of nanometer resolution C-Band radio frequency beam position monitors in the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaton, T.; Mazaheri, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (US). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Shintake, T. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Using a 47 GeV electron beam, the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) produces vertical spot sizes around 70 nm. These small beam sizes introduce an excellent opportunity to develop and test high resolution Radio Frequency Beam Position Monitors (RF-BPMs). These BPMs are designed to measure pulse to pulse beam motion (jitter) at a theoretical resolution of approximately 1 nm. The beam induces a TM{sub 110} mode with an amplitude linearly proportional to its charge and displacement from the BPM's (cylindrical cavity) axis. The C-band (5,712 MHz) TM{sub 110} signal is processed and converted into beam position for use by the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Presented are the experimental procedures, acquisition, and analysis of data demonstrating resolution of jitter near 25 nm. With the design of future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders requiring spot sizes close to 3 nm, understanding and developing RF-BPMs will be essential in resolving and controlling jitter.

  11. Properties of Silicon Dioxide Amorphous Nanopowder Produced by Pulsed Electron Beam Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav G. Il’ves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available SiO2 amorphous nanopowder (NP is produced with the specific surface area of 154 m2/g by means of evaporation by a pulsed electron beam aimed at Aerosil 90 pyrogenic amorphous NP (90 m2/g as a target. SiO2 NP nanoparticles showed improved magnetic, thermal, and optical properties in comparison to Aerosil 90 NP. Possible reasons of emergence of d0 ferromagnetism at the room temperature in SiO2 amorphous NP are discussed. Photoluminescent and cathode luminescent properties of the SiO2 NP were investigated.

  12. Radiation damage in silicon due to albedo neutrons emitted from hadronic beam dumps (Fe and U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the level of radiation damage that can be expected from albedo neutrons when 1- and 5-GeV negative pions are incident on iron and uranium beam dumps. The calculated damage data are presented in several ways including neutron fluence above 0.111 MeV, 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence, damage energy deposition, and DPA or displacements per atom. Details are presented as to the method of calculation. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Computer control of the beam transport system of the Chalk River electron test accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMichael, G.E.; Kidner, S.H.; Fraser, J.S.

    1977-05-01

    The beam transport system of the Chalk River Electron Test Accelerator comprises steering coils and solenoidal focusing magnets driven by voltage-programmed, current-regulated power supplies. This report describes the beam transport and beam diagnostics systems presently in use. The computer controls all beam transport magnets from a single, allocatable control knob. The system is currently being expanded to two knobs and two readouts. (author)

  14. Fault detection and protection system for neutral beam generators on the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deVries, G.J.; Chesley, K.L.; Owren, H.M.

    1983-12-01

    Neutral beam sources, their power supplies and instrumentation can be damaged from high voltage sparkdown or from overheating due to excessive currents. The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) in Berkeley has protective electronic hardware that senses a condition outside a safe operating range and generates a response to terminate such a fault condition. A description of this system is presented in this paper. 8 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  15. Summary test results of the particle-beam diagnostics for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A.; Wang, X.; Sellyey, W.; Patterson, D.; Kahana, E.

    1994-01-01

    During the first half of 1994, a number of the diagnostic systems for measurement of the charged-particle beam parameters throughout the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been installed and tested. The particle beams eventually will involve 450-MeV to 7-GeV positrons and with different pulse formats. The first test and commissionin results for beam profiles, beam position monitors, loss rate monitors, current monitors, and synchrotron radiation photon monitors hve been obtained using 200- to 350-MeV electron beams injected into the subsystems. Data presented are principally from the transport lines and the positron accumulator ring

  16. Studying signal collection in the punch-through protection area of a silicon micro-strip sensor using a micro-focused X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Poley, Anne-luise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    For the Phase-II Upgrade of the ATLAS detector, a new, all-silicon tracker will be constructed in order to cope with the increased track density and radiation level of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. While silicon strip sensors are designed to minimise the fraction of dead material and maximise the active area of a sensor, concessions must be made to the requirements of operating a sensor in a particle physics detector. Sensor geometry features like the punch-through protection deviate from the standard sensor architecture and thereby affect the charge collection in that area. In order to study the signal collection of silicon strip sensors over their punch-through-protection area, ATLAS silicon strip sensors were scanned with a micro-focused X-ray beam at the Diamond Light Source. Due to the highly focused X-ray beam ($\\unit[2\\times3]{\\upmu\\text{m}}^2$) and the short average path length of an electron after interaction with an X-ray photon ($\\unit[\\leq2]{\\upmu\\text{m}}$), local signal collection i...

  17. The optics of the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Brown, K.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Oide, K.

    1991-05-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), currently under construction at the end of the SLAC Linac, is being built by an international collaboration as a test bed for ideas and methods required in the design and construction of final focus systems for next generation e + e - linear colliders. The FFTB lattice is based on the previously developed principle of using sextupole pairs in a dispersive region to compensate chromaticity. The linear lattice was optimized for length, and implementation of diagnostic procedures. The transformations between sextupole pairs (CCX and CCY) are exactly -I, the matrix for the intermediate transformer (BX) is exactly diagonal, and the dispersion function has zero slope at the sextupoles and is thus zero at the minimum of the β x function in the intermediate transformer. The introduction of sextupoles in final focus systems leads to the presence of additional optical aberrations, and synchrotron radiation in the dipoles also enlarges the final spot size. The important fourth-order optical aberrations which determine the main features of the design have been identified. Additional lower order aberrations arise in the implementation of these designs, since the real system is not the ideal design. We concentrate on these aberrations and describe strategies for their diagnosis and correction

  18. Tests of Local Hadron Calibration approaches in ATLAS Combined Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Pospelov, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The three Atlas calorimeter systems in the region of the forward crack at |eta| = 3.2 in the nominal Atlas setup and a typical section of the two barrel calorimeters at |eta| = 0.45 of Atlas have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented for the endcap testbeam. The local hadronic calibration approach as used in the full Atlas setup has been applied to the endcap test beam data. An extension of it using layer correlations has been tested on the barrel test beam data. Both methods utilize modular correction steps based on shower shape variables to correct for invisible energy inside the reconstructed clusters in the calorimeters (compensation) and for lost energy deposits outside of the reconstructed clusters (dead material and out-of-cluster deposits). Results for both methods and comparisons to MC simulations are presented.

  19. Hyperfine and ion beam interaction studies of Sn, Te, I and Sm impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemerink, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the author reports investigations on ion implanted and oven or laser annealed silicon using Moessbauer spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and channeling, time differential perturbed angular correlation and the Hall-effect. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to this field of research. Chapter 2 deals with an outline of the experimental methods used throughout this work. In chapter 3 results are presented from RBS and channeling experiments on Te-implanted Si. Chapters 4 and 5 concern the results from a study of dopant dependent effects in laser annealed TeSi using 119 Sn, 125 Te and 129 I-Moessbauer spectroscopy. Chapter 6 gives the results from a study of as-implanted and oven annealed TeSi using 129 I-time differential perturbed angular correlation and 129 I-Moessbauer spectroscopy. Chapter 7 describes the results from RBS and channeling experiments on oven and laser annealed ISi. Chapter 8 deals with Hall-effect measurements on TeSi and ISi. Chapter 9 finally covers the investigations of 153 Sm-implanted diamond, Si, Ge and α-Sn using channeling and 153 Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopy. (Auth.)

  20. Technology Development on P-type Silicon Strip Detectors for Proton Beam Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aouadi, K.; Bouterfa, M.; Delamare, R.; Flandre, D.; Bertrand, D.; Henry, F.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a technology for the fabrication of n-in-p silicon strip detectors, which is based on the use of Al 2 O 3 oxide compared to p-spray insulation scheme. This technology has been developed using the best technological parameters deduced from simulations, particularly for the p-spray implantation parameters. Different wafers were processed towards the fabrication of the radiation detectors with p-spray insulation and Al 2 O 3 . The evaluation of the prototype detectors has been carried out by performing the electrical characterization of the devices through the measurement of current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics, as well as the measurement of detection response under radiation. The results of electrical measurements indicate that detectors fabricated with Al 2 O 3 exhibit a dark current several times lower than p-spray detectors and show an excellent electrical insulation between strips with a higher inter-strip resistance. Response of Al 2 O 3 strip detector under radiation has been found better. The resulting improved output signal dynamic range finally makes the use of Al 2 O 3 more attractive. (authors)

  1. Broadband silicon polarization beam splitter with a high extinction ratio using a triple-bent-waveguide directional coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jun Rong; Ang, Thomas Y L; Sahin, Ezgi; Pawlina, Bryan; Chen, G F R; Tan, D T H; Lim, Soon Thor; Png, Ching Eng

    2017-11-01

    We report on the design and experimental demonstration of a broadband silicon polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a high extinction ratio (ER)≥30  dB. This was achieved using triple-bent-waveguide directional coupling in a single PBS, and cascaded PBS topology. For the single PBS, the bandwidths for an ER≥30  dB are 20 nm for the quasi-TE mode, and 70 nm for the quasi-TM mode when a broadband light source (1520-1610 nm) was employed. The insertion loss (IL) varies from 0.2 to 1 dB for the quasi-TE mode and 0.2-2 dB for the quasi-TM mode. The cascaded PBS improved the bandwidth of the quasi-TE mode for an ER≥30  dB to 90 nm, with a low IL of 0.2-2 dB. To the best of our knowledge, our PBS system is one of the best broadband PBSs with an ER as high as ∼42  dB and a low IL below 1 dB around the central wavelength, and experimentally demonstrated using edge-coupling.

  2. Two frequency beam-loading compensation in the drive-beam accelerator of the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    1999-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) is a prototype two-beam accelerator, in which a high-current "drive beam" is used to generate the RF power for the main-beam accelerator. The drive-beam accelerator consists of two S-band structures which accelerate a bunch train with a total charge of 500 nC. The substantial beam loading is compensated by operating the two accelerating structures at 7.81 MHz above and below the bunch repetition frequency, respectively. This introduces a change of RF phase from bunch to bunch, which leads, together with off-crest injection into the accelerator, to an approximate compensation of the beam loading. Due to the sinusoidal time-dependency of the RF field, an energy spread of about 7% remains in the bunch train. A set of idler cavities has been installed to reduce this residual energy spread further. In this paper, the considerations that motivated the choice of the parameters of the beam-loading compensation system, together with the experimental results, are presented.

  3. Electrical production testing of the D0 Silicon microstrip tracker detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D0, SMT Production Testing Group; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    The D0 Silicon Microstrip Tracker (SMT) is the innermost system of the D0 detector in Run 2. It consists of 912 detector units, corresponding to 5 different types of assemblies, which add up to a system with 792,576 readout channels. The task entrusted to the Production Testing group was to thoroughly debug, test and grade each detector module before its installation in the tracker. This note describes the production testing sequence and the procedures by which the detector modules were electrically tested and characterized at the various stages of their assembly.

  4. Characterisation of strip silicon detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00407830; Blue, Andrew; Bates, Richard; Bloch, Ingo; Diez, Sergio; Fernandez-Tejero, Javier; Fleta, Celeste; Gallop, Bruce; Greenall, Ashley; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Hara, Kazuhiko; Ikegami, Yoichi; Lacasta, Carlos; Lohwasser, Kristin; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Nagorski, Sebastian; Pape, Ian; Phillips, Peter W.; Sperlich, Dennis; Sawhney, Kawal; Soldevila, Urmila; Ullan, Miguel; Unno, Yoshinobu; Warren, Matt

    2016-07-29

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity, totalling 1x10^35 cm^-2 s^-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb^-1, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1x10^16 1 MeV neutrons per cm^2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 micron FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 micron thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 micron thick full size radial (Endcap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout...

  5. Ion beam evaluation of silicon carbide membrane structures intended for particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallon, J., E-mail: jan.pallon@nuclear.lu.se [Division of Nuclear Physics, Physics Department, Lund University, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Syväjärvi, M. [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, SE-58330 Linköping (Sweden); Wang, Q. [Sensor System, ACREO Swedish ICT AB, Box 1070, SE-164 25 Kista (Sweden); Yakimova, R.; Iakimov, T. [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, SE-58330 Linköping (Sweden); Elfman, M.; Kristiansson, P.; Nilsson, E.J.C.; Ros, L. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Physics Department, Lund University, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    Thin ion transmission detectors can be used as a part of a telescope detector for mass and energy identification but also as a pre-cell detector in a microbeam system for studies of biological effects from single ion hits on individual living cells. We investigated a structure of graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) with the purpose to explore a thin transmission detector with a very low noise level and having mechanical strength to act as a vacuum window. In order to reach very deep cavities in the SiC wafers for the preparation of the membrane in the detector, we have studied the Inductive Coupled Plasma technique to etch deep circular cavities in 325 μm prototype samples. By a special high temperature process the outermost layers of the etched SiC wafers were converted into a highly conductive graphitic layer. The produced cavities were characterized by electron microscopy, optical microscopy and proton energy loss measurements. The average membrane thickness was found to be less than 40 μm, however, with a slightly curved profile. Small spots representing much thinner membrane were also observed and might have an origin in crystal defects or impurities. Proton energy loss measurement (also called Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy, STIM) is a well suited technique for this thickness range. This work presents the first steps of fabricating a membrane structure of SiC and graphene which may be an attractive approach as a detector due to the combined properties of SiC and graphene in a monolithic materials structure.

  6. Piecewise simulaton proton test of gallium arsenide and thin silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. G.; Billets, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) solar cells are viewed as a potential primary power source on certain future Earth orbiting satellites. However, the relative merits of gallium arsenide over silicon in a space radiation environment are largely unknown because a general degradation model for gallium arsenide does not exist. The results of a test simulating the proton radiation environment existing in a polar orbit and the concomitant effects on GaAs and thin silicon (Si) solar cells are presented. The objectives and methodology of the simulation test were discussed. The electrical characteristics of GaAs and Si solar cells are given in graph form. It was concluded that GaAs cells are viable for use on satellites in low Earth orbit.

  7. Test of CMS tracker silicon detector modules with the ARC readout system

    CERN Document Server

    Axer, M; Flügge, G; Franke, T; Hegner, B; Hermanns, T; Kasselmann, S T; Mnich, J; Nowack, A; Pooth, O; Pottgens, M

    2004-01-01

    The CMS tracker will be equipped with 16,000 silicon microstrip detector modules covering a surface of approximately 220 m**2. For quality control, a compact and inexpensive DAQ system is needed to monitor the mass production in industry and in the CMS production centres. To meet these requirements a set-up called APV Readout Controller (ARC) system was developed and distributed among all collaborating institutes to perform full readout tests of hybrids and modules at each production step. The system consists of all necessary hardware components, C++ based readout software using LabVIEW **1 Lab VIEW is a product of National Instruments, Austin, USA. as graphical user interface and provides full database connection to track every single module component during the production phase. Two preseries of Tracker End Cap (TEC) silicon detector modules have been produced by the TEC community and tested with the ARC system at Aachen. The results of the second series are presented.

  8. Fabrication and testing of SMA composite beam with shape control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolvi, Basavaraj; S, Raja; Nagaraj, Shanmukha; Mudradi, Varada Raj

    2017-07-01

    Smart materials are the advanced materials that have characteristics of sensing and actuation in response to the external stimuli like pressure, heat or electric charge etc. These materials can be integrated in to any structure to make it smart. From the different types of smart materials available, Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) is found to be more useful in designing new applications, which can offer more actuating speed, reduce the overall weight of the structure. The unique property of SMA is the ability to remember and recover from large strains of upto 8% without permanent deformation. Embedding the SMA wire/sheet in fiber-epoxy/flexible resin systems has many potential applications in Aerospace, Automobile, Medical, Robotics and various other fields. In this work the design, fabrication, and testing of smart SMA composite beam has been carried out. Two types of epoxy based resin systems namely LY 5210 resin system and EPOLAM 2063 resin system are used in fabricating the SMA composite specimens. An appropriate mould is designed and fabricated to retain the pre-strain of SMA wire during high temperature post curing of composite specimens. The specimens are fabricated using vacuum bag technique.

  9. Beam Test of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Garvey, J; Mahout, G; Moye, T H; Staley, R J; Thomas, J P; Typaldos, D; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Achenbach, R; Föhlisch, F; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Kluge, E E; Mahboubi, K; Meier, K; Meshkov, P; Rühr, F; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Ay, C; Bauss, B; Belkin, A; Rieke, S; Schäfer, U; Tapprogge, T; Trefzger, T; Weber, GA; Eisenhandler, E F; Landon, M; Apostologlou, P; Barnett, B M; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Mirea, A; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Sankey, D P C; Bohm, C; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Silverstein, S

    2005-01-01

    The Level-1 Calorimter Trigger consists of a Preprocessor (PP), a Cluster Processor (CP), and a Jet/Energy-sum Processor (JEP). The CP and JEP receive digitised trigger-tower data from the Preprocessor and produce Region-of-Interest (RoIs) and trigger multiplicities. The latter are sent in real time to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP) where the Level-1 decision is made. On receipt of a Level-1 Accept, Readout Driver Modules (RODs), provide intermediate results to the data acquisition (DAQ) system for monitoring and diagnostic purpose. RoI information is sent to the RoI builder (RoIB) to help reduce the amount of data required for the Level-2 Trigger The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger System at the test beam consisted of 1 Preprocessor module, 1 Cluster Processor Module, 1 Jet/Energy Module and 2 Common Merger Modules. Calorimeter energies were sucessfully handled thourghout the chain and trigger object sent to the CTP. Level-1 Accepts were sucessfully produced and used to drive the readout path. Online diagno...

  10. Reliability Tests of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring FPGA Firmware

    CERN Document Server

    Hajdu, C F; Dehning, B; Jackson, S

    2010-01-01

    The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. In addition to protecting the collider, the system also needs to provide a means of diagnosing machine faults and deliver a feedback of losses to the control room as well as to several systems for their setup and analysis. It has to transmit and process signals from almost 4’000 monitors, and has nearly 3 million configurable parameters. In a system of such complexity, firmware reliability is a critical issue. The integrity of the signal chain of the LHC BLM system and its ability to correctly detect unwanted scenarios and thus provide the required protection level must be ensured. In order to analyze the reliability and functionality, an advanced verification environment has been developed to evaluate the performance and response of the FPGA-based data analysis firmware. This paper will report on the numerous tests that have been performed and on how the results are used to quantify the reliabi...

  11. Modelling and Testing of the Piezoelectric Beam as Energy Harvesting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszewnik Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes modelling and testing of the piezoelectric beam as energy harvesting system. The cantilever beam with two piezo-elements glued onto its surface is considered in the paper. As result of carried out modal analysis of the beam the natural frequencies and modes shapes are determined. The obtained results in the way mentioned above allow to estimate such location of the piezo-actuator on the beam where the piezo generates maximal values of modal control forces. Experimental investigations carried out in the laboratory allow to verify results of natural frequencies obtained during simulation and also testing of the beam in order to obtain voltage from vibration with help of the piezo-harvester. The obtained values of voltage stored on the capacitor C0 shown that the best results are achieved for the beam excited to vibration with third natural frequency, but the worst results for the beam oscillating with the first natural frequency.

  12. Testing Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rijoff, T L

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its minimum crossing angle are limited by the effect of long-range beam-beam collisions. A wire compensators can mitigate part of the long-range effects and may allow for smaller crossing angles, or higher beam intensity. A prototype long-range wire compensator could be installed in the LHC by 2014/15. Since the originally reserved position for such a wire compensator is not available for this first step, we explore other possible options. Our investigations consider various longitudinal and transverse locations, different wire shapes, different optics configurations and several crossing angles between the two colliding beams. Simulations are carried out with the weak-strong code BBtrack. New postprocessing tools are introduced to analyse tune footprints and particle stability. In particular, a new method for the Lyapunov coefficient calculation is implemented. Submitted as "Tesi di laurea" at the University of Milano, 2012.

  13. Growth, structural, and electrical properties of germanium-on-silicon heterostructure by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aheli Ghosh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth, morphological, and electrical properties of thin-film Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si using a two-step growth process were investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated ∼0.10% tensile-strained Ge epilayer, owing to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ge and Si, and negligible epilayer lattice tilt. Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis corroborated the strain-state of the Ge thin-film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of 90  ° Lomer dislocation network at Ge/Si heterointerface, suggesting the rapid and complete relaxation of Ge epilayer during growth. Atomic force micrographs exhibited smooth surface morphology with surface roughness < 2 nm. Temperature dependent Hall mobility measurements and the modelling thereof indicated that ionized impurity scattering limited carrier mobility in Ge layer. Capacitance- and conductance-voltage measurements were performed to determine the effect of epilayer dislocation density on interfacial defect states (Dit and their energy distribution. Finally, extracted Dit values were benchmarked against published Dit data for Ge MOS devices, as a function of threading dislocation density within the Ge layer. The results obtained were comparable with Ge MOS devices integrated on Si via alternative buffer schemes. This comprehensive study of directly-grown epitaxial Ge-on-Si provides a pathway for the development of Ge-based electronic devices on Si.

  14. Growth, structural, and electrical properties of germanium-on-silicon heterostructure by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aheli; Clavel, Michael B.; Nguyen, Peter D.; Meeker, Michael A.; Khodaparast, Giti A.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Hudait, Mantu K.

    2017-09-01

    The growth, morphological, and electrical properties of thin-film Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si using a two-step growth process were investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated ˜0.10% tensile-strained Ge epilayer, owing to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ge and Si, and negligible epilayer lattice tilt. Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis corroborated the strain-state of the Ge thin-film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of 90° Lomer dislocation network at Ge/Si heterointerface, suggesting the rapid and complete relaxation of Ge epilayer during growth. Atomic force micrographs exhibited smooth surface morphology with surface roughness MOS devices, as a function of threading dislocation density within the Ge layer. The results obtained were comparable with Ge MOS devices integrated on Si via alternative buffer schemes. This comprehensive study of directly-grown epitaxial Ge-on-Si provides a pathway for the development of Ge-based electronic devices on Si.

  15. COTS Silicon diodes as radiation detectores in proton and heavy charged particle radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Jäkel, Oliver

    resolution is needed. The detector system consists of a silicon photodiode with a retail price less than 1 Euro encapsulated in a polyoxymethylene housing, connected to a dosimetry elec- trometer. In MV photons beams the output factors, the temperature behavior and the noise properties are similar......, 3] This low-cost inhouse made detectors based on a commercially available silicon diode was suc- cessfully tested at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center for the characterization carbon ion beams....

  16. First test of a CMS DT chamber equipped with full electronics in a muon beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2003-01-01

    A CMS DT chamber of MB3 type, equipped with the final version of a minicrate (containing all on-chamber trigger and readout electronics), was tested in a muon beam for the first time. The beam was bunched in 25 ns spills, allowing an LHC-like response of the chamber trigger. This test confirmed the excellent performance of the trigger design.

  17. Beam test results of STS prototype modules for the future accelerator experiments FAIR/CBM and NICA/MPD projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamov, Petr; Dementev, Dmitrii; Shitenkov, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collision experiments provide the unique possibility to create and investigate extreme states of strongly-interacted matter and address the fundamental aspects of QCD. The experimental investigation the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The reconstruction of the charged particles created in the nuclear collisions, including the determination of their momenta, is the central detection task in high-energy heavy-ion experiments. It is taken up by the Silicon Tracking System in CBM@FAIR and by Inner Tracker in MPD@NICA currently under development. These experiments requires very fast and radiation hard detectors, a novel data read-out and analysis concept including free streaming front-end electronics. Thermal and beam tests of prototype detector modules for these tracking systems showed the stability of sensors and readout electronics operation.

  18. Beam test results of STS prototype modules for the future accelerator experiments FAIR/CBM and NICA/MPD projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharlamov Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-energy heavy-ion collision experiments provide the unique possibility to create and investigate extreme states of strongly-interacted matter and address the fundamental aspects of QCD. The experimental investigation the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The reconstruction of the charged particles created in the nuclear collisions, including the determination of their momenta, is the central detection task in high-energy heavy-ion experiments. It is taken up by the Silicon Tracking System in CBM@FAIR and by Inner Tracker in MPD@NICA currently under development. These experiments requires very fast and radiation hard detectors, a novel data read-out and analysis concept including free streaming front-end electronics. Thermal and beam tests of prototype detector modules for these tracking systems showed the stability of sensors and readout electronics operation.

  19. Beam Test Studies of 3D Pixel Sensors Irradiated Non-Uniformly for the ATLAS Forward Physics Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, S; Boscardin, M; Christophersen, M; Da Via, C; Betta, G -F Dalla; Darbo, G; Fadeyev, V; Fleta, C; Gemme, C; Grenier, P; Jimenez, A; Lopez, I; Micelli, A; Nelist, C; Parker, S; Pellegrini, G; Phlips, B; Pohl, D L; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sicho, P; Tsiskaridze, S

    2013-01-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  20. Quality Assurance and Performance Tests of Silicon Detector Modules for the CMS/Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Dragicevic, Marko

    2005-01-01

    After providing a short overview of the LHC accelerator, the CMS experiment and it’s various detector systems, we will have an in-depth look on silicon semiconductor particle detectors. Various important aspects like theoretical principles, radiation damage and actual design considerations are discussed and the quality assurance scheme for the sensor and module production is introduced. A strong emphasis is made on the ARC module teststand which was set up and operated be the author. Another important aspect in establishing a good quality assurance scheme is flexibility and keeping an eye on the unexpected. At one such occasion, the author had to gather custom made test equipment, to investigate certain effects in silicon sensors manufactured by ST Microelectronics. Conclusions from these measurement could only be drawn very cautiously, as the manufacturing process and many of its subtle changes, remained a well kept secret of the company. Nevertheless, the investigations proofed to be useful and ST Microel...

  1. The design, fabrication, and characterization of silicon-germanium optoelectronic devices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustersic, Nathan Anthony

    In recent years, Ge and SiGe devices have been actively investigated for potential optoelectronic applications such as germanium solar cells for long wavelength absorption, quantum-dot intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs), quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) and germanium light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Current research into SiGe based optoelectronic devices is heavily based on nanostructures which employ quantum confinement and is at a stage where basic properties are being studied in order to optimize growth conditions necessary for incorporation into future devices. Ge and SiGe based devices are especially attractive due to ease of monolithic integration with current Si-based CMOS processing technology, longer carrier lifetime, and reduced phonon scattering. Defect formation and transformation was studied in SiGe layers grown on Si and Ge (100) substrates. The epitaxial layers were grown with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and characterized by X-ray measurements in order to study the accommodation of elastic strain energy in the layers. The accommodation of elastic strain energy specifies the amount of point defects created on the growth surface which may transform into extended crystalline defects in the volume of the layers. An understanding of crystalline defects in high lattice mismatched epitaxial structures is critical in order to optimize growth procedures so that epitaxial structures can be optimized for specific devices such as Ge based solar cells. Considering the optimization of epitaxial layers based on the structural transformation of point defects, Ge solar cells were fabricated and investigated using current-voltage measurements and quantum efficiency data. These Ge solar cells, optimized for long wavelength absorption, were fabricated to be employed in a bonded Ge/Si solar cell device. The doping of self-assembled Ge quantum dot structures grown on Si (100) was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL

  2. First heavy ion beam tests with a superconducting multigap CH cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, W.; Aulenbacher, K.; Basten, M.; Busch, M.; Dziuba, F.; Gettmann, V.; Heilmann, M.; Kürzeder, T.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Podlech, H.; Rubin, A.; Schnase, A.; Schwarz, M.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2018-02-01

    Very compact accelerating-focusing structures, as well as short focusing periods, high accelerating gradients and short drift spaces are strongly required for superconducting (sc) accelerator sections operating at low and medium energies for continuous wave (cw) heavy ion beams. To keep the GSI-super heavy element (SHE) program competitive on a high level and even beyond, a standalone sc cw linac (Helmholtz linear accelerator) in combination with the GSI high charge state injector (HLI), upgraded for cw operation, is envisaged. Recently the first linac section (financed by Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and GSI) as a demonstration of the capability of 217 MHz multigap crossbar H-mode structures (CH) has been commissioned and extensively tested with heavy ion beam from the HLI. The demonstrator setup reached acceleration of heavy ions up to the design beam energy. The required acceleration gain was achieved with heavy ion beams even above the design mass to charge ratio at high beam intensity and full beam transmission. This paper presents systematic beam measurements with varying rf amplitudes and phases of the CH cavity, as well as phase space measurements for heavy ion beams with different mass to charge ratio. The worldwide first and successful beam test with a superconducting multigap CH cavity is a milestone of the R&D work of HIM and GSI in collaboration with IAP in preparation of the HELIAC project and other cw-ion beam applications.

  3. Tests of Local Hadron Calibration Approaches in ATLAS Combined Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, KJ; The ATLAS collaboration; Pospelov, G

    2010-01-01

    Three ATLAS calorimeters in the region of the forward crack at $|eta| = 3.2$ in the nominal ATLAS setup and a typical section of the two barrel calorimeters at $|eta| = 0.45$ of ATLAS have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented for the endcap testbeam. The local hadronic calibration approach as used in the full Atlas setup has been applied to the endcap testbeam data. An extension of it using layer correlations has been tested with the barrel test beam data. Both methods utilize modular correction steps based on shower shape variables to correct for invisible energy inside the reconstructed clusters in the calorimeters (compensation) and for lost energy deposits outside of the reconstructed clusters (dead material and out-of-cluster deposits). Results for both methods and comparisons to Monte-Carlo simulations are presented.

  4. Successful Electron Beam Recirculation Test for Fermilab Electron Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Crawford, A. Curtis; Sharapa, Anatoly; Shemyakin, Alexander

    1998-04-01

    In this paper we describe the successful operation of a dc recirculation electron beam system at energies 1 -- 1.5 MeV and currents in excess of 200 mA. This system employs an electrostatic HV supply like a Van de Graaff generator with maximum charging current of a few hundred microamps. Electron beam line consits of a 10 m long channel with discrete focusing elements flanked by high-gradient (10 kV/cm), small aperture (2.54 cm ID) acceleraton and deceleration tubes. This work is performed as part of the Fermilab R&D program to develop electron cooling for 8 GeV antiprotons.

  5. Experimental results of Tore Supra neutral beam injector in the line testing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumelli, M.; Jequier, F.

    1991-04-01

    Results of the tests carried out on one of the six Tore Supra neutral beam injectors are reported. Several minor modifications of the injector design allowed us to operate up to 92 keV - 30 A beams limited by the high voltage power supplies. Results of studies on different topics like new titanium pumping system, neutron yield from neutraliser and target, beam conditioning and breakdown statistical analysis are also reported [fr

  6. Analysis of test beam data of ATLAS Pixel Detector production modules with a high intensity pion beam.

    CERN Document Server

    Alimonti, G; Bazalova, M; Beccherle, R; Breugnon, P; Brüser, D; Cauz, D; Clemens, J C; Cobal-Grassman, M; Dobos, D; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Flick, T; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Gerlach, P; Gorelov, I; Grosse-Knetter, J; Hügging, F G; Imhauser, M; Kersten, S; Klingenberg, R; Kuhn, M; Lari, T; Martínez, G; Mass, M; Massman, F; Matera, A; Mathes, M; Meroni, C; Morettini, P; Naumov, D; Netchaeva, P; Ragusa, F; Richardson, J; Rossi, L; Rozanov, A; Santi, L; Schiavi, C; Schultes, J; Sícho, P; Stahl, T; Ta, D B; Tieman, D; Tomasek, L; Troncon, C; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Virzi, J; Vrba, V; Weingarten, J

    2005-01-01

    Beam tests of ATLAS Pixel Detector production modules were performed with a high intensity pion bion at the SPS H8 test beam facility. Several of the modules had been previously irradiated to the fluence of 10**15 neq/cm2. Data were taken at different beam intensities, up to the value foreseen for the innermost pixel layer at the design LHC luminosity of 10**34/cm2/s. At each intensity, data were taken with different configurations of the front-end chip. This note describes the analysis of the high intensity run of August 2004. The particles trajectories were reconstructed using the pixel detectors under test and the detection efficiency was measured as a function of the beam intensity. With the standard ATLAS b-layer configuration and at the B-layer expected column-pair hit occupancy of 0.17 pixel hits per bunch crossing, the measured readout efficiency is 98 %, which is the same value found at low intensity. Efficiency losses are observed only when the column pair occupancy exceeds 0.24 hits per bunch cross...

  7. Static and dynamic testing of a damaged post tensioned concrete beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limongelli M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are reported the results of an experimental campaign carried out on a post tensioned concrete beam with the aim of investigating the possibility to detect early warning signs of deterioration basing on static and/or dynamic tests. The beam was tested in several configurations aimed to reproduce several different phases of the ‘life’ of the beam: the original undamaged state, increasing loss of tension in the post tensioning cables, a strengthening intervention carried out by means of a second tension cable, formation of further cracks on the strengthened beam. Responses of the beam were measured by an extensive set of instruments consisting of accelerometers, inclinometers, displacement transducers, strain gauges and optical fibres. The paper discusses the tests program and the dynamic characterization of the beam in the different damage scenarios. The modal properties of the beam in the different phases were recovered basing on the responses recorded on the beam during sine-sweep and impact hammer tests. The variation of the first modal frequency was studied to investigate the sensitivity of this parameter to both the cracking of the concrete section and the tension in the cables and also to compare results given by different types of experimental tests.

  8. Design and test of an airborne IR countermeasures hyper-hemispherical silicon dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael J.; Guyer, Robert C.; Fenton, Thomas E.

    2007-09-01

    A 6.5 inch diameter hyper-hemispherical silicon dome was developed on IRAD for an infrared countermeasures aircraft self-protection system. Having passed operational level environmental testing and many hours of flight performance, a prototype dome was subjected to MIL test requirements in simulated crash safety testing at the manufacturer's facility. Although the dome cracked during shock testing, it remained intact preserving aircraft integrity and actually passing safety requirements. This paper describes design requirements, stress analyses of the dome and its mounting, and test results including a forensic cause of failure study of the dome. The results add insight to the margins of safety normally applied to the stress analyses of brittle optical materials and examine actual cause of failure in the prototype part.

  9. Analysis of pixel systematics and space point reconstruction with DEPFET PXD5 matrices using high energy beam test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuen, Lars

    2011-02-01

    To answer the current questions in particle physics vertex-detectors, the innermost sub-detector system of a multipurpose particle detector, with brilliant spatial resolution and at the same time with as little sensor material as possible are mandatory. These requirements are the driving force behind the newest generation of silicon pixel sensors like the DEPFET pixel, which incorporates the first amplification stage in form of a transistor in the fully depleted sensor bulk, allowing for a high spatial resolution even with thinned down sensors. A DEPFET pixel prototype system, build for the future TeV-scale liner collider ILC, was characterized in a high energy beam test at CERN with a spatial resolution and statistics that allowed for the first time in-pixel homogeneity measurements of DEPFET pixels. Yet, in the quest for higher precision the sensor development must be accompanied by progress in position reconstruction algorithms. A study with three novel approaches in position reconstruction was undertaken. The results of the in-pixel beam test and the performance of the new methods with an emphasis on δ-electrons will be presented here. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of pixel systematics and space point reconstruction with DEPFET PXD5 matrices using high energy beam test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuen, Lars

    2011-02-15

    To answer the current questions in particle physics vertex-detectors, the innermost sub-detector system of a multipurpose particle detector, with brilliant spatial resolution and at the same time with as little sensor material as possible are mandatory. These requirements are the driving force behind the newest generation of silicon pixel sensors like the DEPFET pixel, which incorporates the first amplification stage in form of a transistor in the fully depleted sensor bulk, allowing for a high spatial resolution even with thinned down sensors. A DEPFET pixel prototype system, build for the future TeV-scale liner collider ILC, was characterized in a high energy beam test at CERN with a spatial resolution and statistics that allowed for the first time in-pixel homogeneity measurements of DEPFET pixels. Yet, in the quest for higher precision the sensor development must be accompanied by progress in position reconstruction algorithms. A study with three novel approaches in position reconstruction was undertaken. The results of the in-pixel beam test and the performance of the new methods with an emphasis on {delta}-electrons will be presented here. (orig.)

  11. Beam Loading Tests on DC-SC Photoinjector at Peking University

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Senlin; Chu, Xiangqiang; Ding, Yuantao; Hao, Jiankui; Jiao, Fei; Lin, Lin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan, Shengwen; Wang, Guimei; Wang, Lifang; Xiang Rong; Xiao, Binping; Xie, Datao; Yang Li Min; Zhang, Baocheng; Zhao, Kui; Zhu, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Since the beginning of commissioning in February 2003, lots of tests on the DC-SC photoinjector test facility have been performed. At present, Q0 of the 1+1/2-cell cavity has reached ~1E8 (at 4.2K) and the average gradient was about 4MeV/m. The DC photogun can provide stable electron beams. When the power of output laser went up to 100mW (266nm), the average beam current reached 400μA. Beam loading tests have been carried out, and SC acceleration was achieved. Average current of electron beams is about 100μA after acceleration.Further investigations are in progress to improve diagnostics system and to measure the emittance, energy spread and pulse length of electron beams.

  12. Test bed for a long pulse 160 KeV neutral beam-line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becherer, R.; Bariaud, A.; Bottiglioni, F.; Bussac, J.P.; Desmons, M.; Fumelli, M.; Raimbault, P.; Sledziewski, Z.; Valckx, F.P.G.

    1983-01-01

    The development of 160 KeV neutral injectors with deuterium beams is required for JET - operation. A test bed has been constructed, allowing the operation and testing of quasi DC-neutral beams (10 sec) of 60 A in the energy range of 80 to 160 KeV. For deuterium operation the whole test bed will be moved into a concrete blockhouse for radiation protection. Different elements are described. (author)

  13. Test-beam programs for devices to measure luminosity and energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tem studies for luminosity and energy measurements and beam diagnostics for luminosity optimization. Keywords. ... tional information is obtained from a calorimeter measuring e+e− pairs produced by beamstrahlung ... (left); A diamond sensor of 10 × 10 mm2 size and 300 µm thickness assembled for the test-beam (right).

  14. First Beam Test of Nanometer Spot Size Monitor Using Laser Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walz, D

    2003-01-01

    The nanometer spot size monitor based on the laser interferometry (Laser-Compton Spot Size Monitor) has been tested in FFTB beam line at SLAC. A low emittance beam of 46 GeV electrons, provided by the two-mile linear accelerator, was focused into nanometer spot in the FFTB line, and its transverse dimensions were precisely measured by the spot size monitor.

  15. Analysis of Test-beam Data, Obtained with Module Zero of Hadron End-Cap Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Minaenko, A A

    1999-01-01

    Beam tests of the module zero of the LAr hadron end-cap calorimeter were carried out during two periods in April and August 1998. The results of the analysis of data, obtained with electron and pion beams are presented in the note.

  16. The progress of funnelling gun high voltage condition and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gassner, D. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rahman, O. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sheehy, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pietz, J. [Transfer Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Ackeret, M. [Transfer Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Yeckel, C. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Miller, R. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Dobrin, E. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Thompson, K. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A prototype of a high average current polarized electron funneling gun as an eRHIC injector has been built at BNL. The gun was assembled and tested at Stangenes Incorporated. Two beams were generated from two GaAs photocathodes and combined by a switched combiner field. We observed the combined beams on a YAG crystal and measured the photocurrent by a Faraday cup. The gun has been shipped to Stony Brook University and is being tested there. In this paper we will describe the major components of the gun and recent beam test results. High voltage conditioning is discussed as well.

  17. Functional test of a Radon sensor based on a high-resistivity-silicon BJT detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Betta, G.F., E-mail: dallabe@disi.unitn.it [DISI, Università di Trento, and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); RSens srl, Modena (Italy); Tyzhnevyi, V. [DISI, Università di Trento, and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Bosi, A.; Bonaiuti, M. [RSens srl, Modena (Italy); Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.A.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Lusiani, A. [Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Ciolini, R.; Curzio, G.; D' Errico, F.; Del Gratta, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bidinelli, L. [En and tech, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia (Italy); RSens srl, Modena (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    A battery-powered, wireless Radon sensor has been designed and realized using a BJT, fabricated on a high-resistivity-silicon substrate, as a radiation detector. Radon daughters are electrostatically collected on the detector surface. Thanks to the BJT internal amplification, real-time α particle detection is possible using simple readout electronics, which records the particle arrival time and charge. Functional tests at known Radon concentrations, demonstrated a sensitivity up to 4.9 cph/(100 Bq/m{sup 3}) and a count rate of 0.05 cph at nominally-zero Radon concentration.

  18. Compression of pulsed electron beams for material tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metel, Alexander S.

    2018-03-01

    In order to strengthen the surface of machine parts and investigate behavior of their materials exposed to highly dense energy fluxes an electron gun has been developed, which produces the pulsed beams of electrons with the energy up to 300 keV and the current up to 250 A at the pulse width of 100-200 µs. Electrons are extracted into the accelerating gap from the hollow cathode glow discharge plasma through a flat or a spherical grid. The flat grid produces 16-cm-diameter beams with the density of transported per one pulse energy not exceeding 15 J·cm-2, which is not enough even for the surface hardening. The spherical grid enables compression of the beams and regulation of the energy density from 15 J·cm-2 up to 15 kJ·cm-2, thus allowing hardening, pulsed melting of the machine part surface with the further high-speed recrystallization as well as an explosive ablation of the surface layer.

  19. Beam parameters of a possible emittance-dynamics test area for NLC studies at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.; Fieguth, T.; Kheifets, S.; Raubenheimer, T.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1992-08-01

    A group at SLAC has studied the possibility of using the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) to generate short-bunch small-emittance beams similar to those required for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The conclusion is that such beams are feasible and that an experimental area for testing many concepts related to NLC beams can be provided with a reasonable addition of hardware to the existing SLC Linac. Some of the concepts that can be tested are: (1) effect tolerances of double bunch length compression, (2) wakefields of ultra-short bunches in accelerating structures, (3) the acceleration of short intense multiple bunches, (4) the generation and preservation of bunches with 100 to 1 emittances ratios, (5) beam deflections by collimators, (6) energy and energy spread control of multiple short bunches, and (7) vibration effects and trajectory stability for low emittance beams

  20. The ITER neutral beam test facility: Designs of the general infrastructure, cryosystem and cooling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Chantant, M.; Gravil, B.; Henry, D.; Sabathier, F.; Doceul, L.; Thomas, E.; Houtte, D. van; Zaccaria, P.; Antoni, V.; Bello, S. Dal; Marcuzzi, D.; Antipenkov, A.; Day, C.; Dremel, M.; Mondino, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    The CEA Association is involved, in close collaboration with ENEA, FZK, IPP and UKAEA European Associations, in the first ITER neutral beam (NB) injector and the ITER neutral beam test facility design (EFDA task ref. TW3-THHN-IITF1). A total power of about 50 MW will have to be removed in steady state on the neutral beam test facility (NBTF). The main purpose of this task is to make progress with the detailed design of the first ITER NB injector and to start the conceptual design of the ITER NBTF. The general infrastructure layout of a generic site for the NBTF includes the test facility itself equipped with a dedicated beamline vessel [P.L. Zaccaria, et al., Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility, this conference] and integration studies of associated auxiliaries such as cooling plant, cryoplant and forepumping system

  1. Position sensitive silicon detectors inside the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollinari, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Bellettini, G.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Cervelli, F.; Del Fabbro, R.; Dell'Orso, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Sestini, P.; Stefanini, A.; Tonelli, G.; Zetti, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; Curatolo, M.; Dulach, B.; Esposito, B.; Giromini, P.; Miscetti, S.; Sansoni, A.

    1986-01-01

    Four position sensitive silicon detectors have been tested inside the Tevatron beam pipe at Fermilab. The system is the prototype of the small angle silicon spectrometer designed to study primarily p-anti p elastic and diffractive cross-sections at the Collider of Fermilab (CDF). Particles in the beam halo during p-anti p storage tests were used to study the performance of the detectors. Efficiency, linearity of response and spatial resolution are shown. Measurements performed at different distances from the beam axis have shown that the detectors could be operated at 8.5 mm from the beam with low rates and no disturbance to the circulating beams. This distance corresponds to about 11 times the standard half-width of the local beam envelope. The behaviour of the detectors with the radiation dose has also been investigated. (orig.)

  2. Design and initial tests of beam current monitoring systems for the APS transport lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xucheng.

    1992-01-01

    The non-intercepting beam current monitoring systems suitable for a wide, range of beam parameters have been developed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) low energy transport lines and high energy transport line. The positron or electron beam pulse in the transport lines wig have peak beam currents ranging from 8 mA to 29 A with pulse widths varying from 120 ps to 30 ns and pulse repetition rates from 2 Hz to 60 Hz. The peak beam current or total beam charge is measured with the fast or integrating current transformer, respectively, manufactured by Bergoz. In-house high speed beam signal processing electronics provide a DC level output proportional to the peak current or total charge for the digitizer input. The prototype systems were tested on the linacs which have beam pulse structures similar to that of the APS transport lines. This paper describes the design of beam signal processing electronics and grounding and shielding methods for current transformers. The results of the initial operations are presented. A short introduction on the preliminary design of current monitoring systems for the APS rings is also included

  3. Universal fixture for assembling and testing of a silicon-based microcombustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yufeng; Shan, Xue Chuan; Wang, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Haixia; Wong, Chee Khuen

    2005-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop MEMS-based power generation system, an assembly solution for combustion test of a recent-developed micro combustion device micromachined from single crystal silicon were proposed. In order to supply hydrogen/air to inlets of micro combustor from room temperature to over 700°C at the pressure of 1~3bars, a stainless steel universal fixture was designed and fabricated for the combustion testing of prototype stacked by structured Si wafers of 21.5mmx21.5mm in square. By precisely welding and polishing process in fabrication of the fixture, a metal plate with 18nm roughness was prepared for tightly connecting micro combuster with fuel inlet of 2mm, air inlet 4mm in diameter on the top wafer, while the gap between tubings to be hermetically joined to top plate is about 0.3mm. Primary combustion experiments have been conducted after igniting the fuel/air mixture in the micro chamber. Stable hydrogen-air combustion has been observed to sustain inside the combustion chamber with exit temperature over 1200°C. During the combustion experiments, the silicon dies keep good mechanical integrity under assembly and no gas leakage is observed.

  4. An evaluation testing technique of single event effect using Beam Blanking SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, J.; Hada, T.; Pesce, A.; Akutsu, T.; Matsuda, S. [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Igarashi, T.; Baba, S.

    1997-03-01

    Beam Blanking SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) testing technique has been applied to CMOS SRAM devices to evaluate the occurence of soft errors on memory cells. Cross-section versus beam current and LET curves derived from BBSEM and heavy ion testing technique, respectively, have been compared. A linear relation between BBSEM current and heavy ion LET has been found. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the application of focused pulsed electron beam could be a reliable, convenient and inexpensive tool to investigate the effects of heavy ions and high energy particles on memory devices for space application. (author)

  5. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamps, T.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  6. Beam tests of the 12 MHz RFQ RIB injector for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    In recent tests without beam, the Argonne 12 MHz split-coaxial radio-frequency quadruple (RFQ) achieved a cw intervane voltage of more than 100 kV, the design operating voltage for the device. This voltage is sufficient for the RFQ to function as the first stage of a RIB injector for the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS). Previously reported beam dynamics calculations for the structure predict longitudinal emittance growth of only a few keV·ns for beams of mass 132 and above with transverse emittance of 0.27 π mm·mrad (normalized). Such beam quality is not typical of RFQ devices. The work reported here is preparation for tests with beams of mass up to 132. Beam diagnostic stations are being developed to measure the energy gain and beam quality of heavy ions accelerated by the RFQ using the Dynamitron accelerator facility at the ANL Physics Division as the injector. Beam diagnostic development includes provisions for performing the measurements with both a Si charged-particle detector and an electrostatic energy spectrometer system

  7. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harb, Ali, E-mail: ali.harb@desy.de; Mussgiller, Andreas; Hauk, Johannes

    2017-02-11

    The CMS Binary Chip (CBC) is a prototype version of the front-end read-out ASIC to be used in the silicon strip modules of the CMS outer tracking detector during the high luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC is produced in 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of a double layer silicon strip module, the so-called 2S-p{sub T} module. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide on-board trigger information to the first level trigger system of CMS, with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-p{sub T} track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S-p{sub T} module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2 to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  8. Feasibility study on silicon doping using high temperature test engineering reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masaya; Takaki, Naoyuki; Goto, Minoru; Shimakawa, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility study on silicon doping using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is performed by numerical simulations. The HTTR is a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) situated at JAEA Oarai research and development center. It has a 30MW thermal power and the outlet coolant temperature is 950degC. The objective of this study is to evaluate the following issues, 1. The impact of loading Si-ingots into the core on the criticality, 2. The uniformity of the neutron capture reaction rate in Si-ingots, and 3. The production rate of silicon semiconductor. In this study, six Si-ingots are loaded into the irradiation area which is located in the peripheral region of the core. They are irradiated with rotation movement around the axial direction to obtain uniform neutron capture reaction rate in the radial direction. Additionally, the neutron filter, which is made of graphite containing boron, is used to obtain uniform neutron capture reaction rate in the axial direction. The evaluations were conducted by performing the HTTR whole core calculations with the Monte Carlo code MVP-2.0. In the calculations, several tally regions were defined on the Si-ingots to investigate the uniformity of the neutron capture reaction rate. As a result, loading the Si-ingots into the core causes negative reactivity by about 0.7%dk/k. Uniform neutron capture reaction rate of Si-ingot is obtained 98% in the radial and the axial direction. In case of the target of semiconductor resistivity is set to 50 Ωcm, the required irradiation time becomes 10 hours. The HTTR is able to produce silicon semiconductor of 540kg in one-time irradiation. This study was conducted as a joint research with JAEA, Nuclear Fuel Industries, LTD, Toyota Tsusho Corporation and Tokai University. (author)

  9. Microstructure, microhardness, composition, and corrosive properties of stainless steel 304. I. Laser surface alloying with silicon by beam-oscillating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, Y.; Shi, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Nakai, H.

    2000-01-01

    Laser surface alloying (LSA) with silicon was conducted on austenitic stainless steel 304. Silicon slurry composed of silicon particle of 5 μm in average diameter was made and a uniform layer was supplied on the substrate stainless steel. The surface was melted with beam-oscillated carbon dioxide laser and then LSA layers of 0.4-1.2 mm in thickness were obtained. When an impinged energy density was adjusted to be equal to or lower than 100 W mm -2 , LSA layers retained rapidly solidified microstructure with dispersed cracks. In these samples, Fe 3 Si was detected and the concentration of Si in LSA layer was estimated to be 10.5 wt.% maximum. When the energy density was equal to or greater than 147 W mm -2 , cellular grained structure with no crack was formed. No iron silicate was observed and alpha iron content in LSA layers increased. Si concentration within LSA layers was estimated to be 5 to 9 wt.% on average. Crack-free as-deposited samples exhibited no distinct corrosion resistance. The segregation of Si was confirmed along the grain boundaries and inside the grains. The microstructure of these samples changed with solution-annealing and the corrosion resistance was fairly improved with the time period of solution-annealing. (orig.)

  10. Focused ion beam scan routine, dwell time and dose optimizations for submicrometre period planar photonic crystal components and stamps in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopman, Wico C L; Ay, Feridun; Hu, Wenbin; Gadgil, Vishwas J; Kuipers, Laurens; Pollnau, Markus; Ridder, Rene M de

    2007-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling is receiving increasing attention for nanostructuring in silicon (Si). These structures can for example be used for photonic crystal structures in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) configuration or for moulds which can have various applications in combination with imprint technologies. However, FIB fabrication of submicrometre holes having perfectly vertical sidewalls is still challenging due to the redeposition effect in Si. In this study we show how the scan routine of the ion beam can be used as a sidewall optimization parameter. The experiments have been performed in Si and SOI. Furthermore, we show that sidewall angles as small as 1.5 0 are possible in Si membranes using a spiral scan method. We investigate the effect of the dose, loop number and dwell time on the sidewall angle, interhole milling and total milling depth by studying the milling of single and multiple holes into a crystal. We show that the sidewall angles can be as small as 5 0 in (bulk) Si and SOI when applying a larger dose. Finally, we found that a relatively large dwell time of 1 ms and a small loop number is favourable for obtaining vertical sidewalls. By comparing the results with those obtained by others, we conclude that the number of loops at a fixed dose per hole is the parameter that determines the sidewall angle and not the dwell time by itself

  11. Last Stand-alone Beam Test of the Hadronic End-cap Calorimeter (HEC) Finished.

    CERN Multimedia

    Oberlack, H

    One quarter of all 134 HEC modules are tested with electron, pion and muon beams: two "partial HEC wheels", three HEC1 modules and three HEC2 modules, are used in a standard setup using the HEC cryostat in the H6 beam line. The picture shows a view of the set-up in the cryostat during the installation. MC results show that in this setup the energy leakage is well under control - well below 5 %. In addition, the other three quarters of modules are tested in technical cold tests. Using calibration signals, a detailed test of the cabling, cold electronics, crosstalk and noise performance is being done. The beam tests started with four prototype modules per run in '97, when technological optimization was still the key issue. From '98 onwards, modules of the "module 0" type have been tested, typically in two run periods per year. Finally in '99 the series production has started, with first beam test of series modules in 2000. Since then 57 series modules have been cold tested, 24 of them actually in beam tests. T...

  12. On-Chip Testing Schemes of Through-Silicon-Vias (TSVs in 3D Stacked ICs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi MS. Harb

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents on-chip testing structures to characterize and detect faulty Through Silicon Vias (TSVs in 3D ICs technology. 3D Gunning Transceiver Logic (GTL I/O testing is proposed to characterize the performance of 3D TSVs in high speed applications. The GTL testing circuit will fire different data patterns at different frequencies to characterize the transient performance of TSVs. In addition, Different testing schemes based on an oscillation ring testing methodology are proposed to detect TSVs faults such as stuck-at, open, slope and delay degradation, and severe crosstalk TSVs coupling. A parallel ring-based oscillator test structure is proposed and simulated based on a high performance fully tunable electrical circuit pi-model where a single and coupled TSVs with ground-signal-ground (GSG and ground-signal-signal-ground (GSSG 3D vias configurations are used as a test vehicle for 3D interconnect characterization and test. Simulation results are presented using the Keysight/Agilent Advance Design System (ADS and a standard 0.25 µm CMOS process.

  13. Reanimation of the RICH Test Beam Simulation in GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Arzymatov, Kenenbek

    2017-01-01

    This test was originally developed by Sajan Easo (LHCb) ten years ago mostly for the purpose of testing the behavior of photomultipliers, but it wasn’t used in regression testing in Gauss/Geant4 famework. The goal of project is to revive simulation of cherenkov radiaton test by completing.

  14. First LHC beam induced tracks reconstructed in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, C; Bates, A; Eklund, L; Gersabeck, M; Marinho, F; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rodrigues, E; Szumlak, T; Affolder, A; Bowcock, T; Casse, G; Donleavy, S; Hennessy, K; Huse, T; Hutchcroft, D; Mylroie-Smith, J; Noor, A; Patel, G; Rinnert, K; Smith, N A; Shears, T; Tobin, M; John, M; Bay, A; Frei, R; Haefeli, G; Keune, A; Anderson, J; McNulty, R; Traynor, S; Basiladze, S; Leflat, A; Artuso, M; Borgia, A; Lefeuvre, G; Mountain, R; Wang, J; Akiba, K; van Beuzekom, M; Jans, E; Ketel, T; Mous, I; Papadelis, A; Van Lysebetten, A; Verlaat, B; de Vries, H; Behrendt, O; Buytaert, J; de Capua, S; Collins, P; Ferro-Luzzi, M

    2009-01-01

    The Vertex Locator of the LHCb experiment has been used to fully reconstruct beam induced tracks at the LHC. A beam of protons was collided with a beam absorber during the LHC synchronisation test of the anti-clockwise beam on the weekend 22nd–24th August 2008. The resulting particles have been observed by the Vertex Locator. The LHCb Vertex Locator is a silicon micro-strip detector containing 21 planes of modules. Tracks were observed passing through up to 19 modules (38 silicon sensors). A total of over 700 tracks were reconstructed, and are being used to study the calibration and alignment of the detector.

  15. Test bench for thermal cycling of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Simon Dyhr; Jørgensen, Asger Bjørn; Maarbjerg, Anders Eggert

    2016-01-01

    measurement of on-state voltages and direct real-time measurement of die surface temperatures, enabled by fiber optical sensors, which are built into the power modules. A thermal model of the module prototypes, based on the temperature measurements, is established. Independent verification steps have been......This paper presents a test bench for lifetime investigation of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules. The test bench subjects high voltage switching operation to the modules while power cycling. Thus both a thermal and electrical operating point is emulated. The power cycling setup features offline...... made to validate the performance of the on-state voltage measurement and the thermal model. Issues are revealed in the form of common mode currents in gate drive supply, which should be remedied. Finally a new operating point for power cycling is suggested to better stress the power modules....

  16. Study of parametric instability in gravitational wave detectors with silicon test masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhao, Chunnong; Ju, Li; Blair, David

    2017-01-01

    Parametric instability is an intrinsic risk in high power laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors, in which the optical cavity modes interact with the acoustic modes of the mirrors, leading to exponential growth of the acoustic vibration. In this paper, we investigate the potential parametric instability for a proposed next generation gravitational wave detector, the LIGO Voyager blue design, with cooled silicon test masses of size 45 cm in diameter and 55 cm in thickness. It is shown that there would be about two unstable modes per test mass at an arm cavity power of 3 MW, with the highest parametric gain of  ∼76. While this is less than the predicted number of unstable modes for Advanced LIGO (∼40 modes with max gain of  ∼32 at the designed operating power of 830 kW), the importance of developing suitable instability suppression schemes is emphasized. (paper)

  17. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambade, P.; /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba; Alabau Pons, M.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Amann, J.; /SLAC; Angal-Kalinin, D.; /Daresbury; Apsimon, R.; /Oxford U., JAI; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Bai, S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bellomo, P.; /SLAC; Bett, D.; /Oxford U., JAI; Blair, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Bolzon, B.; /Savoie U.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; /Oxford U., JAI; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; /CERN; Deacon, L.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Elsen, E.; /DESY /Valencia U., IFIC /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Savoie U. /Fermilab /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyungpook Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Savoie U. /Daresbury /Tokyo U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /University Coll. London /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tohoku U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Brookhaven /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /SLAC /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Orsay /Fermilab /Tohoku U. /Manchester U. /CERN /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Hiroshima U. /KEK, Tsukuba /CERN /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /Fermilab /SLAC /Liverpool U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /CERN

    2011-11-11

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  18. First beam test of a combined ramp and squeeze at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jorg; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Redaelli, Stefano; Schaumann, Michaela; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    With increasing maturity of LHC operation it is possible to envisage more complex beam manipulations. At the same time operational efficiency receives increasing attention. So far ramping the beams to their target energy and squeezing the beams to smaller or higher beta are decoupled at the LHC. (De-)squeezing is always performed at the target energy, currently 6.5 TeV. Studies to combine the ramp and squeeze processes have been made for the LHC since 2011, but so far no experimental test with beam had ever performed. This note describes the first machine experiment with beam aiming at validating the combination of ramp and squeeze, the so-called combined ramp and squeeze (CRS).

  19. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  20. Development and testing of a planar, silicon mini-capillary pumped loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerkes, Kirk L.; Pettigrew, Kenneth; Smith, Brian; Gamlen, Carol; Liepmann, Dorian

    2002-01-01

    A planar, silicon mini-capillary pumped loop (CPL) was designed, built, and tested using recent MEMS technology to provide integral cooling and temperature control for electronics. This design featured three silicon fusion bonded wafers incorporating an evaporator, condenser, liquid line and vapor line, all of which were dry plasma etched. Grooves were etched in the condenser and evaporator to provide passive capillary pumping. The finished device was bonded to an external reservoir via a through hole and was filled with a working fluid of water. The evaporator was bonded directly to an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with a calorimeter epoxied above the condenser to control the temperature and monitor heat removal by the CPL. The mini-CPL was operated with an input heat load ranging from 3 to 10 W resulting in the junction temperature of the IGBT being reduced approximately 15 degrees Celsius from that of a solid Si substrate. The mini-CPL also performed as a thermal diode, turning on or off depending on the reservoir temperature. Work is in progress to understand the dynamics observed in the CPL as well as improve the CPL's performance. .

  1. Acoustic emission study on 50 years old reinforced concrete beams under bending and shear tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Hordijk, D.A.; de Boer, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the Acoustic Emission (AE) measurement of several tests carried out on reinforced concrete beams sawn from a 50 years old concrete bridge – Ruytenschildt bridge. The purpose of these tests is to provide additional information to the already executed in-situ load testing on the

  2. Detailed characterisation of focused ion beam induced lateral damage on silicon carbide samples by electrical scanning probe microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, F.; Abu Quba, A. A.; Singer, P.; Rumler, M.; Cherkashin, N.; Schamm-Chardon, S.; Cours, R.; Rommel, M.

    2018-03-01

    The lateral damage induced by focused ion beam on silicon carbide was characterized using electrical scanning probe microscopy (SPM), namely, scanning spreading resistance microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM). It is shown that the damage exceeds the purposely irradiated circles with a radius of 0.5 μm by several micrometres, up to 8 μm for the maximum applied ion dose of 1018 cm-2. Obtained SPM results are critically compared with earlier findings on silicon. For doses above the amorphization threshold, in both cases, three different areas can be distinguished. The purposely irradiated area exhibits resistances smaller than the non-affected substrate. A second region with strongly increasing resistance and a maximum saturation value surrounds it. The third region shows the transition from maximum resistance to the base resistance of the unaffected substrate. It correlates to the transition from amorphized to defect-rich to pristine crystalline substrate. Additionally, conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and annular dark-field STEM were used to complement and explain the SPM results and get a further understanding of the defect spreading underneath the surface. Those measurements also show three different regions that correlate well with the regions observed from electrical SPM. TEM results further allow to explain observed differences in the electrical results for silicon and silicon carbide which are most prominent for ion doses above 3 × 1016 cm-2. Furthermore, the conventional approach to perform current-voltage measurements by c-AFM was critically reviewed and several improvements for measurement and analysis process were suggested that result in more reliable and impactful c-AFM data.

  3. Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite coating with Si content on the nanotube-formed Ti–Nb–Zr alloy using electron beam-physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon [Division of Restorative, Prosthetic and Primary Care Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, 305 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, OH (United States); Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [Division of Restorative, Prosthetic and Primary Care Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, 305 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the electrochemical characteristics of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings on the nanotube-formed Ti–35Nb–10Zr alloy. The silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si–HA) coatings on the nanotube structure were deposited by electron beam-physical vapor deposition and anodization methods, and biodegradation properties were analyzed by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement. The surface characteristics were analyzed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The Si–HA layers were deposited with rough features having highly ordered nanotube structures on the titanium alloy substrate. The thickness of the Si–HA coating was less than that of the HA coating. The XRD results confirmed that the Si–HA coating on the nanotube structure consisted of TiO{sub 2} anatase, TiO{sub 2} rutile, hydroxyapatite, and calcium phosphate silicate. The Si–HA coating surface exhibited lower I{sub corr} than the HA coating, and the polarization resistance was increased by substitution of silicon in hydroxyapatite. - Highlights: • Silicon substituted hydroxyapatite (Si–HA) was coated on nanotubular titanium alloy. • The Si–HA coating thickness was less than single hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. • Si–HA coatings consisted of TiO{sub 2}, HA, and Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}. • Polarization resistance of the coating was increased by Si substitution in HA.

  4. Experimental testing of a self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam using FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlei; Hao, Qingduo; Ou, Jinping

    2009-03-01

    A new kind of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP)-concrete composite beam, which consists of a FRP box beam combined with a thin layer of concrete in the compression zone, was developed by using two embedded FBG sensors in the top and bottom flanges of FRP box beam at mid-span section along longitudinal direction, respectively. The flexural behavior of the proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam was experimentally studied in four-point bending. The longitudinal strains of the composite beam were recorded using the embedded FBG sensors as well as the surfacebonded electric resistance strain gauges. Test results indicate that the FBG sensors can faithfully record the longitudinal strain of the composite beam in tension at bottom flange of the FRP box beam or in compression at top flange over the entire load range, as compared with the surface-bonded strain gauges. The proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam can monitor its longitudinal strains in serviceability limit state as well as in strength limit state, and will has wide applications for long-term monitoring in civil engineering.

  5. CFRP strengthening of concrete beams - testing in sub-zero temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Carolin, A.

    2007-01-01

    durability and do not normally need to be maintained over time. However, disadvantages might be mechanical damage and long term properties. There is also a question regarding the behaviour of CFRP strengthen structures in cold climates, for example will the structure behave more brittle during the winter...... compared to the summer period? In this paper the last issue will be addressed. CFRP strengthen concrete beams have been tested in sub-zero temperature and loaded up to failure. The cold climate tests are then compared with similar beams tested in room climate. From the tests no significantly difference...

  6. Deuteron beam interaction with lithium jet in a neutron source test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1996-01-01

    Testing and evaluating candidate fusion reactor materials in a high-flux, high-energy neutron environment are critical to the success and economic feasibility of a fusion device. The current understanding of materials behavior in fission-like environments and existing fusion facilities is insufficient to ensure the necessary performance of future fusion reactor components. An accelerator-based deuterium-lithium system to generate the required high neutron flux for material testing is considered to be the most promising approach in the near future. In this system, a high-energy (30-40 MeV) deuteron beam impinges on a high-speed (10-20 m/s) lithium jet to produce the high-energy (≥14 MeV) neutrons required to simulate a fusion environment via the Li (d,n) nuclear stripping reaction. Interaction of the high-energy deuteron beam and the subsequent response of the high-speed lithium jet are evaluated in detail. Deposition of the deuteron beam, jet-thermal hydraulic response, lithium-surface vaporization rate, and dynamic stability of the jet are modeled. It is found that lower beam kinetic energies produce higher surface temperature and consequently higher Li vaporization rates. Larger beam sizes significantly reduce both bulk and surface temperatures. Thermal expansion and dynamic velocities (normal to jet direction) due to beam energy deposition and momentum transfer are much lower than jet flow velocity and decrease substantially at lower beam current densities. (orig.)

  7. Analysis and seismic tests of composite shear walls with CFST columns and steel plate deep beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Jianwei; Xu, Fangfang

    2013-12-01

    A composite shear wall concept based on concrete filled steel tube (CFST) columns and steel plate (SP) deep beams is proposed and examined in this study. The new wall is composed of three different energy dissipation elements: CFST columns; SP deep beams; and reinforced concrete (RC) strips. The RC strips are intended to allow the core structural elements — the CFST columns and SP deep beams — to work as a single structure to consume energy. Six specimens of different configurations were tested under cyclic loading. The resulting data are analyzed herein. In addition, numerical simulations of the stress and damage processes for each specimen were carried out, and simulations were completed for a range of location and span-height ratio variations for the SP beams. The simulations show good agreement with the test results. The core structure exhibits a ductile yielding mechanism characteristic of strong column-weak beam structures, hysteretic curves are plump and the composite shear wall exhibits several seismic defense lines. The deformation of the shear wall specimens with encased CFST column and SP deep beam design appears to be closer to that of entire shear walls. Establishing optimal design parameters for the configuration of SP deep beams is pivotal to the best seismic behavior of the wall. The new composite shear wall is therefore suitable for use in the seismic design of building structures.

  8. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    A fixed-price procurement contract for $24.9 million was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, CA, for the design, manufacture, installation, and acceptance testing of the sustaining neutral beam power supply system (SNBPSS). This system is scheduled for completion in early 1981 and will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each of the 24 power supply sets will provide the accel potential of 80 kV at 88 A, the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module

  9. First Results of the Beam Gas Ionization Profile Monitor (BGIP) Tested in the SPS Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Arauzo-Garcia, A; Koopman, J; Variola, A

    2000-01-01

    The BGIP is a proposal for a new, non-destructive beam profile monitor for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This device provides the rms beam size value by means of the analysis of the velocity spectrum of the rest gas ions created and accelerated by the beam itself. After a thorough computer simulation study of the related physics, a first prototype of the BGIP has been conceived, built up and installed in the SPS main ring during 1999. This paper contains a short presentation of the simulation work and a description of the test set-up. The first experimental results are presented and compared with theoretical computations.

  10. Simulation and measurement of the electrostatic beam kicker in the low-energy undulator test line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldschmidt, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    An electrostatic kicker has been constructed for use in the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The function of the kicker is to limit the amount of beam current to be accelerated by the APS linac. Two electrodes within the kicker create an electric field that adjusts the trajectory of the beam. This paper will explore the static fields that are set up between the offset electrode plates and determine the reaction of the beam to this field. The kicker was numerically simulated using the electromagnetic solver package MAFIA [1

  11. The Stress Analysis and Tests on the Hinge Beam of the Diamond Synthesis Cubic Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To deal with the problem of the lug fractures of hinge beam caused by the fatigue and overload during the operation of the cubic press, the analysis methods of finite element are applied to the analysis of the internal stress distributions of the hinge beam. The simulation results show that the internal stress of the hinge beam mainly concentrates on the upper surface of the lug roots connecting the outer cylinder with the both lugs. According to the data of simulation and analysis as well as the actual fracture situations, considering the strain-test methods we have designed the schemes of testing the strain on the lugs of hinge beam. And the strain measurements of the lugs are completed by the repeated loading experiments. Comparing the data of simulation and analysis with the measured data has verified their consistency. It also confirms the model established by the simulation and analysis is reasonable and accurate at the same time.

  12. Development of a synchrotron radiation beam monitor for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpelli, Andrea [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear integrable optics applied to beam dynamics may mitigate multi-particle instabilities, but proof of principle experiments have never been carried out. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron and proton storage ring currently being built at Fermilab, which addresses tests of nonlinear lattice elements in a real machine in addition to experiments on optical stochastic cooling and on the single-electron wave function. These experiments require an outstanding control over the lattice parameters, achievable with fast and precise beam monitoring systems. This work describes the steps for designing and building a beam monitor for IOTA based on synchrotron radiation, able to measure intensity, position and transverse cross-section beam.

  13. The APS X-ray undulator photon beam position monitor and tests at CHESS and NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Barraza, J.; Sanchez, T.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of thirs generation synchrotron sources, like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide significant increases in brilliance over existing synchrotron sources. The APS X-ray undulators will increase the brilliance in the 3-40 keV range by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of the photon beam position monitor is a challenging engineering task. The beam position monitors must withstand the high thermal load, be able to achieve submicron spatial resolution while maintaining their stability, and be compatible with both undulators and wigglers. A preliminary APS prototype photon beam position monitor consisting of a CVD-diamond-based, tungsten-coated blade was tested on the APS/CHESS undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS) and on the NSLS X-13 undulator beamline. Results from these tests, as well as the design of this prototype APS photon beam position monitor, will be discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  14. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer KeithleyÒ 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens PrimusÒ linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TXÒ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens PrimusÒ the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TXÒ the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  15. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com feixe de fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley Registered-Sign 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus Registered-Sign linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX Registered-Sign ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX Registered-Sign the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  16. Latest R&D news and beam test performance of the highly granular SiW-ECAL technological prototype for the ILC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irles, A.

    2018-02-01

    High precision physics at future colliders as the International Linear Collider (ILC) require unprecedented high precision in the determination of the energy of final state particles. The needed precision will be achieved thanks to the Particle Flow algorithms (PF) which require highly granular and hermetic calorimeters systems. The physical proof of concept of the PF was performed in the previous campaign of beam tests of physic prototypes within the CALICE collaboration. One of these prototypes was the physics prototype of the Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter (SiW-ECAL) for the ILC. In this document we present the latest news on R&D of the next generation prototype, the technological prototype with fully embedded very front-end (VFE) electronics, of the SiW-ECAL. Special emphasis is given to the presentation and discussion of the first results from the beam test done at DESY in June 2017. The physics program for such beam test consisted in the calibration and commissioning of the current set of available SiW ECAL modules; the test of performance of individual slabs under 1T magnetic fields; and the study of electromagnetic showers events.

  17. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  18. Construction of the facility for the testing of the TFTR Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughian, J.; Lou, K.; Roth, D.

    1979-11-01

    The prototype for the TFTR Neutral Beam Injection System has been assembled at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboraory, and is presently under test. Some of the construction features of the shielding enclosure, the cryogenic supply system, control and computer area, and the auxiliary vacuum and utility supply system are described. In addition, the paper describes the target chamber, its beam dump and cryopanels, and the duct that connects the target chamber to the injector vessel

  19. Testing fundamental symmetries using radioactive ion beams at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    paper we summarize some recent experimental developments at TRIUMF pertaining to fundamental symmetry tests. These tests use the atomic nucleus as a probe to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Some recent results and future plans are discussed. Keywords. Standard Model; symmetries; radioactive ion ...

  20. Helium Cryo Testing of a SLMS(TM) (Silicon Lightweight Mirrors) Athermal Optical Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.; Stahl, H. Philip; Keys, Andrew S.; Reily, Jack C.; Eng, Ron; Hadaway, James B.; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Siler, Richard

    2003-01-01

    SLMS (TM) a thermal technology has been demonstrated in the small 4-foot helium cryogenic test chamber located at the NASA/MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). A SLMS (TM) Ultraviolet Demonstrator Mirror (UVDM) produced by Schafer under a NASA/MSFC Phase I SBIR was helium cryo tested both free standing and bonded to a Schafer designed prototype carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (Cesic) mount. Surface figure data was obtained with a test measurement system that featured an Instantaneous Phase Interferometer (IPI) by ADE Phase Shift. The test measurement system s minimum resolvable differential figure deformation and possible contributions from test chamber ambient to cryo window deformation are under investigation. The free standing results showed differential figure deformation of 10.4 nm rms from 295K to 27K and 3.9 nm rms after one cryo cycle. The surface figure of the UVDM degraded by lambda/70 rms HeNe once it was bonded to the prototype Cesic mount. The change was due to a small astigmatic aberration in the rototype Cesic mount due to lack of finish machining and not the bonding technique. This effect was seen in SLMST (TM) optical assembly results, which showed differential figure deformation of 46.5 nm rms from 294K to 27K, 42.9 nm rms from 294K to 77K, 28.0 nm rms from 294K to 193K and 6.2 nm rms after one cryo cycle.

  1. Stress testing on silicon carbide electronic devices for prognostics and health management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Power conversion systems for energy storage and other distributed energy resource applications are among the drivers of the important role that power electronics plays in providing reliable electricity. Wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) will help increase the performance and efficiency of power electronic equipment while condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) will increase the operational availability of the equipment and thereby make it more cost effective. Voltage and/or temperature stress testing were performed on a number of SiC devices in order to accelerate failure modes and to identify measureable shifts in electrical characteristics which may provide early indication of those failures. Those shifts can be interpreted and modeled to provide prognostic signatures for use in CM and/or PHM. Such experiments will also lead to a deeper understanding of basic device physics and the degradation mechanisms behind failure.

  2. Photocarrier radiometry for predicting the degradation of electrical parameters of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P. [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, J.Y., E-mail: ljywlj@hit.edu.cn [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System (HIT), Harbin 150001 (China); Yuan, H.M.; Oliullah, Md.; Wang, F. [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Y., E-mail: songpengkevin@126.com [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System (HIT), Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams at various fluences is investigated. A one-dimensional two-layer carrier density wave model has been developed to estimate the minority carrier lifetime of n-region and p-region of the non-irradiated c-Si solar cell by best fitting with the experimental photocarrier radiometry (PCR) signal (the amplitude and the phase). Furthermore, the lifetime is used to determine the initial defect density of the quasi-neutral region (QNR) of the solar cell to predict its I–V characteristics. The theoretically predicted short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), and open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of the non-irradiated samples are in good agreement with experiment. Then a three-region defect distribution model for the c-Si solar cell irradiated by proton beams is carried out to describe the defect density distribution according to Monte Carlo simulation results and the initial defect density of the non-irradiated sample. Finally, we find that the electrical measurements of J{sub sc} and V{sub oc} of the solar cells irradiated at different fluences using 100 KeV proton beams are consistent with the PCR predicting results.

  3. Photocarrier radiometry for predicting the degradation of electrical parameters of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, P.; Liu, J.Y.; Yuan, H.M.; Oliullah, Md.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams at various fluences is investigated. A one-dimensional two-layer carrier density wave model has been developed to estimate the minority carrier lifetime of n-region and p-region of the non-irradiated c-Si solar cell by best fitting with the experimental photocarrier radiometry (PCR) signal (the amplitude and the phase). Furthermore, the lifetime is used to determine the initial defect density of the quasi-neutral region (QNR) of the solar cell to predict its I–V characteristics. The theoretically predicted short-circuit current density (J sc ), and open-circuit voltage (V oc ) of the non-irradiated samples are in good agreement with experiment. Then a three-region defect distribution model for the c-Si solar cell irradiated by proton beams is carried out to describe the defect density distribution according to Monte Carlo simulation results and the initial defect density of the non-irradiated sample. Finally, we find that the electrical measurements of J sc and V oc of the solar cells irradiated at different fluences using 100 KeV proton beams are consistent with the PCR predicting results.

  4. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year

  5. Backsplash studies for the Scintillator Pad Detector of LHCb in a tagged-photon test beam

    CERN Document Server

    Garrido, L; Miquel, R; Peralta, D

    2002-01-01

    The Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD) of the LHCb experiment is part of the calorimeter system, positioned just before the preshower (PS), and is meant to separate photons and electrons at level 0 of the trigger. A tagged-photon test beam allowed to test in photon signals the SPD. These signals are mainly due to pair production inside the scintillator and to particles generated in the electromagnetic shower in the PS and in the electromagnetic calorimeter (backsplash). The observed results in a test beam experiment stress the low inefficiencies in e/gamma separation arising from backsplash.

  6. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Composite Energy-Absorbing Keel Beams for General Aviation Type Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A lightweight energy-absorbing keel-beam concept was developed and retrofitted in a general aviation type aircraft to improve crashworthiness performance. The energy-absorbing beam consisted of a foam-filled cellular structure with glass fiber and hybrid glass/kevlar cell walls. Design, analysis, fabrication and testing of the keel beams prior to installation and subsequent full-scale crash testing of the aircraft are described. Factors such as material and fabrication constraints, damage tolerance, crush stress/strain response, seat-rail loading, and post crush integrity, which influenced the course of the design process are also presented. A theory similar to the one often used for ductile metal box structures was employed with appropriate modifications to estimate the sustained crush loads for the beams. This, analytical tool, coupled with dynamic finite element simulation using MSC.Dytran were the prime design and analysis tools. The validity of the theory as a reliable design tool was examined against test data from static crush tests of beam sections while the overall performance of the energy-absorbing subfloor was assessed through dynamic testing of 24 in long subfloor assemblies.

  7. The design, fabrication and operation of the mechanical systems for the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.A.; Fong, M.; Koehler, G.W.; Low, W.; Purgalis, P.; Wells, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a National Test Facility used to develop long pulse Neutral Beam Sources. The Facility will test sources up to 120 keV, 50 A, with 30 s beam-on times with a 10% duty factor. For this application, an actively cooled beam dump is required and one has been constructed capable of dissipating a wide range of power density profiles. The flexibility of the design is achieved by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure comprised of eight separately controllable manipulator assemblies. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permits the dissipation of 2 kW/cm 2 anywhere on the panel surface. The cooling water requirements of the actively cooled dump system are provided by the closed loop Primary High Pressure Cooling Water System. To minimize the operating costs of continuously running this high power system, a variable speed hydraulic drive is used for the main pump. During beam pulses, the pump rotates at high speed, then cycles to low speed upon completion of the beam shot. A unique neutralizer design has been installed into the NBETF beamline. This is a gun-drilled moveable brazed assembly which provides continuous armoring of the beamline near the source. The unit penetrates the source mounting valve during operation and retracts to permit the valve to close as needed. The beamline also has an inertially cooled duct calorimeter assembly. This assembly is a moveable hinged matrix of copper plates that can be used as a beam stop up to pulse lengths of 50 ms. The beamline is also equipped with many beam scraper plates of differing detail design and dissipation capabilities

  8. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agari, M. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Bauer, C. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Baumeister, D. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Blouw, J. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany)]. E-mail: Johan.Blouw@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Hofmann, W. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Knoepfle, K.T. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Loechner, S. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Schmelling, M. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Pugatch, V. [Kiev Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine); Bay, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Carron, B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Frei, R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Jiminez-Otero, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Tran, M.-T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Voss, H. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Esperante, D. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lois, C. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Vasquez, P. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bernhard, R.P. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Bernet, R. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Ermoline, Y. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Gassner, J. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Koestner, S. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Lehner, F.; Needham, M.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2006-01-15

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(Italy) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry.

  9. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Blouw, J.; Hofmann, W.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Loechner, S.; Schmelling, M.; Pugatch, V.; Bay, A.; Carron, B.; Frei, R.; Jiminez-Otero, S.; Tran, M.-T.; Voss, H.; Adeva, B.; Esperante, D.; Lois, C.; Vasquez, P.; Bernhard, R.P.; Bernet, R.; Ermoline, Y.; Gassner, J.; Koestner, S.; Lehner, F.; Needham, M.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.

    2006-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(Italy) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry

  10. The LHCb silicon tracker project

    CERN Document Server

    Blouw, J

    2004-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(IT) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry.

  11. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  12. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research

  13. The Silicon Lattice Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J

    2003-11-24

    Previously, the generalized luminosity L was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e{sup +}e{sup -} design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam effects in the e{sup -}e{sup -}, e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} channels. One example was tensor beams composed of bunchlets n{sub ijk} implemented with a laser-driven, silicon accelerator based on micromachining techniques. Problems were considered and expressions given for radiative broadening due to bunchlet manipulation near the final focus to optimize luminosity via charge enhancement, neutralization or bunch shaping. Because the results were promising, we explore fully integrated structures that include sources, optics (for both light and particles) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip. Acceptable materials (and wavelengths) must allow velocity synchronism between many laser and electron pulses with optimal efficiency in high radiation environments. There are obvious control and cost advantages that accrue from using silicon structures if radiation effects can be made acceptable and the structures fabricated. Tests related to deep etching, fabrication and radiation effects on candidate amorphous and crystalline materials indicate Si(1.2 < {lambda}{sub L} < 10 {micro}m) and fused c-SiO{sub 2}(0.3 < {lambda}{sub L} < 4 {micro}m) to be ideal.

  14. Chracterization of the beam from the RFQ of the PIP-II Injector Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab; Carneiro. J.-P., Carneiro. J.-P. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Saini, A. [Fermilab; Scarpine, V. [Fermilab; Sista, V. L.S. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Steimel, J. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A 2.1 MeV, 10 mA CW RFQ has been installed and commissioned at the Fermilab’s test accelerator known as PIP-II Injector Test. This report describes the measure-ments of the beam properties after acceleration in the RFQ, including the energy and emittance.

  15. The Cherenkov correlated timing detector: beam test results from quartz and acrylic bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kichimi, H.; Sugaya, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kanda, S.; Olsen, S.; Ueno, K.; Varner, G.; Bergfeld, T.; Bialek, J.; Lorenc, J.; Palmer, M.; Rudnick, G.; Selen, M.; Auran, T.; Boyer, V.; Honscheid, K.; Tamura, N.; Yoshimura, K.; Lu, C.; Marlow, D.; Mindas, C.; Prebys, E.; Asai, M.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Several prototypes of a Cherenkov correlated timing (CCT) detector have been tested at the KEK-PS test beam line. We describe the results for Cherenkov light yields and timing characteristics from quartz and acrylic bar prototypes. A Cherenkov angle resolution is found to be 15 mrad at a propagation distance of 100 cm with a 2 cm thick quartz bar prototype. (orig.)

  16. IOP Latest R&D news and beam test performance of the highly granular SiW-ECAL technological prototype for the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Irles, Adrián

    2018-02-22

    High precision physics at future colliders as the International Linear Collider (ILC) require unprecedented high precision in the determination of the energy of final state particles. The needed precision will be achieved thanks to the Particle Flow algorithms (PF) which require highly granular and hermetic calorimeters systems. The physical proof of concept of the PF was performed in the previous campaign of beam tests of physic prototypes within the CALICE collaboration. One of these prototypes was the physics prototype of the Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter (SiW-ECAL) for the International Large Detector at the ILC. In this document we present the latest nes on R&D of the next generation prototype, the technological prototype with fully embedded very front-end (VFE) electronics, of the SiW-ECAL. Special emphasis is given to the presentation and discussion of the first results from the beam test done at DESY in June 2017. The physics program for such beam test consisted in the calibration a...

  17. Automated touch sensing in the mouse tapered beam test using Raspberry Pi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardesch, Dirk Jan; Balbi, Matilde; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-11-01

    Rodent models of neurological disease such as stroke are often characterized by motor deficits. One of the tests that are used to assess these motor deficits is the tapered beam test, which provides a sensitive measure of bilateral motor function based on foot faults (slips) made by a rodent traversing a gradually narrowing beam. However, manual frame-by-frame scoring of video recordings is necessary to obtain test results, which is time-consuming and prone to human rater bias. We present a cost-effective method for automated touch sensing in the tapered beam test. Capacitive touch sensors detect foot faults onto the beam through a layer of conductive paint, and results are processed and stored on a Raspberry Pi computer. Automated touch sensing using this method achieved high sensitivity (96.2%) as compared to 'gold standard' manual video scoring. Furthermore, it provided a reliable measure of lateralized motor deficits in mice with unilateral photothrombotic stroke: results indicated an increased number of contralesional foot faults for up to 6days after ischemia. The automated adaptation of the tapered beam test produces results immediately after each trial, without the need for labor-intensive post-hoc video scoring. It also increases objectivity of the data as it requires less experimenter involvement during analysis. Automated touch sensing may provide a useful adaptation to the existing tapered beam test in mice, while the simplicity of the hardware lends itself to potential further adaptations to related behavioral tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Successful beam test of the SPS-to-LHC transfer line TI2

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Image of the first beam spot on the last BTV screen traversed by the beam during the TI 2 test.At 12:03:47 on 28 October a beam passed down the 2.7 km of the new SPS-to-LHC transfer line TI 2 at the first attempt, to within some 50 m of the LHC tunnel. After initial tuning, a range of measurements was carried out with a low intensity proton beam and preliminary analyses look good. After the test, no increase in radiation levels was found in either the LHC or ALICE, and the zones were rapidly opened again for access. As from next year TI 2 will regularly transport a beam from the SPS to the LHC injection point of Ring 1, near Point 2 (ALICE). The TI 8 transfer line, which will bring particles from the SPS to the injection point in Ring 2, near Point 8 (LHCb), was commissioned successfully with low intensity beam in 2004. The two LHC injection lines have a combined length of 5.6 km and comprise some seven hundred warm magnets. While a...

  19. Initial beam-profiling tests with the NML prototype station at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.; Flora, R.; Johnson, A.S.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Scarpine, V.; Sun, Y.-E.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Church, M.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The beam-profile diagnostics station prototype for the superconducting rf electron linac being constructed at Fermilab at the New Muon Lab has been tested. The station uses intercepting radiation converter screens for the low-power beam mode: either a 100-{micro}m thick YAG:Ce single crystal scintillator or a 1-{micro}m thin Al optical transition radiation (OTR) foil. The screens are oriented with the surface perpendicular to the beam direction. A downstream mirror with its surface at 45 degrees to the beam direction is used to direct the radiation into the optical transport. The optical system has better than 20 (10) {micro}m rms spatial resolution when covering a vertical field of view of 18 (5) mm. The initial tests were performed at the A0 Photoinjector at a beam energy of {approx}15 MeV and with micropulse charges from 25 to 500 pC for beam sizes of 45 to 250 microns. Example results will be presented.

  20. Maskless and resist-free rapid prototyping of three-dimensional structures through electron beam induced deposition (EBID) of carbon in combination with metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) of silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Hildreth, Owen J; Kulkarni, Dhaval; Henry, Matthew R; Kim, Song-Kil; Wong, Ching Ping; Tsukruk, Vladimir V; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we introduce a maskless, resist-free rapid prototyping method to fabricate three-dimensional structures using electron beam induced deposition (EBID) of amorphous carbon (aC) from a residual hydrocarbon precursor in combination with metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) of silicon. We demonstrate that EBID-made patterned aC coating, with thickness of even a few nanometers, acts as a negative "mask" for the etching process and is sufficient for localized termination of the MaCE of silicon. Optimal aC deposition settings and gold film thickness for fabrication of high-aspect-ratio nanoscale 3D silicon structures are determined. The speed necessary for optimal aC feature deposition is found to be comparable to the writing speed of standard Electron Beam Lithography and the MaCE etching rate is found to be comparable to standard deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) rate.

  1. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomae, R., E-mail: rthomae@tlabs.ac.za; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V. [CERN, BE/ABP/HSL, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  2. Performance of the ATLAS liquid argon forward calorimeter in beam tests

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, J P; Cadabeschi, M; Epshteyn, V; Galt, C; Gillberg, D; Gorbounov, P; Heelan, L; Khakzad, M; Khovanskiy, V; Krieger, P; Loch, P; McCarthy, T G; Oakham, F G; Orr, R S; Rutherfoord, J; Savine, A; Schram, M; Shatalov, P; Shaver, L; Shupe, M; Strickland, V; Thompson, P; Tsukerman, I

    2013-01-01

    One of two ATLAS Forward Calorimeters, consisting of threemodules, one behind the other, was exposed to particle beams ofknown energies in order to study the detector performance with andwithout the presence of upstream material in the beam, and at theinner edge of the acceptance where shower energy containment isincomplete. Data were taken in the H6 beamline at CERN usingelectron and hadron beams with energies from 10 to 200 GeV.Results related to the intrinsic detector calibration, based on datataken with a minimal amount of material in front of the detector,have been previously published, but are updated here. This paperfocuses on studies of data taken with additional upstream materialin place. The effects of this additional material on the linearityand resolution of the response are presented. The response at theinner edge of the acceptance is also investigated. For all analyses,results based on a GEANT4 simulation of the beam-test setup anddetector response are also presented.

  3. Design of optics for the final focus test beam at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oide, Katsunobu.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the Final Focus Test Beam experiment (FFTB) is to produce an electron beam spot of 1 μm by 60 nm in transverse dimensions. In the future linear collider of TeV region (TLC), a typical spot size of 100 nm by 1 nm at the interaction point is required to get luminosity of 1 /times/ 10 34 cm/sup /minus/2/s/sup /minus/1/. This spot size is about 1/1000 of the SLC in the vertical dimension, and is demanding for an optics design, alignments, beam diagnostics, and tuning procedures. The spot size of the FFTB will be an important next step from the SLC toward the TLC. This paper describes the design of the beam optics. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. In-Situ Measurement of Power Loss for Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Thermal Cycling and Mechanical Loading Stress Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    We analyze the degradation of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules undergoing simultaneous thermal, mechanical, and humidity-freeze stress testing to develop a dark environmental chamber in-situ measurement procedure for determining module power loss. We analyze dark I-V curves measured...

  5. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  6. SRAM single event upset calculation and test using protons in the secondary beam in the BEPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuanming; Guo Hongxia; Zhang Fengqi; Zhang Keying; Chen Wei; Luo Yinhong; Guo Xiaoqiang, E-mail: wangym2007@gmail.com [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2011-09-15

    The protons in the secondary beam in the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) are first analyzed and a large proportion at the energy of 50-100 MeV supply a source gap of high energy protons. In this study, the proton energy spectrum of the secondary beam was obtained and a model for calculating the proton single event upset (SEU) cross section of a static random access memory (SRAM) cell has been presented in the BEPC secondary beam proton radiation environment. The proton SEU cross section for different characteristic dimensions has been calculated. The test of SRAM SEU cross sections has been designed, and a good linear relation between SEUs in SRAM and the fluence was found, which is evidence that an SEU has taken place in the SRAM. The SEU cross sections were measured in SRAM with different dimensions. The test result shows that the SEU cross section per bit will decrease with the decrease of the characteristic dimensions of the device, while the total SEU cross section still increases upon the increase of device capacity. The test data accords with the calculation results, so the high-energy proton SEU test on the proton beam in the BEPC secondary beam could be conducted. (semiconductor physics)

  7. MWPC for the test beam on BEPC-LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Ji; Chen Ziyu; Ye Zhenyu; Jiang Linli; Pan Jianjun; Ye Yunxiu; Cui Xiangzhong; Li Jiacai

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the MWPC developed for the test on BEPC, which localizes the particles of e, π by center of gravity of the signals induced on the cathodes of the chamber, and describes its configuration, structure and the investigation of properties. (authors)

  8. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker test-beam results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Baker, K.; Baron, S.; Benjamin, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bondarenko, V.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Capeans, M.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Catinaccio, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Cwetanski, P.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouichi, C.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagnon, P.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Grigalashvili, N.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, P.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G.; Khristatchev, A.; Konovalov, S.; Koudine, L.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kruger, K.; Laritchev, A.; Lichard, P.; Luehring, F.; Lundberg, B.; Maleev, V.; Markina, I.; McFarlane, K.; Mialkovski, V.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mindur, B.; Morozov, S.; Munar, A.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F. M.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S.; Olszowska, J.; Passmore, S.; Patritchev, S.; Peshekhonov, V.; Petti, R.; Price, M.; Rembser, C.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rust, D. R.; Ryabov, Yu.; Schegelsky, V.; Seliverstov, D.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, V.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Vassilieva, L.; Wang, C.; Williams, H. H.; Zalite, A.

    2004-04-01

    Several prototypes of the Transition Radiation Tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC have been built and tested at the CERN SPS accelerator. Results from detailed studies of the straw-tube hit registration efficiency and drift-time measurements and of the pion and electron spectra without and with radiators are presented.

  9. Evaluation of the Impact Resistance of Various Composite Sandwich Beams by Vibration Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Shahdin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact resistance of different types of composite sandwich beams is evaluated by studying vibration response changes (natural frequency and damping ratio. This experimental works will help aerospace structural engineer in assess structural integrity using classification of impact resistance of various composite sandwich beams (entangled carbon and glass fibers, honeycomb and foam cores. Low velocity impacts are done below the barely visible impact damage (BVID limit in order to detect damage by vibration testing that is hardly visible on the surface. Experimental tests are done using both burst random and sine dwell testing in order to have a better confidence level on the extracted modal parameters. Results show that the entangled sandwich beams have a better resistance against impact as compared to classical core materials.

  10. Study of the 2004 End-Cap beam tests of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bieri, Marco

    The ATLAS detector is an all-purpose detector to study high-ener gy proton–proton colli- sions. ATLAS is located at the LHC (Lar ge Hadron Collider) at CERN in Gene va, Switzer - land. Before first data taking, man y beam tests have been carried out in order to fully understand each detector component. The studies in this thesis will concentrate on the 2004 beam test of the entire combined end-cap calorimeter system. The first section of this thesis outlines particle selection in the incoming test beam, eliminating contamination in order to have an accurate calibration environment. The remainder of the thesis focuses on detector calibration and performance studies, including signal-to-ener gy calibration con- stant determination, and various detector ener gy summation methods studying their effect on response. Ov erall detector ener gy sharing characteristics including the response of dead detector regions is also presented.

  11. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  12. Reproducibility of a silicone-based test food to masticatory performance evaluation by different sieve methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Costa, Marina Abrantes; Farias-Neto, Arcelino

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the condensation silicone Optosil Comfort® as an artificial test food for masticatory performance evaluation. Twenty dentate subjects with mean age of 23.3±0.7 years were selected. Masticatory performance was evaluated using the simple (MPI), the double (IME) and the multiple sieve methods. Trials were carried out five times by three examiners: three times by the first, and once by the second and third examiners. Friedman's test was used to find the differences among time trials. Reproducibility was determined by the intra-class correlation (ICC) test (α=0.05). No differences among time trials were found, except for MPI-4 mm (p=0.022) from the first examiner results. The intra-examiner reproducibility (ICC) of almost all data was high (ICC≥0.92, p0.93, psieve method, the average mean of absolute difference from repeated measurements were lower than 1 mm. This trend was observed only from MPI-0.50 to MPI-1.4 for the single sieve method, and from IME-0.71/0.50 to IME-1.40/1.00 for the double sieve method. The results suggest that regardless of the method used, the reproducibility of Optosil Comfort® is high.

  13. Laser Soldering and Thermal Cycling Tests of Monolithic Silicon Pixel Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Strand, Frode Sneve

    2015-01-01

    An ALPIDE-1 monolithic silicon pixel sensor prototype has been laser soldered to a flex printed circuit using a novel interconnection technique using lasers. This technique is to be optimised to ensure stable, good quality connections between the sensor chips and the FPCs. To test the long-term stability of the connections, as well as study the effects on hit thresholds and noise in the sensor, it was thermally cycled in a climate chamber 1200 times. The soldered connections showed good qualities like even melting and good adhesion on pad/flex surfaces, and the chip remained in working condition for 1080 cycles. After this, a few connections failed, having cracks in the soldering tin, rendering the chip unusable. Threshold and noise characteristics seemed stable, except for the noise levels of sector 2 in the chip, for 1000 cycles in a temperature interval of "10^{\\circ}" and "50^{\\circ}" C. Still, further testing with wider temperature ranges and more cycles is needed to test the limitations of the chi...

  14. Reproducibility of a silicone-based test food to masticatory performance evaluation by different sieve methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Sánchez-Ayala

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the condensation silicone Optosil Comfort® as an artificial test food for masticatory performance evaluation. Twenty dentate subjects with mean age of 23.3 ± 0.7 years were selected. Masticatory performance was evaluated using the simple (MPI, the double (IME and the multiple sieve methods. Trials were carried out five times by three examiners: three times by the first, and once by the second and third examiners. Friedman’s test was used to find the differences among time trials. Reproducibility was determined by the intra-class correlation (ICC test (α = 0.05. No differences among time trials were found, except for MPI-4 mm (p = 0.022 from the first examiner results. The intra-examiner reproducibility (ICC of almost all data was high (ICC ≥ 0.92, p 0.93, p < 0.001 for all results. For the multiple sieve method, the average mean of absolute difference from repeated measurements were lower than 1 mm. This trend was observed only from MPI-0.50 to MPI-1.4 for the single sieve method, and from IME-0.71/0.50 to IME-1.40/1.00 for the double sieve method. The results suggest that regardless of the method used, the reproducibility of Optosil Comfort® is high.

  15. Effect of oxygen on the processes of ion beam synthesis of buried SiC layers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, V.V.; Valakh, M.Ya.; Klyuj, N.I.; Mel'nik, V.P.; Romanyuk, A.B.; Romanyuk, B.N.; Yukhimchuk, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of Si-structures with buried silicon carbide (SiC) layers created by high dose carbon implantation into Cz-Si or Fz-Si wafers followed by high-temperature annealing were studied by Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Effect of additional oxygen implantation on the peculiarities of SiC layer formation was also studied. It was shown that under the same implantation and post-implantation annealing conditions the buried SiC layers are more effectively formed in Cz-Si or in Si subjected to additional oxygen implantation. Thus, oxygen in silicon promotes the SiC layer formation due to SiO x precipitate creation and accommodation of the crystal volume in the region where SiC phase is formed

  16. An Electron Miniaccelerator on the Basis of Tesla Transformer for Nondestructive Testing of Charged Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, V.E.; Bulatov, A.V.; Logatchev, P.V.; Kazarezov, I.V.; Korepanov, A.A.; Malyutin, D.A.; Starostenko, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    An electron miniaccelerator on the basis of Tesla-transformer for nondestructive testing of charged particle beams with operating voltage 120...200 kV, half-wave duration 4 mks and diagnostic beam current within few mA is described. The primary circuit is switched by IGBT. The gun control and filament circuit power supply (impregnated cathode with 1.2 mm diameter) are realized through high frequency isolated transformer. The accelerating tube is made of sectional welded metal ceramics insulator (ceramic 22HS with diameter 95/85 mm). The accelerator test results are presented

  17. Test facility for the development of 150-keV, multi-megawatt neutral beam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughian, W.; Baker, W.R.; Biagi, L.A.; Hopkins, D.B.

    1975-11-01

    The next generation of CTR experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), will require neutral-beam injection systems that produce multi-megawatt, 120-keV deuterium-beam pulses of 0.5-second duration. Since present injection systems are operating in the 10- to 40-keV range, an intensive development effort is in progress to meet a 150-keV requirement. The vacuum system and power supplies that make up a test facility to be used in the development of these injectors are described

  18. Memory testing with Saturne synchrotron beams. Experiments with protons and deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buisson, J.

    1989-01-01

    For simulate light ions of the cosmic rays CEA will use facilities used in fundamental physic research. SATURNE is a synchrotron especially designed to accelerate light particles, for example protons with energy up to 2.9 GeV. Two experiments are made on SATURNE to specify the beam characteristics (energy and intensity) and to adapt the beam for irradiation of electronic components. During these preliminary experimentation memories and microprocessors was tested. The results of the tests (cross-section) are given in this paper [fr

  19. Beam tests of WPC-7 prototype of iwire pad chambers for the LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Bochin, B; Lazarev, V A; Saguidova, N; Spiridenkov, E M; Vorobev, A P; Vorobyov, A

    2000-01-01

    A new prototype of the Wire Pad Chamber for the LHCb Muon System, WPC-7, has been constructed at PNPI and tested in the T11 beam at CERN. This prototype proved to be more stable against the electrical discharges at high voltages thus extending the operational plateau of the chamber by 200V. This made it possible to operate with larger wire pad sizes up to 12x16cm2. This report presents the results from the beam tests of the WPC-7 prototype : time resolution and efficiency, cross-talk, noise counting rates, streamer probability measured at various high voltages and discriminator thresholds.

  20. Silicon induces minimal thromboinflammatory response during 28-day intravascular implant testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Melissa E.; Fissell, William H; Roy, Shuvo; Brown, David L

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are used to machine miniaturized implantable medical devices. Our group has used MEMS technology to develop hemofiltration membranes for use in renal replacement therapy which possess enhanced selectivity and permeability. The use of silicon in blood-contacting environments may be limited, however, due to contact activation of the coagulation cascade by silicon which form the surface oxides in atmospheric conditions. As well, reports of long-term biocompatibility of blood-contacting silicon devices are lacking. The aims of this pilot study were: 1) to develop a model for investigating the effects of intravascular implants and 2) to characterize the degree of thrombosis and tissue inflammation incited by prolonged implantation of silicon materials. Silicon implants with and without polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings were surgically implanted transluminally through rat femoral veins. Gore-Tex and stainless steel implants served as controls. Implants were left in vivo for four weeks. All femoral veins remained patent. Veins associated with silicon implants exhibited rare thrombi and occasional mild perivascular inflammation. In contrast, Gore-Tex and stainless steel controls caused moderate vein thrombosis and provoked a moderate to marked cellular infiltrate. Under scanning electron microscopy, bare silicon implants were found to have significant adherent microthrombi, while PEG-treated implants showed no evidence of thrombi. PEG-treated silicon appears to be biocompatible and holds potential as an excellent material with which to construct an implantable, miniaturized hemofiltration membrane. PMID:20431483

  1. The AMS-02 RICH Imager Prototype - In-Beam Tests with 20 GeV/c per Nucleon Ions -

    CERN Document Server

    Buenerd, M.; Aguilar Benitez, M.; Arruda, L.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Baret, B.; Belmont, E.; Berdugo, J.; Boudoul, G.; Borges, J.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Delgado, C.; Diaz, C.; Derome, L.; Eraud, L.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Giovacchini, F.; Goncalves, P.; Lanciotti, E.; Laurenti, G.; Malinine, A.; Mana, C.; Marin, J.; Martinez, G.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Palomares, C.; Pimenta, M.; Protasov, K.; Sanchez, E.; Seo, E-S.; Sevilla, I.; Torrento, A.; Vargas-Trevino, M.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of the AMS Cherenkov imager (RICH) has been tested at CERN by means of a low intensity 20 GeV/c per nucleon ion beam obtained by fragmentation of a primary beam of Pb ions. Data have been collected with a single beam setting, over the range of nuclear charges 2beam conditions and using different radiators. The charge Z and velocity beta resolutions have been measured.

  2. 4-Point beam tensile test on a soft adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzik, Michal K.; Jumel, Julien; Shanahan, Martin E.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An adhesive butt joint with a soft bondline of variable thickness has been studied. ► We found that bondline thickness affects the stress state in soft bondlines. ► Fracture energy at crack onset is lowest for the thinnest of bondlines and becomes stable for thicker layers. ► Maximum stress decreases with increasing bondline thickness. ► We found that for optimal joint design, rate effects must be taken into account. - Abstract: An adhesive butt joint with a soft bondline has been studied. A series of experiments was conducted on test pieces constituted of aluminium adherends bonded with a low modulus epoxy adhesive, Scotch Weld™ 2216. The joint was subjected to four point bending, in tension/compression loading, under constant deflection rate, with the bondline being parallel to the applied load. The objective was to examine and evaluate crack nucleation for a range of adhesive layer thicknesses. Three criteria were used to evaluate joint efficiency. Firstly, force/stress at crack onset revealed that thinner bondlines were preferable to produce stronger and stiffer bonded structures. Secondly, fracture energy was derived, which, in the present configuration, is associated with the energy stored within the adhesive layer, rather than the substrates. This is one of originalities of the test proposed. Fracture energy data lead to the conclusion, that more energy is dissipated by the joints with lower effective rigidity, viz. thicker bondlines. Finally, we applied a criterion of non-linear, ‘pragmatic’ work of adhesion – similar to the J-integral approach. In terms of energy consumption, the third criterion yielded (quasi) independence of the adhesive thickness. From the data collected, we conclude that for optimal joint design, rate effects must be carefully taken into account

  3. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, C.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Oller, J.C.; Willmott, C.; Amigo, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs

  4. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  5. Effect of test structure on electromigration characteristics in three-dimensional through silicon via stacked devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Yoshiyuki; De Messemaeker, Joke; Tyrovouzi, Anna Maria; Miyamori, Yuichi; De Vos, Joeri; Wang, Teng; Beyer, Gerald; Beyne, Eric; De Wolf, Ingrid; Croes, Kristof

    2015-05-01

    Electromigration failure locations in three-dimensional (3D) interconnect structures with high-aspect-ratio through silicon vias, (TSVs, Φ5 × 50 µm2) connected to 40-µm-pitch CuSn solder joints have been identified using test structures which were designed to avoid failures in the back-end-of-line (BEOL). The resistance of the structures with the TSV and bump connections showed a continuous increase until failure. For the structures without a bump connection, where only TSV and re-distributed line (RDL) were the electrically connected, the resistance remained constant prior to the final failure. From cross-sectional analyses after the test, the failure locations were identified at the TSV bottom or at the bump bottom. The location of void formation was changed by applied current direction. The flux divergence generated by the barrier metal and the reservoir effect plays a crucial role in the void formation, and each failure mode is considered to have a different impact on the reliability performance.

  6. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O' Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E parallel B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  8. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J. M.; Addy, T. N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O. K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H. P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S. A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P. O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T. F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A. I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A. I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Goettfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M. D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Haertel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P. D. C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C. G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K. F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K. W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S. V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S. M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; RØhne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L. P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J. E.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S. I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J. B.; Volpi, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H. H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2011-06-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of energy deposits in the calorimeter layers, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20GeV and 180GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by between 11% and 25% compared to the resolution at the electromagnetic scale.

  9. Assessment of mechanical properties of metallic thin-films through micro-beam testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Elizalde, M.R.; Martínez-Esnaola, J.M. [CEIT and TECNUN (University of Navarra), P. Manuel Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Hernandez, M.T.; Li, H.; Pantuso, D. [Design Technology Solutions, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro 97124, OR (United States); Ocaña, I., E-mail: iocana@ceit.es [CEIT and TECNUN (University of Navarra), P. Manuel Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2014-11-28

    Microelectronic industry is driven by the continuous miniaturization process conducing to the introduction of materials with better performance. These materials are subjected to stresses mainly due to thermal mismatch, microstructural changes or process integration which can be in the origin of mechanical reliability issues. To study these phenomena and even electromigration a good mechanical characterization of the materials is needed. This work aims at developing tests to assess fracture and elastoplastic behavior of thin Cu films. The tests developed are based on the deflection of microbeams (micromachined using a focused ion beam) using a nanoindenter. Different test geometries for microbeams have been evaluated and quantitative data have been obtained combining experimental results with analytical or numerical models, depending on the property under study. Microbeam response shows a strong dependence on the orientation of the grains close to the fixed end. Grain orientation has been measured by electron backscatter diffraction and the plastic behavior has been modeled by the finite element method using an in-house crystal plasticity subroutine. The effect of film thickness on fracture energy has been determined from tests of notched beams. - Highlights: • Cu microbeams have been machined with a focused ion beam and tested at a TriboIndenter. • Crystal plasticity has been accounted for when modeling constitutive behavior of Cu. • Fracture energy has been calculated using notched microcantilever beams. • Fracture energy decreases with film thickness.

  10. Single-Event Effect Testing of the Cree C4D40120D Commercial 1200V Silicon Carbide Schottky Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, J.-M.; Casey, M. C.; Wilcox, E. P.; Kim, Hak; Topper, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the single event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the commercial silicon carbide 1200V Schottky diode manufactured by Cree, Inc. Heavy-ion testing was conducted at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Single Event Effects Test Facility (TAMU). Its purpose was to evaluate this device as a candidate for use in the Solar-Electric Propulsion flight project.

  11. Particle Beam Tests of the Calorimetric Electron Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Tamura, Tadahisa

    The Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a new mission addressing outstanding astrophysics questions including the nature of dark matter, the sources of high-energy particles and photons, and the details of particle acceleration and transport in the galaxy by measuring the high-energy spectra of electrons, nuclei, and gamma-rays. It will launch on HTV-5 (H-II Transfer Vehicle 5) in 2014 for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module–Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station. The CALET collaboration is led by JAXA and includes researchers from Japan, the U.S. and Italy. The CALET Main Telescope uses a plastic scintillator charge detector followed by a 30 radiation-length (X0) deep particle calorimeter divided into a 3 X0 imaging calorimeter, with scintillating optical fibers interleaved with thin tungsten sheets, and a 27 X0 fully-active total-absorption calorimeter made of lead tungstate scintillators. CALET prototypes were tested at the CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Ph...

  12. Vertical cold test of the crab cavity with a co-axial beam pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Y.; Hara, K.; Hosoyama, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Nakai, H.; Inoue, M.; Ohkubo, K.

    2003-01-01

    A crab cavity was designed for the KEKB electron-positron collider-accelerator. The aim of this cavity is to deflect the beam bunch and realize the crab-crossing scheme. The cavity, operating in the TM110 mode, has a squashed cell with a co-axial beam pipe coupling scheme to extract the lowest order mode (TM010). Operating voltage should be high enough to deflect a beam bunch for a finite beam-crossing angle. For the R and D of this complicated structure, we have fabricated a prototype cavity and a simplified inner conductor for the co-axial beam pipe structure. We tested the RF performance of the cavity with the inner conductor in a vertical cryostat. During the tests, a serious Q-degradation was observed, which is so called Hydrogen Q-disease'. A calorimetric RF loss measurement showed that the loss at the inner conductor is a cause of the Q-degradation. We applied a quick cool-down procedure to the inner conductor and achieved a required deflecting voltage. (author)

  13. Heavy ion beams from an Alphatross source for use in calibration and testing of diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. J.; Brown, G. M.; Ho, D.; Stockler, B. F. O. F.; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Ion beams from the 1.7 MV Pelletron Accelerator at SUNY Geneseo have been used to test and calibrate many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) diagnostics and high energy density physics (HEDP) diagnostics used at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The ion source on this accelerator, a radio-frequency (RF) alkali-metal charge exchange source called an Alphatross, is designed to produce beams of hydrogen and helium isotopes. There is interest in accelerating beams of carbon, oxygen, argon, and other heavy ions for use in testing several diagnostics, including the Time Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup (TRTF). The feasibility of generating these heavy ion beams using the Alphatross source will be reported. Small amounts of various gases are mixed into the helium plasma in the ion source bottle. A velocity selector is used to allow the desired ions to pass into the accelerator. As the heavy ions pass through the stripper canal of the accelerator, they emerge in a variety of charge states. The energy of the ion beam at the high-energy end of the accelerator will vary as a function of the charge state, however the maximum energy deliverable to target is limited by the maximum achievable magnetic field produced by the accelerator's steering magnet. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Initial measurements of beam breakup instability in the advanced test accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Y.P.; Caporaso, G.T.; Struve, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of beam breakup (BBU) instability performed on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) up to the end of February 1984. The main objective was to produce a high current usable electron beam at the ATA output. A well-known instability is BBU which arises from the accelerator cavity modes interacting with the electron beam. The dominant mode is TM130 at a frequency of approximately 785 MHz. It couples most strongly to the beam motion and has been observed to grow in the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA), which has only eight accelerator cavities. ATA has one hundred and seventy cavities and therefore the growth of BBU is expected to be more severe. In this paper, BBU measurements are reported for ATA with beam currents of 4 to 7 kA. Analysis showed that the growth of the instability with propagation distance was as expected for the lower currents. However, the high current data showed an apparent higher growth rate than expected. An explanation for this anomaly is given in terms of a ''corkscrew'' excitation. The injector BBU noise level for a field emission brush cathode was found to be an order of magnitude lower than for a cold plasma discharge cathode. These injector rf amplitudes agree very well with values obtained using the method of differenced Btheta loops

  15. A neutral beam-line installation for testing injector systems in the long pulse, megawatt regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookes, C.E.; Coupland, J.R.; Green, T.S.; Hammond, D.P.; Hicks, J.B.; Hoskins, A.J.; Pedley, T.R.; West, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The existing Megawatt Beam Line assembly is being upgraded primarily in order to test prototype JET injector modules to the full rating of 80 Kv, 60 A for pulse durations up to 5 seconds. Two extra vacuum tanks are being installed, together with additional cryopumps to bring the total pumping speed to 4 x 10 5 l/s, and an inertial beam stop calorimeter capable of absorbing the full beam power is being manufactured. The auxiliary electrical supply system is being re-designed to match the proposed 'bucket' type plasma source; the new 144 Kw arc supply has a quasi constant power characteristic in order to reduce fluctuations in beam intensity, and the filament supply is designed to stabilise the source cathodes in the required emission limited mode. The high voltage supply has 120 Kv open circuit voltage for the full beam current and a commercial series tube system which will provide voltage stabilisation, tracking, and fast protection has been ordered from the Systems, Science and Software Company. The assembly and testing of all major components is planned to be completed by early 1981 in order to meet the expected delivery time of the first JET prototype injector. (author)

  16. Reception Test of Petals for the End Cap TEC+ of the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, R; Klein, Katja; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Adler, Volker; Adolphi, Roman; Ageron, Michel; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Atz, Bernd; Barvich, Tobias; Baulieu, Guillaume; Beaumont, Willem; Beissel, Franz; Bergauer, Thomas; Berst, Jean-Daniel; Blüm, Peter; Bock, E; Bogelsbacher, F; de Boer, Wim; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Bonnevaux, Alain; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouhali, Othmane; Braunschweig, Wolfgang; Brom, Jean-Marie; Butz, Erik; Chabanat, Eric; Chabert, Eric Christian; Clerbaux, Barbara; Contardo, Didier; De Callatay, Bernard; Dehm, Philip; Delaere, Christophe; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Dewulf, Jean-Paul; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Didierjean, Francois; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Dragicevic, Marko; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Esser, Hans; Estre, Nicolas; Fahrer, Manuel; Fernández, J; Florins, Benoit; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Flügge, Günter; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Freudenreich, Klaus; Frey, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Furgeri, Alexander; Giraud, Noël; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goorens, Robert; Graehling, Philippe; Grégoire, Ghislain; Gregoriev, E; Gross, Laurent; Hansel, S; Haroutunian, Roger; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Hermanns, Thomas; Heydhausen, Dirk; Heyninck, Jan; Hosselet, J; Hrubec, Josef; Jahn, Dieter; Juillot, Pierre; Kaminski, Jochen; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kaussen, Gordon; Keutgen, Thomas; Klanner, Robert; König, Stefan; Kosbow, M; Krammer, Manfred; Ledermann, Bernhard; Lemaître, Vincent; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Linn, Alexander; Lounis, Abdenour; Lübelsmeyer, Klaus; Lumb, Nicholas; Maazouzi, Chaker; Mahmoud, Tariq; Michotte, Daniel; Militaru, Otilia; Mirabito, Laurent; Müller, Thomas; Neukermans, Lionel; Ollivetto, C; Olzem, Jan; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Pandoulas, Demetrios; Pein, Uwe; Pernicka, Manfred; Perriès, Stephane; Piaseki, C; Pierschel, Gerhard; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Poettgens, Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Rouby, Xavier; Sabellek, Andreas; Schael, Stefan; Schirm, Norbert; Schleper, Peter; Schultz von Dratzig, Arndt; Siedling, Rolf; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stahl, Achim; Steck, Pia; Steinbruck, G; Stoye, Markus; Strub, Roger; Tavernier, Stefaan; Teyssier, Daniel; Theel, Andreas; Trocmé, Benjamin; Udo, Fred; Van der Donckt, M; Van der Velde, C; Van Hove, Pierre; Vanlaer, Pascal; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Staa, Rolf; Vanzetto, Sylvain; Weber, Markus; Weiler, Thomas; Weseler, Siegfried; Wickens, John; Wittmer, Bruno; Wlochal, Michael; De Wolf, Eddi A; Zhukov, Valery; Zoeller, Marc Henning

    2009-01-01

    The silicon strip tracker of the CMS experiment has been completed and was inserted into the CMS detector in late 2007. The largest sub system of the tracker are its end caps, comprising two large end caps (TEC) each containing 3200 silicon strip modules. To ease construction, the end caps feature a modular design: groups of about 20 silicon modules are placed on sub-assemblies called petals and these self-contained elements are then mounted onto the TEC support structures. Each end cap consists of 144 such petals, which were built and fully qualified by several institutes across Europe. From

  17. Recent Results from Beam Tests of 3D and Pad pCVD Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wallny, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Results from prototypes of a detector using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond with embedded resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond device are presented. A detector system consisting of 3D devices based on poly-crystalline CVD (pCVD) diamond was connected to a multi-channel readout and successfully tested in a 120 GeV/c proton beam at CERN proving for the first time the feasibility of the 3D detector concept in pCVD for particle tracking applications. We also present beam test results on the dependence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on poly-crystalline CVD diamond. The detectors were tested in a 260 MeV/c pion beam over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2 . The pulse height of the sensors was measured with pad readout electronics at a peaking time of 7 ns. Our data from the 2015 beam tests at PSI indicate that the pulse height of poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensor irradiated to 5×1014 neq/cm2 is independent of particle flux...

  18. Study of the ATLAS MDT spectrometer using high energy CERN combined test beam data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adorisio, C.; et al., [Unknown; Barisonzi, M.; Bobbink, G.; Boterenbrood, H.; Brouwer, G.; Groenstege, H.; Hart, R.; Konig, A.; Linde, F.; van der Graaf, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Werneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a combined system test was performed in the H8 beam line at the CERN SPS with a setup reproducing the geometry of sectors of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, formed by three stations of Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT). The full ATLAS analysis chain was used to obtain the results presented in this

  19. Facility for the testing of the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughian, J.M.

    1977-07-01

    The design of the prototype neutral beam injection system for TFTR is nearing completion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper describes some of the features of the facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory where this prototype will be assembled and tested.

  20. Portable test bench for the studies concerning ion sources and ion beam extraction and focusing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero Lopez, F.

    1961-01-01

    A portable test bench is described, which was designed to check ion sources, ion beam extraction and focusing systems before its use in a 600 KeV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator. The vacuum possibilities of the system are specially analyzed in connection with its particular use. The whole can be considered as a portable accelerator of low energy (50 keV). (Author)

  1. The beam test of muon detector parameters for the SHiP experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhacheva, V. L.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Mefodiev, A. V.; Mineev, O. V.; Khotyantsev, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    Scintillation detectors based on extruded plastics have been tested in a 10 GeV/c beam at CERN. The scintillation signal readout was provided using optical wavelength shifting fibers Y11 Kuraray and Hamamatsu MPPC micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The light yield was scanned along and across the detectors. Time resolution was found by fitting the MPPC digitized pulse rise and other methods.

  2. ALICE EMCal Reconstructable Energy Non-Linearity From Test Beam Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Thomas Michael

    2017-01-01

    Calorimeters play many important roles in modern high energy physics detectors, such as event selection, triggering, and precision energy measurements. EMCal, in the case of the ALICE experiment provides triggering on high energy jets, improves jet quenching study measurement bias and jet energy resolution, and improves electron and photon measurements [3]. With the EMCal detector in the ALICE experiment taking on so many important roles, it is important to fully understand, characterize and model its interactions with particles. In 2010 SPS and PS electron test beam measurements were performed on an EMCal mini-module [2]. Alongside this, the test beam setup and geometry was recreated in Geant4 by Nico [1]. Figure 1 shows the reconstructable energy linearity for the SPS test beam data and that obtained from the test beam monte carlo, indicating the amount of energy deposit as hits in the EMCal module. It can be seen that for energies above ∼ 100 GeV there is a significant drop in the reconstructableenergym...

  3. Facility for the testing of the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughian, J.M.

    1977-07-01

    The design of the prototype neutral beam injection system for TFTR is nearing completion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper describes some of the features of the facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory where this prototype will be assembled and tested

  4. Design and Application of a Beam Testing System for Experiential Learning in Mechanics of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R. Warsi; Rais-Rohani, M.

    2009-01-01

    Research shows that students can significantly improve their understanding and retention of topics presented in an engineering course when discussions of theoretical and mathematical approaches are combined with active-learning exercises involving hands-on physical experiments. In this paper, the design and application of a beam testing system…

  5. Beam property measurement of a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2016-09-01

    The KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator for industrial purposes. A RF ion source was operated at 200 MHz with its matching circuit. The beam profile and emittance were measured behind an accelerating column to confirm the beam property from the RF ion source. The beam profile was measured at the end of the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using a beam profile monitor (BPM) and wire scanner. An Allison-type emittance scanner was installed behind the beam profile monitor (BPM) to measure the beam density in phase space. The measurement results for the beam profile and emittance are presented in this paper.

  6. Evaluation of Asphalt Mixture Low-Temperature Performance in Bending Beam Creep Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Dawid; Jaskula, Piotr; Szydlowski, Cezary

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature cracking is one of the most common road pavement distress types in Poland. While bitumen performance can be evaluated in detail using bending beam rheometer (BBR) or dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) tests, none of the normalized test methods gives a comprehensive representation of low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures. This article presents the Bending Beam Creep test performed at temperatures from −20 °C to +10 °C in order to evaluate the low-temperature performance of asphalt mixtures. Both validation of the method and its utilization for the assessment of eight types of wearing courses commonly used in Poland were described. The performed test indicated that the source of bitumen and its production process (and not necessarily only bitumen penetration) had a significant impact on the low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures, comparable to the impact of binder modification (neat, polymer-modified, highly modified) and the aggregate skeleton used in the mixture (Stone Mastic Asphalt (SMA) vs. Asphalt Concrete (AC)). Obtained Bending Beam Creep test results were compared with the BBR bitumen test. Regression analysis confirmed that performing solely bitumen tests is insufficient for comprehensive low-temperature performance analysis. PMID:29320443

  7. Radiation Testing of a Low Voltage Silicone Nuclear Power Plant Cable.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White II, Gregory Von; Schroeder, John Lee.; Sawyer, Patricia Sue.; Wichhart, Derek; Mata, Guillermo Adrian; Zorrilla, Jorge; Bernstein, Robert

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the results generated in FY13 for cable insulation in support of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, in collaboration with the US-Argentine Binational Energy Working Group (BEWG). A silicone (SiR) cable, which was stored in benign conditions for %7E30 years, was obtained from Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) in Argentina with the approval of NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima). Physical property testing was performed on the as-received cable. This cable was artificially aged to assess behavior with additional analysis. SNL observed appreciable tensile elongation values for all cable insulations received, indicative of good mechanical performance. Of particular note, the work presented here provides correlations between measured tensile elongation and other physical properties that may be potentially leveraged as a form of condition monitoring (CM) for actual service cables. It is recognized at this point that the polymer aging community is still lacking the number and types of field returned materials that are desired, but Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) -- along with the help of others -- is continuing to work towards that goal. This work is an initial study that should be complimented with location-mapping of environmental conditions of Argentinean plant conditions (dose and temperature) as well as retrieval, analysis, and comparison with in- service cables.

  8. Radiation Testing of a Low Voltage Silicone Nuclear Power Plant Cable.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Robert

    2014-08-01

    This report summarizes the results generated in FY13 for cable insulation in support of DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, in collaboration with the US- Argentine Binational Energy Working Group (BEWG). A silicone (SiR) cable, which was stored in benign conditions for %7E30 years, was obtained from Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) in Argentina. Physical property testing was performed on the as-received cable. This cable was artificially aged to assess behavior with additional analysis. SNL observed appreciable tensile elongation values for all cable insulations received, indicative of good mechanical performance. Of particular note, the work presented here provides correlations between measured tensile elongation and other physical properties that may be potentially leveraged as a form of condition monitoring (CM) for actual service cables. It is recognized at this point that the polymer aging community is still lacking the number and types of field returned materials that are desired, but SNL -- along with the help of others -- is continuing to work towards that goal. This work is an initial study that should be complimented with location- mapping of environmental conditions of CNEA plant conditions (dose and temperature) as well as retrieval, analysis, and comparison with in-service cables.

  9. Porous silicon mass spectrometry as an alternative confirmatory assay for compliance testing of methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Taryn M; Neldner, Declan; Stockham, Peter; Kobus, Hilton; Della Vedova, Christopher B; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2017-05-01

    Porous silicon based surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (pSi SALDI-MS) is an analytical technique well suited for high throughput analysis of low molecular weight compounds from biological samples. A potential application of this technology is the compliance monitoring of opioid addiction programmes, where methadone is used as a pharmacological treatment for drugs such as heroin. Here, we present the detection and quantification of methadone and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) from water and clinical samples (saliva, urine, and plasma) from opioid dependent participants using pSi SALDI-MS. A one-step solvent phase extraction using chloroform was developed for the detection of methadone from clinical samples for analysis by pSi SALDI-MS. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used as a comparative technique for the quantification of methadone from clinical saliva and plasma samples. In all cases, we obtained a good correlation of pSi SALDI-MS and LC-MS results, suggesting that pSi SALDI-MS may be an alternative procedure for high-throughput screening and quantification for application in opioid compliance testing. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Silicon etch process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.J.; White, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A silicon etch process wherein an area of silicon crystal surface is passivated by radiation damage and non-planar structure produced by subsequent anisotropic etching. The surface may be passivated by exposure to an energetic particle flux - for example an ion beam from an arsenic, boron, phosphorus, silicon or hydrogen source, or an electron beam. Radiation damage may be used for pattern definition and/or as an etch stop. Ethylenediamine pyrocatechol or aqueous potassium hydroxide anisotropic etchants may be used. The radiation damage may be removed after etching by thermal annealing. (author)

  11. Adaptive silicon monochromators for high-power wigglers. Design, finite-element analysis and laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, J.P.; Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    Multipole wigglers in storage rings already produce X-ray power in the range up to a few kilowatts and planned devices at third-generation facilities promise up to 30 kW. Although the power density at the monochromator position is an order of magnitude lower than that from undulators, the thermal strain field in the beam footprint can still cause severe loss of performance in X-ray optical systems. For an optimized adaptive design, the results of finite-element analysis are compared with double-crystal rocking curves obtained with a laboratory X-ray source and, in a second paper, successful tests at wiggler sources at CHESS and ESRF and in an undulator source at HASYLAB are reported. (au) (19 refs.)

  12. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dierks, J.F. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by ion-beam deposition of 400 eV methane (CH{sub 4}) ions on several smooth and rough ceramics, as well as on ceramics coated with a layer of Si and Ti. Adhesion was measured by the pin-pull method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, but adhesion of DLC to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective because bonding between the DLC film and Ti was poor. The presence of surface roughness appeared to greatly increase the measured adhesion in all cases. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface. If the standard enthalpy of formation for reaction between CH{sub 4} and substrate is calculated assumpting a carbide or carbon phase is produced, a relation is seen between reaction enthalpy and relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. Lack of adhesion to Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for reaction with CH{sub 4} strongly positive and similar in magnitude to that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  13. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ. While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS. Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O^{5+} ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  14. Modelling of tests performed in order to evaluate the residual strength of corroded beams in the framework of the benchmark of the rance beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, A.; Vivier, M.

    2006-11-01

    The Benchmark of the Rance beams has been organised in order to evaluate the capabilities of various modelling tools, to predict the residual load carrying capacity of corroded beams. The Rance beams have been corroded in a marine environment for nearly 40years. Different types of prestressed beams, made of different types of cement, have been subjected to four points bending monotonous and cyclic tests as well as direct traction tests. The tests have been carried on up to failure, in order to evaluate the residual carrying capacity of the beams. Different teams have participated to the blind prediction of the tests results. In this framework, the CEA/DM2S/LM2S team has performed bidimensionnal modellings which are described in details in this paper. The various constitutive elements of the beams are represented : for concrete, the isotropic Mazars' damage model is used, in a non local version, for prestressing and passive steels, an elasto-plastic strain hardening model is adopted. The corrosion effects, taken into account for the longitudinal rebars, are derived on one hand from the measurements performed on the beams after the tests, and on the other hand from the literature. They consist mainly in a reduction of the rebars cross-section, as well as in their ductility. In principle, the properties of the bond between steel and rebars are also modified by the corrosion. Here, because of the unavailability of specific data on the smooth rebars of the Rance beams, the bond has been modelled by means of specific joint finite elements. The load carrying capacity has been calculated for the monotonous as well as the cyclic tests. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis has been performed, by considering variants where either the rebars are sane, or they have only reduced sections, with their original ductility. The results are compared to the experimental database, and discussed.

  15. Thermal shock testing of TiC-coated molybdenum with pulsed hydrogen beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    1985-07-01

    Thermal shock testing of molybdenum samples, on which TiC is coated by TP-CVD and CVD methods, has been made by using a pulsed hydrogen beam. The power density applied was 2 kw/cm 2 . The test results showed that TiC coatings did not exfoliate until the melting of the substrate and showed good adhesion under the thermal shock condition. (author)

  16. First joint test beam of CMS Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    Paolo Giacomelli

    2001-01-01

    The first full size muon drift tube chamber ever built for the CMS barrel with the final cell design (constructed at CIEMAT, Madrid) was succesfully tested with a muon beam in September 2001 at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN. For the first time also both muon detectors for the CMS barrel (DT + RPC) were coupled together. The results of this test were fully succesful and confirmed the excellent performance of both detectors together in a radiation environment.

  17. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  18. Development of a Beam-based Phase Feedforward Demonstration at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083344; Christian, Glenn

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposal for a future linear electron--positron collider that could achieve collision energies of up to 3~TeV. In the CLIC concept the main high energy beam is accelerated using RF power extracted from a high intensity drive beam, achieving an accelerating gradient of 100~MV/m. This scheme places strict tolerances on the drive beam phase stability, which must be better than $0.2^\\circ$ at 12~GHz. To achieve the required phase stability CLIC proposes a high bandwidth (${>}17.5$~MHz), low latency drive beam ``phase feedforward'' (PFF) system. In this system electromagnetic kickers, powered by 500~kW amplifiers, are installed in a chicane and used to correct the phase by deflecting the beam on to longer or shorter trajectories. A prototype PFF system has been installed at the CLIC Test Facility, CTF3; the design, operation and commissioning of which is the focus of this work. Two kickers have been installed in the pre-existing chicane in the TL2 transfer line at CTF3 for t...

  19. Ion beam nanopatterning and micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis on HOPG for testing FIB performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archanjo, B.S., E-mail: bsarchanjo@inmetro.gov.br [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Maciel, I.O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, MG 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Martins Ferreira, E.H.; Peripolli, S.B.; Damasceno, J.C. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Achete, C.A. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais (PEMM), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Jorio, A. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, MG 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    This work reports Ga{sup +} focused ion beam nanopatterning to create amorphous defects with periodic square arrays in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and the use of Raman spectroscopy as a new protocol to test and compare progresses in ion beam optics, for low fluence bombardment or fast writing speed. This can be ultimately used as a metrological tool for comparing different FIB machines and can contribute to Focused Ion Beam (FIB) development in general for tailoring nanostructures with higher precision. In order to do that, the amount of ion at each spot was varied from about 10{sup 6} down to roughly 1 ion per dot. These defects were also analyzed by using high resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The sensitivities of these techniques were compared and a geometrical model is proposed for micro-Raman spectroscopy in which the intensity of the defect induced D band, for a fixed ion dose, is associated with the diameter of the ion beam. In addition, the lateral increase in the bombarded spot due to the cascade effect of the ions on graphite surface was extracted from this model. A semi-quantitative analysis of the distribution of ions at low doses per dot or high writing speed for soft modification of materials is discussed. -- Highlights: {yields} Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface is bombarded using a focused ion beam. {yields} Raman spectroscopy is used to propose a new protocol to test focused ion beam optics. {yields} Scattering diameter of the ions on HOPG surface is experimentally obtained. {yields} Optical limitations of the ion column in fast writing speed are discussed. {yields} Small level of modifications is considered for changing graphene conductive properties.

  20. Silicone Molding and Lifetime Testing of Peripheral Nerve Interfaces for Neuroprostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupte, Kimaya [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Tolosa, Vanessa [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Micro- and Nanotechnology

    2016-08-10

    Implantable peripheral nerve cuffs have a large application in neuroprostheses as they can be used to restore sensation to those with upper limb amputations. Modern day prosthetics, while lessening the pain associated with phantom limb syndrome, have limited fine motor control and do not provide sensory feedback to patients. Sensory feedback with prosthetics requires communication between the nervous system and limbs, and is still a challenge to accomplish with amputees. Establishing this communication between the peripheral nerves in the arm and artificial limbs is vital as prosthetics research aims to provide sensory feedback to amputees. Peripheral nerve cuffs restore sensation by electrically stimulating certain parts of the nerve in order to create feeling in the hand. Cuff electrodes have an advantage over standard electrodes as they have high selective stimulation by bringing the electrical interface close to the neural tissue in order to selectively activate targeted regions of a peripheral nerve. In order to further improve the selective stimulation of these nerve cuffs, there is need for finer spatial resolution among electrodes. One method to achieve a higher spatial resolution is to increase the electrode density on the cuff itself. Microfabrication techniques can be used to achieve this higher electrode density. Using L-Edit, a layout editor, microfabricated peripheral nerve cuffs were designed with a higher electrode density than the current model. This increase in electrode density translates to an increase in spatial resolution by at least one order of magnitude. Microfabricated devices also have two separate components that are necessary to understand before implantation: lifetime of the device and assembly to prevent nerve damage. Silicone molding procedures were optimized so that devices do not damage nerves in vivo, and lifetime testing was performed on test microfabricated devices to determine their lifetime in vivo. Future work of this project

  1. Commissioning and Performance of the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    van Tilburg, J; Buechler, A; Bursche , A; Chiapolini, N; Elsaesser, C; Hangartner, V; Salzmann, C; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Staumann, U; Tobin, M; Vollhardt, A; Bay, A; Bettler, M O; Blanc, F; Bressieux, J; Conti, G; Fave, V; Frei, R; Gauvin, N; Gonzalez, R; Haefeli, G; Hicheur, A; Keune, A; Luisier, J; Muresan, R; Nakada, T; Needham, M; Nicolas, L; Knecht, M; Perrin, A; Potterat, C; Schneider, O; Tran, M; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Bauer, C; Britsch, M; Hofmann, W; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Adeva, B; Esperante, D; Fungueiriño Pazos, J; Gallas, A; Pazos-Alvarez, A; Pérez-Trigo, E; Pló Casasús, M; Rogríguez Pérez, P; Saborido, J; Vázquez, P; Iakovenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb Silicon Tracker is a silicon micro-strip detector with a sensitive area of 12 m$^2$ and a total of 272k readout channels. The Silicon Tracker consists of two parts that use different detector modules. The detector installation was completed by early summer 2008 and the commissioning without beam has reached its finals stage, successfully overcoming most of the encountered problems. Currently, the detector has more than 99% of the channels fully functioning. Commissioning with particles has started using beam-induced events from the LHC injection tests in 2008 and 2009. These events allowed initial studies of the detector performance. Especially, the detector modules could be aligned with an accuracy of about 20 $\\mu$m. Furthermore, with the first beam collisions that took place end of 2009 we could further study the performance and improve the alignment of the detector.

  2. ROOT Analysis of 2004 H8 Test Beam Data & Studies of MDT Sense Wire Displacements

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Tests are being carried out at the CERN H8 Test Facility on the subdetectors of ATLAS. Using MUTRAK, a tool developed by Dan Levin, data from test muon beam runs are converted to PAW plots and ntuples for easy analysis. ROOT classes are currently being developed to convert the PAW output of MUTRAK to ROOT files for more detailed analysis. Also studies are currently underway to understand the effect of sense wire displacements in Monitored Drift Tubes on drift time spectra. Concurrent tests using simulations in GARFIELD and Cosmic Ray MDT experiments are underway to study wire sags which may be up to 480 micrometers due to gravitational and electrostatic forces .

  3. Characterization and integrity testing of flexible film materials utilizing a unique corona beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Gregory J.

    2005-11-01

    The characterization, porosity, permeability and integrity of conductive and non-conductive medical and consumer flexible barrier packaging material are determined utilizing a novel electron beam technology and electronic instrumentation in an open atmosphere for 100% real-time, on-line testing. The electron beam developed in an open atmosphere maintains its prescribed frequency through the use of a nitrogen cover gas, ionizing the gas to create a corona beam. The corona beam discharge, maintained at a high negative voltage, forms from the holes or anomalies in the flexible barrier material. The anomaly is detected and analyzed in order to determine the presence of viral and sub-viral sized voids or holes, as well as other anomalies such as blisters and bubbles. The process can also utilize an established range of acceptability to certify materials that require a well defined level of permeability. This process can be performed by the flexible barrier film manufacturer to certify a specific quality level. It can be performed by the material fabricator to ensure quality standards for preformed materials. It can also be performed by the product packaging manufacturer that uses the packaging material to wrap their products and confirm the integrity of the final sealed package by measuring the atmosphere inside the finished package. There are many other packaging applications that can utilize this technology for film characterization, validation and integrity testing within the pharmaceutical, medical device, and food processing industries, as well as other industrial applications.

  4. FIRST BEAM TESTS OF THE APS MBA UPGRADE ORBIT FEEDBACK CONTROLLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sereno, N. S.; Arnold, N.; Brill, A.; Bui, H.; Carwardine, J.; Decker, G.; Deriy, B.; Emery, L.; Farnsworth, R.; Fors, T.; Keane, R.; Lenkszus, F.; Lill, R.; Paskvan, D.; Pietryla, A.; Shang, H.; Shoaf, S.; Veseli, S.; Wang, J.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.X.

    2017-03-25

    The new orbit feedback system required for the APS multi-bend acromat (MBA) ring must meet challenging beam stability requirements. The AC stability requirement is to correct rms beam motion to 10 % the rms beam size at the insertion device source points from 0.01 to 1000 Hz. The vertical plane represents the biggest challenge for AC stability which is required to be 400 nm rms for a 4 micron vertical beam size. In addition long term drift over a period of 7 days is required to be 1 micron or less at insertion de- vice BPMs and 2 microns for arc bpms. We present test re- sults of theMBA prototype orbit feedback controller (FBC) in the APS storage ring. In this test, four insertion device BPMs were configured to send data to the FBC for process- ing into four fast corrector setpoints. The configuration of four bpms and four fast correctors creates a 4-bump and the configuration of fast correctors is similar to what will be implemented in the MBA ring. We report on performance benefits of increasing the sampling rate by a factor of 15 to 22.6 kHz over the existing APS orbit feedback system, lim- itations due to existing storage ring hardware and extrapo- lation to theMBA orbit feedback design. FBC architecture, signal flow and processing design will also be discussed.

  5. Compact Undulator for the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source: Design and Beam Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temnykh, A; Dale, D; Fontes, E; Li, Y; Lyndaker, A; Revesz, P; Rice, D; Woll, A

    2013-01-01

    We developed, built and beam tested a novel, compact, in-vacuum undulator magnet based on an adjustable phase (AP) scheme. The undulator is 1 m long with a 5mm gap. It has a pure permanent magnet structure with 24.4mm period and 1.1 Tesla maximum peak field. The device consists of two planar magnet arrays mounted on rails inside of a rectangular box-like frame with 156 mm × 146 mm dimensions. The undulator magnet is enclosed in a 273 mm (10.75 ) diameter cylindrical vacuum vessel with a driver mechanism placed outside. In May 2012 the CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) was installed in Cornell Electron Storage Ring and beam tested. During four weeks of dedicated run we evaluated undulator radiation properties as well as magnetic, mechanical and vacuum properties of the undulator magnet. We also studied the effect of the CCU on storage ring beam. The spectral characteristics and intensity of radiation were found to be in very good agreement with expected. The magnet demonstrated reproducibility of undulator parameter K at 1.4 × 10 −4 level. It was also found that the undulator K. parameter change does not affect electron beam orbit and betatron tunes.

  6. A fast atomic oxygen beam facility with in situ testing/analysis capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, H.; Ikeda, J.; Tagawa, M.; Umeno, M.; Ohmae, N.

    1998-06-01

    A fast atomic oxygen beam facility consisting of a beam source, a mass spectrometer, an Auger electron spectroscope, a scanning tunneling microscope, and a friction tester has been developed to investigate interaction of energetic atomic oxygen with solid surfaces. The fast atomic oxygen beam has been characterized by time of flight distribution, quadrupole mass spectrometry, and quartz crystal microbalance. The time of flight distribution of the beam has shown that the average translational energy of the atomic oxygen beam reaches 4.7 eV and that the full width at half-maximum is 5.5 eV. A flux of the atomic oxygen is calculated from the frequency shift of the quartz crystal microbalance with silver electrodes, and typical flux of the atomic oxygen beam being 4.0×1012atoms/cm2 s. The flux of atomic oxygen of this source is fairly low, but is corresponding to that in the altitude of 500 km in low Earth orbit. The surface sensitive analysis methods equipped with the facility, such as Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, have provided changes in the surface composition and morphology caused by the atomic oxygen exposure, without receiving any effect of ambient air. The ultrahigh vacuum friction tester especially designed for this facility is used to measure tribological properties of solid lubricants under the atomic oxygen exposures. Such in situ testing capability of this facility enables fundamental research for understanding the reaction scheme of atomic oxygen as well as engineering-oriented research for obtaining high reliability of the space systems.

  7. Investigation of microstructure and morphology for the Ge on porous silicon/Si substrate hetero-structure obtained by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouder, S. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France); Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Mahamdi, R. [Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Aouassa, M.; Escoubas, S.; Favre, L.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France)

    2014-01-01

    Thick porous silicon (PS) buffer layers are used as sacrificial layers to epitaxially grow planar and fully relaxed Ge membranes. The single crystal Ge layers have been deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on PS substrate. During deposition, the pore network of PS layers has been filled with Ge. We investigate the structure and morphology of PS as fabricated and after annealing at various temperatures. We show that the PS crystalline lattice is distorted and expanded in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane due to the presence of chemisorbed –OH. An annealing at high temperature (> 500 °C), greatly changes the PS morphology and structure. This change is marked by an increase of the pore diameter while the lattice parameter becomes tensily strained in the plane (compressed in the direction perpendicular). The morphology and structure of Ge layers are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy as a function of the deposition temperature and deposited thickness. The results show that the surface roughness, level of relaxation and Si-Ge intermixing (Ge content) depend on the growth temperature and deposited thickness. Two sub-layers are distinguished: the layer incorporated inside the PS pores (high level of intermixing) and the layer on top of the PS surface (low level of intermixing). When deposited at temperature > 500 °C, the Ge layers are fully relaxed with a top Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} layer x = 0.74 and a very flat surface. Such layer can serve as fully relaxed ultra-thin SiGe pseudo-substrate with high Ge content. The epitaxy of Ge on sacrificial soft PS pseudo-substrate in the experimental conditions described here provides an easy way to fabricate fully relaxed SiGe pseudo-substrates. Moreover, Ge thin films epitaxially deposited by MBE on PS could be used as relaxed pseudo-substrate in conventional microelectronic technology. - Highlights: • We have developed a rapid

  8. End-to-end tests using alanine dosimetry in scanned proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, A.; Gouldstone, C.; Kragl, G.; Traneus, E.; Marrale, M.; Vatnitsky, S.; Stock, M.; Palmans, H.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes end-to-end test procedures as the last fundamental step of medical commissioning before starting clinical operation of the MedAustron synchrotron-based pencil beam scanning (PBS) therapy facility with protons. One in-house homogeneous phantom and two anthropomorphic heterogeneous (head and pelvis) phantoms were used for end-to-end tests at MedAustron. The phantoms were equipped with alanine detectors, radiochromic films and ionization chambers. The correction for the ‘quenching’ effect of alanine pellets was implemented in the Monte Carlo platform of the evaluation version of RayStation TPS. During the end-to-end tests, the phantoms were transferred through the workflow like real patients to simulate the entire clinical workflow: immobilization, imaging, treatment planning and dose delivery. Different clinical scenarios of increasing complexity were simulated: delivery of a single beam, two oblique beams without and with range shifter. In addition to the dose comparison in the plastic phantoms the dose obtained from alanine pellet readings was compared with the dose determined with the Farmer ionization chamber in water. A consistent systematic deviation of about 2% was found between alanine dosimetry and the ionization chamber dosimetry in water and plastic materials. Acceptable agreement of planned and delivered doses was observed together with consistent and reproducible results of the end-to-end testing performed with different dosimetric techniques (alanine detectors, ionization chambers and EBT3 radiochromic films). The results confirmed the adequate implementation and integration of the new PBS technology at MedAustron. This work demonstrates that alanine pellets are suitable detectors for end-to-end tests in proton beam therapy and the developed procedures with customized anthropomorphic phantoms can be used to support implementation of PBS technology in clinical practice.

  9. An evaluation of the sandwich beam compression test method for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The sandwich beam in a four-point bending compressive test method for advanced composites is evaluated. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio were obtained for graphite/polyimide beam specimens tested at 117 K, room temperature, and 589 K. Tensile elastic properties obtained from the specimens were assumed to be equal to the compressive elastic properties and were used in the analysis. Strain gages were used to record strain data. A three-dimensional finite-element model was used to examine the effects of the honeycomb core on measured composite mechanical properties. Results of the analysis led to the following conclusions: (1) a near uniaxial compressive stress state existed in the top cover and essentially all the compressive load was carried by the top cover; (2) laminate orientation, test temperature, and type of honeycomb core material were shown to affect the type of beam failure; and (3) the test method can be used to obtain compressive elastic constants over the temperature range 117 to 589 K.

  10. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Krása, Josef; Giuffrida, L.; Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Velyhan, Andriy; Prokůpek, Jan; Láska, Leoš; Mocek, Tomáš; Ullschmied, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 10 (2011), "103302-1"-"103302-8" ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1165; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : aluminium * chemical sensors * diamond * electrostatics * iodine * ion beams * thin films * lasers * time of flight spectrometers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2011 http://jap.aip.org/ resource /1/japiau/v109/i10/p103302_s1

  11. Philips high tension generator (x-ray machine) testing for baby ebm (electron beam machine) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman Awalludin; Leo Kwee Wah; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the test of the HT system (from X-ray machine) for usage of the mini EBM (Electron Beam Machine). It consists the procedures of the installation, the safety procedures when deals with HT, modification of the system for testing purpose and the technique/method for testing the HT system. As a result, the voltage for the HT system and the electron gun (filament) current can be measured. Based on the results, suitability of the machine for baby EBM could be confirmed. (Author)

  12. Effect of deposition distance on thickness and microstructure of silicon thin film produced by electron beam evaporation; Efeito da distancia de deposicao na espessura e microestrutura de filme fino obtido por evaporacao por feixe de eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, T.F.; Ramanery, F.P.; Branco, J.R.T. [Fundacao Centro Tecnologico de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: thalitaqui@yahoo.com.br; Cunha, M.A. [Acos Especiais Itabira S.A. (Acesita), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The interest for materials with new characteristics and properties made thin films an area of highest research interest. Silicon thin films have been widely used in solar cells, being the main active layer. In this work, the effect of deposition distance on thickness and microstructure of silicon films was investigated. The electron beam evaporation technique with argon plasma assistance was used to obtain films on stainless steel 304, Fe-Si alloy and soda lime glass. The experiments were made varying electron beam current and deposition pressure. The results are discussed based on Hertz-Knudsen's law and thin films microstructure evolution models. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and profilometer. (author)

  13. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Himanshu, E-mail: htyagi@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Soni, Jignesh [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  14. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Himanshu; Soni, Jignesh; Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli; Gahlaut, Agrajit; Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak; Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  15. The two-dimensional Gaussian beam synthetic method: Testing and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, R.; Aki, K.

    1984-09-01

    The Gaussian beam method of Červený et al. (1982) is an asymptotic method for the computation of wave fields in inhomogeneous media. The method consists of tracing rays and then solving the wave equation in "ray-centered coordinates." The parabolic approximation is applied to find the asymptotic local solution in the neighborhod of each ray. The approximate global solution for a given source is then constructed by a superposition of Gaussian beams along nearby rays. The Gaussian beam method is tested in a two-dimensional inhomogeneous medium using two approaches. One is the application of the reciprocal theorem for Green's functions in an arbitrarily heterogeneous medium. The discrepancy between synthetic seismograms for reciprocal cases is considered as a measure of the error. The other approach is to apply Gaussian beam synthesis to cases for which solutions are known by other approximate methods. This includes the soft basin problem that has been studied by finite difference, finite element, discrete wavenumber, and glorified optics. We found that the results of these tests were in general satisfactory. We have used the Gaussian beam method for two applications. First, the method is used to study volcanic earthquakes at Mount Saint Helens. The observed large differences in amplitude and arrival time between a station inside the crater and stations on the flanks can be explained by the combined effects of an anomalous velocity structure and a shallow focal depth. The method is also applied to scattering of teleseismic P waves by a lithosphere with randomly fluctuating velocities.

  16. The Possibility of jet Modelling at the CMS Test Beam Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Abramov, Victor

    1997-01-01

    The problem of a jet modelling at the CMS test beam experiments has been studied using GEANT 3.21 package. A simple experimental set-up consisting of an active target and a hodoscope in the forward hemisphere is proposed to separate spectator jets from single particles which passed the target without interaction. The rejection factor of proposed algorithm for single particles is better then 1000 in the energy range from 10 to 1000 GeV. Efficiency of jet detection in the same energy range is about 70% or better. The proposed algorithm of jet selection allows one to study response of calorimeters and other detectors on jets and single particles using existing test beams.

  17. Functional and Linearity test system for the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring data acquisition card

    CERN Document Server

    Emery, Jonathan; Effinger, E; Leitner, R; Zamantzas, C

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of the design and development of the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a flexible test system has been developed to qualify and verify during design and production the BLM LHC data acquisition card. It permits to test completely the functionalities of the board as well as realizing analog input signal generation to the acquisition card. The system utilize two optical receivers, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), eights flexible current sources and a Universal Serial Bus (USB) to link it to a PC where a software written in LabWindows/CVI© (National Instruments) runs. It includes an important part of the measurement processing developed for the BLM in the future LHC accelerator. It is called Beam Loss Electronic Current to Frequency Tester (BLECFT).

  18. Study of the vertex trigger performance on test-beam data

    CERN Document Server

    Teubert, F

    1999-01-01

    99-030 The performance of the Level-1 vertex trigger algorithm on test-beam data collected with a prototype of the VDET detector is presented. The effect of the detectors misalignment on the Level-1 vertex trigger performance is shown to be a critical issue if the relative position is not controlled better than $100~\\mu$m. The Primary vertex resolution on the longitudinal direction obtained on the test-beam for 2D-tracks ($270~\\mu$m), translates into a resolution close to $80~\\mu$m for the statistics of an LHC event in good agreement with expectations. The discriminating power between B-events and Minimum Bias events is studied using a sample of ``artificial'' events built from events interacting at different targets separated by 1~cm. The results are very encouraging showing the feasibility to trigger on low multiplicity displaced vertices.

  19. Combined performance studies for electrons at the 2004 ATLAS combined test-beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J. M.; Addy, T. N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O. K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H. P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S. A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P. O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T. F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A. I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A. I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Goettfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M. D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Haertel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P. D. C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C. G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K. F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K. W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S. V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S. M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; RØhne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L. P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J. E.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S. I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J. B.; Volpi, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H. H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2010-11-01

    In 2004 at the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) combined test beam, one slice of the ATLAS barrel detector (including an Inner Detector set-up and the Liquid Argon calorimeter) was exposed to particles from the H8 SPS beam line at CERN. It was the first occasion to test the combined electron performance of ATLAS. This paper presents results obtained for the momentum measurement p with the Inner Detector and for the performance of the electron measurement with the LAr calorimeter (energy E linearity and resolution) in the presence of a magnetic field in the Inner Detector for momenta ranging from 20 GeV/c to 100 GeV/c. Furthermore the particle identification capabilities of the Transition Radiation Tracker, Bremsstrahlungs-recovery algorithms relying on the LAr calorimeter and results obtained for the E/p ratio and a way how to extract scale parameters will be discussed.

  20. Quality assurance tests of the CBM silicon tracking system sensors with an infrared laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teklishyn, Maksym [FAIR GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); KINR, Kyiv (Ukraine); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Double-sided 300 μm thick silicon microstrip sensors are planned to be used in the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the future CBM experiment. Different tools, including an infrared laser, are used to induce charge in the sensor medium to study the sensor response. We use present installation to develop a procedure for the sensor quality assurance during mass production. The precise positioning of the laser spot allows to make a clear judgment about the sensor interstrip gap response which provides information about the charge distribution inside the sensor medium. Results are compared with the model estimations.