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Sample records for test beam coordination

  1. Test Beam Coordination: 2003 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Girolamo, B.

    The 2003 Test Beam Period The 2003 Test Beam period has been very fruitful for ATLAS. In spite of several days lost because of the accelerator problems, ATLAS has been able to achieve many results: FCAL has completed the calibration program in H6 Tilecal has completed the calibration program in H8 Pixel has performed extensive studies with normal and high intensity beams (up to 1.4*108 hadrons/spill) SCT has completed a variety of studies with quite a high number of modules operated concurrently TRT has performed several studies at high, low and very low energy (first use of the new H8 beam in the range 1 to 9 GeV) Muons (MDT,RPC and TGC) have been operating a large setup for about 5 months. The almost final MDT ROD (MROD) has been integrated in the readout and the final trigger electronics for TGC and RPC has been tested and certified with normal beam and during dedicated 40 MHz beam periods. The TDAQ has exploited a new generation prototype successfully and the new Event Filter infrastructure f...

  2. TEST BEAM COORDINATION: Major upgrade of the ATLAS Test Beam network infrastructure

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Girolamo, B; Pasqualucci, E

    Based on the positive experience gained last year by the Muon group with the adoption of a completely isolated private network for the data acquisition, already last year for the 2002 Combined Pixel-Tilecal-Muon Test Beam, we adopted the private network solution. The main advantage of the isolation from the common CERN network infrastructure is the complete independence from possible problems that could affect the network in the area, intended to serve many other users, and the possibility to have a completely independent management of the IP addresses assignment. Moreover the presence of a firewall in the private network allows a better protection against possible external hackers, allowing users to transparently access the external word. A Fast Ethernet network has been set up as a control network. It relies on a backbone 24-port Fast Ethernet switch on which, in a tree structure, are connected several smaller switches dedicated to each sub-detector. In this way each sub-detector produces its own traffic...

  3. TEST BEAM COORDINATION: The 2004 Test Beam Calorimetry set-up in H8

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M; Di Girolamo, B; Ferrari, C; Giugni, D; Santoni, C; Wingerter, I

    A new table has been designed, built and finally mounted to position the LAr cryostat in front of the Tilecal modules. The new table has been connected to the existing Tilecal table to be able to move the full set-up along eta values between 0 and 1.2. The table has been conceived by D. Giugni (INFN Milano and now CERN PH) and modeled by G. Braga (INFN Milano) in spring-summer 2003. The realization of the table has been done by an Italian firm (MatecImpianti, Fenegrò, Como) under the supervision of S. Coelli (INFN Milano) starting August 2003. Figure 1 shows the table assembled at the firm (left). Figure 1: The Tilecal-LAr table: in Fenegro (left) and at CERN (right). In November 2003 the table has been delivered to CERN and put in temporary storage to be assembled after the preparation of the Tilecal zone. In February 2004 two technicians from the firm and the team of technician coordinated by C. Ferrari (CERN AB/ATB), assembled, tested and commissioned the table under the supervision of S. Coelli...

  4. TESTBEAM COORDINATION: 2nd ATLAS H8 Combined Test Beam Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B

    The second ATLAS H8 Combined Test Beam Workshop took place at CERN on 24th and 25th November. After a first workshop in July to warm up the atmosphere, a lot of work has been done in the meantime and there was a clear need to get together again before the end of 2003. The morning of the first day has been devoted to an assessment of the status of the various elements needed for next year’s test beam in H8. Each sub-detector has been presenting the status of preparation, as well as the work in progress and still to be done. The picture has been completed with the first plans for the DAQ from the point of view of the sub-detectors requirements, and a status of the LVL1 elements. Finally, the status and the timescale for availability of the LVL2 and EF infrastructure have been presented. The final draft layout of the sub-detectors has been discussed (figures 1 and 2). A more detailed description of the layout is in preparation to include more information on dead material and on the ancillary detectors (scint...

  5. Dynamic correction of the laser beam coordinate in fabrication of large-sized diffractive elements for testing aspherical mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimansky, R. V.; Poleshchuk, A. G.; Korolkov, V. P.; Cherkashin, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a method of improving the accuracy of a circular laser system in fabrication of large-diameter diffractive optical elements by means of a polar coordinate system and the results of their use. An algorithm for correcting positioning errors of a circular laser writing system developed at the Institute of Automation and Electrometry, SB RAS, is proposed and tested. Highprecision synthesized holograms fabricated by this method and the results of using these elements for testing the 6.5 m diameter aspheric mirror of the James Webb space telescope (JWST) are described..

  6. Test beam studies of the light yield, time and coordinate resolutions of scintillator strips with WLS fibers and SiPM readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Dmitri [Fermilab, Batavia IL (United States); Evdokimov, Valery [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Lukić, Strahinja; Ujić, Predrag [Vinča Institute, University of Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-03-11

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for large muon detection systems were tested in the muon beam of the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. Light yield of up to 137 photoelectrons per muon per strip has been observed , as well as time resolution of 330 ps and position resolution along the strip of 5.4 cm.

  7. Final focus test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  8. GTK beam test 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Vostinic, Snezana

    2017-01-01

    The GTK is in operation at NA62 since 2014 and is among the few silicon pixel detectors performing 4D tracking. This summer, a beam test was conducted to study the phenomena determining the detector time resolution. The project described here contributed to the beam test preparation, data taking and data analyses. One of the main goals of the test was to understand the weight field contribution to the detector time resolution. This field is distorting the signal pulse shape at the edge of the pixel. Hence, to study this effect, the position of the hits inside the pixel has to be determined. An external telescope was therefore used for this purpose.

  9. Beam-Based Alignment in CTF3 Test Beam Line

    OpenAIRE

    Sterbini, G; Dӧbert, S; Marín, E.; Lillestol, RL; Schulte, D.; Adli, E.

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC linear collider is based on the two beams acceleration scheme. During acceleration of the colliding beams, the drive beam suffers a large build up on its energy spread. In order to efficiently transport such a beam, beam-based alignment techniques together with tight prealignment tolerances are crucial. To evaluate the performance of these steering algorithms, a beam-based steering campaign has been conducted at the Test Beam Line of the CLIC Test Facility. In the following we presen...

  10. Test Beams and Polarized Fixed Target Beams at the NLC

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Lewis; Pitthan, Rainer; Rokni, Sayed; Thompson, Kathleen; Kolomenski, Yury

    2001-01-01

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics runni...

  11. Note on the use of localized beam models for light scattering theories in spherical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajie; Gouesbet, Gèrard

    2012-06-10

    Localized beam models provide the most efficient and enlightening ways to evaluate beam shape coefficients of electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beams for use in light scattering theories. At the present time, they are valid in spherical and (circular and elliptical) cylindrical coordinates. A misuse of localized beam models in spherical coordinates recently appeared several times in the literature. We therefore present a warning to avoid the propagation of an incorrect use of localized beam models.

  12. Test-beam with Python

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The talk will show the current implementation of the software tool developed by Silab (Bonn) and Oxford University to analyze test beam data with Mimosa telescope. Data collected from the telescope are merged with hits recorded on pixel detectors with a FE-I4 chips, the official read-out chip of the Atlas Pixel Detector. The software tool used to collect data, pyBAR, is developed with Python as well. The test-beam analysis tool parses the data-sets, recreates the tracks, aligns the telescope planes and allows to investigate the detectors spatial properties with high resolution. This has just allowed to study the properties of brand new devices that stand as possible candidate to replace the current pixel detector in Atlas.

  13. The 2002 Test Beam DAQ

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L.

    The ATLAS Tilecal group has been the first user of the Test Beam version of the DAQ/EF-1 prototype in 2000. The prototype was successfully tested in lab in summer 1999 and it has been officially adopted as baseline solution for the Test Beam DAQ at the end of 1999. It provides the right solution for users who need to have a modern data acquisition chain for final or almost final front-end and off-detector electronics (RODs and ROD emulators). The typical architecture for the readout and the DAQ is sketched in the figure below. A number of detector crates can send data over the Read Out Link to the Read Out System. The Read Out System sends data over an Ethernet link to a SubFarm PC that provides to send the data to Central Data Recording. In 2001 also the Muon MDT group has adopted this modern DAQ where for the first time a PC-based ReadOut System has been used, instead of the VME based implementation used in 2000, and for the Tilecal DAQ in 2001. In 2002 also Tilecal has adopted the PC-based implement...

  14. The 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    The ATLAS CTB Team, .

    2004-01-01

    In the year 2004, ATLAS has been involved in a huge combined test beam (CTB) effort in H8. A complete slice of the barrel detector and of the Muon End-cap has been tested, with the following clear goals: pre-commission the final elements and study the detector performance in a realistic combined data taking. Thanks to this experience, a lot of expertise in the operations has been acquired and much data (~ 4.6 TB of data, ~ 90 million events on castor) has been collected and is already under analysis. The CTB has been characterized by different phases with an incremental presence of sub-detectors modules and associated DAQ infrastructure, as well as incremental improvement of analysis tools for prompt data certification. The physics goals of the CTB have been defined in consultation with the physics coordinator, all the sub-detector representatives and the combined performance group representative. With all these indications, a detailed run plan day-by-day schedule was defined before the CTB start and was foll...

  15. Beam Instrumentation for the Single Electron DAFNE Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitelli, G; Valente, P; Vescovi, M

    2003-01-01

    The DAΦNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) has been successfully commissioned in February 2002, and started operation in November of the same year. Although the BTF is a beam transfer line optimized for single particle production, mainly for high energy detectors calibration, it can provide electrons and positrons in a wide range of multiplicity: between 1-1010, with energies from a few tens of MeV up to 800 MeV. The large multiplicity range requires many different diagnostic devices, from high-energy calorimeters and ionization/fluorescence chambers in the few particles range, to standard beam diagnostics systems. The schemes of operation, the commissioning results, as well as the beam diagnostics are presented.

  16. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olvegård

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high-intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addressed experimentally at the CLIC test facility where up to 55% of the power is extracted from the beam in the test beam line, a small-scale version of the CLIC drive-beam decelerator, leaving the beam with a very wide energy profile. For monitoring of the transverse beam profile and Twiss parameters we use optical transition radiation screens and quadrupole scans. The intra-pulse-train energy spectrum before and after deceleration is measured with segmented beam dumps. In this paper we discuss the performance of these diagnostic devices with a particular emphasis on the large energy spread and its effect on the beam imaging techniques, and with a final outlook to the CLIC drive-beam diagnostics.

  17. One cryogenic collimator, tested with beam

    CERN Document Server

    EuCARD, Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The main accelerator SIS100 of the FAIR-complex will provide heavy ion beams of highest intensities. Beam loss due to ionization is the most demanding loss mechanism at operation with high intensity, intermediate charge state heavy ions. A special synchrotron design has been developed for SIS100, aiming for hundred percent control of ionization beam loss by means of a dedicated cryogenic ion catcher system. To suppress dynamic vacuum effects, the cryocatcher system shall provide a significantly reduced effective desorption yield. The construction and test of a prototype cryocatcher is a task of the EuCARD WP8 ColMat. A prototype test setup, including cryostat has been constructed, manufactured and tested under realistic conditions with beams from the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18. The design and results are presented.

  18. Laser Wire and Beam Position Monitor tests

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, S T; Lyapin, A; Nevay, L; Snuverink, J

    2013-01-01

    This subtask involved two main activities; Firstly the development and subsequent usage of high resolution beam position monitors (BPM) for the International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider projects (CLIC); and secondly the development of a laser-wire (LW) transverse beam size measurement systems. This report describes the technical progress achieved at a large-scale test ILC compatible BPM system installed at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2). The ATF2 is an energy-scaled demonstration system for the final focus systems required to deliver the particle beams to collision at the ILC and CLIC. The ATF2 cavity beam position monitor system is one of the largest of its kind and rivals systems used at free electron lasers. The ATF2 cavity beam position system has achieved a position resolutionof 250 nm (with signal attuenation) and 27 nm (without attenuation). The BPM system has been used routinely for lattice diagnostics, beam based alignment and wakefield measurements. Extensive experience...

  19. Test Beam Measurements on Picosec Gaseous Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Sohl, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    In the Picosec project micro pattern gaseous detectors with a time resolution of some ten picoseconds are developed. The detectors are based on Micromegas detectors. With a cherenkov window and a photocathode the time jitter from different position of the primary ionization clusters can be substituted. This reports describes the beam setup and measurements of different Picosec prototypes. A time resolution of under 30 ps has been measured during the test beam. This report gives an overview of my work as a Summer Student. I set up and operated a triple-GEM tracker and a trigger system for the beam. During the beam I measured different prototypes of Picosec detectors and analysed the data.

  20. Heavy ion beam probe coordinate mapping and calibration at WEGA stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoba, Y; Otte, M; Wagner, F; Krupnik, L; Zhezhera, A

    2010-01-01

    The heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) is an established nonperturbing diagnostic for high spatially and temporary resolved measurements of magnetically confined plasma parameters such as potential, density, and temperature. These quantities can be determined from the change in the ion beam parameters (charge, intensity, and trajectory) passing through a plasma volume due to collisions with electrons and interaction with the confining magnetic field. One of the problems that should be solved during HIBP installation and tuning is the coordinate matching. Conventionally the coordinate mapping of the HIBP measurement point is provided by ray tracing calculations of the ion beam in the magnetic field. However, it is very difficult to include all physical effects and uncertainties in the model. Thus, the result of the calculations may differ from the real probing position. In order to improve the mapping precision of the HIBP installed at the WEGA stellarator an additional measurement of the beam position is provided using a primary beam detector array inside the vacuum vessel. This allows comparing the measured and calculated ion beam positions in order to prove the calculated coordinate precision and include adjustments in the calculation code if necessary. The principle and the results of this calibration, which is not specific to WEGA but could be adapted to other experiments as well, are presented in this work.

  1. Results from ATLAS Calorimeter Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrade, F

    2007-01-01

    Beam tests of combinations of ATLAS calorimeters have been performed both for the barrel and end cap parts. During a combined test beam in summer 2004 a slice of the ATLAS barrel detector - including all detector sub systems from the inner tracker, the calorimetry to the muon system - was exposed to particle beams (electrons, pions, photons, muons) with different energies (1GeV to 350GeV). The aim was to study the combined performance of the different detector sub systems in ATLAS-like conditions. We will present the electronics calibration scheme of the electromagnetic calorimeter and its implementation. The following studies on the combined testbeam data have been performed and will be presented: performance of the electromagnetic calorimetry down to very low energies (> GeV), photon reconstruction including converted photons and position measurements using the very precise ATLAS tracker and the electromagnetic calorimeter. These measurements have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations showing the good de...

  2. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  3. Pixel-Tilecal-MDT Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    B. Di Girolamo

    A test with many expectations When an additional week of running (from September 11th to 18th) was allocated for the test-beam, it was decided to give priority to a combined run with the participation of the Pixel, Tilecal and MDT sub-detectors. The integration of these three sub-detectors was possible as they all use the baseline (DAQ-1/EF based) DAQ for test beams (as reported in a previous e-news). The tests and the addition of a common trigger and busy were organized in a short timescale by experts from the three sub-detectors and DAQ/EF. The expectations were many; both looking for problems and finding solutions. The setup The setup, shown in the figure, consisted of the Pixel telescope normally used during the sub-detector tests, two Tilecal barrel modules, two Tilecal extended barrel modules, and six MDT barrel chambers. This fully occupied a length of some 30 meters in the H8 line of the SPS North Area. Each sub-detector used their own specialized front-end electronics. The data collected by modu...

  4. Coordinate transformation based cryo-correlative methods for electron tomography and focused ion beam milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Schrod, Nikolas; Schaffer, Miroslava; Feng, Li Rebekah; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Lucic, Vladan

    2014-08-01

    Correlative microscopy allows imaging of the same feature over multiple length scales, combining light microscopy with high resolution information provided by electron microscopy. We demonstrate two procedures for coordinate transformation based correlative microscopy of vitrified biological samples applicable to different imaging modes. The first procedure aims at navigating cryo-electron tomography to cellular regions identified by fluorescent labels. The second procedure, allowing navigation of focused ion beam milling to fluorescently labeled molecules, is based on the introduction of an intermediate scanning electron microscopy imaging step to overcome the large difference between cryo-light microscopy and focused ion beam imaging modes. These methods make it possible to image fluorescently labeled macromolecular complexes in their natural environments by cryo-electron tomography, while minimizing exposure to the electron beam during the search for features of interest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reliability of a New Lower-Extremity Motor Coordination Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antosiak-Cyrak Katarzyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Motor coordination is a basic motor ability necessary for daily life, which also allows athletes to win a sports rivalry and patients to assess their recovery progress after therapy and rehabilitation. The aim of the present study was to assess the reliability of a new lower-extremity rate of movements test and testing apparatus.

  6. Beam test performance of the SKIROC2 ASIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amjad, M.S. [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Université de Paris-Sud XI, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Anduze, M. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Augustin, J.-E. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et de Hautes Energies, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Bonis, J. [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Université de Paris-Sud XI, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Boudry, V. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Bourgeois, C. [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Université de Paris-Sud XI, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Brient, J.-C. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Callier, S. [OMEGA, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Cerutti, M. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Chen, S. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Cornat, R. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); and others

    2015-04-01

    Beam tests of the first layers of CALICE silicon tungsten ECAL technological prototype were performed in April and July 2012 using 1–6 GeV electron beam at DESY. This paper presents an analysis of the SKIROC2 readout ASIC performance under test beam conditions.

  7. Beam test performance of the SKIROC2 ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Frisson, T; Anduze, M; Augustin, J.E; Bonis, J; Boudry, V; Bourgeois, C; Brient, J.C; Callier, S; Cerutti, M; Chen, S; Cornat, R; Cornebise, P; Cuisy, D; David, J; De la Taille, C; Dulucq, F; Frotin, M; Gastaldi, F; Ghislain, P; Giraud, J; Gonnin, A; Grondin, D; Guliyev, E; Hostachy, J.Y; Jeans, D; Kamiya, Y; Kawagoe, K; Kozakai, C; Lacour, D; Lavergne, L; Lee, S.H; Magniette, F; Ono, H; Poeschl, R; Rouëné, J; Seguin-Moreau, N; Song, H.S; Sudo, Y; Thiebault, A; Tran, H; Ueno, H; Van der Kolk, N; Yoshioka, T

    2015-01-01

    Beam tests of the first layers of CALICE silicon tungsten ECAL technological prototype were performed in April and July 2012 using 1–6 GeV electron beam at DESY. This paper presents an analysis of the SKIROC2 readout ASIC performance under test beam conditions.

  8. Testing multiple coordination constraints with a novel bimanual visuomotor task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene M Sisti

    Full Text Available The acquisition of a new bimanual skill depends on several motor coordination constraints. To date, coordination constraints have often been tested relatively independently of one another, particularly with respect to isofrequency and multifrequency rhythms. Here, we used a new paradigm to test the interaction of multiple coordination constraints. Coordination constraints that were tested included temporal complexity, directionality, muscle grouping, and hand dominance. Twenty-two healthy young adults performed a bimanual dial rotation task that required left and right hand coordination to track a moving target on a computer monitor. Two groups were compared, either with or without four days of practice with augmented visual feedback. Four directional patterns were tested such that both hands moved either rightward (clockwise, leftward (counterclockwise, inward or outward relative to each other. Seven frequency ratios (3∶1, 2∶1, 3∶2, 1∶1, 2∶3. 1∶2, 1∶3 between the left and right hand were introduced. As expected, isofrequency patterns (1∶1 were performed more successfully than multifrequency patterns (non 1∶1. In addition, performance was more accurate when participants were required to move faster with the dominant right hand (1∶3, 1∶2 and 2∶3 than with the non-dominant left hand (3∶1, 2∶1, 3∶2. Interestingly, performance deteriorated as the relative angular velocity between the two hands increased, regardless of whether the required frequency ratio was an integer or non-integer. This contrasted with previous finger tapping research where the integer ratios generally led to less error than the non-integer ratios. We suggest that this is due to the different movement topologies that are required of each paradigm. Overall, we found that this visuomotor task was useful for testing the interaction of multiple coordination constraints as well as the release from these constraints with practice in the presence of

  9. Tests of a High Resolution Beam Profile Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norem, J.

    2004-10-28

    High energy linear colliders require very small beams at the interaction point to produce high luminosities, and these beams must be measured and monitored. We have developed and tested a technique where the profile can be obtained from an extension of pinhole camera optics using thick, single sided collimators and slits. Very high resolutions (a few nm) should be possible. Gamma beams can be obtained from bremsstrahlung, Compton or beamstrahlung radiation. We describe tests of the technique using bremsstrahlung from an 800 MeV electron beam at Bates/MIT, Compton scattered photons from 47 GeV Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC, and other applications, such as linear colliders.

  10. Beam Line Design for the CERN Hiradmat Test Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Hessler, C.; Assmann, R.; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Weterings, W

    2009-01-01

    The LHC phase II collimation project requires beam shock and impact tests of materials used for beam intercepting devices. Similar tests are also of great interest for other accelerator components such as beam entrance/exit windows and protection devices. For this purpose a dedicated High Radiation Material test facility (HiRadMat) is under study. This facility may be installed at CERN at the location of a former beam line. This paper describes the associated beam line which is foreseen to de...

  11. Modified M20 Beam Position Monitor Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koros, Jessica; Musson, John

    2017-09-01

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are used to measure lateral beam position. Two pairs of modified wire BPMs are being evaluated for installation into the injector at Jefferson Lab (JLab). The BPMs were coated with a Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) to aid in pumping at the electron gun, as an ultra-high vacuum is required to protect the gun and to avoid scattering the beam. Beam in the injector has a large diameter, allowing extraction of second moments to give information about beam profile and emittance. The purpose of this project is to determine the effects of NEG coating on the BPMs and to calculate second moments from beam models on the Goubau Line (G-Line). Using the G-Line, scans of the BPMs were taken before and after NEG coating. Each scan produced an electrical field map, which characterizes properties of the BPM, including scale factors and coupling. Second moments were calculated using superposition of previous scan data, and verification of this method was attempted using several beam models. Results show the BPMs responded well to NEG and that measurement of second moments is possible. Once the BPMs are installed, they will enhance gun vacuum and enable monitoring of shape and trajectory of the beam as it exits the electron gun to ensure quality beam for experiments. This work is made possible through support from NSF award 1659177 to Old Dominion University.

  12. ATLAS TRT Barrel in Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Luehring, F

    In July, the TRT group made a highly successful test of 6 Barrel TRT modules in the ATLAS H8 testbeam. Over 3000 TRT straw tubes (4 mm diameter gas drift tubes) were instrumented and found to operate well. The prototype represents 1/16 of the ATLAS TRT barrel and was assembled from TRT modules produced as spares. This was the largest scale test of the TRT to this date and the measured detector performance was as good as or better than what was expected in all cases. The 2004 TRT testbeam setup before final cabling was attached. The readout chain and central DAQ system used in the TRT testbeam is a final prototype for the ATLAS experiment. The TRT electronics used to read out the data were: The Amplifier/Shaper/Discriminator with Baseline Restoration (ASDBLR) chip is the front-end analog chip that shapes and discriminates the electronic pulses generated by the TRT straws. The Digital Time Measurement Read Out Chip (DTMROC) measures the time of the pulse relative to the beam crossing time. The TRT-ROD ...

  13. Body coordination test for children (KTK: Applications and normative studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Sá Carneiro Ribeiro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present review were: i to demonstrate the use of the Body Coordination Test for Children (Körperkoordinationstest Für Kinder - KTK in diverse populations of children, ii to describe studies that developed reference values for KTK, and iii to ascertain the existence of reference values of KTK for Brazilian children’s motor coordination. The selection of publications was performed between April and June (2010 and the Pubmed, Lilacs and www.google.com/scholar databases were employed. The results indicated that the KTK is an evaluation instrument for motor coordinative performance appropriate to be applied in different childish populations, such as Down syndrome bearers. Most studies that constructed reference values for their childish population showed lower mean values than those established from the group of German children from whom originated the reference data of KTK. This fact demonstrates the importance of the construction of normative data in different countries in view of diverse biological, social, economical and cultural characteristics to be considered. Finally, it was observed the absence of reference data of KTK for Brazilian children, however, it is undeniable the importance of applying the test to evaluate the global motor coordination of these children.

  14. Beam Tests of a Prototype Stripline Beam Position Monitoring System for the Drive Beam of the CLIC Two-beam Module at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, Alfonso; Nappa, Jean-Marc; Vilalte, Sebastien; Wendt, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with LAPP and IFIC, two units of a prototype stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam (DB), and its associated readout electronics have been successfully installed and tested in the Two-Beam-Module (TBM) at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. This paper gives a short overview of the BPM system and presents the performance measured under different Drive Beam configurations.

  15. Directed Beam Alignment System Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-04

    4 2.1.1 Handover Based on DBAS Alignment ........... 7 2.2 Conceptoal Implementation of DBAS .... ........... 8 3.0 Breadboard...A SCATTERING PHENOMENOLOGY When an electromagnetic wave propagates through any passive media , energy is removed from the radiation beam. The relative...amount of energy/ power removed from the beam per unit length of propagation defines the extinction coefficient for the media and is I dP Yext = P

  16. A beam test of prototype time projection chamber using micro ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We conducted a series of beam tests of prototype TPCs for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment, equipped with an MWPC, a MicroMEGAS, or GEMs as a readout device. The prototype operated successfully in a test beam at KEK under an axial magnetic field of up to 1 T. The analysis of data is now in ...

  17. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    OpenAIRE

    Olvegård, M.; Adli, E.; Andreazza, W; Bolzon, B; Bravin, E.; Chritin, N; Dabrowski, A.; Döbert, S; Duraffourg, M; Lefèvre, T.; Lillestøl, R.; Ziemann, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addre...

  18. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Auchmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2009–2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012 instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  19. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  20. Finite Element Modelling of Infinite Euler Beams on Kelvin Foundations Exposed to Moving Loads in Convected Co-ordinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    The paper deals with the finite element method (FEM) solution of the problem with loads moving uniformly along an infinite Euler beam supported by a linear elastic Kelvin foundation with linear viscous damping. Initially, the problem is formulatedin a moving co-ordinate system following the load ...

  1. CERN PSB Beam Tests of CNAO Synchrotron's Digital LLRF

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; De Martinis, C; Falbo, L; Findlay, A; Foglio, R; Hunt, S; Tourres, D; Vescovi, C

    2008-01-01

    The Italian National Centre for Oncological hAdrontherapy (CNAO), in its final construction phase, uses proton and carbon ion beams to treat patients affected by solid tumours. At the heart of CNAO is a 78- meter circumference synchrotron that accelerates particles to up to 400 MeV/u. The synchrotron relies on a digital LLRF system based upon Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). This system implements cavity servoing and beam control capabilities, such as phase and radial loops. Beam tests of the CNAO synchrotron LLRF system were carried out at CERN's Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) in autumn 2007, to verify the combined DSP/FPGA architecture and the beam control capabilities. For this, a prototype version of CNAO's LLRF system was adapted to the PSB requirements. This paper outlines the prototype system layout and describes the tests carried out and their results. In particular, system architecture and beam control capabilities were successfully proven by comparison wit...

  2. Optical Testing Using Portable Laser Coordinate Measuring Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khreishi, M.; Ohl, R.; Mclean, K.; Hadjimichael, T.; Hayden, J.

    2017-01-01

    High precision, portable coordinate measuring instruments (CMI) such as laser radars (LR) and laser trackers (LT) have been used for optical system alignment and integration. The LRs ability to perform a non-contact scan of surfaces was previously utilized to characterize large spherical and aspheric mirrors. In this paper, we explore the use of a CMI as an accurate, fast, robust, and non-contact tool for prescription characterization of powered optical surfaces. Using Nikons MV-224350 LR and Leicas Absolute Tracker AT401402 instruments, proof of concept measurements were performed to characterize a variety of optical components by measuring the actual and apparent, or equivalently the direct and through (DT), coordinates of calibrated metrology targets. Custom macros in metrology software and other data reduction code were developed to compute surface-ray intercepts and surface slopes from the DT shots. The calculated data is fit to an aspheric surface formula to obtain the optimum prescription. The results were compared to the nominal parameters and were crosschecked using LR scans or other approaches. We discuss potential applications across the fields of optical component fabrication and system alignment and testing.

  3. In Beam Tests of Implanted Helium Targets

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, J E; Ahmed, M W; Blackston, M A; Delbar, T; Gai, M; Kading, T J; Parpottas, Y; Perdue, B A; Prior, R M; Rubin, D A; Spraker, M C; Yeomans, J D; Weissman, L; Weller, H R; Delbar, Th.; Conn, LNS/U; Duke, TUNL/

    2006-01-01

    Targets consisting of 3,4He implanted into thin aluminum foils (approximately 100, 200 or 600 ug/cm^2) were prepared using intense (a few uA) helium beams at low energy (approximately 20, 40 or 100 keV). Uniformity of the implantation was achieved by a beam raster across a 12 mm diameter tantalum collimator at the rates of 0.1 Hz in the vertical direction and 1 Hz in the horizontal direction. Helium implantation into the very thin (approximately 80-100 ug/cm^2) aluminum foils failed to produce useful targets (with only approximately 10% of the helium retained) due to an under estimation of the range by the code SRIM. The range of low energy helium in aluminum predicted by Northcliffe and Shilling and the NIST online tabulation are observed on the other hand to over estimate the range of low energy helium ions in aluminum. An attempt to increase the amount of helium by implanting a second deeper layer was also carried out, but it did not significantly increase the helium content beyond the blistering limit (ap...

  4. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  5. Test beam performance of the ALICE silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; Ohnishi, H; Olmos-Giner, A; Osmic F; Pappalardo, G S; Anelli, G; Antinori, F; Boccardi, A; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Chochula, P; Cinausero, M; D'Alessandro, A; Dima, R; Dinapoli, R; Elia, D; Enyo, H; Fabris, D; Fini, R; Fioretto, E; Formenti, F; Fujiwara, K; Heuser, J M; Kano, J; Kapusta, S; Kluge, A; Krivda, M; Lenti, V; Librizzi, F; Lunardon, M; Manzari, V; Morel, M; Olmos-Giner, A; Osmic, F; Pepato, Adriano; Prete, G; Riedler, P; Santoro, R; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Stefanini, G; Tanida, K; Taketani, A; Turrisi, R; Vannucci, L; Viesti, G; Virgili, T

    2004-01-01

    The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) will include 1200 bump-bonded readout chips produced in a commercial 0.25 mu CMOS process. Each chip has 8192 pixels of size 50 * 425 mu m/sup 2/, which leads to about 10 million readout channels in the whole detector system. Test beam measurements were recently carried out at the CERN SPS using a positive proton/pion beam as well as a 158 AGeV/c heavy ion beam (In) with a fixed Pb target. Analysis show good performance of the ALICE chip and assemblies in the positive beam as well as in the high multiplicity In beam. Preliminary results from data analysis show good performance of the SPD and fulfill the ALICE requirements.

  6. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  7. FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Petr; Kohoutková, Alena; Jedlinský, Petr

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with a FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam. Omega beam is a precast prestressed high-performance concrete element with the shape of Greek letter omega. Omega beam was designed as a self-supporting permanent formwork member for construction of girder bridges. FEM program ATENA Science was exploited for simulation of load-bearing test of the beam. The numerical model was calibrated using the data from both static loading test and tests of material properties. Comparison of load-displacement diagrams obtained from the experiment and the model was conducted. Development of cracks and crack patterns were compared. Very good agreement of experimental data and the FEM model was reached. The calibrated model can be used for design of optimized Omega beams in the future without the need of expensive loading tests. The calibrated material model can be also exploited in other types of FEM analyses of bridges constructed with the use of Omega beams, such as limit state analysis, optimization of shear connectors, prediction of long-term deflections or prediction of crack development.

  8. Partial wave series expansions in spherical coordinates for the acoustic field of vortex beams generated from a finite circular aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Mitri, F G

    2014-01-01

    Stemming from the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld surface integral, the addition theorems for the spherical wave and Legendre functions, and a weighing function describing the behavior of the radial component of the normal velocity at the surface of a finite circular radiating source, partial-wave series expansions are derived for the incident field of acoustic spiraling (vortex) beams in a spherical coordinate system centered on the axis of wave propagation. Examples for vortex beams, comprising \\rho-vortex, zeroth-order and higher-order Bessel-Gauss and Bessel, truncated Neumann-Gauss and Hankel-Gauss, Laguerre-Gauss, and other Gaussian-type vortex beams are considered. The mathematical expressions are exact solutions of the Helmholtz equation. The results presented here are particularly useful to accurately evaluate analytically and compute numerically the acoustic scattering and other mechanical effects of finite vortex beams, such as the axial and 3D acoustic radiation force and torque components on a sphere of any ...

  9. Alignment of the Pixel and SCT Modules for the 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Ahmad, A.; Andreazza, A.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Barr, A.J.; Beccherle, R.; Bell, P.J.; Bernabeu, J.; Broklova, Z.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Cauz, D.; Chevalier, L.; Chouridou, S.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cobal, M.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Darbo, G.; de Vivie, J.B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drohan, J.; Einsweiler, K.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Facius, K.; Ferrari, P.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrere, D.; Flick,, T.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagliardi, G.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B.J.; Gan, K.K.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorfine, G.; Gottfert, T.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Hansen, P.H.; Hara, K.; Hartel, R.; Harvey, A.; Hawkings, R.J.; Heinemann, F.E.W.; Henss, T.; Hill, J.C.; Huegging, F.; Jansen, E.; Joseph, J.; Unel, M. Karagoz; Kataoka, M.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kostyukhin, V.; Lacasta, C.; Lari, T.; Latorre, S.; Lester, C.G.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lourerio, K.F.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Mathes, M.; Meroni, C.; Mikulec, B.; Mindur, B.; Moed, S.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Moyse, E.W.J.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Nikolaev, K.; Parodi, F.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pater, J.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P.W.; Pinto, B.; Poppleton, A.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Reznicek, P.; Risso, P.; Robinson, D.; Roe, S.; Rozanov, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santi, L.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schultes, J.; Sfyrla, A.; Shaw, C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Toczek, B.; Troncon, C.; Tyndel, M.; Vernocchi, F.; Virzi, J.; Anh, T. Vu; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Wellsf, P.S.; Zhelezkow, A.

    2008-06-02

    A small set of final prototypes of the ATLAS Inner Detector silicon tracking system(Pixel Detector and SemiConductor Tracker), were used to take data during the 2004 Combined Test Beam. Data were collected from runs with beams of different flavour (electrons, pions, muons and photons) with a momentum range of 2 to 180 GeV/c. Four independent methods were used to align the silicon modules. The corrections obtained were validated using the known momenta of the beam particles and were shown to yield consistent results among the different alignment approaches. From the residual distributions, it is concluded that the precision attained in the alignmentof the silicon modules is of the order of 5 mm in their most precise coordinate.

  10. Alignment of the Pixel and SCT Modules for the 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Andreazza, A.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Bell, P. J.; Bernabeu, J.; Broklova, Z.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Cauz, D.; Chevalier, L.; Chouridou, S.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cobal, M.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Darbo, G.; de Vivie, J. B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drohan, J.; Einsweiler, K.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Facius, K.; Ferrari, P.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrere, D.; Flick, T.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagliardi, G.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Göttfert, T.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Härtel, R.; Harvey, A.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henss, T.; Hill, J. C.; Huegging, F.; Jansen, E.; Joseph, J.; Karagöz Ünel, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kostyukhin, V.; Lacasta, C.; Lari, T.; Latorre, S.; Lester, C. G.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lourerio, K. F.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Mathes, M.; Meroni, C.; Mikulec, B.; Mindur, B.; Moed, S.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Nikolaev, K.; Parodi, F.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pater, J.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pinto, B.; Poppleton, A.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Reznicek, P.; Risso, P.; Robinson, D.; Roe, S.; Rozanov, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santi, L.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schultes, J.; Sfyrla, A.; Shaw, C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Toczek, B.; Troncon, C.; Tyndel, M.; Vernocchi, F.; Virzi, J.; Anh, T. Vu; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Zhelezko, A.

    2008-09-01

    A small set of final prototypes of the ATLAS Inner Detector silicon tracking system (Pixel Detector and SemiConductor Tracker), were used to take data during the 2004 Combined Test Beam. Data were collected from runs with beams of different flavour (electrons, pions, muons and photons) with a momentum range of 2 to 180 GeV/c. Four independent methods were used to align the silicon modules. The corrections obtained were validated using the known momenta of the beam particles and were shown to yield consistent results among the different alignment approaches. From the residual distributions, it is concluded that the precision attained in the alignment of the silicon modules is of the order of 5 μm in their most precise coordinate.

  11. Testing long range beam-beam compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rijoff, Tatiana; Caracciolo, Sergio

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its minimum crossing angle are limited by long-range beam-beam collisions. A wire compensators can mitigate part of the long-range effects and may allow for smaller crossing angles, or higher beam intensity. A prototype long-range wire compensator should be installed in the LHC by 2014/15. The originally reserved position for the wire compensator (named BBC) seems not available in this first step, we need so to test other possibilities. The performed tests consider various longitudinal and transverse locations, different wire shapes, different optics configuration and trying several crossing angles between the beam. Simulation are done with the weak-strong code BBtrack developed by U. Dorda. New postprocessing tools were used to analyse tune footprints and particle stability In particular for particle stability was implemented a new method for the Lyapunov coefficient calculation.

  12. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P.P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E.B.; Lechner, A.; Del Busto, E. Nebot; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-25

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam- induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy depositio...

  13. Flexural Test of Fly Ash based Geopolimer Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindyawati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is a by-product from the coal industry, which is widely available in Indonesia. Fly ash contains quite high silicate and alumina. Silica and alumina reacts with alkaline solution to produce alumina silicate gel which binds the aggregate to produce geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer concrete is introduced as an environmental concrete with high compressive strength. The use of geopolymer concrete beams is a solution to reduce the effects of greenhouse gases. This research uses experimental designs. The data are obtained from the testing of 4 pieces of reinforced geopolymer concrete beams and reinforced ordinary concrete beams with a / d of 1.11 and 2.24. The results are obtained from the maximum load that can be accepted by the beam. The results of this study are: (1 Geopolymer concrete cylinder has 26.78% higher compressive strength than ordinary concrete cylinders (2 Ordinary concrete beams can withstand 34.8% load higher compared to the geopolymer concrete beam (3 Reinforced ordinary concrete beams experience bending shear collapse while reinforced geopolymer concrete beam experience pure bending collapse.

  14. Beam position determination for the Test Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The Test Storage Ring (TSR) for heavy ions, currently under design and construction at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, requires an extensive beam diagnostics system in order to enable it to operate without friction. This thesis concerns the beam position determination sub-system of this diagnostics system which is intended to determine the beam center of gravity of a bunched beam inside the cross section of the beam tube in a non-destructive manner. An electrostatic pickup is used to sense the location of the beam; the mode of operation of this device will be explained in detail. The signals go to a preamplifier from where they are then sent via a multiplex system to the measuring unit. This point also represents the interface to the computer system that controls the TSR. The prototype developed here was tested with the aid of a particle beam, as well as with other measurement methods. Resolutions of better than 1 mm about the center have been measured. In order to achieve or even improve such resolutions later in actual operation, it is possible to determine the properties of the preamplifiers with the aid of calibration signals and to take these into account in the course of the signal evaluation in the computer. The differences between the individual electrodes of a given pickup must also be compensated. These procedures and their associated electronic circuits are also described in this paper.

  15. Testing fundamental symmetries using radioactive ion beams at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ISAC Facility at TRIUMF, Canada's national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics, provides rare isotope beams for a diverse research program. In this paper we summarize some recent experimental developments at TRIUMF pertaining to fundamental symmetry tests. These tests use the atomic nucleus as a probe ...

  16. The trigger system of the first CMS tracker beam tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaller, B.; Drouhin, F.; Pallares, A.; Fontaine, J.C.; Benhammou, Y.; Charles, F.; Huss, D. [Univ. de Haute Alsace, Mulhouse (France). Groupe de Recherche en Physique des Hautes Energies; Hoffmann, C. [Inst. de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg (France). Unite d`Electronique EXperimentale, Strasbourg (France)

    1998-10-01

    The trigger for the first compact muon solenoid (CMS) tracking beam tests is a dedicated system for analog multiplexed front-end electronics. With this first generation of electronics dedicated to CMS tracker detectors, some new specific development was necessary to read it with a multicrate distributed Data AcQuisition (DAQ) system. The goal of this development was to reach a high scalability of experiment subsystems and a good robustness for test beams. Each subsystem had to be independent from the others, both from the hardware and software point of view. Remote control software for this system as well as further monitoring facilities were the required functions of the trigger system.

  17. Pulsed beam tests at the SANAEM RFQ beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turemen, G.; Akgun, Y.; Alacakir, A.; Kilic, I.; Yasatekin, B.; Ergenlik, E.; Ogur, S.; Sunar, E.; Yildiz, V.; Ahiska, F.; Cicek, E.; Unel, G.

    2017-07-01

    A proton beamline consisting of an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source, two solenoid magnets, two steerer magnets and a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is developed at the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority’s (TAEA) Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SNRTC-SANAEM) in Ankara. In Q4 of 2016, the RFQ was installed in the beamline. The high power tests of the RF power supply and the RF transmission line were done successfully. The high power RF conditioning of the RFQ was performed recently. The 13.56 MHz ICP source was tested in two different conditions, CW and pulsed. The characterization of the proton beam was done with ACCTs, Faraday cups and a pepper-pot emittance meter. Beam transverse emittance was measured in between the two solenoids of the LEBT. The measured beam is then reconstructed at the entrance of the RFQ by using computer simulations to determine the optimum solenoid currents for acceptance matching of the beam. This paper will introduce the pulsed beam test results at the SANAEM RFQ beamline. In addition, the high power RF conditioning of the RFQ will be discussed.

  18. Energy Linearity and Resolution of the ATLAS Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter in an Electron Test-Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aharrouche, M; Di Ciaccio, L; El-Kacimi, M; Gaumer, O; Gouanère, M; Goujdami, D; Lafaye, R; Laplace, S; Le Maner, C; Neukermans, L; Perrodo, P; Poggioli, L; Prieur, D; Przysiezniak, H; Sauvage, G; Tarrade, F; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Lanni, F; Ma, H; Rajagopalan, S; Rescia, S; Takai, H; Belymam, A; Benchekroun, D; Hakimi, M; Hoummada, A; Barberio, E; Gao, Y S; Lü, L; Stroynowski, R; Aleksa, Martin; Beck-Hansen, J; Carli, T; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fassnacht, P; Follin, F; Gianotti, F; Hervás, L; Lampl, W; Collot, J; Hostachy, J Y; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Martin, P; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Saboumazrag, S; Leltchouk, M; Parsons, J A; Seman, M; Simion, S; Banfi, D; Carminati, L; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Delmastro, M; Fanti, M; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Tartarelli, F; Bourdarios, C; Fayard, L; Fournier, D; Graziani, G; Hassani, S; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Kado, M; Lechowski, M; Lelas, M; Parrour, G; Puzo, P; Rousseau, D; Sacco, R; Serin, L; Unal, G; Zerwas, D; Camard, A; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Nikolic-Audit, I; Schwemling, P; Ghazlane, H; Cherkaoui-El-Moursli, R; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Boonekamp, M; Kerschen, N; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, P; Schwindling, J; Lund-Jensen, B; Tayalati, Y

    2006-01-01

    A module of the ATLAS electromagnetic barrel liquid argon calorimeter was exposed to the CERN electron test-beam at the H8 beam line upgraded for precision momentum measurement. The available energies of the electron beam ranged from 10 to 245 GeV. The electron beam impinged at one point corresponding to a pseudo-rapidity of eta=0.687 and an azimuthal angle of phi=0.28 in the ATLAS coordinate system. A detailed study of several effects biasing the electron energy measurement allowed an energy reconstruction procedure to be developed that ensures a good linearity and a good resolution. Use is made of detailed Monte Carlo simulations based on Geant which describe the longitudinal and transverse shower profiles as well as the energy distributions. For electron energies between 15 GeV and 180 GeV the deviation of the measured incident electron energy over the beam energy is within 0.1%. The systematic uncertainty of the measurement is about 0.1% at low energies and negligible at high energies. The energy resoluti...

  19. Tests of beam-based alignement at FACET

    CERN Document Server

    Latina, A; Schulte, D; Adli, E

    2014-01-01

    The performance of future linear colliders will depend critically on beam-based alignment (BBA) and feedback systems, which will play a crucial role in guaranteeing the low emittance transport throughout such machines. BBA algorithms designed to improve the beam transmission in a linac by simultaneously optimising the trajectory and minimising the residual dispersion, have thoughtfully been studied in theory over the last years, and successfully verified experimentally. One such technique is called Dispersion-Free Steering (DFS). A careful study of the DFS performance at the SLAC test facility FACET lead us to design a beam-based technique specifically targeted to reduce the impact of transverse short-range wakefields, rather than of the dispersion, being the wakefields the limiting factor to the FACET performance. This technique is called Wakefield-Free Steering (WFS). The results of the first tests of WFS at FACET are presented in this paper.

  20. QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The author presents a measurement of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s} derived from multijet rates using data collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC and find that {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2}) = 0.118 {+-} 0.002(stat.) {+-} 0.003(syst.) {+-} 0.010(theory). He presents tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions via preliminary measurements of the ratios {alpha}{sub s}(b)/{alpha}{sub s}(udsc) and {alpha}{sub s}(uds)/{alpha}{sub s}(bc). In addition, the group has measured the difference in charged particle multiplicity between Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} and Z{sup 0} {yields} u{bar u}, d{bar d}, s{bar s} events, and find that it supports the prediction of perturbative QCD that the multiplicity difference be independent of center-of-mass energy. Finally, the group has made a preliminary study of jet polarization using the jet handedness technique.

  1. Spectrometry in the Test Beam Line at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegaard, Maja; Chritin, N; Dabrowski, A; Dallocchio, A; Doebert, S; Lefevre, T; Adli, E

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC study is based on the so-called two-beam acceleration concept and one of the main goals of the CLIC Test Facility 3 is to demonstrate the efficiency of the CLIC RF power production scheme. As part of this facility a Test Beam Line (TBL), presently under commissioning, is a small-scale version of a CLIC decelerator. To perform as expected the beam line must show efficient and stable RF power production over 16 consecutive decelerating structures. As the high intensity electron beam is decelerated its energy spread grows by up to 60 %. A novel segmented beam dump for time resolved energy measurements has been designed to match the requirements of the TBL. As a complement, a diffusive OTR screen is also installed in the same spectrometer line. The combination of these two devices will provide both a high spatial resolution measurement of both the energy and energy spread and a measurement with a few nanoseconds time response. This paper describes the design of the new segmented dump and presents the res...

  2. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  3. Collimation quench test with 4 TeV proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Salvachua, B; Cauchi, M; Deboy, D; Hofle, W; Holzer, EB; Jacquet, D; Lari, L; Nebot, E; Mirarchi, D; Quaranta, E; Redaelli, S; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Valentino, G; Valuch, D; Wenniger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, at the end of the LHC physics run I, several quench tests took place with the aim to measure the quench limit of the LHC superconducting magnets. The LHC superconducting magnets in the dispersion suppressor of IR7 are the most exposed to beam losses leaking from the betatron collimation system and represent the main limitation for the halo cleaning. A collimation quench test was performed with 4 TeV proton beams to improve the quench limit estimates, which determine the maximum allowed beam loss rate for a given collimation cleaning. The main goal of the collimation quench test was to try to quench the magnets by increasing losses at the collimators. This note describes the procedure during the test and the first results with the data. Losses of up to 1 MW over a few seconds were generated by blowing up the beam, achieving total losses of about 5.8 MJ. These controlled losses exceeded by a factor 2 the collimation design value, and the magnets did not quench.

  4. PSB LLRF renovation: Initial beam tests of the new digital beam control system

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, ME; Butterworth, A; Findlay, A; Pedersen, F; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    The beam control renovation project for CERN’s PS Booster (PSB) was started in autumn 2008. Its aim is to equip all four PSB rings with modern digital beam control systems, characterised by fully-PPM parameters and complete remote control. Additionally, all intermediate and input/output signals are to be remotely acquired in a digital way and in full PPM fashion, and displayed via the Oasis application program. The same digital technology concepts have already been successfully applied to the LEIR beam control system, which has acted as a pilot project for the whole PS Complex renovation project. This new technology allows a very flexible performance and can improve the system maintainability by becoming the standard for the PS Complex beam controls. This note details the first step in the PSB consolidation project, namely the beam control prototype tests carried out on PSB ring 4 in October and November 2008. Both C02 and C04 RF system have been successfully controlled; bunch splitting and extraction synch...

  5. Generalization of the extended optical theorem for scalar arbitrary-shape acoustical beams in spherical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G; Silva, G T

    2014-11-01

    The extended optical theorem is generalized for scalar acoustical beams of arbitrary character with any angle of incidence interacting with an object of arbitrary geometric shape and size, and placed randomly in the beam's path with any scattering angle. Analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, and scattering cross sections are derived, and the connections with the axial (i.e., along the direction of wave propagation) torque and radiation force calculations are discussed. As examples to illustrate the analysis for a viscoelastic object, the extinction, absorption, and scattering cross sections are provided for an infinite plane progressive wave, infinite nondiffracting Bessel beams, a zero-order spherical quasi-Gaussian beam, and a Bessel-Gauss vortex beam emanating from a finite circular aperture, which reduces to a finite high-order Bessel beam, a finite zero-order Bessel beam, and a finite piston radiator vibrating uniformly with appropriate selection of beam parameters. The similarity with the asymptotic quantum inelastic cross sections is also mentioned.

  6. Results from the 1999 Beam Test of a Preshower Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Aspell, Paul; Bloch, Philippe; Bourotte, Jean; Domeniconi, Jacques; Peisert, Anna; Evangelou, Ioannis; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loos, Robert; Loukas, Demetrios; Mousa, Jehad; Peron, Franck; Reynaud, Serge; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tournefier, Edwige; Van Hove, Alain; Zamiatin, Nikolai

    2000-01-01

    At the end of June 1999 a test of a preshower prototype, equipped with real-size detectors and LHC-style electronics, was tested in the H4 beam at CERN in front of a matrix of "Endcap" crystals. Data were taken with a variety of incident electron energies, and three angles of incidence ( to simulate different regions of the CMS endcaps). The prototype functioned well, with a very small startup period and operated successfully for the duration of the test ( ~ 1 week) without intervention. Good agreement has been found between data and a GEANT-3 based simulation, and the absolute results are promising. Plans are presented for a further test of the prototype in 2000 in the H2 beam inside the 3T magnet.

  7. High luminosity liquid-argon calorimeter test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novgorodova, Olga; Straessner, Arno [TU Dresden, IKTP (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the future HL-LHC the luminosity will increase by factor of 5-7 with respect to the original LHC design. The HiLum collaboration studied the impact on small-sized modules of the ATLAS electromagnetic, hadronic, and forward calorimeters also instrumented by various intensity and position detectors. The intensity of beam varied over a wide range (10{sup 6} to 10{sup 12} p/s) and beyond the maximum expected at HL-LHC for these calorimeters. Results from the last test beam campaign in 2013 on the signal shape analysis from the calorimeter modules are compared with MC simulations. The correlation between high-voltage return currents of the electromagnetic calorimeter and beam intensity is used to estimate critical parameters and compared with predictions.

  8. Gegenbauer expansion to model the incident wave-field of a high-order Bessel vortex beam in spherical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this short communication is to report that Gegenbauer's (partial-wave) expansion, that may be used (under some specific conditions) to represent the incident field of an acoustical (or optical) high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) in spherical coordinates, anticipates earlier expressions for undistorted waves. The incident wave-field is written in terms of the spherical Bessel function of the first kind, the gamma function as well as the Gegenbauer or ultraspherical functions given in terms of the associated Legendre functions when the order m of the HOBB is an integer number. Expressions for high-order and zero-order Bessel beams as well as for plane progressive waves reported in prior works can be deduced from Gegenbauer's partial-wave expansion by appropriate choice of the beams' parameters. Hence the value of this note becomes historical. In addition, Gegenbauer's expansion in spherical coordinates may be used to advantage to model the wave-field of a fractional HOBB at the origin (i.e. z=0). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Elementary Green function as an integral superposition of Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures in Cartesian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červený, Vlastislav; Pšenčík, Ivan

    2017-08-01

    Integral superposition of Gaussian beams is a useful generalization of the standard ray theory. It removes some of the deficiencies of the ray theory like its failure to describe properly behaviour of waves in caustic regions. It also leads to a more efficient computation of seismic wavefields since it does not require the time-consuming two-point ray tracing. We present the formula for a high-frequency elementary Green function expressed in terms of the integral superposition of Gaussian beams for inhomogeneous, isotropic or anisotropic, layered structures, based on the dynamic ray tracing (DRT) in Cartesian coordinates. For the evaluation of the superposition formula, it is sufficient to solve the DRT in Cartesian coordinates just for the point-source initial conditions. Moreover, instead of seeking 3 × 3 paraxial matrices in Cartesian coordinates, it is sufficient to seek just 3 × 2 parts of these matrices. The presented formulae can be used for the computation of the elementary Green function corresponding to an arbitrary direct, multiply reflected/transmitted, unconverted or converted, independently propagating elementary wave of any of the three modes, P, S1 and S2. Receivers distributed along or in a vicinity of a target surface may be situated at an arbitrary part of the medium, including ray-theory shadow regions. The elementary Green function formula can be used as a basis for the computation of wavefields generated by various types of point sources (explosive, moment tensor).

  10. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, Alexander, E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Alessi, James G., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward N., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  11. Test beam results from the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Brunelière, R

    2004-01-01

    A precision lead tungstate crystal calorimeter is being constructed by the CMS collaboration. As a key part of the future CMS detector at the LHC, the electromagnetic calorimeter will play a major role in probing electroweak symmetry-breaking and searches for new physics. In order to check that the required performance of the electromagnetic calorimeter is attainable, every prototype is tested in real conditions within a beam of particles. In 2003 two modules of the electromagnetic calorimeter featuring the final mechanical design and electronic architecture have been tested with two different versions of the front-end electronics. In this paper a review of the main results of test beam campaigns in 2002 and 2003 are given. (7 refs).

  12. Data Analysis and Simulation for the RICH Upgrade Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Lalanne, Louis-Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four particles physics experiments collecting data at the Large Hadron Collider. One of its key detector components is the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. This provides charged particle identification over a wide momentum range, from 2–100 GeV/c. In order to increase the readout frequency from 1MHz to 40MHz RICH detectors will be upgrade in 2020. Prototypes are designed and tested by the RICH upgrade group of CERN. A full GEANT4 simulation have been programmed to reproduce the experimental test beam set-up and to produce MonteCarlo data. Those data have been compared to data from the test beam in order to study and compared the photon yield and the Cherenkov angle resolution of the most recent version of RICH.

  13. Non-Dimensional Analysis of a Two-Dimensional Beam Using Linear Stiffness Matrix in Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Woo; Lee, Jae Wook; Jang, Jin Seok; Oh, Joo Young [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Ryul [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ji Heon; Yoo, Wan Suk [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Absolute nodal coordinate formulation was developed in the mid-1990s, and is used in the flexible dynamic analysis. In the process of deriving the equation of motion, if the order of polynomial referring to the displacement field increases, then the degrees of freedom increase, as well as the analysis time increases. Therefore, in this study, the primary objective was to reduce the analysis time by transforming the dimensional equation of motion to a nondimensional equation of motion. After the shape function was rearranged to be non-dimensional and the nodal coordinate was rearranged to be in length dimension, the non-dimensional mass matrix, stiffness matrix, and conservative force was derived from the non-dimensional variables. The verification and efficiency of this nondimensional equation of motion was performed using two examples; cantilever beam which has the exact solution about static deflection and flexible pendulum.

  14. Preliminary Beam Irradiation Test for RI Production Targets at KOMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Cho, Yong Sub; Seol, Kyung Tae; Song, Young Gi; Kim, Dae Il; Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung; Min, Yi Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The new beamline and target irradiation facility has been constructed for the production of therapeutic radio-isotope. Sr-82 and Cu-67 were selected as the target isotope in this facility, they are promising isotope for the PET imaging and cancer therapy. For the facility commissioning, the irradiation test for the prototype-target was conducted to confirm the feasibility of radio-isotope production, the proto-type targets are made of RbCl pellet and the natural Zn metal for Sr-82 and Cu-67 production respectively, In this paper, an introduction to the RI production targetry system and the results of the preliminary beam irradiation test are discussed. the low-flux beam irradiation tests for proto-type RI target have been conducted. As a result of the beam irradiation tests, we could obtain the evidence of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production, have confirmed the feasibility of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production at KOMAC RI production facility.

  15. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report FY17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominsky, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmidt, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rivera, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Uplegger, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Asaadi, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freeman, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Price, J. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Casey, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ehrlich, R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Belmont, R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Boose, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Conners, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Haggerty, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, K. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hodges, A. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Huang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kistenev, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lajoie, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Mannel, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Osborn, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pontieri, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sarsour, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Sen, A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Skoby, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Stoll, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toldo, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ujvari, B. [Debrecen Univ., Debrecen (Hungary); Woody, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ronzhin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hanagaki, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Apresyan, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bose, T. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Canepa, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Demina, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Gershtein, Y. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Halkiadakis, E. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haytmyradov, M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hazen, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Hindrichs, O. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Korjenevski, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Nachtman, J. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Narain, M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Nash, K. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Onel, Y. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Osherson, M. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Rankin, D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Schneider, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stone, B. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Metcalfe, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benoit, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Vicente, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); di Bello, F. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Cavallaro, E. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Chakanov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frizzell, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Kiehn, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Meng, L. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Miucci, A. [Univ. of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Nodulman, L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Terzo, S. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Wang, Rui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weston, T. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Xie, Junqie [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Xu, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaffaroni, E. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Zhang, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Argelles, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Axani, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Katori, T. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Noulai, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Mandalia, S. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Sandstrom, P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Kryemadhi, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Barner, L. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Grove, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Mohler, J. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Roth, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Beuzekom, M. van [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dall' Occo, E. [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schindler, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Paley, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Badgett, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Denisov, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lukic, S. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Ujic, P. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Lebrun, P. L.G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Fields, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Christian, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zaki, R. [Radboud Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2018-01-23

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab Test Beam operations for FY2017. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF and are listed in Table 1. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  16. Micromachining of commodity plastics by proton beam writing and fabrication of spatial resolution test-chart for neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, T.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Matsubayashi, M.; Kada, W.; Kohka, M.; Satoh, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Ishii, Y.; Takano, K.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam writing is a direct-write technique and a promising method for the micromachining of commodity plastics such as acrylic resins. Herein, we describe the fabrication of microscopic devices made from a relatively thick (∼75 μm) acrylic sheet using proton beam writing. In addition, a software package that converts image pixels into coordinates data was developed, and the successful fabrication of a very fine jigsaw puzzle was achieved. The size of the jigsaw puzzle pieces was 50 × 50 μm. For practical use, a prototype of a line and space test-chart was also successfully fabricated for the determination of spatial resolution in neutron radiography.

  17. Trigger and DAQ in the Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Dobson, M; Padilla, C

    2004-01-01

    Introduction During the Combined Test Beam the latest prototype of the ATLAS Trigger and DAQ system is being used to support the data taking of all the detectors. Further development of the TDAQ subsystems benefits from the direct experience given by the integration in the beam test. Support of detectors for the Combined Test Beam All ATLAS detectors need their own detector-specific DAQ development. The readout electronics is controlled by a Readout Driver (ROD), custom-built for each detector. The ROD receives data for events that are accepted by the first level trigger. The detector-specific part of the DAQ system needs to control the ROD and to respond to commands of the central DAQ (e.g. to "Start" a run). The ROD module then sends event data to a Readout System (ROS), a PC with special receiver modules/buffers. At this point the data enters the realm of the ATLAS DAQ and High Level Trigger system, constructed from Linux PCs connected with gigabit Ethernet networks. Most ATLAS detectors, representing s...

  18. Beam tests on a proton linac booster for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    De Martinis, C; Berra, P; Birattari, C; Calabretta, L; Crandall, K; Giove, D; Masullo, M R; Mauri, M; Rosso, E; Rovelli, A; Serafini, L; Szeless, Balázs; Toet, D Z; Vaccaro, Vittorio G; Weiss, M; Zennaro, R

    2002-01-01

    LIBO is a 3 GHz modular side-coupled proton linac booster designed to deliver beam energies up to 200 MeV, as required for the therapy of deep seated tumours. The injected beam of 50 to 70 MeV is produced by a cyclotron like those in several hospitals and research institutes. A full-scale prototype of the first module with an input/output energy of 62/74 MeV, respectively, was designed and built in 1999 and 2000. Full power RF tests were carried out successfully at CERN using a test facility at LIL at the end of the year 2000. In order to prove the feasibility of the acceleration process, an experimental setup with this module was installed at the INFN Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud (LNS) in Catania during 2001. The superconducting cyclotron provided the 62 MeV test beam. A compact solid-state RF modulator with a 4 MW klystron, made available by IBA-Scanditronix, was put into operation to power the linac. In this paper the main features of the accelerator are reviewed and the experimental results obtained duri...

  19. Beam Tests of a New Digital Beam Control System for the CERN LEIR Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Blas, Alfred; De Long, Joseph; Findlay, Alan; Matuszkiewicz, Pawel; Pedersen, Flemming; Salom-Sarasqueta, Angela

    2005-01-01

    The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) is a major component in the Large Hadron Collider ion injector chain. We have been developing an all-digital beam control and cavity servo system for the RF acceleration in LEIR. The system is housed by VME motherboards that may hold various daughter boards. Fast tasks are executed in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), slower tasks and communication with the software layer above are achieved in Digital Signal Processors (DSPs). We describe a simplified system prototype, which we tested with low intensity beams on the CERN PS Booster (PSB). The aim was to verify the combined DSP+FPGA architecture and the feedback loop dynamics. An additional goal was to deploy and validate novel software concepts, such as reference-functions and timings generation, and user-selectable digital data acquisition.

  20. Beam tests of the 12 MHz RFQ RIB injector for ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifft, B. E.; Kaye, R. A.; Kedzie, M.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-06

    Beam tests of the ANL 12 MHz Radio-Frequency Quadruple (RFQ), designed for use as the initial element of an injector system for radioactive beams into the existing ATLAS accelerators, are in progress. Recent high-voltage tests of the RFQ without beam achieved the design intervane voltage of 100 kV CW, enabling beam tests with A/q as large as 132 using beams from the ANL Physics Division 4 MV Dynamitron accelerator facility. Although the RFQ was designed for bunched beams, initial tests have been performed with unbunched beams. Experiments with stable, unbunched beams of singly-charged {sup 132}Xe and {sup 84}Kr measured the output beam energy distribution as a function of the RFQ operating voltage. The observed energies are in excellent agreement with numerical beam simulations.

  1. LHCb Scintillating Fibre Tracker: Test Beam Report 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues Cavalcante, Ana Barbara; Gavardi, Laura; Girard, Olivier Goran; Greim, Roman; Haefeli, Guido; Han, Xiaoxue; Joram, Christian; Kecke, Matthieu; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Leverington, Blake Dean; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Muller, Janine; Neuner, Max; Nieswand, Simon; Tekampe, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    This document summarizes the testbeam results of scintillating fibre mats tested at the SPS at CERN in May and November of 2015. Fibre mats consisting of 5, 6, and 8 layers (with a wider pitch) were tested for their light yield, attenuation length, single hit efficiency, and position resolution. In November 2016, one 6-layer module was additionally irradiated to the LHCb-Upgrade dose profile for fibre mats next to the beam pipe. The loss in signal was measured near the mirror.

  2. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Campabadal, F; Key, M; Lozano, M; Martínez, C; Pellegrini, G; Rafí, J M; Ullán, M; Johansen, L; Pommeresche, B; Stugu, B; Ciocio, A; Fadeev, V; Gilchriese, M G D; Haber, C; Siegrist, J; Spieler, H; Vu, C; Bell, P J; Charlton, D G; Dowell, John D; Gallop, B J; Homer, R J; Jovanovic, P; Mahout, G; McMahon, T J; Wilson, J A; Barr, A J; Carter, J R; Fromant, B P; Goodrick, M J; Hill, J C; Lester, C G; Palmer, M J; Parker, M A; Robinson, D; Sabetfakhri, A; Shaw, R J; Anghinolfi, F; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Chouridou, S; Fortin, R; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwé, M; Ferrari, P; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; MacPherson, A; Niinikoski, T O; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Rudge, A; Ruggiero, G; Wallny, R; Weilhammer, P; Bialas, W; Dabrowski, W; Grybos, P; Koperny, S; Blocki, J; Brückman, P; Gadomski, S; Godlewski, J; Górnicki, E; Malecki, P; Moszczynski, A; Stanecka, E; Stodulski, M; Szczygiel, R; Turala, M; Wolter, M; Ahmad, A; Benes, J; Carpentieri, C; Feld, L; Ketterer, C; Ludwig, J; Meinhardt, J; Runge, K; Mikulec, B; Mangin-Brinet, M; D'Onofrio, M; Donega, M; Moêd, S; Sfyrla, A; Ferrère, D; Clark, A G; Perrin, E; Weber, M; Bates, R L; Cheplakov, A P; Saxon, D H; O'Shea, V; Smith, K M; Iwata, Y; Ohsugi, T; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Terada, S; Ujiie, N; Ikegami, Y; Unno, Y; Takashima, R; Brodbeck, T; Chilingarov, A G; Hughes, G; Ratoff, P; Sloan, T; Allport, P P; Casse, G L; Greenall, A; Jackson, J N; Jones, T J; King, B T; Maxfield, S J; Smith, N A; Sutcliffe, P; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Beck, G A; Carter, A A; Lloyd, S L; Martin, A J; Morris, J; Morin, J; Nagai, K; Pritchard, T W; Anderson, B E; Butterworth, J M; Fraser, T J; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; Postranecky, M; Warren, M R M; Cindro, V; Kramberger, G; Mandic, I; Mikuz, M; Duerdoth, I P; Freestone, J; Foster, J M; Ibbotson, M; Loebinger, F K; Pater, J; Snow, S W; Thompson, R J; Atkinson, T M; Bright, G; Kazi, S; Lindsay, S; Moorhead, G F; Taylor, G N; Bachindgagyan, G; Baranova, N; Karmanov, D; Merkine, M; Andricek, L; Bethke, Siegfried; Kudlaty, J; Lutz, Gerhard; Moser, H G; Nisius, R; Richter, R; Schieck, J; Cornelissen, T; Gorfine, G W; Hartjes, F G; Hessey, N P; de Jong, P; Muijs, A J M; Peeters, S J M; Tomeda, Y; Tanaka, R; Nakano, I; Dorholt, O; Danielsen, K M; Huse, T; Sandaker, H; Stapnes, S; Bargassa, Pedrame; Reichold, A; Huffman, T; Nickerson, R B; Weidberg, A; Doucas, G; Hawes, B; Lau, W; Howell, D; Kundu, N; Wastie, R; Böhm, J; Mikestikova, M; Stastny, J; Broklová, Z; Broz, J; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Kubík, P; Reznicek, P; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I; Chren, D; Horazdovsky, T; Linhart, V; Pospísil, S; Sinor, M; Solar, M; Sopko, B; Stekl, I; Ardashev, E N; Golovnya, S N; Gorokhov, S A; Kholodenko, A G; Rudenko, R E; Ryadovikov, V N; Vorobev, A P; Adkin, P J; Apsimon, R J; Batchelor, L E; Bizzell, J P; Booker, P; Davis, V R; Easton, J M; Fowler, C; Gibson, M D; Haywood, S J; MacWaters, C; Matheson, J P; Matson, R M; McMahon, S J; Morris, F S; Morrissey, M; Murray, W J; Phillips, P W; Tyndel, M; Villani, E G; Dorfan, D E; Grillo, A A; Rosenbaum, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Booth, P; Buttar, C M; Dawson, I; Dervan, P; Grigson, C; Harper, R; Moraes, A; Peak, L S; Varvell, K E; Chu Ming Lee; Hou Li Shing; Lee Shih Chang; Teng Ping Kun; Wan Chang Chun; Hara, K; Kato, Y; Kuwano, T; Minagawa, M; Sengoku, H; Bingefors, N; Brenner, R; Ekelöf, T J C; Eklund, L; Bernabeu, J; Civera, J V; Costa, M J; Fuster, J; García, C; García, J E; González-Sevilla, S; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Martí i García, S; Modesto, P; Sánchez, J; Sospedra, L; Vos, M; Fasching, D; González, S; Jared, R C; Charles, E

    2005-01-01

    The design and technology of the silicon strip detector modules for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment have been finalised in the last several years. Integral to this process has been the measurement and verification of the tracking performance of the different module types in test beams at the CERN SPS and the KEK PS. Tests have been performed to explore the module performance under various operating conditions including detector bias voltage, magnetic field, incidence angle, and state of irradiation up to 3 multiplied by 1014 protons per square centimetre. A particular emphasis has been the understanding of the operational consequences of the binary readout scheme.

  3. Performance of CREAM Calorimeter Results of Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, H S; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Castellina, A; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; Duvernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Hyun, H J; Kang, T G; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, M Y; Kim, T; Kim, Y J; Lee, J K; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Mognet, S I; Nam, S W; Nutter, S; Park, N H; Park, H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Syed, S; Song, C; Swordy, S; Wu, J; Yang, J; Zhang, H Q; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM), a balloon-borne experiment, is under preparation for a flight in Antarctica at the end of 2004. CREAM is planned to measure the energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays directly at energies between 1 TeV and 1000 TeV. Incident particle energies will be measured by a transition radiation detector and a sampling calorimeter. The calorimeter was constructed at the University of Maryland and tested at CERN in 2003. Performance of the calorimeter during the beam tests is reported.

  4. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013-14). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase of the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the pixel detector. An overview of the sensor technologies’ qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests are presented.

  5. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013–2014). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing Pixel Detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase in the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the Pixel Detector. An overview of the sensor technologies' qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests is presented.

  6. A Coordinated Focused Ion Beam/Ultramicrotomy Technique for Serial Sectioning of Hayabusa Particles and Other Returned Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, E. L.; Keller, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent sample return missions, such as NASA's Stardust mission to comet 81P/Wild 2 and JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa, have returned particulate samples (typically 5-50 µm) that pose tremendous challenges to coordinated analysis using a variety of nano- and micro-beam techniques. The ability to glean maximal information from individual particles has become increasingly important and depends critically on how the samples are prepared for analysis. This also holds true for other extraterrestrial materials, including interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites and lunar regolith grains. Traditionally, particulate samples have been prepared using microtomy techniques (e.g., [1]). However, for hard mineral particles ?20 µm, microtome thin sections are compromised by severe chatter and sample loss. For these difficult samples, we have developed a hybrid technique that combines traditional ultramicrotomy with focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, allowing for the in situ investigation of grain surfaces and interiors. Using this method, we have increased the number of FIB-SEM prepared sections that can be recovered from a particle with dimensions on the order of tens of µms. These sections can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of electron beam techniques. Here, we demonstrate this sample preparation technique on individual lunar regolith grains in order to study their space-weathered surfaces. We plan to extend these efforts to analyses of individual Hayabusa samples.

  7. A Turbo Pascal program for testing eye-hand coordination by means of tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, M

    1992-02-01

    A Turbo Pascal program for eye-hand coordination testing using standard PC XT/AT mouse is presented. The contour segments of three simple figures (square, circle and triangle) are chosen as tracing trajectories. Tracing performance expressed in root mean squared (RMS) and modulus mean error (MME) measures are calculated and used, together with tracing time for evaluation of eye hand coordination ability.

  8. Impact and Estimation of Balance Coordinate System Rotations and Translations in Wind-Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Kenneth G.; Parker, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between the model and balance coordinate systems lead to biases in the aerodynamic measurements during wind-tunnel testing. The reference coordinate system relative to the calibration coordinate system at which the forces and moments are resolved is crucial to the overall accuracy of force measurements. This paper discusses sources of discrepancies and estimates of coordinate system rotation and translation due to machining and assembly differences. A methodology for numerically estimating the coordinate system biases will be discussed and developed. Two case studies are presented using this methodology to estimate the model alignment. Examples span from angle measurement system shifts on the calibration system to discrepancies in actual wind-tunnel data. The results from these case-studies will help aerodynamic researchers and force balance engineers to better the understand and identify potential differences in calibration systems due to coordinate system rotation and translation.

  9. Beam tests of the balloon-borne ATIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ganel, O; Ahn, H S; Ampe, J; Bashindzhagian, G L; Case, G; Chang, H; Ellison, S; Fazely, A; Gould, R; Granger, D; Gunasingha, R M; Guzik, T G; Han, Y J; Isbert, J; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, S K; Kwon, Y; Panasyuk, M Y; Panov, A; Price, B; Samsonov, G; Schmidt, W K H; Sen, M; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Sokolskaya, N; Stewart, M; Voronin, A; Wagner, D; Wang, J Z; Wefel, J P; Wu, J; Zatsepin, V

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurements from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide information about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATIC's design centers on an 18 radiation length (X0) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75λint graphite target. In September 1999, the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000–January 2001 and again in December 2002–January 2003, ATIC flew on the first two of a series of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 to 375 G...

  10. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, P. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: pierluigi.zaccaria@igi.cnr.it; Dal Bello, S. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Marcuzzi, D. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Masiello, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Cordier, J.J. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Hemsworth, R. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Antipenkov, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Day, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dremel, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mack, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jones, T. [UKAEA Culham EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coniglio, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Pillon, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Sandri, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Speth, E. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Tanga, A. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Pietro, E. Di [EFDA CSU, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mondino, P.L. [EFDA CSU, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER international team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D{sup -} ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimise the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring.

  11. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Coniglio, A.; Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX Association Euratom-ENEA, Padova (Italy); Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DSM/DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Antipenkov, A.; Day, C.; Dremel, M.; Mack, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Physik; Pillon, M.; Sandri, S. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia; Speth, E.; Tanga, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP CSU, Garching (Germany); Jones, T. [UKAEA Culham Euratom/Ukaea Fusion Association Culham Science Centre, Abingdom OX (United Kingdom); Di Pietro, E.; Mondino, P.L. [EFDA CSU, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER International Team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D{sup -} ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimize the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring. (authors)

  12. Beam Tests of the Balloon-Borne ATIC Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganel, O.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, E. J.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Ellison, S.; Fazely, A.; Gould, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurement from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide crucial hints about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATTIC'S design centers on an 18 radiation length (X(sub Omnicron)) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75 lambda(sub int) graphite target. In September 1999 the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator, within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000 - January 2001, ATIC flew on the first of a series of long duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam-tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 GeV to 375 GeV, as well as signal linearity and collection efficiency estimates. We show how these results compare with expectations based on simulations, and their expected impacts on mission performance.

  13. Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

  14. Successful beam tests for ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Another round of beam tests of prototypes for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for ALICE has been completed and there are already some good results. Mass production of the components of the detector will start early next year.   Top view of the setup for the Transition Radiation Detector prototype tests at CERN.On the left, can be seen the full-scale TRD prototype together with four smaller versions. These are busy days for the TRD (Transition Radiation Detector) team of ALICE. Twenty people - mainly from Germany, but also from Russia and Japan - were working hard during the beam tests this autumn at CERN to assess the performance of their detector prototypes. Analysis of the data shows that the TRD can achieve the desired physics goal even for the highest conceivable multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In its final configuration in the ALICE experiment, the TRD will greatly help in identifying high-momentum electrons, which are 'needles in a haystack' that consists mostly of...

  15. Planar Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS Upgrade: Beam Tests results

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, J

    2012-01-01

    The performance of planar silicon pixel sensors, in development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, has been examined in a series of beam tests at the CERN SPS facilities since 2009. Salient results are reported on the key parameters, including the spatial resolution, the charge collection and the charge sharing between adjacent cells, for different bulk materials and sensor geometries. Measurements are presented for n+-in-n pixel sensors irradiated with a range of fluences and for p-type silicon sensors with various layouts from different vendors. All tested sensors were connected via bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel read-out chip. The tests reveal that both n-type and p-type planar sensors are able to collect significant charge even after the lifetime fluence expected at the HL-LHC.

  16. LArIAT: Liquid Argon TPC in a Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Phil [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-02-28

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of the LArIAT collaboration who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out starting during the 2013 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The TSW is intended primarily for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocation for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. It reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this TSW to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. This TSW fulfills Article 1 (facilities and scope of work) of the User Agreements signed (or still to be signed) by an authorized representative of each institution collaborating on this experiment. Precision neutrino physics has entered a new era both with pressing questions to be addressed at short and long baselines, and with increasing interest and development of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs). These open volume liquid argon TPCs drift ionization electrons from passing charged particles to readout wire chamber planes at the edge of the detector. The Signals are then combined to form 2D and 3D pho-quality like millimeter scale images of the charged particles tracks and to provide calorimetric measurements of the deposited energy in the detector.

  17. 3D silicon pixel sensors: Recent test beam results

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, P; Sandaker, H; Korolkov, I; Barrera, C; Wermes, N; Borri, M; Grinstein, S; Troyano, I; Grenier, P; Devetak, E; Fleta, C; Kenney, C; Tsybychev, D; Nellist, C; Chmeissan, M; Su, D; DeWilde, B; Silverstein, D; Dorholt, O; Tsung, J; Sjoebaek, K; Stupak, J; Slaviec, T; Micelli, A; Helle, K; Bolle, E; Huegging, F; Kocian, M; Fazio, S; Balbuena, J; Dalla Betta, G F; La Rosa, A; Rivero, F; Mastroberardino, A; Hasi, J; Darbo, G; Boscardin, M; Da Via, C; Nordahl, P; Giordani, M; Jackson, P; Rohne, O; Gemme, C; Young, C

    2011-01-01

    The 3D silicon sensors aimed for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade have been tested with a high energy pion beam at the CERN SPS in 2009. Two types of sensor layouts were tested: full-3D assemblies fabricated in Stanford, where the electrodes penetrate the entire silicon wafer thickness, and modified-3D assemblies fabricated at FBK-irst with partially overlapping electrodes. In both cases three read-out electrodes are ganged together to form pixels of dimension 50 x 400 mu m(2). Data on the pulse height distribution, tracking efficiency and resolution were collected for various particle incident angles, with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field. Data from a planar sensor of the type presently used in the ATLAS detector were used at the same time to give comparison. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Modified Mode-I Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) Fracture Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    2001-01-01

    Five composite sandwich panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Four of these panels had E-glass/vinylester facesheets and one had carbon/epoxy facesheets. The sandwich panels had different density PVC foam cores. The four E-glass panels had core densities of 80, 100, 130, 200 kg/cu m. The sandwich with carbon/epoxy 3 facesheets had a core with density of 100 kg/cu m. Fracture tests were conducted using a modified Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) test configuration. Load displacement curves were obtained for loading and unloading of the specimens during crack growth. Various increments of crack growth were monitored. Critical Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) were determined from the tests using the area method. The critical values of SERR can be considered the fracture toughness of the sandwich material. The fracture toughness ranged 367 J/sq m to 1350 J/sq m over the range of core densities. These results are compared to the Mode-I fracture toughness of the PVC foam core materials and values obtained for foam-cored sandwiches using the TSD specimen. Finite-element analyses (FEA) were performed for the test configuration and Strain Energy Release Rates were calculated using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). The SERR values determined from the FEA were scaled to the fracture loads, or critical loads, obtained from the modified CSB tests. These critical loads were in close agreement with the test values.

  19. PS BOOSTER BEAM TESTS OF THE NEW DIGITAL BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM FOR LEIR

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Bento, J; De Long, J H; Findlay, A; Matuszkiewicz, P; Pedersen, F; Salom-Sarasqueta, A; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2005-01-01

    We have been developing a scaled-down prototype of the new digital beam control and cavity servoing system for CERN’s Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) slated for commissioning in 2005. The system’s hardware and software, developed as part of a CERN-BNL collaboration, are based on new all-digital technology already deployed at BNL's AGS Booster. The system relies on VME modules, carrying Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) as well as Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and daughter cards. New concepts deployed include software implementation, through DSPs & FPGAs, of functions traditionally executed by analogue hardware, such as reference-functions and timings generation. Additionally, a user-selectable digital data acquisition functionality provides diagnostic and troubleshoot access points, a new feature which is very useful in a digital system. The scaled-down prototype implements frequency program, radial steering, phase and radial loops capabilities and it has been tested in CERN's PS Booster (PSB) dur...

  20. Test Beam Data Analysis for a Timepix3 Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Morag

    2016-01-01

    The vertex and tracker detector R&D for a future linear collider (CLICdp) aims at developing new silicon sensor technologies. The EP-LCD group has been helping develop a novel pixel detector chip called the Timepix3 with a very thick active silicon layer (675 μm). This thick detector can be used to reconstruct the track incidence angle using the charge drift-time information. To evaluate the principle, test beam data was taken in October 2015 and June 2016 with the Timepix3 at various angles to the beam. The data was analysed to evaluate the sensors performance in calculating the track incidence angle. The device angle was determined using three methods: the first using the cluster size information, secondly using the timing information, and finally using a multivariate analysis technique. The timing method proved the principle of the Timepix3 track angle measurements but the MVA method was found to give much better results, especially for smaller angles, than the other two methods and requires fewer cal...

  1. Test Beam Results with a Full Size sTGC

    CERN Document Server

    Rettie, Sebastien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The forthcoming LHC upgrade to high luminosity will increase the background rate in the forward region of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer (composed of three Big Wheels (BW) and a Small Wheel (SW) on each side of the detector) by approximately a factor of five. With such a rate some of the present Muon Spectrometer detectors in the SW region will produce fake triggers and will therefore be replaced by a New Small Wheel (NSW) composed of small Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) and Micromegas planes. The aim of the detectors is to reach 100 micrometers position resolution and an online muon track reconstruction with better than 1 mrad precision. A full size sTGC quadruplet has been constructed and equipped with the first prototype of the dedicated front end electronics (VMM1). The performance of the sTGC quadruplet at the Fermilab test beam facility is presented here.

  2. Development, Production and Testing of 4500 Beam Loss Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, E B; Dehning, B; Ferioli, G; Grishin, V; Jimenez, T M; Koshelev, A; Kramer, Daniel; Larionov, A; Taborelli, M; Seleznev, V; Sleptsov, M; Sytin, A; Wevers, I

    2008-01-01

    Beam-loss monitoring (BLM) [1] is a key element in the LHC machine protection. 4250 nitrogen filled ionization chambers (IC) and 350 secondary emission monitors (SEM) have been manufactured and tested at the Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Protvino, Russia, following their development at CERN. Signal speed and robustness against aging were the main design criteria. Each monitor is permanently sealed inside a stainless-steel cylinder. The quality of the welding was a critical aspect during production. The SEMs are requested to hold a vacuum of $10^{-7}$ bar. Impurity levels from thermal and radiationinduced desorption should remain in the range of parts per million in the ICs. To avoid radiation aging (up to $2·10^{8}$ Gy in 20 years) production of the chambers followed strict UHV requirements. IHEP designed and built the UHV production stand. Due to the required dynamic range of $10^{8}$, the leakage current of the monitors has to stay below 2 pA. Several tests during and after production were ...

  3. Tests of Local Hadron Calibration approaches in ATLAS Combined Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Pospelov, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The three Atlas calorimeter systems in the region of the forward crack at |eta| = 3.2 in the nominal Atlas setup and a typical section of the two barrel calorimeters at |eta| = 0.45 of Atlas have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented for the endcap testbeam. The local hadronic calibration approach as used in the full Atlas setup has been applied to the endcap test beam data. An extension of it using layer correlations has been tested on the barrel test beam data. Both methods utilize modular correction steps based on shower shape variables to correct for invisible energy inside the reconstructed clusters in the calorimeters (compensation) and for lost energy deposits outside of the reconstructed clusters (dead material and out-of-cluster deposits). Results for both methods and comparisons to MC simulations are presented.

  4. Test of the ATLAS pion calibration scheme in the ATLAS combined test beam

    CERN Document Server

    Spanò, F

    2009-01-01

    Pion energy reconstruction is studied using the data collected during the 2004 ATLAS combined test beam. The strategy to extract corrections for the non-compensating nature of the ATLAS calorimeters for dead material losses and for leakage effects is discussed and assessed. The default ATLAS strategy based on a weighting technique of the energy deposits in calorimeter cells is presented and compared to a novel technique exploiting correlations among energy deposited in calorimeter layers.

  5. Tests of a particle flow algorithm with CALICE test beam data

    CERN Document Server

    ,; CALICE Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The studies presented in this paper provide a first experimental test of the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA) concept using data recorded in high granularity calorimeters. Pairs of overlaid pion showers from CALICE 2007 test beam data are reconstructed by the PandoraPFA program developed to implement PFA for a future lepton collider. Recovery of a neutral hadron's energy in the vicinity of a charged hadron is studied. The impact of the two overlapping hadron showers on energy resolution is investigated. The dependence of the confusion error on the distance between a 10 GeV neutral hadron and a charged pion is derived for pion energies of 10 and 30 GeV which are representative of a 100 GeV jet. The comparison of these test beam data results with Monte Carlo simulation is done for various hadron shower models within the GEANT4 framework. The results for simulated particles and for beam data are in good agreement thereby providing support for previous simulation studies of the power of Particle Flow Calorimetry at ...

  6. Modelling and Testing of the Piezoelectric Beam as Energy Harvesting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszewnik Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes modelling and testing of the piezoelectric beam as energy harvesting system. The cantilever beam with two piezo-elements glued onto its surface is considered in the paper. As result of carried out modal analysis of the beam the natural frequencies and modes shapes are determined. The obtained results in the way mentioned above allow to estimate such location of the piezo-actuator on the beam where the piezo generates maximal values of modal control forces. Experimental investigations carried out in the laboratory allow to verify results of natural frequencies obtained during simulation and also testing of the beam in order to obtain voltage from vibration with help of the piezo-harvester. The obtained values of voltage stored on the capacitor C0 shown that the best results are achieved for the beam excited to vibration with third natural frequency, but the worst results for the beam oscillating with the first natural frequency.

  7. A Test of Motor (Not Executive) Planning in Developmental Coordination Disorder and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Swieten, Lisa M.; van Bergen, Elsje; Williams, Justin H. G.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Plumb, Mandy S.; Kent, Samuel W.; Mon-Williams, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Grip selection tasks have been used to test "planning" in both autism and developmental coordination disorder (DCD). We differentiate between "motor" and "executive" planning and present a modified motor planning task. Participants grasped a cylinder in 1 of 2 orientations before turning it clockwise or anticlockwise.…

  8. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Performance in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Su, Chwen-Yng; Su, Jui-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the executive functions measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) between children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and age-matched normal controls. A second purpose was to examine the relations between executive functions and school functions in DCD children.…

  9. Justification and implementation of the coordinate method among potentially possible precise methods for measuring angles between axes of small-angle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, M. D.

    2017-08-01

    A series of studies devoted to the theoretical justification and development of methods and tools for angular measurements based on the use of multiple sources of optical beams with a small angular aperture is continued. The source used in this study is a holographic prism: a fluorite single crystal with a system of superimposed holograms recorded in its bulk, which generates a series of diffracted small-angle beams in the form of a flat fan under illumination by a reference laser. This fan has a high spatial stability, including constancy of angles between any pair of fan beams in a wide range of external conditions. Based on the previously introduced notion of an effective beam axis, potential exact methods for measuring angles between fan beams are considered, and a coordinate method using a coordinate measuring machine and a CCD recorder is substantiated and implemented. The accuracy of the proposed method is analyzed. It is shown that its errors can potentially be reduced to a level of 1″ or even less.

  10. Fabrication and testing of SMA composite beam with shape control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolvi, Basavaraj; S, Raja; Nagaraj, Shanmukha; Mudradi, Varada Raj

    2017-07-01

    Smart materials are the advanced materials that have characteristics of sensing and actuation in response to the external stimuli like pressure, heat or electric charge etc. These materials can be integrated in to any structure to make it smart. From the different types of smart materials available, Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) is found to be more useful in designing new applications, which can offer more actuating speed, reduce the overall weight of the structure. The unique property of SMA is the ability to remember and recover from large strains of upto 8% without permanent deformation. Embedding the SMA wire/sheet in fiber-epoxy/flexible resin systems has many potential applications in Aerospace, Automobile, Medical, Robotics and various other fields. In this work the design, fabrication, and testing of smart SMA composite beam has been carried out. Two types of epoxy based resin systems namely LY 5210 resin system and EPOLAM 2063 resin system are used in fabricating the SMA composite specimens. An appropriate mould is designed and fabricated to retain the pre-strain of SMA wire during high temperature post curing of composite specimens. The specimens are fabricated using vacuum bag technique.

  11. Beam Test of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Garvey, J; Mahout, G; Moye, T H; Staley, R J; Thomas, J P; Typaldos, D; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Achenbach, R; Föhlisch, F; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Kluge, E E; Mahboubi, K; Meier, K; Meshkov, P; Rühr, F; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Ay, C; Bauss, B; Belkin, A; Rieke, S; Schäfer, U; Tapprogge, T; Trefzger, T; Weber, GA; Eisenhandler, E F; Landon, M; Apostologlou, P; Barnett, B M; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Mirea, A; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Sankey, D P C; Bohm, C; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Silverstein, S

    2005-01-01

    The Level-1 Calorimter Trigger consists of a Preprocessor (PP), a Cluster Processor (CP), and a Jet/Energy-sum Processor (JEP). The CP and JEP receive digitised trigger-tower data from the Preprocessor and produce Region-of-Interest (RoIs) and trigger multiplicities. The latter are sent in real time to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP) where the Level-1 decision is made. On receipt of a Level-1 Accept, Readout Driver Modules (RODs), provide intermediate results to the data acquisition (DAQ) system for monitoring and diagnostic purpose. RoI information is sent to the RoI builder (RoIB) to help reduce the amount of data required for the Level-2 Trigger The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger System at the test beam consisted of 1 Preprocessor module, 1 Cluster Processor Module, 1 Jet/Energy Module and 2 Common Merger Modules. Calorimeter energies were sucessfully handled thourghout the chain and trigger object sent to the CTP. Level-1 Accepts were sucessfully produced and used to drive the readout path. Online diagno...

  12. Testing Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rijoff, T L

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its minimum crossing angle are limited by the effect of long-range beam-beam collisions. A wire compensators can mitigate part of the long-range effects and may allow for smaller crossing angles, or higher beam intensity. A prototype long-range wire compensator could be installed in the LHC by 2014/15. Since the originally reserved position for such a wire compensator is not available for this first step, we explore other possible options. Our investigations consider various longitudinal and transverse locations, different wire shapes, different optics configurations and several crossing angles between the two colliding beams. Simulations are carried out with the weak-strong code BBtrack. New postprocessing tools are introduced to analyse tune footprints and particle stability. In particular, a new method for the Lyapunov coefficient calculation is implemented. Submitted as "Tesi di laurea" at the University of Milano, 2012.

  13. Computerized Tests of Team Performance and Crew Coordination Suitable for Military/Aviation Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Ben D; Britt, Thomas W; Kelley, Amanda M; Athy, Jeremy R; Legan, Shauna M

    2017-08-01

    The coordination of team effort on shared tasks is an area of inquiry. A number of tests of team performance in challenging environments have been developed without comparison or standardization. This article provides a systematic review of the most accessible and usable low-to-medium fidelity computerized tests of team performance and determines which are most applicable to military- and aviation-relevant research, such as studies of group command, control, communication, and crew coordination. A search was conducted to identify computerized measures of team performance. In addition to extensive literature searches (DTIC, Psychinfo, PubMed), the authors reached out to team performance researchers at conferences and through electronic communication. Identified were 57 potential tests according to 6 specific selection criteria (e.g., the requirement for automated collection of team performance and coordination processes, the use of military-relevant scenarios). The following seven tests (listed alphabetically) were considered most suitable for military needs: Agent Enabled Decision Group Environment (AEDGE), C3Conflict, the C3 (Command, Control, & Communications) Interactive Task for Identifying Emerging Situations (NeoCITIES), Distributed Dynamic Decision Making (DDD), Duo Wondrous Original Method Basic Awareness/Airmanship Test (DuoWOMBAT), the Leader Development Simulator (LDS), and the Planning Task for Teams (PLATT). Strengths and weaknesses of these tests are described and recommendations offered to help researchers identify the test most suitable for their particular needs. Adoption of a few standard computerized test batteries to study team performance would facilitate the evaluation of interventions intended to enhance group performance in multiple challenging military and aerospace operational environments.Lawson BD, Britt TW, Kelley AM, Athy JR, Legan SM. Computerized tests of team performance and crew coordination suitable for military/aviation settings

  14. Stiffness, intralimb coordination, and joint modulation during a continuous vertical jump test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pupo, Juliano; Dias, Jonathan Ache; Gheller, Rodrigo Ghedini; Detanico, Daniele; dos Santos, Saray Giovana

    2013-09-01

    This study analysed the modulation of jump performance, vertical stiffness as well as joint and intralimb coordination throughout a 30-s vertical jump test. Twenty male athletes performed the test on a force plate while undergoing kinematic analysis. Jump height, power output, ground contact time, vertical stiffness, maximum knee and hip flexion angles, and coordination by continuous relative phase (CRP) were analysed. Analysis of variance was used to compare variables within deciles, and t-tests were used to compare CRP data between the initial and final jumps. Results showed reduction in jump height, power output, and vertical stiffness, with an increase in contact time found during the test. Maximum knee and hip flexion angles declined, but hip angle decreased earlier (10-20% of the test) than knee angle (90-100%). No changes were observed in CRP for thigh-leg coupling when comparing initial and final jumps, but the trunk-thigh coupling was more in-phase near the end of the test. We conclude that fatigue causes reduction in jump performance, as well as changes in stiffness and joint angles. Furthermore, changes in intralimb coordination appear at the last 10% of the test, suggesting a neuromotor mechanism to counterbalance the loss of muscle strength.

  15. Beam Test of Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Elliott D

    1999-05-27

    A beam test of GLAST (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) components was performed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in October, 1997. These beam test components were simple versions of the planned light hardware. Results on the performance of the tracker, calorimeter, and anticoincidence charged particle veto are presented.

  16. BeamCal Instrumentation IC: Design, Implementation, and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusleme, Angel; Dragone, Angelo; Haller, Gunther; Wooley, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    The BeamCal detector, one of the calorimeters in the forward region of the International Linear Collider detector, will serve three purposes: ensure hermeticity of the detector for small polar angles, reduce the backscattering from beamstrahlung electron-positron pairs into the detector center, and provide a low-latency signal for beam diagnostics. The BeamCal specifications in terms of noise suppression, signal charge, pulse rate, and occupancy pose unique challenges in the front end and readout electronics design. The Bean-BeamCal instrumentation IC is the integrated circuit under study to fulfill these requirements. To process the signal charge at the International Collider pulse rate, the Bean uses switched-capacitor filters and a slow reset-release technique. Each channel has a 10-bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converter. The Bean also features a fast feedback adder capable of providing a low latency output for beam diagnostic purposes. This work presents the design and characterization of a 3-channel prototype of the Bean built to validate concepts while the final device will comprise 32 channels.

  17. The AMS02 Cherenkov imager prototype In-beam tests with high-energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Buénerd, Michel

    2005-01-01

    A prototype of the AMS Cherenkov imager has been tested at CERN with 20 and per nucleon ion obtained by fragmentation of a primary beam of Pb and In ions, respectively. Data have been collected with single low-intensity beam settings, over the range of nuclear charges 2beam conditions and using different radiators. The charge Z and velocity β resolution of the prototype have been measured and the aerogel material properties investigated.

  18. EFFECT OF PRANAYAMA AND EYE EXERCISES ON EYE TO HAND COORDINATION: STUDY BY FINGER DEXTERITY TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our eyes are bo dy's most well developed sensory organs. Indeed, a far larger part of our brain is devoted to the functions of eyesight than to those of hearing, taste, touch or smell together. We usually take our eyesight for granted, although when vision problems develop, most of us will do everything in our capacity to restore our eyesight to normal . Eyes work together to perceive depth thus allowing us to coordinate with motor actions. Practicing relaxation exercises in the form of pranayama and eye exercise has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. AIM: To study the effect of pranayama and eye exercises on eye to hand coordination. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study consisted of 60 healthy subjects divided equally into two groups. One group practiced kapalabhati pranayama and eye exercises for eight weeks whereas other group did not participate in any kind of exercise. The effect of pranayama and eye exercises on eye to hand coordination were assessed by finger dexterity test by using O′Connor finger dexterity task. RESULTS: There was significant improvement in eye to hand coordination in subjects practicing pranayama and eye exercises. Fi nger dexterity test values in study group before and after intervention were 31±4.94 and 33±4.98 respectively. Whereas in control group the values were 29.9±5.7 and 30.1±5.31 respectively. CONCLUSION: Both Kapalabhati pranayama and eye to hand coordination can improve fine motor skills

  19. Tests of Local Hadron Calibration Approaches in ATLAS Combined Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, KJ; The ATLAS collaboration; Pospelov, G

    2010-01-01

    Three ATLAS calorimeters in the region of the forward crack at $|eta| = 3.2$ in the nominal ATLAS setup and a typical section of the two barrel calorimeters at $|eta| = 0.45$ of ATLAS have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented for the endcap testbeam. The local hadronic calibration approach as used in the full Atlas setup has been applied to the endcap testbeam data. An extension of it using layer correlations has been tested with the barrel test beam data. Both methods utilize modular correction steps based on shower shape variables to correct for invisible energy inside the reconstructed clusters in the calorimeters (compensation) and for lost energy deposits outside of the reconstructed clusters (dead material and out-of-cluster deposits). Results for both methods and comparisons to Monte-Carlo simulations are presented.

  20. Commissioning status of the decelerator test beam line in CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Lillestol, R; Olvegaard, M; Syratchev, I; Carrillo, D; Toral, F; Faus-Golfe, A; Garcia-Garrigos, J J; Kubyshin, Y; Montoro, G

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN was constructed by the CTF3 collaboration to study the feasibility of the concepts for a compact linear collider. The test beam line (TBL) recently added to the CTF3 machine was designed to study the CLIC decelerator beam dynamics and 12 GHz power production. The beam line consists of a FODO lattice with high precision BPM’s and quadrupoles on movers for precise beam alignment. A total of 16 Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) will be installed in between the quadrupoles to extract 12 GHz power from the drive beam provided by the CTF3 machine. The CTF3 drive beam with a bunch-train length of 140 ns, 12 GHz bunch repetition frequency and an average current over the train of up to 28 A will be injected into the test beam line. Each PETS structure will produce 135 MW of 12 GHz power at nominal current. The beam will have lost more than 50 % of its initial energy of 150 MeV at the end of the beam line and will contain particles with energies between 65 MeV and 1...

  1. Static and dynamic testing of a damaged post tensioned concrete beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limongelli M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are reported the results of an experimental campaign carried out on a post tensioned concrete beam with the aim of investigating the possibility to detect early warning signs of deterioration basing on static and/or dynamic tests. The beam was tested in several configurations aimed to reproduce several different phases of the ‘life’ of the beam: the original undamaged state, increasing loss of tension in the post tensioning cables, a strengthening intervention carried out by means of a second tension cable, formation of further cracks on the strengthened beam. Responses of the beam were measured by an extensive set of instruments consisting of accelerometers, inclinometers, displacement transducers, strain gauges and optical fibres. The paper discusses the tests program and the dynamic characterization of the beam in the different damage scenarios. The modal properties of the beam in the different phases were recovered basing on the responses recorded on the beam during sine-sweep and impact hammer tests. The variation of the first modal frequency was studied to investigate the sensitivity of this parameter to both the cracking of the concrete section and the tension in the cables and also to compare results given by different types of experimental tests.

  2. Beam Loading Tests on DC-SC Photoinjector at Peking University

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Senlin; Chu, Xiangqiang; Ding, Yuantao; Hao, Jiankui; Jiao, Fei; Lin, Lin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan, Shengwen; Wang, Guimei; Wang, Lifang; Xiang Rong; Xiao, Binping; Xie, Datao; Yang Li Min; Zhang, Baocheng; Zhao, Kui; Zhu, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Since the beginning of commissioning in February 2003, lots of tests on the DC-SC photoinjector test facility have been performed. At present, Q0 of the 1+1/2-cell cavity has reached ~1E8 (at 4.2K) and the average gradient was about 4MeV/m. The DC photogun can provide stable electron beams. When the power of output laser went up to 100mW (266nm), the average beam current reached 400μA. Beam loading tests have been carried out, and SC acceleration was achieved. Average current of electron beams is about 100μA after acceleration.Further investigations are in progress to improve diagnostics system and to measure the emittance, energy spread and pulse length of electron beams.

  3. Results from the beam test of the engineering model of the GLAST large area telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto e Silva, E. do E-mail: eduardo@slac.stanford.edu; Anthony, P.; Arnold, R.; Arrighi, H.; Bloom, E.; Baughman, B.; Bogart, J.; Bosted, P.; Bumala, B.; Chekhtman, A.; Cotton, N.; Crider, A.; Dobbs-Dixon, I.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Dubois, R.; Engovatov, D.; Espigat, P.; Evans, J.L.; Fieguth, T.; Flath, D.; Frigaard, M.; Giebels, B.; Gillespie, S.; Godfrey, G.; Grove, J.E.; Handa, T.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hernando, J.; Hicks, M.; Hirayama, M.; Johnson, W.N.; Johnson, R.; Kamae, T.; Kroeger, W.; Lauben, D.; Lin, Y.C.; Lindner, T.; Michelson, P.; Moiseev, A.; Nikolaou, M.; Nolan, P.; Odian, A.; Ohsugi, T.; Ormes, J.; Paliaga, G.; Parkinson, P. Saz; Phlips, B.; Ritz, S.; Rock, S.; Russel, J.J.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Silvis, J.; Szalata, Z.; Terrier, R.; Thompson, D.J.; Tournear, D.M.; Waite, A.P.; Wallace, J.; Williams, S.; Williamson, R.; Winker, G

    2001-11-21

    This paper describes the results of a beam test using the Engineering Model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope, which was installed in a beam of positrons, hadrons and tagged photons at SLAC. The performance of the four subsystems, Anti Coincidence Detector, Silicon Tracker, Calorimeter and Data Acquisition will be described.

  4. Results from the Beam Test of the Engineering Model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    do Couto e Silva, Eduardo

    2000-11-03

    This paper describes the results of a beam test using the Engineering Model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope, which was installed in a beam of positrons, hadrons and tagged photons at SLAC. The performance of the four subsystems, Anti Coincidence Detector, Silicon Tracker, Calorimeter and Data Acquisition will be described.

  5. Beam Diagnostics Report for the Thermal Test Conducted on 3/9/2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-11

    The thermal test OTR data revealed several issues with the beam focus and the target window itself. The oxidation of the target window and the prominence of a scratch across the center of the window makes it impossible to accurately measure the beam profile and size.

  6. Partial-wave series expansions in spherical coordinates for the acoustic field of vortex beams generated from a finite circular aperture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F

    2014-12-01

    Stemming from the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld surface integral, the addition theorems for the spherical wave and Legendre functions, and a weighting function describing the behavior of the radial component vp1 of the normal velocity at the surface of a finite circular radiating source, partial-wave series expansions are derived for the incident field of acoustic spiraling (vortex) beams in a spherical coordinate system centered on the axis of wave propagation. Examples for vortex beams, comprising ρ-vortex, zeroth-order and higher order Bessel-Gauss and Bessel, truncated Neumann-Gauss and Hankel- Gauss, Laguerre-Gauss, and other Gaussian-type vortex beams are considered. The mathematical expressions are exact solutions of the Helmholtz equation. The results presented here are particularly useful to accurately evaluate analytically and compute numerically the acoustic scattering and other mechanical effects of finite vortex beams, such as the axial and 3-D acoustic radiation force and torque components on a sphere of any (isotropic, anisotropic, etc.) material (fluid, elastic, viscoelastic, etc.), either centered on the beam's axis of wave propagation, or placed off-axially. Numerical predictions allow optimal design of parameters in applications including but not limited to acoustical tweezers, acousto-fluidics, beamforming design, and imaging, to name a few.

  7. Development and Beam Tests of an Automatic Algorithm for Alignment of LHC Collimators with Embedded BPMs

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, G; Gasior, M; Mirarchi, D; Nosych, A A; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Assmann, R W; Sammut, N

    2013-01-01

    Collimators with embedded Beam Position Monitor (BPM) buttons will be installed in the LHC during the upcoming long shutdown period. During the subsequent operation, the BPMs will allow the collimator jaws to be kept centered around the beam trajectory. In this manner, the best possible beam cleaning efficiency and machine protection can be provided at unprecedented higher beam energies and intensities. A collimator alignment algorithm is proposed to center the jaws automatically around the beam. The algorithm is based on successive approximation, as the BPM measurements are affected by non-linearities, which vary with the distance between opposite buttons, as well as the difference between the beam and the jaw centers. The successful test results, as well as some considerations for eventual operation in the LHC are also presented.

  8. The progress of funnelling gun high voltage condition and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gassner, D. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rahman, O. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sheehy, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pietz, J. [Transfer Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Ackeret, M. [Transfer Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Yeckel, C. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Miller, R. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Dobrin, E. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Thompson, K. [Thompson, Stangenes Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A prototype of a high average current polarized electron funneling gun as an eRHIC injector has been built at BNL. The gun was assembled and tested at Stangenes Incorporated. Two beams were generated from two GaAs photocathodes and combined by a switched combiner field. We observed the combined beams on a YAG crystal and measured the photocurrent by a Faraday cup. The gun has been shipped to Stony Brook University and is being tested there. In this paper we will describe the major components of the gun and recent beam test results. High voltage conditioning is discussed as well.

  9. Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors: Simulation of Signal Formation & Irradiation Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091318; Stamoulis, G; Vavougios, D

    The Beam Loss Monitoring system of the Large Hadron Collider is responsible for the pro- tection of the machine from damage and for the prevention of a magnet quench. Near the interaction points of the LHC, in the triplet magnets area, the BLMs are sensitive to the collision debris, limiting their ability to distinguish beam loss signal from signal caused due to the collision products. Placing silicon & diamond detectors inside the cold mass of the mag- nets, in liquid helium temperatures, would provide significant improvement to the precision of the measurement of the energy deposition in the superconducting coil of the magnet. To further study the signal formation and the shape of the transient current pulses of the aforementioned detectors in cryogenic temperatures, a simulation application has been developed. The application provides a fast way of determining the electric field components inside the detectors bulk and then introduces an initial charge distribution based on the properties of the radiat...

  10. Test of the LHC DIAMOND Beam Loss Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H; Griesmayer, E

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition(CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-­radiation environment. Four detectors were configured with fast, radiation-­hard pre-amplifiers with a bandwidth of 2GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, particle losses were resolved with a 2ns rise time, a pulse width of 10ns and a time resolution of 615ps. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2us. Measurements during the LHC start-­up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the LHC RF freq...

  11. High heat flux test on the thermocouple embedded ITER neutral beam duct liner mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.K., E-mail: ckpark@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.S., E-mail: hskim@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.H.; Ahn, H.J. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.K.; Lee, D.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Urbani, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067, St. Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Twenty thermocouples have been installed on the NB duct liner full scale mock-up. • High heat flux test has been performed. • Four thermocouple fixation schemes had been verified by high heat flux test. • Temperature behavior of the NB duct liner has been successfully simulated. - Abstract: The ITER neutral beam duct liner is located within the tokamak VV port extension and is mounted on the VV port extension flange. The duct liner is made from CuCrZr copper alloy and is actively cooled through deep-drilled channels. A number of thermocouples should be installed on the neutral beam duct liner in order to provide the ability to detect temperature excursions on the surface of the duct liner. Twenty thermocouples have been installed on the neutral beam duct liner full scale mock-up, and a high heat flux test has been performed at the KoHLT-EB test facility, in order to simulate temperature detection in the neutral beam duct liner during ITER operation. For each thermocouple, the fixation method has been verified by high heat flux test with uniform electron beam profile, and the temperature behavior of the neutral beam duct liner has been successfully simulated by Gaussian electron beam profile.

  12. Test of the BEXE autocorrelator circuit at the CLIC laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aulenbacher, K; Cornali, R; Manarin, A; Rossa, E; Schmickler, Hermann; Voors, G; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1997-01-01

    This device allows the measurement of the bunch length of a photon bunch by autocorrelation. The detector works in a very large range from X-rays to Infrared. This report describes the laser beam test and the resulting calibration.

  13. Design and construction of a prototype of a flat top beam interferometer and initial tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agresti, J [University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa (Italy); D' Ambrosio, E [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); DeSalvo, R [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Forest, D [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Lagrange, B [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Mackowski, J M [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Michel, C [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Montorio, J L [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Morgado, N [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Pinard, L [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Remillieux, A [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, 22 Bd.Niels Bohr, Villeurbane (France); Simoni, B [University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa (Italy); Tarallo, M [University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa (Italy); Willems, P [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2006-03-02

    A non-Gaussian, flat-top laser beam profile, also called Mesa Beam Profile, supported by non spherical mirrors known as Mexican Hat (MH) mirrors, has been proposed as a way to depress the mirror thermal noise and thus improve the sensitivity of future interferometric Gravitational Wave detectors, including Advanced LIGO. Non-Gaussian beam configurations have never been tested before hence the main motivation of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of this new concept. A 7m rigid suspended Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity which can support a scaled version of a Mesa beam applicable to the LIGO interferometers has been developed. The FP cavity prototype is being designed to prove the feasibility of actual MH mirror profiles, determine whether a MH mirror cavity is capable of transforming an incoming Gaussian beam into a flat top beam profile, study the effects of unavoidable mirror imperfections on the resulting beam profile and gauge the difficulties associated with locking and maintaining the alignment of such an optical cavity. We present the design of the experimental apparatus and simulations comparing Gaussian and Mesa beams performed both with ideal and current (measured) mirror profiles. An overview of the technique used to manufacture this kind of mirror and initial results showing Mesa beam properties are presented.

  14. An evaluation testing technique of single event effect using Beam Blanking SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, J.; Hada, T.; Pesce, A.; Akutsu, T.; Matsuda, S. [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Igarashi, T.; Baba, S.

    1997-03-01

    Beam Blanking SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) testing technique has been applied to CMOS SRAM devices to evaluate the occurence of soft errors on memory cells. Cross-section versus beam current and LET curves derived from BBSEM and heavy ion testing technique, respectively, have been compared. A linear relation between BBSEM current and heavy ion LET has been found. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the application of focused pulsed electron beam could be a reliable, convenient and inexpensive tool to investigate the effects of heavy ions and high energy particles on memory devices for space application. (author)

  15. Summary and Conclusions of the First DESY Test Beam User Workshop arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Arling, Jan-Hendrik; Bandiera, Laura; Behnke, Ties; Dannheim, Dominik; Diener, Ralf; Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan; Ehrlichmann, Heiko; Gerbershagen, Andreas; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Hayrapetyan, Avetik; Kaminski, Jochen; Kroll, Jiri; Martinengo, Paolo; Meyners, Norbert; Müntz, Christian; Poley, Luise; Schwenker, Benjamin; Stanitzki, Marcel

    On October 5/6, 2017, DESY hosted the first DESY Test Beam User Workshop [1] which took place in Hamburg. Fifty participants from different user communities, ranging from LHC (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb) to FAIR (CBM, PANDA), DUNE, Belle-II, future linear colliders (ILC, CLIC) and generic detector R&D presented their experiences with the DESY II Test Beam Facility, their concrete plans for the upcoming years and a first estimate of their needs for beam time in the long-term future beyond 2025. A special focus was also on additional improvements to the facility beyond its current capabilities.

  16. Beam test results for the SuperB-SVT thin striplet detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, L.; Comotti, D.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Pellegrini, G.; Sbarra, C.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Bevan, A.; Wilson, F.; Beck, G.; Morris, J.; Ganaway, F.; Cenci, R.; Bombelli, L.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fiorini, C.; Liberali, V.; Monti, M.; Nasri, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stabile, A.; Balestri, G.; Batignani, G.; Bernardelli, A.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morsani, F.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Petragnani, G.; Profeti, A.; Rizzo, G.; Soldani, A.; Walsh, J.; Gaioni, L.; Manazza, A.; Quartieri, E.; Ratti, L.; Zucca, S.; Alampi, G.; Cotto, G.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fontana, G.; Pancheri, L.; Povoli, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cristaudo, P.; Lanceri, L.; Liberti, B.; Rashevskaya, I.; Stella, C.; Vitale, L.

    2013-08-01

    The baseline detector option for the first layer of the SuperB Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is a high resistivity double-sided silicon device with short strips (striplets) at 45° angle to the detector's edge. A prototype was tested with a 120 GeV/c pion beam in September 2011 at the SPS-H6 test-beam line at CERN. In this paper studies on efficiency, resolution and cluster size are reported.

  17. Status of an automatic Beam Steering for the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dabrowski, A; Schulte, D; Shaker, SH; Skowronski, P; Tecker, F; Tomás, R

    2008-01-01

    An automatic beam steering application for CTF 3 is being designed in order to automatize operation of the machine, as well as providing a test-bed for advanced steering algorithms for CLIC. Beam-based correction including dispersion free steering have been investigated. An approach based on a PLACET on-line model has been tested. This paper gives an overview of the current status and the achieved results of the CTF3 automatic steering.

  18. Last Stand-alone Beam Test of the Hadronic End-cap Calorimeter (HEC) Finished.

    CERN Multimedia

    Oberlack, H

    One quarter of all 134 HEC modules are tested with electron, pion and muon beams: two "partial HEC wheels", three HEC1 modules and three HEC2 modules, are used in a standard setup using the HEC cryostat in the H6 beam line. The picture shows a view of the set-up in the cryostat during the installation. MC results show that in this setup the energy leakage is well under control - well below 5 %. In addition, the other three quarters of modules are tested in technical cold tests. Using calibration signals, a detailed test of the cabling, cold electronics, crosstalk and noise performance is being done. The beam tests started with four prototype modules per run in '97, when technological optimization was still the key issue. From '98 onwards, modules of the "module 0" type have been tested, typically in two run periods per year. Finally in '99 the series production has started, with first beam test of series modules in 2000. Since then 57 series modules have been cold tested, 24 of them actually in beam tests. T...

  19. Reanimation of the RICH Test Beam Simulation in GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Arzymatov, Kenenbek

    2017-01-01

    This test was originally developed by Sajan Easo (LHCb) ten years ago mostly for the purpose of testing the behavior of photomultipliers, but it wasn’t used in regression testing in Gauss/Geant4 famework. The goal of project is to revive simulation of cherenkov radiaton test by completing.

  20. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bambade, P; Amann, J; Angal-Kalinin, D; Apsimon, R; Araki, S; Aryshev, A; Bai, S; Bellomo, P; Bett, D; Blair, G; Bolzon, B; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Burrows, P N; Christian, G; Coe, P; Constance, B; Delahaye, J P; Deacon, L; Elsen, E; Faus-Golfe, A; Fukuda, M; Gao, J; Geffroy, N; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Guler, H; Hayano, H; Heo, A Y; Honda, Y; Huang, J Y; Hwang, W H; Iwashita, Y; Jeremie, A; Jones, J; Kamiya, Y; Karataev, P; Kim, E S; Kim, H S; Kim, S H; Komamiya, S; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Lam, B; Lyapin, A; Masuzawa, M; McCormick, D; Molloy, S; Naito, T; Nakamura, T; Nelson, J; Okamoto, D; Okugi, T; Oroku, M; Park, Y J; Parker, B; Paterson, E; Perry, C; Pivi, M; Raubenheimer, T; Renier, Y; Resta-Lopez, J; Rimbault, C; Ross, M; Sanuki, T; Scarfe, A; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Spencer, C; Suehara, T; Sugahara, R; Swinson, C; Takahashi, T; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tomas, R; Urakawa, J; Urner, D; Verderi, M; Wang, M H; Warden, M; Wendt, M; White, G; Wittmer, W; Wolski, A; Woodley, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamanaka, T; Yan, Y; Yoda, H; Yokoya, K; Zhou, F; Zimmermann, F; 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.13.042801

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  1. First beam test of a combined ramp and squeeze at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jorg; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Redaelli, Stefano; Schaumann, Michaela; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    With increasing maturity of LHC operation it is possible to envisage more complex beam manipulations. At the same time operational efficiency receives increasing attention. So far ramping the beams to their target energy and squeezing the beams to smaller or higher beta are decoupled at the LHC. (De-)squeezing is always performed at the target energy, currently 6.5 TeV. Studies to combine the ramp and squeeze processes have been made for the LHC since 2011, but so far no experimental test with beam had ever performed. This note describes the first machine experiment with beam aiming at validating the combination of ramp and squeeze, the so-called combined ramp and squeeze (CRS).

  2. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A. [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie Centrum (HIT), D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

  3. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A

    2012-02-01

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

  4. CFRP strengthening of concrete beams - testing in sub-zero temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Carolin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Strengthening structures with epoxy bonded Carbon Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) plates and sheets are today a well-known and over the world common used method to improve a structure performance. The composite materials used for strengthening are very light and easy to handle,. have good...... compared to the summer period? In this paper the last issue will be addressed. CFRP strengthen concrete beams have been tested in sub-zero temperature and loaded up to failure. The cold climate tests are then compared with similar beams tested in room climate. From the tests no significantly difference...

  5. Analysis and seismic tests of composite shear walls with CFST columns and steel plate deep beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Jianwei; Xu, Fangfang

    2013-12-01

    A composite shear wall concept based on concrete filled steel tube (CFST) columns and steel plate (SP) deep beams is proposed and examined in this study. The new wall is composed of three different energy dissipation elements: CFST columns; SP deep beams; and reinforced concrete (RC) strips. The RC strips are intended to allow the core structural elements — the CFST columns and SP deep beams — to work as a single structure to consume energy. Six specimens of different configurations were tested under cyclic loading. The resulting data are analyzed herein. In addition, numerical simulations of the stress and damage processes for each specimen were carried out, and simulations were completed for a range of location and span-height ratio variations for the SP beams. The simulations show good agreement with the test results. The core structure exhibits a ductile yielding mechanism characteristic of strong column-weak beam structures, hysteretic curves are plump and the composite shear wall exhibits several seismic defense lines. The deformation of the shear wall specimens with encased CFST column and SP deep beam design appears to be closer to that of entire shear walls. Establishing optimal design parameters for the configuration of SP deep beams is pivotal to the best seismic behavior of the wall. The new composite shear wall is therefore suitable for use in the seismic design of building structures.

  6. Development of a synchrotron radiation beam monitor for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpelli, Andrea [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear integrable optics applied to beam dynamics may mitigate multi-particle instabilities, but proof of principle experiments have never been carried out. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron and proton storage ring currently being built at Fermilab, which addresses tests of nonlinear lattice elements in a real machine in addition to experiments on optical stochastic cooling and on the single-electron wave function. These experiments require an outstanding control over the lattice parameters, achievable with fast and precise beam monitoring systems. This work describes the steps for designing and building a beam monitor for IOTA based on synchrotron radiation, able to measure intensity, position and transverse cross-section beam.

  7. High-energy lattice for first-beam operation of the SRF test accelerator at NML

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, C.; /NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P.; /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab; Church, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Accelerator, a linear electron accelerator currently in construction at Fermilab's New Muon Laboratory, will eventually reach energies of {approx} 900 MeV using four ILC-type superconducting accelerating cryomodules. The accelerator's construction is staged according to cryomodules availability. The first phase that will support first beam operation incorporates one cryomodule. In this Note, we summarize a possible design for the first-beam accelerator configuration.

  8. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  9. Test beam Characterizations of 3D Silicon Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathes, M; Da Via, C.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Einsweiler, K.; Hasi, J.; Kenney, C.; Parker, Sherwood; Reuen, L.; Ruspa, M.; Velthuis, J.; Watts, S.; Wermes, N.

    2008-01-01

    3D silicon detectors are characterized by cylindrical electrodes perpendicular to the surface and penetrating into the bulk material in contrast to standard Si detectors with planar electrodes on its top and bottom. This geometry renders them particularly interesting to be used in environments where standard silicon detectors have limitations, such as for example the radiation environment expected in an LHC upgrade. For the first time, several 3D sensors were assembled as hybrid pixel detectors using the ATLAS-pixel front-end chip and readout electronics. Devices with different electrode configurations have been characterized in a 100 GeV pion beam at the CERN SPS. Here we report results on unirradiated devices with three 3D electrodes per 50 x 400 um2 pixel area. Full charge collection is obtained already with comparatively low bias voltages around 10 V. Spatial resolution with binary readout is obtained as expected from the cell dimensions. Efficiencies of 95.9% +- 0.1 % for tracks parallel to the electrode...

  10. Coordinated control of a space manipulator tested by means of an air bearing free floating platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Marco; Gasbarri, Paolo; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

    2017-10-01

    A typical approach studied for the guidance of next generation space manipulators (satellites with robotic arms aimed at autonomously performing on-orbit operations) is to decouple the platform and the arm maneuvers, which are supposed to happen sequentially, mainly because of safety concerns. This control is implemented in this work as a two-stage Sequential control, where a first stage calls for the motion of the platform and the second stage calls for the motion of the manipulator. A second novel strategy is proposed, considering the platform and the manipulator as a single multibody system subject to a Coordinated control, with the goal of approaching and grasping a target spacecraft. At the scope, a region that the end effector can reach by means of the arm motion with limited reactions on the platform is identified (the so called Reaction Null workspace). The Coordinated control algorithm performs a gain modulation (finalized to a balanced contribution of the platform and arm motion) as a function of the target position within this Reaction Null map. The result is a coordinated maneuver in which the end effector moves thanks to the platform motion, predominant in a first phase, and to the arm motion, predominant when the Reaction-Null workspace is reached. In this way the collision avoidance and attitude over-control issues are automatically considered, without the need of splitting the mission in independent (and overall sub-optimal) segments. The guidance and control algorithms are first simulated by means of a multibody code, and successively tested in the lab by means of a free floating platform equipped with a robotic arm, moving frictionless on a flat granite table thanks to air bearings and on-off thrusters; the results will be discussed in terms of optimality of the fuel consumption and final accuracy.

  11. Damage localization and quantification in simply supported beams using static test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Solís, M.

    2017-05-01

    A novel simple method using static test data for damage detection, localization, and quantification in beams is presented in this paper. The method is based on the change of the deflections of the beam between a reference and a damaged state. For simply supported beams with a single damage, the maximum value of the change of deflections indicates the location of damage. Once the damage is located, one could estimate the rotational stiffness at the damaged cross section by applying a superposition scheme to isolate the effect of damage and by using basic structural analysis equilibrium equations. Afterwards, damage extent is evaluated through an existing relation between rotational stiffness and damage severity. Several static tests of a simply supported steel beam with a point load at different locations were conducted to exam the performance of the strategy. The damage is artificially introduced as an opened crack located at the bottom of the beam. The deflections of the beam were measured by using a Digital Image Correlation system. The results show that the method can accurately detect and quantify the damage. The method is non-model based and can be easily conducted. No specific loading positions are required and damage identification objective can be achieved from just one single static test.

  12. TileCal Beam Test Simulation Application in the FADS/Goofy Framework (GEANT4)

    CERN Document Server

    Solodkov, A A

    2003-01-01

    A new application for the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) beam test simulation has been developed in GEANT4 within the FADS/Goofy framework. The geometry and readout systems for all the different TileCal modules have been implemented in a quite detailed way. This application allows to simulate all the TileCal beam test setup configurations existing so far. Details of the development as well as instructions to install and run the program are presented. The first tests have been performed for a beam test setup consisting of five prototype modules using negative pions with different energies and results of comparison to the experimental data from TileCal TDR are presented as well.

  13. Backsplash studies for the Scintillator Pad Detector of LHCb in a tagged-photon test beam

    CERN Document Server

    Garrido, L; Miquel, R; Peralta, D

    2002-01-01

    The Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD) of the LHCb experiment is part of the calorimeter system, positioned just before the preshower (PS), and is meant to separate photons and electrons at level 0 of the trigger. A tagged-photon test beam allowed to test in photon signals the SPD. These signals are mainly due to pair production inside the scintillator and to particles generated in the electromagnetic shower in the PS and in the electromagnetic calorimeter (backsplash). The observed results in a test beam experiment stress the low inefficiencies in e/gamma separation arising from backsplash.

  14. Numerical analyses and laboratory testing of concrete composite T-shaped beams without interface adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłoński, Łukasz

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory tests of concrete composite concrete T-shaped beams with variously arranged interface were performed. In the particular series the interface between concrete parts was reinforced or non-reinforced. Additionally the interface conditions varied as follows: existence of adhesion in the interface, adhesion partly broken using chemical agent and adhesion completely broken with PVE membrane put in the interface. The paper presents the compiled results of all tests and the first stage of FEM analysis concerning the series of beams, where the adhesion was broken. Results of numerical analysis are compared with the crack pattern observed during tests.

  15. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Composite Energy-Absorbing Keel Beams for General Aviation Type Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A lightweight energy-absorbing keel-beam concept was developed and retrofitted in a general aviation type aircraft to improve crashworthiness performance. The energy-absorbing beam consisted of a foam-filled cellular structure with glass fiber and hybrid glass/kevlar cell walls. Design, analysis, fabrication and testing of the keel beams prior to installation and subsequent full-scale crash testing of the aircraft are described. Factors such as material and fabrication constraints, damage tolerance, crush stress/strain response, seat-rail loading, and post crush integrity, which influenced the course of the design process are also presented. A theory similar to the one often used for ductile metal box structures was employed with appropriate modifications to estimate the sustained crush loads for the beams. This, analytical tool, coupled with dynamic finite element simulation using MSC.Dytran were the prime design and analysis tools. The validity of the theory as a reliable design tool was examined against test data from static crush tests of beam sections while the overall performance of the energy-absorbing subfloor was assessed through dynamic testing of 24 in long subfloor assemblies.

  16. Testing coordinate measuring arms with a geometric feature-based gauge: in situ field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, E.; Alvarez, B. J.; Patiño, H.; Telenti, A.; Barreiro, J.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes in detail the definition of a procedure for calibrating and evaluating coordinate measuring arms (AACMMs or CMAs). CMAs are portable coordinate measuring machines that have been widely accepted in industry despite their sensitivity to the skill and experience of the operator in charge of the inspection task. The procedure proposed here is based on the use of a dimensional gauge that incorporates multiple geometric features, specifically designed for evaluating the measuring technique when CMAs are used, at company facilities (workshops or laboratories) and by the usual operators who handle these devices in their daily work. After establishing the procedure and manufacturing the feature-based gauge, the research project was complemented with diverse in situ field tests performed with the collaboration of companies that use these devices in their inspection tasks. Some of the results are presented here, not only comparing different operators but also comparing different companies. The knowledge extracted from these experiments has allowed the procedure to be validated, the defects of the methodologies currently used for in situ inspections to be detected, and substantial improvements for increasing the reliability of these portable instruments to be proposed.

  17. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  18. Beam acceleration test in negative-ion based NBI system for JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, K.; Akino, N.; Araki, M.; Ebisawa, N.; Fujiwara, Y.; Hanada, M.; Honda, A.; Inoue, T.; Itoh, T.; Kawai, M.; Kazawa, M.; Koizumi, J.; Kuriyama, M.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Mogaki, K.; Nagase, A.; Ohara, Y.; Ohga, T.; Okumura, Y.; Oohara, H.; Ohshima, K.; Satoh, F.; Takahashi, S.; Takenouchi, T.; Usami, H.; Usui, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamazaki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 311-01 (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    Beam extraction and acceleration test in the Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injector for JT-60U has been started using one ion source that is designed to produce a 500 keV, 22 A D{sup {minus}} ion beam. Deuterium negative ions are produced in a cesium-seeded semi-cylindrical plasma generator and accelerated by a multi-aperture three-stage electrostatic accelerator. In the preliminary experiment of beam acceleration, the D{sup {minus}} ion beam of 13.5 A was successfully accelerated to 400 keV for a pulse duration of 0.12 s. The negative ion beam power was 5.4 MW. The operating gas pressure in the plasma generator was as low as 0.22 Pa. The highest energy beam of 460 keV, 2.4 A, 0.44 s was also obtained. The ratio of extracted electron current to extracted negative ion current is estimated Ie/I{sub D{sup {minus}}}{lt}1. It was confirmed that the electron leak from the extractor to the accelerator is suppressed efficiently by the effects of biassing, electron trapping gap and magnetic field. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. ELECTRON AND OPTICAL BEAM TESTING OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS

    OpenAIRE

    Collin, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of Integrated Circuits technology and architecture is pushing today the associated test and characterization technology to even higher levels. The test must not only present even higher parametric performances like voltage, temporal and spatial resolutions and a good fault coverage but also high level functionalities like a CAD link and automation capabilities. Each and all of these characteristics, when they are identified as measurement and functional performances, need more a...

  20. Reliability and Responsiveness of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children--Second Edition Test in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Su, Jui-Hsing; Su, Chwen-Yng

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To examine the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and responsiveness of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children--Second Edition (MABC-2) Test for children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Method: One hundred and forty-four Taiwanese children with DCD aged 6 to 12 years (87 males, 57 females) were tested on…

  1. The Cherenkov correlated timing detector beam test results from quartz and acrylic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Sugaya, Y; Yoshimura, Y; Kanda, S; Olsen, S; Ueno, K; Varner, G S; Bergfeld, T; Bialek, J J; Lorenc, J; Palmer, M; Rudnick, G; Selen, M; Auran, T; Boyer, V; Honscheid, K; Tamura, N; Yoshimura, K; Lü, C; Marlow, D R; Mindas, C R; Prebys, E J; Asai, M; Kimura, A; Hayashi, S

    1995-01-01

    Several prototypes of a Cherenkov Correlated Timing (CCT) Detector have been tested at the KEK-PS test beam line. We describe the results for Cherenkov light yields and timing characteristics from quartz and acrylic bar prototypes. A Cherenkov angle resolution is found to be 15 mrad at a propagation distance of 100 cm with a 2 cm thick quartz bar prototype.

  2. Results from the October 2014 CERN test beam of LumiCal

    CERN Document Server

    Borysov, O; Levy, A; Levy, I; Lukic, S; Moron, J; Neagu, A T; Preda, T; Rosenblat, O

    2016-01-01

    A prototype of a luminometer, designed for a future e+e- collider detector, was tested in the CERN PS accelerator T9 testbeam. The objective of this test beam was to demonstrate a multi-plane operation, to study the development of the electromagnetic shower and to compare it with MC simulations.

  3. Chracterization of the beam from the RFQ of the PIP-II Injector Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab; Carneiro. J.-P., Carneiro. J.-P. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Saini, A. [Fermilab; Scarpine, V. [Fermilab; Sista, V. L.S. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Steimel, J. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A 2.1 MeV, 10 mA CW RFQ has been installed and commissioned at the Fermilab’s test accelerator known as PIP-II Injector Test. This report describes the measure-ments of the beam properties after acceleration in the RFQ, including the energy and emittance.

  4. Successful beam test of the SPS-to-LHC transfer line TI2

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Image of the first beam spot on the last BTV screen traversed by the beam during the TI 2 test.At 12:03:47 on 28 October a beam passed down the 2.7 km of the new SPS-to-LHC transfer line TI 2 at the first attempt, to within some 50 m of the LHC tunnel. After initial tuning, a range of measurements was carried out with a low intensity proton beam and preliminary analyses look good. After the test, no increase in radiation levels was found in either the LHC or ALICE, and the zones were rapidly opened again for access. As from next year TI 2 will regularly transport a beam from the SPS to the LHC injection point of Ring 1, near Point 2 (ALICE). The TI 8 transfer line, which will bring particles from the SPS to the injection point in Ring 2, near Point 8 (LHCb), was commissioned successfully with low intensity beam in 2004. The two LHC injection lines have a combined length of 5.6 km and comprise some seven hundred warm magnets. While a...

  5. Automated touch sensing in the mouse tapered beam test using Raspberry Pi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardesch, Dirk Jan; Balbi, Matilde; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-11-01

    Rodent models of neurological disease such as stroke are often characterized by motor deficits. One of the tests that are used to assess these motor deficits is the tapered beam test, which provides a sensitive measure of bilateral motor function based on foot faults (slips) made by a rodent traversing a gradually narrowing beam. However, manual frame-by-frame scoring of video recordings is necessary to obtain test results, which is time-consuming and prone to human rater bias. We present a cost-effective method for automated touch sensing in the tapered beam test. Capacitive touch sensors detect foot faults onto the beam through a layer of conductive paint, and results are processed and stored on a Raspberry Pi computer. Automated touch sensing using this method achieved high sensitivity (96.2%) as compared to 'gold standard' manual video scoring. Furthermore, it provided a reliable measure of lateralized motor deficits in mice with unilateral photothrombotic stroke: results indicated an increased number of contralesional foot faults for up to 6days after ischemia. The automated adaptation of the tapered beam test produces results immediately after each trial, without the need for labor-intensive post-hoc video scoring. It also increases objectivity of the data as it requires less experimenter involvement during analysis. Automated touch sensing may provide a useful adaptation to the existing tapered beam test in mice, while the simplicity of the hardware lends itself to potential further adaptations to related behavioral tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preliminary Beam Tests at REX for an Automatic Cavity Phasing Routine at HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Broere, J; Lanaia, D; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The HIE upgrade at ISOLDE will use 32 independently phased superconducting quarterwave cavities, which will impose new demands on the operation and set-up of the linac. The large range of different radioactive species and the broad experimental programme means that the same beam species and energy are rarely studied twice, and the accelerator must be re-tuned for each experimental run. In order to expedite machine set-up it is foreseen to calculate and set automatically the cavity phases when the operator inputs the desired beam energy and A/q of the beam species. In this note we explore our understanding of the REX rf system and test our beam dynamics calculations with two independently phased 7-gap split-ring cavities.

  7. Review of the Drive Beam Stabilization in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Skowronski, P; Tecker, F; Persson, T

    2013-01-01

    CTF3 is a Test Facility focusing on beam-based studies of the key concepts of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. Over the past several years many aspects of the CLIC two-beam acceleration scheme were studied in CTF3, including the crucial issue of drive beam stability. The main sources of drifts and instabilities have been identified and mitigated, helping to improve the machine performance and showing significant progress towards the experimental demonstration of the very stringent requirements on current, energy and phase stability needed in CLIC. In this paper, the more effective techniques and feed-backs are summarized. The latest measurements on beam stability are reported and their relevance to CLIC is discussed.

  8. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  9. HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups tested with ion beams at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D

    2014-01-01

    The future HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups for both the intercryomodule regions and the HEBTs have been tested using 34S+7, 4He+, 23Na+6 and 20Ne+5 beams from the ISAC-II accelerator at TRIUMF. Their performance has been characterized together with the Faraday cups from REX-ISOLDE and those from ISAC-II. The measurements were done at E/A = 1.5, 2.85 and 5.5 MeV/u, with beam intensities in the range of 100 pA to 4 nA. The performance of these Faraday cups has been compared under the same beam conditions for different bias voltages up to -350 V. Within the experimental uncertainties, most of them coming from fluctuations in beam intensity, all devices showed similar results. Biasing the Faraday cup repeller ring to voltages of at least -60 V, the escape of secondary electrons was suppressed.

  10. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomae, R., E-mail: rthomae@tlabs.ac.za; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V. [CERN, BE/ABP/HSL, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  11. Performance of the ATLAS liquid argon forward calorimeter in beam tests

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, J P; Cadabeschi, M; Epshteyn, V; Galt, C; Gillberg, D; Gorbounov, P; Heelan, L; Khakzad, M; Khovanskiy, V; Krieger, P; Loch, P; McCarthy, T G; Oakham, F G; Orr, R S; Rutherfoord, J; Savine, A; Schram, M; Shatalov, P; Shaver, L; Shupe, M; Strickland, V; Thompson, P; Tsukerman, I

    2013-01-01

    One of two ATLAS Forward Calorimeters, consisting of threemodules, one behind the other, was exposed to particle beams ofknown energies in order to study the detector performance with andwithout the presence of upstream material in the beam, and at theinner edge of the acceptance where shower energy containment isincomplete. Data were taken in the H6 beamline at CERN usingelectron and hadron beams with energies from 10 to 200 GeV.Results related to the intrinsic detector calibration, based on datataken with a minimal amount of material in front of the detector,have been previously published, but are updated here. This paperfocuses on studies of data taken with additional upstream materialin place. The effects of this additional material on the linearityand resolution of the response are presented. The response at theinner edge of the acceptance is also investigated. For all analyses,results based on a GEANT4 simulation of the beam-test setup anddetector response are also presented.

  12. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  13. Collimation quench test with 6.5 TeV proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Bruce, Roderik; Hermes, Pascal Dominik; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Jacquet, Delphine; Kalliokoski, Matti; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Skordis, Eleftherios; Valentino, Gianluca; Valloni, Alessandra; Wollmann, Daniel; Zerlauth, Markus; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    We show here the analysis of the MD test that aimed to quench the superconducting magnets in the dispersion suppressor region downstream of the main betatron collimation system. In Run I there were several attempts to quench the magnets in the same region. This was done by exciting the Beam 2 in a controlled way using the transverse damper and generating losses leaking from the collimation cleaning. No quench was achieved in 2013 with a maximum of 1 MW of beam power loss absorbed by the collimation system at 4 TeV beam energy. In 2015 a new collimation quench test was done at 6.5 TeV aiming at similar power loss over longer period, 5-10 s. The main outcome of this test is reviewed.

  14. Study of the 2004 End-Cap beam tests of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bieri, Marco

    The ATLAS detector is an all-purpose detector to study high-ener gy proton–proton colli- sions. ATLAS is located at the LHC (Lar ge Hadron Collider) at CERN in Gene va, Switzer - land. Before first data taking, man y beam tests have been carried out in order to fully understand each detector component. The studies in this thesis will concentrate on the 2004 beam test of the entire combined end-cap calorimeter system. The first section of this thesis outlines particle selection in the incoming test beam, eliminating contamination in order to have an accurate calibration environment. The remainder of the thesis focuses on detector calibration and performance studies, including signal-to-ener gy calibration con- stant determination, and various detector ener gy summation methods studying their effect on response. Ov erall detector ener gy sharing characteristics including the response of dead detector regions is also presented.

  15. Design of cryosorption pumps for TEST BEDS of ITER relevant Neutral Beam Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremel, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: matthias.dremel@itp.fzk.de; Day, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mack, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jensen, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Speth, E. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Falter, H.D. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riedl, R. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cordier, J.J. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108, Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Gravil, B. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108, Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Henry, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108, Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Zaccaria, P. [CONSORZIO RFX Association EURATOM-ENEA, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2005-11-15

    This paper presents the results of the design investigations and the manufacturing of cryosorption pumps for the Neutral Beam Test Facility 'MANITU' at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) and the cryopump design analyses performed for the development of a test facility for the first ITER Neutral Beam Injector. The two identical cryopumps for IPP are foreseen to pump a hydrogen-throughput of 3 Pa m{sup 3}/s (H{sub 2}) with a pumping speed of 350 m{sup 3}/s per pump. The pressure conditions must be maintained over 4 h pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels. For the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility, design calculations to assess heat loads and pumping parameters of the cryopumps will be briefly described.

  16. Reliability and Accuracy of Batak Lite Tests Used for Assessing Coordination Motor Abilities in Wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gierczuk Dariusz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this work was to assess selected validity criteria of motor tasks included in Batak Lite. The tasks are used to control coordination motor abilities in athletes of different sports. Material and methods. Twenty male Greco-Roman wrestlers from the sports school SMS in Radom were included in the study. They were 17-18 years of age and their training experience was 4-7.5 years long. The validity of motor tasks was determined on the basis of two criteria, i.e. reliability and diagnostic accuracy. To define the reliability of the tests, the research was carried out twice with an interval of 5-7-days (test-retest. Diagnostic accuracy of selected indices was determined with the help of three main criteria. The analysis included 6 motor tasks performed with the use of Batak Lite. Results. Tests I, II, IV and V are characterised by reliability coefficients higher than 0.50 and, regardless of the assumed accuracy criterion, by coefficients higher than 0.30. Thus, they meet the validity requirements within the assessed criteria. The highest accuracy coefficients were observed in motor tests assessing quick reaction (r = 0.46-0.63, simple reaction including sensory (r = 0.61-0.78, motor (r = 0.33-0.46 and complex (r = 0.34-0.49 reactions as well as spatio-temporal orientation (r = 0.33-0.49 and movement coupling (r = 0.34-0.49. Conclusions. Four Batak Lite tests displayed sufficient reliability and diagnostic accuracy. Therefore, they can be implemented in the training process of wrestlers. The strongest correlation was noted between Batak Lite tests and motor tests that assessed quick reaction, spatio-temporal orientation and movement coupling.

  17. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  18. Modelling the double cantilever beam test with bending moments by using bilinear discontinuous cohesive laws

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valvo, Paolo S.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Toftegaard, Helmuth Langmaack

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model of the double cantilever beam tests with bending moments (DCB-UBM) is presented. The specimen is modelled as the assemblage of two laminated beams connected by a cohesive interface. It is assumed that the traction-separation laws – i.e. the relationships between the interfacial...... the cohesive law parameters from experiments. Experimental tests have been conducted on glass fibre reinforced specimens under pure mode I and II loading conditions. The predictions of the theoretical model turn out to be in very good agreement with the experimental results....

  19. Performance tests of a new fast digitiser for beam diagnostic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E

    2002-01-01

    A new type of PCI-based fast digitisers has been deployed to implement new beam diagnostic systems and as a prototype for a new family of applications. The modules selected for the first tests and applications are the Acqiris DC265 fast digitiser boards, characterised by a high sampling speed, a large amount of memory per channel (2 MSamples per channel as the chosen option) and a PCI bus interface. This note details the tests carried out, and the results obtained, to ascertain the DC265 board and crate suitability to general beam diagnostics applications.

  20. Measurements of beam emittance, accelerated RF phase band, and centring in a 1 MeV test cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnel, M.P.; Erdman, K.L. [Obco Technologies Inc., Richmond B.C. (Canada); Kuo, T. [TRIUMF, Vancouver B.C. (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Differential probe measurements of radial and axial circulating beam intensity in the EBCO/TRIUMF 1 MeV H{sup -} Test Cyclotron have been made. Intensity profile simulations from an analytical model compare well with the measured beam intensity data, and yield important beam related quantities such as the emittance, the accelerated RF phase band and the beam centring. The experimental hardware details, comparisons of measured and computed data, and a description of the analytical model are reported. (authors)

  1. Linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility final focus beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Okugi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2 final focus beam line are described. The beam optics of the ATF2 beam line is designed based on a local chromaticity correction scheme similar to the ILC final focus system. Beam measurements in 2012 revealed skew sextupole field errors that were much larger than expected from magnetic field measurements. The skew sextupole field error was a critical limitation of the beam size at the ATF2 virtual interaction point (IP. Therefore, four skew sextupole magnets were installed to correct the field error in August 2012. By using the four skew sextupole magnets, the predicted tolerances of the skew sextupole field errors of the ATF2 magnets were increased. Furthermore, analyzing field maps of the sextupole magnets identified the source of the skew sextupole field error. After the field error source was removed, the IP vertical beam size could more easily be focused to less than 65 nm.

  2. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  3. Development of laser decontamination. 4. Test of beam transmission by fibers and the most suitable condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Ryuichirou; Ishijima, Noboru; Tanimoto, Kenichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-07-01

    In this work, the characteristics of laser beam transmission by optical fibers and decontamination speed by the most suitable condition and improvement of the characteristics of secondary products are experimented for apply laser decontamination technique to radioactive wastes treatment and decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities. The results are as follows. (1) Beam transmission: For Q switch pulse YAG laser, beam transmission by optical fibers were examined. Transmission energy increase in proportion to diameter of fiber. The maximum transmission energy of optical fiber was 61 mJ, which was not damaged. The transmission energy of bundle fiber was more plenty than the energy of single fibers at same numbers. It is able to apply bundle fiber to transmission system of Q switch pulse YAG laser beam. (2) Improvement of decontamination speed: Imitation contaminants were removed perfectly on the condition that, the irradiation frequency was 2 times, move speed of test piece was 3.0 mm/sec, beam diameter was 1.2 mm, repetition speed was 10 Hz. At this time, the number of beam shots were more 4 in the unit area. The case of fluence is constant, the number of beam shots were increased by spread of beam diameter in the unit area. (3) Measurement of secondary products: Particle diameters of more than 50% secondary products by Q switch pulse YAG laser were less than 0. 1 {mu}m. Particle diameters of more than 50% secondary products by normal pulse YAG laser were from 0.1 {mu}m to 1 {mu}m. (author)

  4. Effect of practice and span length on the dual-task coordination executive test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwan R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The measure "mu", proposed as an index of the ability to coordinate concurrent box-crossing (BC and digit-span (DS tasks in the dual task (DT, should reflect the capacity of the executive component of the working memory system. We investigated the effect of practice in BC and of a change in the digit span on mu by adding previous practice trials in BC and diminishing, maintaining or increasing the digit sequence length. The mu behavior was evaluated throughout three trials of the test. Reported strategies in digit tasks were also analyzed. Subjects with diminished span showed the best performance in DT due to a stable performance in DS and BC in the single- and dual-task conditions. These subjects also showed a more stable performance throughout trials. Subjects with diminished span tended to employ effortless strategies, whereas subjects with increased span employed effort-requiring strategies and showed the lowest means of mu. Subjects with initial practice trials showed the best performance in BC and the most differentiated performance between the single- and dual-task conditions in BC. The correlation coefficient between the mu values obtained in the first and second trials was 0.814 for subjects with diminished span and practice trials in BC. It seems that the within-session practice in BC and the performance variability in DS affect the reliability of the index mu. To control these factors we propose the introduction of previous practice trials in BC and a modification of the current method to determine the digit sequence length. This proposal should contribute to the development of a more reliable method to evaluate the executive capacity of coordination in the dual-task paradigm.

  5. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J. M.; Addy, T. N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O. K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H. P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S. A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P. O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T. F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A. I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A. I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Goettfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M. D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Haertel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P. D. C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C. G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K. F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K. W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S. V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S. M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; RØhne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L. P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J. E.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S. I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J. B.; Volpi, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H. H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2011-06-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of energy deposits in the calorimeter layers, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20GeV and 180GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by between 11% and 25% compared to the resolution at the electromagnetic scale.

  6. Trajectory measurements and correlations in the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Renier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the beam delivery system of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC as well as to define and to test the tuning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. ATF2 commissioning started in December 2008, and thanks to submicron resolution beam position monitors (BPMs, it has been possible to measure the beam position fluctuation along the final focus of ATF2 during the 2009 runs. The optics was not the nominal one yet, with a lower focusing to make the tuning easier. In this paper, a method to measure the noise of each BPM every pulse, in a model-independent way, will be presented. A method to reconstruct the trajectory’s fluctuations is developed which uses the previously determined BPM resolution. As this reconstruction provides a measurement of the beam energy fluctuations, it was also possible to measure the horizontal and vertical dispersion function at each BPMs parasitically. The spatial and angular dispersions can be fitted from these measurements with uncertainties comparable with usual measurements.

  7. ALICE EMCal Reconstructable Energy Non-Linearity From Test Beam Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Thomas Michael

    2017-01-01

    Calorimeters play many important roles in modern high energy physics detectors, such as event selection, triggering, and precision energy measurements. EMCal, in the case of the ALICE experiment provides triggering on high energy jets, improves jet quenching study measurement bias and jet energy resolution, and improves electron and photon measurements [3]. With the EMCal detector in the ALICE experiment taking on so many important roles, it is important to fully understand, characterize and model its interactions with particles. In 2010 SPS and PS electron test beam measurements were performed on an EMCal mini-module [2]. Alongside this, the test beam setup and geometry was recreated in Geant4 by Nico [1]. Figure 1 shows the reconstructable energy linearity for the SPS test beam data and that obtained from the test beam monte carlo, indicating the amount of energy deposit as hits in the EMCal module. It can be seen that for energies above ∼ 100 GeV there is a significant drop in the reconstructableenergym...

  8. Design and Application of a Beam Testing System for Experiential Learning in Mechanics of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R. Warsi; Rais-Rohani, M.

    2009-01-01

    Research shows that students can significantly improve their understanding and retention of topics presented in an engineering course when discussions of theoretical and mathematical approaches are combined with active-learning exercises involving hands-on physical experiments. In this paper, the design and application of a beam testing system…

  9. Facility for the testing of the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughian, J.M.

    1977-07-01

    The design of the prototype neutral beam injection system for TFTR is nearing completion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper describes some of the features of the facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory where this prototype will be assembled and tested.

  10. Recent Results from Beam Tests of 3D and Pad pCVD Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wallny, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Results from prototypes of a detector using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond with embedded resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond device are presented. A detector system consisting of 3D devices based on poly-crystalline CVD (pCVD) diamond was connected to a multi-channel readout and successfully tested in a 120 GeV/c proton beam at CERN proving for the first time the feasibility of the 3D detector concept in pCVD for particle tracking applications. We also present beam test results on the dependence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on poly-crystalline CVD diamond. The detectors were tested in a 260 MeV/c pion beam over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2 . The pulse height of the sensors was measured with pad readout electronics at a peaking time of 7 ns. Our data from the 2015 beam tests at PSI indicate that the pulse height of poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensor irradiated to 5×1014 neq/cm2 is independent of particle flux...

  11. Test beam results of a stereo preshower integrated in the liquid argon accordion calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, R; Greenious, G; Kitching, P; Olsen, B; Pinfold, James L; Rodning, N L; Boos, E; Zhautykov, B O; Aubert, Bernard; Bazan, A; Beaugiraud, B; Boniface, J; Colas, Jacques; Eynard, G; Jézéquel, S; Le Flour, T; Linossier, O; Nicoleau, S; Sauvage, G; Thion, J; Van den Plas, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y; Chmeissani, M; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Padilla, C; Citterio, M; Gordon, H A; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Makowiecki, D S; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Rescia, S; Stephani, D; Takai, H; Baisin, L; Berset, J C; Chevalley, J L; Gianotti, F; Gildemeister, O; Marin, C P; Nessi, Marzio; Poggioli, Luc; Richter, W; Vuillemin, V; Baze, J M; Delagnes, E; Gosset, L G; Lavocat, P; Lottin, J P; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, J P; Renardy, J F; Schwindling, J; Simion, S; Taguet, J P; Teiger, J; Walter, C; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Hostachy, J Y; Mahout, G; Barreiro, F; Del Peso, J; García, J; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Romero, P; Scheel, C V; Chekhtman, A; Cousinou, M C; Dargent, P; Dinkespiler, B; Etienne, F; Fassnacht, P; Fouchez, D; Martin, L; Miotto, A; Monnier, E; Nagy, E; Olivetto, C; Tisserant, S; Battistoni, G; Camin, D V; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Cozzi, L; Fedyakin, N N; Ferrari, A; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Perini, L; Resconi, S; Sala, P R; Beaudoin, G; Depommier, P; León-Florián, E; Leroy, C; Roy, P; Augé, E; Breton, D; Chase, Robert L; Chollet, J C; de La Taille, C; Fayard, Louis; Fournier, D; González, J; Hrisoho, A T; Jacquier, Y; Merkel, B; Nikolic, I A; Noppe, J M; Parrour, G; Pétroff, P; Puzo, P; Richer, J P; Schaffer, A C; Seguin-Moreau, N; Serin, L; Tisserand, V; Veillet, J J; Vichou, I; Canton, B; David, J; Genat, J F; Imbault, D; Le Dortz, O; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schwemling, P; Eek, L O; Lund-Jensen, B; Söderqvist, J; Astbury, Alan; Keeler, Richard K; Lefebvre, M; Robertson, S; White, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of an integrated preshower within the RD3 liquid argon accordion calorimeter. It has a stereo view which enables the measurement of two transverse coordinates. The prototype was tested at CERN with electrons, photons and muons to validate its capability to work at LHC ( Energy resolution, impact point resolution, angular resolution, $\\pi^o$/$\\gamma$ rejection ).

  12. Test Beam Results of Multi-Geometry Prototype Sensors for the LHCb Inner Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Agari, M; Carron, B; Heule, S; Jiménez-Otero, S; Lehner, F; Ludwig, A; Pugatch, V; Schmelling, M; Sievers, P; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Tran, M T; Vollhardt, A; Voss, H

    2002-01-01

    Multi-geometry silicon prototype sensors designed for the LHCb Inner Tracker have been studied in a test beam performed in the X7 beam line at CERN in May 2002. Measurements were made using the Beetle 1.1 analogue front-end chip and a sampling at 40 MHz. In this note results on resolution, signal-to-noise, noise rates and efficiencies are presented as function of the bias voltage and for different shaping times. Based on these results a decision will be made on which geometry will be implemented in the final sensors for the LHCb Inner Tracker.

  13. Evaluation of Asphalt Mixture Low-Temperature Performance in Bending Beam Creep Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczola, Marek; Jaczewski, Mariusz; Rys, Dawid; Jaskula, Piotr; Szydlowski, Cezary

    2018-01-10

    Low-temperature cracking is one of the most common road pavement distress types in Poland. While bitumen performance can be evaluated in detail using bending beam rheometer (BBR) or dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) tests, none of the normalized test methods gives a comprehensive representation of low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures. This article presents the Bending Beam Creep test performed at temperatures from -20 °C to +10 °C in order to evaluate the low-temperature performance of asphalt mixtures. Both validation of the method and its utilization for the assessment of eight types of wearing courses commonly used in Poland were described. The performed test indicated that the source of bitumen and its production process (and not necessarily only bitumen penetration) had a significant impact on the low-temperature performance of the asphalt mixtures, comparable to the impact of binder modification (neat, polymer-modified, highly modified) and the aggregate skeleton used in the mixture (Stone Mastic Asphalt (SMA) vs. Asphalt Concrete (AC)). Obtained Bending Beam Creep test results were compared with the BBR bitumen test. Regression analysis confirmed that performing solely bitumen tests is insufficient for comprehensive low-temperature performance analysis.

  14. First test beam results of prototype modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS strip tracking detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00218553; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is foreseen to be upgraded to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). This will result in higher particle rates and radiation doses. The ATLAS experiment plans to replace its inner tracking detector by a new all-silicon tracker which is based on the concept of modularity. For the new silicon strip tracker a large prototyping and evaluation campaign is ongoing. Many modules of different types were built and tested both in the laboratories and in test beams. In the following first results obtained in test beams are presented. Both mini and full-size modules for the central and forward regions were tested before and after irradiation to fluences as expected at the HL-LHC.

  15. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Luo, Y.; Paskvan, D.; Perry, A.; Schrage, D.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Sommer, R.; Toter, W.; Zinkann, G.

    2012-11-01

    The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW) RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf) measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O5+ ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  16. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ. While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS. Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O^{5+} ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  17. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  18. TCT and test beam results of irradiated magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-Si) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luukka, P.; Harkonen, J.; Maenpaa, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Betchart, B.; /Rochester U.; Czellar, S.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Demina, R.; /Rochester U.; Furgeri, A.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Gotra, Y.; /Rochester U.; Frey, M.; Hartmann, F.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Korjenevski, S.; /Rochester U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Louvain U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2009-01-01

    Pad and strip detectors processed on high resistivity n-type magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-Si) were irradiated to several different fluences with protons. The pad detectors were characterized with the transient current technique (TCT) and the full-size strip detectors with a reference beam telescope and a 225 GeV muon beam. The TCT measurements indicate a double junction structure and space charge sign inversion in MCz-Si detectors after 6x1014 1 MeV neq/cm2 fluence. In the beam test a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 50 was measured for a non-irradiated MCz-Si sensor, and a S/N ratio of 20 for the sensors irradiated to the fluences of 1x1014 1 and 5x1014 1 MeV neq/cm2.

  19. Beam test results of the irradiated Silicon Drift Detector for ALICE

    OpenAIRE

    Kushpil, S.; Crescio, E; Giubellino, P.; Idzik, M.; Kolozhvari, A; Kushpil, V.; Martinez, M.I.; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Nouais, D; Petracek, V; Piemonte, C; Rashevsky, A; Riccati, L

    2005-01-01

    The Silicon Drift Detectors will equip two of the six cylindrical layers of high precision position sensitive detectors in the ITS of the ALICE experiment at LHC. In this paper we report the beam test results of a SDD irradiated with 1 GeV electrons. The aim of this test was to verify the radiation tolerance of the device under an electron fluence equivalent to twice particle fluence expected during 10 years of ALICE operation.

  20. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos [CERN; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias [CERN; Fabich, Adrian [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  1. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/201...

  2. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  3. Development of a Beam-based Phase Feedforward Demonstration at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083344; Christian, Glenn

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposal for a future linear electron--positron collider that could achieve collision energies of up to 3~TeV. In the CLIC concept the main high energy beam is accelerated using RF power extracted from a high intensity drive beam, achieving an accelerating gradient of 100~MV/m. This scheme places strict tolerances on the drive beam phase stability, which must be better than $0.2^\\circ$ at 12~GHz. To achieve the required phase stability CLIC proposes a high bandwidth (${>}17.5$~MHz), low latency drive beam ``phase feedforward'' (PFF) system. In this system electromagnetic kickers, powered by 500~kW amplifiers, are installed in a chicane and used to correct the phase by deflecting the beam on to longer or shorter trajectories. A prototype PFF system has been installed at the CLIC Test Facility, CTF3; the design, operation and commissioning of which is the focus of this work. Two kickers have been installed in the pre-existing chicane in the TL2 transfer line at CTF3 for t...

  4. An Architecture Proposal for the ILC Test Beam Silicon Telescope at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turqueti, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The requirements for an ILC Test Beam silicon telescope system are foreseen to be very stringent. Resolution, noise, and throughput must be carefully managed in order to provide a useful instrument for the high energy physics community to develop detector technologies for the ILC. Since the ILC Test Beam is meant to test a wide variety of different detectors, it must employ universally accepted software techniques, hardware standards and protocols as well as easy integration of hardware and software with the various clients using the system. In this paper, we describe an open modular architecture to achieve these goals, including an analysis of the entire chain of software and hardware needed to meet the requirements.

  5. FIRST BEAM TESTS OF THE APS MBA UPGRADE ORBIT FEEDBACK CONTROLLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sereno, N. S.; Arnold, N.; Brill, A.; Bui, H.; Carwardine, J.; Decker, G.; Deriy, B.; Emery, L.; Farnsworth, R.; Fors, T.; Keane, R.; Lenkszus, F.; Lill, R.; Paskvan, D.; Pietryla, A.; Shang, H.; Shoaf, S.; Veseli, S.; Wang, J.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.X.

    2017-03-25

    The new orbit feedback system required for the APS multi-bend acromat (MBA) ring must meet challenging beam stability requirements. The AC stability requirement is to correct rms beam motion to 10 % the rms beam size at the insertion device source points from 0.01 to 1000 Hz. The vertical plane represents the biggest challenge for AC stability which is required to be 400 nm rms for a 4 micron vertical beam size. In addition long term drift over a period of 7 days is required to be 1 micron or less at insertion de- vice BPMs and 2 microns for arc bpms. We present test re- sults of theMBA prototype orbit feedback controller (FBC) in the APS storage ring. In this test, four insertion device BPMs were configured to send data to the FBC for process- ing into four fast corrector setpoints. The configuration of four bpms and four fast correctors creates a 4-bump and the configuration of fast correctors is similar to what will be implemented in the MBA ring. We report on performance benefits of increasing the sampling rate by a factor of 15 to 22.6 kHz over the existing APS orbit feedback system, lim- itations due to existing storage ring hardware and extrapo- lation to theMBA orbit feedback design. FBC architecture, signal flow and processing design will also be discussed.

  6. Thermal shock tests with beryllium coupons in the electron beam facility JUDITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Schuster, J.L.A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Several grades of American and Russian beryllium have been tested in high heat flux tests by means of an electron beam facility. For safety reasons, major modifications of the facility had to be fulfilled in advance to the tests. The influence of energy densities has been investigated in the range between 1 and 7 MJ/m{sup 2}. In addition the influence of an increasing number of shots at constant energy density has been studied. For all samples, surface profiles have been measured before and after the experiments. Additional information has been gained from scanning electron microscopy, and from metallography.

  7. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Himanshu, E-mail: htyagi@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Soni, Jignesh [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  8. FLEXURAL TESTING OF WOOD-CONCRETE COMPOSITE BEAM MADE FROM KAMPER AND BANGKIRAI WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengky Satria Yoresta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Certain wood has a tensile strength that almost equal with steel rebar in reinforced concrete beams. This research aims to understand the capacity and flexural behavior of concrete beams reinforced by wood (wood-concrete composite beam. Two different types of beams based on placement positions of wood layers are proposed in this study. Two kinds of wood used are consisted of Bangkirai (Shorea laevifolia and Kamper (Cinnamomum camphora, meanwhile the concrete mix ratio for all beams is 1 cement : 2 fine aggregates : 3 coarse aggregates. Bending test is conducted by using one-point loading method. The results show that composite beam using Bangkirai wood is stronger than beams using Kamper wood. More thicker wood layer in tensile area will increase the flexural strength of beams. Crack patterns identified could be classified into flexural cracks, shear cracks, and split on wood layer   Beberapa jenis kayu tertentu memiliki kekuatan tarik yang hampir sama dengan tulangan baja pada balok beton bertulang. Penelitian ini bertujuan memahami kapasitas dan perilaku lentur balok beton bertulang yang diperkuat menggunakan kayu (balok komposit beton-kayu. Dua tipe balok yang berbeda berdasarkan posisi penempatan kayu digunakan dalam penelitian ini. Dua jenis kayu yang digunakan adalah kayu Bangkirai (Shorea laevifolia and Kamper (Cinnamomum camphora, sementara itu rasio campuran beton untuk semua balok menggunakan perbandingan 1 semen : 2 agregat halus : 3 agregat kasar. Pengujian lentur dilakukan menggunakan metode one-point loading. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa balok komposit dengan kayu Bangkirai lebih kuat dibandingkan balok dengan kayu Kamper. Semakin tebal lapisan kayu yang berada di daerah tarik akan meningkatkan kekuatan lentur balok. Pola kerusakan yang teridentifikasi dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi retak lentur, retak geser, dan pecah pada kayu REFERENCES Boen T. (2010. Retrofitting Simple Buildings Damaged by Earthquakes. World Seismic

  9. Beam Test Performance and Simulation of Prototypes for the ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Conrad, J; Antinori, F; Badalà, A; Barbera, R; Boccardi, A; Bruno, G E; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Ceresa, S; Chochula, P; Cinausero, M; Dima, R; Elia, D; Fabris, D; Fini, R A; Fioretto, E; Kapusta, S; Kluge, A; Krivda, M; Lenti, V; Librizzi, F; Lunardon, M; Manzari, V; Morel, M; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Nilsson, P; Noriega, M L; Osmic, F; Pappalardo, G S; Paticchio, V; Pepato, Adriano; Prete, G; Pulvirenti, A; Riedler, P; Riggi, F; Santoro, R; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Stefanini, G; Sándor, L; Torcatode-Matos, C; Turrisi, R; Vannucci, L; Viesti, G; Virgili, T

    2007-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector (SPD) of the ALICE experiment in preparation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is designed to provide the precise vertex reconstruction needed for measuring heavy flavor production in heavy ion collisions at very high energies and high multiplicity. The SPD forms the innermost part of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) which also includes silicon drift and silicon strip detectors. Single assembly prototypes of the ALICE SPD have been tested at the CERN SPS using high energy proton/pion beams in 2002 and 2003. We report on the experimental determination of the spatial precision. We also report on the first combined beam test with prototypes of the other ITS silicon detector technologies at the CERN SPS in November 2004. The issue of SPD simulation is briefly discussed.

  10. Study of the vertex trigger performance on test-beam data

    CERN Document Server

    Teubert, F

    1999-01-01

    99-030 The performance of the Level-1 vertex trigger algorithm on test-beam data collected with a prototype of the VDET detector is presented. The effect of the detectors misalignment on the Level-1 vertex trigger performance is shown to be a critical issue if the relative position is not controlled better than $100~\\mu$m. The Primary vertex resolution on the longitudinal direction obtained on the test-beam for 2D-tracks ($270~\\mu$m), translates into a resolution close to $80~\\mu$m for the statistics of an LHC event in good agreement with expectations. The discriminating power between B-events and Minimum Bias events is studied using a sample of ``artificial'' events built from events interacting at different targets separated by 1~cm. The results are very encouraging showing the feasibility to trigger on low multiplicity displaced vertices.

  11. Combined performance studies for electrons at the 2004 ATLAS combined test-beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J. M.; Addy, T. N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O. K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H. P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S. A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P. O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T. F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A. I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A. I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Goettfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M. D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Haertel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P. D. C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C. G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K. F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K. W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S. V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S. M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; RØhne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L. P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J. E.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S. I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J. B.; Volpi, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H. H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2010-11-01

    In 2004 at the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) combined test beam, one slice of the ATLAS barrel detector (including an Inner Detector set-up and the Liquid Argon calorimeter) was exposed to particles from the H8 SPS beam line at CERN. It was the first occasion to test the combined electron performance of ATLAS. This paper presents results obtained for the momentum measurement p with the Inner Detector and for the performance of the electron measurement with the LAr calorimeter (energy E linearity and resolution) in the presence of a magnetic field in the Inner Detector for momenta ranging from 20 GeV/c to 100 GeV/c. Furthermore the particle identification capabilities of the Transition Radiation Tracker, Bremsstrahlungs-recovery algorithms relying on the LAr calorimeter and results obtained for the E/p ratio and a way how to extract scale parameters will be discussed.

  12. Test~of~Beam~Extraction~by~Crystal~Channeling~at~the~SPS: A First Step towards a LHC Extracted Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD22 \\\\ \\\\ The availability of a beam extracted out of the LHC accelerator would open up very interesting possibilities for B-physics, in particular for the study of CP-violation. Channeling in bent crystals appears to be the most promising method to produce an extracted beam of intensity $\\sim$~10$^{8}$ p/sec. This would provide as many as 10$^{10}$ $ B \\bar{B} $ pairs per year of run, two orders of magnitude more than could be produced by an e$^+$e$^-$ B-factory with L~=~10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ We propose a R\\&D program to study beam extraction at the CERN SPS, using a silicon bent crystal to be installed in the SPS beam pipe and placed next to the beam in such a way as to intercept the beam halo. Transverse excitation of the beam in presence of non-linearities will be used to create halo conditions similar to what are expected for LHC.

  13. Beam tests of a prototype level-1 calorimeter trigger for LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brawn, I.P. (The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Carney, R.E. (The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Dickow, U. (CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)); Eisenhandler, E. (Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)); Ellis, N. (CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)); Garvey, J. (The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Gee, C.N.P. (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)); Gillman, A.R. (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)); Hatley, R. (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)); Landon, M. (Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)); Perera, V. (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)); Quinton, S. (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton

    1994-10-01

    Beam tests of a first-prototype electromagnetic calorimeter trigger processor for LHC experiments are described. The synchronous, pipelined, digital processor built with ASICs, was successfully operated at the full LHC bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz. Real data signals were obtained from a liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter. The measured performance of the electron/photon trigger algorithm is compared with Monte Carlo simulations. ((orig.))

  14. Beam test results of a drift velocity monitoring system for silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A; Mazza, G; Nissinen, J; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2002-01-01

    We report results on drift velocity monitoring using MOS charge injectors in silicon drift detectors obtained in beam test conditions. The correction of velocity variations as small as 0.03% caused by temperature variations of the order of 0.04 K allowed to get an average space resolution along all the drift path of 28 mu m. Preliminary result demonstrating the possibility to correct for temperature gradients along the anode axis are also presented.

  15. Measurement of trapping time constants in irradiated DOFZ silicon with test beam data

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, T

    2004-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure the trapping time constants in irradiated materials with test beam data. The measurements have been performed on ATLAS pixel detectors irradiated with protons to a fluence of 1.1 * 10/sup 15/ n/sub eq/ cm/sup -2/. Different defect annealing scenarios have been investigated. The trapping probability has been observed to be smaller after 25 h of annealing at 60 degrees C than after beneficial annealing only.

  16. Applying User Input to the Design and Testing of an Electronic Behavioral Health Information System for Wraparound Care Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Eric J; Hyde, Kelly L; Sather, April; Hook, Alyssa N; Lyon, Aaron R

    2016-05-01

    Health information technology (HIT) and care coordination for individuals with complex needs are high priorities for quality improvement in health care. However, there is little empirical guidance about how best to design electronic health record systems and related technologies to facilitate implementation of care coordination models in behavioral health, or how best to apply user input to the design and testing process. In this paper, we describe an iterative development process that incorporated user/stakeholder perspectives at multiple points and resulted in an electronic behavioral health information system (EBHIS) specific to the wraparound care coordination model for youth with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. First, we review foundational HIT research on how EBHIS can enhance efficiency and outcomes of wraparound that was used to inform development. After describing the rationale for and functions of a prototype EBHIS for wraparound, we describe methods and results for a series of six small studies that informed system development across four phases of effort-predevelopment, development, initial user testing, and commercialization-and discuss how these results informed system design and refinement. Finally, we present next steps, challenges to dissemination, and guidance for others aiming to develop specialized behavioral health HIT. The research team's experiences reinforce the opportunity presented by EBHIS to improve care coordination for populations with complex needs, while also pointing to a litany of barriers and challenges to be overcome to implement such technologies.

  17. Mode Gaussian beam tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, M. Yu.; Zakharenko, A. D.; Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    A mode parabolic equation in the ray centered coordinates for 3D underwater sound propagation is developed. The Gaussian beam tracing in this case is constructed. The test calculations are carried out for the ASA wedge benchmark and proved an excellent agreement with the source images method in the case of cross-slope propagation. But in the cases of wave propagation at some angles to the cross-slope direction an account of mode interaction becomes necessary.

  18. Test beam & time resolution analysis for UFSD and CVD diamond detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Scali, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The ever-increasing luminosity in particle physics, aimed at seeking new phenomena, has led to the need for radiation-hard detectors with a remarkable time resolution. To reach the goal several tests and data analysis has been performed but further development is still required. During my internship I have participated to the test of new sensors. After an introduction to the theoretical framework this report describes the data taking procedure using SPS beam at the H8 site in Prevessin. The second part describes the data analysis and extrapolation of the time resolution for many boards.

  19. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  20. Nuclear Counter Effect and Pion-Electron misidentification Simulations and 1998 test beam results

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmar, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The electron/charged pion discrimination within the ECAL is investigated using GEANT simulations and the 1998 test beam results. The Nuclear Counter Effect within the Avalanche Photo-Diodes enhances the probability of an electron misidentification. The test beam data show a Nuclear Counter Effect with a mean value of about 450 MeV for a Minimum Ionizing Particle crossing the APD, instead of the expected 200-250 MeV for a readout with a single APD. This value can be explained with the inefficient connection between crystals and APD`s in the PROTO 97 set-up. The pion beam data show a long tail in the E/p-ratio, which can be reproduced by GEANT simulations with Nuclear Counter Effect. GEANT simulations are then used for a study of the pion-electron confusion with the expected Nuclear Counter Effect and the foreseen set-up with two APD`s per crystal. These simulations show that the tail in the pion-energy deposition is still present. As a result one expects that about 0.1 % of the pions with 10 GeV < E &am...

  1. A Study of Hadronic Calibration Schemes for Pion Test Beam Data in the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Thomas G

    The ATLAS forward calorimeters constitute a small though important fraction of the detector's calorimeter system, designed in part to accurately and precisely measure the energy of particles and jets of particles originating from the collisions of high-energy protons at the detector's centre. The application of hadronic weights, a practice common in high-energy calorimetry, provides a means of compensation for the fraction of energy which is deposited by particles in the detector, but which is invisible to the detector due to the nature of hadronic showers. Explored here are various schemes of extracting hadronic weights, as well as the application of such weights, based on pion data from the 2003 ATLAS forward calorimeter test beam. During the collection of test beam data, beams of both pions and electrons of known energy, ranging from 10 to 200 GeV, were fired at specific points of an isolated detector in order to understand its response. The improvement in noise-subtracted energy resolution with respect to...

  2. Studies of the ATLAS hadronic Calorimeter response to different particles at Test Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Zakareishvili, Tamar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Phase II upgrade aims to increase the accelerator luminosity by a factor of 5-10. Due to the expected higher radiation levels and the aging of the current electronics, a new readout system of the ATLAS experiment hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) is needed. A prototype of the upgrade TileCal electronics has been tested using the beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerator at CERN. Data were collected with beams of muons, electrons and hadrons at various incident energies and impact angles. The muons data allow to study the dependence of the response on the incident point and angle in the cell. The electron data are used to determine the linearity of the electron energy measurement. The hadron data will allow to tune the calorimeter response to pions and kaons modelling to improve the reconstruction of the jet energies. The results of the ongoing data analysis are discussed in the presentation.

  3. Brightness and uniformity measurements of plastic scintillator tiles at the CERN H2 test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.

    2017-09-25

    We study the light output, light collection efficiency and signal timing of a variety of organic scintillators that are being considered for the upgrade of the hadronic calorimeter of the CMS detector. The experimental data are collected at the H2 test-beam area at CERN, using a 150 GeV muon beam. In particular, we investigate the usage of over-doped and green-emitting plastic scintillator, two solutions that have not been extensively considered. We present a study of the energy distribution in plastic-scintillator tiles, the hit efficiency as a function of the hit position, and a study of the signal timing for blue and green scintillators.

  4. A Layer Correlation Technique for Pion Energy Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, Karl-Johan

    2009-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the ATLAS calorimeters were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by about 20% compared to the electromagnetic scale.

  5. A Layer Correlation Technique for ATLAS Calorimetry Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, T; Spanò, F; Speckmayer, P

    2008-01-01

    A method for calibrating the response of a segmented calorimeter to hadrons is developed. The ansatz is that information on longitudinal shower fluctuations gained from a principal component analysis of the layer energy depositions can improve energy resolution by correcting for hadronic invisible energy and dead material losses: projections along the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix are used as input for the calibration. The technique is used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the ATLAS calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. Simulated Monte Carlo events are used to derive corrections for invisible energy lost in nuclear reactions and in dead material in front and in between the calorimeters. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the resolution is improved by about 20%.

  6. Measurements of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Honda

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the measurement results of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes. The measurements were carried out with an upgraded laser wire beam profile monitor. The monitor has now a vertical wire as well as a horizontal one and is able to make much faster measurements thanks to an increased effective laser power inside the cavity. The measured emittance shows no large bunch-to-bunch dependence in either the horizontal or vertical directions. The values of the vertical emittance are similar to those obtained in the single-bunch operation. The present results are an important step toward the realization of a high-energy linear collider.

  7. Use of Silicon Carbide as Beam Intercepting Device Material: Tests, Issues and Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delonca, M; Gil Costa, M; Vacca, A

    2014-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) stands as one of the most promising ceramic material with respect to its thermal shock resistance and mechanical strengths. It has hence been considered as candidate material for the development of higher performance beam intercepting devices at CERN. Its brazing with a metal counterpart has been tested and characterized by means of microstructural and ultrasound techniques. Despite the positive results, its use has to be evaluated with care, due to the strong evidence in literature of large and permanent volumetric expansion, called swelling, under the effect of neutron and ion irradiation. This may cause premature and sudden failure, and can be mitigated to some extent by operating at high temperature. For this reason limited information is available for irradiation below 100°C, which is the typical temperature of interest for beam intercepting devices like dumps or collimators. This paper describes the brazing campaign carried out at CERN, the results, and the theoretical and numeric...

  8. Compact Low-Voltage, High-Power, Multi-beam Klystron for ILC: Initial Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teryaev, V. E. [Omega-P, New Haven; Shchelkunov, S. V. [Yale U.; Kazakov, S. Yu. [Fermilab; Hirshfield, J. L. [Yale U.; Ives, R. L. [Calabazas Creek Res. Inc., San Mateo; Marsden, D. [Calabazas Creek Res. Inc., San Mateo; Collins, G. [Calabazas Creek Res. Inc., San Mateo; Karimov, R. [Calabazas Creek Res. Inc., San Mateo; Jensen, R. [CPI, Palo Alto

    2015-10-20

    Initial test results of an L-band multi-beam klystron with parameters relevant for ILC are presented. The chief distinction of this tube from MBKs already developed for ILC is its low operating voltage of 60 kV, a virtue that implies considerable technological simplifications in the accelerator complex. To demonstrate the concept underlying the tubes design, a six-beamlet quadrant (a 54 inch high one-quarter portion of the full 1.3 GHz tube) was built and recently underwent initial tests, with main goals of demonstrating rated gun perveance, rated gain, and at least one-quarter of the full 10-MW rated power. Our initial three-day conditioning campaign without RF drive (140 microsec pulses @ 60 Hz) was stopped at 53% of full rated duty because of time-limits at the test-site; no signs appeared that would seem to prevent achieving full duty operation (i.e., 1.6 msec pulses @ 10 Hz). The subsequent tests with 10-15 microsec RF pulses confirmed the rated gain, produced output powers of up to 2.86 MW at 60 kV with high efficiency and 56 dB gain, and showed acceptable beam interception. These results suggest that a full version of the tube should be able to produce up to 11.5 MW. Follow-on tests are planned for later in 2015.

  9. Construction and tests of an in-beam PET-like demonstrator for hadrontherapy beam ballistic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montarou, G., E-mail: montarou@clermont.in2p3.fr [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Bony, M.; Busato, E.; Chadelas, R. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Donnarieix, D. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Force, P.; Guicheney, C.; Insa, C.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Magne, M.; Martin, F. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Millardet, C. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Nivoix, M.; Podlyski, F.; Rozes, A. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France)

    2017-02-11

    We present the first results obtained with a detector, called Large Area Pixelized Detector (LAPD), dedicated to the study the ballistic control of the beam delivered to the patient by in-beam and real time detection of secondary particles, emitted during its irradiation in the context of hadrontherapy. These particles are 511 keV γ from the annihilation of a positron issued from the β{sup +} emitters induced in the patient tissues along the beam path. The LAPD basic concepts are similar to a conventional PET camera. The 511 keV γ are detected and the reconstructed lines of response allow to measure the β{sup +} activity distribution. Nevertheless, when trying to use γ from positron annihilation for the ballistic control in hadrontherapy, the large prompt γ background should be taken into account and properly rejected. First reconstruction results, obtained with a phantom filled with a high intensity FDG source at the cancer research centre of Clermont-Ferrand are shown. We also report results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre with one third of the detector, using proton and carbon ion beams.

  10. Design of a compact device to generate and test beams with orbital angular momentum in the EUV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, D O; Ledesma, S A; Quinteiro, G F; Capeluto, M G

    2017-10-10

    We present a compact design to generate and test optical-vortex beams with possible applications in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The device consists of a diffractive mask where both the beam with orbital angular momentum and the reference wavefront to test its phase are generated. In order to show that the proposal would work in the EUV, simulations and proof-of-principle experiments were performed, using typical parameters for EUV holography scaled to visible wavelengths. As the simplest case, we consider the well-known Laguerre-Gaussian (LG)-like beams, which have a single vortex in the propagation axis. To further test the versatility of the device, we consider Mathieu beams, more complex structured beams that may contain several vortices. In the experiment, a spatial light modulator was used to display the mask. As examples, we show the results for a LG-like beam with topological charge ℓ=1 and Mathieu beams with topological charge ℓ=2 and ellipticity q=2. These results show the potential of the device to generate a variety of beam shapes at EUV wavelengths.

  11. Beam test of the upgraded ALICE ITS detector with ion beam: Study of the expected charged particle occupancy on the chip

    CERN Document Server

    Mongkolkiattichai, Jirayu

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE experiment plan to upgrade the ITS. In particular, a new high-resolution, and low mass 7-layer silicon tracker based on monolithic pixel detector In this phase of the project, beam tests of the basic component of the detector, the chip, are very important to characterize its performance. The aim of my study is to establish the expected occupancy of the new chip for ITS ALICE Upgraded in beam tests with ion beams, it will help ALICE physicists to arrange the chip in appropriated position. To provide expected occupancy, dN/dy in Au + Au collisions of AGS Experiment is used to fit by Gaussian distribution and transformed via a relation of rapidity and pseudo rapidity to occupancy which depends on radius and angle. The detector should be near area of collision as soon as possible and the angle with respect to beam line depends on beam energy, 22, 24, 42 and 84 degrees for 2, 4, 6 and 8 A GeV

  12. High Energy Tests of Advanced Materials for Beam Intercepting Devices at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Dos Santos, S; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaeelli, S; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2012-01-01

    Predicting by simulations the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting Collimators and other Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) is a fundamental issue for machine protection: this can be done by resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, these codes require reliable material models that, at the extreme conditions generated by a beam impact, are either imprecise or non-existent. To validate relevant constitutive models or, when unavailable, derive new ones, a comprehensive experimental test foreseeing intense particle beam impacts on six different materials, either already used for present BID or under development for future applications, is being prepared at CERN HiRadMat facility. Tests will be run at medium and high intensity using the SPS proton beam (440 GeV). Material characterization will be carried out mostly in real time relying on embarked instrumentation (strain gauges, microphones, temperature and pressure sensors) and on remote acquisition dev...

  13. Handedness and developmental coordination disorder in Portuguese children: study with the M-ABC test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cidália; Vasconcelos, Maria Olga; Botelho, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the probable developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to identify differences in motor performance according to handedness, sex and age in typically developing Portuguese children not engaged in out-of-school sports. The Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) was applied to a convenience sample of 154 right-handed and 119 left-handed children (n=273), aged 4-12 (mean age=7.96 years, SD=2.38). The results suggest that the occurrence rate of probable DCD was 25.3% for right-handers and 36.1% for left-handers. This study showed a significant effect of handedness in age band 2, left-handers exhibited a higher prevalence of probable DCD than right-handers. Sex produced a significant effect, with girls performing better in manual dexterity in age band 1 and boys performing better in ball skills in age bands 2 and 3. The lower motor performances were observed in older children. These findings reinforce for Portuguese children and particularly for left-handers, the need for further investigation involving longitudinal studies and children of different handedness in the motor coordination domain. Moreover, we highlight the importance of developing physical education programmes that emphasize motor coordination parameters, especially in left-handed children.

  14. A~Scalable~Data~Taking~System at~a~Test~Beam~for~LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-13 A Scalable Data Taking System at a Test Beam for LHC \\\\ \\\\We have installed a test beam read-out facility for the simultaneous test of LHC detectors, trigger and read-out electronics, together with the development of the supporting architecture in a multiprocessor environment. The aim of the project is to build a system which incorporates all the functionality of a complete read-out chain. Emphasis is put on a highly modular design, such that new hardware and software developments can be conveniently introduced. Exploiting this modularity, the set-up will evolve driven by progress in technologies and new software developments. \\\\ \\\\One of the main thrusts of the project is modelling and integration of different read-out architectures to provide a valuable training ground for new techniques. To address these aspects in a realistic manner, we collaborate with detector R\\&D projects in order to test higher level trigger systems, event building and high rate data transfers, once the techniques involve...

  15. Hadron beam test of a scintillating fibre tracker system for elastic scattering and luminosity measurement in ATLAS

    OpenAIRE

    Anghinolfi, F.; S. Ask; Barrillon, P.; Blanchot, G; Blin, S.; Braem, André; C. De La Taille; Di Girolamo, B.; I. Efthymiopoulos(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Faustino, J; Fournier, D.; Franz, S.; Grafström, P.; Gurriana, L.; Haguenauer, M.

    2007-01-01

    A scintillating fibre tracker is proposed to measure elastic proton scattering at very small angles in the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The tracker will be located in so-called Roman Pot units at a distance of 240 m on each side of the ATLAS interaction point. An initial validation of the design choices was achieved in a beam test at DESY in a relatively low energy electron beam and using slow off-the-shelf electronics. Here we report on the results from a second beam test experiment carried out...

  16. Performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring tested with clinical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piliero, M.A., E-mail: piliero@pi.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Bisogni, M.G. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Cerello, P. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino (Italy); Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Fiorina, E. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino (Italy); Liu, B.; Morrocchi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Pennazio, F. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino (Italy); Pirrone, G. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, sezione di Pisa (Italy); Wheadon, R. [INFN, sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    In this work we present the performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring during the irradiation of a PMMA phantom with a clinical proton beam. The experimental set-up was based on 4 independent detection modules. Two detection modules were placed at one side of a PMMA phantom and the other two modules were placed at the opposite side of the phantom. One detection module was composed of a Silicon Photon Multiplier produced by AdvanSiD coupled to a single scintillating LYSO crystal. The read-out system was based on the TOFPET ASIC managed by a Xilinx ML605 FPGA Evaluation Board (Virtex 6). The irradiation of the PMMA phantom was performed at the CNAO hadrontherapy facility (Pavia, Italy) with a 95 MeV pulsed proton beam. The pulsed time structure of the proton beam was reconstructed by each detection module. The β{sup +} annihilation peak was successfully measured and the production of β{sup +} isotopes emitters was observed as increasing number of 511 keV events detected during irradiation. Finally, after the irradiation, the half lives of the {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O radioactive isotopes were estimated.

  17. Performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring tested with clinical proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Cerello, P.; Del Guerra, A.; Fiorina, E.; Liu, B.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Pirrone, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present the performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring during the irradiation of a PMMA phantom with a clinical proton beam. The experimental set-up was based on 4 independent detection modules. Two detection modules were placed at one side of a PMMA phantom and the other two modules were placed at the opposite side of the phantom. One detection module was composed of a Silicon Photon Multiplier produced by AdvanSiD coupled to a single scintillating LYSO crystal. The read-out system was based on the TOFPET ASIC managed by a Xilinx ML605 FPGA Evaluation Board (Virtex 6). The irradiation of the PMMA phantom was performed at the CNAO hadrontherapy facility (Pavia, Italy) with a 95 MeV pulsed proton beam. The pulsed time structure of the proton beam was reconstructed by each detection module. The β+ annihilation peak was successfully measured and the production of β+ isotopes emitters was observed as increasing number of 511 keV events detected during irradiation. Finally, after the irradiation, the half lives of the 11C and 15O radioactive isotopes were estimated.

  18. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  19. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, Mateusz Karol; Calabrese, Roberto; Cardinale, Roberta; Carniti, Paolo; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cojocariu, Lucian Nicolae; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dorosz, Piotr Andrzej; Easo, Sajan; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frei, Christoph; Gambetta, Silvia; Gibson, Valerie; Gotti, Claudio; Harnew, Neville; He, Jibo; Keizer, Floris; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Maciuc, Florin; Maino, Matteo; Malaguti, Roberto; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mccann, Michael Andrew; Morris, Adam; Muheim, Franz; Papanestis, Antonis; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedigrossi, Didier; Pistone, Alessandro; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Sigurdsson, Saevar; Simi, Gabriele; Smith, Jackson William; Spradlin, Patrick; Tomassetti, Luca; Wotton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to use the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors are one of the key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper, we describe the setup and the results of the first tests in a particle beam carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded optoelectronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  20. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, M.K.

    2017-01-16

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  1. System tests of the LHCb RICH detectors in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Skottowe, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    The RICH detectors of the LHCb experiment will provide efficient particle identification over the momentum range 1-100 GeV=c. Results are presented from a beam test of the LHCb RICH system using final production pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors, the final readout electronics and an adapted version of LHCb RICH reconstruction software. Measurements of the photon yields and Cherenkov angle resolutions for both nitrogen and C4F10 radiators agree well with full simulations. The quality of the data and the results obtained demonstrate that all aspects meet the stringent physics requirements of the experiment are now ready for first data.

  2. Beam test of a prototype read-out system for precision tracking detectors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Millmore, M; Gill, K; Hall, G; Howell, G; Jones, L; Langhans, W A; MacEvoy, B C; Matheson, J; Payne, R; Raymond, M; Stefanini, G; Vasey, F; Vitè, Davide F; Watts, S; Wheadon, R

    1996-01-01

    A prototype of a read-out system developed for high spatial precision tracking detectors at LHC has been tested in a beam at CERN. It is based on a radiation hard CMOS front end chip which includes signal amplification, storage in an analogue delay line and a deconvolution filter. Data were transferred from the front-end chip using an analogue fibre optic link emplouing a novel reflective electro-optic modulator and continuous laser light source remote from the detector. This is the first time such a system has been used in an experimental environment and is the basis of the system proposed for the CMS experiment at LHC.

  3. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  4. Design and Beam Test Results for the sPHENIX Electromagnetic and Hadronic Calorimeter Prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidala, C.A.; et al.

    2017-04-05

    The sPHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will perform high precision measurements of jets and heavy flavor observables for a wide selection of nuclear collision systems, elucidating the microscopic nature of strongly interacting matter ranging from nucleons to the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. A prototype of the sPHENIX calorimeter system was tested at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility as experiment T-1044 in the spring of 2016. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) prototype is composed of scintillating fibers embedded in a mixture of tungsten powder and epoxy. The hadronic calorimeter (HCal) prototype is composed of tilted steel plates alternating with plastic scintillator. Results of the test beam reveal the energy resolution for electrons in the EMCal is $2.8\\%\\oplus~15.5\\%/\\sqrt{E}$ and the energy resolution for hadrons in the combined EMCal plus HCal system is $13.5\\%\\oplus 64.9\\%/\\sqrt{E}$. These results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed calorimeter system is consistent with \\geant simulations and satisfies the sPHENIX specifications.

  5. Residual Stress Test and Finite Element Analysis of Titanium Alloy Surface Obtained by Electron Beam Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Xiaojia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ti60 titanium alloy plates were welded by electron beam,and the welding residual stress was tested and simulated by the residual stress tester and finite element analysis. The comparison of the residual stress values caused in the three kinds of welding processes of pre-heating, slow cooling and both pre-heating and slow cooling was carried out. The residual stress distribution law was also studied. Results show that in the vertical welding section, the longitudinal welding residual stress tested is similar to that simulated as to the change trend; in the parallel welding section, the distributions of the tested and simulated longitudinal welding residual stress are similar. These prove that the finite element analysis is reasonable and reliable. The process of pre-heating has little influence on the welding residual stress, but the slow cooling process can change its distribution.

  6. Nondestructive testing and monitoring of stiff large-scale structures by measuring 3D coordinates of cardinal points using electronic distance measurements in a trilateration architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David H.

    2017-04-01

    By using three, or more, electronic distance measurement (EDM) instruments, such as commercially available laser trackers, in an unconventional trilateration architecture, 3-D coordinates of specialized retroreflector targets attached to cardinal points on a structure can be measured with absolute uncertainty of less than one part-permillion. For example, 3-D coordinates of a structure within a 100 meter cube can be measured within a volume of a 0.1 mm cube (the thickness of a sheet of paper). Relative dynamic movements, such as vibrations at 30 Hz, are typically measured 10 times better, i.e., within a 0.01 mm cube. Measurements of such accuracy open new areas for nondestructive testing and finite element model confirmation of stiff, large-scale structures, such as: buildings, bridges, cranes, boilers, tank cars, nuclear power plant containment buildings, post-tensioned concrete, and the like by measuring the response to applied loads, changes over the life of the structure, or changes following an accident, fire, earthquake, modification, etc. The sensitivity of these measurements makes it possible to measure parameters such as: linearity, hysteresis, creep, symmetry, damping coefficient, and the like. For example, cracks exhibit a highly non-linear response when strains are reversed from compression to tension. Due to the measurements being 3-D, unexpected movements, such as transverse motion produced by an axial load, could give an indication of an anomaly-such as an asymmetric crack or materials property in a beam, delamination of concrete, or other asymmetry due to failures. Details of the specialized retroreflector are included.

  7. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  8. Hadron beam test of a scintillating fibre tracker system for elastic scattering and luminosity measurement in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Anghinolfi, F; Barrillon, P; Blanchot, G; Blin, S; Braem, André; de La Taille, C; Di Girolamo, B; Efthymiopoulos, I; Faustino, J; Fournier, D; Franz, S; Grafström, P; Gurriana, L; Haguenauer, M; Hedberg, V; Heller, M; Hoffmann, S; Iwanski, W; Joram, C; Kocnár, A; Lavigne, B; Lundberg, B; Maio, A; Maneira, M J P; Mapelli, A; Marques, C; Mjörnmark, U; Conde-Muíño, P; Puzo, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Saraiva, J G; Seguin-Moreau, N; Soares, S; Stenzel, H; Thioye, M; Varouchas, D; Vorobel, V

    2007-01-01

    A scintillating fibre tracker is proposed to measure elastic proton scattering at very small angles in the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The tracker will be located in so-called Roman Pot units at a distance of 240 m on each side of the ATLAS interaction point. An initial validation of the design choices was achieved in a beam test at DESY in a relatively low energy electron beam and using slow off-the-shelf electronics. Here we report on the results from a second beam test experiment carried out at CERN, where new detector prototypes were tested in a high energy hadron beam, using the first version of the custom designed front-end electronics. The results show an adequate tracking performance under conditions which are similar to the situation at the LHC. In addition, the alignment method using so-called overlap detectors was studied and shown to have the expected precision.

  9. Integrating supervision, control and data acquisition—The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, A., E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.; Breda, M.; Capobianco, R.; Molon, F.; Moressa, M.; Simionato, P.; Zampiva, E.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The paper describes the experience gained in the integration of different systems for the control and data acquisition system of the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility. • It describes the way the different frameworks have been integrated. • It reports some lessons learnt during system integration. • It reports some authors’ considerations about the development the ITER CODAC. - Abstract: The ITER Neutral Beam (NBI) Test Facility, under construction in Padova, Italy consists in the ITER full scale ion source for the heating neutral beam injector, referred to as SPIDER, and the full size prototype injector, referred to as MITICA. The Control and Data Acquisition System (CODAS) for SPIDER has been developed and is going to be in operation in 2016. The system is composed of four main components: Supervision, Slow Control, Fast Control and Data Acquisition. These components interact with each other to carry out the system operation and, since they represent a common pattern in fusion experiments, software frameworks have been used for each (set of) component. In order to reuse as far as possible the architecture developed for SPIDER, it is important to clearly define the boundaries and the interfaces among the system components so that the implementation of any component can be replaced without affecting the overall architecture. This work reports the experience gained in the development of SPIDER components, highlighting the importance in the definition of generic interfaces among component, showing how the specific solutions have been adapted to such interfaces and suggesting possible approaches for the development of other ITER subsystems.

  10. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  11. MMW/IR beam combiner with graphene IR window for MMW/IR compact range compound test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Li, Yanhong; Pang, Xudong; Zhu, Weihua; Wang, Liquan; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Tailei; Zhu, Shouzheng

    2017-06-01

    A millimeter wave (MMW)/infrared (IR) beam combiner with a graphene IR window for the MMW/IR compact range (CR) compound test is creatively proposed with comprehensive analysis and simulation. Graphene is used as the IR window material to transfer the IR feed signal behind a perforated MMW CR reflector for it has the unique property of high IR transmissivity and high MMW conductivity. This research shows that graphene IR windows have better IR transmissivity than conducting inductive mesh IR windows when the beam combiner meets the MMW CR test demanding. Graphene IR windows also show a better MMW test bandwidth than dielectric IR windows. Meanwhile, the graphene IR window MMW/IR beam combiner has a circular aperture test zone with which it is sufficient to test a cylindrical unit under test according to the requirement.

  12. Performance of CMS hadron calorimeter timing and synchronization using test beam, cosmic ray, and LHC beam data

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; 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Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; 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Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and performance of the time measurement technique and of the synchronization systems of the CMS hadron calorimeter. Timing performance results are presented from the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla and LHC beam runs taken in the Autumn of 2008. For hadronic showers of energy greater than 100 GeV, the timing resolution is measured to be about 1.2 ns. The inter-channel synchronization is measured to be within 2 ns.

  13. The data acquisition system of the SuperB-SVT beam test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarra, C.; Fabbri, L.; Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Lusiani, A.; Paoloni, E.; Pellegrini, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.

    2013-08-01

    Prototypes of a new hybrid pixel detector and a high resistivity detector with short strips, developed by the VIPIX Collaboration and aimed at equipping the layer-0 of the SuperB vertex detector, have been tested in September 2011 with a 120 GeV pion beam at the SPS H6 beam line at CERN. They are placed at the center of a reference telescope consisting of six planes of silicon detector with a double-sided strip readout. Both the telescope and the detectors under test (DUT) are equipped with a custom-design, data-push digital readout. The main elements of the trigger and data acquisition system are two VME boards (EDRO) organized in a master-slave configuration and responsible for programming the front-end chips of both the telescope and the DUT. The master board distributes a global synchronization clock and the triggers to all devices, including two 3×3 analog-maps matrices placed behind the DUT and supplied with an independent readout. Both EDROs act as event-fragment builders. These are sent out to a remote PC for event building, buffering and storage.

  14. Test-beam measurements and simulation studies of thin pixel sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00574329; Dannheim, Dominik

    The multi-$TeV$ $e^{+}e^{-}$ Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is one of the options for a future high-energy collider for the post-LHC era. It would allow for searches of new physics and simultaneously offer the possibility for precision measurements of standard model processes. The physics goals and experimental conditions at CLIC set high precision requirements on the vertex detector made of pixel detectors: a high pointing resolution of 3 $\\mu m$, very low mass of 0.2% $X_{0}$ per layer, 10 ns time stamping capability and low power dissipation of 50 mW/$cm^{2}$ compatible with air-flow cooling. In this thesis, hybrid assemblies with thin active-edge planar sensors are characterised through calibrations, laboratory and test-beam measurements. Prototypes containing 50 $\\mu m$ to 150 $\\mu m$ thin planar silicon sensors bump-bonded to Timepix3 readout ASICs with 55 $\\mu m$ pitch are characterised in test beams at the CERN SPS in view of their detection efficiency and single-point resolution. A digitiser for AllP...

  15. MINERvA neutrino detector response measured with test beam data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, L. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Altinok, O. [Physics Department, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Araujo Del Castillo, C. [Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima (Peru); Bagby, L.; Bellantoni, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bergan, W.F. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Bodek, A.; Bradford, R. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Bravar, A. [University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Budd, H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Butkevich, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Martinez Caicedo, D.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Carneiro, M.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Christy, M.E. [Hampton University, Department of Physics, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Chvojka, J. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Motta, H. da [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Devan, J. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); and others

    2015-07-21

    The MINERvA collaboration operated a scaled-down replica of thesolid scintillator tracking and sampling calorimeter regions of the MINERvA detector in a hadron test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. This paper reports measurements with samples of protons, pions, and electrons from 0.35 to 2.0 GeV/c momentum. The calorimetric response to protons, pions, and electrons is obtained from these data. A measurement of the parameter in Birks' law and an estimate of the tracking efficiency are extracted from the proton sample. Overall the data are well described by a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of the detector and particle interactions with agreements better than 4% for the calorimetric response, though some features of the data are not precisely modeled. These measurements are used to tune the MINERvA detector simulation and evaluate systematic uncertainties in support of the MINERvA neutrino cross-section measurement program.

  16. Beam tests of an integrated prototype of the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00397348

    2016-09-19

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is intended to measure protons scattered at small angles from the ATLAS interaction point. To this end, a combination of 3D Silicon pixel tracking modules and Quartz-Cherenkov time-of-flight (ToF) detectors is installed 210m away from the interaction point at both sides of ATLAS. Beam tests with an AFP prototype detector combining tracking and timing sub-detectors and a common readout have been performed at the CERN-SPS test-beam facility in November 2014 and September 2015 to complete the system integration and to study the detector performance. The successful tracking-timing integration was demonstrated. Good tracker hit efficiencies above 99.9% at a sensor tilt of 14{\\deg}, as foreseen for AFP, were observed. Spatial resolutions in the short pixel direction with 50 {\\mu}m pitch of 5.5 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m per pixel plane and of 2.8 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m for the full four-plane tracker at 14{\\deg} were found, largely surpassing the AFP requirement of 10 {\\mu}m. The timing detector...

  17. The data-acquisition system for the CMS tracker beam tests

    CERN Document Server

    Drouhin, F; Pallarès, A; Verdini, P G; Fontaine, J C; Jeanneau, F; Huss, D

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the conception and the development of a real- time data-acquisition system for prototype detectors of the Tracker being designed for the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, European Laboratory for Particle Physics, Geneva, Switzerland. The rationale for the development of a dedicated data-acquisition system was the need to perform two fundamental beam tests (the "Milestone Barrel 1" and "Milestone Forward 1"), with large-scale prototypes of the detectors planned as the baseline design. The number of readout channels, the complexity of the readout electronics, and the stringent requirements of the milestone tests mandated that a thorough understanding of the issues related to the physics of the detectors themselves be coupled with the application of leading-edge electronic and software engineering technologies. The implementation described in this paper is based on a distributed architecture. An event builder CPU handles the two main tasks of synchr...

  18. Test Beam Studies for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Readout Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Douglas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider is expected to deliver 3-4/ab of p-p collisions with around 200 collisions per proton bunch crossing starting in 2026, and the readout electronics of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter need to be upgraded to deal with the high rate of data taking as well as the large pileup conditions. The proposed digitizer/shaper cards were tested in 2016-7 in the North Area at CERN using the beam from the SPS to produce high energy pions, electrons, muons, and kaons. This presentation summarizes the setup for particle identification and study of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter data taking in preparation for the production of main boards and digitizer/shaper boards for the photo-multiplier tubes. The fully assembled and tested mini-drawers will start to be installed after the LHC long shutdown in December 2023. The pulse shape, uniformity, and timing precision of the upgrade system are demonstrated.

  19. Beam test results for the upgraded LHCb RICH opto-electronic readout system

    CERN Multimedia

    Carniti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is devoted to high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics by studying the decays of beauty and charmed hadrons produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Two RICH detectors are currently installed and operating successfully, providing a crucial role in the particle identification system of the LHCb experiment. Starting from 2019, the LHCb experiment will be upgraded to operate at higher luminosity, extending its potential for discovery and study of new phenomena. Both the RICH detectors will be upgraded and the entire opto-electronic system has been redesigned in order to cope with the new specifications, namely higher readout rates, and increased occupancies. The new photodetectors, readout electronics, mechanical assembly and cooling system have reached the final phase of development and their performance was thoroughly and successfully validated during several beam test sessions in 2014 and 2015 at the SPS facility at CERN. Details of the test setup and perf...

  20. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  1. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auty, David John [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0%$\\bar{v}$μ, which can be separated from the vμ because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study $\\bar{v}$μ oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the $\\bar{v}$μ oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for vμ, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam $\\bar{v}$μ before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure $\\bar{v}$μ beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% $\\bar{v}$μ component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The $\\bar{v}$μ of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3-7.6+7.6(stat.)-3.6+3.6(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 σ deficit, and a best fit value of Δ$\\bar{m}$322 = 18 x 10-3 eV2 and sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$23 = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of $\\bar{v}$μ events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The

  2. Interface Fracture Toughness Assessment of Solder Joints Using Double Cantilever Beam Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Shane Zhi Yuan; Lee, Puay Cheng; Lim, Zan Xuan; Yantara, Natalia; Tee, Tong Yan; Tan, Cher Ming; Chen, Zhong

    In the current work, a test scheme to evaluate solder joint interface fracture toughness using double cantilever beam (DCB) test has been successfully demonstrated. The obtained results, in terms of critical energy release rate, predict the joint failure based on the principle of fracture mechanics. The results can be used as a materials property in the reliability design of various types of solder-ball joined packages. DCB specimens made of 99.9 wt% copper were selected in the current work. Eutectic Sn-37Pb and lead-free Sn-3.5Ag-0.5Cu solders were used to join two pieces of the copper beams with controlled solder thickness. The test record showed steady propagation of the crack along the solder / copper interface, which verifies the viability of such a testing scheme. Interface fracture toughness for as-joined, extensively-reflowed and thermally aged samples has been measured. Both the reflow treatment and the thermal aging lead to degradation of the solder joint fracture resistance. Reflow treatment was more damaging as it induces much faster interface reaction. Fractographic analysis established that the fracture has a mixed micromechanism of dimple and cleavage. The dimples are formed as a result of the separation between the hard intermetallic compound (IMC) particles and the soft solder material, while the cleavage is formed by the brittle split of the IMCs. When the IMC thickness is increased due to extended interface reaction, the proportion of IMC cleavage failure increases, and this was reflected in the decrease of the critical energy release rate.

  3. A 5000-hour test of a grid-translation beam-deflection system for a 5-cm diameter Kaufman thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathem, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    A grid-translation type beam deflection system was tested on a 5-cm diameter mercury ion thruster for 5000 hours at a thrust level of about 0.36 mlb. During the first 2000 hours the beam was vectored 10 degrees in one direction. No erosion damage attributable to beam deflection was detected. Results indicate a possible lifetime of 15,000 to 20,000 hours. An optimized neutralizer position was used which eliminated the sputter erosion groove observed on the SERT 2 thrusters.

  4. A modern and versatile data-acquisition package for calorimeter prototypes test-beams H4DAQ

    CERN Document Server

    Marini, Andrea Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the calorimeters for the HL-LHC or for future colliders requires an extensive programme of tests to qualify different detector prototypes with dedicated test beams. A common data-acquisition system (called H4DAQ) was developed for the H4 test beam line at the North Area of the CERN SPS in 2014 and it has since been adopted by an increasing number of teams involved in the CMS experiment and AIDA groups. Several different calorimeter prototypes and precision timing detectors have used H4DAQ from 2014 to 2017, and it has proved to be a versatile application, portable to many other beam test environments (the CERN beam lines EA-T9 at the PS, H2 and H4 at the SPS, and at the INFN Frascati Beam Test Facility).The H4DAQ is fast, simple, modular and can be configured to support different setups. The different functionalities of the DAQ core software are split into three configurable finite state machines the data readout, run control, and event builder. The distribution of information and data betw...

  5. Performance Test of the Next Generation X-Ray Beam Position Monitor System for The APS Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Lee, S.; Westferro, F.; Jaski, Y.; Lenkszus, F.; Sereno, N.; Ramanathan, M.

    2017-03-25

    The Advanced Photon Source is developing its next major upgrade (APS-U) based on the multi-bend achromat lattice. Improved beam stability is critical for the upgrade and will require keeping short-time beam angle change below 0.25 µrad and long-term angle drift below 0.6 µrad. A reliable white x-ray beam diagnostic system in the front end will be a key part of the planned beam stabilization system. This system includes an x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) based on x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from two specially designed GlidCop A-15 absorbers, a second XBPM using XRF photons from the Exit Mask, and two white beam intensity monitors using XRF from the photon shutter and Compton-scattered photons from the front end beryllium window or a retractable diamond film in windowless front ends. We present orbit stability data for the first XBPM used in the feedback control during user operations, as well as test data from the second XBPM and the intensity monitors. They demonstrate that the XBPM system meets APS-U beam stability requirements.

  6. Reliability and responsiveness of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition Test in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Su, Jui-Hsing; Su, Chwen-Yng

    2012-02-01

    To examine the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and responsiveness of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (MABC-2) Test for children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). One hundred and forty-four Taiwanese children with DCD aged 6 to 12 years (87 males, 57 females) were tested on three separate occasions: two baseline measurements with a 20-day interval before the intervention, and a follow-up measurement after 6 months of rehabilitation. The therapists rated the performance of children in school-related physical tasks at baseline and after intervention. Internal consistency for the MABC-2 Test was α = 0.90. Test-retest reliability for the total score was excellent, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. A small to medium magnitude of treatment effect was captured by the MABC-2 Test. The minimal detectable change (MDC) was 0.28 points whereas the minimal important difference (MID) values were from 2.36 to 2.50. All subscales except balance showed acceptable validity in differentiating groups of children whose physical performance had improved or remained stable. The MABC-2 Test is a reliable and valid measure to assess motor competence in children with DCD. The MID and MDC scores provide the reference point for clinical decision-making in managing the individual child. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  7. Test beam analysis of ultra-thin hybrid pixel detector assemblies with Timepix readout ASICs

    CERN Document Server

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Dannheim, Dominik; Firu, Elena; Kulis, Szymon; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for the vertex detector at the proposed Compact Linear Collider imply a very small material budget: less than 0.2% of a radiation length per detection layer including services and mechanical supports. We present here a study using Timepix readout ASICs hybridised to pixel sensors of 50 − 500 μm thickness, including assemblies with 100 μm thick sensors bonded to thinned 100μm thick ASICs. Sensors from three producers (Advacam, Micron Semiconductor Ltd, Canberra) with different edge termination technologies (active edge, slim edge) were bonded to Timepix ASICs. These devices were characterised with the EUDET telescope at the DESY II test beam using 5.6 GeV electrons. Their performance for the detection and tracking of minimum ionising particles was evaluated in terms of charge sharing, detection efficiency, single-point resolution and energy deposition.

  8. Test Beam results and integration of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, M; Cataldi, G; Chiodini, G; Fiore, G; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Miccoli, A; Perrino, R; Primavera, M; Spagnolo, S; Tassielli, G F; Ventura, A; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Canale, V; Caprio, M A; Carlino, G; Conventi, F; De Asmundis, R; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Iengo, P; Izzo, V; Migliaccio, A; Patricelli, S; Sekhniaidze, G; Bocci, V; Chiodi, G; Gennari, E; Nisati, A; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Petrolo, E; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; Aielli, G; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; Delle Fratte, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Di Stante, L; Liberti, B; Salamon, A; Santonico, R; Solfaroli, E; Aprodu, V; Petcu, M; 2004 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium And Medical Imaging Conference

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Muon Trigger will be crucial for the online selection of events with high transverse momentum muons and for its correct association to the bunch-crossing corresponding to the detected events. This system uses dedicated coarse granularity and fast detectors capable of providing measurements in two orthogonal projections. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are used in the barrel region. The associated trigger electronics is based on a custom chip, the Coincidence Matrix, that performs space coincidences within programmable roads and time gates. The system is highly redundant and communicates with the ATLAS Level-1 trigger Processor with the MUCTPI Interface. The trigger electronics provides also the Readout of the RPCs. Preliminary results achieved with a full trigger tower with production detectors in the H8 test beam at CERN will be shown. In particular preliminary results on the integration of the barrel muon trigger electronics with the MUCTPI interface and with the ATLAS DAQ system will ...

  9. Beam test of a 12-layer scintillating-fiber charged-particle tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Howell, B.L.; Koltick, D.; McIlwain, R.L.; Schmitz, C.J.; Shibata, E.I.; Zhou, Z.; Baumbaugh, B.; Ivancic, M.; Jaques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Kelley, M.; Mahoney, M.; Marchant, J.; Ruchti, R.; Wayne, M.; Atac, M.; Baumbaugh, A.; Elias, J.E.; Romero, A.; Chrisman, D.; Park, J.; Adams, M.R.; Chung, M.; Goldberg, H.; Margulies, S.; Solomon, J.; Chaney, R.; Orgeron, J.; Armstrong, T.; Lewis, R.A.; Mitchell, G.S.; Moore, R.S.; Passaneau, J.; Smith, G.A.; Corcoran, M.; Adams, D.; Bird, F.; Fenker, H.; Regan, T.; Thomas, J. (Dept. of Physics, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States) Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Texas, Richardson, TX (United States) Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States) Dept. of Physics, Rice Univ

    1994-02-01

    A 96-channel, 3-superlayer, scintillating-fiber tracking system has been tested in a 5 GeV/c [pi][sup -] beam. The scintillating fibers were 830 [mu]m in diameter, spaced 850 [mu]m apart, and 4.3 m in length. They were coupled to 6 m long, clear fiber waveguides and finally to visible light photon counters. A spatial resolution of [approx]150 [mu]m for a double-layered ribbon was achieved with this tracking system. This first prototype of a charged-particle tracking system configured for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the Superconducting Super Collider is a benchmark in verifying the expected number of photoelectrons from the fibers. (orig.)

  10. Laboratory and test beam results from a large-area silicon drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; Giubellino, P; Gregorio, A; Idzik, M; Kolojvari, A A; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nouais, D; Petta, C; Rashevsky, A; Randazzo, N; Reito, S; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A very large-area (6.75*8 cm/sup 2/) silicon drift detector with integrated high-voltage divider has been designed, produced and fully characterised in the laboratory by means of ad hoc designed MOS injection electrodes. The detector is of the "butterfly" type, the sensitive area being subdivided into two regions with a maximum drift length of 3.3 cm. The device was also tested in a pion beam (at the CERN PS) tagged by means of a microstrip detector telescope. Bipolar VLSI front-end cells featuring a noise of 250 e/sup -/ RMS at 0 pF with a slope of 40 e/sup -//pF have been used to read out the signals. The detector showed an excellent stability and featured the expected characteristics. Some preliminary results will be presented. (12 refs).

  11. A prototype of the CMS Object Oriented Reconstruction and Analysis Framework for the Beam Test Data

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestris, L

    1998-01-01

    CMS software requirements and computing resources will by far exceed those of any existing high energy physics experiment, not only for the complexity of the detector and of the physics task but also for the size of the collaboration and the long time scale. Therefore, software should be developed keeping in mind not only performance but also modularity, flexibility, maintainability, quality assurance and documentation. Object Orientation has been identified as the enabling technology, since it directly addresses this kind of problems. We will report on the development of an Object Oriented Reconstruction and Analysis Framework for the CMS experiment and in particular on a prototype of a complete analysis chain for the CMS test-beam data. The analysis chain consists of three different components: data acquisition, reconstruction and analysis, and interactive analysis tools. In the online part the data, read from the VME, are stored into an Objectivity federated database. Later, using an automatic procedure, t...

  12. Adaptive support for aircraft panel testing: New method and its experimental verification on a beam structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Delf; Baschke, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic transmissibility of aircraft panels is measured in full-scale test rigs. The panels are supported at their frames. These boundary conditions do not take into account the dynamic influence of the fuselage, which is significant in the frequency range below 300 Hz. This paper introduces a new adaptive boundary system (ABS). It combines accelerometers and electrodynamic shakers with real-time signal processing. The ABS considers the dynamic effect of the fuselage on the panel. The frames are dominating the dynamic behaviour of a fuselage in the low-frequency range. Therefore, the new method is applied to a beam representing a frame of the aircraft structure. The experimental results are evaluated and the precision of the ABS is discussed. The theoretical apparent mass representing the cut-off part of a frame is calculated and compared with the apparent mass, as provided by the ABS. It is explained how the experimental set-up limits the precision of the ABS.

  13. Low-energy beam test results of a calorimeter prototype for the CREAM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bagliesi, M G; Ganel, O; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Lomtadze, T A; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Seo, E S; Valle, G D

    2003-01-01

    CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass) is an experiment under construction for a direct measurement of high energy cosmic rays (10 /sup 12/ to >5.10/sup 14/ eV) over the elemental range from proton to iron. The first flight of CREAM is intended to demonstrate the new ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) capability under development by NASA. A prototype of a tungsten-SciFi imaging calorimeter designed for CREAM has been tested at CERN with electron beam energies ranging from 5 to 100 GeV. Although the calorimeter module is optimized for cosmic-ray spectral measurements in the multiTeV region, the response of its electromagnetic section to low energy electrons has been studied with this dedicated prototype. Results show good agreement with the expected behaviour in terms of linearity and energy resolution.

  14. Test beam results of a depleted monolithic active pixel sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obermann, Theresa; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Bonn Univ. (Germany); Schwenker, Benjamin [Goettingen Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS Pixel-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    New monolithic detector concepts are currently being explored for future particle physics experiments, in particular for the upgrade of the ATLAS detector. Common to monolithic pixel detectors is the integration of the front-end circuitry and the sensor on the same silicon substrate. The DMAPS concept makes use of high resistive silicon as substrate. It enables the application of a high bias voltage to create a drift field for the charge collection in the sensor part as well as the full usage of CMOS logic in the same piece of silicon. DMAPS prototypes from several foundries are available since three years and have been extensively characterized in the lab. In this talk, results of test beam campaigns, with neutron irradiated prototypes implemented in the ESPROS process, are presented.

  15. Development of RFQ particle dynamics simulation tools and validation with beam tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maus, Johannes M.

    2010-07-01

    Two different strategies of designing RFQs have been introduced. The analytic description of the electric fields inside the quadrupole channel has been derived and the two term simplification was shown as well as the limitation of these approaches. The main work of this thesis was the implementation and analysis of a multigrid Poisson solver to describe the potential and electric field of RFQs which are needed to simulate the particle dynamics accurately. The main two ingredients of a multigrid Poisson solver are the ability of a Gauss-Seidel iteration method to smooth the error of an approximation within a few iteration steps and the coarse grid principle. The smoothing corresponds to a damping of the high frequency components of the error. After the smoothing, the error term can well be approximated on a coarser grid in which the low frequency components of the error on the fine grid are converted to high frequency errors on the coarse grid which can be damped further with the same Gauss-Seidel method. After implementation, the multigrid Poisson solver was analyzed using two different type of test problems: with and without a charge density. As a charge density, a homogeneously charged ball and cylinder were used to represent the bunched and unbunched beam and placed inside a quadruple channel. The solver showed a good performance. Next, the performance of the solver to calculate the external potentials (and fields) of RFQs was analyzed. Closing the analysis of the external field, the transmission and fraction of accelerated particles of the set of 12 RFQs for the two different methods were shown. In the last chapter of this thesis some experimental work on the MAFF (Munich Accelerator for Fission Fragments) IH-RFQ is described. The MAFF RFQ was designed to accelerate very neutron-rich fission fragments for various experiments. The machine was assembled in Frankfurt and a beam test stand was built. As a part of this thesis the shunt impedance of the structure was

  16. Quench Tests of LHC Magnets with Beam: Studies on Beam Loss development and determination of Quench levels

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Sapinski, M

    The application of superconducting materials in the field of high energy accelerator physics not only opens the doors to the generation of the magnetic fields unattainable to normal conductors but also demands facing new challenges. A transition fromthe superconducting state, which is characterized by a resistance-free flow of the electric current, to the normal conducting state is called quenching. This process might be extremely dangerous and even lead to destruction of amagnet superconducting coil if no protecting actions are taken. Therefore, the knowledge of a magnet quench level, i.e. amount of energy which causes the transition to the resistive state, is crucial for the safety and operational efficiency of the accelerator. Regarding that, specific thresholds are incorporated to dedicated quench prevention systems in order to suppress the origin of detected energy perturbation, for example beam losses, or mitigate the consequences of the quenching process by dissipating the energy stored in the magnetic...

  17. submitter Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    CERN Document Server

    Thomae, R; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  18. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  19. First Results from Beam Measurements at the 3 MeV Test Stand for CERN LINAC4

    CERN Document Server

    Cheymol, B; Lokhovitsky, A; Midttun, O; Raich, U; Roncarolo, F; Scrivens, R; Zorin, E

    2011-01-01

    The H- source and the low energy beam transport(LEBT) line will determine to a large extend the performance of Linac-4, the new machine foreseen at CERN as injector into the PS Booster. For this reason a test stand is being set up, consisting of the source, the LEBT, the RFQ and the chopper line. Up to now only the source and LEBT are installed. First measurements have been performed using a Faraday Cup to measure the total source intensity, a slit and grid emittance meter for transverse emittance measurements as well as a spectrometer for energy spread measurements. Beam intensity, profile, transverse emittance and energy spread have been measured. The paper discusses measurements done on H- beams at 35 kV extraction voltage as well as proton beams at 45 keV.

  20. Diffraction Radiation test at CesrTA for Non-Intercepting Micron-scale Beam Size Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Bobb, L; Lefevre, T; Mazzoni, S; Aumeyr, T; Karataev, P; Billing, M; Conway, J

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction radiation (DR) is produced when a relativistic charged particle moves in the vicinity of a medium. The electric field of the charged particle polarises the target atoms which then oscillate, emitting radiation with a very broad spectrum. The spatial-spectral properties of DR are sensitive to a range of electron beam parameters. Furthermore, the energy loss due to DR is so small that the electron beam parameters are unchanged. DR can therefore be used to develop non-invasive diagnostic tools. To achieve the micron-scale resolution required to measure the transverse (vertical) beam size using incoherent DR in CLIC, DR in UV and X-ray spectral-range must be investigated. Experimental validation of such a scheme is ongoing at CesrTA at Cornell University, USA. Here we report on the test using 0.5 mm and 1 mm target apertures on a 2.1 GeV electron beam and 400 nm wavelength.

  1. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.; Cervaro, V.; Delogu, R.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Molon, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G., E-mail: gianluigi.serianni@igi.cnr.it; Tollin, M.; Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA) (Italy); De Muri, M. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA) (Italy); INFN-LNL, v.le dell' Università 2, I-35020, Legnaro (PD) Italy (Italy); Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma (IFP-CNR) – Via Cozzi 53, 20125, Milano (Italy)

    2015-04-08

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with the aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 3×5 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.

  2. Non-linear beam dynamics tests in the LHC: LHC dynamic aperture MD on Beam 2 (24th of June 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Maclean, E H; Persson, T H B; Redaelli, S; Schmidt, F; Tomas, R; Uythoven, J

    2013-01-01

    This MD note summarizes measurements performed on LHC Beam 2 during the non-linear machine development (MD) of 24 June 2012. The aim of the measurement was to observe the dynamic aperture of LHC Beam 2, and obtain turn-by-turn (TbT) betatron oscillation data, enabling the study of amplitude detuning and resonance driving terms (RDTs). The regular injections required by the MD also represented an opportunity to test a new coupling feedback routine based on the analysis of injection oscillation data. Initial measurements were performed on the nominal state of the LHC at injection. On completion of this study the Landau octupoles were turned off and corrections for higher-order chromaticities were implemented to reduce the non-linearity of the machine as far as possible. A second set of measurements were then performed. All studies were performed using the LHC aperture kicker (MKA).

  3. Experiences in simulating and testing coordinated voltage control provided by multiple wind power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlaban, T.; Alonso, O.; Ortiz, D. [Acciona Windpower S.A. (Spain); Peiro, J.; Rivas, R. [Red Electrica de Espana SAU (Spain); Quinonez-Varela, G.; Lorenzo, P. [Acciona Energia S.A. (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    This document presents some field tests performed in a transmission system node in order to check the adequacy of voltage control performance by multiple wind power plants, with an overall capacity of 395 MW. It briefly explains the Spanish TSO motivation towards new voltage control requirements and the necessity of performing such tests in order to set the most convenient voltage control parameters and to verify the stable operation. It presents how different the voltage control capability between modern wind turbines (DFIG) and older ones (SCIG) specifically retrofitted for voltage control is. (orig.)

  4. Tests of Coordinate Transfer from Magnetic to Mechanical Reference for LCLS Undulator Fiducialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levashov, Yu.

    2010-12-13

    Fiducialization of the LCLS undulators will be based on magnetic measurements by Hall probe. Pointed magnets, proposed by I.Vasserman for quadrupole lens fiducialization will be used as an intermediate reference. A prototype of the pointed magnet fixture has been made and tested. In this note we will describe a procedure for measuring the position of the center of the Hall probe sensitive area with respect to the undulator fiducial marks. The pointed magnet calibration procedure, a two-point algorithm for locating the magnetic center of the fixture, and test results are presented.

  5. System Test of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in the H8 Beam at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Etzion, Erez; 2004 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium And Medical Imaging Conference; Etzion, Erez

    2004-01-01

    An extensive system test of the ATLAS muon spectrometer has been performed in the H8 beam line at the CERN SPS during the last four years. This spectrometer will use pressurized Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) for precision tracking, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) for triggering in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) for triggering in the end-cap region. The test set-up emulates one projective tower of the barrel (six MDT chambers and six RPCs) and one end-cap octant (six MDT chambers, A CSC and three TGCs). The barrel and end-cap stands have also been equipped with optical alignment systems, aiming at a relative positioning of the precision chambers in each tower to 30-40 micrometers. In addition to the performance of the detectors and the alignment scheme, many other systems aspects of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been tested and validated with this setup, such as the mechanical detector integration and installation, the detector control system, the data acquisi...

  6. Long term creep tests on timber beams in heated and non-heated environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowda, S.; Kortesmaa, M.; Ranta-Maunus, A. [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland). Building Materials and Products

    1996-12-31

    The aim of this research investigation was to study the long term effect of creep on different wood materials under natural environmental conditions. The tests were initiated in the summer of 1992 and the results collected until the end of 1995 are reported here. The experiments on sawn timber of pine and spruce, glulam, Kerto-LVL and I-profile with hard board web structural size members were carried out in a sheltered environment, where the changes in moisture and temperature of the surrounding followed the natural climatic conditions of Southern Finland. In addition, separate tests on eight glulam beams were carried out in a heated room environment. The experiments were carried out at low load levels (2-7 MPa). The surface of few groups of specimens were treated with alkyd and emulsion paint, some were creosoted and salt impregnated, while few samples had no treatment. The creep test data of all specimens were analysed systematically to obtain creep curves. The data showed significant variation in creep among wood materials with different treatments. Creep of glulam was same in heated and non-heated environment. (orig.) (3 refs.)

  7. Pulse Shape Characterization of Silicon Diodes for HGCal with data from Beam Test at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, Malinda

    2016-01-01

    The High Luminosity phase of the LHC (starting operation in 2025) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosity, with 25 ns bunch crossing intervals and up to 140 pileup events. A challenge is to provide excellent physics performance in such a harsh environment to fully exploit the HL-LHC potentialities and explore new physics frontiers. In this context, the High Granularity Calorimeter is the detector designed to provide electromagnetic and hadronic energy coverage and reconstruction in the forward direction of the upgraded CMS. In April 2016 and June 2016, a set of 36 diodes were tested in order to understand various characteristics of its performance, in order to use them in the upgraded HG Calorimeter. Here, the silicon diodes were mounted onto a test bench at CERN’s beam test area and exposed to electron showers. Data received from these diodes were acquired and analysed separately. The objective of this report is to show the variation of Time Rise, Time Over Threshold with various...

  8. The CALICE Tile Hadron Calorimeter Prototype With SiPM Readout: Design, Construction and First Test Beam Results

    CERN Document Server

    Wattimena, N

    2008-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration has constructed a test beam hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) with 7608 scintillator tiles, individually read out by novel multi-pixel Geiger mode photodiodes, so called SiPMs, and tested it in electron and hadron beams at CERN. This prototype is the first device which uses SiPMs on a large scale; its purpose is to establish the technology and to record hadron shower data with unprecedented granularity for the validation of simulation models and the development of clustering algorithms.

  9. Calibration of LHCf calorimeters for photon measurement by CERN SPS test beam

    CERN Document Server

    Mase, T; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Castellini, G; D'Alessandro, R; Fukui, K; Haguenauer, M; Itow, Y; Kasahara, K; Macina, D; Masuda, K; Menjo, H; Mitsuka, G; Mizuishi, M; Muraki, Y; Nakai, M; Papini, P; Perrot, A-L; Ricciarini, S; Sako, T; Shimizu, Y; Sumi, T; Taki, K; Tamura, T; Torii, S; Tricomi, A; Turner,W C; Viciani, A; Watanabe, H; Yoshida, K

    2012-01-01

    Energy resolution and linearity of the LHCf calorimeters for electromagnetic showers were measured at the SPS H4 beam line in 2007 using electron beams of 50–200 GeV and muon beams of 150 GeV. The absolute energy scale was determined in these data. The results that were obtained (<5% energy resolution) are well understood by using Monte Carlo simulations and are good enough for the requirements of the LHCf experiment.

  10. Non-linear beam dynamics tests in the LHC: measurement of intensity decay for probing dynamic aperture at injection

    CERN Document Server

    Cettour Cave, S; Giovannozzi, M; Ludwig, M; MacPherson, A; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    For a second year in a row dynamic aperture experiments have been performed at the LHC. These studies have been carried out by two teams following alternative techniques: On Beam 1 a novel approach has been tested which heats the beam until the emittance becomes large, and derives the dynamic aperture from beam losses assuming an inverse logarithm model for the time-dependence of the intensity. On Beam 2, the traditional approach of sampling the dynamic aperture with large amplitude kicks has been pursued [1]. In 2011, considerable progress was made and impressive results have been reported. In 2012 a further Machine Development (MD) session was scheduled during which both teams have benefited from an improved availability of the beams and more optimal performance of the instrumentation. Observations and analysis are presented as two MD reports of the LHC dynamic aperture experiment MD. This note describes the observations made on Beam 1, when the strength of the spool pieces have been varied. The key quantit...

  11. Photon reconstruction in the ATLAS Inner Detector and Liquid Argon Barrel Calorimeter at the 2004 Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Abat, E; Addy, T N; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Ahmad, A; Akesson, T.P A; Aleksa, M; Alexa, C; Anderson, K; Andreazza, A; Anghinolfi, F; Antonaki, A; Arabidze, G; Arik, E; Atkinson, T; Baines, J; Baker, O K; Banfi, D; Baron, S; Barr, A J; Beccherle, R; Beck, H P; Belhorma, B; Bell, P J; Benchekroun, D; Benjamin, D P; Benslama, K; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Bernabeu, J; Bertelsen, H; Binet, S; Biscarat, C; Boldea, V; Bondarenko, V G; Boonekamp, M; Bosman, M; Bourdarios, C; Broklova, Z; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Bychkov, V; Callahan, J; Calvet, D; Canneri, M; Capeans Garrido, M; Caprini, M; Cardiel Sas, L; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Catinaccio, A; Cauz, D; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cetin, S A; Chen, H; Cherkaoui, R; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chouridou, S; Ciobotaru, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, B; Cobal, M; Cogneras, E; Conde Muino, P; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Cornelissen, T; Correard, S; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cuneo, S; Cwetanski, P; Da Silva, D; Dam, M; Dameri, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Darbo, G; Davidek, T; De, K; Defay, P O; Dekhissi, B; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Dobos, D; Dobson, M; Dolgoshein, B A; Dotti, A; Drake, G; Drasal, Z; Dressnandt, N; Driouchi, C; Drohan, J; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, P; Efthymiopoulos, I; Egorov, K; Eifert, T F; Einsweiler, K; El Kacimi, M; Elsing, M; Emelyanov, D; Escobar, C; Etienvre, A I; Fabich, A; Facius, K; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farthouat, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fayard, L; Febbraro, R; Fedin, O L; Fenyuk, A; Fergusson, D; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Filippini, G; Flick, T; Fournier, D; Francavilla, P; Francis, D; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Fullana, E; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Gallas, M; Gallop, B J; Gameiro, S; Gan, K K; Garcia, R; Garcia, C; Gavrilenko, I L; Gemme, C; Gerlach, P; Ghodbane, N; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Giokaris, N; Glonti, G; Gottfert, T.; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; Gomez, M D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodrick, M J; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Goujdami, D; Grahn, K J; Grenier, P; Grigalashvili, N; Grishkevich, Y; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwe, M; Guicheney, C; Gupta, A; Haeberli, C; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Hance, M; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Harvey, A., Jr; Hawkings, R J; Heinemann, F.E W; Henriques Correia, A; Henss, T; Hervas, L; Higon, E; Hill, J C; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, J Y; Hruska, I; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hulsbergen, W; Hurwitz, M; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Jansen, E; Jen-La Plante, I; Johansson, P.D C; Jon-And, K; Joos, M; Jorgensen, S; Joseph, J; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Karyukhin, A; Kataoka, M; Kayumov, F; Kazarov, A; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Kerschen, N; Kersten, S; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khramov, E; Khristachev, A; Khubua, J; Kittelmann, T H; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Kolos, S; Konovalov, S P; Konstantinidis, N; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Kostyukhin, V; Kovalenko, S; Kowalski, T Z; Kruger, K.; Kramarenko, V; Kudin, L G; Kulchitsky, Y; Lacasta, C; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Lari, T; Le Bihan, A C; Lechowski, M; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lehmann, G; Leitner, R; Lelas, D; Lester, C G; Liang, Z; Lichard, P; Liebig, W; Lipniacka, A; Lokajicek, M; Louchard, L; Loureiro, K F; Lucotte, A; Luehring, F; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Ma, H; Mackeprang, R; Maio, A; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mandelli, L; Maneira, J; Mangin-Brinet, M; Manousakis, A; Mapelli, L; Marques, C; Marti i Garcia, S; Martin, F; Mathes, M; Mazzanti, M; McFarlane, K W; McPherson, R; Mchedlidze, G; Mehlhase, S; Meirosu, C; Meng, Z; Meroni, C; Mialkovski, V; Mikulec, B; Milstead, D; Minashvili, I; Mindur, B; Mitsou, V A; Moed, S; Monnier, E; Moorhead, G; Morettini, P; Morozov, S V; Mosidze, M; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E.W J; Munar, A; Myagkov, A; Nadtochi, A V; Nakamura, K; Nechaeva, P; Negri, A; Nemecek, S; Nessi, M; Nesterov, S Y; Newcomer, F M; Nikitine, I; Nikolaev, K; Nikolic-Audit, I; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Oleshko, S B; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, S; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Paolone, V; Parodi, F; Parsons, J; Parzhitski, S; Pasqualucci, E; Passmore, S M; Pater, J; Patrichev, S; Peez, M; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petti, R; Phillips, P W; Pilcher, J; Pina, J; Pinto, B; Podlyski, F; Poggioli, L; Poppleton, A; Poveda, J; Pralavorio, P; Pribyl, L; Price, M J; Prieur, D; Puigdengoles, C; Puzo, P; Ragusa, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reeves, K; Reisinger, I; Rembser, C; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Reznicek, P; Ridel, M; Risso, P; Riu, I; Robinson, D; Roda, C; Roe, S; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A; Rousseau, D; Rozanov, A; Ruiz, A; Rusakovich, N; Rust, D; Ryabov, Y F; Ryjov, V; Salto, O; Salvachua, B; Salzburger, A; Sandaker, H; Santamarina Rios, C.Santamarina; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Sauvage, G; Says, L P; Schaefer, M; Schegelsky, V A; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, C; Schultes, J; Schwemling, P; Schwindling, J; Seixas, J M; Seliverstov, D M; Serin, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalanda, N; Shaw, C; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Silva, J; Simion, S; Simonyan, M; Sloper, J E; Smirnov, S.Yu; Smirnova, L; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovianov, O; Soloviev, I; Sosnovtsev, V V; Spano, F; Speckmayer, P; Stancu, S; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Straessner, A; Suchkov, S I; Suk, M; Szczygiel, R; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, F; Tas, P; Tayalati, Y; Tegenfeldt, F; Teuscher, R; Thioye, M; Tikhomirov, V O; Timmermans, C.J.W P; Tisserant, S; Toczek, B; Tremblet, L; Troncon, C; Tsiareshka, P; Tyndel, M; Karagoz Unel, M.; Unal, G; Unel, G; Usai, G; Van Berg, R; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valls, J A; Vandelli, W; Vannucci, F; Vartapetian, A; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vasilyeva, L; Vazeille, F; Vernocchi, F; Vetter-Cole, Y; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Virzi, J; Vivarelli, I; de Vivie, J B; Volpi, M; Vu Anh, T; Wang, C; Warren, M; Weber, J; Weber, M; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Wells, P S; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wiesmann, M; Wilkens, H; Williams, H H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Yasu, Y; Zaitsev, A; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zhang, H; Zhelezko, A; Zhou, N

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction of photons in the ATLAS detector is studied with data taken during the 2004 Combined Test Beam, where a full slice of the ATLAS detector was exposed to beams of particles of known energy at the CERN SPS. The results presented show significant differences in the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic shower between converted and unconverted photons as well as in the total measured energy. The potential to use the reconstructed converted photons as a means to precisely map the material of the tracker in front of the electromagnetic calorimeter is also considered. All results obtained are compared with a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of the test-beam setup which is based on the same simulation and reconstruction tools as those used for the ATLAS detector itself.

  12. Photon reconstruction in the ATLAS Inner Detector and Liquid Argon Barrel Calorimeter at the 2004 Combined Test Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J. M.; Addy, T. N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O. K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H. P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S. A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P. O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T. F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A. I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A. I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Goettfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M. D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Haertel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P. D. C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C. G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Loureiro, K. F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K. W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S. V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S. M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pilcher, J.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L. P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J. E.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S. I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J. B.; Volpi, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H. H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2011-04-01

    The reconstruction of photons in the ATLAS detector is studied with data taken during the 2004 Combined Test Beam, where a full slice of the ATLAS detector was exposed to beams of particles of known energy at the CERN SPS. The results presented show significant differences in the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic shower between converted and unconverted photons as well as in the total measured energy. The potential to use the reconstructed converted photons as a means to precisely map the material of the tracker in front of the electromagnetic calorimeter is also considered. All results obtained are compared with a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of the test-beam setup which is based on the same simulation and reconstruction tools as those used for the ATLAS detector itself.

  13. The beam test measurements of the Belle II vertex detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilka, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Belle II experiment designed to study CP Violation and Beyond Standard model physics at the decays of B-mesons is quickly approaching its first physics run with the SuperKEKB accelerator (Tsukuba, Japan) already under commissioning. To operate in the unique conditions of the Belle II experiment, its vertex detector (VXD) is a six layers silicon detector with two innermost layers of DEPFET active pixel modules and four layers of double-sided strip modules. A section of it will become a commissioning detector for the first collisions of the next-generation high luminosity B-factory. The same setup, from cooling services, mechanical support or sensors and front-end electronics to DAQ, including the software and alignment framework, is tested under an electron beam provided by DESY facilities. We present the basic characteristics of the pixel and strip modules and the setup under test, including software and alignment framework—as close to the final system as possible.

  14. Test-beam results from the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Bohm, C; Bright-Thomas, P G; Connors, A; Edwards, J; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellis, Nick; Engström, M; Farthouat, Philippe; Garvey, J; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Hanke, P; Hatley, R; Hellman, S; Hillier, S J; Kluge, E E; Landon, M; Maddox, A J; Pentney, J M; Perera, V J O; Pfeiffer, U; Schuler, G A; Schumacher, C; Shah, T P; Silverstein, S; Staley, R J; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Wunsch, M

    1998-01-01

    The ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger will utilise a number of advanced technologies, many of which have already been successfully demonstrated. To evaluate the different technologies associated with the important areas of $9 high-speed data transport a large demonstrator system has been designed and operated during the last two years, using signals from prototype calorimeters in the ATLAS test-beam. Using this system, inter-crate data transmission and $9 reception have been demonstrated at over 1.4 Gbyte/s, with individual links running at up to 1.6 Gbaud. Operating with 160 Mbit/s signals across a transmission-line backplane, custom transceiver ASICs have achieved inter-module data $9 fanout at peak rates above 800 Mbyte/s. With the addition of further modules, the system was extended to emulate a vertical slice through the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger. We present here the results from these tests, including $9 measurements of bit-error rates across different data paths. (12 refs).

  15. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  16. Effects of T-tabs and large deflections in double cantilever beam specimen tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.; Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    1991-01-01

    A simple strength of materials analysis was developed for a double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimen to account for geometric nonlinearity effects due to large deflections and T-tabs. A new DCB data analysis procedure was developed to include the effects of these nonlinearities. The results of the analysis were evaluated by DCB tests performed for materials having a wide range of toughnesses. The materials used in the present study were T300/5208, IM7/8551-7, and AS4/PEEK. Based on the present analysis, for a typical deflection/crack length ratio of 0.3 (for AS4/PEEK), T-tabs and large deflections cause a 15 and 3 percent error, respectively, in the computer Mode I strain energy release rate. Design guidelines for DCB specimen thickness and T-tab height were also developed in order to keep errors due to these nonlinearities within 2 percent. Based on the test results, for both hinged and tabbed specimens, the effects of large deflection on the Mode I fracture toughness (G sub Ic) were almost negligible (less than 1 percent) in the case of T300/5208 and IM7/8551-7; however, AS4/PEEK showed a 2 to 3 percent effect. The effects of T-tabs G sub Ic were more significant for all the materials with T300/5208 showing a 5 percent error, IM7/8551-7 a 15 percent error, and, AS4/PEEK a 20 percent error.

  17. Beam test results of a 16 ps timing system based on ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartiglia, N.; Staiano, A.; Sola, V.; Arcidiacono, R.; Cirio, R.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Bellora, A.; Durando, S.; Mandurrino, M.; Minafra, N.; Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gkougkousis, E.; Grabas, H.; Gruey, B.; Labitan, C. A.; Losakul, R.; Luce, Z.; McKinney-Martinez, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Hidalgo, S.; Carulla, M.; Flores, D.; Merlos, A.; Quirion, D.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we report on the timing resolution obtained in a beam test with pions of 180 GeV/c momentum at CERN for the first production of 45 μm thick Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) design, employing n-on-p silicon sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction. The UFSD used in this test had a pad area of 1.7 mm2. The gain was measured to vary between 5 and 70 depending on the sensor bias voltage. The experimental setup included three UFSD and a fast trigger consisting of a quartz bar readout by a SiPM. The timing resolution was determined by doing Gaussian fits to the time-of-flight of the particles between one or more UFSD and the trigger counter. For a single UFSD the resolution was measured to be 34 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 27 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V. For the combination of 3 UFSD the timing resolution was 20 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 16 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V.

  18. Beam test results of a 16 ps timing system based on ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartiglia, N., E-mail: cartiglia@to.infn.it [INFN, Torino (Italy); Staiano, A.; Sola, V. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Arcidiacono, R. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy); Cirio, R.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Bellora, A.; Durando, S. [Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mandurrino, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Minafra, N. [University of Kansas, KS (United States); Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gkougkousis, E. [SCIPP, University of California Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we report on the timing resolution obtained in a beam test with pions of 180 GeV/c momentum at CERN for the first production of 45 µm thick Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) design, employing n-on-p silicon sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction. The UFSD used in this test had a pad area of 1.7 mm{sup 2}. The gain was measured to vary between 5 and 70 depending on the sensor bias voltage. The experimental setup included three UFSD and a fast trigger consisting of a quartz bar readout by a SiPM. The timing resolution was determined by doing Gaussian fits to the time-of-flight of the particles between one or more UFSD and the trigger counter. For a single UFSD the resolution was measured to be 34 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 27 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V. For the combination of 3 UFSD the timing resolution was 20 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 16 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V.

  19. Influence of steel fibers on the shear and flexural performance of high-strength concrete beams tested under blast loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algassem, O.; Li, Y.; Aoude, H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study examining the effect of steel fibres on the blast behaviour of high-strength concrete beams. As part of the study, a series of three large-scale beams built with high-strength concrete and steel fibres are tested under simulated blast loading using the shock-tube testing facility at the University of Ottawa. The specimens include two beams built with conventional high-strength concrete (HSC) and one beam built with high-strength concrete and steel fibres (HSFRC). The effect of steel fibres on the blast behaviour is examined by comparing the failure mode, mid-span displacements and, overall blast resistance of the specimens. The results show that the addition of steel fibres in high-strength concrete beams can prevent shear failure and substitute for shear reinforcement if added in sufficient quantity. Moreover, the use of steel fibres improves flexural response under blast loading by reducing displacements and increasing blast capacity. Finally, the provision of steel fibres is found to improve the fragmentation resistance of high-strength concrete under blast loads.

  20. Test-beam Results from a RICH Detector Prototype Using Aerogel Radiator and Pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aglieri-Rinella, G; Van Lysebetten, A; Piedigrossi, D; Wyllie, K; Bellunato, T F; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Perego, D L; Somerville, L P; Newby, C; Easo, S; Wotton, S

    2006-01-01

    A test-beam study was performed at CERN with a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) prototype using three pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors. Results on the photon yield and Cherenkov angle resolution are presented here, for the Aerogel radiator and also for reference runs taken with Nitrogen radiator.

  1. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  2. Feasibility tests of a new all-digital beam control scheme for LEIR

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Findlay, A; Pedersen, F; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2004-01-01

    The new Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR), to be commissioned at CERN in early 2005, will be a very important element of the LHC lead ions injection chain and will require a new beam control and cavity servoing system. Current plans call for a new all-digital beam control system based on the same technology deployed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the to control the AGS Booster beam. That beam control system, now under development, relies on VME modules and daughter boards based on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The DSP provides high throughput processing capabilities and ease of connection with the software layer immediately above, while the daughter boards implement master clock, digital receiver and modulator capabilities. The resulting system is very flexible because is configurable via software and offers multi-processing capabilities and high bandwidth data paths, features that make it very attractive for a beam control implementation. For application t...

  3. SU-E-T-354: Efficient and Enhanced QA Testing of Linear Accelerators Using a Real-Time Beam Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J; Farrokhkish, M; Norrlinger, B; Wang, Y [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heaton, R; Jaffray, D; Islam, M [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of performing routine QA tests of linear accelerators (Linac) using the Integral Quality Monitoring (IQM) system. The system, consisting of a 1-D sensitivity gradient large area ion-chamber mounted at the collimator, allows automatic collection and analysis of beam data. Methods: The IQM was investigated to perform several QA constancy tests, similar to those recommended by AAPM TG142, of a Linac including: beam output, MLC calibration, beam symmetry, relative dose factor (RDF), dose linearity, output as a function of gantry angle and dose rate. All measurements by the IQM system accompanied a reference measurement using a conventional dosimetry system and were performed on an Elekta Infinity Linac with Agility MLC. The MLC calibration check is done using a Picket-Fence type 2×10cm{sup 2} field positioned at different off-axis locations along the chamber gradient. Beam symmetry constancy values are established by signals from an 4×4cm{sup 2} aperture located at various off-axis positions; the sensitivity of the test was determined by the changes in the signals in response to a tilt in the beam. The data for various square field sizes were used to develop a functional relationship with RDF. Results: The IQM tracked the beam output well within 1% of the reference ion-chamber readings. The Picket-Fence type field test detected a 1mm shift error of one MLC bank. The system was able to detect 2.5% or greater beam asymmetry. The IQM results for all other QA tests were found to agree with the reference values to within 0.5%. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the IQM system can effectively monitor the Linac performance parameters for the purpose of routine QA constancy tests. With minimum user interactions a comprehensive set of tests can be performed efficiently, allowing frequent monitoring of the Linac. The presenting author’s salary is funded by the manufacturer of the QA device. All the other authors have financial

  4. Assessment of Corona/Arcing Hazard for Electron Beam Welding in Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for ISWE: Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Vaughn, J.; Stocks, C.; ODell, D.; Bhat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Test welds were made in argon over a range of pressures from 10-5 to 10-3 torr (the latter pressure an order of magnitude above pressures anticipated in the space shuttle bay during welding) with and without plasma on 304 stainless steel, 6Al-4V titanium, and 5456 aluminum in search of any possible unwanted electrical discharges. Only a faint steady glow of beam-excited atoms around the electron beam and sometimes extending out into the vacuum chamber was observed. No signs of current spiking or of any potentially dangerous electrical discharge were found.

  5. Electron beam welding and beam positioning

    OpenAIRE

    MOROZOV M.Y.; BRAVERMAN V.Y.; MEDNIKOV D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Programs for control of mutual movements of the welded parts and EB gun are written in the unified language ISO-7bit. Beam settings control uses electronic charts or optional languages, sometimes self-designed. Operator coordinates movements and beam settings manually.

  6. Tests with beam setup of the TileCal phase-II upgrade electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reward Hlaluku, Dingane

    2017-09-01

    The LHC has planned a series of upgrades culminating in the High Luminosity LHC which will have an average luminosity 5-7 times larger than the nominal Run-2 value. The ATLAS Tile calorimeter plans to introduce a new readout architecture by completely replacing the back-end and front-end electronics for the High Luminosity LHC. The photomultiplier signals will be fully digitized and transferred for every bunch crossing to the off-detector Tile PreProcessor. The Tile PreProcessor will further provide preprocessed digital data to the first level of trigger with improved spatial granularity and energy resolution in contrast to the current analog trigger signals. A single super-drawer module commissioned with the phase-II upgrade electronics is to be inserted into the real detector to evaluate and qualify the new readout and trigger concepts in the overall ATLAS data acquisition system. This new super-drawer, so-called hybrid Demonstrator, must provide analog trigger signals for backward compatibility with the current system. This Demonstrator drawer has been inserted into a Tile calorimeter module prototype to evaluate the performance in the lab. In parallel, one more module has been instrumented with two other front-end electronics options based on custom ASICs (QIE and FATALIC) which are under evaluation. These two modules together with three other modules composed of the current system electronics were exposed to different particles and energies in three test-beam campaigns during 2015 and 2016.

  7. INTEGRATING CONTROLS FRAMEWORKS: CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR NA62 LAV DETECTOR TEST BEAMS

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, O; Golonka, P; Gonzalez-Berges, M; Milcent, H

    2011-01-01

    The detector control system for the NA62 experiment at CERN, to be ready for physics data-taking in 2014, is going to be built based on control technologies recommended by the CERN Engineering group. A rich portfolio of the technologies is planned to be showcased and deployed in the final application, and synergy between them is needed. In particular two approaches to building controls application need to play in harmony: the use of the high-level application framework called UNICOS, and a bottom-up approach of development based on the components of the JCOP Framework. The aim of combining the features provided by the two frameworks is to avoid duplication of functionality and minimize the maintenance and development effort for future controls applications. In the paper the result of the integration efforts obtained so far are presented; namely the control applications developed for beam-testing of NA62 detector prototypes. Even though the delivered applications are simple, significant conceptual and developm...

  8. The LHC1 pixel detector studied in a 120 GeV/c pion test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropotar, I. E-mail: iztok.ropotar@cern.ch; Buis, E.-J.; Antinori, F.; Barberis, D.; Becks, K.H.; Beker, H.; Burger, P.; Campbell, M.; Cantatore, E.; Casagrande, L.; Catanesi, M.G.; Chesi, E.; Corsi, F.; D' Auria, S.; Da Via, C.; Danielyan, V.; Darbo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Eijk, B. van; Elberich, J.; Gagliardi, G.; Geppert, R.; Gowdy, S.; Goessling, C.; Grigoriev, E.; Gys, T.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Howard, A.S.; Humpston, G.; Jakubek, J.; Jarron, P.; Leitner, R.; Lenti, V.; Letheren, M.; Lisowski, B.; Loukas, D.; Ludwig, J.; Martinengo, P.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Middelkamp, P.; Mikulec, B.; Morando, M.; Morettini, P.; O' Shea, V.; Pernigotti, E.; Pospisil, S.; Quercigh, E.; Redaelli, N.; Ridky, J.; Rossi, L.; Saladino, S.; Santiard, J.C.; Scharfetter, L.; Segato, G.; Shahoian, R.; Simone, S.; Smith, K.M.; Snoeys, W.; Sonderegger, P.; Sopko, B.; Stekl, I.; Tomasek, L.; Vardanyan, H.; Vrba, V

    2000-01-11

    Hybrid assemblies of LHC1 read-out chips and 300 {mu}m thick silicon pixel detectors have been tested with a 120 GeV/c pion beam at the CERN SPS. The equivalent noise charge at the input of the preamplifier is {approx}200 e{sup -}. The particle detection efficiency is higher than 99.9%. A 30 ns wide efficiency plateau is reached for a 60 ns wide trigger pulse applied after a {approx}2 {mu}s delay. The 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixels yield a spatial precision of {sigma}=129.4{+-}0.2 {mu}m in the large pitch direction. In the other direction the precision is {sigma}=12.2{+-}0.2 {mu}m for single-pixel clusters and {sigma}=8.2{+-}0.2 {mu}m for double-pixel clusters, yielding an average of {sigma}=11.4{+-}0.2 {mu}m. Three different detector layouts on the same pitch were characterized.

  9. Integrating Controls Frameworks: Control Systems for NA62 LAV Detector Test Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Oliver; Golonka, Piotr; Gonzalez-Berges, Manuel; Milcent, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The detector control system for the NA62 experiment at CERN, to be ready for physics data-taking in 2014, is going to be built based on control technologies recommended by the CERN Engineering group. A rich portfolio of the technologies is planned to be showcased and deployed in the final application, and synergy between them is needed. In particular two approaches to building controls application need to play in harmony: the use of the high-level application framework called UNICOS, and a bottom-up approach of development based on the components of the JCOP Framework. The aim of combining the features provided by the two frameworks is to avoid duplication of functionality and minimize the maintenance and development effort for future controls applications. In the paper the result of the integration efforts obtained so far are presented; namely the control applications developed for beam-testing of NA62 detector prototypes. Even though the delivered applications are simple, significant conceptual and developm...

  10. Pion Energy Reconstruction by the Local Hadronic Calibration Method with ATLAS Combined Test Beam 2004 data

    CERN Document Server

    Kulchitsky, Y; Khubua, J; Russakovich, N; Shigaev, V; Vinogradov, V

    2008-01-01

    The pion energy reconstruction by the local hadronic calibration method on the basis of the 2004 combined test beam data in the energy range 10 -- 350 GeV and $\\eta = 0.25$ is performed. In this method energies deposited in each cell are weighted. The weights are determined by the Monte Carlo simulation using Calibration Hits software. We have modified this method by applying cuts in weights. The obtained fractional energy resolution with the conventional method of determination of the energy deposit in the dead material between LAr and Tile calorimeters is $\\sigma/E = (67\\pm2)\\%/\\sqrt{E} \\oplus (3.9\\pm0.2)\\% \\oplus (95\\pm22)\\%/E$. This is about 1.5 times better than the results for the hadronic calibration method obtained by the Oxford-Stockholm group and slightly better than the H1 method results for CTB04 obtained by Pisa group. The energy linearity is within $\\pm$1\\%. We have determined the general normalization constant of 0.91 for which the mean value linearity for the weight cut of 1.05 is about 1. At ...

  11. Test Beam Performance Measurements for the Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dragicevic, M.; Hrubec, J.; Steininger, H.; Gädda, A.; Härkönen, J.; Lampén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Winkler, A.; Eerola, P.; Tuuva, T.; Baulieu, G.; Boudoul, G.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Dupasquier, T.; Gallbit, G.; Lumb, N.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Donckt, M.Vander; Viret, S.; Bonnin, C.; Charles, L.; Gross, L.; Hosselet, J.; Tromson, D.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Pierschel, G.; Preuten, M.; Rauch, M.; Wlochal, M.; Aldaya, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Bertsche, D.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garcia, J.Garay; Hansen, K.; Haranko, M.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Keaveney, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kleinwort, C.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Maser, H.; Mittag, G.; Muhl, C.; Mussgiller, A.; Pitzl, D.; Reichelt, O.; Savitskyi, M.; Schütze, P.; Sola, V.; Spannagel, S.; Walsh, R.; Zuber, A.; Biskop, H.; Buhmann, P.; Centis-Vignali, M.; Garutti, E.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Klanner, R.; Lapsien, T.; Matysek, M.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, Ch.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Vormwald, B.; Wellhausen, J.; Abbas, M.; Amstutz, C.; Barvich, T.; Barth, Ch.; Boegelspacher, F.; Boer, W.De; Butz, E.; Casele, M.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Freund, B.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S.; Husemann, U.; Kornmeyer, A.; Kudella, S.; Muller, Th.; Simonis, H.J.; Steck, P.; Weber, M.; Weiler, Th.; Kiss, T.; Siklér, F.; Tölyhi, T.; Veszprémi, V.; Cariola, P.; Creanza, D.; Palma, M.De; Robertis, G.De; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Loddo, F.; Sala, G.; Silvestris, L.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Costa, S.; Mattia, A.Di; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M.A.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Focardi, E.; Dinardo, M.E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R.A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Dall'Osso, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Tosi, M.; Solestizi, L.Alunni; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G.M.; Cecchi, C.; Checcucci, B.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Gentsos, C.; Ionica, M.; Leonardi, R.; Manoni, E.; Mantovani, G.; Marconi, S.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Modak, A.; Morozzi, A.; Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Placidi, P.; Postolache, V.; Rossi, A.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Storchi, L.; Spiga, D.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; Ceccanti, M.; Ciocci, M.A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M.T.; Ligabue, F.; Magazzu, G.; Mammini, P.; Mariani, F.; Mazzoni, E.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Morsani, F.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Profeti, A.; Raffaelli, F.; Ragonesi, A.; Rizzi, A.; Soldani, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, I.; Albert, E.; Auzinger, G.; Berruti, G.; Bonnaud, J.; Daguin, J.; D'Auria, A.; Detraz, S.; Dondelewski, O.; Engegaard, B.; Faccio, F.; Frank, N.; Gill, K.; Honma, A.; Kornmayer, A.; Labaza, A.; Manolescu, F.; McGill, I.; Mersi, S.; Michelis, S.; Onnela, A.; Ostrega, M.; Pavis, S.; Peisert, A.; Pernot, J.F.; Petagna, P.; Postema, H.; Rapacz, K.; Sigaud, C.; Tropea, P.; Troska, J.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Verlaat, B.; Vichoudis, P.; Zwalinski, L.; Bachmair, F.; Becker, R.; di Calafiori, D.; Casal, B.; Berger, P.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Arbol, P.Martinez Ruiz del; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M.; Perozzi, L.; Roeser, U.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D.; Amsler, C.; Bösiger, K.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Maier, R.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H.C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Chen, P.H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.S.; Lu, R.S.; Moya, M.; Tsai, J.F.; Tzeng, Y.M.; Cussans, D.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Newbold, D.; Hobson, P.; Reid, I.D.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Dauncey, P.; Hall, G.; James, T.; Magnan, A.M.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D.M.; Uchida, K.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Flores, C.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Squires, M.; Thomson, J.; Yohay, R.; Burt, K.; Ellison, J.; Hanson, G.; Olmedo, M.; Si, W.; Yates, B.R.; Dominguez, A.; Bartek, R.; Bentele, B.; Cumalat, J.P.; Ford, W.T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S.R.; Apresyan, A.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J.N.; Canepa, A.; Cheung, H.W.K.; Christian, D.; Cooper, W.E.; Deptuch, G.; Derylo, G.; Gingu, C.; Grünendahl, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Hoff, J.; Howell, J.; Hrycyk, M.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Kahlid, F.; Kwan, S.; Lei, C.M.; Lipton, R.; Sá, R.Lopes De; Liu, T.; Los, S.; Matulik, M.; Merkel, P.; Nahn, S.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Schneider, B.; Sellberg, G.; Shenai, A.; Siehl, K.; Spiegel, L.; Tran, N.; Uplegger, L.; Voirin, E.; Berry, D.R.; Chen, X.; Ennesser, L.; Evdokimov, A.; Gerber, C.E.; Makauda, S.; Mills, C.; Gonzalez, I.D.Sandoval; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.J.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.S.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bubna, M.; Hinton, N.; Jones, M.; Miller, D.H.; Shi, X.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Schmitz, E.; Wilson, G.; Ivanov, A.; Mendis, R.; Mitchell, T.; Skhirtladze, N.; Taylor, R.; Anderson, I.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Acosta, J.G.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D.R.; Fangmeier, C.; Suarez, R.Gonzalez; Monroy, J.; Siado, J.; Bartz, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Walker, M.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Vargas, J.E.Ramirez; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; McDermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Zientek, M.; Akgün, B.; Ecklund, K.M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Zabel, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Johns, W.; Rose, K.

    2017-05-30

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These upgrades allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. In this paper, comprehensive test beam studies are presented which have been conducted to verify the design and to quantify the performance of the new detector assemblies in terms of tracking efficiency and spatial resolution. Under optimal conditions, the tracking efficiency has been determined to be ($99.95 \\pm 0.05$) \\%, while the intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured to be ($4.80 \\pm 0.25$) $\\mu$m and ($7.99 \\pm 0.21$...

  12. 3D-FBK Pixel sensors: recent beam tests results with irradiated devices

    CERN Document Server

    Micelli, A; Sandaker, H; Stugu, B; Barbero, M; Hugging, F; Karagounis, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kruger, H; Tsung, J W; Wermes, N; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Susinno, G; Gallrapp, C; Di Girolamo, B; Dobos, D; La Rosa, A; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Slavicek, T; Pospisil, S; Jakobs, K; Kohler, M; Parzefall, U; Darbo, G; Gariano, G; Gemme, C; Rovani, A; Ruscino, E; Butter, C; Bates, R; Oshea, V; Parker, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Grinstein, S; Korokolov, I; Pradilla, C; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Borri, M; Da Via, C; Freestone, J; Kolya, S; Lai, C H; Nellist, C; Pater, J; Thompson, R; Watts, S J; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, S; Bolle, E; Gjersdal, H; Sjobaek, K N; Stapnes, S; Rohne, O; Su, D; Young, C; Hansson, P; Grenier, P; Hasi, J; Kenney, C; Kocian, M; Jackson, P; Silverstein, D; Davetak, H; DeWilde, B; Tsybychev, D; Dalla Betta, G F; Gabos, P; Povoli, M; Cobal, M; Giordani, M P; Selmi, L; Cristofoli, A; Esseni, D; Palestri, P; Fleta, C; Lozano, M; Pellegrini, G; Boscardin, M; Bagolini, A; Piemonte, C; Ronchin, S; Zorzi, N; Hansen, T E; Hansen, T; Kok, A; Lietaer, N; Kalliopuska, J; Oja, A

    2011-01-01

    The Pixel detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary and secondary vertices of short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration (VLSI) and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradi...

  13. Design studies and sensor tests for the beam calorimeter of the ILC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, E.

    2007-03-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is being designed to explore particle physics at the TeV scale. The design of the Very Forward Region of the ILC detector is considered in the presented work. The Beam Calorimeter - one of two electromagnetic calorimeters situated there - is the subject of this thesis. The Beam Calorimeter has to provide a good hermeticity for high energy electrons, positrons and photons down to very low polar angles, serve for fast beam diagnostics and shield the inner part of the detector from backscattered beamstrahlung remnants and synchrotron radiation. As a possible technology for the Beam Calorimeter a diamond-tungsten sandwich calorimeter is considered. Detailed simulation studies are done in order to explore the suitability of the considered design for the Beam Calorimeter objectives. Detection efficiency, energy and angular resolution for electromagnetic showers are studied. At the simulation level the diamondtungsten design is shown to match the requirements on the Beam Calorimeter performance. Studies of polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamond as a sensor material for the Beam Calorimeter are done to explore the properties of the material. Results of the measurements performed with pCVD diamond samples produced by different manufacturers are presented. (orig.)

  14. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dubrovskiy, A; Syratchev, I; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter reg...

  15. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter regime of CLIC.

  16. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Zhu, Jun [Mianyang CAEP

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  17. Design of a 3 GHz Accelerator Structure for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF 3) Drive Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Carron, G; Jensen, E.; Luong, M.; Millich, A.; Rugo, E.; Syratchev, I; Thorndahl, L

    2000-01-01

    For the CLIC two-beam scheme, a high-current, long-pulse drive beam is required for RF power generation. Taking advantage of the 3 GHz klystrons available at the LEP injector once LEP stops, a 180 MeV electron accelerator is being constructed for a nominal beam current of 3.5 A and 1.5 microsecond pulse length. The high current requires highly effective suppression of dipolar wakes. Two concepts are investigated for the accelerating structure design: the "Tapered Damped Structure" developed f...

  18. Design of a 3 GHz Accelerator Structure for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF 3) Drive Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Carron, G; Jensen, E.; Luong, M.; Millich, A.; Rugo, E.; Syratchev, I; Thorndahl, L

    2000-01-01

    For the CLIC two-beam scheme, a high-current, long-pulse drive beam is required for RF power generation. Taking advantage of the 3 GHz klystrons available at the LEP injector once LEP stops, a 180 MeV electron accelerator is being constructed for a nominal beam current of 3.5 A and 1.5 ms pulse length. The high current requires highly effective suppression of dipolar wakes. Two concepts are investigated for the accelerating structure design: the "Tapered Damped Structure" developed for the CL...

  19. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  20. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, M., E-mail: mauro.dallapalma@igi.cnr.it; Pasqualotto, R.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); Sartori, E. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova 35122 (Italy); Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); INFN-LNL, Legnaro (PD) 35020 (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  1. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Palma, M; Pasqualotto, R; Sartori, E; Spagnolo, S; Spolaore, M; Veltri, P

    2016-11-01

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  2. The Prestressed Track Beam Testing Technology of Shanghai Electromagnetic Levitation Train

    OpenAIRE

    Qing-biao WANG; Zhang, Cong; Xiao-kang WEN; Zhen-yue SHI

    2013-01-01

    Shanghai electromagnetic levitation train (maglev) is the first one that is constructed and operated commercially in the world. Many technological problems have to be tackled during its construction, and the most difficult problem in the civil engineering part is the making of prestressed track beam. It requires high precision because of its special function. The stretching control of the pre-tensioning force and the post-tensioning force in the making of prestressed track beam is ...

  3. Beam-loss-induced electrical stress test on CMS Silicon Strip Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, M; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; MacPherson, A; Muller, T H; Weiler, T h

    2004-01-01

    Based on simulated LHC beam loss scenarios, fully depleted CMS silicon tracker modules and sensors were exposed to 42 ns-long beam spills of approximately 10**1**1 protons per spill at the PS at CERN. The ionisation dose was sufficient to short circuit the silicon sensors. The dynamic behaviour of bias voltage, leakage currents and voltages over coupling capacitors were monitored during the impact. Results of pre- and post-qualification as well as the dynamic behaviour are shown.

  4. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon g - 2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, A.; Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Bartolini, M.; Cantatore, G.; Cauz, D.; Corradi, G.; Dabagov, S.; Di Sciascio, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Driutti, A.; Escalante, O.; Ferrari, C.; Fienberg, A. T.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Gioiosa, A.; Hampai, D.; Hertzog, D. W.; Iacovacci, M.; Karuza, M.; Kaspar, J.; Liedl, A.; Lusiani, A.; Marignetti, F.; Mastroianni, S.; Moricciani, D.; Pauletta, G.; Piacentino, G. M.; Raha, N.; Rossi, E.; Santi, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  5. Development of Flexible, Scalable, Low Cost Readout for Beam Tests of High Granularity Calorimeter for the CMS Endcap

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinov, Paul

    2016-01-01

    As part of the development of the High Granularity Calorimeter for the CMS Endcap at HL-LHC, The CMS collaboration is conducting a comprehensive series of beam tests. The first beam test, with a single HGC module was carried out in March of 2016 at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, continuing to a 16 module test in July of 2016. We describe here the development of a low cost readout system that is simple to implement and is able to grow with the system under test. The system is based on the low cost Zynq SoC that allows simple DAQ development in a Linux environment. For this application we used the Digilent ZedBoard, which allows high speed LVDS links and Linux software development on a single commercial board. A small custom FPGA board designed to comply with the VITA 57 Field Programmable Mezzanine Card standard implements the interface to the readout ASIC mounted on the HGC sensor modules and provides the LVDS links to the ZedBoard, either directly over the FMC connector or via a custom carrier card. This a...

  6. Design of Data Acquisition and Control System for Indian Test Facility of Diagnostics Neutral Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Jignesh, E-mail: jsoni@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Tyagi, Himanshu; Yadav, Ratnakar; Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 380 025, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Gahluat, Agrajit [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Sudhir, Dass; Joshi, Jaydeep; Prasad, Rambilas [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 380 025, Gujarat (India); Pandya, Kaushal [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Shah, Sejal; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 380 025, Gujarat (India); Chakraborty, Arun [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • More than 900 channels Data Acquisition and Control System. • INTF DACS has been designed based on ITER-PCDH guidelines. • Separate Interlock and Safety system designed based on IEC 61508 standard. • Hardware selected from ITER slow controller and fast controller catalog. • Software framework based on ITER CODAC Core System and LabVIEW software. - Abstract: The Indian Test Facility (INTF) – a negative hydrogen ion based 100 kV, 60 A, 5 Hz modulated NBI system having 3 s ON/20 s OFF duty cycle. Prime objective of the facility is to install a full-scale test bed for the qualification of all Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) parameters, prior to installation in ITER. The automated and safe operation of the INTF will require a reliable and rugged instrumentation and control system which provide control, data acquisition (DAQ), interlock and safety functions, referred as INTF-DACS. The INTF-DACS has been decided to be design based on the ITER CODAC architecture and ITER-PCDH guidelines since the technical understanding of CODAC technology gained from this will later be helpful in development of plant system I&C for DNB. For complete operation of the INTF, approximately 900 numbers of signals are required to be superintending by the DACS. In INTF conventional control loop time required is within the range of 5–100 ms and for DAQ except high-end diagnostics, required sampling rates in range of 5 sample per second (Sps) to 10 kSps; to fulfill these requirements hardware components have been selected from the ITER slow and fast controller catalogs. For high-end diagnostics required sampling rates up to 100 MSps normally in case of certain events, therefore event and burst based DAQ hardware has been finalized. Combined use of CODAC core software (CCS) and NI-LabVIEW has been finalized due to the fact that full required DAQ support is not available in present version of CCS. Interlock system for investment protection of facility and Safety system for

  7. Numerical simulation and optimization of the variable energy 60-1000 MeV proton beams at PNPI synchrocyclotron for testing the radiation resistance of electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonov, S. A.; Ivanov, E. M.; Ivanov, N. A.; Lebedeva, J. S.; Riabov, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    A universal center for testing electronic components (ECs) for the needs of aviation and space is created in the SC-1000 Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute" (PNPI NRC KI). One of the main instruments of these tests is variable energy protons beams. This paper presents Monte Carlo simulation results for a proton beam with energy of 1000 MeV passing through copper and tungsten degraders, and defines the length of these degraders to obtain energies of 60, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000 MeV. Detailed studies of further transmission of the proton beams along the beam line using the copper degrader are accomplished. Basic theoretical parameters for each proton beam, such as the intensity, the energy heterogeneity, beam size, and uniformity of its spatial distribution are obtained.

  8. Accelerator beam test of the kinematic lightweight energy meter detector prototype for very high energy cosmic ray measurements in space

    CERN Document Server

    Bashindzhagian, G L

    2004-01-01

    The idea of the KLEM (Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter) detector is to directly measure the elemental energy spectra of very high-energy cosmic rays in space by determining the angular distribution of secondary particles produced in a target. The first test of the simple KLEM prototype was performed at the CERN SPS test-beam with 180 GeV pions. The results of the first test analysis confirm that, using the KLEM method, the energy of 180 GeV pions can be measured with a relative error of about 67%, which is very close to the results of the simulation (65 %).

  9. A test beam set-up for the characterization of the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode technology for particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Vilella, A; Trenado, J; Vila, A; Casanova, R; Vos, M; Garrido, L; Dieguez, A

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that avalanche photodiodes operated in the Geiger mode above the breakdown voltage offer a virtually infinite gain and time accuracy in the picosecond range that can be used for single photon detection. However, their performance in particle detection still remains unexplored. In this contribution, we are going to expose different steps that we have taken in order to prove the efficiency of the Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes in the aforementioned field. In particular, we will present a setup for the characterization of these sensors in a test beam. The expected results of the test beam at DESY and CERN have been simulated with Geant4 and will also be exposed.

  10. Assessment the Strength of Column and Beam at Religious Building Structure by Using Non-Destructive Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Nor Azizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mosque is a sacred place for worship for Muslims. To this date, the traditional mosque needs to be conserved and preserved wood for aesthetic value. Nowadays, most of the mosque materials have a combination of other materials such as concrete, wood and glass. In order to maintain its fit-for-purpose status, non-destructive tests (NDTs are recommended to be done periodically to identify hidden deteriorations for planning maintenance and repair works without damaging the structure itself. This paper presents two NDTs - Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity tool (PUNDIT and Schmidt rebound hammer test – done on 38 concrete columns and 29 ground beams of Masjid Kampung Ulu Semerah, Batu Pahat. Recorded readings have shown that most beams and columns had moderate or weak strength. As such, remedial action should be taken to uphold the mosque’s structural integrity.

  11. Online neural trigger for optimizing data acquisition during particle beam calibration tests with calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Da Silva, P V M; De Seixas, J M; Ferreira, B C

    2004-01-01

    For LHC, the hadronic calorimetry of the ATLAS detector is performed by Tilecal, a scintillating tile calorimeter. For calibration purposes, a fraction of the Tilecal modules is placed in particle beam lines. Despite beam high quality, experimental beam contamination is observed and this masks the actual performance of the calorimeter. For optimizing the calibration task, an online neural particle classifier was developed for Tilecal. Envisaging a neural trigger for incoming particles, a neural process runs integrated to the data acquisition task and performs online training for particle identification. The neural classification performance is evaluated by correlating the neural response to classical methodology, confirming an ability for outsider identification at levels as high as 99.3%.

  12. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF; Validacion en el Test Beam del CERN/GIF de la electronica de Lectura de las Camaras de Muones del Experimento CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Fouz, M. c.; Marin, J.; Oller, J. C.; Willmott, C.; Amigo, L. J.

    2002-07-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  13. Test beam results using scintillating fibers read out by a multianode phototube and visible light photon counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Davies, R.; Koltick, D.; McIlwain, R.; Schmitz, C.J.; Shibata, E.I. (Purdue Univ., Physics Dept., West Lafayette, IN (United States)); Atac, M. (Univ. California, Dept. of Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States)); Baumbaugh, B.; Jaques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Marchant, J.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M. (Univ. Notre Dame, Dept. of Physics, IN (United States)); Binkley, M.; Elias, J. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States)); Goldberg, H.; Margulies, S.; Solomon, J. (Univ. Illinois, Dept. of Physics, Coll. of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Chicago, IL (United States)); Armstrong, T.; Lewis, R.; Smith, G. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The results from a test beam experiment at Fermilab using 830 [mu]m scintillating fibers, a version of a solid state photomultiplier, the VLPC, and a 256 channel multianode phototube are reported. Muon tracks were observed in a combined tracking system read out by VLPCs and the multianode phototube. A tracking algorithm was developed to unfold the complex cross talk pattern observed in the multianode phototube. A spatial resolution of [proportional to]130 [mu]m was obtained. (orig.).

  14. Thermal management and prototype testing of Compton scattering X-ray beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Yang, B. X.; Collins, J. T.; Ramanathan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade. In the next-generation XBPMs for the canted-undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0 mrad, the lower beam power (changes through the interface via thermal simulations, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) of TIMs at an interface between two solid materials under even contact pressure must be known. This paper addresses the TCR measurements of several TIMs, including gold, silver, pyrolytic graphite sheet, and 3D graphene foam. In addition, a prototype of a Compton-scattering XBPM with diamond blades was installed at APS Beamline 24-ID-A in May 2015 and has been tested. This paper presents the design of the Compton-scattering XBPM, and compares thermal simulation results obtained for the diamond blade of this XBPM by the finite element method with in situ empirical measurements obtained by using reliable infrared technology.

  15. Dynamic testing of thin-walled composite box beams in a vacuum chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1989-01-01

    Vibration characteristics of thin-walled composite box beams are measured in a rotating environment in a 10-ft diameter vacuum chamber. Symmetric and antisymmetric layup beams are fabricated out of graphite/epoxy prepreg material using an autoclave molding technique. These are excited using piezoelectric ceramic elements and responses are measured using strain gages and accelerometers. First three natural modes are identified using spectrum analyzer over a range of rotational speeds up to 1000 rpm. Measured frequencies and mode shapes (displacement as well as strain) are correlated satisfactorily with calculated finite element results.

  16. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Summary of progress since last CMS week. Ten years of construction work have been completed. CMS is closed, in very close to the ideal low luminosity configuration, and performed well in the first tests with LHC beam. Behind this encouraging news is the story of a summer of intense commitment by many teams (from the collaboration and 3 CERN departments) working together, against the clock and despite many minor setbacks, to ensure that the experiment was ready to play a leading role in the excitement of September 10. Following beampipe bakeout and refill with pure neon, a magnificent effort by the ECAL group and the pt 5 technical crew made it possible to install and commission all 4 ECAL endcap Dees before the end of August. In the shadow of this activity, the barrel and forward pixel trackers and part of the beam monitoring were installed within the vac tank. The pt 5 technical teams then succeeded in safely removing the 20t installation tables and their support blocks from beneath the already installed ...

  17. Analysis of test beam data of ALPIDE, the final Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) prototype for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Emriskova, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration is currently preparing a major upgrade of its apparatus, planned for installation during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider in 2019-20. The main pillar of the upgrade is the replacement of the current Inner Tracking System (ITS) with a new, low-material, high resolution silicon pixel detector, made of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This technology, combining front-end circuitry and sensitive layer in a single device, will lead to a higher granularity of the detector and therefore a better pointing resolution. The silicon pixel chips, called ALPIDEs, developed specifically for the new ITS, are currently characterized using test beams. A part of this characterization is presented in this work. The project involves the very first analysis of test beam data with inclined tracks. The tested ALPIDE is rotated with respect to the beam, hence the particles cross the chip with an inclined incidence angle. The influence of these rotations on the efficiency profile...

  18. Does an Eye-Hand Coordination Test Have Added Value as Part of Talent Identification in Table Tennis? : A Validity and Reproducibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, IR (Irene); Nijhuis-van der Sanden, MWG (Ria); Oosterveld, FGJ (Frits)

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7–12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and

  19. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, I.R.; Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local

  20. Beam-beam instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  1. beam-beam interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The Beam 1 (represented in blue) and the Beam 2 (represented in red) are colliding with an angle at the Interaction Point (IP). The angle is needed to avoid unwanted multiple collisions along the interaction region. Despite of the separation introduced by the angle, the two beams interact via their electromagnetic field, the so called "beam-beam" interaction.

  2. Component-level test of molded freeform optics for LED beam shaping using experimental ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Gustavo; Hilbig, David; Fleischmann, Friedrich; Henning, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Due to the high demand of LED light sources, the need to modify their radiation pattern to meet specific application requirements has also increased. This is mostly achieved by using molded secondary optics, which are composed of a combination of several aspherical and freeform surfaces. Unfortunately, the manufacturers of these secondary optics only provide output information at system level, making impossible to independently characterize the secondary optic in order to determine the sources of erroneous results. For this reason, it is necessary to perform a component-level verification leading to the validation of the correctness of the produced secondary optic independently of the light source. To understand why traditional inspection methods fail, it is necessary to take into account that not only errors due to irregularities on the lens surface like pores, glass indentations or scratches affect the performance of the lens, but also differences in refractive index appear after the compression during fabrication process. These internal alterations are generally produced during the cooling stage and their effect over the performance of the lens are not possible to be measured using tactile techniques. Additionally, the small size of the lens and the freeform characteristics of its surface introduce additional difficulties to perform its validation. In this work, the component-level test is done by obtaining the ray mapping function (RMF) which describes the deflection of the light beam as a function of the input angle. To obtain the RMF, firstly a collimated light source is held fix and the lens is rotated. Thus, a virtual point source is created and subsequently by using experimental ray tracing it is possible to determine the ray slopes, which are used to the retrieve the RMF. Under the assumption that the optical system under analysis is lossless and considering the principle of energy conservation, it is possible under specific conditions to use this new

  3. Test-beam programs for devices to measure luminosity and energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , very similar to the ILC. Usually one bunch is accelerated, a two-bunch operation with 20–400 ns bunch spacing is possible. The average beam momentum will be determined by the deflection in a magnetic field. A magnet chicane consisting ...

  4. Optimisation analysis and improvement of the effective beam sizes in Accelerator Test Facility 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082063; Kisiel, Adam

    2016-10-20

    A lepton linear collider is considered by the accelerator and particle physics communities as an appropriate machine to perform high precision particle physics research in the TeV energy regime. There are two proposals for the future e+e- linear collider: the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC), both developed by two wide international collaborations with strong overlap between them. Both designs satisfy the particle physics requirements. At the TeV energy regime the cross sections of many processes of interest are small, therefore large luminosities on the order of 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} at the interaction point (IP) are required to deliver the required event rates. The luminosity inversely depends on the transverse size of the colliding beams which restricts the beam sizes at the IP to the nanometer level. The strong focusing of the beams occurs in the final focus system (FFS), the most inner part of a linear collider, where the beams are focused at the IP by means of t...

  5. Beam tests of MedAustron RF-jump at CERN’s PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Hancock, S; Dorda, U

    2013-01-01

    MedAustron is a centre for ion beam cancer therapy (protons and carbon ions) and non-clinical research currently under construction in Wiener-Neustadt (Austria). MedAustron’s synchrotron Low-Level RF (LLRF) system is being developed in collaboration with CERN’s RF group. As part of the preparation of the beam for the betatron-core driven, horizontal third order slow resonant extraction, an RF-jump to the unstable phase must be executed which creates a uniform momentum spread of fixed width. A conceptual feasibility study of this RF-gymnastic was carried out during the 2012 run at CERN’s PS Booster (PSB). This consisted of several machine development sessions where the beam in PSB ring 4 was accelerated via a prototype Digital LLRF (DLLRF) system and a jump to the unstable phase and back was carried out in a controlled way. The aim of the study was to define the beam control features required to carry out this RF gymnastic and if possible to validate their implementation. This note describes the MedAu...

  6. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Although the incident on 19th September brought an untimely, temporary close to the exciting and successful commissioning of CMS with beam, activity at point 5 resumed with barely reduced intensity once underground access was restored. The preliminary steps were to re-fill the beamipe to atmospheric pressure with pure neon gas, to de-classify the cavern for radiological risks and to get agreement for formally deferring screening and tracing of material extracted from UXC. As planned, attention was then focused on completing commissioning of the solenoid, whose progression towards nominal 3.8 Tesla operating field had been interrupted a few shifts from its conclusion. Additional mechanical restraints and shielding structures needed to be installed to control the effects of field escaping from the return yoke and finding other pathways between the magnet poles. Certain pumps, sensors, lights and cameras, absent during the extensive “MTCC” surface testing in 2006, needed to be protected, w...

  7. A Study of Beam Position Diagnostics with Beam-excited Dipole Higher Order Modes using a Downconverter Test Electronics in Third Harmonic 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Baboi, N. [DESY; Eddy, N. [Fermilab; Fellenz, B. [Fermilab; Jones, R. M. [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Lorbeer, B. [DESY; Wamsat, T. [DESY; Wendt, M. [Fermilab

    2012-08-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to define a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 {\\mu}m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 {\\mu}m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  8. A study of beam position diagnostics with beam-excited dipole higher order modes using a downconverter test electronics in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, N.; Lorbeer, B.; Wamsat, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Jones, R.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to de ne a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  9. First Beam and High-Gradient Cryomodule Commissioning Results of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Darren; et al.

    2015-06-01

    The advanced superconducting test accelerator at Fermilab has accelerated electrons to 20 MeV and, separately, the International Linear Collider (ILC) style 8-cavity cryomodule has achieved the ILC performance milestone of 31.5 MV/m per cavity. When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one ILC-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We report on the results of first beam, the achievement of our cryomodule to ILC gradient specifications, and near-term future plans for the facility.

  10. Beam Test Results for Single- and Double-Sided Silicon Detector Prototypes of the CMS Central Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O

    1997-01-01

    We report the results of two beam tests performed in July and September 1995 at CERN using silicon microstrip detectors of various types: single sided, double sided with small angle stereo strips, double sided with orthogonal strips, double sided with pads. For the read-out electronics use was made of Preshape32, Premux128 and VA1 chips. The signal to noise ratio and the resolution of the detectors was studied for different incident angles of the incoming particles and for different values of the detector bias voltage. The goal of these tests was to check and improve the performances of the prototypes for the CMS Central Detector.

  11. Determining mode I cohesive law of Pinus pinaster by coupling double cantilever beam test with digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The direct identification of the cohesive law in pure mode I of Pinus pinaster is addressed. The approach couples the double cantilever beam (DCB test with digital image correlation (DIC. Wooden beam specimens loaded in the radial-longitudinal (RL fracture propagation system are used. The strain energy release rate in mode I ( is uniquely determined from the load-displacement ( curve by means of the compliance-based beam method (CBBM. This method relies on the concept of equivalent elastic crack length ( and therefore does not require the monitoring of crack propagation during test. The crack tip opening displacement in mode I is determined from the displacement field at the initial crack tip. The cohesive law in mode I is then identified by numerical differentiation of the relationship. Moreover, the proposed procedure is validated by finite element analyses including cohesive zone modelling. It is concluded that the proposed data reduction scheme is adequate for assessing the cohesive law in pure mode I of P. pinaster

  12. A Layer Correlation Technique for Pion Energy Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test (Conference record)

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, K-J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the ATLAS calorimeters were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by about 20% compared to the electromagnetic scale.

  13. Brightness and uniformity measurements of plastic scintillator tiles at the CERN H2 test beam arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Sirunyan, A.M.; Tumasyan, A.; Litomin, A.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Alves, G.A.; Aldá Júnior, W.L.; Hensel, C.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W.L.; Tonelli Manganote, E.J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Kveton, A.; Tomsa, J.; Adamov, G.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Gunnellini, P.; Lobanov, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Muhl, C.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M.; Saxena, P.; Hegde, V.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Sharma, S.; Beri, S.B.; Bhawandeep, B.; Chawla, R.; Kalsi, A.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Walia, G.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ghosh, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Sharan, M.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, P.; Guchait, M.; Jain, S.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Patil, M.; Sarkar, T.; Juodagalvis, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Ershov, Y.; Golutvin, I.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Popova, E.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Karneyeu, A.; Krasnikov, N.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Toms, M.; Zhokin, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Terkulov, A.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kalinin, A.; Krychkine, V.; Mandrik, P.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Volkov, A.; Sekmen, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Rumerio, P.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, N.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z.S.; Dölek, F.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E.E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Işik, C.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I.S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Murat Guler, A.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Atakisi, I.O.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Koseyan, O.K.; Ozcelik, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E.A.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Boyarintsev, A.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Popov, V.; Sorokin, P.; Flacher, H.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S.I.; Henderson, C.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Gastler, D.; Hazen, E.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Wu, S.; Zou, D.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Kwok, K.H.M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Yu, D.R.; Gary, J.W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S.M.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O.R.; Wei, H.; Bhandari, R.; Heller, R.; Stuart, D.; Yoo, J.H.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J.M.; Nguyen, T.; Spiropulu, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Chlebana, F.; Freeman, J.; Green, D.; Hare, D.; Hirschauer, J.; Joshi, U.; Lincoln, D.; Los, S.; Pedro, K.; Spalding, W.J.; Strobbe, N.; Tkaczyk, S.; Whitbeck, A.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Bertoldi, M.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Kolberg, T.; Baarmand, M.M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Debbins, P.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R.P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Schmidt, I.; Snyder, C.; Southwick, D.; Tiras, E.; Yi, K.; Al-bataineh, A.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; McBrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Wang, Q.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L.K.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calderon, J.D.; Eno, S.C.; Feng, Y.B.; Ferraioli, C.; Grassi, T.; N.J.Hadley, G-Y Jeng; Kellogg, R.G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y.H.; Skuja, A.; Yang, Z.S.; Yao, Y.; Brandt, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; Hu, M.; Klute, M.; Niu, X.; Chatterjee, R.M.; Evans, A.; Frahm, E.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Heering, A.; Karmgard, D.J.; Musienko, Y.; Ruchti, R.; Wayne, M.; Benaglia, A.D.; Mei, K.; Tully, C.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K.H.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Agapitos, A.; Amouzegar, M.; Chou, J.P.; Hughes, E.; Saka, H.; Sheffield, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P.R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S.W.; Libeiro, T.; Mengke, T.; Muthumuni, S.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Goadhouse, S.; Hirosky, R.; Wang, Y.

    We study the light output, light collection efficiency and signal timing of a variety of organic scintillators that are being considered for the upgrade of the hadronic calorimeter of the CMS detector. The experimental data are collected at the H2 test-beam area at CERN, using a 150 GeV muon beam. In particular, we investigate the usage of over-doped and green-emitting plastic scintillator, two solutions that have not been extensively considered. We present a study of the energy distribution in plastic-scintillator tiles, the hit efficiency as a function of the hit position, and a study of the signal timing for blue and green scintillators.

  14. First tests for an online treatment monitoring system with in-beam PET for proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kraan, Aafke C; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Cappucci, F; Ciocca, M; Ferrari, A; Ferretti, S; Mairani, A; Molinelli, S; Pullia, M; Retico, A; Sala, P; Sportelli, G; Del Guerra, A; Rosso, V

    2014-01-01

    PET imaging is a non-invasive technique for particle range verification in proton therapy. It is based on measuring the beta+ annihilations caused by nuclear interactions of the protons in the patient. In this work we present measurements for proton range verification in phantoms, performed at the CNAO particle therapy treatment center in Pavia, Italy, with our 10 x 10 cm^2 planar PET prototype DoPET. PMMA phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams and clinical treatment plans, and PET data were acquired during and shortly after proton irradiation. We created 1-D profiles of the beta+ activity along the proton beam-axis, and evaluated the difference between the proximal rise and the distal fall-off position of the activity distribution. A good agreement with FLUKA Monte Carlo predictions was obtained. We also assessed the system response when the PMMA phantom contained an air cavity. The system was able to detect these cavities quickly after irradiation.

  15. The Prestressed Track Beam Testing Technology of Shanghai Electromagnetic Levitation Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-biao WANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Shanghai electromagnetic levitation train (maglev is the first one that is constructed and operated commercially in the world. Many technological problems have to be tackled during its construction, and the most difficult problem in the civil engineering part is the making of prestressed track beam. It requires high precision because of its special function. The stretching control of the pre-tensioning force and the post-tensioning force in the making of prestressed track beam is most important during the construction. This paper introduces and analyses the technical features of vibrating wire sensors as well as the development, the research and the application of force sensor for pulling force measurement of anchor cable.

  16. Coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 2 hours duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measuring: 1) Measuring and verification of tolerances on coordinate measuring machines, 2) Traceabilit...

  17. Review of the neutral-beam current requirements for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.D.; Coensgen, F.H.; Devoto, R.S.; Molvik, A.W.; Osher, J.F.; Shearer, J.W.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1978-08-04

    The techniques used to evaluate the beam-current requirements for MFTF are similar to those in previous studies but incorporate some improvements. In particular, we have enlarged the radial code BUILDUP to allow for a smaller radial grid and to improve the numerical accuracy; we have also improved the model of the atomic physics processes and the particle-equilibrium calculations. Also, a model of plasma containment that conserves energy as well as particles but does not include any effect of the expected drift-cyclotron loss-cone (DCLC) turbulence has been incorporated into the previous studies. We show that the DCLC turbulence increases the average ion energy and decreases the particle confinement time. Because these effects cancel to first order, the beam-current requirements are independent of the turbulence. We find that 24 of the present LBL source modules would sustain a plasma with an average beta of 0.46. This figure is within 10% of the MFTF goal and is within our calculational accuracies. We further show that the beam-current requirements for the large-diameter plasma are consistent with those of experiments to study the buildup of a field-reversed plasma.

  18. Beam incidents - High particle rate tests of an LHCb/Velo silicon strip module

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, L; Behrendt, O; van Beuzekomb, M; Buytaert, J; Collins, P; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Hennessy, K; Imong, J

    2009-01-01

    A silicon micro-strip detector module from the LHCb/Velo detector was exposed to proton rates in the range of $2\\times 10^9$ to $9\\times 10^{12}$ protons per pulse. The beam energy was $1.4~\\rm{GeV}$ and the pulse length was 200 ns, concentrated on a surface area of approximately $0.5~{\\rm cm^2}$. The sensor is of $n$-in-$n$ type and AC-coupled to a front-end chip in $0.25~\\rm{\\mu m}$ CMOS technology. Both the active sensor area and the readout chips were exposed to successive beam pulses, at perpendicular impact. The module was powered with both low and high voltage, and read out during and between beam exposures. We report on the measurements of the backplane bias voltage collapse, of the leakage current, as well as noise and pedestal variations of the front-end readout. No degradation or damage was observed beyond those normally expected from the accumulated radiation dose.

  19. Technical Note: Validation of halo modeling for proton pencil beam spot scanning using a quality assurance test pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liyong, E-mail: linl@uphs.upenn.edu; Huang, Sheng; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; McDonough, James E.; Ainsley, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models that include the halo component (low-dose tails) of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape, position, and dose. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN #1 and UN #2). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distributions based on the weighted superposition of location-independent (UN #1) or location-dependent (UN #2) spot profiles, previously measured using a pair-magnification method and between two nozzles. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The two nozzles clearly have different characteristics, as a direct comparison of measured data shows a passing rate of 89.7% for the 115 MeV proton beam. At 225 MeV, the corresponding gamma comparisons agree better between measurement and calculation, and between measurements in the two nozzles. Conclusions: In addition to confirming the primary component of individual PBS spot profiles, a comprehensive test pattern is useful for the validation of the halo component at off-axis locations, especially for low energy protons.

  20. A Study of Beam Position Diagnostics with Beam-excited Dipole Higher Order Modes using a Downconverter Test Electronics in Third Harmonic 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Eddy, N; Fellenz, B; Jones, R M; Lorbeer, B; Wamsat, T; Wendt, M

    2012-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to define a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 micron accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth d...

  1. Development of laser beam welding transverse-varestraint test for assessment of solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Eun-Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds of type 310S stainless steel, a transverse-Varestraint testing system using a laser beam welding apparatus was newly constructed. The timing-synchronization between the laser oscillator, welding robot and hydraulic pressure devices was established by employing high-speed camera observations together with electrical signal control among the three components. Moreover, the yoke-drop time measured by the camera was used to prevent underestimation of the crack length. The laser beam melt-run welding used a variable welding speed from 10.0 to 40.0 mm/s, while the gas tungsten arc welding varied the welding speed from 1.67 to 5.00 mm/s. As the welding speed increased from 1.67 to 40.0mm/s, the solidification brittle temperature range of type 310S stainless steel welds was reduced from 146 to 120 K. It follows that employing the laser beam welding process mitigates the solidification cracking susceptibility for type 310S stainless steel welds.

  2. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, M.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, Andrei; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; Densham, C.; Greenhalgh, R.Justin; Jackson, F.; Kalinin, A.; Zimmermann, F.; Zagorodnov, I.; Sugimoto, Y.; Walston, S.; Burton, D.; Smith, J.; Shales, N.; Sopczak, A.; Tucker, R.; Barlow, R.; Kurevlev, G.; Mercer, A.; Hildreth, M.; Burrows, P.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Molloy, S.; White, G.; Mueller, W.; Weiland, T.; Watson, N.; Bailey, D.; Cussans, D.; Kolomensky, Y.; Slater, M.; Thomson, M.; Ward, D.; Boogert, S.; Liapine, A.; Malton, S.; Miller, D.J.; Wing, M.; Arnold, R.; Sinev, N.; Torrence, E.

    2005-01-01

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  3. Beam Test Results of Thin n-in-p 3D and Planar Pixel Sensors for the High Luminosity LHC Tracker Upgrade at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Zoi, Irene; Dalla Betta, G. F; Dinardo, Mauro; Giacomini, G; Menasce, Dario; Mendicino, R; Meschini, Marco; Messineo, Alberto; Moroni, Luigi; Ronchin, S; Sultan, D.M.S; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vernieri, Caterina; Viliani, Lorenzo; Zuolo, Davide

    2017-01-01

    This is necessary for the pixel tracker that is the closest to the interaction point and will be replaced. In this paper, the results, from beam tests performed at Fermilab Test Beam Facility, of thin (100 $\\mu$m and 130 $\\mu$m thick) n-in-p type sensors, assembled into hybrid single chip modules bump bonded to the PSI46dig readou...

  4. Deployment Testing of Flexible Composite Hinges in Bi-Material Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Jonathan F.; Trease, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Composites have excellent properties for strength, thermal stability, and weight. However, they are traditionally highly rigid, and when used in deployable structures require hinges bonded to the composite material, which increases complexity and opportunities for failure. Recent research in composites has found by adding an elastomeric soft matrix, often silicone instead of an epoxy, the composite becomes flexible. This work explores the deployment repeatability of silicone matrix composite hinges which join rigid composite beams. The hinges were found to have sub-millimeter linear deployment repeatability, and sub-degree angular deployment repeatability. Also, an interesting relaxation effect was discovered, as a hinges deployment error would decrease with time.

  5. Performance of a Tungsten-Cerium Fluoride Sampling Calorimeter in High-Energy Electron Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A.C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; Lope, C. Jorda; Meridiani, P.; Nuccetelli, M.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Rahatlou, S.; Soffi, L.; Brianza, L.; Govoni, P.; Martelli, A.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P.P.; Candelise, V.; Della Ricca, G.

    2015-12-21

    A prototype for a sampling calorimeter made out of cerium fluoride crystals interleaved with tungsten plates, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres, has been exposed to beams of electrons with energies between 20 and 150 GeV, produced by the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator complex. The performance of the prototype is presented and compared to that of a Geant4 simulation of the apparatus. Particular emphasis is given to the response uniformity across the channel front face, and to the prototype's energy resolution.

  6. Designing, manufacturing, and testing of embedded EFPI strain sensor for damage detection of smart composite beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Lay M.; Zhou, Gang

    2005-04-01

    Designing a fiber optic sensor in the development of a real-time damage detection and evaluation system is important for providing reliable results. This paper describes the manufacturing and implementation of an Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (EFPI) strain sensor for the non-destructive quantitative evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced composites. The EPFI strain sensors were examined for their integrity and performance. The integrity of the sensors was assessed experimentally by determining the bending strength of the glass tube, which was used in the fabrication of the sensor. Further validations on the survival of the sensors when embedded were also carried out with the application of the modified classical lamination theory (CLT). The sensor performance was examined extensively by either bonded on the surface or embedded in the tensile region of simple quasi-isotropic (QI) composite beams. These smart beams were loaded quasi-statically in three-point bend and cantilever loading The EFPI strain sensors have shown to surface a maximum tensile strain of up to 0.8%, which was adequate and reliable for strain measurements in the current system. The understanding of the EFPI strain sensors behaviour have paved way for the success in achieving a fiber optic strain sensor based damage detection and evaluation system (FODDAS).

  7. Coordinated activation of candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens via promoter demethylation in head and neck cancer and lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Smith

    Full Text Available Epigenetic alterations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, however, proto-oncogenes activated by promoter demethylation have been sporadically reported. We used an integrative method to analyze expression in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and pharmacologically demethylated cell lines to identify aberrantly demethylated and expressed candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens in HNSCC.We noted coordinated promoter demethylation and simultaneous transcriptional upregulation of proto-oncogene candidates with promoter homology, and phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters demonstrated potential recognition sites for the transcription factor BORIS. Aberrant BORIS expression correlated with upregulation of candidate proto-oncogenes in multiple human malignancies including primary non-small cell lung cancers and HNSCC, induced coordinated proto-oncogene specific promoter demethylation and expression in non-tumorigenic cells, and transformed NIH3T3 cells.Coordinated, epigenetic unmasking of multiple genes with growth promoting activity occurs in aerodigestive cancers, and BORIS is implicated in the coordinated promoter demethylation and reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes in human cancers.

  8. Coordinated activation of candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens via promoter demethylation in head and neck cancer and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian M; Glazer, Chad A; Mithani, Suhail K; Ochs, Michael F; Sun, Wenyue; Bhan, Sheetal; Vostrov, Alexander; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Lobanenkov, Victor; Gray, Andrew; Liu, Chunyan; Chang, Steven S; Ostrow, Kimberly L; Westra, William H; Begum, Shahnaz; Dhara, Mousumi; Califano, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, however, proto-oncogenes activated by promoter demethylation have been sporadically reported. We used an integrative method to analyze expression in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and pharmacologically demethylated cell lines to identify aberrantly demethylated and expressed candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens in HNSCC. We noted coordinated promoter demethylation and simultaneous transcriptional upregulation of proto-oncogene candidates with promoter homology, and phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters demonstrated potential recognition sites for the transcription factor BORIS. Aberrant BORIS expression correlated with upregulation of candidate proto-oncogenes in multiple human malignancies including primary non-small cell lung cancers and HNSCC, induced coordinated proto-oncogene specific promoter demethylation and expression in non-tumorigenic cells, and transformed NIH3T3 cells. Coordinated, epigenetic unmasking of multiple genes with growth promoting activity occurs in aerodigestive cancers, and BORIS is implicated in the coordinated promoter demethylation and reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes in human cancers.

  9. Nurse care coordination and technology effects on health status of frail older adults via enhanced self-management of medication: randomized clinical trial to test efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Karen Dorman; Stetzer, Frank; Ryan, Polly A; Bub, Linda Denison; Adams, Scott J; Schlidt, Andrea; Lancaster, Rachelle; O'Brien, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Self-management of complex medication regimens for chronic illness is challenging for many older adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate health status outcomes of frail older adults receiving a home-based support program that emphasized self-management of medications using both care coordination and technology. This study used a randomized controlled trial with three arms and longitudinal outcome measurement. Older adults having difficulty in self-managing medications (n = 414) were recruited at discharge from three Medicare-certified home healthcare agencies in a Midwestern urban area. All participants received baseline pharmacy screens. The control group received no further intervention. A team of advanced practice nurses and registered nurses coordinated care for 12 months to two intervention groups who also received either an MD.2 medication-dispensing machine or a medplanner. Health status outcomes (the Geriatric Depression Scale, Mini Mental Status Examination, Physical Performance Test, and SF-36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary) were measured at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. After covariate and baseline health status adjustment, time × group interactions for the MD.2 and medplanner groups on health status outcomes were not significant. Time × group interactions were significant for the medplanner and control group comparisons. Participants with care coordination had significantly better health status outcomes over time than those in the control group, but addition of the MD.2 machine to nurse care coordination did not result in better health status outcomes.

  10. Towards powerful negative ion beams at the test facility ELISE for the ITER and DEMO NBI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U.; Hopf, C.; Wünderlich, D.; Friedl, R.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Kurutz, U.; Riedl, R.; Nocentini, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2017-11-01

    The test facility ELISE represents an important step in the European R&D roadmap towards the neutral beam injection (NBI) systems on ITER. ELISE provides early experience with operation of large radio frequency (RF) driven negative hydrogen ion sources. Starting with first plasma pulses in March 2013, ELISE has demonstrated stable 1 h plasma discharges with repetitive 10 s beam extraction pulses every 3 min in hydrogen and deuterium at the pressure of 0.3 Pa required by ITER. Stable ion currents of 9.3 A and 5.8 A have been extracted using only one quarter of the available RF power and reducing the extraction voltage in order to control the co-extracted electrons. The best hydrogen pulse for the required 1000 s for hydrogen gave an extracted current of 21.4 A and resulted in an accelerated current of 17.9 A, using only 53 kW per driver. Linear scaling towards full RF power (90 kW/driver) predicts that the target value of the negative ion current (H-: 33 A extracted, 23 A accelerated; D-: 28 A extracted and 20 A accelerated) can be achieved or even exceeded. Issues in long pulse operation are the caesium dynamics and the stability of the co-extracted electron current, for which the caesium management and the magnetic field configuration are promising tools for optimisation. Operation at high RF power for long pulses has highest priority for the next experimental campaign. In parallel or in a later stage, ELISE could serve as a test bed for studies on a DEMO NBI system. Examples are concepts concerning RF efficiency, operation with largely reduced caesium consumption or with caesium alternatives, and neutralization of the accelerated ion beam by a laser neutralizer in order to improve efficiency and reliability of NBI systems. Lab scale experiments on these topics are carried out presently in parallel with ELISE operation.

  11. APLICACIÓN DEL TEST DE LA BARRA TRANSVERSAL MODIFICADO PARA EVALUAR RATAS HEMIPARKINSONIZADAS. Modify Beam Transversal Test to Evauate Hemiparkinsonian Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LISETTE BLANCO LEZCANO

    Full Text Available La degeneración nigroestriatal que caracteriza a la enfermedad de Parkinson (EP es estudiada en modelos experimentales en roedores por inyección de 6-hidroxidopamina (6-OHDA. El presente estudio presenta una versión modificada del test de la barra transversal (TBT que permite la cuantificación del déficit motor a través de: tiempo que demora la rata en alcanzar una de las plataformas (latencia de escape, LE; tiempo que demora en caer de la barra (latencia de caída, LC; número total de errores cometidos durante la ejecución en cada barra (número de errores, NE. La forma y el diámetro de la sección transversal de la barra se modificaron desde barras rectangulares y circulares de 2,5 cm de diámetro hasta barras con esta misma forma y 1 cm de diámetro respectivamente lo cual impuso la mayor dificultad a la ejecución del test. Tres grupos de ratas Wistar fueron evaluados: no tratadas (n=15, lesionadas con 6-OHDA (n=14 y falsas operadas (n=14. Todas las variables estudiadas mostraron diferencias signifi-cativas entre ratas controles y hemiparkinsonizadas. Para todos los tipos de barras, las variables LE y NE se incrementaron mientras que la LC disminuyó significativamente en las ratas hemiparkinsonizadas en comparación con las ratas controles. La LC mostró diferencias altamente significativas (pThe nigrostriatal degeneration underlying Parkinson’s disease (PD is commonly studied in experimental animals by injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. The present study describes a modified version of a beam traversal test which allows the quantification of the motor deficit through the time spent to arrive to the platform once all four paws of the animals are in contact with the beam (escape latency, EL, the time spent before falling (tumbled down latency, TDL and the number of errors (NE committed for the animals in each beam. The shape and the diameter of the cross section of the beams were modified from rectangular and circular

  12. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    The 2008-9 CMS shutdown has reached its final phase. The yoke is closed again and the HFs are being prepared for lifting to beam height. Assuming no last minute problems occur, the detector will be ready for magnetic field tests by the end of June. The commitment of all the teams involved has ensured that an ambitious programme of work, including several tasks unforeseen in November 08, is nevertheless concluding on-time and successfully. All efforts are now being made to be ready for the CRAFT09 exercise. The way to proceed after CRAFT will depend on the LHC re-start schedule (to be clarified around the end of June). Options will be discussed during this CMS week. Shutdown 2008-9 Sub-Detectors As a reminder, the major shutdown activities on the detector components are listed below; details on each point can be found elsewhere in this bulletin. •    Installation and check-out of the Preshower detector on both endcaps •    Mainten...

  13. Simulation of Heavily Irradiated Silicon Pixel Sensors and Comparison with Test Beam Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Chiochia, Vincenzo; Bortoletto, Daniela; Cremaldi, Lucien; Cucciarelli, Susanna; Dorokhov, Andrei; Hoermann, Christoph; Kim, Dongwook; Konecki, Marcin; Kotlinski, Danek; Prokofiev, Kirill; Regenfus, Christian; Rohe, Tilman; Sanders, David A.; Son, Seunghee; Speer, Thomas; Chiochia, Vincenzo; Swartz, Morris; Bortoletto, Daniela; Cremaldi, Lucien; Cucciarelli, Susanna; Dorokhov, Andrei; Hoermann, Christoph; Kim, Dongwook; Konecki, Marcin; Kotlinski, Danek; Prokofiev, Kirill; Regenfus, Christian; Rohe, Tilman; Sanders, David A.; Son, Seunghee; Speer, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Charge collection measurements performed on heavily irradiated p-spray DOFZ pixel sensors with a grazing angle hadron beam provide a sensitive determination of the electric field within the detectors. The data are compared with a complete charge transport simulation of the sensor which includes signal trapping and charge induction effects. A linearly varying electric field based upon the standard picture of a constant type-inverted effective doping density is inconsistent with the data. A two-trap double junction model implemented in the ISE TCAD software can be tuned to produce a doubly-peaked electric field which describes the data reasonably well. The modeled field differs somewhat from previous determinations based upon the transient current technique. The model can also account for the level of charge trapping observed in the data.

  14. Wideband precision two-axis beam steerer tracking servo design and test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, William L.; McCullough, T.; Reth, A.; Kaufman, David M.

    1993-08-01

    A compact, light-weight, two-axis beam steerer (TABS) with a 38 mm (1.5') Beryllium clear aperture was designed into a 1000 Hz servo loop for precision tracking of a remote laser source. The design is composed of a quadrant photodiode, a track-tone demodulator, a linear ratiometric processor with sum and difference circuits, and a proportional/integral controller with a phase lead compensator. The demodulator is a phase-lock-loop used for locking onto and then synchronously detecting the envelope of a modulated tracking beacon. This approach provides background rejection, star discrimination (or any other CW source), receiver AC coupling, and 1/f noise reduction. The linear ratiometric processor provides x and y error signals to the controller which are independent of input signal levels. The far-field performance goal is < 0.5 microradians rms from a Landsat-type of base motion disturbance.

  15. Thermo-Mechanical tests for the CLIC two-beam module study

    CERN Document Server

    Xydou, A; Riddone, G; Daskalaki, E

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity goal of CLIC requires micron level precision with respect to the alignment of the components on its two-meter long modules, composing the two main linacs. The power dissipated inside the module components introduces mechanical deformations affecting their alignment and therefore the resulting machine performance. Several two-beam prototype modules must be assembled to extensively measure their thermo-mechanical behavior under different operation modes. In parallel, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel should be studied. The air conditioning and ventilation system providing specified air temperature and flow has been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The power dissipation occurring in the modules is being reproduced by the electrical heaters inserted inside the RF structure mock-ups and the quadrupoles. The efficiency of the cooling systems is being verified and the alignment of module components is monitored. The measurement results will be compared to finite elemen...

  16. Analysis of adhesion test methods and the evaluation of their use for ion-beam-mixed metal/ceramic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.

    1988-07-01

    Several thin film adhesion tests have been examined to determine which provides the most reliable method for the measurement of the adhesion of thin metallic films to ceramic substrate. An attempt was made to use the testing techniques described to measure adhesion changes caused by ion beam mixing for a variety of metal/ceramic systems. The techniques analyzed were the scratch test, the acoustic-emission test, and the pull test. The major variables of the scratch test include film thickness, substrate hardness, and stylus radius, but it is not known precisely what effects changes in these have on the measurement of adhesion. The scratch analyses methods discussed in the literature, each describing a load or stress on the system that is presumed to cause de-adhesion, do not always hold because none of the analyses account for both plastic and elastic deformation or incorporate many of the important parameters. The scratch test was much more likely to reveal a critical value for de-adhesion for relatively brittle films such as chromium than for ductile films such as nickel. 65 refs, 29 figs, 17 tabs.

  17. Test of the beam effect on vacuum arc occurrence in a high-gradient accelerating structure for the CLIC project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2130409; Gagliardi, Martino

    A new generation of lepton colliders capable of reaching TeV energies is pres- ently under development, and to succeed in this task it is necessary to show that the technology for such a machine is available. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a possible design option among the future lepton collider projects. It consists of two normal-conducting linacs. Accelerating structures with a gradient of the order of 100 MV/m are necessary to reach the required high energies within a reasonable machine length. One of the strictest require- ments for such accelerating structures is a relatively low occurrence of vacuum arcs. CLIC prototype structures have been tested in the past, but only in absence of beam. In order to proof the feasibility of the high gradient technology for building a functional collider, it is necessary to understand the effect of the beam presence on the vacuum breakdowns. Tests of this type have never been performed previously. The main goal of this work is to provide a first measurement of t...

  18. The performance of the LHCb Pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors in a 25ns structured test-beam

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, Davide Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Particle identification plays an important role in the challenging physics programme of the LHCb experiment. Pion-kaon separation in the wide momentum range 1-100 GeV/$c$ will be achieved by a pair of Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors, using three radiators. Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm will be detected by pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) developed by LHCb in collaboration with industry. The HPDs and associated electronics have been designed to operate at 40 MHz, the bunch-crossing frequency of the LHC. Final production photon detectors and the full readout chain, coupled for the LHCb data handling system, have been tested for the first time in a particle beam, operating with the nominal 25 ns bunch spacing, in September 2006. A total of 48 HPDs mounted on three RICH columns have been installed inside a customised RICH detector using N$_2$ GeV/$c$ pion beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The results of the tests demonstrate that the HPD is a reliable photon detector that meet...

  19. Analysis of pixel systematics and space point reconstruction with DEPFET PXD5 matrices using high energy beam test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuen, Lars

    2011-02-15

    To answer the current questions in particle physics vertex-detectors, the innermost sub-detector system of a multipurpose particle detector, with brilliant spatial resolution and at the same time with as little sensor material as possible are mandatory. These requirements are the driving force behind the newest generation of silicon pixel sensors like the DEPFET pixel, which incorporates the first amplification stage in form of a transistor in the fully depleted sensor bulk, allowing for a high spatial resolution even with thinned down sensors. A DEPFET pixel prototype system, build for the future TeV-scale liner collider ILC, was characterized in a high energy beam test at CERN with a spatial resolution and statistics that allowed for the first time in-pixel homogeneity measurements of DEPFET pixels. Yet, in the quest for higher precision the sensor development must be accompanied by progress in position reconstruction algorithms. A study with three novel approaches in position reconstruction was undertaken. The results of the in-pixel beam test and the performance of the new methods with an emphasis on {delta}-electrons will be presented here. (orig.)

  20. Test beam studies of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for the upgrade of CMS endcap muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ram Krishna

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will provide exceptional high instantaneous and integrated luminosity. The forward region $\\mid \\eta \\mid \\geq 1.5$ of the CMS detector will face extremely high particle rates in tens of $KHz/cm^{2}$ and hence it will affect the momentum resolution and longevity of the muon detectors. To overcome these issues the CMS collaboration has decided to install new large size rate capable Triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors in the forward region of CMS muon system. The first set of Triple GEM detectors will be installed in the GE1/1 region $(1.5 \\leq \\eta \\leq 2.2)$ of muon endcap during the LS2 of the LHC and the next one will be installed in the GE2/1 region $(1.6 \\leq \\eta \\leq 2.5)$, during the LS3. Towards this goal, full-size CMS Triple GEM prototype chambers have been fabricated and put under the test beam at the CERN SPS test beam facility. The GEM detectors were operated with two gas mixtures $Ar/CO_{2}$ (70/30) and $Ar/CO_{2}/CF_{4}$ (40/15/45). In 2014 and 2016, ...

  1. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene R Faber

    Full Text Available This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years from national (n = 13, regional (n = 11 and local training centres (n = 19 participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter and using a tennis or table tennis ball. 'Within session' reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate 'between sessions' reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05. The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001. Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between -8 and +7 repetitions with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between -3 and +3 repetitions. Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test.

  2. FairMQ for Online Reconstruction - An example on \\overline{{\\rm{P}}}ANDA test beam data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmanns, Tobias; PANDA collaboration

    2017-10-01

    One of the large challenges of future particle physics experiments is the trend to run without a first level hardware trigger. The typical data rates exceed easily hundreds of GBytes/s, which is way too much to be stored permanently for an offline analysis. Therefore a strong data reduction has to be done by selection of only those data, which are physically interesting. This implies that all detector data are read out and have to be processed with the same rate as it is produced. Several different hardware approaches from FPGAs, GPUs to multicore CPUs and mixtures of these systems are under study. Common to all of them is the need to process the data in massive parallel systems. One very convenient way to realize parallel systems on heterogeneous systems is the usage of message queue based multiprocessing. One package that allow development of such application is the FairMQ module in the FairRoot simulation framework developed at GSI. FairRoot is used by several different experiments at and outside the GSI including the \\overline{{{P}}}ANDA experiment. FairMQ is an abstract layer for message queue base application, it has up to now two implementations: ZeroMQ and nanomsg. For the \\overline{{{P}}}ANDA experiment, FairMQ is under test in two different ways. On the one hand side for online processing test beam data of prototypes of sub-detectors of \\overline{{{P}}}ANDA and, in a more generalized way, on time-based simulated data of the complete detector system. The first test on test beam data is presented in this paper.

  3. Lamb waves beam deviation due to small inclination of the test structure in air-coupled ultrasonic NDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichou, H B; Chavez, J A; Turo, A; Salazar, J; Garcia-Hernandez, M J

    2006-12-22

    In Lamb waves inspection, an air-coupled transmitter transducer is oriented at a specific angle such that it generates a pure Lamb mode which propagates along the structure and interacts with any existing defects. For this inspection system, amplitude losses appears when small inclinations of the tested structure occurs. An important factor which affects directly these losses has been observed, it consists of the Lamb waves beam (LWB) deviation due to this bad alignment. In this work, a simple expression of LWB deviation has been deduced. This expression includes the test structure angle, phase velocity of generated Lamb mode, and the phase velocity of waves propagating in the coupled medium. A(0) Lamb mode is generated and detected in 1 mm thick aluminium plate sample using 1 MHz PZ27 piezoelectric transducers of 20 mm of diameter. Experimental LWB deviation angles are measured for different inclination angles of the test sample. A comparative study is released with theoretical results. For 1 degree of misalignment in the aluminium plate inclination, and transducers separation distance of 35 mm, LWB deviation angle is around 7 degrees and the amplitude is reduced by around 11%. Then, for a large separation distance, we must move the receiver transducer to detect the deviated LWB. It is shown that, for both theoretical and experimental studies, the LWB deviation and its measured amplitude are very sensitive to the alignment of the tested structure with respect to the transmitter-receiver transducers plane. In metal plates it is most satisfactory to use A(0) mode compared with S(0) mode since it is easy to excite and has a large amplitude and small deviation beam angles.

  4. Mechanical and thermal measurements on a 11 m long beam screen in the LHC Magnet Test String during RUN 3A

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Kos, N

    1999-01-01

    Two eleven meter long beam screens were installed in the third dipole of the LHC Magnet Test String. Instrumentation was used to measure the mechanical and thermal behaviour of the screens during thermal transients and quenches. The horizontal deformation, angular displacement, heating of the screen as a result of the quench induced eddy currents and relative longitudinal displacement between beam screen and magnet end were measured.

  5. Tests of Bubble Damage Detectors in a Heavy Ion Beam from the SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is designed to investigate the properties of a bubble damage polymer (BDP) using ion beams from the SPS. These polymers are already used commercially for making neutron and gamma-ray dosimeters. \\\\ \\\\ An attractive feature of BDP detectors is the ability to ``design'' a material to have a particular dE/dx threshold which can be used to detect such objects as monopoles and heavy ions as well as relativistic, singly charged tracks originating f particle interactions. \\\\ \\\\ The BDP detector is a polymer which holds droplets of super-heated liquid in suspension. The droplet size is typically a few microns and the droplet density is normally between 10|5 and 10|7 droplets/cm|3. The passage of a particle with a dE/dx exceeding the threshold of the material will cause the droplets with a sufficiently s parameter to change state, giving rise to bubbles. The dE/dx threshold of the BDP varies with pressure and temperature. The growth of bubbles in the bubble trail is limited by the polymer matrix and th...

  6. The REX survey as a tool to test the beaming model for BL Lacs

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; MacCacaro, T; Wolter, A; Gioia, I M

    1999-01-01

    In the context of the beaming model (BM) BL Lac and FR I radio galaxies are thought to be the same class of sources seen at different angles. If this picture is correct, we expect to find some transition objects with intermediate properties between the two classes. To date, this intermediate population of objects is missing, probably due to the limiting fluxes of the current X-ray/radio surveys and/or to the criteria used to separate BL Lacs from normal elliptical galaxies. As pointed out by Browne and Marcha (1993), the detection of the transition objects requires particular attention since the "weak" BL Lac nucleus is hidden by the light of the host elliptical galaxy. A useful criterion often used to assess the presence of a non-thermal source, in addition to the stellar emission of the host galaxy, is the Ca contrast at 4000 AA (K/sub 4000/). This quantity, which is defined as the relative depression of the spectrum across 4000 AA, is a typical feature observed in a "normal" elliptical galaxy; the samples ...

  7. Analysis of failure mechanisms in fatigue test of reinforced concrete beam utilizing acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Bunnori

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic emission technique is used for monitoring the fatigue failure mechanisms in reinforced concrete beam under three point bending. The analysis was conducted by using the bathtub curve method plotted from acoustic emission data. In this study, the fatigue behavior was divided into three stages. The first stage is involved with the decreasing failure rate, known as early life failure or burn-in phase, the second stage is characterized by constant failure rate and the third stage is called the burn-out phase which is an increase of failure rate. The three parameters used in analyzing is the fatigue behavior for each stage of failure which are severity, signal strength and the cumulative signal strength. From severity analysis, the range of each stage of failure had been determined while from signal strength analysis, the initiation of distribution of crack had been detected through the fluctuation of signal strength. Cumulative signal strength parameter provides a clearer view of the initiation and distribution of crack.

  8. The operation of the LHCb RICH photon detection system in a charged particle test beam

    CERN Document Server

    Brisbane, Sean

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN employs two Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors to provide particle identification over the range 1 to 100 GeV/$c$. The RICH detectors use custom-built Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) to detect the Cherenkov photons over the wavelength range 200-600 nm. Three colums of 16 HPDs with final readout electronics and data acquisition were installed in a prototype Cherenkov gas enclosure. Two gas radiators were studied, nitrogen and $C_{4}F_{10}$. Saturated Cherenkov rings ($\\beta \\approx$ 1) were focused onto the plane of HPDs by exposing the radiators to a beam of 80 GeV/$c$ charged pions from the CERN SPS, operated with a 25 ns bunch structure. The HPDs and the on- and off-detector electronics performed to specification, and the DAQ system was verified under the sustained 40 MHz readout mode required for LHC running. The analysis verified the local alignment across the HPDs and their relative timing. The photon yields from both radiators are in good agreement with expectations.

  9. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M.R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Griesmayer, E. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Verbitskaya, E., E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Egorov, N. [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-05-11

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} proton/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage. - Highlights: • Silicon and diamond detectors are proposed for beam loss monitoring at LHC. • The first in situ radiation test of Si and diamond detectors at 1.9 K is described. • Both diamond and silicon detectors survived after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation at 1.9 K. • The rate of Si detectors degradation depends on bias polarity and is larger at V{sub forw}. • Sensitivity of Si detectors irradiated to 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} is independent on resistivity.

  10. Automatically produced FRP beams with embedded FOS in complex geometry: process, material compatibility, micromechanical analysis, and performance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Markus; Tkachenko, Viktoriya; Küppers, Simon; Kuka, Georg G.; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Milwich, Markus; Knippers, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of the presented work was to evolve a multifunctional beam composed out of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) and an embedded optical fiber with various fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBG). These beams are developed for the use as structural member for bridges or industrial applications. It is now possible to realize large scale cross sections, the embedding is part of a fully automated process and jumpers can be omitted in order to not negatively influence the laminate. The development includes the smart placement and layout of the optical fibers in the cross section, reliable strain transfer, and finally the coupling of the embedded fibers after production. Micromechanical tests and analysis were carried out to evaluate the performance of the sensor. The work was funded by the German ministry of economics and technology (funding scheme ZIM). Next to the authors of this contribution, Melanie Book with Röchling Engineering Plastics KG (Haren/Germany; Katharina Frey with SAERTEX GmbH & Co. KG (Saerbeck/Germany) were part of the research group.

  11. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Wang, Shafei [North Electronic Device Research Institution, P.O. Box 947, Beijing 100141 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under −15 dB, transmission up to −1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under −20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  12. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  13. Beam tests of full-size prototypes of silicon detectors for TOF heavy-ions diagnostics in Super-FRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, V.; Bezbakh, A.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Fomichev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Gorshkov, A.; Galkin, A.; Kiselev, O.; Knyazev, A.; Kostyleva, D.; Krupko, S.; Mitina, D.; Slepnev, R.; Sharov, P.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2017-03-01

    The full-size prototypes of large-area silicon detectors for the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) diagnostics of heavy ions were tested with 132Xe (600 MeV/u) beam. The obtained time resolution of the prototypes was about 13 ps, which satisfied the requirements of diagnostics for the Super Fragment Separator (Super-FRS) that is under development at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The irradiation effect on the timing properties of silicon detectors was studied with super-fast silicon pad detectors with a rise time of 190 ps. It was shown that the changes in the rise time of the leading edge of the detector current response to 40Ar ions (40.5 MeV/u) were negligible up to the fluence of 2 × 1011 ion/cm2 expected after one year of Super-FRS operation. This result confirms the model of the leading edge current pulse formation via a flow of the polarization current in dense tracks of heavy ions and shows the perspectives for application of silicon detectors for the TOF diagnostics of intensive heavy-ion beams.

  14. Design of the 'half-size' ITER neutral beam source for the test facility ELISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.heinemann@ipp.mpg.de; Falter, H.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Gutser, R.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Staebler, A.; Wuenderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Agostinetti, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Jiang, T. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, ChengDu (China)

    2009-06-15

    In 2007 the radio frequency driven negative hydrogen ion source developed at IPP in Garching was chosen by the ITER board as the new reference source for the ITER neutral beam system. In order to support the design and the commissioning and operating phases of the ITER test facilities ISTF and NBTF in Padua, IPP is presently constructing a new test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment). ELISE will be operated with the so-called 'half-size ITER source' which is an intermediate step between the present small IPP RF sources (1/8 ITER size) and the full size ITER source. The source will have approximately the width but only half the height of the ITER source. The modular concept with 4 drivers will allow an easy extrapolation to the full ITER size with 8 drivers. Pulsed beam extraction and acceleration up to 60 kV (corresponding to pre-acceleration voltage of SINGAP) is foreseen. The aim of the design of the ELISE source and extraction system was to be as close as possible to the ITER design; it has however some modifications allowing a better diagnostic access as well as more flexibility for exploring open questions. Therefore one major difference compared to the source of ITER, NBTF or ISTF is the possible operation in air. Specific requirements for RF sources as found on IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU are implemented [A. Staebler, et al., Development of a RF-driven ion source for the ITER NBI system, SOFT Conference 2008, Fusion Engineering and Design, 84 (2009) 265-268].

  15. Assessment of similarity of HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) with separate effects test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Slovik, G.C.

    1990-11-01

    A Separate Effects Test (SET) facility was constructed in 1963 to demonstrate the feasibility of the HFBR design and to determine the core power limits for a safe flow reversal event. The objective of the task reported here is to review the capability of the test to scale the dominant phenomena in the HFBR during a flow reversal event and the applicability of the range of the power level obtained from the test to the HFBR. The conclusion of this report was that the flow during the flow reversal event will not be similar in the two facilities. The causes of the dissimilarity are the differences in the core inlet friction, bypass path friction, the absence of the check valve in the test, and the materials used to represent the fuel plates. The impact of these differences is that the HFBR will undergo flow reversal sooner than the test and will have a higher flow rate in the final Natural Circulation Period. The shorter duration of the flow reversal event will allow less time for the plate to heat up and the larger flow in the Natural Circulation Period will lead to higher critical heat flux limits in the HFBR than in the test. Based on these observations, it was concluded that the HFBR can undergo flow reversal safely for heat fluxes up to 46,700 (BTU/hr ft{sup 2}), the heat flux limit obtained from the 1963 test.

  16. Data analysis of the ZEUS forward plug calorimeter beam test at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Kasemann, M; Boettcher, S; Bohnet, I; Fernandez, J P; Goebel, F; Gottlicher, P; Gabareen, A; Garcia, G; Gendner, N; Graciani, R; Hauser, M; Horstmann, D; Inuzuka, M; Khein, L A; Lohr, B; Lewis, R; Lim, H; Lindemann, L; Markun, P; Martinez, M; Neumann, T; Park, I H; del Peso, J; Raach, H; Savin, A; Son, D; Tokushuku, K; Wolfle, S; Whitmore, J; Wick, K; Wolf, G; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Before installation in ZEUS the Forward Plug Colorimeter FPC was tested and calibrated using the X test b eam facility of the SPS accelerator at CERN This note summarizes setup and conditions of the test b eam measurements The energy calibration of the FPC using GeV electron and pion b eams as well as GeV muon data is describ ed in some detail The detector p erformance with pion and electron b eams is studied and the results of two monitoring systems using a Co source and an LED system are presented

  17. Beam test results of STS prototype modules for the future accelerator experiments FAIR/CBM and NICA/MPD projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamov, Petr; Dementev, Dmitrii; Shitenkov, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collision experiments provide the unique possibility to create and investigate extreme states of strongly-interacted matter and address the fundamental aspects of QCD. The experimental investigation the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The reconstruction of the charged particles created in the nuclear collisions, including the determination of their momenta, is the central detection task in high-energy heavy-ion experiments. It is taken up by the Silicon Tracking System in CBM@FAIR and by Inner Tracker in MPD@NICA currently under development. These experiments requires very fast and radiation hard detectors, a novel data read-out and analysis concept including free streaming front-end electronics. Thermal and beam tests of prototype detector modules for these tracking systems showed the stability of sensors and readout electronics operation.

  18. An integral test of FLUKA nuclear models with 160 MeV proton beams in multi-layer Faraday cups

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, I; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Mairani, A

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are useful tools to simulate the complex processes of proton beam interactions with matter. In proton therapy, nuclear reactions influence the dose distribution. Therefore, the validation of nuclear models adopted in MC codes is a critical requisite for their use in this field. A simple integral test can be performed using a multi-layer Faraday cup (MLFC). This method allows separation of the nuclear and atomic interaction processes, which are responsible for secondary particle emission and the finite primary proton range, respectively. In this work, the propagation of 160 MeV protons stopping in two MLFCs made of polyethylene and copper has been simulated by the FLUKA MC code. The calculations have been performed with and without secondary electron emission and transport, as well as charge sharing in the dielectric layers. Previous results with other codes neglected those two effects. The impact of this approximation has been investigated and found to be relevant only in the proximity ...

  19. Beam Test Studies of 3D Pixel Sensors Irradiated Non-Uniformly for the ATLAS Forward Physics Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, S; Boscardin, M; Christophersen, M; Da Via, C; Betta, G -F Dalla; Darbo, G; Fadeyev, V; Fleta, C; Gemme, C; Grenier, P; Jimenez, A; Lopez, I; Micelli, A; Nelist, C; Parker, S; Pellegrini, G; Phlips, B; Pohl, D L; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sicho, P; Tsiskaridze, S

    2013-01-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  20. Beam test results of STS prototype modules for the future accelerator experiments FAIR/CBM and NICA/MPD projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharlamov Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-energy heavy-ion collision experiments provide the unique possibility to create and investigate extreme states of strongly-interacted matter and address the fundamental aspects of QCD. The experimental investigation the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The reconstruction of the charged particles created in the nuclear collisions, including the determination of their momenta, is the central detection task in high-energy heavy-ion experiments. It is taken up by the Silicon Tracking System in CBM@FAIR and by Inner Tracker in MPD@NICA currently under development. These experiments requires very fast and radiation hard detectors, a novel data read-out and analysis concept including free streaming front-end electronics. Thermal and beam tests of prototype detector modules for these tracking systems showed the stability of sensors and readout electronics operation.

  1. Beam backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during LHC loss map tests at beta*=40cm and beta*=80cm at Ebeam=6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this note the beam-background measurements with the ATLAS detector during lossmap tests of the LHC are described. Loss maps taken at beta*=40 cm and the normal 2015 setting of beta*=80 cm are compared. In the first case several collimator settings were explored, resulting in significant changes of beam backgrounds in ATLAS. Besides the studies of the dependence of background on collimation, which are important for optimisation of the LHC performance, these tests provide a clean environment to study the relative importance of beam halo losses on the experiment. The results show that the halo-related component of beam background in ATLAS decreases exponentially with increasing aperture of the tertiary collimators, the slope in terms of nominal sigma being about -0.5. From the data it is also shown that in normal operation conditions of LHC run 2 the beam halo losses contribute at most at the percent level to the total background, the dominant part coming from beam-gas interactions. The data are also used to ...

  2. Test Measurements of a 20 ms-1 Carbon Wire Beam Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    De Freitas, J; Emery, J; Herranz Alvarez, J F; Koujili, M; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; Ait-Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper pre­sents the de­sign of the ac­tu­a­tor for the fast and high ac­cu­ra­cy Wire Scan­ner sys­tem. The ac­tu­a­tor con­sists of a ro­tary brushless syn­chronous motor with the per­ma­nent mag­net rotor in­stalled in­side the vac­u­um cham­ber and the sta­tor in­stalled out­side. The fork, per­ma­nent mag­net rotor and two an­gu­lar po­si­tion sen­sors are mount­ed on the same axis and lo­cat­ed in­side the beam vac­u­um cham­ber. The system has to re­sist a bake-out tem­per­a­ture of 200 C and ion­iz­ing radi­a­tion up to tenths of kGy/year. Max­i­mum wire trav­el­ling speed of 20 m/s and a po­si­tion mea­sure­ment ac­cu­ra­cy of 4 um is re­quired. Therefore, the sys­tem must avoid gen­er­at­ing vi­bra­tion and electromagnet­ic in­ter­fer­ence. A dig­i­tal feed­back con­troller will allow max­i­mum flex­i­bil­i­ty for the loop pa­ram­e­ters and feeds the 3-phase lin­ear power driv­er. The per­for­mance of the pr...

  3. In situ micro-tensile testing on proton beam-irradiated stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, H. T.; Reichardt, A.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2017-09-01

    Small-scale mechanical testing techniques are currently being explored and developed for engineering applications. In particular, micro-tensile testing can add tremendous value, since the entire stress-strain curve, including the strain to failure, can be measured directly. In this work, 304 stainless steel specimens irradiated with 2 MeV protons to 10 dpa (full-cascade setting in the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter, SRIM, software) at 360 °C was evaluated using micro-tensile testing. It was found that even on the micron scale, the measured strain corresponds well with macroscopic expectations. In addition, a new approach to analyzing sudden slip events is presented.

  4. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA's apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Diermaier, Martin; Kolbinger, Bernadette; Malbrunot, Chloé; Massiczek, Oswald; Sauerzopf, Clemens; Simon, Martin C.; Wolf, Michael; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter pendant to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth's magnetic field.

  5. Validation of the Local Hadronic Calibration Scheme of ATLAS with Combined Beam Test Data in the End-Cap and Forward Regions of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kiryunin, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The three Atlas calorimeter systems in the region of the forward crack at |eta| = 3.2 in the nominal Atlas setup have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented. The Local Hadron Calibration developed for the energy reconstruction and the calibration of jets and missing transverse energy in ATLAS, has been validated using data obtained during these beam tests. The analysis has been carried out by using special sets of calibration weights and corrections obtained with the Geant4 simulation of a detailed beam test set-up. The validation itself has been performed by careful studying specific calorimeter performance parameters such as e.g. energy response, energy resolution, shower shapes, cluster energy density as well as different physics lists of the Geant4 simulation.

  6. Measuring deflections of a corroded concrete beam loaded dynamically by a four-point-bending test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, R.P.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    One of the key-elements in Structural Health Monitoring of reinforced concrete structures is the level of rebar corrosion and the way in which it affects the structural performance. A dynamic four-point-bending test was developed to help understanding the deflections of concrete structures under

  7. T10 Beam Studies & Beam Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Michael Georges; Van Dijk, Maarten; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2017-01-01

    In order to test detector components before their installation in actual experiments, one uses test beams in which one can control particle typ, momentum and size to high degree. For this project the focus of a secondary beam at T10 in the East Area at CERN was analysed using an AZALEA telescope from DESY.

  8. To Test a Prototype of a Proton Lifetime Detector in a Neutrino Beam at the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In order to test the performances of the calorimeter method in a nucleon lifetime experiment, a 3 ton prototype calorimeter made of iron and polystyrene scintillator sandwiches and of fine-grain counters has been designed by our collaboration. The energy and angular resolution will be tested by exposing this prototype to charged particles ($e, \\mu , \\pi$) in the 0.5 GeV/c range at Orsay and at CERN in Summer 1980. Since an unavoidable background to any experiment on nucleon decay consists of atmospheric neutrino events, which could in some cases simulate a nucleon decay, the knowledge of the configuration of such events in our detector is essential. It has been shown that the energy distribution of the $\

  9. 26 CFR 1.1502-98A - Coordination with section 383 generally applicable for testing dates (or members joining or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... applicable for testing dates (or members joining or leaving a group) before June 25, 1999. 1.1502-98A Section 1.1502-98A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME... section 383 generally applicable for testing dates (or members joining or leaving a group) before June 25...

  10. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D.; Halbur, J.; Lemmer, S.; Delfs, B.; Harder, D.; Looe, H. K.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm-3) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current-voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  11. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D; Halbur, J; Lemmer, S; Delfs, B; Harder, D; Looe, H K; Poppe, B

    2017-09-05

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm-3) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current-voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  12. Test beam evaluation of newly developed n-in-p planar pixel sensors for use in a high radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, K., E-mail: kimihiko@hep.phys.titech.ac.jp [Institute of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yamaguchi, D.; Motohashi, K. [Institute of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nakamura, K.; Unno, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Jinnouchi, O. [Institute of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Altenheiner, S. [Experimentelle Physik IV, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Blue, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bomben, M. [CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Laboratoire de physique nucléaire et de hautes energies (LPNHE), Univ. Paris-UMPC, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Univ. Paris Diderot (France); Butter, A. [LAL, University Paris-Sud (France); CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Cervelli, A. [Universität Bern, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Sidlerstrasse 55, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Crawley, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Ducourthial, A. [CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Laboratoire de physique nucléaire et de hautes energies (LPNHE), Univ. Paris-UMPC, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Univ. Paris Diderot (France); Gisen, A. [Experimentelle Physik IV, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Hagihara, M. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8751 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-21

    Radiation-tolerant n-in-p planar pixel sensors have been under development in cooperation with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (HPK). This is geared towards applications in high-radiation environments, such as for the future Inner Tracker (ITk) placed in the innermost part of the ATLAS detector in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) experiment. Prototypes of those sensors have been produced, irradiated, and evaluated over the last few years. In the previous studies, it was reported that significant drops in the detection efficiency were observed after irradiation, especially under bias structures. The bias structures are made up of poly-Si or Al bias rails and poly-Si bias resistors. The structure is implemented on the sensors to allow quality checks to be performed before the bump-bonding process, and to ensure that charge generated in floating pixels due to non-contacting or missing bump-bonds is dumped in a controlled way in order to avoid noise. To minimize the efficiency drop, several new pixel structures have been designed with bias rails and bias resistors relocated. Several test beams have been carried out to evaluate the drops in the detection efficiency of the new sensor structures after irradiation. Newly developed sensor modules were irradiated with proton-beams at the Cyclotron and Radio-Isotope Center (CYRIC) in Tohoku University to see the effect of sensor-bulk damage and surface charge-up. An irradiation with γ-rays was also carried out at Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Center, with the goal of decoupling the effect of surface charge-up from that of bulk damage. Those irradiated sensors have been evaluated with particle beams at DESY and CERN. Comparison between different sensor structures confirmed significant improvements in minimizing efficiency loss under the bias structures after irradiation. The results from γ-irradiation also enabled cross-checking the results of a semiconductor technology simulation program (TCAD). - Highlights: • The

  13. Development and evaluation of the British English coordinate response measure speech-in-noise test as an occupational hearing assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Hannah D; Rowan, Daniel; van Besouw, Rachel M; Allsopp, Adrian A

    2017-10-01

    The studies described in this article outline the design and development of a British English version of the coordinate response measure (CRM) speech-in-noise (SiN) test. Our interest in the CRM is as a SiN test with high face validity for occupational auditory fitness for duty (AFFD) assessment. Study 1 used the method of constant stimuli to measure and adjust the psychometric functions of each target word, producing a speech corpus with equal intelligibility. After ensuring all the target words had similar intelligibility, for Studies 2 and 3, the CRM was presented in an adaptive procedure in stationary speech-spectrum noise to measure speech reception thresholds and evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CRM SiN test. Studies 1 (n = 20) and 2 (n = 30) were completed by normal-hearing civilians. Study 3 (n = 22) was completed by hearing impaired military personnel. The results display good test-retest reliability (95% confidence interval (CI) test (r ≤ 0.65), and the CRM is sensitive to hearing impairment. The British English CRM using stationary speech-spectrum noise is a "ready to use" SiN test, suitable for investigation as an AFFD assessment tool for military personnel.

  14. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); “Tor Vergata” University, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI Universitá di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, via Antonio Scarpa 14/16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Paroli, B. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  15. Beam test performance of a scintillator-based detector for the charge identification of relativistic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocchesi, P.S., E-mail: marrocchesi@pi.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Adriani, O. [Department of Physics, University of Florence, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Akaike, Y. [Department of Physics, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Bagliesi, M.G. [Department of Physics, University of Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Basti, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Largo B.Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Bongi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Florence, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Kim, M.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Lomtadze, T. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Largo B.Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Maestro, P. [Department of Physics, University of Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Niita, T.; Ozawa, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Torii, S. [Department of Physics, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2011-12-11

    We report on the measurements performed with relativistic ions from Be to Fe, at the Fragment Separator (FRS) of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, to test the performance of charge-sensitive detectors that were designed to separate - via multiple dE/dx measurements - fully stripped nuclei of cosmic origin in the experiment CALET. The latter is a space mission by the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) scheduled to be launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2013. The CALET instrument is managed by an international collaboration and it is scheduled to take data for 5 years on the Exposure Facility (JEM-EF) of the Japanese module KIBO on the ISS. The aim of the test was to accurately measure the response of the scintillator to different nuclear species and parametrize the saturation of the scintillation light in order to assess the impact of this effect on the charge resolution of the instrument. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Charge identification of relativistic cosmic nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Saturation of scintillation light from ionization by heavy nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Charge resolution with scintillators with high Z ionizing radiation.

  16. Electron beam test of an iron/gas calorimeter based on ceramic parallel plate chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arefiev, A.; Bencze, Gy.L.; Bizzeti, A.; Choumilov, E.; Civinini, C; Dalla Santa, F.; D' Alessandro, R.; Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M.C.; Herve, A.; Iglesias, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Josa, M.I.; Maggi, F.; Malinin, A.; Meschini, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Radermacher, E.; Salicio, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    The baseline option for the very forward calorimetry in the CMS experiment is an iron/gas calorimeter based on parallel plate chambers. A small prototype module of such a calorimeter, has been tested using electrons of 5 to 100 GeV/c momentum with various high voltages and two gases: CO2 (100%) and CF4/CO2 (80/20), at atmospheric pressure. The collected charge has been measured as a function of the high voltage and of the electron energy. The energy resolution has also been measured. Comparisons have been made with Monte-Carlo predictions. Agreement between data an simulation allows to make and estimation of the expected performance of a full size calorimeter. (Author) 23 refs.

  17. Beam test results of pixel triggerless prototypes for the P{sup ¯}ANDA MVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Daniela, E-mail: calvo@to.infn.it [INFN–Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); De Remigis, Paolo; Filippi, Alessandra; Mazza, Giovanni; Rivetti, Angelo; Wheadon, Richard [INFN–Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); De Mori, Francesca; Marcello, Simonetta; Zotti, Laura [INFN–Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Universita' di Fisica, Torino (Italy); Bianco, Simone; Zaunick, Hans-Georg [HISKP, Universität Bonn (Germany); Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Quagli, Tommaso; Schnell, Robert [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus–Liebig Universität Giessen, Giessen (Germany)

    2013-12-21

    Hybrid pixel and double sided silicon microstrip devices will equip the Micro Vertex Detector of the P{sup ¯}ANDA experiment. The most challenging request of the experiment is the continuous readout at the rate of 2×10{sup 7} interactions/s. The detector is in an advanced R and D phase and pixel assemblies, composed of thinned epitaxial sensor read out by the custom chip prototype ToPix, developed in the 130 nm CMOS technology, were produced. The triggerless ASIC implements readout channels that are able to detect signals and transmit the information with a precise timestamp. It performs the energy loss measurement using the Time over Threshold technique, in the input range to about 50 fC. A dedicated testing bench allows the control and the readout of each single chip assembly. Two experimental setups were assembled for testing these first single chip prototypes with pions at CERN, T9, in August 2012. The first one is based on a pixel assembly positioned in the middle of a telescope composed of double sided silicon strips sensors. A 50 MHz clock signal synchronizes these two systems, the triggerless pixels and the strip detectors triggered by scintillation detectors. The second experimental setup is a tracking station housing four pixel assemblies. First results will be reported. -- Highlights: •The most challenge request of the experiment is the continuous readout. •The triggerless circuit transmits the information with a precise timestamp. •The sensor is based on a epitaxial silicon layer. •Timestamp matching of the detected hits belonging to the same event.

  18. Test-beam evaluation of heavily irradiated silicon strip modules for ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Blue, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC with 10 years of operation at instantaneous luminosities of 7.5x1034cm−2s−1. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1x1015 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2 in the ATLAS Strips system. The silicon strip tracker exploits the concept of modularity. Fast readout electronics, deploying 130nm CMOS front-end electronics are glued on top of a silicon sensor to make a module. The radiation hard n-in-p micro-strip sensors used have been developed by the ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. A series of tests were performed at the DESY-II and CERN SPS test beam facilities to investigate the detailed performance of a strip module with both 2.5cm and 5cm length strips before and after irradiation with 8x1014neqcm−2 protons and a total ionising dose of 37.2MRad. The DURA...

  19. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) from Integrated Circuit Test Structures Using a 10 MeV Carbon Microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aton, T.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Duggan, J.L.; El Bouanani, M.; Guo, B.N.; McDaniel, F.D.; Renfrow, S.N.; Walsh, D.S.

    1998-11-18

    As future sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICS. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1pm diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICS. With the aid of layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented. In the present work a 10 MeV Carbon high-resolution microbeam was used to demonstrate the differential charge collection efficiency in ICS with the aid of the IC design Information. When ions strike outside the FET, the charge was only measured on the outer ring, and decreased with strike distance from this diode. When ions directly strike the inner and ring diodes, the collected charge was localized to these diodes. The charge for ions striking the gate region was shared between the inner and ring diodes. I The IBICC measurements directly confirmed the interpretations made in the earlier work.

  20. Test-beam and laboratory characterisation of the TORCH prototype detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, A.; Brook, N. H.; Castillo-Garcia, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Foehl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Van Dijk, M.

    2017-02-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight (TOF) detector is being developed to provide particle identification up to a momentum of 10 GeV/c over a flight distance of 10 m. It has a DIRC-like construction with 10 mm thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a Cherenkov radiator. Photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate periphery where they are focused onto an array of customised position-sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detectors. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple photons. The MCPs have pixels of effective size 0.4 mm×6.6 mm2 in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, by incorporating a novel charge-sharing technique to improve the spatial resolution to better than the pitch of the readout anodes. Prototype photon detectors and readout electronics have been tested and calibrated in the laboratory. Preliminary results from testbeam measurements of a prototype TORCH detector are also presented.

  1. Test-beam and laboratory characterisation of the TORCH prototype detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ros, A; Castillo-Garcia, L; Conneely, T; Cussans, D; Foehl, K; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gao, R; Gys, T; Harnew, N; Milnes, J; Piedigrossi, D; Rademacker, J; Van Dijk, M

    2016-01-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight (TOF) detector is being developed to provide particle identification up to a momentum of 10 GeV/c over a flight distance of 10 m. It has a DIRC-like construction with View the MathML source10mm thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a Cherenkov radiator. Photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate periphery where they are focused onto an array of customised position-sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detectors. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple photons. The MCPs have pixels of effective size 0.4 mm×6.6 mm2 in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, by incorporating a novel charge-sharing technique to improve the spatial resolution to better than the pitch of the readout anodes. Prototype photon detectors and readout electronics have been tested and calibrated in the laboratory. Preliminary results from testbeam measurements of a prototype TORCH detector are a...

  2. Beam test results of CMS RPCs at high eta region under high-radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S; Bahk, S Y; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kang, D H; Kang, T I; Kim, T J; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Oh, J K; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward resistivity plate chambers (RPCs) at the high eta region must be operated in presence of a radiation-induced rate as high as 1 kHz/cm**2. It is still unknown if the RPCs coated with linseed oil can be operated under such a high- radiation environment over the lifetime of CMS. Non-oiled RPCs may be one of the options since phenolic or melamine-coated bakelite is chemically stabler than linseed oil. We have constructed oiled and non-oiled RPCs at the high eta region of CMS using phenolic bakelite and tested them in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. While both RPCs show the same characteristics in the efficiency and the strip multiplicity, the non-oiled RPC generates an intrinsic noise rate of 50 Hz/cm**2, compared to only 5 Hz/cm**2 for the oiled RPC, both at 10.0kV which is about 100 V above the 95% knee of the efficiency curve.

  3. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Introduction Underground installation of the initial CMS detector is almost complete. During this CMS week the detector will reach the minimum necessary condition allowing closure for beam. Configuration for pixel, BCM and endcap ECAL installation will then follow, with the installation of one or both endcap ECAL beingdependent on the actual date when beams may be expected through point 5. As we approach the culmination of 9 years of assembly at Cessy, it is appropriate to pay tribute once again to the continuing dedication and flexibility of all the CERN, collaboration and contractor teams working at point 5, including recently our colleagues from AT/VAC. There is every indication that the legacy of their hard work will be a superb scientific instrument. Safety The final burst of assembly activity in the UXC before closing for beam will involve the familiar worksite risks of heavy manipulation, restricted workspaces, multiple activity and work at height, now amplified by the presence of the very fragile be...

  4. First LHC beam in 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Impressions from the ATLAS control room while waiting for the very first 2017 LHC beams, from the traditional croissants in the morning to the "beam splashes" in the evening. The shift crew, online experts, run coordinators and management are looking forward the next steps of the LHC restart.

  5. First test experiment to produce the slowed-down RI beam with the momentum-compression mode at RIBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikama, T., E-mail: sumikama@ribf.riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ahn, D.S.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Kubo, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aoi, N. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Beaumel, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d’Orsay (IPNO), CNRS/IN2P3, 91405 Orsay (France); Hasegawa, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ideguchi, E. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Imai, N. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsushita, M.; Michimasa, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Otsu, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimoura, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    The {sup 82}Ge beam has been produced by the in-flight fission reaction of the {sup 238}U primary beam with 345 MeV/u at the RIKEN RI beam factory, and slowed down to about 15 MeV/u using the energy degraders. The momentum-compression mode was applied to the second stage of the BigRIPS separator to reduce the momentum spread. The energy was successfully reduced down to 13 ± 2.5 MeV/u as expected. The focus was not optimized at the end of the second stage, therefore the beam size was larger than the expectation. The transmission of the second stage was half of the simulated value mainly due to out of focus. The two-stage separation worked very well for the slowed-down beam with the momentum-compression mode.

  6. Protostellar hydrodynamics: Constructing and testing a spatially and temporally second-order-accurate method. I - Spherical coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.; Myhill, Elizabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    Two related numerical schemes for calculating the 3D collapse of protostellar clouds are defined, developed, and checked on a wide variety of test problems in spherical symmetry and multiple dimensions. One scheme is first-order accurate in time (code S), and the other second-order accurate in time (code ST). Through convergence testing, the codes are shown to be second-order accurate in spatial differences. Compared with the previous 3D code, the combination of reduced numerical dissipation through second-order accuracy and of removing the systematic bias toward central concentrations implies that the tendency for fragmentation into binary or multiple protostars should increase. A reinvestigation of fragmentation as a mechanism for forming binary stars is expected to yield an even more favorable evaluation.

  7. Survey finds that many prisons and jails have room to improve HIV testing and coordination of postrelease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Liza; Montague, Brian T; Beckwith, Curt G; Baillargeon, Jacques; Costa, Michael; Dumont, Dora; Kuo, Irene; Kurth, Ann; Rich, Josiah D

    2014-03-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV and effective antiretroviral treatment are key elements in efforts to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. Incarcerated populations are disproportionately affected by HIV, with the disease's prevalence among inmates estimated to be three to five times higher than among the general population. Correctional institutions offer important opportunities to test for HIV and link infected people to postrelease treatment services. To examine HIV testing and policies that help HIV-positive people obtain treatment in the community after release, we administered a survey to the medical directors of the fifty state prison systems and of forty of the largest jails in the United States. We found that 19 percent of prison systems and 35 percent of jails provide opt-out HIV testing, which is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Additionally, fewer than 20 percent of prisons and jails conform to the CDC's recommendations regarding discharge planning services for inmates transitioning to the community: making an appointment with a community health care provider, assisting with enrollment in an entitlement program, and providing a copy of the medical record and a supply of HIV medications. These findings suggest that opportunities for HIV diagnosis and linking HIV-positive inmates to community care after release are being missed in the majority of prison systems and jails.

  8. Evaluation of the End Effect Impact on the Torsion Test for Determining the Shear Modulus of a Timber Beam through a Photogrammetry Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gharavi, Niaz.; Zhang, Hexin.; Xie, Yanjun

    2017-01-01

    The timber beam end effect in the torsion test is evaluated using binocular stereo vision system. It is recommended by BS EN 408:2010+A1:2012 to exclude a distance of two to three times of cross-sectional thickness (b) from ends to avoid the end effect; whereas, this study indicates that this distance is not sufficiently far enough to remove this effect in slender cross-sections. The shear modulus of six timber beams with different aspect ratios is determined at the various angles and cross-s...

  9. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, Daniel [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  10. Measured and simulated transport of 1.9 MeV laser-accelerated proton bunches through an integrated test beam line at 1 Hz

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nishiuchi; H. Sakaki; T. Hori; P. R. Bolton; K. Ogura; A. Sagisaka; A. Yogo; M. Mori; S. Orimo; A. S. Pirozhkov; I. Daito; H. Kiriyama; H. Okada; S. Kanazawa; S. Kondo

    2010-01-01

    A laser-driven repetition-rated 1.9 MeV proton beam line composed of permanent quadrupole magnets (PMQs), a radio frequency (rf) phase rotation cavity, and a tunable monochromator is developed to evaluate and to test the simulation of laser-accelerated proton beam transport through an integrated system for the first time. In addition, the proton spectral modulation and focusing behavior of the rf phase rotation cavity device is monitored with input from a PMQ triplet. In the 1.9 MeV region we...

  11. Test results for electron beam charging of flexible insulators and composites. [solar array substrates, honeycomb panels, and thin dielectric films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staskus, J. V.; Berkopec, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Flexible solar-array substrates, graphite-fiber/epoxy - aluminum honeycomb panels, and thin dielectric films were exposed to monoenergetic electron beams ranging in energy from 2 to 20 keV in the Lewis Research Center's geomagnetic-substorm-environment simulation facility to determine surface potentials, dc currents, and surface discharges. The four solar-array substrate samples consisted of Kapton sheet reinforced with fabrics of woven glass or carbon fibers. They represented different construction techniques that might be used to reduce the charge accumulation on the array back surface. Five honeycomb-panel samples were tested, two of which were representative of Voyager antenna materials and had either conductive or nonconductive painted surfaces. A third sample was of Navstar solar-array substrate material. The other two samples were of materials proposed for use on Intelsat V. All the honeycomb-panel samples had graphite-fiber/epoxy composite face sheets. The thin dielectric films were 2.54-micrometer-thick Mylar and 7.62-micrometer-thick Kapton.

  12. An anthropomorphic breathing phantom of the thorax for testing new motion mitigation techniques for pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, R L; Zakova, M; Peroni, M; Bernatowicz, K; Bikis, C; Knopf, A K; Safai, S; Fernandez-Carmona, P; Tscharner, N; Weber, D C; Parkel, T C; Lomax, A J

    2017-03-21

    Motion-induced range changes and incorrectly placed dose spots strongly affect the quality of pencil-beam-scanned (PBS) proton therapy, especially in thoracic tumour sites, where density changes are large. Thus motion-mitigation techniques are necessary, which must be validated in a realistic patient-like geometry. We report on the development and characterisation of a dynamic, anthropomorphic, thorax phantom that can realistically mimic thoracic motions and anatomical features for verifications of proton and photon 4D treatments. The presented phantom is of an average thorax size, and consists of inflatable, deformable lungs surrounded by a skeleton and skin. A mobile 'tumour' is embedded in the lungs in which dosimetry devices (such as radiochromic films) can be inserted. Motion of the tumour and deformation of the thorax is controlled via a custom made pump system driving air into and out of the lungs. Comprehensive commissioning tests have been performed to evaluate the mechanical performance of the phantom, its visibility on CT and MR imaging and its feasibility for dosimetric validation of 4D proton treatments. The phantom performed well on both regular and irregular pre-programmed breathing curves, reaching peak-to-peak amplitudes in the tumour of  90% in the central planes of the target. The results of this study demonstrate that this anthropomorphic thorax phantom is suitable for imaging and dosimetric studies in a thoracic geometry closely-matched to lung cancer patients under realistic motion conditions.

  13. Accelerator test of an improved Angle Detecting Inclined Sensor (ADIS) prototype with beams of {sup 78}Kr and fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, J.J., E-mail: james.connell@unh.edu [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Lopate, C. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); McLaughlin, K.R. [Space Science Center and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-11-21

    The measurement of cosmic rays and Solar energetic particles in space is basic to our understanding of the Galaxy, the Sun, phenomena in the heliosphere and the emerging field of space weather. For these reasons, cosmic ray instruments are common on both scientific spacecraft and operational spacecraft such as weather satellites. Cosmic rays and Solar energetic particles include ions over the full range of elements found in the Solar System. High-resolution measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition require the angle of incidence of these energetic ions be determined to correct for pathlength variation in detectors within an instrument. The Angle Detecting Inclined Sensor (ADIS) system is a simple detector configuration used to determine the angle of incidence of heavy ions in space instruments. ADIS replaces complex position sensing detectors (PSDs) with a system of simple, reliable and robust detectors inclined at an angle to the instrument axis. An ADIS instrument thus offers significant advantages in mass, power, telemetry and cost. In February 2008 an improved ADIS prototype was tested with a 150 MeV/u {sup 78}Kr beam at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's (NSCL) Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF). This demonstrated a charge resolution of σ~0.3 e at Kr (Z=36), an exceptional charge resolution for such a simple instrument system.

  14. Particles fluidized bed receiver/reactor tests with quartz sand particles using a 100-kWth beam-down solar concentrating system at Miyazaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Cho, Hyun Seok; Matsubara, Koji; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Senuma, Kazuya; Itoh, Sumie; Yokota, Shin-nosuke

    2017-06-01

    A window-type, solar fluidized bed receiver with quartz sand particles was tested by a 100-kWth novel beam-down solar concentrating system at Miyazaki, Japan. A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) was placed above the quartz window of the receiver to increase the concentration of the solar fluxes from the beam-down solar concentrating system. The solar tests were performed in the middle of December, 2015. The central bed temperature of the receiver was reached around 960-1100° C. It was found that only 20 Ndm3/min of air flow rate was enough to create the uniform fluidization of the particles at the given temperature range. It was predicted that if the central bed temperature could have been higher than 1100°C if solar receiver test had conducted in other seasons than winter. The next solar campaign of the receiver test will be carried out in October, 2016.

  15. Status and test report on the LANL-Boeing APLE/HPO flying-wire beam-profile monitor. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, M.; Barlow, D.; Fortgang, C.; Gilpatrick, J.; Meyer, R.; Rendon, A.; Warren, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Greegor, R. [Boeing Co., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The High-Power Oscillator (HPO) demonstration of the Average Power Laser Experiment (APLE) is a collaboration by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Boeing to demonstrate a 10 kW average power, 10 {mu}m free electron laser (FEL). As part of the collaboration, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for many of the electron beam diagnostics in the linac, transport, and laser sections. Because of the high duty factor and power of the electron beam, special diagnostics are required. This report describes the flying wire diagnostic required to monitor the beam profile during high-power, high-duty operation. The authors describe the diagnostic and prototype tests on the Los Alamos APLE Prototype Experiment (APEX) FEL. They also describe the current status of the flying wires being built for APLE.

  16. HOM Choice Study with Test Electronics for Use as beam Position Diagnostics in 3.9 GHz Accelerating Cavities in FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Baboi, N; Zhang, P; Eddy, N; Fellenz, B; Wendt, M

    2012-01-01

    Higher Order Modes (HOM) excited by the beam in the 3.9 GHz accelerating cavities in FLASH can be used for beam position diagnostics, as in a cavity beam position monitor. Previous studies of the modal choices within the complicated spectrum have revealed several options: cavity modes with strong coupling to the beam, and therefore with the potential for better position resolution, but which are propagating within all 4 cavities, and modes localized in the cavities or the beam pipes, which can give localized position information, but which provide worse resolution. For a better characterization of these options, a set of test electronics has been built, which can down-convert various frequencies between about 4 and 9 GHz to 70 MHz. The performance of various 20 MHz bands has been estimated. The best resolution of 20 m was found for some propagating modes. Based on this study one band at ca. 5 GHz was chosen for high resolution position monitoring and a band at ca. 9 GHz for localized monitoring.

  17. Beam instability induced by rf deflectors in the combiner ring of the CLIC test facility and mitigation by damped deflecting structures

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Ghigo, A; Corsini, R

    2011-01-01

    In the CTF3 (CLIC test facility 3) run of November 2007, a vertical beam instability has been found in the combiner ring during operation. After a careful analysis, the source of the instability has been identified in the vertical deflecting modes trapped in the rf deflectors and excited by the beam passage. A dedicated tracking code that includes the induced transverse wakefield and the multibunch multipassage effects has been written and the results of the beam dynamics analysis are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the instability was similar to the beam breakup in a linear accelerator or in an energy recovery linac. The results of the code allowed identifying the main key parameters driving such instability and allowed finding the main knobs to mitigate it. To completely suppress such beam instability, two new rf deflectors have been designed, constructed, and installed in the ring. In the new structures the frequency separation between the vertical and horizontal deflecting modes has been increase...

  18. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  19. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  20. Testing of full-size reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP composites : experimental results and design methods verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    In 1997, a load rating of an historic reinforced concrete bridge in Oregon, Horsetail Creek Bridge, indicated substandard shear and moment capacities of the beams. As a result, the Bridge was strengthened with fiber reinforced : polymer composites as...

  1. Testing of full-size reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP composites : experimental results and design methods verification(appendices)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    In 1997, a load rating of an historic reinforced concrete bridge in Oregon, Horsetail Creek Bridge, indicated substandard shear and moment capacities of the beams. As a result, the Bridge was strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer composites as a...

  2. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  3. Scanning Optical Head with Nontilted Reference Beam: Assuring Nanoradian Accuracy for a New Generation Surface Profiler in the Large-Slope Testing Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinan Qian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoradian Surface Profilers (NSPs are required for state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation optics and high-precision optical measurements. Nano-radian accuracy must be maintained in the large-angle test range. However, the beams' notable lateral motions during tests of most operating profilers, combined with the insufficiencies of their optical components, generate significant errors of ∼1 μrad rms in the measurements. The solution to nano-radian accuracy for the new generation of surface profilers in this range is to apply a scanning optical head, combined with nontilted reference beam. I describe here my comparison of different scan modes and discuss some test results.

  4. Performance of a downconverter test-electronics with MTCA-based digitizers for beam position monitoring in 3.9GHz accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Wamsat, T; Lorbeer, B; Zhang, P

    2012-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in 3.9GHz accelerating cavities are planned to be used for beam position monitoring at the European XFEL. The selected HOMs are located around 5460MHz, with a bandwidth of 100MHz and 9060MHz, with a bandwidth of 50MHz. A downconverter electronics, built for tests at FLASH, converts the HOMs to an intermediate frequency of 70MHz. The MTCA (Micro Telecommunications Computing Architecture) standard will be used for the XFEL. Thus it is important to have a performance study of the downconverter test-electronics using the MTCA digitizer card SIS8300. In the digitizer the IF frequency of 70MHz is undersampled with a clock frequency of 108MS/s. The paper presents the performance of the digitizer together with the test-electronics. A comparison with a 216MS/s VME (Versa Module Eurocard) digitizer is made.

  5. Evaluar la Coordinación Motriz Global en Educación Secundaria: El Test Motor SportComp. [Motor co-ordination assessment in Secondary Education: The SportComp Test].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Ruiz-Perez

    2017-07-01

    coordination of adolescents. There are currently no valid tools to assess motor coordination in physical education classes useful for teachers. Many instruments are very expensive, time consuming and difficult to apply in P.E. contexts. The SportComp test was developed based in a review of motor tests for children 12 to 17 years old, Content validity was evaluated by experts and motor tasks selected was applied to 5732 students of this age range. Principal components analysis yielded one component relating to gross motor function. Findings suggested satisfactory criterial validity with the MABC-2 Test and test-retest reliability (ICC 0,91 [95% CI 0,88-0,94]. Psychometric properties of this test were good and its possibilities to be applied in P.E. context high cause its low cost, low time consuming, norms and its possibilities to detect students with low motor coordination. This motor test has the potential to aid P.E. teachers in their assessment of student’s motor coordination and therefore contribute to improved P.E. programs.

  6. Construction and commissioning of a hadronic test-beam calorimeter to validate the particle-flow concept at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groll, M.

    2007-06-15

    This thesis discusses research and development studies performed for a hadronic calorimeter concept for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The requirements for a detector for the ILC are de ned by the particle-ow concept in which the overall detector performance for jet reconstruction is optimised by reconstructing each particle individually. The calorimeter system has to have unprecedented granularity to ful l the task of shower separation. The validation of the shower models used to simulate the detector performance is mandatory for the design and optimisation of the ILC detector. The construction and operation of a highly granular test-beam system will serve as a tool for this validation. This motivates the urgent need of research and development on calorimeter prototypes. One possible realisation of the hadronic calorimeter is based on a sampling structure of steel and plastic scintillator with analogue readout, where the sensitive scintillator layers are divided into tiles. A newly developed silicon based photo-detector (SiPM) o ers the possibilities to design such a system. The SiPM is a multi-pixel avalanche photo-diode operated in Geiger mode. Due to its small dimensions it is possible to convert the light produced in the calorimeter to an electronic signal already inside the calorimeter volume. The basic developments on scintillator, tile and photo-detector studies provide the basis for prototype construction. The main part of this thesis will discuss the construction and rst commissioning of an analogue hadronic calorimeter prototype consisting of 8000 channels read out with SiPMs. The smallest calorimeter unit is the tile system including the SiPM. The production and characterisation chain of this unit is an essential step in the construction of a large scale prototype. These basic units are arranged on readout layers, which are already a multi-channel system of 200 channels. In addition, the new photo-detector requires dedicated readout

  7. An anthropomorphic breathing phantom of the thorax for testing new motion mitigation techniques for pencil beam scanning proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, R. L.; Zakova, M.; Peroni, M.; Bernatowicz, K.; Bikis, C.; Knopf, A. K.; Safai, S.; Fernandez-Carmona, P.; Tscharner, N.; Weber, D. C.; Parkel, T. C.; Lomax, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    Motion-induced range changes and incorrectly placed dose spots strongly affect the quality of pencil-beam-scanned (PBS) proton therapy, especially in thoracic tumour sites, where density changes are large. Thus motion-mitigation techniques are necessary, which must be validated in a realistic patient-like geometry. We report on the development and characterisation of a dynamic, anthropomorphic, thorax phantom that can realistically mimic thoracic motions and anatomical features for verifications of proton and photon 4D treatments. The presented phantom is of an average thorax size, and consists of inflatable, deformable lungs surrounded by a skeleton and skin. A mobile ‘tumour’ is embedded in the lungs in which dosimetry devices (such as radiochromic films) can be inserted. Motion of the tumour and deformation of the thorax is controlled via a custom made pump system driving air into and out of the lungs. Comprehensive commissioning tests have been performed to evaluate the mechanical performance of the phantom, its visibility on CT and MR imaging and its feasibility for dosimetric validation of 4D proton treatments. The phantom performed well on both regular and irregular pre-programmed breathing curves, reaching peak-to-peak amplitudes in the tumour of  materials were clearly visualised in CT scans, and all, except the bone and lung components, were MRI visible. Radiochromic film measurements in the phantom showed that imaging for repositioning was required (as for a patient treatment). Dosimetry was feasible with Gamma Index agreements (4%/4 mm) between film dose and planned dose  >90% in the central planes of the target. The results of this study demonstrate that this anthropomorphic thorax phantom is suitable for imaging and dosimetric studies in a thoracic geometry closely-matched to lung cancer patients under realistic motion conditions.

  8. Beam-beam diagnostics from closed-orbit distortion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M.; Chin, Y.H.; Eden, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kozanecki, W. [DAPNIA/SPP, CEN Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette, (FR)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tennyson, J.; Ziemann, V. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    We study the applicability of beam-beam deflection techniques as a tuning tool for asymmetric B factories, focusing on PEP-II as an example. Assuming that the closed orbits of the two beams are separated vertically at the interaction point by a local orbit bump that is nominally closed, we calculate the residual beam orbit distortions due to the beam-beam interaction. Difference orbit measurements, performed at points conveniently distant from the interaction point (IP), provide distinct signatures that can be used to maintain the beams in collision and perform detailed optical diagnostics at the IP. A proposal to test this method experimentally at the TRISTAN ring is briefly discussed.

  9. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam-matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Raginel, V.; Wollmann, D.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam-matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the numerical

  10. First results from a beam test of a high-granularity silicon-based calorimeter for CMS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan

    2016-01-01

    A prototype of the electromagnetic calorimeter for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter that is being designed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) was tested in a test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF). The detector consisted of 16 sampling layers of silicon sensors interspersed withtungsten plates for a total thickness of 15.3 X$_{0}$. Each of the hexagonal sensors were sub-divided into 128 cells, predominantly hexagonal in shape, of area ~1.1 cm$^2$. The analog signal from the 2048 cells was readout using the 64-channel SKIROC2 ASIC, developed by the LLR OMEGA group for the CALICE collaboration. Data were collected with a custom data acquisition system developed for these tests. The detector was calibrated using signals obtained with 120 GeV protons.We report here the design of the prototype detector and the results obtained from analyzing the data collected in July 2016, with electron beams at energies ranging from 4 to 32 GeV.

  11. Estimation of local confidence limit for 6 MV photon beam IMRT system using AAPM TG 119 test protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Kadam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate local confidence limit for 6 MV photon beam based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT using TG119 test protocol.Methods: The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM Task Group 119 (TG119 prescribed a protocol to evaluate overall accuracy of IMRT system rather than independent uncertainty in dose calculation, dose delivery and measurement system. Two preliminary and five clinical test cases were created based on dose prescriptions and planning objectives given by TG119 report. Verification plans were created in a planning slab phantom, 2D Matrix dosimetry system (I’MatriXX with multicube phantom and aS-1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID. Radiation absorbed doses to high dose points in the planning target volume (PTV region and low dose points in avoidance structures were measured using CC13 ionization chamber having sensitive volume of 0.13 cm3. The measured and planned doses were normalized with respect to their prescription doses and intercompared. The gamma analysis was carried out for both I’MatriXX and EPID, adopting the acceptance criteria of 3% DD (dose difference and 3 mm DTA (distance to agreement with 10% threshold dose.Results: For the point dose measurements with ion chamber, the average dose difference ratio in high dose low gradient PTV region was -0.0133 ± 0.012 corresponding to a confidence limit of 0.037. The average dose difference in low dose region (avoidance structure was -0.00004 ± 0.010 corresponding to a confidence limit of 0.021. The average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3% DD and 3 mm DTA for composite planar dose distribution measured by I’MatriXX was 99.47 ± 0.43 which corresponds to a confidence limit of 1.38 (i.e. 98.62% passing. Similarly, the average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3% DD and 3 mm DTA for per-field dose distribution measured by EPID was 98.00 ± 2.49 which corresponds to a

  12. Analytical modeling, finite-difference simulation and experimental validation of air-coupled ultrasound beam refraction and damping through timber laminates, with application to non-destructive testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Furrer, Roman; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Niemz, Peter; Schütz, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) ultrasound systems for timber composite structures require quantitative understanding of the propagation of ultrasound beams in wood. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model is described, which incorporates local anisotropy variations of stiffness, damping and density in timber elements. The propagation of pulsed air-coupled ultrasound (ACU) beams in normal and slanted incidence configurations is reproduced by direct definition of material properties (gas, solid) at each model pixel. First, the model was quantitatively validated against analytical derivations. Time-varying wavefronts in unbounded timber with curved growth rings were accurately reproduced, as well as the acoustic properties (velocity, attenuation, beam skewing) of ACU beams transmitted through timber lamellas. An experimental sound field imaging (SFI) setup was implemented at NDT frequencies (120 kHz), which for specific beam incidence positions allows spatially resolved ACU field characterization at the receiver side. The good agreement of experimental and modeled beam shifts across timber laminates allowed extrapolation of the inner propagation paths. The modeling base is an orthotropic stiffness dataset for the desired wood species. In cross-grain planes, beam skewing leads to position-dependent wave paths. They are well-described in terms of the growth ring curvature, which is obtained by visual observation of the laminate. Extraordinary refraction phenomena were observed, which lead to well-collimated quasi-shear wave coupling at grazing beam incidence angles. The anisotropic damping in cross-grain planes is satisfactorily explained in terms of the known anisotropic stiffness dataset and a constant loss tangent. The incorporation of high-resolution density maps (X-ray computed tomography) provided insight into ultrasound scattering effects in the layered growth ring structure. Finally, the combined potential of the FDTD model and the SFI setup for

  13. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2012-01-01

      UXC + detectors As explained in detail in the November 2011 bulletin, the bellows unit at −18.5 m from the CMS interaction point was identified as a prime candidate for the regularly occurring pressure spikes which occasionally led to sustained severe background conditions in 2011, affecting dead time and data quality. Similar regions in LHC with vacuum instabilities were observed to be close to bellows, which radiography showed to have distorted RF-fingers — on removal, they proved to have been severely overheated. The plans for the Year-End Technical Stop were adapted to prioritise radiography of the bellows at 16 m to 18 m either end of CMS. Excellent work by the beam pipe, survey and heavy mechanical teams allowed the X-rays to be taken as planned on 20th December, showing that the bellow at −18.5m had an obvious non-conformity. The RF-fingers were found inside the end of the opposing flared pipe instead of outside. In addition, the overlap between fingers and...

  14. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  15. FPGA Design of the digital acquisition chain to test and implement ALPS, the new Beam Position Monitor for the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Degl'Innocenti, Irene; Boccardi, Andrea

    This thesis presents the firmware design and the data analysis to test and implement part of the acquisition chain of ALPS (A Logarithmic Position Monitor), the new beam position monitor of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. CERN provides particle accelerators and detectors to accelerate beams of particles and observe their collisions and the SPS is the second larger circular machine in the accelerator complex. The SPS beam position monitor, the system that measures the transverse position of the accelerated particle beams along the pipe, is now under redesign. In the BPM acquisition chain the signal from the sensor is first conditioned by the analog front-end, then digitalised in the digital front-end and transmitted to the back-end for being processed. The goal of the thesis is the conception of firmware modules and analysis tools integrated with the acquisition chain, aiming to acquire and analyse data to qualify the system and finally implement ...

  16. Measured and simulated transport of 1.9 MeV laser-accelerated proton bunches through an integrated test beam line at 1 Hz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nishiuchi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A laser-driven repetition-rated 1.9 MeV proton beam line composed of permanent quadrupole magnets (PMQs, a radio frequency (rf phase rotation cavity, and a tunable monochromator is developed to evaluate and to test the simulation of laser-accelerated proton beam transport through an integrated system for the first time. In addition, the proton spectral modulation and focusing behavior of the rf phase rotation cavity device is monitored with input from a PMQ triplet. In the 1.9 MeV region we observe very weak proton defocusing by the phase rotation cavity. The final transmitted bunch duration and transverse profile are well predicted by the PARMILA particle transport code. The transmitted proton beam duration of 6 ns corresponds to an energy spread near 5% for which the transport efficiency is simulated to be 10%. The predictive capability of PARMILA suggests that it can be useful in the design of future higher energy transport beam lines as part of an integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system.

  17. Particle Identification with Cherenkov detectors in the 2011 CALICE Tungsten Analog Hadronic Calorimeter Test Beam at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D; Klempt, W; Lucaci Timoce, A; van der Kraaij, E

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 the CALICE Tungsten Analog Hadronic Calorimeter prototype (W-AHCAL) was exposed to mixed beams of electrons, pions, kaons and protons with momenta from 10 to 300 GeV in the CERN SPS H8 beam line. The selection of pion, kaon and proton samples is based on the information obtained from two Cherenkov threshold counters. This note presents the strategy for the particle identification, as well as the calibration, operation and analysis of the Cherenkov counters. Efficiency and sample-purity estimates are given for the data selected for the W-AHCAL data analysis.

  18. Heavy ion beam test results of the silicon charge detector for the CREAM cosmic ray balloon mission

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I H; Bok, J B; Ganel, O; Hahn, J H; Han, W; Hyun, H J; Kim, H J; Kim, M Y; Kim, Y J; Lee, J K; Lutz, L; Malinine, A; Min, K W; Nam, S W; Nam, W; Park, H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Seon, K I; Sone, J H; Yang, J; Zinn, S Y

    2004-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is designed to measure cosmic ray elemental spectra to help understand the source and acceleration mechanisms of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The payload is planned to launch in December 2004 from McMurdo Station, Antarctica as a balloon mission. A Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) was designed and constructed for the CREAM experiment to provide precision charge measurements of incident cosmic rays with a resolution of 0.2 charge unit or better. The SCD was exposed to heavy ion beams at CERN's H2 beam line in November 2003. The results reported here show the SCD performs as designed.

  19. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1993-08-01

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  20. Latest R&D news and beam test performance of the highly granular SiW-ECAL technological prototype for the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Irles, Adrian (on behalf of CALICE Collaboration)

    2017-01-01

    High precision physics at future colliders as the International Linear Collider (ILC) require unprecedented high precision in the determination of the energy of final state particles. The needed precision will be achieved thanks to the Particle Flow algorithms (PF) which require highly granular and hermetic calorimeters systems. The physical proof of concept of the PF was performed in the previous campaign of beam tests of physic prototypes within the CALICE collaboration. One of these prototypes was the physics prototype of the Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter (SiW-ECAL) for the International Large Detector at the ILC. In this document we present the latest nes on R&D of the next generation prototype, the technological prototype with fully embedded very front-end (VFE) electronics, of the SiW-ECAL. Special emphasis is given to the presentation and discussion of the first results from the beam test done at DESY in June 2017. The physics program for such beam test consisted in the calibration a...

  1. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Mussgiller, Andreas [DESY-Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The CMS Binary Chip 2 (CBC2) is a prototype version of the front-end readout ASIC to be used in the silicon stripmodules of the CMS outer tracker during the high-luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC2 is produced in a 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of the double layer silicon strip modules, the so-called 2S modules. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide an on-board trigger with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-momentum track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S module prototypes equipped with CBC2 were put under test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data was collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy range of 2 to 4 GeV. The test setup, the event reconstruction, and the analysis results such as beam properties, alignment, clusters properties, and per-chip efficiency are presented.

  2. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01

    Ahigh resolution(σ< 2 μm) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. EUDET was a coordinated detector R&D programme for the future International Linear Collider providing test beam infrastructure to detector R&D groups. The telescope consists of six sensor planes with a pixel pitch of either 18.4 μm or 10 μmand canbe operated insidea solenoidal magnetic fieldofupto1.2T.Ageneral purpose cooling, positioning, data acquisition (DAQ) and offine data analysis tools are available for the users. The excellent resolution, readout rate andDAQintegration capabilities made the telescopea primary beam tests tool also for several CERN based experiments. In this report the performance of the final telescope is presented. The plans for an even more flexible telescope with three differentpixel technologies(ATLASPixel, Mimosa,Timepix) withinthenew European detector infrastructure project AIDA are presented.

  3. A new 2.5 MeV injector and beam test facility for the spallation neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, R. F.; Aleksandrov, A.; Han, B. X.; Kang, Y. W.; Middendorf, M. M.; Murray, S. N.; Piller, M.; Pennisi, T. R.; Peplov, V.; Saethre, R.; Santana, M.; Stinson, C.; Stockli, M. P.

    2017-08-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now operates with 1.2 MW of beam power on target with the near-term goal of delivering 1.4 MW and a longer-term goal of delivering >2 MW to support a planned second target station. Presently, H- beam pulses (50-60 mA, 1 ms, 60 Hz) from an RF-driven, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion source are first accelerated to 2.5 MeV by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, injected into a ˜1 GeV linac, compressed to transmission, the initial applications of the BTF will be to conduct 6D beam dynamic studies, develop & demonstrate ion sources capable of meeting the current and future requirements of the SNS, and contribute to neutron moderator development. This report provides a facility update, description of the BTF ion source systems as well as a discussion of the first LEBT and RFQ beam current measurements performed at the BTF.

  4. Linear Collider Test Facility: Twiss Parameter Analysis at the IP/Post-IP Location of the ATF2 Beam Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, Benoit; /Annecy, LAPP; Jeremie, Andrea; /Annecy, LAPP; Bai, Sha; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bambade, Philip; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    At the first stage of the ATF2 beam tuning, vertical beam size is usually bigger than 3 {micro}m at the IP. Beam waist measurements using wire scanners and a laser wire are usually performed to check the initial matching of the beam through to the IP. These measurements are described in this paper for the optics currently used ({beta}{sub x} = 4cm and {beta}{sub y} = 1mm). Software implemented in the control room to automate these measurements with integrated analysis is also described. Measurements showed that {beta} functions and emittances were within errors of measurements when no rematching and coupling corrections were done. However, it was observed that the waist in the horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane was abnormally shifted and simulations were performed to try to understand these shifts. They also showed that multiknobs are needed in the current optics to correct simultaneously {alpha}{sub x}, {alpha}{sub y} and the horizontal dispersion (D{sub x}). Such multiknobs were found and their linearity and orthogonality were successfully checked using MAD optics code. The software for these multiknobs was implemented in the control room and waist scan measurements using the {alpha}{sub y} knob were successfully performed.

  5. 6D beam-beam interaction step-by-step

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Papaphilippou, Yannis; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This document describes in detail the numerical method used in different simulation codes for the simulation of beam-beam interactions using the “Synchro Beam Mapping” approach, in order to correctly model the coupling introduced by beam-beam between the longitudinal and the transverse plane. The goal is to provide in a compact, complete and self-consistent manner the set of equations needed for the implementation in a numerical code. The effect of a “crossing angle” in an arbitrary “crossing plane” with respect to the assigned reference frame is taken into account with a suitable coordinate transformation. The employed description of the strong beam allows correctly accounting for the hour-glass effect as well as for linear coupling at the interaction point.

  6. Performance of the LHCb RICH photo-detectors and readout in a system test using charged particles from a 25 ns-structured beam

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; D’Ambrosio, C; Gys, T; Morant, J; Piedigrossi, D; Patel, M; Wyllie, K; Ameri, M; Fontanelli, F; Mini, G; Sannino, M; Arnaboldi, C; Bellunato, T F; Fanchini, E; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Barham, C; Buszello, C; Dickens, J; Gibson, V; Jones, C; Kerzel, U; Rogers, G; Skottowe, H; Wotton, S; Blake, T; Eames, C; Plackett, R; Brisbane, S; Harnew, N; Libby, J; Powell, A; Sullivan, P; Topp-Jorgensen, S; Easo, S; Papanestis, A; Zhang, Z; Eisenhardi, S; Muheim, F; Styles, N

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) utilises two Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detectors for particle identification. To verify that the RICH assembly will perform as expected prior to installation, an array of 48 production Hybrid Photon Detectors and their readout have been tested under realistic running conditions in a 25 ns-structured charged particle beam provided by the SPS facility at CERN. This system test is an important milestone in the overall commissioning of the LHCb detector and demonstrates that all aspects meet the stringent physics requirements of the LHCb experiment.

  7. Beam Injection into RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  8. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  9. Jets at high Q{sup 2} at HERA and test beam measurements with the EUDET pixel telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, Joerg

    2010-09-15

    In this thesis the measurement of inclusive dijet and trijet cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA is presented. The kinematic phase space of the measurement was defined by 1258 GeV and -1<{eta}{sub LAB}{sup jet}<2.5, where the first quantity is the transverse jet energy in the Breit frame and the latter the jet pseudorapidity in the laboratory frame. For the selection of dijet (trijet) events it was required that at least the two (three) highest-transverse-energy jets have exceeded the transverse-energy threshold. Additionally, the invariant dijet mass of the two highest-transverse-energy jets in the event was required to be greater than 20 GeV. The measurements were compared to fixed-order NLO QCD calculations as implemented in the NLOJET++ program. The agreement in shape and normalisation between theory and the measurement was good. The ratio, R{sub 3/2}, between the cross sections for trijet and dijet production was determined as a function of the average transverse jet energy in the Breit frame, E{sub T,B}{sup jet}, in intervals of Q{sup 2}. The quantity R{sub 3/2} was utilised for an extraction of the strong coupling, {alpha}{sub s}, with partially reduced systematic uncertainties. The extracted value was in agreement with the world average value of {alpha}{sub s}. In a second part, test-beam measurements were performed with the EUDET pixel telescope. During the work for this thesis, the online-monitoring software was improved, the MIMOSA 26 sensors were integrated into the offline analysis software and

  10. The NSCL electron beam ion trap for the reacceleration of rare isotopes coming to life: First extraction tests with a high-current electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Johnson, M.; Kester, O.; Kostin, M.; Ottarson, J.; Portillo, M.; Wilson, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), MSU, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo [Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    NSCL is currently constructing the ReA3 reaccelerator, which will accelerate rare isotopes obtained from gas stopping of fast-fragment beams to energies of up to 3 MeV/u for uranium and higher for lighter ions. A high-current charge breeder, based on an electron beam ion trap (EBIT), has been chosen as the first step in the acceleration process, as it has the potential to efficiently produce highly charged ions in a single charge state. These ions are fed into a compact linear accelerator consisting of a radio frequency quadrupole structure and superconducting cavities. The NSCL EBIT has been fully designed with most of the parts constructed. The design concept of the EBIT and results from initial commissioning tests of the electron gun and collector with a temporary 0.4 T magnet are presented.

  11. Bimanual coordination in dyslexic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, L H; Brown, W S; Markee, T E; Theberge, D C; Zvi, J C

    1995-06-01

    Various types of dyslexia have been associated with tactile-motor coordination deficits and inefficient transfer of information between the two cerebral hemispheres. Twenty-one dyslexic adults were compared to 21 controls on the Bimanual Coordination Task, a test of tactile-motor coordination and interhemispheric collaboration. When compared to control subjects, dyslexics showed a consistent pattern of deficits in bimanual motor coordination, both with and without visual feedback. In particular, dyslexics had greater difficulty relative to normals when the left hand had to move faster than the right, and when the hands had to make opposite (mirror-image) movements, suggesting problems with interhemispheric modulation of visuomotor control. In addition, accuracy on this bimanual coordination task was significantly correlated with the Block Design subtest of the WAIS--R, but not with a rhyme fluency task, suggesting some contribution of right hemisphere controlled visuospatial skill to performance.

  12. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Chamizo

    2012-01-01

      On 17th January, as soon as the services were restored after the technical stop, sub-systems started powering on. Since then, we have been running 24/7 with reduced shift crew — Shift Leader and DCS shifter — to allow sub-detectors to perform calibration, noise studies, test software upgrades, etc. On 15th and 16th February, we had the first Mid-Week Global Run (MWGR) with the participation of most sub-systems. The aim was to bring CMS back to operation and to ensure that we could run after the winter shutdown. All sub-systems participated in the readout and the trigger was provided by a fraction of the muon systems (CSC and the central RPC wheel). The calorimeter triggers were not available due to work on the optical link system. Initial checks of different distributions from Pixels, Strips, and CSC confirmed things look all right (signal/noise, number of tracks, phi distribution…). High-rate tests were done to test the new CSC firmware to cure the low efficiency ...

  13. SU-D-304-05: Validation of Low-Dose-Tail Modeling for Proton Pencil Beam Spot Scanning Using a Quality Assurance Test Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Solberg, T; McDonough, J; Ainsley, C [Univ Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models of the low-dose tails of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape and location, and for determining monitor units. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distribution based on the weighted superposition of spot profiles previously measured using a pair-magnification method. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The cutoff of the halo component is smaller at higher energies, and is not observable for the 225 MeV proton beam for UN #2. Conclusion: In conclusion, the use of a comprehensive test pattern can facilitate the validation of the halo component of proton PBS spots at off axis locations. The cutoff of the halo component should be taken into consideration for large fields or PBS systems that intend to trim spot profiles using apertures. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  14. Arm-eye coordination test to objectively quantify motor performance and muscles activation in persons after stroke undergoing robot-aided rehabilitation training: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-Yu; Hu, Xiaoling; Li, Le; Sun, Rui

    2013-09-01

    This study designed an arm-eye coordination test to investigate the effectiveness of the robot-aided rehabilitation for persons after stroke. Six chronic poststroke subjects were recruited to attend a 20-session robot-aided rehabilitation training of elbow joint. Before and after the training program, subjects were asked to perform voluntary movements of elbow flection and extension by following sinusoidal trajectories at different velocities with visual feedback on their joint positions. The elbow angle and the electromyographic signal of biceps and triceps as well as clinical scores were evaluated together with the parameters. Performance was objectively quantified by root mean square error (RMSE), root mean square jerk (RMSJ), range of motion (ROM), and co-contraction index (CI). After 20 sessions, RMSE and ROM improved significantly in both the affected and the unaffected side based on two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05). There was significant lower RMSJ in the affected side at higher velocities (P < 0.05). There was significant negative correlation between average RMSE with different tracking velocities and Fugl-Meyer shoulder-elbow score (P < 0.05). There was also significant negative correlation between average RMSE and average ROM (P < 0.05), and moderate nonsignificant negative correlation with RMSJ, and CI. The characterization of velocity-dependent deficiencies, monitoring of training-induced improvement, and the correlation between quantitative parameters and clinical scales could enable the exploration of effects of different types of treatment and design progress-based training method to accelerate the processes of recovery.

  15. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    The use of glass as a load carrying material in structural elements is rarely seen even though glass is a popular material for many architects. This is owed to the unreliable and low tensile strength, which is due to surface flaws and high brittleness of the material. These properties lead...... to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  16. Performance monitoring of large-scale autonomously healed concrete beams under four-point bending through multiple non-destructive testing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaiskos, G.; Tsangouri, E.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Tittelboom, K.; De Belie, N.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2016-05-01

    Concrete is still the leading structural material due to its low production cost and great structural design flexibility. Although it is distinguished by such a high durability and compressive strength, it is vulnerable in a series of ambient and operational degradation factors which all too frequently result in crack formation that can adversely affect its mechanical performance. The autonomous healing system, using encapsulated polyurethane-based, expansive, healing agent embedded in concrete, is triggered by the crack formation and propagation and promises material repair and operational service life extension. As shown in our previous studies, the formed cracks on small-scale concrete beams are sealed and repaired by filling them with the healing agent. In the present study, the crack formation and propagation in autonomously healed, large-scale concrete beams are thoroughly monitored through a combination of non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. The ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), using embedded low-cost and aggregate-size piezoelectric transducers, the acoustic emission (AE) and the digital image correlation (DIC) are the NDT methods which are comprehensively used. The integrated ultrasonic, acoustic and optical monitoring system introduces an experimental configuration that detects and locates the four-point bending mode fracture on large-scale concrete beams, detects the healing activation process and evaluates the subsequent concrete repair.

  17. Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago.

  18. Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2013-01-01

    As soon as the first particles emerge from an ion source, the source characteristics need to be determined. The total beam intensity, the transverse particle distributions, the beam divergence and emittance as well as the longitudinal parameters of the beam must be measured. This chapter provides an overview of typical measurement methods and the instruments used, and shows the results obtained.

  19. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2012-01-01

      In the reporting period, CMS has collected about 10 fb–1 of pp collision data. Considering the prolonged duration of the current running period, with no opportunity for thorough maintenance since 2009, the reliability of the infrastructure and common systems was satisfactory. . Once again, CMS was fortunate that some failures coincided with LHC downtime, avoiding major data losses. After repeated difficulties over the summer with reconnection of the cold box following an unexpected stop, the procedure was revised. For reliability, and to reduce the risk of a fast discharge, the reconnection is now done at a reduced field of 2 T, resulting in a mechanical on-off-on cycle. It is also time consuming, with two times two hours for the ramp-down/up and several hours for refilling the He dewar before restoring the field to 3.8 T. In response to this, a mode of operation has been successfully tested that allows doubling the refill rate of the dewar. Reconnection at a somewhat higher field is ...

  20. Measurement of charm and beauty-production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and test beam studies of ATLAS pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libov, Vladyslav

    2013-08-15

    A measurement of charm and beauty production in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA is presented. The analysis is based on the data sample collected by the ZEUS detector in the period from 2003 to 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 354 pb{sup -1}. The kinematic region of the measurement is given by 54.2(5) GeV for charm (beauty) and -1.6<{eta}{sup jet}<2.2 for both charm and beauty, where E{sup jet}{sub T} and {eta}{sup jet} are the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet, respectively. The significance of the decay length and the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with the secondary vertex are used as discriminating variables to distinguish between signal and background. Differential cross sections of jet production in charm and beauty events as a function of Q{sup 2}, y, E{sup jet}{sub T} and {eta}{sup jet} are measured. Results are compared to Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) predictions from Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in the fixed flavour number scheme. Good agreement between data and theory is observed. Contributions of the charm and beauty production to the inclusive proton structure function, F{sup cbar} {sup c}{sub 2} and F{sup b} {sup anti} {sup b}{sub 2}, are determined by extrapolating the double differential cross sections using NLO QCD predictions. Contributions to the test beam program for the Insertable B-Layer upgrade project of the ATLAS pixel detector are discussed. The test beam data analysis software package EUTelescope was extended, which allowed an efficient analysis of ATLAS pixel sensors. The USBPix DAQ system was integrated into the EUDET telescope allowing test beam

  1. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harb, Ali, E-mail: ali.harb@desy.de; Mussgiller, Andreas; Hauk, Johannes

    2017-02-11

    The CMS Binary Chip (CBC) is a prototype version of the front-end read-out ASIC to be used in the silicon strip modules of the CMS outer tracking detector during the high luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC is produced in 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of a double layer silicon strip module, the so-called 2S-p{sub T} module. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide on-board trigger information to the first level trigger system of CMS, with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-p{sub T} track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S-p{sub T} module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2 to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  2. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Ali; Mussgiller, Andreas; Hauk, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The CMS Binary Chip (CBC) is a prototype version of the front-end read-out ASIC to be used in the silicon strip modules of the CMS outer tracking detector during the high luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC is produced in 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of a double layer silicon strip module, the so-called 2S-pT module. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide on-board trigger information to the first level trigger system of CMS, with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-pT track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S-pT module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2 to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  3. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083921; Mussgiller, Andreas; Hauk, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The CMS Binary Chip (CBC) is a prototype version of the front-end read-out ASIC to be used in the silicon strip modules of the CMS outer tracking detector during the high luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC is produced in 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of a double layer silicon strip module, the so-called 2S-$p_{T}$ module. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide on-board trigger information to the first level trigger system of CMS, with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-$p_{T}$ track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S-$p_{T}$ module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2~to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  4. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, Thorben

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5 - 1.0 cm2 interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front- end chip (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). In 2017, the setup has been extended with CALICEs AHCAL prototype, a scinitillator based sampling calorimeter, and it was further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end ASIC was used for the first time. We highlight final results from our studies in 2016, including po...

  5. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, Thorben

    2017-01-01

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5 - 1.0 cm$^2$ interspersed with absorbers.Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front-end chip (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). This year, the setup is extended with CALICE's AHCAL prototype and it is further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end chip is used for the first time.We present final results from our studies in 2016, including noise performance, calibration with MIPs, energy and p...

  6. High Intensity Beam Test of Low Z Materials for the Upgrade of SPS-to-LHC Transfer Line Collimators and LHC Injection Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Maciariello, Fausto; Butcher, Mark; Calviani, Marco; Folch, Ramon; Kain, Verena; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Lamas Garcia, Inigo; Lechner, Anton; Nuiry, Francois-Xavier; Steele, Genevieve; Uythoven, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) and High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, the collimators in the SPS-to LHC transfer lines will undergo important modifications. The changes to these collimators will allow them to cope with beam brightness and intensity levels much increased with respect to their original design parameters: nominal and ultimate LHC. The necessity for replacement of the current materials will need to be confirmed by a test in the High Radiation to Materials (HRM) facility at CERN. This test will involve low Z materials (such as Graphite and 3-D Carbon/Carbon composite), and will recreate the worst case scenario those materials could see when directly impacted by High luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) or Batch Compression Merging and Splitting (BCMS) beams. Thermo-structural simulations used for the material studies and research, the experiment preparation phase, the experiment itself, pre irradiation analysis (including ultrasound and metrology tests on the target materials), the resul...

  7. SU-G-TeP4-12: Individual Beam QA for a Robotic Radiosurgery System Using a Scintillator Cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuinness, C; Descovich, M; Sudhyadhom, A [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The targeting accuracy of the Cyberknife system is measured by end-to-end tests delivering multiple isocentric beams to a point in space. While the targeting accuracy of two representative beams can be determined by a Winston-Lutz-type test, no test is available today to determine the targeting accuracy of each clinical beam. We used a scintillator cone to measure the accuracy of each individual beam. Methods: The XRV-124 from Logos Systems Int’l is a scintillator cone with an imaging system that is able to measure individual beam vectors and a resulting error between planned and measured beam coordinates. We measured the targeting accuracy of isocentric and non-isocentric beams for a number of test cases using the Iris and the fixed collimator. The average difference between plan and measured beam position was 0.8–1.2mm across the collimator sizes and plans considered here. The max error for a single beam was 2.5mm for the isocentric plans, and 1.67mm for the non-isocentric plans. The standard deviation of the differences was 0.5mm or less. Conclusion: The CyberKnife System is specified to have an overall targeting accuracy for static targets of less than 0.95mm. In E2E tests using the XRV124 system we measure average beam accuracy between 0.8 to 1.23mm, with maximum of 2.5mm. We plan to investigate correlations between beam position error and robot position, and to quantify the effect of beam position errors on patient specific plans. Martina Descovich has received research support and speaker honoraria from Accuray.

  8. Measurement of coronary calcium scores by electron beam computed tomography or exercise testing as initial diagnostic tool in low-risk patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geluk, Christiane A.; Perik, Patrick J.; Tio, Rene A.; Goette, Marco J.W.; Hillege, Hans L.; Zijlstra, Felix [University Medical Center Groningen, Thoraxcenter, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Dikkers, Riksta; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Houwers, Janneke B.; Willems, Tineke P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    We determined the efficiency of a screening protocol based on coronary calcium scores (CCS) compared with exercise testing in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), a normal ECG and troponin levels. Three-hundred-and-four patients were enrolled in a screening protocol including CCS by electron beam computed tomography (Agatston score), and exercise testing. Decision-making was based on CCS. When CCS{>=}400, coronary angiography (CAG) was recommended. When CCS<10, patients were discharged. Exercise tests were graded as positive, negative or nondiagnostic. The combined endpoint was defined as coronary event or obstructive CAD at CAG. During 12{+-}4 months, CCS{>=}400, 10-399 and <10 were found in 42, 103 and 159 patients and the combined endpoint occurred in 24 (57%), 14 (14%) and 0 patients (0%), respectively. In 22 patients (7%), myocardial perfusion scintigraphy was performed instead of exercise testing due to the inability to perform an exercise test. A positive, nondiagnostic and negative exercise test result was found in 37, 76 and 191 patients, and the combined endpoint occurred in 11 (30%), 15 (20%) and 12 patients (6%), respectively. Receiver-operator characteristics analysis showed that the area under the curve of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.93) for CCS was superior to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.61-0.78) for exercise testing (P<0.0001). In conclusion, measurement of CCS is an appropriate initial screening test in a well-defined low-risk population with suspected CAD. (orig.)

  9. A fast Gaussian beam tracing method for reflection and refraction of general vectorial astigmatic Gaussian beams from general curved surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, A.; Shishegar, A. A.; Safavi-Naeini, S.

    2004-03-01

    A fast Gaussian beam tracing method for general vectorial astigmatic Gaussian beams based on phase matching has been formulated. Given the parameters of a vectorial Gaussian beam in its principal coordinate system the parameters of the reflected and refracted beams from a general curved surface (with general constitutive parameters) are found. The reflection and transmission of such beams from and through passive photonic structures such as lenses, mirrors and prisms can then be found by considering multiple reflections and transmissions.

  10. Test beam measurement of ams H35 HV-CMOS capacitively coupled pixel sensor prototypes with high-resistivity substrate arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, M.; Casanova, R.; Cavallaro, E.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Di Bello, F.A.; Ferrere, D.; Frizzell, D.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Grinstein, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Kiehn, M.; Lanni, F.; Liu, H.; Metcalfe, J.; Meng, L.; Merlassino, C.; Miucci, A.; Muenstermann, D.; Nessi, M.; Okawa, H.; Perić, I.; Rimoldi, M.; Ristić, B.; Sultan, D M S; Terzo, S.; Vicente Barrero Pinto, M.; Vilella Figueras, E.; Weber, M.; Weston, T.; Wu, W.; Xie, J.; Xu, L.; Zaffaroni, E.; Zhang, M.

    In the context of the studies of the ATLAS High Luminosity LHC programme, radiation tolerant pixel detectors in CMOS technologies are investigated. To evaluate the effects of substrate resistivity on CMOS sensor performance, the H35DEMO demonstrator, containing different diode and amplifier designs, was produced in ams H35 HV-CMOS technology using four different substrate resistivities spanning from $\\mathrm{80}$ to $\\mathrm{1000~\\Omega \\cdot cm}$. A glueing process using a high-precision flip-chip machine was developed in order to capacitively couple the sensors to FE-I4 Readout ASIC using a thin layer of epoxy glue with good uniformity over a large surface. The resulting assemblies were measured in beam test at the Fermilab Test Beam Facilities with 120 GeV protons and CERN SPS H8 beamline using 80 GeV pions. The in-time efficiency and tracking properties measured for the different sensor types are shown to be compatible with the ATLAS ITk requirements for its pixel sensors.

  11. Spot-to-Beam Procedure

    CERN Document Server

    Seidov, Zakir F; Yahalom, Asher

    2004-01-01

    We describe the interactive "STB" (spot_to_beam) MATHEMATICA procedure for a) approximating the spot image at the screen as ellipse, b) getting five parameters of the elliptic beam (two diameters, center coordinates, and orientation angle). The basic idea is to "map" the reference holes at screen onto the X-Y plane normal to the beam direction (Z-axis). All distortions of the image, e.g., due to camera-screen disposition can be, in principle, taken into account,assuming that the hole positions at screen and the orientation of the screen are known. With the non-linear LMS fitting, the "curved-coordinate-system" of the holes at image is transferred to the Cartesian coordinate system at XY-plane. Then the fitting ellipse is found in this latter system, by solving the system of N linear equations for 5 unknown parameters of beam ellipse, where N>5 is a number of reference points on edge of spot image. The examples of the real measurements at various screens will be demonstrated. The accuracy of beam diameters is ...

  12. Over-the-air Radiated Testing of Millimeter-Wave Beam-steerable Devices in a Cost-Effective Measurement Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Kyösti, Pekka; Rumney, Moray

    2018-01-01

    With the severe spectrum congestion of sub-6GHz cellular systems, large-scale antenna systems in the millimeter-wave (mmWave) bands can potentially meet the high data rate envisioned for fifth generation (5G) communications. Performance evaluation of antenna systems is an essential step...... in the product design and development stage. However, conventional cable conducted test methods are not applicable for mmWave devices. There is a strong need for over-the-air (OTA) radiated methods, where mmWave device performance can be evaluated in a reliable, repeatable, and feasible way in laboratory...... conditions. In this article, radiated testing methods are reviewed, with a focus on their principle and applicability for beam steerable mmWave devices. To explore the spatial sparsity of mmWave channel profiles, a cost-effective simplified 3D sectored multi-probe anechoic chamber (MPAC) system with an OTA...

  13. TECHNICAL COORDINATION SCHEDULE & INTEGRATION

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Zeuner

    Introduction The endgame of CMS installation in the underground cavern is in full swing, with several major milestones having been passed since the last CMS week. The Tracker was installed inside the Vactank just before the CERN end-of-year shutdown. Shortly after the reopening in 2008, the two remaining endcap disks, YE-2 and YE-1, were lowered, marking the completion of eight years of assembly in the surface building SX5. The remaining tasks, before the detector can be closed for the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla (CRAFT), are the installation of the thermal shields, the cabling of the negative endcap, the cabling of the tracker and the beam pipe installation. In addition to these installation tasks, a test closure of the positive endcap is planned just before the installation of the central beam pipe. The schedule is tight and complicated but the goal to close CMS by the end of May for a cosmic test with magnetic field remains feasible. Safety With all large components now being underground, the shortage...

  14. Notes on the design of experiments and beam diagnostics with synchrotron light detected by a gated photomultiplier for the Fermilab superconducting electron linac and for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio; Romanov, Aleksandr; Ruan, Jinhao; Santucci, James; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Valishev, Alexander