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Sample records for tesla magnetic resonance

  1. 3 Tesla turbo-FLASH magnetic resonance imaging of deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Milan R; Lazarus, Cathy L; Pai, Vinay M; Mulholland, Thomas P; Shepard, Timothy; Branski, Ryan C; Wang, Edwin Y

    2012-04-01

    In this article we describe a methodology for obtaining high-quality dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences of the swallow sequence in healthy volunteers. The study includes comparison to previous work done in our lab using a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnet. Case series. Three healthy volunteers underwent turbo-fast low angle shot MRI at 3T while swallowing liquid boluses delivered via intravenous tubing to the oral cavity. Imaging was performed in the sagittal and axial planes. Imaging provided by this sequence provided high temporal resolution, with the ability to depict deglutition in the axial and sagittal planes. Comparison with imaging at 1.5 T demonstrated benefits in temporal resolution and signal-to-noise. Anatomic information provided differed from comparative videofluoroscopy. MRI of swallowing using the described technique is reliable and provides a unique evaluation of the swallowing sequence. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Intraoperative 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging: our experience in tumors.

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    García-Baizán, A; Tomás-Biosca, A; Bartolomé Leal, P; Domínguez, P D; García de Eulate Ruiz, R; Tejada, S; Zubieta, J L

    2018-01-17

    To report our experience in the use of 3 tesla intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in neurosurgical procedures for tumors, and to evaluate the criteria for increasing the extension of resection. This retrospective study included all consecutive intraoperative MRI studies done for neuro-oncologic disease in the first 13 months after the implementation of the technique. We registered possible immediate complications, the presence of tumor remnants, and whether the results of the intraoperative MRI study changed the surgical management. We recorded the duration of surgery in all cases. The most common tumor was recurrent glioblastoma, followed by primary glioblastoma and metastases. Complete resection was achieved in 28%, and tumor remnants remained in 72%. Intraoperative MRI enabled neurosurgeons to improve the extent of the resection in 85% of cases. The mean duration of surgery was 390±122minutes. Intraoperative MRI using a strong magnetic field (3 teslas) is a valid new technique that enables precise study of the tumor resection to determine whether the resection can be extended without damaging eloquent zones. Although the use of MRI increases the duration of surgery, the time required decreases as the team becomes more familiar with the technique. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative evaluation of tongue carcinoma.

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    Moreno, K F; Cornelius, R S; Lucas, F V; Meinzen-Derr, J; Patil, Y J

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tongue tumour thickness via direct and reconstructed measures, and their correlations with corresponding histological measures, nodal metastasis and extracapsular spread. A prospective study was conducted of 25 patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and pre-operative 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging from 2009 to 2012. Correlations between 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histological measures of tongue tumour thickness were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient: r values were 0.84 (p magnetic resonance imaging, direct measures of tumour thickness (mean ± standard deviation, 18.2 ± 7.3 mm) did not significantly differ from the reconstructed measures (mean ± standard deviation, 17.9 ± 7.2 mm; r = 0.879). Moreover, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging had 83 per cent sensitivity, 82 per cent specificity, 82 per cent accuracy and a 90 per cent negative predictive value for detecting cervical lymph node metastasis. In this cohort, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging measures of tumour thickness correlated highly with the corresponding histological measures. Further, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was an effective method of detecting malignant adenopathy with extracapsular spread.

  4. Functional and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging at 3 tesla

    CERN Document Server

    Klarhoefer, M

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development and optimization of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for non-invasive functional studies of the human brain and perfusion imaging on a 3 Tesla (T) whole body NMR system. The functional MRI (fMRI) experiments performed showed that single-shot multi-echo EPI and spiral imaging techniques provide fast tools to obtain information about T2* distributions during functional activation in the human brain. Both sequences were found to be useful in the separation of different sources contributing to the functional MR signal like inflow or susceptibility effects in the various vascular environments. An fMRI study dealing with the involvement of prefrontal brain regions in movement preparation lead to inconsistent results. It could not be clarified if these were caused by problems during a spatial normalization process of the individual brains or if the functional paradigm, using very short inter-stimulus intervals, was not suited for the problem investigated. Blood flo...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement of brain tumors at 3 tesla versus 1.5 tesla.

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    Nöbauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Barth, Markus; Schöggl, Alexander; Heimberger, Karl; Matula, Christian; Fog, Amura; Kaider, Alexandra; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2002-03-01

    To compare the diagnostic efficacy of a standard dose of MRI contrast agent in the evaluation of primary brain tumors and metastases using a high-field 3 tesla MR unit versus a 1.5 tesla MR unit. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were examined at both field strengths using identical axial T1-SE protocols pre- and postcontrast (0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium), and postcontrast coronal 3D GRE with magnetization preparation (MP-RAGE), which was adjusted separately for each field strength. Evaluation of the images was performed quantitatively and, in the case of T1-SE images, also by visual assessment. Tumor-to-brain-contrast after gadolinium administration using statistical evaluation of MP-RAGE scans was significantly higher at 3 tesla (97.5) than at 1.5 tesla (46.3). The same was true for T1-SE sequences (93.0 vs. 72.1). Signal enhancement of the lesions in T1-SE sequences was not significantly different between both field strengths. Administration of a gadolinium contrast agent produces higher contrast between tumor and normal brain at 3 tesla than at 1.5 tesla.

  6. Dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla

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    Klein C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The assessment of inducible wall motion abnormalities during high-dose dobutamine-stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DCMR is well established for the identification of myocardial ischemia at 1.5 Tesla. Its feasibility at higher field strengths has not been reported. The present study was performed to prospectively determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of DCMR at 3 Tesla for depicting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis (≥ 50% diameter stenosis in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and methods Thirty consecutive patients (6 women (66 ± 9.3 years were scheduled for DCMR between January and May 2007 for detection of coronary artery disease. Patients were examined with a Philips Achieva 3 Tesla system (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands, using a spoiled gradient echo cine sequence. Technical parameters were: spatial resolution 2 × 2 × 8 mm3, 30 heart phases, spoiled gradient echo TR/TE: 4.5/2.6 msec, flip angle 15°. Images were acquired at rest and stress in accordance with a standardized high-dose dobutamine-atropine protocol during short breath-holds in three short and three long-axis views. Dobutamine was administered using a standard protocol (10 μg increments every 3 minutes up to 40 μg dobutamine/kg body weight/minute plus atropine if required to reach target heart rate. The study protocol included administration of 0.1 mmol/kg/body weight Gd-DTPA before the cine images at rest were acquired to improve the image quality. The examination was terminated if new or worsening wall-motion abnormalities or chest pain occurred or when > 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate was reached. Myocardial ischemia was defined as new onset of wall-motion abnormality in at least one segment. In addition, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE was performed. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers. Diagnostic accuracy was determined with coronary

  7. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  8. Design of the superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Dai, Y.; Ni, Z.; Zhu, X.; Li, L.; Zhao, B.; Chen, S.

    2017-02-01

    A superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is designed and fabricated in Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the electromagnetic design methods of the main coils and compensating coils are presented. Sensitivity analysis is performed for all superconducting coils. The design of the superconducting shimming coils is also presented and the design of electromagnetic decoupling of the Z2 coils from the main coils is introduced. Stress and strain analysis with both averaged and detailed models is performed with finite element method. A quench simulation code with anisotropic continuum model and control volume method is developed by us and is verified by experimental study. By means of the quench simulation code, the quench protection system for the 9.4 T magnet is designed for the main coils, the compensating coils and the shimming coils. The magnet cryostat design with zero helium boiling-off technology is also introduced.

  9. Travelling Wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, F; Marrufo, O; Rodriguez, A O

    2013-01-01

    Waveguides have been successfully used to generate magnetic resonance images at 7 T with whole-body systems. The bore limits the magnetic resonance signal transmitted because its specific cut-off frequency is greater than the majority of resonant frequencies. This restriction can be overcome by using a parallel-plate waveguide whose cut-off frequency is zero for the transversal electric modes and it can propagate any frequency. To investigate the potential benefits for whole-body imaging at 3 T, we compare numerical simulations at 1.5 T, 3 T, 7 T, and 9 T via the propagation of the parallel-plate waveguide principal mode filled with a cylindrical phantom and two surface coils. B1 mapping was computed to investigate the feasibility of this approach at 3T. The point spread function method was used to measure the imager performance for the traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Human leg images were acquired to experimentally validate this approach. The principal mode shows very little field magni...

  10. Cervical external immobilization devices: evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues at 3.0 Tesla.

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    Diaz, Francis L; Tweardy, Lisa; Shellock, Frank G

    2010-02-15

    Laboratory investigation, ex vivo. Currently, no studies have addressed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Under certain conditions significant heating may occur, resulting in patient burns. Furthermore, artifacts can be substantial and prevent the diagnostic use of MRI. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to evaluate MRI issues for 4 different cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Excessive heating and substantial artifacts are 2 potential complications associated with performing MRI at 3-Tesla in patients with cervical external immobilization devices. Using ex vivo testing techniques, MRI-related heating and artifacts were evaluated for 4 different cervical devices during MRI at 3-Tesla. Four cervical external immobilization devices (Generation 80, Resolve Ring and Superstructure, Resolve Ring and Jerome Vest/Jerome Superstructure, and the V1 Halo System; Ossur Americas, Aliso Viejo, CA) underwent MRI testing at 3-Tesla. All devices were made from nonmetallic or nonmagnetic materials. Heating was determined using a gelled-saline-filled skull phantom with fluoroptic thermometry probes attached to the skull pins. MRI was performed at 3-Tesla, using a high level of RF energy. Artifacts were assessed at 3-Tesla, using standard cervical imaging techniques. The Generation 80 and V1 Halo devices exhibited substantial temperature rises (11.6 degrees C and 8.5 degrees C, respectively), with "sparking" evident for the Generation 80 during the MRI procedure. Artifacts were problematic for these devices, as well. By comparison, the 2 Resolve Ring-based cervical external immobilization devices showed little or no heating (Tesla.

  11. Improved Depiction of Pterygopalatine Fossa Anatomy Using Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 7 Tesla

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    K. P. Q. Oomen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the anatomy of the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF using ultrahigh-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. A human cadaveric tissue block containing the pterygopalatine fossa was examined on a clinical 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system. Subsequently, cryosections of the tissue block were created in a coronal plane. The cryosections were photographed and collected on adhesive tape. The on-tape sections were stained for Mallory-Cason, in order to detail the anatomic structures within the fossa. Magnetic resonance images were compared with surface photos of the tissue block and on-tape sections. Results. High-resolution magnetic resonance images demonstrated the common macroscopic structures in the PPF. Smaller structures, best viewed at the level of the operation microscope, which have previously been obscured on magnetic resonance imaging, could be depicted. Some of the orbital pterygopalatine ganglion branches and the pharyngeal nerve were clearly viewed. Conclusions. In our experience with one human cadaver specimen, magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla seems effective in depicting pterygopalatine fossa anatomy and provides previously unseen details through its demonstration of the pharyngeal nerve and the orbital pterygopalatine ganglion branches. The true viability of depicting the pterygopalatine fossa with ultrahigh-resolution MR will depend on confirmation of our results in larger studies.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging at 0.2 Tesla.

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    Stroman, P W; Malisza, K L; Onu, M

    2003-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging of healthy human volunteers was carried out at 0.2 T, using proton-density weighted (TE = 24 ms) spin-echo imaging, in order to eliminate any contribution from the blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) effect. The purpose of the study was to verify the existence of a proton-density change contribution to spin-echo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Results demonstrated signal intensity changes in motor and sensory areas of the brain during performance of a motor task and cold sensory stimulation of the hand, with signal changes ranging from 1.7 to 2.3%. These values are consistent with 1.9% signal changes observed previously under similar conditions at 3 T. These findings confirm the proton-density change contribution to spin-echo fMRI data and support the theory of signal enhancement by extravascular water protons (SEEP) as a non-BOLD fMRI contrast mechanism. This study also demonstrates that fMRI based on the SEEP contrast mechanism can be carried out at low fields where the BOLD effect is expected to be negligible.

  13. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

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    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents at 7 Tesla: in vitro T1 relaxivities in human blood plasma.

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    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris M; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Juras, Vladimír; Kraff, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSE/INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the T1 relaxivities (r1) of 8 gadolinium (Gd)-based MR contrast agents in human blood plasma at 7 Tesla, compared with 3 Tesla. Eight commercially available Gd-based MR contrast agents were diluted in human blood plasma to concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/L. In vitro measurements were performed at 37 degrees C, on a 7 Tesla and on a 3 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scanner. For the determination of T1 relaxation times, Inversion Recovery Sequences with inversion times from 0 to 3500 ms were used. The relaxivities were calculated. The r1 relaxivities of all agents, diluted in human blood plasma at body temperature, were lower at 7 Tesla than at 3 Tesla. The values at 3 Tesla were comparable to those published earlier. Notably, in some agents, a minor negative correlation of r1 with a concentration of up to 2 mmol/L could be observed. This was most pronounced in the agents with the highest protein-binding capacity. At 7 Tesla, the in vitro r1 relaxivities of Gd-based contrast agents in human blood plasma are lower than those at 3 Tesla. This work may serve as a basis for the application of Gd-based MR contrast agents at 7 Tesla. Further studies are required to optimize the contrast agent dose in vivo.

  15. Prostate cancer detection by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Nishida, Sachiyo; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Mishima, Takao; Kurokawa, Hiroaki; Sakaida, Noriko; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2011-09-01

    The diagnostic value of 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to assess the features of prostate cancer detectable by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla MRI. From January 2007 through to December 2008, 116 patients who were examined by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla MRI underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Prostate specimens were examined to see whether the largest cancer area was the same as the area indicated on the MRI. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify variables predictive of agreement between MRI and histopathological findings. Sixty-six (56.9%) patients were suspected of having prostate cancer on the basis of MRI findings. In 49 of these patients (74.2%), it was considered that there was agreement between the abnormal area on the MRI and the index tumor. Univariate analysis revealed that there were significant differences in abnormal digital rectal examination, capsular penetration, the diameter of the index tumor of the radical prostatectomy specimen, and the Gleason scores of the biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens. Multivariate analysis revealed that the Gleason score of the radical prostatectomy specimen was associated with the accurate detection of the prostate cancer by MRI (P = 0.0177). In conclusion, 3.0-Tesla MRI tends to accurately diagnose prostate cancer with high tumor burden and aggressiveness. Multimodal examination (T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging) is recommended for the diagnosis of prostate cancer using 3.0-Tesla MRI. © 2011 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Image quality and cancer visibility of T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the prostate at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, E.K.; Lagemaat, M.W.; Barentsz, J.O.; Futterer, J.J.; Zamecnik, P.; Roozen, H.; Orzada, S.; Bitz, A.K.; Maas, M.C.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the image quality of T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and the visibility of prostate cancer at 7 Tesla (T).Seventeen prostate cancer patients underwent T2w imaging at 7T with only an external transmit/receive array coil. Three radiologists independently scored

  17. Can magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0-Tesla reliably detect patients with endometriosis? Initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Maarten G; Steensma, Anneke B; van Santbrink, Evert J; Willemssen, Francois E; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Hunink, Myriam G; Spronk, Sandra; Laven, Joop S; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an optimized 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol is sensitive and specific enough to detect patients with endometriosis. This was a prospective cohort study with consecutive patients. Forty consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of endometriosis underwent 3.0-Tesla MRI, including a T2-weighted high-resolution fast spin echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 ×1.5 mm³) and a 3D T1-weighted high-resolution gradient echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 × 2.0 mm³). Two radiologists reviewed the dataset with consensus reading. During laparoscopy, which was used as reference standard, all lesions were characterized according to the revised criteria of the American Fertility Society. Patient-level and region-level sensitivities and specificities and lesion-level sensitivities were calculated. Patient-level sensitivity was 42% for stage I (5/12) and 100% for stages II, III and IV (25/25). Patient-level specificity for all stages was 100% (3/3). The region-level sensitivity and specificity was 63% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity per lesion was 61% (90% for deep lesions, 48% for superficial lesions and 100% for endometriomata). The detection rate of obliteration of the cul-the-sac was 100% (10/10) with no false positive findings. The interreader agreement was substantial to perfect (kappa=1 per patient, 0.65 per lesion and 0.71 for obliteration of the cul-the-sac). An optimized 3.0-Tesla MRI protocol is accurate in detecting stage II to stage IV endometriosis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Value of 3 Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessing liver fibrosis.

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    Papalavrentios, Lavrentios; Sinakos, Emmanouil; Chourmouzi, Danai; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Drevelegas, Konstantinos; Constantinides, Manos; Drevelegas, Antonios; Talwalkar, Jayant; Akriviadis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the new generation 3 Tesla technology, and especially diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in predicting liver fibrosis. The aim of our pilot study was to assess the clinical performance of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of liver parenchyma for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). 18 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD underwent DWI with 3 Tesla MRI. DWI was performed with single-shot echo-planar technique at b values of 0-500 and 0-1000 s/mm2. ADC was measured in four locations in the liver and the mean ADC value was used for analysis. Staging of fibrosis was performed according to the METAVIR system. The median age of patients was 52 years (range 23-73). The distribution of patients in different fibrosis stages was: 0 (n=1), 1 (n=7), 2 (n=1), 3 (n=5), 4 (n=4). Fibrosis stage was poorly associated with ADC at b value of 0-500 s/mm2 (r= -0.30, P=0.27). However it was significantly associated with ADC at b value of 0-1000 s/mm2 (r= -0.57, P=0.01). For this b value (0-1000 s/mm2) the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.93 for fibrosis stage ≥3 and the optimal ADC cut-off value was 1.16 ×10-3 mm2/s. 3 Tesla DWI can possibly predict the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

  19. Mapping quantal touch using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit intraneural microstimulation.

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    Sanchez Panchuelo, Rosa Maria; Ackerley, Rochelle; Glover, Paul M; Bowtell, Richard W; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T; McGlone, Francis

    2016-05-07

    Using ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we map the cortical and perceptual responses elicited by intraneural microstimulation (INMS) of single mechanoreceptive afferent units in the median nerve, in humans. Activations are compared to those produced by applying vibrotactile stimulation to the unit's receptive field, and unit-type perceptual reports are analyzed. We show that INMS and vibrotactile stimulation engage overlapping areas within the topographically appropriate digit representation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Additional brain regions in bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in contralateral prefrontal cortex are also shown to be activated in response to INMS. The combination of INMS and 7T fMRI opens up an unprecedented opportunity to bridge the gap between first-order mechanoreceptive afferent input codes and their spatial, dynamic and perceptual representations in human cortex.

  20. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. METHODS: Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. CONCLUSION: 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. PMID:24003354

  1. 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging to detect cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Yao

    Full Text Available Neocortical lesions (NLs are an important pathological component of multiple sclerosis (MS, but their visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI remains challenging.We aimed at assessing the sensitivity of multi echo gradient echo (ME-GRE T2*-weighted MRI at 7.0 Tesla in depicting NLs compared to myelin and iron staining.Samples from two MS patients were imaged post mortem using a whole body 7 T MRI scanner with a 24-channel receive-only array. Isotropic 200 micron resolution images with varying T2* weighting were reconstructed from the ME-GRE data and converted into R2* maps. Immunohistochemical staining for myelin (proteolipid protein, PLP and diaminobenzidine-enhanced Turnbull blue staining for iron were performed.Prospective and retrospective sensitivities of MRI for the detection of NLs were 48% and 67% respectively. We observed MRI maps detecting only a small portion of 20 subpial NLs extending over large cortical areas on PLP stainings. No MRI signal changes suggestive of iron accumulation in NLs were observed. Conversely, R2* maps indicated iron loss in NLs, which was confirmed by histological quantification.High-resolution post mortem imaging using R2* and magnitude maps permits detection of focal NLs. However, disclosing extensive subpial demyelination with MRI remains challenging.

  2. Veins in plaques of multiple sclerosis patients - a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study at 7 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal-Bianco, Assunta; Auff, Eduard; Leutmezer, Fritz; Vass, Karl [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurology, Wien (Austria); Hametner, Simon [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Brain Research, Wien (Austria); Grabner, Guenther; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Wien (Austria); Reitner, Andreas; Vass, Clemens; Kircher, Karl [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Ophthalmology, Wien (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To monitor the venous volumes in plaques of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to an age-matched control group over a period of 3.5 years. Ten MS patients underwent an annual neurological examination and MRI. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) combined with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) or FLAIR-like contrast at 7 Tesla (7 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for manual segmentation of veins in plaques, in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and in location-matched white matter of 9 age-matched controls. Venous volume to tissue volume ratio was assessed for each time point in order to describe the dynamics of venous volumes in MS plaques over time. MS plaques, which were newly detected during the study period, showed significantly higher venous volumes compared to the preplaque area 1 year before plaque detection and the corresponding NAWM regions. Venous volumes in established MS plaques, which were present already in the first scans, were significantly higher compared to the NAWM and controls. Our data underpin a relation of veins and plaque development in MS and reflect increased apparent venous calibers due to increased venous diameters or increased oxygen consumption in early MS plaques. (orig.)

  3. Horizontal nystagmus and multiple sclerosis using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Iyer, P M; Fagan, A J; Meaney, J F; Colgan, N C; Meredith, S D; Driscoll, D O; Curran, K M; Bradley, D; Redmond, J

    2016-11-01

    Nystagmus in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is generally attributed to brainstem disease. Lesions in other regions may result in nystagmus. The identification of these other sites is enhanced by using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3TMRI) due to increased signal-to-noise ratio. We sought to evaluate the distribution of structural lesions and disruption of tracts in patients with horizontal nystagmus secondary to MS using 3TMRI. Twenty-four patients (20 women, 4 men; age range 26-55 years) with horizontal nystagmus secondary to MS underwent 3TMRI brain scans; and 18 patients had diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for tractography. Nystagmus was bidirectional in 11, right-sided in 6 and left-sided in 7. We identified 194 lesions in 20 regions within the neural integrator circuit in 24 patients; 140 were within the cortex and 54 were within the brainstem. Only two patients had no lesions in the cortex, and 9 had no lesions in the brainstem. There was no relationship between side of lesion and direction of nystagmus. Thirteen of 18 (72 %) had tract disruption with fractional anisotropy (FA) values below 0.2. FA was significantly lower in bidirectional compared to unidirectional nystagmus (p = 0.006). In MS patients with horizontal nystagmus, lesions in all cortical eye fields and their descending connections were evident. Technical improvements in tractography may help identify the specific site(s) resulting in nystagmus in MS.

  4. 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Cortical Pathology in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelderen, Peter; Merkle, Hellmuth; Chen, Christina; Lassmann, Hans; Duyn, Jeff H.; Bagnato, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Background Neocortical lesions (NLs) are an important pathological component of multiple sclerosis (MS), but their visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains challenging. Objectives We aimed at assessing the sensitivity of multi echo gradient echo (ME-GRE) T2*-weighted MRI at 7.0 Tesla in depicting NLs compared to myelin and iron staining. Methods Samples from two MS patients were imaged post mortem using a whole body 7T MRI scanner with a 24-channel receive-only array. Isotropic 200 micron resolution images with varying T2* weighting were reconstructed from the ME-GRE data and converted into R2* maps. Immunohistochemical staining for myelin (proteolipid protein, PLP) and diaminobenzidine-enhanced Turnbull blue staining for iron were performed. Results Prospective and retrospective sensitivities of MRI for the detection of NLs were 48% and 67% respectively. We observed MRI maps detecting only a small portion of 20 subpial NLs extending over large cortical areas on PLP stainings. No MRI signal changes suggestive of iron accumulation in NLs were observed. Conversely, R2* maps indicated iron loss in NLs, which was confirmed by histological quantification. Conclusions High-resolution post mortem imaging using R2* and magnitude maps permits detection of focal NLs. However, disclosing extensive subpial demyelination with MRI remains challenging. PMID:25303286

  5. Pre-surgical Multiparametric Assessment of Breast Lesions Using 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirka, Hynek; Tupy, Radek; Narsanska, Andrea; Hes, Ondrej; Ferda, Jiri

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate experience with multiparametric breast imaging on 3-Tesla magnetic resonance (3T-MRI) scanner using a dedicated 18-channel coil compared to histological findings in women after surgery. The study included 100 women with 105 Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 to 6 lesions by mammography who were examined using 3T-MRI and subsequently underwent surgery. MRI included non-contrast T1, T2 and T2 short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, diffusion-weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coeficient maps, postcontrast dynamic study and single-voxel MRI spectroscopy. The results were compared to those of histopathological examination. A sensitivity of 98.68% was found for the whole population, with a specificity of 86.20%. The most valuable findings were diffusion restriction with sensitivity of 90.79% and specificity of 89.66%, and increased choline in the spectrum with sensitivity of 68.42% and specificity of 93.10%. Evaluation of the enhancement curve had sensitivity of 45.05% and specificity of 72.41%. In examination of lymph nodes, 3T-MRI had sensitivity of 92.59% and specificity of 93.87%. Multiparametric 3T-MRI breast imaging shows excellent results in evaluation of breast cancer compared to histological findings, both for primary tumor and nodal metastases. The greatest contribution to improving diagnostic performance is the evaluation of diffusion. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel at 7 Tesla in comparison to 1.5 Tesla: First steps towards clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnemann, Maria L; Kraff, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan; Johst, Soeren; Orzada, Stephan; Umutlu, Lale; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2016-06-01

    To perform non-enhanced (NE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the small bowel at 7 Tesla (7T) and to compare it with 1.5 Tesla (1.5T). Twelve healthy subjects were prospectively examined using a 1.5T and 7T MRI system. Coronal and axial true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP) imaging and a coronal T2-weighted (T2w) half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence were acquired. Image analysis was performed by 1) visual evaluation of tissue contrast and detail detectability, 2) measurement and calculation of contrast ratios and 3) assessment of artifacts. NE MRI of the small bowel at 7T was technically feasible. In the vast majority of the cases, tissue contrast and image details were equivalent at both field strengths. At 7T, two cases revealed better detail detectability in the TrueFISP, and better contrast in the HASTE. Susceptibility artifacts and B1 inhomogeneities were significantly increased at 7T. This study provides first insights into NE ultra-high field MRI of the small bowel and may be considered an important step towards high quality T2w abdominal imaging at 7T MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging in children and adults with congenital heart disease; 3-Tesla-Magnetresonanztomographie zur Untersuchung von Kindern und Erwachsenen mit angeborenen Herzfehlern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voges, I.; Hart, C.; Kramer, H.H.; Rickers, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler und Kinderkardiologie, Kiel (Germany); Jerosch-Herold, M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (United States); Helle, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has become a routinely used imaging modality for congenital heart disease. A CMR examination allows the assessment of thoracic anatomy, global and regional cardiac function, blood flow in the great vessels and myocardial viability and perfusion. In the clinical routine cardiovascular MRI is mostly performed at field strengths of 1.5 Tesla (T). Recently, magnetic resonance systems operating at a field strengths of 3 T became clinically available and can also be used for cardiovascular MRI. The main advantage of CMR at 3 T is the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio resulting in improved image quality and/or allowing higher acquisition speed. Several further differences compared to MRI systems with lower field strengths have to be considered for practical applications. This article describes the impact of CMR at 3 T in patients with congenital heart disease by meanings of methodical considerations and case studies. (orig.) [German] Die kardiovaskulaere Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) hat sich zu einer etablierten bildgebenden Methode zur Untersuchung von Patienten mit angeborenen Herzfehlern entwickelt. Sie erlaubt in einer einzigen Untersuchung die exakte Beurteilung von Anatomie, globaler und regionaler Funktion, Blutfluessen sowie der myokardialen Perfusion und Vitalitaet. In der klinischen Routine erfolgen die Untersuchungen zumeist bei einer Feldstaerke von 1,5 Tesla (T), mittlerweile gibt es jedoch Geraete und Bildgebungstechniken, die die kardiovaskulaere MRT auch bei 3 T ermoeglichen. Der wesentliche Vorteil der MRT bei 3 T ist das hoehere Signal-zu-Rausch-Verhaeltnis, das sowohl zu einer Verbesserung der Bildqualitaet als auch zu einer Verkuerzung der Untersuchungszeit genutzt werden kann. Darueber hinaus bestehen verschiedene andere Unterschiede gegenueber Systemen mit niedriger Feldstaerke, die im praktischen Einsatz beachtet werden muessen. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die Erfahrungen der 3-T-MRT fuer die

  8. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-07-28

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength.

  9. Nonenhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the lower extremity vessels at 7 tesla: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anja; Maderwald, Stefan; Orzada, Stephan; Johst, Sören; Schäfer, Lena C; Ladd, Mark E; Nassenstein, Kai; Umutlu, Lale; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of nonenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the lower extremities at 7 tesla (T). Eight healthy volunteers were examined on a 7-T whole-body magnetic resonance system. For image acquisition, a custom-built 16-channel transmit/receive coil and a manually positionable AngioSURF table for multistation imaging were used. A nonenhanced T1-weighted 2-dimensional fast low-angle shot (2D FLASH) sequence was acquired with and without venous saturation radiofrequency pulses in axial orientation, covering the vasculature from the pelvis to the feet. Acquisition time of 1 table position amounted to 2 minutes and 19 seconds (with venous saturation pulse) and 1 minute and 9 seconds (without venous saturation pulse), covering a field of view of approximately 10 cm in the z-axis. Time-interleaved acquisition of modes was integrated to obtain homogeneous image quality of the vasculature. A qualitative image analysis was performed in the iliac, femoral, popliteal, and tibiofibular vessel segments regarding vessel delineation using a 5-point scale (5 to 1, excellent vessel delineation to nondiagnostic). For the quantitative image evaluation, the signal was measured in the specified segments and in the surrounding musculature of both legs to obtain contrast ratios (CR). T1-weighted 2D FLASH imaging enabled homogeneous, hyperintense delineation of the arteries with saturation of surrounding tissue in almost all analyzed vessel segments. The qualitative image evaluation demonstrated a moderate to good delineation and assessment of the vessel lumen (mean score: iliac, 3.17; femoral, 3.71; popliteal, 4.00; and tibiofibular, 3.31 for 2D FLASH). The quantitative analysis showed similar CRs in all vessel segments, with the best contrast to surrounding tissue achieved in the femoral segments (CRiliac, 0.59; CRfemoral, 0.69; CRpopliteal, 0.74; and CRtibiofibular, 0.57), although a medial signal drop-off in the thigh region

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant - a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  12. Comparison of Pelvic Phased-Array versus Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla for Local Staging of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Materials and Methods Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radi...

  13. 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with nipple discharge when mammography and ultrasound fail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubina, Nora; Schedelbeck, Ulla; Weng, Andreas Max; Hahn, Dietbert; Bley, Thorsten Alexander [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Roth, Anne [Centre of Radiology Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Geissinger, Eva [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hoenig, Arnd [Catholic Clinical Centre Mainz, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To compare 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with galactography for detection of benign and malignant causes of nipple discharge in patients with negative mammography and ultrasound. We prospectively evaluated 56 breasts of 50 consecutive patients with nipple discharge who had inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound, using 3.0 Tesla breast MRI with a dedicated 16-channel breast coil, and then compared the results with galactography. Histopathological diagnoses and follow-ups were used as reference standard. Lesion size estimated on MRI was compared with the size at histopathology. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI vs. galactography for detecting pathologic findings were 95.7 % vs. 85.7 % and 69.7 % vs. 33.3 %, respectively. For the supposed concrete pathology based on MRI findings, the specificity was 67.6 % and the sensitivity 77.3 % (PPV 60.7 %, NPV 82.1 %). Eight malignant lesions were detected (14.8 %). The estimated size at breast MRI showed excellent correlation with the size at histopathology (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.95, p < 0.0001). MRI of the breast at 3.0 Tesla is an accurate imaging test and can replace galactography in the workup of nipple discharge in patients with inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound. (orig.)

  14. Surgical Accuracy of 3-Tesla Versus 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laar, Peter Jan; Oterdoom, D L Marinus; Ter Horst, Gert J; van Hulzen, Arjen L J; de Graaf, Eva K L; Hoogduin, Hans; Meiners, Linda C; van Dijk, J Marc C

    2016-09-01

    In deep brain stimulation (DBS), accurate placement of the lead is critical. Target definition is highly dependent on visual recognition on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We prospectively investigated whether the 7-T MRI enabled better visualization of targets and led to better placement of leads compared with the 1.5-T and the 3-T MRI. Three patients with PD (mean, 55 years) were scanned on 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T MRI before surgery. Tissue contrast and signal-to-noise ratio were measured. Target coordinates were noted on MRI and during surgery. Differences were analyzed with post-hoc analysis of variance. The 7-T MRI demonstrated a significant improvement in tissue visualization (P < 0.005) and signal-to-noise ratio (P < 0.005). However, no difference in the target coordinates was found between the 7-T and the 3-T MRI. Although the 7-T MRI enables a significant better visualization of the DBS target in patients with PD, we found no clinical benefit for the placement of the DBS leads. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after implantation of a titanium cervical disc prosthesis: a comparison of 1.5 and 3 Tesla magnet strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundseth, Jarle; Jacobsen, Eva A; Kolstad, Frode; Nygaard, Oystein P; Zwart, John A; Hol, Per K

    2013-10-01

    Cervical disc prostheses induce significant amount of artifact in magnetic resonance imaging which may complicate radiologic follow-up after surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate as to what extent the artifact, induced by the frequently used Discover(®) cervical disc prosthesis, impedes interpretation of the MR images at operated and adjacent levels in 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR. Ten subsequent patients were investigated in both 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR with standard image sequences one year following anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the images by consensus. Emphasis was made on signal changes in medulla at all levels and visualization of root canals at operated and adjacent levels. A "blur artifact ratio" was calculated and defined as the height of the artifact on T1 sagittal images related to the operated level. The artifacts induced in 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR were of entirely different character and evaluation of the spinal cord at operated level was impossible in both magnets. Artifacts also made the root canals difficult to assess at operated level and more pronounced in the 3 Tesla MR. At the adjacent levels however, the spinal cord and root canals were completely visualized in all patients. The "blur artifact" induced at operated level was also more pronounced in the 3 Tesla MR. The artifact induced by the Discover(®) titanium disc prosthesis in both 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR, makes interpretation of the spinal cord impossible and visualization of the root canals difficult at operated level. Adjusting the MR sequences to produce the least amount of artifact is important.

  16. Usefulness of 3-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of aortic stenosis severity in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Iacuzio, Laura; Civaia, Filippo; Rusek, Stephane; Dommerc, Carine; Hugues, Nicolas; Alexandrescu, Clara; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Recently, 1.5-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was reported to provide a reliable alternative to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for the quantification of aortic stenosis (AS) severity. Few data are available using higher magnetic field strength MRI systems in this context. To evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of the assessment of aortic valve area (AVA) using 3-Tesla CMR in routine clinical practice, and to assess concordance between TTE and CMR for the estimation of AS severity. Ninety-one consecutive patients (60 men; mean age 74±10years) with known AS documented by TTE were included prospectively in the study. All patients underwent comprehensive TTE and CMR examination, including AVA estimation using the TTE continuity equation (0.81±0.18cm2), direct CMR planimetry (CMRp) (0.90±0.22cm2) and CMR using Hakki's formula (CMRhk), a simplified Gorlin formula (0.70±0.19cm2). Although significant agreement with TTE was found for CMRp (r=0.72) and CMRhk (r=0.66), CMRp slightly overestimated (bias=0.11±0.18cm2) and CMRhk slightly underestimated (bias=-0.11±0.17cm2) AVA compared with TTE. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities of CMR measurements were excellent (r=0.72 and r=0.74 for CMRp and r=0.88 and r=0.92 for peak aortic velocity, respectively). 3-Tesla CMR is a feasible, radiation-free, reproducible imaging modality for the estimation of severity of AS in routine practice, knowing that CMRp tends to overestimate AVA and CMRhk to underestimate AVA compared with TTE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  18. [Options for the reduction of magnetic susceptibility artifacts caused by implanted microchips in 0.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesnack, S; Oechtering, G; Ludewig, E

    2015-01-01

    Microchips contain ferromagnetic materials, which lead to severe focal image interferences when performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Very small animals are particularly prone to these susceptibility artifacts, which may hinder analysis of the neck-region MRI image. We investigated the impact of sequence type on the artifact's size and determined the optimal imaging parameters to minimize these artifacts. Furthermore, the minimum distance between the microchip and the spinal canal required to assess the spinal structures should be determined. Investigations were performed on the cadavers of 26 cats and two dogs using a low-field MRI System (field strength 0.5 Tesla). To quantify susceptibility artifacts, several sequence types (spin echo, turbo-spin echo (TSE), gradient echo) and imaging parameters (echo time (TE), voxel volume, frequency direction) were systematically varied. Additionally, computed tomography imaging was performed to determine the distance between the microchip and the spinal canal. The size of the artifact was smallest with T1-weighted TSE sequences. A short TE (10 ms) and a small voxel size (acquisition matrix 256 x 256 pixels, field of view 160 mm, slice thickness 2 mm) significantly reduced artifact size. Furthermore, it could be shown that by changing the frequency- and phase-encoding direction, the shape and orientation of the maximum dimension of the artifact could be influenced. Even when using an optimized T1-weighted TSE sequence, it was impossible to evaluate the spinal cord when the distance between the microchip and the center of the spinal canal was dogs and cats, microchips can cause severe susceptibility artifacts. Because of the small distance between the microchip and the spinal structures, spinal evaluation may be limited or impossible. The investigations demonstrated that the adjustment of sequence parameters helps to significantly minimize artifact size and shape. The greatest reduction in artifact size was achieved by

  19. Initial results of 3-dimensional 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the localization of prostate cancer at 3 Tesla: should we use an endorectal coil?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakar, D.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Huisman, H.J.; Barentsz, J.O.; Futterer, J.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of 3 Tesla, 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) with and without the use of an endorectal coil (ERC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our prospective study

  20. Loop radiofrequency coils for clinical magnetic resonance imaging at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraff, Oliver; Kraff, O.

    2011-01-01

    To date, the 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner remains a pure research system and there is still a long way ahead till full clinical integration. Key challenges are the absence of a body transmit radiofrequency (RF) coil as well as of dedicated RF coils in general, short RF wavelengths of

  1. 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with nipple discharge when mammography and ultrasound fail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubina, Nóra; Schedelbeck, Ulla; Roth, Anne; Weng, Andreas Max; Geissinger, Eva; Hönig, Arnd; Hahn, Dietbert; Bley, Thorsten Alexander

    2015-05-01

    To compare 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with galactography for detection of benign and malignant causes of nipple discharge in patients with negative mammography and ultrasound. We prospectively evaluated 56 breasts of 50 consecutive patients with nipple discharge who had inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound, using 3.0 Tesla breast MRI with a dedicated 16-channel breast coil, and then compared the results with galactography. Histopathological diagnoses and follow-ups were used as reference standard. Lesion size estimated on MRI was compared with the size at histopathology. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI vs. galactography for detecting pathologic findings were 95.7 % vs. 85.7 % and 69.7 % vs. 33.3 %, respectively. For the supposed concrete pathology based on MRI findings, the specificity was 67.6 % and the sensitivity 77.3 % (PPV 60.7 %, NPV 82.1 %). Eight malignant lesions were detected (14.8 %). The estimated size at breast MRI showed excellent correlation with the size at histopathology (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.95, p ultrasound. • Breast MRI is an excellent diagnostic tool for patients with nipple discharge. • MRI of the breast reveals malignant lesions despite inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound. • MRI of the breast has greater sensitivity and specificity than galactography. • Excellent correlation of lesion size measured at MRI and histopathology was found.

  2. Ability of preoperative 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging to predict the absence of side-specific extracapsular extension of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tomohiko; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Tohru; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Kawahara, Takashi; Manabe, Tomoko; Miyake, Mototaka; Arai, Eri; Kanai, Yae; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have shown an improvement in prostate cancer diagnosis with the use of 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. We retrospectively assessed the ability of this imaging technique to predict side-specific extracapsular extension of prostate cancer. From October 2007 to August 2011, prostatectomy was carried out in 396 patients after preoperative 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Among these, 132 (primary sample) and 134 patients (validation sample) underwent 12-core prostate biopsy at the National Cancer Center Hospital of Tokyo, Japan, and at other institutions, respectively. In the primary dataset, univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to predict side-specific extracapsular extension using variables determined preoperatively, including 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging findings (T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging). A prediction model was then constructed and applied to the validation study sample. Multivariate analysis identified four significant independent predictors (P Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings, ≥2 positive biopsy cores on each side and a maximum percentage of positive cores ≥31% on each side. The negative predictive value was 93.9% in the combination model with these four predictors, meanwhile the positive predictive value was 33.8%. Good reproducibility of these four significant predictors and the combination model was observed in the validation study sample. The side-specific extracapsular extension prediction by the biopsy Gleason score and factors associated with tumor location, including a positive 3.0-Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging finding, have a high negative predictive value, but a low positive predictive value. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. Role of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance hysterosalpingography in the diagnostic work-up of female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Valentina; Guerrieri, Daniele; Pietrangeli, Daniela; Santucci, Domiziana; Argirò, Renato; de Felice, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Imaging evaluation plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of female infertility. In recent years, the possibility to evaluate tubal patency using 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance (1.5T MR) has been studied. To assess the feasibility of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (3.0T MR) hysterosalpingography and its role in the diagnostic work-up of female infertility and to evaluate if this fast "one-stop-shop" imaging approach should be proposed as a first-line examination. A total of 116 infertile women were enrolled in this prospective study; all underwent 3.0T MR hysterosalpingography. After standard imaging of the pelvis, tubal patency was assessed by acquiring 3D dynamic time-resolved T1-weighted (T1W) sequences during manual injection of 4-5 mL of contrast solution consisting of gadolinium and normal sterile saline. Images were evaluated by two radiologists with different experience in MR imaging (MRI). The examination was successfully completed in 96.5% of cases, failure rate was 3.5%. Dynamic sequences showed bilateral tubal patency in 64.3%, unilateral tubal patency in 25.9%, and bilateral tubal occlusion in 9.8%. Extratubal abnormalities were found in 69.9% of patients. Comprehensive analysis of morphological and dynamic sequences showed extratubal abnormalities in 43.1% of patients with bilateral tubal patency. 3.0T MR hysterosalpingography is a feasible, simple, fast, safe, and well-tolerated examination, which allows evaluation of tubal patency and other pelvic causes of female infertility in a single session, and it may thus represent a "one-stop-shop" solution in female infertility diagnostic work-up. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  4. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid Parametric Mapping of the Longitudinal Relaxation Time T1 Using Two-Dimensional Variable Flip Angle Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Matthias A.; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. Methods T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Results Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of

  6. Rapid parametric mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 using two-dimensional variable flip angle magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias A Dieringer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1 weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+ uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. METHODS: T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. RESULTS: Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2 mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance

  7. Rapid parametric mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 using two-dimensional variable flip angle magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Matthias A; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of parametric MR based lesion detection and

  8. Multicontrast-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic plaques at 3.0 and 1.5 Tesla: ex-vivo comparison with histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koops, Andreas; Ittrich, Harald; Priest, Andrew; Stork, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Weber, Christoph [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Petri, Susan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Pathology, Hamburg (Germany); Lockemann, Ute [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Forensic Medicine, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    The purpose was to analyze magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging at 3.0 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla in correlation with histopathology. MR imaging (MRI) of the abdominal aorta and femoral artery was performed on seven corpses using T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and PD-weighted sequences at 3.0 and 1.5 Tesla. Cross-sectional images at the branching of the inferior mesenteric artery and the profunda femoris were rated with respect to image quality. Corresponding cross sections of the imaged vessels were obtained at autopsy. The atherosclerotic plaques in the histological slides and MR images were classified according to the American Heart Association (AHA) and analyzed for differences. MRI at 3.0 Tesla offered superior depiction of arterial wall composition in all contrast weightings, rated best for T2-weighted images. Comparing for field strength, the highest differences were observed in T1-weighted and T2-weighted techniques (both P{<=}0.001), with still significant differences in PD-weighted sequence (P{<=}0.005). The majority of plaques were histologically classified as calcified plaques. In up to 21% of the cases, MRI at both field strengths detected signal loss characteristic of calcification although calcified plaque was absent in histology. MRI at 3.0 Tesla offers superior plaque imaging quality compared with 1.5 Tesla, but further work is necessary to determine whether this translates in superior diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging monitoring of peripheral nerve regeneration following neurotmesis at 4.7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Björn; Schnabel, Reinhild; Mirastschijski, Ursula; Ibrahim, Bchar; Angenstein, Frank; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    The preoperative diagnostic imaging of peripheral nerve lesions and the postoperative monitoring of microsurgically coapted nerves remain unsolved problems. The aim of this study was to investigate peripheral nerve regeneration after complete neurotmesis with magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Study groups included 70 rats. Their right sciatic nerve was either cut and left untreated or epineurially coapted. After postoperative days 3, 6, 10, and 14 and then weekly until postoperative day 84, these rats underwent scanning at 4.7 T. T2 signal intensities of the nerves were analyzed. In parallel, on postoperative days 3, 6, 10, 14, 21, 28, 42, 63, or 84, rats were killed for histologic processing. These findings were related to the corresponding images. After an initial T2 signal increase of the nerves in both groups, the coapted group demonstrated a major T2 signal decrease in the distal part of the nerve after postoperative day 21, whereas in the unrepaired group a signal decrease was not observed until postoperative day 42. Differences between the two groups were significant at postoperative days 3, 6, and 28 and thereafter. The signal decrease in the coapted nerves could be correlated to the ingrowth of regenerating axons observed by histology. Moreover, the continuity of coapted nerves or an explicit gap in the unrepaired group was detectable at every time point. This study presents novel magnetic resonance imaging data regarding regeneration after neurotmesis. High-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to diagnose a discontinuity within a nerve of interest and monitor its regeneration after coaptation.

  10. Cranial fixation plates in cerebral magnetic resonance imaging: a 3 and 7 Tesla in vivo image quality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bixia; Schoemberg, Tobias; Kraff, Oliver; Dammann, Philipp; Bitz, Andreas K; Schlamann, Marc; Quick, Harald H; Ladd, Mark E; Sure, Ulrich; Wrede, Karsten H

    2016-06-01

    This study assesses and quantifies impairment of postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7 Tesla (T) after implantation of titanium cranial fixation plates (CFPs) for neurosurgical bone flap fixation. The study group comprised five patients who were intra-individually examined with 3 and 7 T MRI preoperatively and postoperatively (within 72 h/3 months) after implantation of CFPs. Acquired sequences included T1-weighted magnetization-prepared rapid-acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE), T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) imaging, and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Two experienced neurosurgeons and a neuroradiologist rated image quality and the presence of artifacts in consensus reading. Minor artifacts occurred around the CFPs in MPRAGE and T2 TSE at both field strengths, with no significant differences between 3 and 7 T. In SWI, artifacts were accentuated in the early postoperative scans at both field strengths due to intracranial air and hemorrhagic remnants. After resorption, the brain tissue directly adjacent to skull bone could still be assessed. Image quality after 3 months was equal to the preoperative examinations at 3 and 7 T. Image quality after CFP implantation was not significantly impaired in 7 T MRI, and artifacts were comparable to those in 3 T MRI.

  11. Amide Proton Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Alzheimer′s Disease at 3.0 Tesla: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amide proton transfer (APT imaging has recently emerged as an important contrast mechanism for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the field of molecular and cellular imaging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of APT imaging to detect cerebral abnormality in patients with Alzheimer′s disease (AD at 3.0 Tesla. Methods: Twenty AD patients (9 men and 11 women; age range, 67-83 years and 20 age-matched normal controls (11 men and 9 women; age range, 63-82 years underwent APT and traditional MRI examination on a 3.0 Tesla MRI system. The magnetic resonance ratio asymmetry (MTR asym values at 3.5 ppm of bilateral hippocampi (Hc, temporal white matter regions, occipital white matter regions, and cerebral peduncles were measured on oblique axial APT images. MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of the cerebral structures between AD patients and control subjects were compared with independent samples t-test. Controlling for age, partial correlation analysis was used to investigate the associations between mini-mental state examination (MMSE and the various MRI measures among AD patients. Results: Compared with normal controls, MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of bilateral Hc were significantly increased in AD patients (right 1.24% ± 0.21% vs. 0.83% ± 0.19%, left 1.18% ± 0.18% vs. 0.80%± 0.17%, t = 3.039, 3.328, P = 0.004, 0.002, respectively. MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of bilateral Hc were significantly negatively correlated with MMSE (right r = −0.559, P = 0.013; left r = −0.461, P = 0.047. Conclusions: Increased MTR asym (3.5 ppm values of bilateral Hc in AD patients and its strong correlations with MMSE suggest that APT imaging could potentially provide imaging biomarkers for the noninvasive molecular diagnosis of AD.

  12. Brain of rats intoxicated with acrylamide: observation with 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Matsumura, H; Igisu, H; Yokota, A

    2000-10-01

    When rats were injected intraperitoneally with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day) for 8 days, all animals developed ataxia and weakness in the hindlimbs. On examining their brain with an ultrahigh-field (4.7 T) magnetic resonance (MR) spectrometer, the lateral ventricles on both sides and the third ventricle were dilated. The aqueduct and cisterns were also enlarged. The size of the cerebral cortex was quantified in three MR image slices covering the cerebrum. Compared with the images of the brain of body weight-matched controls, the cerebral cortex of rats intoxicated with acrylamide was found to be smaller in the primary motor area in all slices, and in the primary or secondary sensory area in two slices. Taken together with previous enzymatic analyses, rats intoxicated with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day for 8 days) seem to represent an animal model of acrylamide encephalopathy not only biochemically but also structurally.

  13. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography at 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenchel, Michael; Seeger, Achim; Kramer, Ulrich; Miller, Stephan [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Nael, Kambiz; Saleh, Roya [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The quality of magnetic resonance (MR) angiography could be substantially improved over the past several years based on the introduction and application of parallel imaging, new sequence techniques, such as, e.g., centric k-space trajectories, dedicated contrast agents, and clinical high-field scanners. All of these techniques have played an important role to improve image resolution or decrease acquisition time for the dedicated examination of a single vascular territory. However, whole-body MR angiography may be the application with the potential to profit most from these technical advances. The present review article describes the technical innovations with a focus on parallel imaging at high field strength and the impact on whole-body MR angiography. The clinical value of advanced whole-body MR angiography techniques is illustrated by characteristic cases. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of rodent spinal cord with an improved performance coil at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of animal models provide reliable means to study human diseases. The image acquisition particularly determined by the radio frequency coil to detect the signal emanated from a particular region of interest. A scaled-down version of the slotted surface coil was built based on the previous results of a magnetron-type surface coil for human applications. Our coil prototype had a 2 cm total diameter and six circular slots and was developed for murine spinal cord at 7 T. Electromagnetic simulations of the slotted and circular coils were also performed to compute the spatially dependent magnetic and electric fields using a simulated saline-solution sphere. The quality factor of both coils was experimentally measured giving a lower noise figure and a higher quality factor for the slotted coil outperforming the circular coil. Images of the spinal cord of a rat were acquired using standard pulse sequences. The slotted surface coil can be a good tool for spinal cord rat imaging using conventional pulse sequences at 7 T.

  15. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza [Post-graduation Program in Abdominal Imaging, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nasser, Felipe [Intervention Radiology Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo [Gynecology and Obstetrics Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Imaging Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings.

  16. Intraindividual comparison between gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadobutrol for magnetic resonance perfusion in normal brain and intracranial tumors at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesel, Frederik L; Mehndiratta, Amit; Risse, Frank; Rius, Maria; Zechmann, Christian M; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Gerigk, Lars; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Politi, Maria; Essig, Marco; Griffiths, Paul D; Wilkinson, Iain D

    2009-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that the 3-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance (MR) characteristics of high- and standard-molar gadolinium-based contrast agents differ. Such differences may indicate that high-molar (1.0 M) agents offer advantages for perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) at 3T, as has been previously reported at 1.5 T. To investigate possible intraindividual differences of high- versus low-molar contrast agents on PWI at 3T in patients with intracranial space-occupying lesions. Six patients with intraaxial and five patients with extraaxial tumors underwent two MR examinations at 3T, separated by at least 48 hours. On each occasion, an exogenous contrast-based, T2*-weighted, gradient-recalled echo-planar imaging (EPI) technique was used to determine the intracranial perfusion characteristics using one of two intravenous contrast agents: either 5 ml of 1.0 M gadobutrol or 10 ml of 0.5 M gadopentetate dimeglumine. The primary PWI outcome measure was region-of-interest maximal signal change (C(max)). The difference in C(max) for gray and white matter (Delta C(max)) was significantly higher for gadobutrol compared to gadopentetate dimeglumine (Pgadopentetate dimeglumine, particularly with respect to delineation between gray and white matter and for the demarcation of highly vascularized tumor tissue on brain PWI performed at 3T.

  17. Detailing radio frequency heating induced by coronary stents: a 7.0 Tesla magnetic resonance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Santoro

    Full Text Available The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study.

  18. Assessment of acute intestinal graft versus host disease by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, Johannes; Michaely, Henrik J.; Attenberger, Ulrike; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Heidenreich, Daniela; Kreil, Sebastian; Nolte, Florian; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Klein, Stefan A. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    After allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), a reliable diagnosis of acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) is essential for an early and successful treatment. It is the aim of this analysis to assess intestinal aGvHD by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior to allogeneic SCT, 64 consecutive patients underwent abdominal MRI examination on a 3 T MR system, including axial and coronal T2w sequences and a three-dimensional dynamic T1w, contrast enhanced sequence. After SCT, 20 patients with suspected aGvHD received a second MRI as well as an endoscopic examination. Nine patients suffered from histologically proven intestinal aGvHD. In eleven patients intestinal aGvHD was excluded. In all aGvHD patients typical MRI findings with long-segment bowel wall thickening - always involving the terminal ileum - with profound submucosal oedema, were detected. The bowel wall was significantly thickened in patients with intestinal aGvHD. Bowel contrast enhancement spared the submucosa while demonstrating strong mucosal hyperemia. In intestinal aGvHD, a characteristic MR-appearance can be detected. This MRI pattern might facilitate an early and non-invasive diagnosis of intestinal aGvHD. MRI might thus be used as a sensitive tool to rule out or support the clinical diagnosis of aGvHD. (orig.)

  19. Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Cranial and Spinal Cases Using Preexisting "C" Shaped Three Side Open 0.2 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Vinod Kumar; Tripathi, Ravindra; Aggarwal, Subodh; Hussain, Mazhar; Das Gupta, Hari Kishan

    2017-01-01

    The existing Intraoperative MRI (IMRI) of developed countries is too costly to be affordable in any developing country and out of the reach of common and poor people of developing country at remote areas. We have used the pre-existing (refurbished) 3 side open "C" shaped 0.2 Tesla MRI for IMRI in a very remote area. In this technique the 0.2 Tesla MRI and the operating theatre were merged. MRI table was used as an operation table. We have operated 36 cases via IMRI from November 2005 to till date. First case operated was on 13th nov 2005. Low (0.2) Tesla open setup costs very low (around Rs 40 lakhs) so highly affordable to management and thus to patients, used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes both, the equipments like Nitrous, oxygen and suction is outside the MRI room so no noise inside operative room, positioning the patient didn't take much time due to manual adjustments, no special training to nurses and technicians required because of low (0.2) Tesla power of magnet and same instruments and techniques, sequencing took only 1.31 mints per sequence and re registration is not required since we always note down the two orthogonal axis in x and y axis in preoperative imaging and we were able to operate on posterior fossa tumors as well because of no head fixation except with leucoplast strap. Moreover the images we got intraoperative are highly acceptable. Three side open 0.2 Tesla MRI system, if used for intraoperative guidance, is highly affordable and overcomes the limitations of western setup of IMRI. Postoperative MRI images were highly acceptable and also highly affordable too.

  20. 7 Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in adult X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratai, Eva; Kok, Trina; Wiggins, Christopher; Wiggins, Graham; Grant, Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; O'Neill, Gilmore; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Eichler, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Background Adult patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) remain at risk for progressive neurological deterioration. Phenotypes vary in their pathology, ranging from axonal degeneration to inflammatory demyelination. The severity of symptoms is poorly explained by conventional imaging. Objective To test the hypothesis that neurochemistry in normal appearing brain differs among adult phenotypes of X-ALD, and that neurochemical changes correlate with the severity of symptoms. Patients and Methods Using a 7 Tesla scanner we performed structural and proton MRSI in 13 adult patients with X-ALD, including 4 patients with adult cerebral ALD (ACALD), 5 with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and 4 female heterozygotes. Studies were also performed in nine healthy controls. Results Among adult X-ALD phenotypes, MI/Cr was 46% higher and Cho/Cr 21% higher in normal appearing white matter of ACALD compared to AMN (p < 0.05). Both NAA/Cr and Glu/Cr ratios were lower in AMN patients (p = 0.028 and p = 0.036, respectively) than in controls. There were no significant differences between AMN and female heterozygotes. In cortex, ACALD patients had lower values of NAA/Cr compared to female heterozygotes and controls (p = 0.022). The global MI/Cr ratio demonstrated a significant association with the EDSS (Spearman ρ = 0.66, p = 0.039). Conclusion 7 Tesla proton MRSI reveals differences in the neurochemistry of ACALD but is unable to distinguish AMN from female heterozygotes. MI/Cr correlates with the severity of the symptoms and may be a meaningful biomarker in adult X-ALD. PMID:19001168

  1. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2017-11-08

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen greater 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason score, staging and positive surgical margins, significantly predicted biochemical recurrence. This suggests an important new

  2. Brain glutamate in anorexia nervosa: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy case control study at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Beata R; Pike, Alexandra; Sharpley, Ann L; Ayton, Agnes; Park, Rebecca J; Cowen, Philip J; Emir, Uzay E

    2017-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality. There are no established pharmacological treatments and the neurobiology of the condition is poorly understood. Previous studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have shown that AN may be associated with reductions in indices of brain glutamate; however, at conventional field strengths (≤3 T), it is difficult to separate glutamate from its precursor and metabolite, glutamine. The objective of the present study was to use high field (7 T) MRS to measure concentrations of glutamate, in three separate brain voxels, in women with AN. We studied 13 female participants with AN and 12 healthy female controls who underwent MRS scanning at 7 T with voxels placed in anterior cingulate cortex, occipital cortex and putamen. Neurometabolites were calculated using the unsuppressed water signal as a reference and corrected for individual cerebrospinal fluid concentration in the voxel. We found that participants with AN had significantly lower concentrations of glutamate in all three voxels (mean reduction 8%, p = 0.002) but glutamine levels were not altered. Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, creatine, GABA and glutathione were also unchanged. However, inositol was lower in AN participants in anterior cingulate (p = 0.022) and occipital cortex (p = 0.002). Women with AN apparently have widespread reductions in brain glutamate. Further work will be needed to assess if this change has pathophysiological relevance or whether it is a consequence of the many physical changes produced in AN by food restriction.

  3. Dilated perivascular spaces and fatigue: is there a link? Magnetic resonance retrospective 3Tesla study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conforti, Renata; Cirillo, Mario; Sardaro, Angela; Negro, Alberto; Cirillo, Sossio [Second University of Naples, Neuroradiology Service, Department of Radiology, Naples (Italy); Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Paccone, Antonella [Second University of Naples, MRI Research Center SUN-FISM, Naples (Italy); Sacco, Rosaria; Sparaco, Maddalena; Gallo, Antonio; Lavorgna, Luigi; Tedeschi, Gioacchino [Second University of Naples, Department of Neurology, Naples (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    Fatigue (F) is a common, inexplicable, and disabling symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a possible correlation between fatigue and morpho-volumetric features and site of dilated perivascular spaces (dPS), visible on 3T magnetic resonance (MR) in fatigued multiple sclerosis patients (FMS). We studied 82 relapsing remitting (RR) FMS patients and 43 HC, matched for age, sex, and education. F was assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). To evaluate a possible correlation between degree of F and characteristics of dPS, patients were divided in two groups: more (mFMS) (FSS ≥ 5; n = 30) and less fatigued (lFMS) (FSS ≥ 4; n = 52), compared to a matched healthy control (HC) subject group. The MR study was performed with 3T scanner by SpinEcho T1, Fast-SpinEcho DP-T2, FLAIR, and 3D FSPGR T1 sequences. dPS volumes were measured with Medical Image Processing Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV); Global Cerebral Atrophy (GCA), expressed as Brain Parenchymal Fraction (BPF), was assessed by FSL SIENAX. The t test showed significantly increased dPS number (p = 0.021) in FMS patients (mFMS p = 0.0024 and lFMS p = 0.033) compared to HC. Pearson correlation revealed a significant correlation between dPS number and FSS (r = 0.208 p = 0.051). Furthermore, the chi-squared test confirms the intragroup (HC, mFMS, lFMS) differences about dPS location (p = 0.01) and size (p = 0.0001). Our study confirms that PS in MS patients presents with different volumetric and site characteristics as compared to HC; moreover, F severity significantly correlates with dPS number, site, and size. (orig.)

  4. In vivo skin moisturizing measurement by high-resolution 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesrar, J; Ognard, J; Garetier, M; Chechin, D; Misery, L; Ben Salem, D

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rarely used for the exploration of skin, even if studies have validated both feasibility of skin MRI and its interest for anatomical, physiological, and biochemical study of the skin. The purpose of this study is to explore moisturizing of the different skin layers using 3-T scan. An MRI of the heel's skin was performed using a 23 mm coil diameter on a 3T scan with a FFE (Fast Field Echo) 3D T1-weighted sequence and a TSE (Turbo Spin Echo) calculation T2-weighted sequence (pixels size of respectively 60 and 70 μm). This study was conducted on 35 healthy volunteers, who were scanned before applying moisturizer topic and 1 h after applying it. Region of interest in the stratum corneum, the epidermis and the dermis were generated on the T2 mapping. The thickness of each layer was measured. The T1 sequence allowed accurate cross-examination repositioning to ensure the comparability of the measurements. Among the 35 cases, two were excluded from the analysis because of movement artifacts. Measurements before and after moisturizer topic application displayed a T2 increase of 48.94% (P < 0.0001) in the stratum corneum and of 5.45% (P < 0.0001) in the epidermis yet without significant difference in the dermis. There was no significant link between the thickness of the stratum corneum and the T2 increase. However, there was a strong correlation between the thickness of the stratum corneum and the thickness of the epidermis (P < 0.001; rhô=0.72). High-resolution MRI allows fine exploration of anatomical and physiological properties of the skin and can further be used to extend the studies of skin hydration. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. High-resolution magnetic resonance angiography of the lower extremities with a dedicated 36-element matrix coil at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Harald; Michaely, Henrik J; Matschl, Volker; Schmitt, Peter; Reiser, Maximilian F; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2007-06-01

    Recent developments in hard- and software help to significantly increase image quality of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Parallel acquisition techniques (PAT) help to increase spatial resolution and to decrease acquisition time but also suffer from a decrease in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The movement to higher field strength and the use of dedicated angiography coils can further increase spatial resolution while decreasing acquisition times at the same SNR as it is known from contemporary exams. The goal of our study was to compare the image quality of MRA datasets acquired with a standard matrix coil in comparison to MRA datasets acquired with a dedicated peripheral angio matrix coil and higher factors of parallel imaging. Before the first volunteer examination, unaccelerated phantom measurements were performed with the different coils. After institutional review board approval, 15 healthy volunteers underwent MRA of the lower extremity on a 32 channel 3.0 Tesla MR System. In 5 of them MRA of the calves was performed with a PAT acceleration factor of 2 and a standard body-matrix surface coil placed at the legs. Ten volunteers underwent MRA of the calves with a dedicated 36-element angiography matrix coil: 5 with a PAT acceleration of 3 and 5 with a PAT acceleration factor of 4, respectively. The acquired volume and acquisition time was approximately the same in all examinations, only the spatial resolution was increased with the acceleration factor. The acquisition time per voxel was calculated. Image quality was rated independently by 2 readers in terms of vessel conspicuity, venous overlay, and occurrence of artifacts. The inter-reader agreement was calculated by the kappa-statistics. SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios from the different examinations were evaluated. All 15 volunteers completed the examination, no adverse events occurred. None of the examinations showed venous overlay; 70% of the examinations showed an excellent vessel conspicuity

  6. 3 Tesla (23)Na magnetic resonance imaging during aerobic and anaerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammon, Matthias; Grossmann, Susan; Linz, Peter; Kopp, Christoph; Dahlmann, Anke; Janka, Rolf; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Titze, Jens

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the work described here was to determine the feasibility of monitoring Na(+) concentration and distribution in muscle/skin during aerobic/anaerobic exercise with (23)Na magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Na(+) concentration and water content of muscle/skin of the left lower leg of six healthy subjects (mean age, 26 years; range, 22-30 years; three men and three women) were assessed before and after aerobic/anaerobic cycle ergometry and during recovery with 3-T (23)Na/(1)H MRI. (23)Na MRI was performed with a custom-made knee coil. A gradient echo sequence with an acquisition time of 3.25 minutes, echo time of 2.07 ms, repetition time of 100 ms, and spatial resolution of 3 × 3 × 30 mm(3) was applied. Phantoms with increasing sodium concentration served for quantification via linear extrapolation. Blood values were determined by blood gas analysis. The concentration of Na(+) significantly increased during anaerobic exercise in all muscle compartments except the medial gastrocnemius muscle, whereas no significant change was observed in most muscle compartments during aerobic exercise (only the soleus muscle exhibited a significant increase in Na(+) concentration during aerobic exercise: 1.6 ± 1.5 mmol/kg, 4.5%, P = .046). During anaerobic exercise, the mean Na(+) concentration of the triceps surae and the whole leg increased by 9.0% (3.1 ± 2.1 mmol/kg, P = .016) and 6.5% (2.2 ± 1.3 mmol/kg, P anaerobic exercise. Na(+) concentration significantly decreased during recovery after anaerobic and aerobic exercise in all muscle compartments except the soleus. The Na(+) concentration of the skin did not significantly change during anaerobic/aerobic exercise. Sodium(23) MRI allows reliable and noninvasive visualization and quantification of Na(+) concentration and distribution in muscle and skin during exercise. (23)Na MRI can be used to gain new insights into Na(+) homeostasis, presumably leading to better comprehension of pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015

  7. White Matter Brain Lesions in Midlife Familial Hypercholesterolemic Patients at 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, S.A.; O' Regan, D.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Neuwirth, C.; Potter, E.; Tosi, I.; Hajnal, J.V.; Naoumova, R.P. (Imaging Sciences Dept. and Clinical Research Facility, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (GB))

    2008-03-15

    Background: Patients with hypercholesterolemia of 60 years and older have an increased risk for white matter brain lesions and dementia. Purpose: To investigate whether patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) develop white matter lesions at 3-Tesla (T) MRI as early as in midlife. Material and Methods: Non-diabetic, non-smoking, and non-hypertensive heterozygous FH patients on treatment with maximally tolerated dose of a statin for more than 5 years (n = 14) and matched controls (n = 22) aged 25 to 60 years of age were studied. Imaging was performed at 3T with a fluid-attenuated T2-weighted MR pulse sequence and a T1-weighted spin-echo pulse sequence following 10 ml of i.v. gadopentetate dimeglumine. Images were evaluated by two independent readers. Fasting blood samples were taken. Student's t test was employed at P<0.05. Results: Three volunteers and one FH patient had white matter lesions (P<0.53). No other evidence of past ischemic stroke was observed. Mean total serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were significantly higher in the FH group (6.0+-1.1 vs. 5.1+-0.9 mmol/l, P<0.02 and 4.1+-0.9 vs. 3.1+-0.8 mmol/l, P<0.004, respectively). Conclusion: Heterozygous FH patients on statin treatment in the age range of 25 to 60 years are not at increased risk of white matter lesions at 3T MRI

  8. [Reproducibility and accuracy in the morphometric and mechanical quantification of trabecular bone from 3 Tesla magnetic resonance images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberich-Bayarri, A; Martí-Bonmatí, L; Sanz-Requena, R; Sánchez-González, J; Hervás Briz, V; García-Martí, G; Pérez, M Á

    2014-01-01

    We used an animal model to analyze the reproducibility and accuracy of certain biomarkers of bone image quality in comparison to a gold standard of computed microtomography (μCT). We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and μCT to study the metaphyses of 5 sheep tibiae. The MR images (3 Teslas) were acquired with a T1-weighted gradient echo sequence and an isotropic spatial resolution of 180μm. The μCT images were acquired using a scanner with a spatial resolution of 7.5μm isotropic voxels. In the preparation of the images, we applied equalization, interpolation, and thresholding algorithms. In the quantitative analysis, we calculated the percentage of bone volume (BV/TV), the trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), the trabecular index (Tb.N), the 2D fractal dimension (D(2D)), the 3D fractal dimension (D(3D)), and the elastic module in the three spatial directions (Ex, Ey and Ez). The morphometric and mechanical quantification of trabecular bone by MR was very reproducible, with percentages of variation below 9% for all the parameters. Its accuracy compared to the gold standard (μCT) was high, with errors less than 15% for BV/TV, D(2D), D(3D), and E(app)x, E(app)y and E(app)z. Our experimental results in animals confirm that the parameters of BV/TV, D(2D), D(3D), and E(app)x, E(app)y and E(app)z obtained by MR have excellent reproducibility and accuracy and can be used as imaging biomarkers for the quality of trabecular bone. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging at 0.5 Tesla of mechanically inducedosteoarthritis in rabbit knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torelli S.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study we assessed induced osteoarthritis data in rabbits, compared three diagnostic methods, i.e., radiography (XR, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and correlated the imaging findings with those obtained by macroscopic evaluation. Ten young female rabbits of the Norfolk breed were used. Seven rabbits had the right knee immobilized in extension for a period of 12 weeks (immobilized group, and three others did not have a limb immobilized and were maintained under the same conditions (control group. Alterations observed by XR, CT and MRI after the period of immobilization were osteophytes, osteochondral lesions, increase and decrease of joint space, all of them present both in the immobilized and non-immobilized contralateral limbs. However, a significantly higher score was obtained for the immobilized limbs (XT: P = 0.016, CT: P = 0.031, MRI: P = 0.0156. All imaging methods were able to detect osteoarthritis changes after the 12 weeks of immobilization. Macroscopic evaluation identified increased thickening of joint capsule, proliferative and connective tissue in the femoropatellar joint, and irregularities of articular cartilage, especially in immobilized knees. The differences among XR, CT and MRI were not statistically significant for the immobilized knees. However, MRI using a 0.5 Tesla scanner was statistically different from CT and XR for the non-immobilized contralateral knees. We conclude that the three methods detected osteoarthritis lesions in rabbit knees, but MRI was less sensitive than XR and CT in detecting lesions compatible with initial osteoarthritis. Since none of the techniques revealed all the lesions, it is important to use all methods to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  10. Verbal and visual memory performance and hippocampal volumes, measured by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging, in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmini, Eugenia; Santos, Alicia; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; Vives, Yolanda; Pires, Patricia; Crespo, Iris; Portella, Maria J; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Barahona, Maria-José; Webb, Susan M

    2012-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) affects cognition and memory. Our objective was to evaluate memory and hippocampal volumes (HV) on 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) in CS patients and controls. Thirty-three CS patients (11 active, 22 cured) and 34 controls matched for age, sex, and education underwent Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure memory tests. Gray matter and HV were calculated on 3T MRI, using FreeSurfer image analyses software. No differences in HV were observed between active and cured CS or controls. Memory performance was worse in CS patients than controls (P verbal (P = 0.02) and visual memory (P = 0.04) than controls. In 12 CS patients, memory was below normative cutoff values for verbal (n = 6, cured), visual memory (n = 10, six cured) or both (n = 4); these patients with severe memory impairments showed smaller HV compared with their matched controls (P = 0.02 with verbal impairment; P = 0.03 with visual impairment). They were older (P = 0.04), had shorter education (P = 0.02), and showed a trend toward longer duration of hypercortisolism (P = 0.07) than the remaining CS patients. Total (P = 0.004) and cortical (P = 0.03) brain gray matter volumes were decreased in CS compared with controls, indicating brain atrophy, whereas subcortical gray matter (which includes HV) was reduced only in the 12 patients with severe memory impairment. Verbal and visual memory is worse in CS patients than controls, even after biochemical cure. HV was decreased only in those whose memory scores were below normative cutoff values.

  11. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging at 0.5 Tesla of mechanically induced osteoarthritis in rabbit knees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torelli, S.R. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Medicina Veterinaria; Rahal, R.S. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Cirurgia e Anestesiologia Veterinaria]. E-mail: sheilacr@fmvz.unesp.br; Volpi, R.S. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Yamashita, S. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagens; Mamprim, M.J. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia; Crocci, A.J. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Bioestatistica

    2004-04-01

    In the present experimental study we assessed induced osteoarthritis data in rabbits, compared three diagnostic methods, i.e., radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and correlated the imaging findings with those obtained by macroscopic evaluation. Ten young female rabbits of the Norfolk breed were used. Seven rabbits had the right knee immobilized in extension for a period of 12 weeks (immobilized group), and three others did not have a limb immobilized and were maintained under the same conditions (control group). Alterations observed by XR, CT and MRI after the period of immobilization were osteophytes, osteochondral lesions, increase and decrease of joint space, all of them present both in the immobilized and non-immobilized contralateral limbs. However, a significantly higher score was obtained for the immobilized limbs (XT: P = 0.016, CT: P 0.031, MRI: P = 0.0156). All imaging methods were able to detect osteoarthritis changes after the 12 weeks of immobilization. Macroscopic evaluation identified increased thickening of joint capsule, proliferative and connective tissue in the femoropatellar joint, and irregularities of articular cartilage, especially in immobilized knees. The differences among XR, CT and MRI were not statistically significant for the immobilized knees. However, MRI using a 0.5 Tesla scanner was statistically different from CT and XR for the non-immobilized contralateral knees. We conclude that the three methods detected osteoarthritis lesions in rabbit knees, but MRI was less sensitive than XR and CT in detecting lesions compatible with initial osteoarthritis. Since none of the techniques revealed all the lesions, it is important to use all methods to establish an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  12. Comparative Analysis of Cortical Microinfarcts and Microbleeds using 3.0-Tesla Postmortem Magnetic Resonance Images and Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Atsushi; Ii, Yuichiro; Shindo, Akihiro; Matsuo, Ko; Ishikawa, Hidehiro; Taniguchi, Akira; Takase, Shinichi; Maeda, Masayuki; Sakuma, Hajime; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular lesions including cortical microinfarctions (CMIs) and cerebral lobar microbleeds (CMBs) are usually caused by cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in the elderly and are correlated with cognitive decline. However, their radiological-histopathological coincidence has not been revealed systematically with widely used 3-Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of the present study is to delineate the histopathological background corresponding to MR images of these lesions. We examined formalin-fixed 10-mm thick coronal brain blocks from 10 CAA patients (five were also diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, three with dementia with Lewy bodies, and two with CAA only) with dementia and six non CAA patients with neurodegenerative disease. Using 3T MRI, both 3D-fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and 3D-double inversion recovery (DIR) were examined to identify CMIs, and T2* and susceptibility-weighted images (SWI) were examined to identify CMBs. These blocks were subsequently examined histologically and immunohistochemically. In CAA patients, 48 CMIs and 6 lobar CMBs were invariably observed in close proximity to degenerated Aβ-positive blood vessels. Moreover, 16 CMIs (33%) of 48 were detected with postmortem MRI, but none were seen when the lesion size was smaller than 1 mm. In contrast, only 1 undeniable CMI was founded with MRI and histopathology in 6 non CAA patients. Small, cortical high-intensity lesions seen on 3D-FLAIR and 3D-DIR images likely represent CMIs, and low-intensity lesions in T2* and SWI correspond to CMBs with in vivo MRI. Furthermore, a close association between amyloid-laden vessels and these microvascular lesions indicated the contribution of CAA to their pathogenesis.

  13. Initial results of 3-dimensional 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the localization of prostate cancer at 3 Tesla: should we use an endorectal coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakar, Derya; Heijmink, Stijn W T P J; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Huisman, Henkjan; Barentsz, Jelle O; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Scheenen, Tom W J

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of 3 Tesla, 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the localization of prostate cancer (PCa) with and without the use of an endorectal coil (ERC). Our prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Between October 2004 and January 2006, 18 patients with histologically proven PCa on biopsy and scheduled for radical prostatectomy were included and underwent 3D-MRSI with and without an ERC. The prostate was divided into 14 regions of interest (ROIs). Four readers independently rated (on a 5-point scale) their confidence that cancer was present in each of these ROIs. These findings were correlated with whole-mount prostatectomy specimens. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve were determined. A difference with a P Tesla slightly but significantly increased the localization performance compared with not using an ERC.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 tesla detects more lesions in acute optic neuritis than at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Rostrup, Egill; Frederiksen, Jette L

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: We sought to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 T detects more brain lesions in acute optic neuritis (ON) than MRI at 1.5 T. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Twenty-eight patients with acute ON were scanned at both field-strengths using fast-fluid-attenuated inversion recov...

  15. The predictive value of endorectal 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension in patients with low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somford, D M; Hamoen, E H; Fütterer, J J; van Basten, J P; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A; Vreuls, W; van Oort, I M; Vergunst, H; Kiemeney, L A; Barentsz, J O; Witjes, J A

    2013-11-01

    We determined the positive and negative predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy for different prostate cancer risk groups. We evaluated a cohort of 183 patients who underwent 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, including T2-weighted, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast enhanced sequences, with an endorectal coil before radical prostatectomy. Pathological stage at radical prostatectomy was used as standard reference for extraprostatic extension. The cohort was classified into low, intermediate and high risk groups according to the D'Amico criteria. We recorded prevalence of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy and determined sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension in each group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy. The overall prevalence of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy was 49.7% ranging from 24.7% to 77.1% between low and high risk categories. Overall staging accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension was 73.8%, with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 58.2%, 89.1%, 84.1% and 68.3%, respectively. Positive predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension was best in the high risk cohort with 88.8%. Negative predictive value was highest in the low risk cohort with 87.7%. With an odds ratio of 10.3 multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is by far the best preoperative predictor of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy. For adequate patient counseling, knowledge of predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension is

  16. Time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla for evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of vascular malformations: description of distinct subgroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Simone; Fellner, Claudia; Wohlgemuth, Walter A. [University Hospital Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Uller, Wibke [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University Hospital Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Manger, Florentine [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Zeman, Florian [University Hospital Regensburg, Center for Clinical Trials, Regensburg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Quantitative evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of arteriovenous and venous malformations using time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla. Time-resolved MRA with interleaved stochastic trajectories (TWIST) at 3.0 Tesla was studied in 83 consecutive patients with venous malformations (VM) and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Enhancement characteristics were calculated as percentage increase of signal intensity above baseline over time. Maximum percentage signal intensity increase (signal{sub max}), time intervals between onset of arterial enhancement and lesion enhancement (t{sub onset}), and time intervals between beginning of lesion enhancement and maximum percentage of lesion enhancement (t{sub max}) were analyzed. All AVMs showed a high-flow hemodynamic pattern. Two significantly different (p < 0.001) types of venous malformations emerged: VMs with arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) (median signal{sub max} 737 %, IQR [interquartile range] = 511 - 1182 %; median t{sub onset} 5 s, IQR = 5 - 10 s; median t{sub max} 35 s, IQR = 26 - 40 s) and without AVFs (median signal{sub max} 284 %, IQR = 177-432 %; median t{sub onset} 23 s, IQR = 15 - 30 s; median t{sub max} 60 s, IQR = 55 - 75 s). Quantitative evaluation of time-resolved MRA at 3.0 Tesla provides hemodynamic characterization of vascular malformations. VMs can be subclassified into two hemodynamic subgroups due to presence or absence of AVFs. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of pelvic phased-array versus endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radical prostatectomy. All patients were evaluated with either pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil prostate MRI prior to surgery (63 endorectal coils and 88 pelvic phased-array coils). Tumor stage based on MRI was compared with pathologic stage. We calculated the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each group in the evaluation of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Both endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI achieved high specificity, low sensitivity and moderate accuracy for the detection of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. There were statistically no differences in specificity, sensitivity and accuracy between the two groups. Overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different between endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI.

  18. Breath-hold imaging of the coronary arteries using Quiescent-Interval Slice-Selective (QISS) magnetic resonance angiography: pilot study at 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Robert R; Giri, S; Pursnani, A; Botelho, M P F; Li, W; Koktzoglou, I

    2015-11-23

    Coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is usually obtained with a free-breathing navigator-gated 3D acquisition. Our aim was to develop an alternative breath-hold approach that would allow the coronary arteries to be evaluated in a much shorter time and without risk of degradation by respiratory motion artifacts. For this purpose, we implemented a breath-hold, non-contrast-enhanced, quiescent-interval slice-selective (QISS) 2D technique. Sequence performance was compared at 1.5 and 3 Tesla using both radial and Cartesian k-space trajectories. The left coronary circulation was imaged in six healthy subjects and two patients with coronary artery disease. Breath-hold QISS was compared with T2-prepared 2D balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) and free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D bSSFP. Approximately 10 2.1-mm thick slices were acquired in a single ~20-s breath-hold using two-shot QISS. QISS contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was 1.5-fold higher at 3 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla. Cartesian QISS provided the best coronary-to-myocardium CNR, whereas radial QISS provided the sharpest coronary images. QISS image quality exceeded that of free-breathing 3D coronary MRA with few artifacts at either field strength. Compared with T2-prepared 2D bSSFP, multi-slice capability was not restricted by the specific absorption rate at 3 Tesla and pericardial fluid signal was better suppressed. In addition to depicting the coronary arteries, QISS could image intra-cardiac structures, pericardium, and the aortic root in arbitrary slice orientations. Breath-hold QISS is a simple, versatile, and time-efficient method for coronary MRA that provides excellent image quality at both 1.5 and 3 Tesla. Image quality exceeded that of free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D MRA in a much shorter scan time. QISS also allowed rapid multi-slice bright-blood, diastolic phase imaging of the heart, which may have complementary value to multi-phase cine imaging. We conclude that, with further clinical

  19. High resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla using PROPELLER-EPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Martin; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group

    2014-09-01

    We report the application of PROPELLER-EPI for high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter in-plane resolution on a clinical 3 Tesla scanner. Periodically rotated blades of a long-axis PROPELLER-EPI sequence were acquired with fast gradient echo readout and acquisition matrix of 320 x 50 per blade. Images were reconstructed by using 2D-gridding, phase and geometric distortion correction and compensation of resonance frequency drifts that occurred during extended measurements. To characterize these resonance frequency offsets, short FID calibration measurements were added to the PROPELLER-EPI sequence. Functional PROPELLER-EPI was performed with volunteers using a simple block design of right handed finger tapping. Results indicate that PROPELLER-EPI can be employed for fast, high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging provided geometric distortions and possible resonance frequency drifts are properly corrected. Even small resonance frequency drifts below 10 Hz as well as non-corrected geometric distortions degraded image quality substantially. In the initial fMRI experiment image quality and signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient for obtaining high resolution functional activation maps. (orig.)

  20. Time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla for evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of vascular malformations: description of distinct subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Simone; Uller, Wibke; Manger, Florentine; Fellner, Claudia; Zeman, Florian; Wohlgemuth, Walter A

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of arteriovenous and venous malformations using time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla. Time-resolved MRA with interleaved stochastic trajectories (TWIST) at 3.0 Tesla was studied in 83 consecutive patients with venous malformations (VM) and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Enhancement characteristics were calculated as percentage increase of signal intensity above baseline over time. Maximum percentage signal intensity increase (signalmax), time intervals between onset of arterial enhancement and lesion enhancement (tonset), and time intervals between beginning of lesion enhancement and maximum percentage of lesion enhancement (tmax) were analyzed. All AVMs showed a high-flow hemodynamic pattern. Two significantly different (p < 0.001) types of venous malformations emerged: VMs with arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) (median signalmax 737 %, IQR [interquartile range] = 511 - 1182 %; median tonset 5 s, IQR = 5 - 10 s; median tmax 35 s, IQR = 26 - 40 s) and without AVFs (median signalmax 284 %, IQR = 177-432 %; median tonset 23 s, IQR = 15 - 30 s; median tmax 60 s, IQR = 55 - 75 s). Quantitative evaluation of time-resolved MRA at 3.0 Tesla provides hemodynamic characterization of vascular malformations. VMs can be subclassified into two hemodynamic subgroups due to presence or absence of AVFs. • Time-resolved MRA at 3.0 Tesla provides quantitative hemodynamic characterization of vascular malformations. • Malformations significantly differ in time courses of enhancement and signal intensity increase. • AVMs show a distinctive high-flow hemodynamic pattern. • Two significantly different types of VMs emerged: VMs with and without AVFs.

  1. Inter-observer agreement and diagnostic accuracy of myocardial perfusion reserve quantification by cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuye, Katharina; Buckert, Dominik; Schaaf, Lisa; Walcher, Thomas; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Bernhardt, Peter

    2013-03-27

    Quantification of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) at 1.5 Tesla has been shown to correlate to invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and to yield good inter-observer agreement. However, little is known about quantitative adenosine-perfusion CMR at 3 Tesla and no data about inter-observer agreement is available. Aim of our study was to evaluate inter-observer agreement and to assess the diagnostic accuracy in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Fifty-three patients referred for coronary x-ray angiography were previously examined in a 3 Tesla whole-body scanner. Adenosine and rest perfusion CMR were acquired for the quantification of MPR in all segments. Two blinded and independent readers analyzed all images. QCA was performed in case of coronary stenosis. QCA data was used to assess diagnostic accuracy of the MPR measurements. Inter-observer agreement was high for all myocardial perfusion territories (ρ = 0.92 for LAD, ρ = 0.93 for CX and RCA perfused segments). Compared to QCA receiver-operating characteristics yielded an area under the curve of 0.78 and 0.73 for RCA, 0.66 and 0.69 for LAD, and 0.52 and 0.53 for LCX perfused territories. Inter-observer agreement of MPR quantification at 3 Tesla CMR is very high for all myocardial segments. Diagnostic accuracy in comparison to QCA yields good values for the RCA and LAD perfused territories, but moderate values for the posterior LCX perfused myocardial segments.

  2. Improved Cerebral Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 7 Tesla – Feasibility Study and Preliminary Results Using Optimized Venous Saturation Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Johst, Sören; Dammann, Philipp; Özkan, Neriman; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Kraemer, Markus; Maderwald, Stefan; Ladd, Mark E.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale; Schlamann, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) due to specific absorption rate (SAR) limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) algorithm saturation pulses. Material and Methods Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26–70 years) with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens) whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. Results Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. Conclusion The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies. PMID:25232868

  3. Visibility of Anterolateral Ligament Tears in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knees With Standard 1.5-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, David E; Carroll, Kevin W; Kosarek, Frank J; Piasecki, Dana P; Fleischli, James F; D'Alessandro, Donald F

    2016-10-01

    To attempt to visualize the ligament with standard 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-torn knee, and if it is visible, attempt to characterize it as torn or intact at its femoral, meniscal, and tibial attachment sites. This was a retrospective MRI study based on arthroscopic findings of a known ACL tear in 72 patients between the years 2006 and 2010. Patients all had hamstring ACL reconstructions, no concomitant lateral collateral ligament, or posterolateral corner injury based on imaging and physical examination, and had a preoperative 1.5-tesla MRI scan with standard sequences performed within 3 weeks of the injury. Two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed the preoperative MRI for visualization of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) for concomitant tears. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was calculated. Learning effect was analyzed to determine if radiologists' agreement improved as reads progressed. Both radiologists were able to visualize the ALL in 100% of the scans. Overall, ALL tears were noted in 26% by radiologist 1 and in 62% by radiologist 2. The agreement between the ligament being torn or not had a kappa of 0.54 between radiologists. The agreements in torn or not torn between radiologists in the femoral, meniscal, and tibial sites were 0.14, 0.15, and 0.31. The intraobserver reliability by radiologist 1 for femoral, meniscal, and tibial tears was 0.04, 0.57, and 0.54 respectively. For radiologist 2, they were 0.75, 0.61, and 0.55. There was no learning effect noted. ALL tears are currently unable to be reliably identified as torn or intact on standard 1.5-tesla MRI sequences. Proper imaging sequences are of crucial importance to reliably follow these tears to determine their clinical significance. Level IV, therapeutic case series study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved cerebral time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography at 7 Tesla--feasibility study and preliminary results using optimized venous saturation pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten H Wrede

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA due to specific absorption rate (SAR limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE algorithm saturation pulses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26-70 years with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. RESULTS: Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. CONCLUSION: The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies.

  5. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  6. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography at 3 tesla using a hybrid protocol in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Eiberg, Jonas P; Logager, Vibeke B

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3T whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) using a hybrid protocol in comparison with a standard protocol in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). In 26 consecutive patients with PAD two different proto...

  7. Initial experience of 3 tesla endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging and 1H-spectroscopic imaging of the prostate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fütterer, J.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Dorsten, F.A. van; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Witjes, J.A.; Heerschap, A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2004-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: We sought to explore the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate at 3T, with the knowledge of potential drawbacks of MRI at high field strengths. MATERIAL AND METHOD: MRI, dynamic MRI, and 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging were performed in 10 patients

  8. Magnetic resonance safety and compatibility of tantalum markers used in proton beam therapy for intraocular tumors: A 7.0 Tesla study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberacker, Eva; Paul, Katharina; Huelnhagen, Till; Oezerdem, Celal; Winter, Lukas; Pohlmann, Andreas; Boehmert, Laura; Stachs, Oliver; Heufelder, Jens; Weber, Andreas; Rehak, Matus; Seibel, Ira; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2017-10-01

    Proton radiation therapy (PRT) is a standard treatment of uveal melanoma. PRT patients undergo implantation of ocular tantalum markers (OTMs) for treatment planning. Ultra-high-field MRI is a promising technique for 3D tumor visualization and PRT planning. This work examines MR safety and compatibility of OTMs at 7.0 Tesla. MR safety assessment included deflection angle measurements (DAMs), electromagnetic field (EMF) simulations for specific absorption rate (SAR) estimation, and temperature simulations for examining radiofrequency heating using a bow-tie dipole antenna for transmission. MR compatibility was assessed by susceptibility artifacts in agarose, ex vivo pig eyes, and in an ex vivo tumor eye using gradient echo and fast spin-echo imaging. DAM (α mK). Susceptibility artifact size (<8 mm) and location suggest no restrictions for MRI of the nervus opticus. OTMs are not a per se contraindication for MRI. Magn Reson Med 78:1533-1546, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our...... and after chemotherapy. The spectra showed considerable changes during chemotherapy. It is concluded that 31P spectroscopy using surface coils is of limited value for tumour characterization, but may add useful information in monitoring the effect of chemotherapy....

  10. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, A G; Bovens, S M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F L; de Borst, G J

    2011-02-01

    In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 tesla detects more lesions in acute optic neuritis than at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Rostrup, Egill; Frederiksen, Jette L.

    2006-01-01

    recovery (FLAIR), proton density and T2-weighted turbo spin echo, and T1-weighted spin echo after contrast. In addition, magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) was obtained after contrast at 3.0 T. Lesion number and volumes were assessed by an observer blind to patient identity...

  12. Geometric accuracy of 3D coordinates of the Leksell stereotactic skull frame in 1.5 Tesla- and 3.0 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison of three different fixation screw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Yamamuro, Osamu; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Uchiyama, Yukio; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the geometric distortion of 1.5-Tesla (T) and 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) images with the Leksell skull frame system using three types of cranial quick fixation screws (QFSs) of different materials—aluminum, aluminum with tungsten tip, and titanium—for skull frame fixation. Two kinds of acrylic phantoms were placed on a Leksell skull frame using the three types of screws, and were scanned with computed tomography (CT), 1.5-T MR imaging and 3.0-T MR imaging. The 3D coordinates for both strengths of MR imaging were compared with those for CT. The deviations of the measured coordinates at selected points (x = 50, 100 and 150; y = 50, 100 and 150) were indicated on different axial planes (z = 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150). The errors of coordinates with QFSs of aluminum, tungsten-tipped aluminum, and titanium were 2.0 mm in most positions. The geometric accuracy of the Leksell skull frame system with 1.5-T MR imaging was high and valid for clinical use. However, the geometric errors with 3.0-T MR imaging were larger than those of 1.5-T MR imaging and were acceptable only with aluminum QFSs, and then only around the central region. PMID:25034732

  13. Frequency and topography of small cerebrovascular lesions in vascular and in mixed dementia: a post-mortem 7-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Pasquier, Florence; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mixed dementia (MixD) refers to a combination of definite Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular encephalopathy. The existence of a "pure" type of vascular dementia (VaD) is controversial. There is a need to find magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics allowing the distinction between VaD and MixD. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI compares the frequency or severity and the topography of the small cerebrovascular lesions in brains of patients with VaD and with MixD. Material and methods: Based on neuropathological criteria, 14 brains were classified as VaD, 24 as MixD and 11 as controls. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere and a horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere underwent T2 and T2* 7.0-tesla MRI examination. The mean values and topographic distribution of white matter changes (WMCs), lacunar infarcts (LIs), cortical microbleeds (CoMBs) and cortical microinfarcts (CoMIs) were determined and compared between the different groups. Results: Compared to the controls, both VaD and MixD brains had significantly more severe WMCs and increased numbers of CoMBs and CoMIs. Lacunar infarcts predominated only in the VaD cases. On mutual comparison of VaD and MixD brains, CoMBs and CoMIs predominated in the frontal lobe and the cerebellum of VaD, while were mainly present in the occipital lobe of MixD. White matter changes predominated in the temporal lobe of MixD cases. Lacunar infarcts were significantly increased in the corona radiata and putamen of VaD patients. Conclusions: The present post-mortem MRI study shows clear differences in the distribution and the types of cerebrovascular lesions on high-field MRI, confirming that VaD and MixD are different diseases. .

  14. Frequency and topography of small cerebrovascular lesions in vascular and in mixed dementia: a post-mortem 7-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques De Reuck

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Mixed dementia (MixD refers to a combination of definite Alzheimer’s disease (AD and vascular encephalopathy. The existence of a “pure” type of vascular dementia (VaD is controversial. There is a need to find magnetic resonance imaging (MRI characteristics allowing the distinction between VaD and MixD. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI compares the frequency or severity and the topography of the small cerebrovascular lesions in brains of patients with VaD and with MixD. Material and methods : Based on neuropathological criteria, 14 brains were classified as VaD, 24 as MixD and 11 as controls. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere and a horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere underwent T2 and T2* 7.0-tesla MRI examination. The mean values and topographic distribution of white matter changes (WMCs, lacunar infarcts (LIs, cortical microbleeds (CoMBs and cortical microinfarcts (CoMIs were determined and compared between the different groups. Results : Compared to the controls, both VaD and MixD brains had significantly more severe WMCs and increased numbers of CoMBs and CoMIs. Lacunar infarcts predominated only in the VaD cases. On mutual comparison of VaD and MixD brains, CoMBs and CoMIs predominated in the frontal lobe and the cerebellum of VaD, while were mainly present in the occipital lobe of MixD. White matter changes predominated in the temporal lobe of MixD cases. Lacunar infarcts were significantly increased in the corona radiata and putamen of VaD patients. Conclusions : The present post-mortem MRI study shows clear differences in the distribution and the types of cerebrovascular lesions on high-field MRI, confirming that VaD and MixD are different diseases.

  15. Use of a radio frequency shield during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: experimental evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favazza CP

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher P Favazza, Deirdre M King, Heidi A Edmonson, Joel P Felmlee, Phillip J Rossman, Nicholas J Hangiandreou, Robert E Watson, Krzysztof R Gorny Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Radiofrequency (RF shields have been recently developed for the purpose of shielding portions of the patient's body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations. We present an experimental evaluation of a commercially available RF shield in the MRI environment. All tests were performed on 1.5 T and 3.0 T clinical MRI scanners. The tests were repeated with and without the RF shield present in the bore, for comparison. Effects of the shield, placed within the scanner bore, on the RF fields generated by the scanner were measured directly using tuned pick-up coils. Attenuation, by as much as 35 dB, of RF field power was found inside the RF shield. These results were supported by temperature measurements of metallic leads placed inside the shield, in which no measurable RF heating was found. In addition, there was a small, simultaneous detectable increase (~1 dB of RF power just outside the edges of the shield. For these particular scanners, the autocalibrated RF power levels were reduced for scan locations prescribed just outside the edges of the shield, which corresponded with estimations based on the pick-up coil measurements. Additionally, no significant heating during MRI scanning was observed on the shield surface. The impact of the RF shield on the RF fields inside the magnet bore is likely to be dependent on the particular model of the RF shield or the MRI scanner. These results suggest that the RF shield could be a valuable tool for clinical MRI practices. Keywords: radiofrequency shield, magnetic resonance imaging, radiofrequency attenuation

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hip at 3 Tesla: clinical value in femoroacetabular impingement of the hip and current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamisch, Tallal Charles; Bittersohl, Bernd; Hughes, Timothy; Kim, Young-Jo; Welsch, Goetz H; Dudda, Marcel; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Werlen, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2008-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most promising noninvasive modality for hip joint evaluation, but it has limitations in diagnosing cartilage lesion and acetabular labrum changes, especially in early stages. This is significant due to superior outcome results of surgery intervention in hip dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement in patients not exceeding early degeneration. This emphasizes the need for accurate and reproducible methods in evaluating cartilage structure. In this article, we discuss the impact of the most recent technological advance in MRI, namely the advantage of 3-T imaging, on diagnostic imaging of the hip. Limitations of standard imaging techniques are shown with emphasis on femoroacetabular impingement. Clinical imaging examples and biochemical techniques are presented that need to be further evaluated.

  17. Use of a radio frequency shield during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; King, Deirdre M; Edmonson, Heidi A; Felmlee, Joel P; Rossman, Phillip J; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J; Watson, Robert E; Gorny, Krzysztof R

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) shields have been recently developed for the purpose of shielding portions of the patient's body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. We present an experimental evaluation of a commercially available RF shield in the MRI environment. All tests were performed on 1.5 T and 3.0 T clinical MRI scanners. The tests were repeated with and without the RF shield present in the bore, for comparison. Effects of the shield, placed within the scanner bore, on the RF fields generated by the scanner were measured directly using tuned pick-up coils. Attenuation, by as much as 35 dB, of RF field power was found inside the RF shield. These results were supported by temperature measurements of metallic leads placed inside the shield, in which no measurable RF heating was found. In addition, there was a small, simultaneous detectable increase (∼1 dB) of RF power just outside the edges of the shield. For these particular scanners, the autocalibrated RF power levels were reduced for scan locations prescribed just outside the edges of the shield, which corresponded with estimations based on the pick-up coil measurements. Additionally, no significant heating during MRI scanning was observed on the shield surface. The impact of the RF shield on the RF fields inside the magnet bore is likely to be dependent on the particular model of the RF shield or the MRI scanner. These results suggest that the RF shield could be a valuable tool for clinical MRI practices.

  18. Investigation of Parallel Radiofrequency Transmission for the Reduction of Heating in Long Conductive Leads in 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElcheran, Clare E; Yang, Benson; Anderson, Kevan J T; Golenstani-Rad, Laleh; Graham, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is increasingly used to treat a variety of brain diseases by sending electrical impulses to deep brain nuclei through long, electrically conductive leads. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients pre- and post-implantation is desirable to target and position the implant, to evaluate possible side-effects and to examine DBS patients who have other health conditions. Although MRI is the preferred modality for pre-operative planning, MRI post-implantation is limited due to the risk of high local power deposition, and therefore tissue heating, at the tip of the lead. The localized power deposition arises from currents induced in the leads caused by coupling with the radiofrequency (RF) transmission field during imaging. In the present work, parallel RF transmission (pTx) is used to tailor the RF electric field to suppress coupling effects. Electromagnetic simulations were performed for three pTx coil configurations with 2, 4, and 8-elements, respectively. Optimal input voltages to minimize coupling, while maintaining RF magnetic field homogeneity, were determined for all configurations using a Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm. Resulting electric and magnetic fields were compared to that of a 16-rung birdcage coil. Experimental validation was performed with a custom-built 4-element pTx coil. In simulation, 95-99% reduction of the electric field at the tip of the lead was observed between the various pTx coil configurations and the birdcage coil. Maximal reduction in E-field was obtained with the 8-element pTx coil. Magnetic field homogeneity was comparable to the birdcage coil for the 4- and 8-element pTx configurations. In experiment, a temperature increase of 2±0.15°C was observed at the tip of the wire using the birdcage coil, whereas negligible increase (0.2±0.15°C) was observed with the optimized pTx system. Although further research is required, these initial results suggest that the concept of optimizing pTx to reduce DBS

  19. Investigation of Parallel Radiofrequency Transmission for the Reduction of Heating in Long Conductive Leads in 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E McElcheran

    Full Text Available Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS is increasingly used to treat a variety of brain diseases by sending electrical impulses to deep brain nuclei through long, electrically conductive leads. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of patients pre- and post-implantation is desirable to target and position the implant, to evaluate possible side-effects and to examine DBS patients who have other health conditions. Although MRI is the preferred modality for pre-operative planning, MRI post-implantation is limited due to the risk of high local power deposition, and therefore tissue heating, at the tip of the lead. The localized power deposition arises from currents induced in the leads caused by coupling with the radiofrequency (RF transmission field during imaging. In the present work, parallel RF transmission (pTx is used to tailor the RF electric field to suppress coupling effects. Electromagnetic simulations were performed for three pTx coil configurations with 2, 4, and 8-elements, respectively. Optimal input voltages to minimize coupling, while maintaining RF magnetic field homogeneity, were determined for all configurations using a Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm. Resulting electric and magnetic fields were compared to that of a 16-rung birdcage coil. Experimental validation was performed with a custom-built 4-element pTx coil. In simulation, 95-99% reduction of the electric field at the tip of the lead was observed between the various pTx coil configurations and the birdcage coil. Maximal reduction in E-field was obtained with the 8-element pTx coil. Magnetic field homogeneity was comparable to the birdcage coil for the 4- and 8-element pTx configurations. In experiment, a temperature increase of 2±0.15°C was observed at the tip of the wire using the birdcage coil, whereas negligible increase (0.2±0.15°C was observed with the optimized pTx system. Although further research is required, these initial results suggest that the concept of optimizing p

  20. 3D double-echo steady-state sequence assessment of hip joint cartilage and labrum at 3 Tesla: comparative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Antoch, Gerald [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hesper, Tobias; Rettegi, Fanni; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Ruediger; Bittersohl, Bernd [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Paradise Valley Hospital, Joint Preservation and Deformity Correction, San Diego, CA (United States); Tri-city Medical Center, Hip Preservation, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of a high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequence with radial imaging at 3 Tesla (T) for evaluating cartilage and labral alterations in the hip. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data obtained at 3 T, including radially reformatted DESS images and intraoperative data of 45 patients (mean age 42 ± 13.7 years) who underwent hip arthroscopy, were compared. The acetabular cartilage and labrum of the upper hemisphere of the acetabulum and the central femoral head cartilage were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and negative and positive predictive values were determined. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the DESS technique were 96.7%, 75% and 93.7% for detecting cartilage lesions and 98%, 76.2% and 95.9% for detecting labral lesions. The positive and negative predictive values for detecting or ruling out cartilage lesions were 96% and 78.9%. For labral lesions, the positive and negative predictive values were 97.5% and 80%. A high-resolution, 3D DESS technique with radial imaging at 3 T demonstrated high accuracy for detecting hip cartilage and labral lesions with excellent interobserver agreement and moderate correlation between MRI and intraoperative assessment. (orig.)

  1. Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seok Kyun; Kim, Gwang Won; Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Gwang Woo [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jong Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Kwun [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures. The sex hormone levels of the postoperative MTF transsexuals were in the normal range of healthy heterosexual females. The brain areas, which were activated by viewing male nude pictures when compared with viewing female nude pictures, included predominantly the cerebellum, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate gyrus, head of caudate nucleus, amygdala, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and body of caudate nucleus. On the other hand, brain activation induced by viewing female nude pictures was predominantly observed in the hypothalamus and the septal area. Our findings suggest that distinct brain activation patterns associated with visual sexual arousal in postoperative MTF transsexuals reflect their sexual orientation to males.

  2. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  3. Gray matter-specific changes in brain bioenergetics after acute sleep deprivation: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Trksak, George H; Jensen, J Eric; Penetar, David M; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Riedner, Brady A; Tartarini, Wendy L; Dorsey, Cynthia M; Renshaw, Perry F; Lukas, Scott E; Harper, David G

    2014-12-01

    A principal function of sleep may be restoration of brain energy metabolism caused by the energetic demands of wakefulness. Because energetic demands in the brain are greater in gray than white matter, this study used linear mixed-effects models to examine tissue-type specific changes in high-energy phosphates derived using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Experimental laboratory study. Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. A total of 32 MRS scans performed in eight healthy individuals (mean age 35 y; range 23-51 y). Phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) were measured using 31P MRS three dimensional-chemical shift imaging at high field (4 Tesla) after a baseline night of sleep, acute sleep deprivation (SD), and 2 nights of recovery sleep. Novel linear mixed-effects models were constructed using spectral and tissue segmentation data to examine changes in bioenergetics in gray and white matter. PCr increased in gray matter after 2 nights of recovery sleep relative to SD with no significant changes in white matter. Exploratory analyses also demonstrated that increases in PCr were associated with increases in electroencephalographic slow wave activity during recovery sleep. No significant changes in β-NTP were observed. These results demonstrate that sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery-induced changes in high-energy phosphates primarily occur in gray matter, and increases in PCr after recovery sleep may be related to sleep homeostasis. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Evaluation of a laminin-alginate biomaterial, adipocytes, and adipocyte-derived stem cells interaction in animal autologous fat grafting model using 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yo-Shen; Hsueh, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Yen-Yu; Lo, Cheng-Yu; Tai, Hao-Chih; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2017-01-01

    Biomaterials are often added to autologous fat grafts both as supporting matrices for the grafted adipocytes and as cell carrier for adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). This in vivo study used an autologous fat graft model to test a lamininalginate biomaterial, adipocytes, and ADSCs in immune-competent rats. We transplanted different combinations of shredded autologous adipose tissue [designated "A" for adipose tissue]), laminin-alginate beads [designated "B" for bead], and ADSCs [designated "C" for cell]) into the backs of 15 Sprague-Dawley rats. Group A received only adipocytes, Group B received only laminin-alginate beads, Group AB received adipocytes mixed with laminin-alginate beads, Group BC received laminin-alginate beads encapsulating ADSCs, and Group ABC received adipocytes and laminin-alginate beads containing ADSCs. Seven-tesla magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate the rats at the 1st, 6th, and 12th weeks after transplantation. At the 12th week, the rats were sacrificed and the implanted materials were retrieved for gross examination and histological evaluation. The results based on MRI, gross evaluation, and histological data all showed that implants in Group ABC had better resorption of the biomaterial, improved survival of the grafted adipocytes, and adipogenic differentiation of ADSCs. Volume retention of grafts in Group ABC (89%) was also significantly greater than those in Group A (58%) (p < 0.01). Our findings support that the combination of shredded adipose tissue with ADSCs in laminin-alginate beads provided the best overall outcome.

  5. Three tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: can we differentiate complete from partial tears?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten Duffel/Mechelen, Department of Radiology, Duffel (Belgium); Dossche, Lieven; Gestel, Jozef van [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Orthopedics, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Scientific Coordination and Biostatistics, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    To determine the ability of 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to identify partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to allow distinction of complete from partial ACL tears. One hundred seventy-two patients were prospectively studied by 3.0T MR imaging and arthroscopy in our institution. MR images were interpreted in consensus by two experienced reviewers, and the ACL was diagnosed as being normal, partially torn, or completely torn. Diagnostic accuracy of 3.0T MR for the detection of both complete and partial tears of the ACL was calculated using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. There were 132 patients with an intact ACL, 17 had a partial, and 23 had a complete tear of the ACL seen at arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 3.0T MR for complete ACL tears were 83, 99, and 97%, respectively, and, for partial ACL tears, 77, 97, and 95%, respectively. Five of 40 ACL lesions (13%) could not correctly be identified as complete or partial ACL tears. MR imaging at 3.0T represents a highly accurate method for identifying tears of the ACL. However, differentiation between complete and partial ACL tears and identification of partial tears of this ligament remains difficult, even at 3.0T. (orig.)

  6. Preliminary findings on the safety of 1.5 and 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in cardiac pacemaker patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Vincent F; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Ramdat Misier, R Anand; Elvan, Arif; van Es, H Wouter; Rensing, Benno J W M; Raciti, Giovanni; Boersma, Lucas V A

    2017-07-01

    Modern pacemakers are designed to allow patients to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under a set of specific conditions. Aim of this study is to provide confirmatory evidence of safety and performance of a new pacing system (ImageReady™, Boston Scientific) in patients undergoing 1.5 and 3T MRI. Two prospective, nonrandomized, single-arm studies were designed to provide confirmatory data of no impact of MRI on device function, lead parameters, and patient conditions in subjects implanted with the system undergoing a clinically non-indicated 1.5T and 3T MRI, respectively. Device measurements were done within 1 hour before and after the scan and at 1 month follow-up. Thirty-two subjects underwent MRI visit (17 subjects with 1.5T MRI and 15 subjects with 3T MRI). There were no unanticipated adverse effects related to the pacemaker. Device measurements taken pre- and post-MRI scan did not show any clinical relevant change that could indicate an effect of the MRI on the device or at the lead-tissue interface (RV threshold change: 0.01 ± 0.13 V, P = 0.60; RA threshold change: 0.01 ± 0.11 V, P = 0.53; R wave change: -0.44 ± 1.73 mV, P = 0.36; R wave change: 0.12 ± 1.67 mV, P = 0.73), with data confirmed at 1-month follow-up visit. The study documented safety of the pacing system in the 1.5T and 3T MRI environment by showing no adverse events related to device or MRI scan. Additional data are required to cover the more complex scenarios involving different diagnostic needs, conditions of use, clinical conditions, and new emerging technologies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nonenhanced hybridized arterial spin labeled magnetic resonance angiography of the extracranial carotid arteries using a fast low angle shot readout at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Walker, Matthew T; Meyer, Joel R; Murphy, Ian G; Edelman, Robert R

    2016-04-12

    To evaluate ungated nonenhanced hybridized arterial spin labeling (hASL) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the extracranial carotid arteries using a fast low angle shot (FLASH) readout at 3 Tesla. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved and HIPAA-compliant study, we evaluated the image quality (4-point scale) of nonenhanced hASL MRA using a FLASH readout with respect to contrast-enhanced MRA (CEMRA) in 37 patients presenting with neurologic symptoms. Two certified neuroradiologists independently evaluated 407 arterial segments (11 per patient) for image quality. The presence of vascular pathology was determined by consensus reading. Gwet's AC1 was used to assess inter-rater agreement in image quality scores, and image quality scores were correlated with age and body mass index. Objective measurements of arterial lumen area and sharpness in the carotid arteries were compared to values obtained with CEMRA. Comparisons were also made with conventional nonenhanced 2D time-of-flight (TOF) MRA. CEMRA provided the best image quality, while nonenhanced hASL FLASH MRA provided image quality that exceeded 2D TOF at the carotid bifurcation and in the internal and external carotid arteries. All nine vascular abnormalities of the carotid and intracranial arteries detected by CEMRA were depicted with hASL MRA, with no false positives. Inter-rater agreement of image quality scores was highest for CEMRA (AC1 = 0.87), followed by hASL (AC1 = 0.61) and TOF (AC1 = 0.43) (P < 0.001, all comparisons). With respect to CEMRA, agreement in cross-sectional lumen area was significantly better with hASL than TOF in the common carotid artery (intraclass correlation (ICC) = 0.90 versus 0.66; P < 0.05) and at the carotid bifurcation (ICC = 0.87 versus 0.54; P < 0.05). Nonenhanced hASL MRA provided superior arterial sharpness with respect to CEMRA and 2D TOF (P < 0.001). Although inferior to CEMRA in terms of image quality and inter

  8. Accuracy of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging using detection of fiber loss and a visual analog scale for diagnosing partial and complete cranial cruciate ligament ruptures in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Constance G; Muir, Peter; Schaefer, Susan L; Waller, Kenneth R

    2017-11-01

    Canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture is often bilateral and asymmetrical, ranging from partial to complete rupture. The purpose of our diagnostic accuracy study was to assess the accuracy of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of fiber loss and use of a visual analog scale in the diagnosis of complete versus partial cranial cruciate ligament rupture in 28 clinical dogs with unilateral complete rupture and contralateral partial rupture. Three Tesla MRI was performed on 56 stifles using sagittal sequences (T2-weighted fast spin echo with fat saturation, proton density fast spin echo, and T2-weighted 3D fast spin echo CUBE). Two MRI observers assessed the cranial cruciate ligament for fiber loss and completed a visual analog scale. The MRI data were compared to arthroscopy and clinical status. Accuracy classifying partial or complete rupture was assessed using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Compared to arthroscopy, for complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI detection of fiber loss were 0.78, 0.50-0.60, and 0.68-0.71, respectively, and, for partial tears, specificity was 1.00. An MRI visual analog scale score ≥79 was indicative of complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (sensitivity 0.72-0.94 and specificity 0.71-0.84). Using a visual analog scale cut-point ≥79, observers achieved good accuracy discriminating clinical status of partial or complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (area under the curve 0.87-0.93). MRI evaluation for fiber loss and use of a visual analog scale are specific in stifles with clinically stable partial cranial cruciate ligament rupture. In stifles with clinically unstable complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture, both MRI tests are sensitive though not specific compared to arthroscopy. As a diagnostic imaging method, MRI may help guide treatment in patients with cranial cruciate ligament damage, particularly for stable partial rupture. Published 2017

  9. Assessment of global myocardial perfusion reserve using cardiovascular magnetic resonance of coronary sinus flow at 3 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite increasing clinical use, there is limited data regarding regadenoson in stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). In particular, given its long half-life the optimal stress protocol remains unclear. Although Myocardial Perfusion Reserve (MPR) may provide additive prognostic information, current techniques for its measurement are cumbersome and challenging for routine clinical practice. The aims of this study were: 1) To determine the feasibility of MPR quantification during regadenoson stress CMR by measurement of Coronary Sinus (CS) flow; and 2) to investigate the role of aminophylline reversal during regadenoson stress-CMR. Methods 117 consecutive patients with possible myocardial ischemia were prospectively enrolled. Perfusion imaging was performed at 1 minute and 15 minutes after administration of 0.4 mg regadenoson. A subgroup of 41 patients was given aminophylline (100 mg) after stress images were acquired. CS flow was measured using phase-contrast imaging at baseline (pre CS flow), and immediately after the stress (peak CS flow) and rest (post CS flow) perfusion images. Results CS flow measurements were obtained in 92% of patients with no adverse events. MPR was significantly underestimated when calculated as peak CS flow/post CS flow as compared to peak CS flow/pre CS flow (2.43 ± 0.20 vs. 3.28 ± 0.32, p = 0.03). This difference was abolished when aminophylline was administered (3.35 ± 0.44 vs. 3.30 ± 0.52, p = 0.95). Impaired MPR (peak CS flow/pre CS flow Regadenoson stress CMR with MPR measurement from CS flow can be successfully performed in most patients. This measurement of MPR appears practical to perform in the clinical setting. Residual hyperemia is still present even 15 minutes after regadenoson administration, at the time of resting-perfusion acquisition, and is completely reversed by aminophylline. Our findings suggest routine aminophylline administration may be required when

  10. Non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of unruptured intracranial aneurysms at 7 Tesla: Comparison with digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Chen, Bixia [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurosurgery, Essen (Germany); Matsushige, Toshinori [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurosurgery, Essen (Germany); Hiroshima University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Goericke, Sophia L.; Umutlu, Lale; Forsting, Michael [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology (E020), Heidelberg (Germany); Johst, Soeren [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Sure, Ulrich [University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurosurgery, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To prospectively evaluate non-contrast-enhanced 7-Tesla (T) MRA for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) in comparison with DSA. Forty patients with single or multiple UIAs were enrolled in this IRB-approved trial. Sequences acquired at 7 T were TOF MRA and non-contrast-enhanced MPRAGE. All patients additionally underwent 3D rotational DSA. Two neuroradiologists individually analysed the following aneurysm and image features on a five-point scale in 2D and 3D image reconstructions: delineation of parent vessel, dome and neck; overall image quality; presence of artefacts. Interobserver accordance was assessed by the kappa coefficient. A total of 64 UIAs were detected in DSA and in all 2D and 3D MRA image reconstructions. Ratings showed comparable results for DSA and 7-T MRA when considering all image reconstructions. Highest ratings for individual image reconstructions were given for 2D MPRAGE and 3D TOF MRA. Interobserver accordance was almost perfect for the majority of ratings. This study demonstrates excellent delineation of UIAs using 7-T MRA within a clinical setting comparable to the gold standard, DSA. The combination of 7-T non-enhanced MPRAGE and TOF MRA for assessment of untreated UIAs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA. (orig.)

  11. Non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of unruptured intracranial aneurysms at 7 Tesla: Comparison with digital subtraction angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H; Matsushige, Toshinori; Goericke, Sophia L; Chen, Bixia; Umutlu, Lale; Quick, Harald H; Ladd, Mark E; Johst, Sören; Forsting, Michael; Sure, Ulrich; Schlamann, Marc

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate non-contrast-enhanced 7-Tesla (T) MRA for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) in comparison with DSA. Forty patients with single or multiple UIAs were enrolled in this IRB-approved trial. Sequences acquired at 7 T were TOF MRA and non-contrast-enhanced MPRAGE. All patients additionally underwent 3D rotational DSA. Two neuroradiologists individually analysed the following aneurysm and image features on a five-point scale in 2D and 3D image reconstructions: delineation of parent vessel, dome and neck; overall image quality; presence of artefacts. Interobserver accordance was assessed by the kappa coefficient. A total of 64 UIAs were detected in DSA and in all 2D and 3D MRA image reconstructions. Ratings showed comparable results for DSA and 7-T MRA when considering all image reconstructions. Highest ratings for individual image reconstructions were given for 2D MPRAGE and 3D TOF MRA. Interobserver accordance was almost perfect for the majority of ratings. This study demonstrates excellent delineation of UIAs using 7-T MRA within a clinical setting comparable to the gold standard, DSA. The combination of 7-T non-enhanced MPRAGE and TOF MRA for assessment of untreated UIAs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA. • Non-enhanced 7-T MRA allowed excellent delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). • Image quality at 7-T was comparable with DSA considering both sequences. • Assessment of UIAs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA.

  12. Whole-brain three-dimensional T2-weighted BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Jones, Craig K

    2014-12-01

    A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. It uses a T2-preparation module to induce blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, followed by a single-shot three-dimensional (3D) fast gradient-echo readout with short echo time (TE). It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the "dead time" due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed "3D T2prep-GRE," was implemented at 7 Tesla (T) with a typical spatial (2.5 × 2.5 × 2.5 mm(3) ) and temporal (TR = 2.3 s) resolution for functional MRI (fMRI) and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Intra-individual crossover comparison of gadobenate dimeglumine and gadopentetate dimeglumine for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the supraaortic vessels at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueltmann, Eva; Erb, Gunter; Kirchin, Miles A; Klose, Uwe; Naegele, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    To compare gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the supraaortic vessels at 3 Tesla. Twelve healthy volunteers each underwent two contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography examinations, one with Gd-BOPTA and one with Gd-DTPA each at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight. The 2 examinations were performed in randomized order and were separated by at least 72 hours. Imaging was performed in the coronal plane at 3T (Magnetom TIM Trio Siemens) using a 12-channel neurovascular array coil. The MR sequence parameters were identical for all examinations. Maximum intensity projection reconstructions were evaluated separately and in matched-pairs by a single independent blinded reviewer in terms of qualitative (5-point scales for technical quality and vessel delineation) and quantitative (relative contrast-to-noise ratio) contrast enhancement across 19 arteries/arterial segments comprising the internal carotid arteries; anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries; vertebral arteries; and basilar artery. Findings were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The mean technical quality across all examinations was significantly (P = 0.031) greater after Gd-BOPTA. The overall median score for vessel delineation was also significantly higher for Gd-BOPTA than for Gd-DTPA (4.3 vs. 3.7; P = 0.005). Matched-pairs assessment revealed significant (P

  14. The diagnostic performance of non-contrast 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) versus 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance arthrography (1.5-T MRA) in femoro-acetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Rodríguez, Ana M; De Lucas-Villarrubia, Jose C; Pastrana-Ledesma, Miguel; Hualde-Juvera, Ana; Méndez-Alonso, Santiago; Padron, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T non-contrast MRI versus 1.5-T MRA for assessing labrum and articular cartilage lesions in patients with clinical suspicion of femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). Fifty patients (thirty men and twenty women, mean age 42.5 years) underwent 1.5-T MRA, 3-T MRI and arthroscopy on the same hip. An optimized high-resolution proton density spin echo pulse sequence was included in the 3-T non-contrast MRI protocol. The 3-T non-contrast MRI identified forty-two of the forty-three arthroscopically proven tears at the labral-chondral transitional zone (sensitivity, 97.7%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value (PPV), 100%; negative predictive value (NPV), 87.5%; accuracy 98%). With 1.5-T MRA, forty-four tears were diagnosed. However, there was one false positive (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 85.7%; PPV, 97.7%; NPV, 100%; accuracy 98%). Agreement between arthroscopy and MRI, whether 3-T non-contrast MRI or 1.5-T MRA, as to the degree of chondral lesion in the acetabulum was reached in half of the patients and in the femur in 76% of patients. Non-invasive assessment of the hip is possible with 3-T MR magnet. 3-T non-contrast MRI could replace MRA as the workhorse technique for assessing hip internal damage. MRA would then be reserved for young adults with a strong clinical suspicion of FAI but normal findings on 3-T non-contrast MRI. When compared with 1.5-T MRA, optimized sequences with 3-T non-contrast MRI help in detecting normal variants and in diagnosing articular cartilage lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hepatic Iron Quantification on 3 Tesla (3 T Magnetic Resonance (MR: Technical Challenges and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Anwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MR has become a reliable and noninvasive method of hepatic iron quantification. Currently, most of the hepatic iron quantification is performed on 1.5 T MR, and the biopsy measurements have been paired with R2 and R2* values for 1.5 T MR. As the use of 3 T MR scanners is steadily increasing in clinical practice, it has become important to evaluate the practicality of calculating iron burden at 3 T MR. Hepatic iron quantification on 3 T MR requires a better understanding of the process and more stringent technical considerations. The purpose of this work is to focus on the technical challenges in establishing a relationship between T2* values at 1.5 T MR and 3 T MR for hepatic iron concentration (HIC and to develop an appropriately optimized MR protocol for the evaluation of T2* values in the liver at 3 T magnetic field strength. We studied 22 sickle cell patients using multiecho fast gradient-echo sequence (MFGRE 3 T MR and compared the results with serum ferritin and liver biopsy results. Our study showed that the quantification of hepatic iron on 3 T MRI in sickle cell disease patients correlates well with clinical blood test results and biopsy results. 3 T MR liver iron quantification based on MFGRE can be used for hepatic iron quantification in transfused patients.

  16. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Nakiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. INTRODUCTION: Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. METHODS: Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1. Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1 and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1. Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%, which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between

  17. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced) and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakiri, Guilherme S.; Santos, Antonio C.; Abud, Thiago G.; Abud, Daniel G., E-mail: gsnakiri@yahoo.com.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Radiology; Aragon, Davi C. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Statistics; Colli, Benedicto O. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Neurosurgery

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: to compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. Introduction: many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurysmal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. Methods: forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuro radiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. Results: inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1). Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1) and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1). Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%), which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between contrast-enhanced-magnetic

  18. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 Teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced) and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakiri, Guilherme S; Santos, Antonio C; Abud, Thiago G; Aragon, Davi C; Colli, Benedicto O; Abud, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1). Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1) and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1). Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%), which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography and

  19. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. A comparative analysis of 7.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histology measurements of knee articular cartilage in a canine posterolateral knee injury model: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Scott R; Griffith, Chad J; Wijdicks, Coen A; Goerke, Ute; McNulty, Margaret A; Parker, Josh B; Carlson, Cathy S; Ellermann, Jutta; LaPrade, Robert F

    2009-11-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the use of 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating articular cartilage degeneration and quantifying the progression of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate articular cartilage cross-sectional area and maximum thickness in the medial compartment of intact and destabilized canine knees using 7.0-T magnetic resonance images and compare these results with those obtained from the corresponding histologic sections. Controlled laboratory study. Five canines had a surgically created unilateral grade III posterolateral knee injury that was followed for 6 months before euthanasia. The opposite, noninjured knee was used as a control. At necropsy, 3-dimensional gradient echo images of the medial tibial plateau of both knees were obtained using a 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Articular cartilage area and maximum thickness in this site were digitally measured on the magnetic resonance images. The proximal tibias were processed for routine histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Articular cartilage area and maximum thickness were measured in histologic sections corresponding to the sites of the magnetic resonance slices. The magnetic resonance imaging results revealed an increase in articular cartilage area and maximum thickness in surgical knees compared with control knees in all specimens; these changes were significant for both parameters (P .1). These results demonstrate that 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging provides an alternative method to histology to evaluate early osteoarthritic changes in articular cartilage in a canine model by detecting increases in articular cartilage area. The noninvasive nature of 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging will allow for in vivo monitoring of osteoarthritis progression and intervention in animal models and humans for osteoarthritis.

  1. Laser Femto-Tesla Magnetic Gradiometer (LFMG) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase 1 SBIR proposal describes development of a conceptual design for a Laser Femto-Tesla Magnetic Gradiometer (LFMG). The LFMG innovations include the ability...

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Algorithm for the Computer-Assisted Segmentation of the Human Hypothalamus on 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura; Anwander, Alfred; Strauß, Maria; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Möller, Harald E.; Hegerl, Ulrich; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Post mortem studies have shown volume changes of the hypothalamus in psychiatric patients. With 7T magnetic resonance imaging this effect can now be investigated in vivo in detail. To benefit from the sub-millimeter resolution requires an improved segmentation procedure. The traditional anatomical landmarks of the hypothalamus were refined using 7T T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. A detailed segmentation algorithm (unilateral hypothalamus) was developed for colour-coded, histogram-matched images, and evaluated in a sample of 10 subjects. Test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated in terms of intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice's coefficient (DC). The computer-assisted segmentation algorithm ensured test-retest reliabilities of ICC≥.97 (DC≥96.8) and inter-rater reliabilities of ICC≥.94 (DC = 95.2). There were no significant volume differences between the segmentation runs, raters, and hemispheres. The estimated volumes of the hypothalamus lie within the range of previous histological and neuroimaging results. We present a computer-assisted algorithm for the manual segmentation of the human hypothalamus using T1-weighted 7T magnetic resonance imaging. Providing very high test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, it outperforms former procedures established at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance images and thus can serve as a gold standard for future automated procedures. PMID:23935821

  3. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  4. Prospective screening study of 0.5 Tesla dedicated magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in young, high-risk women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumkin Jules H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based screening guidelines are needed for women under 40 with a family history of breast cancer, a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, or other risk factors. An accurate assessment of breast cancer risk is required to balance the benefits and risks of surveillance, yet published studies have used narrow risk assessment schemata for enrollment. Breast density limits the sensitivity of film-screen mammography but is not thought to pose a limitation to MRI, however the utility of MRI surveillance has not been specifically examined before in women with dense breasts. Also, all MRI surveillance studies yet reported have used high strength magnets that may not be practical for dedicated imaging in many breast centers. Medium strength 0.5 Tesla MRI may provide an alternative economic option for surveillance. Methods We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized pilot study of 30 women age 25–49 years with dense breasts evaluating the addition of 0.5 Tesla MRI to conventional screening. All participants had a high quantitative breast cancer risk, defined as ≥ 3.5% over the next 5 years per the Gail or BRCAPRO models, and/or a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation. Results The average age at enrollment was 41.4 years and the average 5-year risk was 4.8%. Twenty-two subjects had BIRADS category 1 or 2 breast MRIs (negative or probably benign, whereas no category 4 or 5 MRIs (possibly or probably malignant were observed. Eight subjects had BIRADS 3 results, identifying lesions that were "probably benign", yet prompting further evaluation. One of these subjects was diagnosed with a stage T1aN0M0 invasive ductal carcinoma, and later determined to be a BRCA1 mutation carrier. Conclusion Using medium-strength MRI we were able to detect 1 early breast tumor that was mammographically undetectable among 30 young high-risk women with dense breasts. These results support the concept that breast MRI can enhance surveillance for young high

  5. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a ... the limitations of MRI defecography? What is magnetic resonance (MR) defecography? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  6. ENERGY GAIN BY MEANS OF RESONANCE IN THE TESLA COIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Batygin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical review of publications on the problem, first formulated by Nikola Tesla, generating «free» energy from the air in the surrounding space has been presented. The hypothesis of the resonance phenomenon as a «key» to the air energy has been advanced. The main unsolved problem is the extrac-tion of «free» energy (proposed to call it «resonance» and its supply to the electrical load have been noted. It is expected that the quality factor of the secondary circuit must be large enough.

  7. Role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed at 1.5 Tesla MR system using a standard head coil. Imaging included conventional MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was done using either single or multi-voxel technique. Surgical biopsy was then performed to ...

  8. The effects of the use of piezoelectric motors in a 1.5-Tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging system (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, O; Oellinger, J; Lüth, T C; Felix, R; Boenick, U

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation with two different rotatory piezomotors in a closed 1.5 Tesla high-field MRI. The focus of the investigation was on testing the functionality of these motors within the MRI and to determining the image interference they caused. To obtain a differentiated estimate of the interference the motors were tested in both the passive (turned off, i.e. without current flow) and active (turned on, i.e. with current flow) state during MRI scanning. Three different types of sequences were used for the test: Spin-Echo (SE), Gradient-Echo (GE) and Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI). A plastic container filled with a gadolinium-manganese solution was used for representation of the artefacts. The motors investigated were placed parallel to the container at predetermined distances during the experiment. The results show that the motors investigated suffered no functional limitations in the magnetic field of the MRI but, depending on the type of motor, the measurement distance and the state of the motor, the motors had different effects on the sequence images. A motor in the off-state placed immediately next to the object to be measured mainly causes artefacts because of its material properties. If, on the other hand, the piezomotor is in the on-state images with strong noise result when the motor is immediately next to the object being measured. The images regain their normal quality when the motor is approximately at a distance of 1 m from the object being investigated. Driving the motor inside the MRI, therefore, is only to be recommended during the pauses in scanning: this delivers artefact-free images if minimal, motor-specific distances are kept to. With regard to the three different types of sequences it was determined that the SE sequence was the least sensitive and the EPI sequence the most sensitive to disturbance. The GE sequence showed only minimal differences to the SE sequence with regard to signal-to-noise ratios

  9. 3.0Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for comprehensive renal evaluation of living renal donors: pilot study with computerized tomography angiography (CTA) comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Mittul; Dermendjian, Harout; Gómez, Ana M; Tan, Nelly; Margolis, Daniel J; Lu, David S; Gritsch, H Albin; Raman, Steven S

    2016-01-01

    Most living related donor (LRD) kidneys are harvested laparoscopically. Renal vascular anatomy helps determine donor suitability for laparoscopic nephrectomy. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the current gold standard for preoperative imaging; magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) offers advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and lower incidence of contrast reactions. We evaluated 3.0T MRA for assessing renal anatomy of LRDs. Thirty consecutive LRDs underwent CTA followed by 3.0T MRA. Data points included number and branching of vessels, incidental findings, and urothelial opacification. Studies were individually evaluated by three readers blinded to patient data. Studies were reevaluated in consensus with discrepancies revealed, and final consensus results were labeled "truth". Compared with consensus "truth", both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging were highly accurate for assessment of arterial and venous anatomy, although CT was superior for detection of late venous confluence as well as detection of renal stones. Both modalities were comparable in opacification of lower ureters and bladder; MRA underperformed CTA for opacification of upper urinary tracts. 3.0T MRA enabled excellent detection of comprehensive renal anatomy compared to CTA in LRDs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Topographic distribution of brain iron deposition and small cerebrovascular lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques; Devos, David; Moreau, Caroline; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in 15% of the cases. A neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD-TDP is suspected. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study compares the topographic distribution of iron (Fe) deposition and the incidence of small cerebrovascular lesions in ALS and in FTLD brains. Seventy-eight post-mortem brains underwent 7.0-tesla MRI. The patients consisted of 12 with ALS, 38 with FTLD, and 28 controls. Three ALS brains had minor FTLD features. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere were submitted to T2 and T2* MRI sequences. The amount of Fe deposition in the deep brain structures and the number of small cerebrovascular lesions was determined in ALS and the subtypes of FTLD compared to control brains, with neuropathological correlates. A significant increase of Fe deposition was observed in the claustrum, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, thalamus, and subthalamic nucleus of the FTLD-FUS and FTLD-TDP groups, while in the ALS one, the Fe increase was only observed in the caudate and the subthalamic nuclei. White matter changes were only significantly more severe in the FTLD compared to those in ALS and in controls brains. Cortical micro-bleeds were increased in the frontal and temporal lobes of FTLD as well as of ALS brains compared to controls. Cortical micro-infarcts were, on the other hand, more frequent in the control compared to the ALS and FTLD groups. The present study supports the assumption of a neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD and illustrates the favourable vascular risk profile in these diseases.

  11. Six tesla analyzing magnet for heavy-ion beam transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.P.; Bollinger, L.; Erskine, J.; Genens, L.; Hoffman, J.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting analyzer magnet for particle beam deflection has been designed and is being fabricated for use at the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). This six tesla magnet will provide 45/sup 0/ of deflection for the heavy-ion beams from the ATLAS tandem electrostatic accelerator and together with its twin will replace the existing conventional 90/sup 0/ analyzer magnet which will become inadequate when ATLAS is completed.

  12. Evaluation of preoperative high magnetic field motor functional MRI (3 Tesla) in glioma patients by navigated electrocortical stimulation and postoperative outcome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roessler, K; Donat, M; Lanzenberger, R; Novak, K; Geissler, A; Gartus, A; Tahamtan, A R; Milakara, D; Czech, T; Barth, M; Knosp, E; Beisteiner, R

    2005-01-01

    The validity of 3 Tesla motor functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with gliomas involving the primary motor cortex was investigated by intraoperative navigated motor cortex stimulation (MCS...

  13. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Oliver; Winter, Lukas; Dieringer, Matthias A; Els, Antje; Oezerdem, Celal; Rieger, Jan; Kuehne, Andre; Cassara, Antonino M; Pfeiffer, Harald; Wetterling, Friedrich; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation. Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated. Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit. Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants.

  14. Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Winter

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T. For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T to 600 MHz (14.0T. The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50% hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32mm(3 iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  15. Specific proof of various stages of Osler's disease of the brain via high field magnetic resonance tomography (1. 5 Tesla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, F.; Bluemm, R.G.; Beyer, H.K.

    1988-08-01

    MR is a sensitive noninvasive examination method for diagnosing parenchymatous cryptic arteriovenous malformations and sequels of cerebral haemorrhage. In a patient with recurring nosebleed and brain stem syndrome eleven so-called cryptic arteriovenous malformations or their haemorrhage sequels were diagnosed via magnetic resonance tomography. Basing on these specific findings, nosebleeding, and a positive family anamnesis, the findings could be classified as belonging to manifestations of Osler's disease (hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia). This rare disease is characterised by a triad of signs: telangiectasias, recurring bleeding, and heredity. In this article the specific MR image is compared with the CT pattern and the results are discussed against the background of literature on Osler's disease which is also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  16. Renal magnetic resonance angiography at 3.0 Tesla using a 32-element phased-array coil system and parallel imaging in 2 directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenchel, Michael; Nael, Kambiz; Deshpande, Vibhas S; Finn, J Paul; Kramer, Ulrich; Miller, Stephan; Ruehm, Stefan; Laub, Gerhard

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of renal magnetic resonance angiography at 3.0 T using a phased-array coil system with 32-coil elements. Specifically, high parallel imaging factors were used for an increased spatial resolution and anatomic coverage of the whole abdomen. Signal-to-noise values and the g-factor distribution of the 32 element coil were examined in phantom studies for the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) sequence. Eleven volunteers (6 men, median age of 30.0 years) were examined on a 3.0-T MR scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA) using a 32-element phased-array coil (prototype from In vivo Corp.). Contrast-enhanced 3D-MRA (TR 2.95 milliseconds, TE 1.12 milliseconds, flip angle 25-30 degrees , bandwidth 650 Hz/pixel) was acquired with integrated generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA), in both phase- and slice-encoding direction. Images were assessed by 2 independent observers with regard to image quality, noise and presence of artifacts. Signal-to-noise levels of 22.2 +/- 22.0 and 57.9 +/- 49.0 were measured with (GRAPPAx6) and without parallel-imaging, respectively. The mean g-factor of the 32-element coil for GRAPPA with an acceleration of 3 and 2 in the phase-encoding and slice-encoding direction, respectively, was 1.61. High image quality was found in 9 of 11 volunteers (2.6 +/- 0.8) with good overall interobserver agreement (k = 0.87). Relatively low image quality with higher noise levels were encountered in 2 volunteers. MRA at 3.0 T using a 32-element phased-array coil is feasible in healthy volunteers. High diagnostic image quality and extended anatomic coverage could be achieved with application of high parallel imaging factors.

  17. High spatial resolution and temporally resolved T2* mapping of normal human myocardium at 7.0 Tesla: an ultrahigh field magnetic resonance feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Hezel

    Full Text Available Myocardial tissue characterization using T(2(* relaxation mapping techniques is an emerging application of (preclinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. The increase in microscopic susceptibility at higher magnetic field strengths renders myocardial T(2(* mapping at ultrahigh magnetic fields conceptually appealing. This work demonstrates the feasibility of myocardial T(2(* imaging at 7.0 T and examines the applicability of temporally-resolved and high spatial resolution myocardial T(2(* mapping. In phantom experiments single cardiac phase and dynamic (CINE gradient echo imaging techniques provided similar T(2(* maps. In vivo studies showed that the peak-to-peak B(0 difference following volume selective shimming was reduced to approximately 80 Hz for the four chamber view and mid-ventricular short axis view of the heart and to 65 Hz for the left ventricle. No severe susceptibility artifacts were detected in the septum and in the lateral wall for T(2(* weighting ranging from TE = 2.04 ms to TE = 10.2 ms. For TE >7 ms, a susceptibility weighting induced signal void was observed within the anterior and inferior myocardial segments. The longest T(2(* values were found for anterior (T(2(* = 14.0 ms, anteroseptal (T(2(* = 17.2 ms and inferoseptal (T(2(* = 16.5 ms myocardial segments. Shorter T(2(* values were observed for inferior (T(2(* = 10.6 ms and inferolateral (T(2(* = 11.4 ms segments. A significant difference (p = 0.002 in T(2(* values was observed between end-diastole and end-systole with T(2(* changes of up to approximately 27% over the cardiac cycle which were pronounced in the septum. To conclude, these results underscore the challenges of myocardial T(2(* mapping at 7.0 T but demonstrate that these issues can be offset by using tailored shimming techniques and dedicated acquisition schemes.

  18. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Weinberger

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation.Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated.Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit.Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants.

  19. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey's head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system.

  20. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Herrmann

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx and a phased array coil for receive (Rx tightly enclosing the monkey's head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI.The TW Primate System (TWPS uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil.The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired.The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system.

  1. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific information about your own examination. What is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)? What is MRI used for? How safe ... What is the MRI examination like? What is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)? MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, is a ...

  3. T1 mapping using saturation recovery single-shot acquisition at 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: comparison to late gadolinium enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ryo; Kido, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Masashi; Kido, Teruhito; Kurata, Akira; Uetani, Teruyoshi; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the T1 values of segments and slices and the reproducibility in healthy controls, using saturation recovery single-shot acquisition (SASHA) at 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, we examined the difference in T1 values between hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and healthy controls, and compared those with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Twenty-one HCM patients and 10 healthy controls underwent T1 mapping before and after contrast administration. T1 values were measured in 12 segments. Native T1 values were significantly longer in HCM than in healthy controls [1373 ms (1312-1452 ms) vs. 1279 ms (1229-1326 ms); p T1 values were significantly longer than in healthy control segments [1366 ms (1300-1439 ms) vs. 1279 ms (1229-1326 ms); p T1 values, we differentiated between HCM and healthy controls with 95% sensitivity, 90% specificity, 94% accuracy, and an area under the curve of 0.95. Native T1 values using a SASHA at 3T could differentiate HCM from healthy controls. Moreover, native T1 values have the potential to detect abnormal myocardium that cannot be identified adequately by LGE in HCM.

  4. Evaluation of intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Inés; Richter, Henning; Beckmann, Katrin; Meier, Dieter; Dennler, Matthias; Kircher, Patrick R

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate metabolite concentrations of the brains of dogs with intracranial neoplasia or noninfectious meningoencephalitis by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3.0 T. ANIMALS 29 dogs with intracranial lesions (14 with neoplasia [3 oligodendromas, 3 glioblastomas multiformes, 3 astrocytomas, 2 lymphomas, and 3 meningiomas] and 15 is with noninfectious meningoencephalitis) and 10 healthy control dogs. PROCEDURES Short echo time, single voxel (1)H-MRS at 3.0 T was performed on neoplastic and noninfectious inflammatory intracranial lesions identified with conventional MRI. Metabolites of interest included N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline, creatine, myoinositol, the glutamine-glutamate complex (Glx), glutathione, taurine, lactate, and lipids. Data were analyzed with postprocessing fitting algorithm software. Metabolite concentrations relative to brain water content were calculated and compared with results for the healthy control dogs, which had been previously evaluated with the same (1)H MRS technique. RESULTS NAA, creatine, and Glx concentrations were reduced in the brains of dogs with neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis, whereas choline concentration was increased. Concentrations of these metabolites differed significantly between dogs with neoplasia and dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. Concentrations of NAA, creatine, and Glx were significantly lower in dogs with neoplasia, whereas the concentration of choline was significantly higher in dogs with neoplasia. Lipids were predominantly found in dogs with high-grade intra-axial neoplasia, meningioma, and necrotizing meningoencephalitis. A high concentration of taurine was found in 10 of 15 dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE (1)H MRS provided additional metabolic information about intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs.

  5. In vivo T1rho quantitative assessment of knee cartilage after anterior cruciate ligament injury using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolbos, Radu I; Ma, C Benjamin; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Li, Xiaojuan

    2008-11-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the spatial distribution of cartilage structure in controls and patients, and to quantitatively assess the cartilage overlying bone marrow edema-like lesion (BMEL) and within defined cartilage compartments in knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears using T1rho mapping technique at 3 T magnetic resonance imaging. The knee joints of 15 healthy controls (4 women, 11 men, mean age = 30.1 year) and 16 patients with ACL tear (5 women, 11 men, mean age = 32.5 years) who showed BMEL was studied using a 3 T GE MR scanner and a quadrature knee coil. The imaging protocol included sequences for cartilage morphology and 3D quantitative T1rho mapping. Lateral femoral condyle and medial femoral condyles compartments were partitioned into anterior and posterior nonweight-bearing (ant-nwb and postnwb) portions and weight-bearing (wb) portions in all subjects. In patients only, cartilage overlying BMEL and surrounding cartilage portions were also defined. T1rho values were quantified in cartilage overlying BMEL and surrounding compartments and in each defined compartment of the ACL-injured knees, and compared with controls. Significantly elevated T1rho values were found in the femoral nonweight-bearing (nwb) portions when compared with weight-bearing (wb) portions both in patients and controls. Significantly increased T1rho values were found in cartilage overlying BMEL when compared with surrounding cartilage at the lateral tibia (LT), but no difference was found in the lateral femoral condyle. T1rho mapping technique provides tools to quantitatively evaluate the cartilage matrix overlying BMEL in patients with ACL injuries. Cartilage abnormalities are already present following initial ACL injuries over the lateral tibia. Quantitative MRI can allow critical evaluation of medical and surgical treatments for ligament and degenerative conditions of the knee.

  6. An initial clinical experience to improve postoperative monitoring of peripheral nerve regeneration following neurotmesis using magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez Neto, Oswaldo R; Freitas, Tiago; Mendelovitz, Paulo; Schetchtman, Noel; Kessler, Irvena

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions in the upper limbs occur predominantly in reproductive-age men and are often caused by sharp objects. Microsurgery is the choice treatment for these injuries, and regeneration after surgery typically is evaluated with clinical and electrophysiological examinations. The aim of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate peripheral nerve regeneration after complete neurotmesis, and to compare the MRI findings with those obtained with clinical and EMG evaluations. We conducted a prospective analysis of 6 patients referred to the Neurosurgery Unit of the University Hospital of Brasília (HUB) with a diagnosis of traumatic neurotmesis of the ulnar nerve. Patients that underwent primary neurorrhaphy were followed with clinical evaluation to monitor the progression of nerve regeneration and clinical recovery, which included physical examination, electromyography (EMG) and MRI on postoperative days 14 and 50 and physical examination along with EMG after 6 months. T2 signal intensities on 1.5-T MRI were analyzed simultaneously with other clinical evaluations. We observed hyperintense T2 signals at the first postoperative examination, which decreased significantly by the second postoperative examination (P<0.05). All patients showed partial recovery of nerve function 6 months after surgery. These findings corroborate those of previous studies using experimental models and at least 1.5-T MRI. The signal decrease in the repaired nerves could be correlated to the ingrowth of regenerating axons. Therefore, 1.5-T MRI might be used to diagnose discontinuities within peripheral nerves, detect neuromas, monitor nerve regeneration, and determine the prognosis after peripheral nerve repair, presenting as a non-invasive exam.

  7. Regional Metabolic Changes in the Hippocampus and Posterior Cingulate Area Detected with 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiqun Wang; Cheng Zhao; Kuncheng Li (Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)); Lei Yu; Weidong Zhou (Dept. of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) plays an important role in early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD). There are many reports on MRS studies among individuals with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, very few studies have compared spectroscopic data of different limbic regions among AD and MCI subjects. Purpose: To compare metabolite changes of different regions in the brain of AD and MCI patients by using 3.0T short-echo-time MRS. Material and Methods: Metabolite ratios in the hippocampus and posterior cingulate area were compared in a group of patients with AD (n=16), MCI (n=16), and normal subjects as a control group (n=16). Clinical neuropsychological tests were measured in all subjects. Results: In the hippocampus, there were significant differences in N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), myo-inositol (mI)/Cr, and mI/NAA ratios among the three groups. However, there were no significant differences in choline (Cho)/Cr ratio among the three groups. In the posterior cingulate area, there were no significant differences in the NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr ratios among the three groups. However, there were significant differences in mI/NAA ratio between patients with AD and the control group, and between the AD and MCI groups. In addition, there was significant correlation between mI/NAA ratio and Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) score in subjects with AD and MCI. Conclusion: The study reveals that the elevation of mI/NAA ratio in the hippocampus is more significant than that in the posterior cingulate area, which corresponds to the pathologic procession of AD. The ratios of mI/NAA in the hippocampus and in the posterior cingulate area together provide valuable discrimination among the three groups (AD, MCI, and controls). There is a significant correlation between mI/NAA ratio and cognitive decline.

  8. Dapsone improves functional deficit and diminishes brain damage evaluated by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance image after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Mondragón-Lozano, Rodrigo; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Nava-Ruiz, Concepción; Ríos, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of death and the first of disability in the world population. We have shown that dapsone acts as an antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic agent after brain Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rats; however, its therapeutic efficacy, measured by imaging has not been characterized. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dapsone by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate imaging markers with motor function and oxidative stress after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). We used male rats throughout the experiment. Functional deficit after I/R was assessed by using Longa scale. The area of brain tissue damage was measured by histology. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Finally, difussion tensor MRI was employed to measure the fractional anisotropy (FA), as a MRI marker of the pathophysiologic brain status. Results showed a better functional recovery and less damaged tissue in animals treated with dapsone vs control group. The values of FA were higher in animals receiving treatment, indicating a better preservation of brain structure. At early stages of the damage, dapsone was able to reduce both oxidative markers (Nrf-2 and ROS). Our findings provide new evidence for the efficacy of dapsone when administered during the acute phase after I/R and that quantitative sequences of MRI are useful for characterizing its potential therapeutic benefits after stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Early microvascular dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease is not detectable on 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencl, Stine; Garz, Cornelia; Niklass, Solveig; Braun, Holger; Göb, Eva; Homola, György; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reymann, Klaus G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Human cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) has distinct histopathologic and imaging findings in its advanced stages. In spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP), a well-established animal model of CSVD, we recently demonstrated that cerebral microangiopathy is initiated by early microvascular dysfunction leading to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an activated coagulatory state resulting in capillary and arteriolar erythrocyte accumulations (stases). In the present study, we investigated whether initial microvascular dysfunction and other stages of the pathologic CSVD cascade can be detected by serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fourteen SHRSP and three control (Wistar) rats (aged 26-44 weeks) were investigated biweekly by 3.0 Tesla (3 T) MRI. After perfusion, brains were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and histology was correlated with MRI data. Three SHRSP developed terminal CSVD stages including cortical, hippocampal, and striatal infarcts and macrohemorrhages, which could be detected consistently by MRI. Corresponding histology showed small vessel thromboses and increased numbers of small perivascular bleeds in the infarcted areas. However, 3 T MRI failed to visualize intravascular erythrocyte accumulations, even in those brain regions with the highest densities of affected vessels and the largest vessels affected by stases, as well as failing to detect small perivascular bleeds. Serial MRI at a field strength of 3 T failed to detect the initial microvascular dysfunction and subsequent small perivascular bleeds in SHRSP; only terminal stages of cerebral microangiopathy were reliably detected. Further investigations at higher magnetic field strengths (7 T) using blood- and flow-sensitive sequences are currently underway.

  10. Biological responses of human solid tumor cells to X-ray irradiation within a 1.5-Tesla magnetic field generated by a magnetic resonance imaging–linear accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Li; Hoogcarspel, Stan Jelle; Wen, Zhifei; van Vulpen, Marco; Molkentine, David P.; Kok, Jan; Lin, Steven H.; Broekhuizen, Roel; Ang, Kie Kian; Bovenschen, Niels; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Frank, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Devices that combine magnetic resonance imaging with linear accelerators (MRL) represent a novel tool for MR-guided radiotherapy. However, whether magnetic fields (MFs) generated by these devices affect the radiosensitivity of tumors is unknown. We investigated the influence of a 1.5-T MF on cell

  11. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Buatti, John M., E-mail: john-buatti@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  12. Value of 3-Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and targeted biopsy for improved risk stratification in patients considered for active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Rodrigo R; Viana, Publio C; Mattedi, Romulo L; Guglielmetti, Giuliano B; Cordeiro, Mauricio D; Coelho, Rafael F; Nahas, William C; Srougi, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate and transrectal ultrasonography guided biopsy (TRUS-Bx) with visual estimation in early risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer on active surveillance (AS). Patients with low-risk, low-grade, localised prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled and submitted to a 3-T 16-channel cardiac surface coil mpMRI of the prostate and confirmatory biopsy (CBx), which included a standard biopsy (SBx) and visual estimation-guided TRUS-Bx. Cancer-suspicious regions were defined using Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) scores. Reclassification occurred if CBx confirmed the presence of a Gleason score ≥7, greater than three positive fragments, or ≥50% involvement of any core. The performance of mpMRI for the prediction of CBx results was assessed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to study relationships between age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, PSA density (PSAD), number of positive cores in the initial biopsy, and mpMRI grade on CBx reclassification. Our report is consistent with the Standards of Reporting for MRI-targeted Biopsy Studies (START) guidelines. In all, 105 patients were available for analysis in the study. From this cohort, 42 (40%) had PI-RADS 1, 2, or 3 lesions and 63 (60%) had only grade 4 or 5 lesions. Overall, 87 patients underwent visual estimation TRUS-Bx. Reclassification among patients with PI-RADS 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 was 0%, 23.1%, 9.1%, 74.5%, and 100%, respectively. Overall, mpMRI sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for disease reclassification were 92.5%, 76%, 81%, and 90.5%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, only PSAD and mpMRI remained significant for reclassification (P PI-RADS grades 4 or 5 lesions. Despite the usefulness of visual-guided biopsy, it still remains highly recommended to retrieve standard fragments during CBx in order

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee at 3 and 7 Tesla: a comparison using dedicated multi-channel coils and optimised 2D and 3D protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); University of Berne, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Berne (Switzerland); Baer, Peter [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Blanke, Matthias [University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Fujita, Hiroyuki [Quality Electrodynamics (QED), Mayfield Village, OH (United States)

    2012-09-15

    To show the feasibility and possible superiority of two 7 Tesla knee protocols (''7 T high resolution'' and ''7 T quick'') using a new 28-channel knee coil compared to an optimised 3 T knee protocol using an 8-channel knee coil. The study was approved by the ethics committee. Both 3 T and 7 T MRI of the knee were performed in 10 healthy volunteers (29.6 {+-} 7.9 years), with two 2D sequences (PD-TSE and T1-SE) and three isotropic 3D sequences (TRUFI, FLASH and PD-TSE SPACE). Quantitative contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitative evaluations were performed by different readers, and intra- and inter-rater agreement was assessed. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as well as the CNR values for cartilage-bone, cartilage-fluid, cartilage-menisci and menisci-fluid were, in most cases, higher at 7 T compared to 3 T, and the 7 T quick measurement was slightly superior compared to the 7 T high-resolution measurement. The results of the subjective qualitative analysis were higher for the 7 T measurements compared to the 3 T measurements. Inter- and intra-observer reliability was high (0.884-0.999). Through higher field strength and an optimal coil, resolution at 7 T can be increased and acquisition time can be reduced, with superior quantitative and comparable qualitative results compared to 3 T. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of Gross Body Fat-Water Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla to Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Obese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, HJ; Niswender, KD; Kullberg, J; Berglund, J; Johansson, L; Bruvold, M; Avison, MJ; Welch, EB.

    2012-01-01

    Improved understanding of how depot-specific adipose tissue mass predisposes to obesity-related comorbidities could yield new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of obesity as well as metabolic benefits of weight loss. We hypothesized that three-dimensional contiguous “fat-water” MR imaging (FWMRI) covering the majority of a whole-body field of view (FOV) acquired at 3 Tesla (3T) and coupled with automated segmentation and quantification of amount, type and distribution of adipose and lean soft tissue would show great promise in body composition methodology. Precision of adipose and lean soft tissue measurements in body and trunk regions were assessed for 3T FWMRI and compared to DEXA. Anthropometric, FWMRI and DEXA measurements were obtained in twelve women with BMI 30–39.9 kg/m2. Test-retest results found coefficients of variation for FWMRI that were all under 3%: gross body adipose tissue (GBAT) 0.80%, total trunk adipose tissue (TTAT) 2.08%, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) 2.62%, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) 2.11%, gross body lean soft tissue (GBLST) 0.60%, and total trunk lean soft tissue (TTLST) 2.43%. Concordance correlation coefficients between FWMRI and DEXA were 0.978, 0.802, 0.629, and 0.400 for GBAT, TTAT, GBLST and TTLST, respectively. While Bland Altman plots demonstrated agreement between FWMRI and DEXA for GBAT and TTAT, a negative bias existed for GBLST and TTLST measurements. Differences may be explained by the FWMRI FOV length and potential for DEXA to overestimate lean soft tissue. While more development is necessary, the described 3T FWMRI method combined with fully-automated segmentation is fast (<30 minutes total scan and post-processing time), noninvasive, repeatable and cost effective. PMID:23712980

  15. Biomechanical factors and physical examination findings in osteoarthritis of the knee: associations with tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography and high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to explore the associations between knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography (CR) and by high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as biomechanical factors and findings from physical examination in patients with knee OA. Methods This was an explorative cross-sectional study of 105 patients with knee OA. Index knees were imaged using CR and MRI. Multiple features from CR and MRI (cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow lesions, effusion and synovitis) were related to biomechanical factors (quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy and varus-valgus laxity) and physical examination findings (bony tenderness, crepitus, bony enlargement and palpable warmth), using multivariable regression analyses. Results Quadriceps weakness was associated with cartilage integrity, effusion, synovitis (all detected by MRI) and CR-detected joint space narrowing. Knee joint laxity was associated with MRI-detected cartilage integrity, CR-detected joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation. Multiple tissue abnormalities including cartilage integrity, osteophytes and effusion, but only those detected by MRI, were found to be associated with physical examination findings such as crepitus. Conclusion We observed clinically relevant findings, including a significant association between quadriceps weakness and both effusion and synovitis, detected by MRI. Inflammation was detected in over one-third of the participants, emphasizing the inflammatory component of OA and a possible important role for anti-inflammatory therapies in knee OA. In general, OA-related tissue abnormalities of the knee, even those detected by MRI, were found to be discordant with biomechanical and physical examination features. PMID:23039323

  16. Preoperative 3-Tesla Multiparametric Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Odds of Upgrading and Upstaging at Radical Prostatectomy in Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, John V. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Mulkern, Robert V. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fennessy, Fiona M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); D' Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tempany, Clare M.C., E-mail: ctempany@bwh.harvard.edu [Division of MRI, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether 3-T esla (3T) multiparametric endorectal MRI (erMRI) can add information to established predictors regarding occult extraprostatic or high-grade prostate cancer (PC) in men with clinically localized PC. Methods and Materials: At a single academic medical center, this retrospective study's cohort included 118 men with clinically localized PC who underwent 3T multiparametric erMRI followed by radical prostatectomy, from 2008 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analyses in all men and in 100 with favorable-risk PC addressed whether erMRI evidence of T3 disease was associated with prostatectomy T3 or Gleason score (GS) 8-10 (in patients with biopsy GS {<=}7) PC, adjusting for age, prostate-specific antigen level, clinical T category, biopsy GS, and percent positive biopsies. Results: The accuracy of erMRI prediction of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion was 75% and 95%, respectively. For all men, erMRI evidence of a T3 lesion versus T2 was associated with an increased odds of having pT3 disease (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-16.98, P=.015) and pGS 8-10 (AOR 5.56, 95% CI 1.10-28.18, P=.038). In the favorable-risk population, these results were AOR 4.14 (95% CI 1.03-16.56), P=.045 and AOR 7.71 (95% CI 1.36-43.62), P=.021, respectively. Conclusions: Three-Tesla multiparametric erMRI in men with favorable-risk PC provides information beyond that contained in known preoperative predictors about the presence of occult extraprostatic and/or high-grade PC. If validated in additional studies, this information can be used to counsel men planning to undergo radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy about the possible need for adjuvant radiation therapy or the utility of adding hormone therapy, respectively.

  17. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular ...

  18. Overdrainage of cerebrospinal fluid caused by detachment of the pressure control cam in a programmable valve after 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Seguchi, Tatsuya; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2010-02-01

    The authors report a rare case of overdrainage of the CSF caused by the malfunction of a Codman-Hakim programmable valve (CHPV) following a 3-T MR imaging procedure. Nine years ago this 72-year-old woman underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement with a CHPV system for hydrocephalus due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. The postoperative course was uneventful and the system functioned well. A radiograph obtained immediately after 3-T MR imaging revealed that the pressure control cam in the valve system was detached from the base plate. Intracranial hypotension syndrome occurred several hours after the MR imaging study, and a CT scan revealed a decrease in ventricle size. A revision of the system promptly resolved the symptoms, and a postoperative CT scan revealed that the ventricle size was restored to normal. Examination of the extracted valve showed a Y-shaped crack in the plastic housing as well as detachment of the white marker and cam from the base plate. A reduction in the power of the flat spring to press the valve ball led to CSF overdrainage because of a loss of support by the cam. Because the patient had incurred no head injury during the day and radiographic studies of the system 5 years previously had shown detachment of the white marker, damage to the system might have been caused by a past impact. These facts may indicate that the antimagnetic performance of the system could have decreased due to a previous impact and that the strong magnetic force in a 3-T MR imaging environment might have caused detachment of the cam.

  19. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  20. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy: basic methodology and clinical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been limited for a long time, mainly due to its low sensitivity. However, with the advent of clinical MR systems with higher magnetic field strengths such as 3 Tesla, the development of better coils, and the design of optimized

  1. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  2. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-neon-cooled magnet has been designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. Its feasibility was established by a previously reported parametric study. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors; tensile-shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives; and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will be made of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll-bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock-up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  3. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization d...

  4. Proposal for a spintronic femto-Tesla magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Cahay, M.

    2005-03-01

    We propose a spintronic magnetic field sensor, fashioned out of quantum wires, which may be capable of detecting very weak magnetic fields with a sensitivity of ∼1 fT/√{Hz} at a temperature of 4.2 K, and ∼80 fT/√{Hz} at room temperature. Such sensors have commercial applications in magnetometry, quantum computing, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, magneto-encephalography, and military applications in weapon detection.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  9. Prospective observations of 100 high-risk neonates by high-field (1.5 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. II. Lesions associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, S E; Adcock, E W; McArdle, C B

    1991-04-01

    One hundred neonates determined prospectively to be at risk for neurologic handicap underwent magnetic resonance imaging with a high-field (1.5 T) imager. Thirty-three demonstrated a total of 37 lesions consistent with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, including periventricular leukomalacia (n = 12), basal ganglia hemorrhage (n = 5), multicystic encephalomalacia (n = 5), and focal parenchymal hemorrhage (n = 15). Diagnoses by ultrasonography and computed tomography were compared with those by magnetic resonance imaging in 29 and 17 infants, respectively. Ultrasonography agreed more frequently with magnetic resonance imaging than did computed tomography. Ultrasonography detected 79% of lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging whereas computed tomography detected only 41%. Periventricular leukomalacia was seen most often in preterm infants, basal ganglia hemorrhage and multicystic encephalomalacia primarily occurred in term infants, and focal parenchymal hemorrhage occurred at all gestational ages. Basal ganglia hemorrhage and multicystic encephalomalacia were strongly associated with histories of perinatal asphyxia, seizures, and early abnormal neurological status. All infants with basal ganglia hemorrhage (5/5) and multicystic encephalomalacia (5/5) and the majority with periventricular leukomalacia (9/12) and focal parenchymal hemorrhages (9/15) had developmental abnormalities at discharge.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  11. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  12. Ghost magnetic resonance angiography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Edelman, Robert R

    2009-01-01

    Traditional methods for magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) involve the radiofrequency excitation of vascular spins within a selected region of tissue, followed by gradient localization and imaging of those spins within that same region...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-01

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π / 2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong-Joo, E-mail: sj.lee@kriss.re.kr; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min [Center for Biosignals, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), 267 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-09

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π/2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, RH; Newton, MI

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medica...

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  17. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-10-12

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8,158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with RMS error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apotransferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g. 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1M at m/z =2,700).

  18. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged Substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with root-mean-square (RMS) error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apo-transferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g., 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1 M at m/z = 2700).

  19. Seven-Tesla Magnetization Transfer Imaging to Detect Multiple Sclerosis White Matter Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Jun; Lim, Su-Yin; Tanasescu, Radu; Al-Radaideh, Ali; Mougin, Olivier E; Tench, Christopher R; Whitehouse, William P; Gowland, Penny A; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2017-09-25

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at 3 Tesla (T) field strength is the most sensitive modality for detecting white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis. While 7T FLAIR is effective in detecting cortical lesions, it has not been fully optimized for visualization of white matter lesions and thus has not been used for delineating lesions in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the normal appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of 7T magnetization-transfer-weighted (MTw ) images in the detection of white matter lesions compared with 3T-FLAIR. Fifteen patients with clinically isolated syndrome, 6 with multiple sclerosis, and 10 healthy participants were scanned with 7T 3-dimensional (D) MTw and 3T-2D-FLAIR sequences on the same day. White matter lesions visible on either sequence were delineated. Of 662 lesions identified on 3T-2D-FLAIR images, 652 were detected on 7T-3D-MTw images (sensitivity, 98%; 95% confidence interval, 97% to 99%). The Spearman correlation coefficient between lesion loads estimated by the two sequences was .910. The intrarater and interrater reliability for 7T-3D-MTw images was good with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 98.4% and 81.8%, which is similar to that for 3T-2D-FLAIR images (ICC 96.1% and 96.7%). Seven-Tesla MTw sequences detected most of the white matter lesions identified by FLAIR at 3T. This suggests that 7T-MTw imaging is a robust alternative for detecting demyelinating lesions in addition to 3T-FLAIR. Future studies need to compare the roles of optimized 7T-FLAIR and of 7T-MTw imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  4. Magnetic Resonance Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Sammet, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has a superior soft-tissue contrast compared to other radiological imaging modalities and its physiological and functional applications have led to a significant increase in MRI scans worldwide. A comprehensive MRI safety training to protect patients and other healthcare workers from potential bio-effects and risks of the magnetic fields in an MRI suite is therefore essential. The knowledge of the purpose of safety zones in an MRI suite as well as MRI appropri...

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    This article summarizes the early history of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) during the first 25–30 years. The method- ology went through vigorous growth and development during this time, laying the theoretical basis for understanding a wide array of applications. The stage was set for the breath- taking advances the ...

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  15. Nonenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla: intraindividual comparison of 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Gesine; Lauff, Marie-Teres; Hirsch, Sebastian; Schwenke, Carsten; Hamm, Bernd; Wagner, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    To prospectively compare 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA vs. 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA for assessment of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla. Forty-two patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease underwent nonenhanced MRA of calf arteries at 3 Tesla with 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (fast spin echo sequence; 3D-FSE-MRA) and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (balanced steady-state-free-precession sequence; 2D-bSSFP-MRA). Moreover, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) as standard-of-reference. Two readers performed a per-segment evaluation for image quality (4 = excellent to 0 = non-diagnostic) and severity of stenosis. Image quality scores of 2D-bSSFP-MRA were significantly higher compared to 3D-FSE-MRA (medians across readers: 4 vs. 3; p Tesla with significantly higher image quality and diagnostic accuracy compared to 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (3D-FSE-MRA). • 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (2D-bSSFP-MRA) is a robust NE-MRA technique at 3T • 2D-bSSFP-MRA outperforms 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (3D-FSE-MRA) as NE-MRA of calf arteries • 2D-bSSFP-MRA is a promising alternative to CE-MRA for calf PAOD evaluation.

  16. Predesign Study of a 4-5 tesla Superconducting Wiggler Magnet for the ESRF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, Herman H.J.; ter Avest, D.; ter Avest, D.; Ravex, A.; Lagnier, M.; Elleaume, P.

    1994-01-01

    The ESRF is currently setting up a beam line for very hard photons well above 250 keV. This requires the installation of a high field three polewavelength shifter. The nominal and target fields of the wiggler magnet are 4 and 5 tesla respectively while the nominal field integral over the central

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  2. Sub-tesla-field magnetization of vibrated magnetic nanoreagents for screening tumor markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh, Jen-Jie; Huang, Kai-Wen; Shi, Jin-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic nanoreagents (MNRs), consisting of liquid solutions and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with bioprobes, have been widely used in biomedical disciplines. For in vitro tests of serum biomarkers, numerous MNR-based magnetic immunoassay methods or schemes have been developed; however, their applications are limited. In this study, a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used for screening tumor biomarkers based on the same MNRs as those used in other immunoassay methods. The examination mechanism is that examined tumor biomarkers are typically conjugated to the bioprobes coated on MNPs to form magnetic clusters. Consequently, the sub-Tesla-field magnetization (Msub-T) of MNRs, including magnetic clusters, exceeds that of MNRs containing only separate MNPs. For human serum samples, proteins other than the targeted biomarkers induce the formation of magnetic clusters with increased Msub-T because of weak nonspecific binding. In this study, this interference problem was suppressed by the vibration condition in the VSM and analysis. Based on a referenced Msub-T,0 value defined by the average Msub-T value of a normal person's serum samples, including general proteins and few tumor biomarkers, the difference ΔMsub-T between the measured Msub-T and the reference Msub-T,0 determined the expression of only target tumor biomarkers in the tested serum samples. By using common MNRs with an alpha-fetoprotein-antibody coating, this study demonstrated that a current VSM can perform clinical screening of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Focused tight dressing does not prevent cochlear implant magnet migration under 1.5 Tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, D; Murri, A; Succo, G

    2013-04-01

    We report a retrospective case of inner magnet migration, which occurred after 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning in an adult recipient of a bilateral cochlear implant (CI) despite a focused head dressing. The patient, bilaterally implanted with Nucleus 5 CIs (Cochlear LTD, Sydney, Australia), underwent a 1.5 Tesla cholangio-MRI scan for biliary duct pathology. In subsequent days, a focal skin alteration appeared over the left inner coil. Plain skull radiographs showed partial magnet migration on the left side. Surgical exploration confirmed magnet twisting; the magnet was effectively repositioned. Left CI performance was restored to pre-migration level. The wound healed without complications. Thus, focused dressing does not prevent magnet migration in CI recipients undergoing 1.5 Tesla MRI. All patients should be counselled on this potential complication. A minor surgical procedure is required to reposition the magnet. Nevertheless, timely diagnosis is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and subsequent device contamination. Plain skull radiograph is very effective in identifying magnet twisting; it should be performed systematically after MRI or minimally on all suspected cases.

  4. Molecular Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Yvonne Y; Pfeifer, Andreas; Ebersberger, Hans U

    2016-01-01

    In the Western world and developing countries, the number one causes of mortality and morbidity result from cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases represent a wide range of pathologies, including myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease, which...... impact on society, there are still limitations in the early diagnosis and the prevention of the disease. Current imaging methods mainly focus on morphological changes that occur at an advanced disease stage, e.g., degree of stenosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and specifically molecular...... cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging are capable to reveal pathophysiological changes already occurring during early atherosclerotic plaque formation. This allows for the assessment of cardiovascular disease on a level, which goes beyond morphological or anatomical criteria. In this review, we...

  5. Nonenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla: intraindividual comparison of 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knobloch, Gesine; Lauff, Marie-Teres; Hirsch, Sebastian; Hamm, Bernd; Wagner, Moritz [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten [SCO:SSiS Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To prospectively compare 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA vs. 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA for assessment of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla. Forty-two patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease underwent nonenhanced MRA of calf arteries at 3 Tesla with 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (fast spin echo sequence; 3D-FSE-MRA) and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (balanced steady-state-free-precession sequence; 2D-bSSFP-MRA). Moreover, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) as standard-of-reference. Two readers performed a per-segment evaluation for image quality (4 = excellent to 0 = non-diagnostic) and severity of stenosis. Image quality scores of 2D-bSSFP-MRA were significantly higher compared to 3D-FSE-MRA (medians across readers: 4 vs. 3; p < 0.0001) with lower rates of non-diagnostic vessel segments on 2D-bSSFP-MRA (reader 1: <1 % vs. 15 %; reader 2: 1 % vs. 29 %; p < 0.05). Diagnostic performance of 2D-bSSFP-MRA and 3D-FSE-MRA across readers showed sensitivities of 89 % (214/240) vs. 70 % (168/240), p = 0.0153; specificities: 91 % (840/926) vs. 63 % (585/926), p < 0.0001; and diagnostic accuracies of 90 % (1054/1166) vs. 65 % (753/1166), p < 0.0001. 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (2D-bSSFP-MRA) is a robust nonenhanced MRA technique for assessment of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla with significantly higher image quality and diagnostic accuracy compared to 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (3D-FSE-MRA). (orig.)

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  7. [Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganssen, A; Loeffler, W; Oppelt, A; Schmidt, F

    1981-04-01

    Imaging methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance allow the production of sectional images of the human body without ionizing radiation. It is possible to measure the density and relaxation times of the water protons in body fluids or tissue. This allows not only to obtain morphological information but also to get some insight into the spatial distribution of physiological data. Starting with a review of the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance it is explained how the measured signal can be associated with an image point; it is also explained what type of apparatus is necessary and what the physical limitations are. Possible risks the patient may be exposed to in an examination using nuclear magnetic resonance are discussed. The present state of the technical development enables the production of whole-body sectional images of a living person within about one minute. By means of some typical examples the nature and properties of these images are explained. Although extensive clinical studies will be necessary before a more general assessment can be made of this method, an outlook is provided on expected further developments and possible future fields of application.

  8. Delayed injection of polypyrrole doped with iodine particle suspension after spinal cord injury in rats improves functional recovery and decreased tissue damage evaluated by 3.0 Tesla in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragon-Lozano, Rodrigo; Ríos, Camilo; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Cruz, Guillermo J; Olayo, Maria G; Olayo, Roberto; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; Morales, Juan; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Alvarez-Mejia, Laura; Fabela, Omar; Morales-Guadarrama, Axayacatl; Sánchez-Torres, Stephanie; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes irreversible damage with loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic functions. Currently, there is not an effective treatment to restore the lost neurologic functions. Injection of polypyrrole-iodine(PPy-I) particle suspension is proposed as a therapeutic strategy. This is an in vivo animal study. This study evaluates the use of such particles in rats after SCI by examining spared nervous tissue and the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale to evaluate the functional outcome. Diffusive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) as non-invasive biomarkers of damage after SCI. Fractional anisotropy decreased, whereas ADC increased in all groups after the lesion. There were significant differences in FA when compared with the SCI-PPy-I group versus the SCI group (p<.05). Significant positive correlations between BBB and FA (r(2)=0.449, p<.05) and between FA and preserved tissue (r(2)=0.395, p<.05) were observed, whereas significant negative associations between BBB and ADC (r(2)=0.367, p<.05) and between ADC and preserved tissue (r(2)=0.421, p<.05) were observed. The results suggested that PPy-I is neuroprotective as it decreased the amount of damaged tissue while improving the motor function. Non-invasive MRI proved to be useful in the characterization of SCI and recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vacuum RF Breakdown of Accelerating Cavities in Multi-Tesla Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Lane, Peter [IIT, Chicago; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Palmer, Mark [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures within multi-Tesla magnetic fields. The application of strong magnetic fields has been shown to lead to an increase in vacuum RF breakdown. This phenomenon imposes operational (i.e. gradient) limitations on cavities in ionization cooling channels, and has a bearing on the design and operation of other RF structures as well, such as photocathodes and klystrons. We present recent results from Fermilab's MuCool Test Area (MTA), in which 201 and 805 MHz cavities were operated at high power both with and without the presence of multi-Tesla magnetic fields. We present an analysis of damage due to breakdown in these cavities, as well as measurements related to dark current and their relation to a conceptual model describing breakdown phenomena.

  10. Poly-coil design for a 60 tesla quasi-stationary magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boenig, H. J.; Campbell, L. J.; Hodgdon, M. L.; Lopez, E. A.; Rickel, D. G.; Rogers, J. D.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    1993-02-01

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving.

  11. Improving the spatial accuracy in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect: benefits from parallel imaging and a 32-channel head array coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, C; Doenitz, C; Finkenzeller, T; Jung, E M; Rennert, J; Schlaier, J

    2009-01-01

    Geometric distortions and low spatial resolution are current limitations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate if application of parallel imaging or significant reduction of voxel size in combination with a new 32-channel head array coil can reduce those drawbacks at 1.5 T for a simple hand motor task. Therefore, maximum t-values (tmax) in different regions of activation, time-dependent signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(t)) as well as distortions within the precentral gyrus were evaluated. Comparing fMRI with and without parallel imaging in 17 healthy subjects revealed significantly reduced geometric distortions in anterior-posterior direction. Using parallel imaging, tmax only showed a mild reduction (7-11%) although SNR(t) was significantly diminished (25%). In 7 healthy subjects high-resolution (2 x 2 x 2 mm3) fMRI was compared with standard fMRI (3 x 3 x 3 mm3) in a 32-channel coil and with high-resolution fMRI in a 12-channel coil. The new coil yielded a clear improvement for tmax (21-32%) and SNR(t) (51%) in comparison with the 12-channel coil. Geometric distortions were smaller due to the smaller voxel size. Therefore, the reduction in tmax (8-16%) and SNR(t) (52%) in the high-resolution experiment seems to be tolerable with this coil. In conclusion, parallel imaging is an alternative to reduce geometric distortions in fMRI at 1.5 T. Using a 32-channel coil, reduction of the voxel size might be the preferable way to improve spatial accuracy.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for cardiac tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori; Harada, Tsutomu; Ishida, Yoshikazu.

    1988-09-01

    We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients with cardiac tumor (1 with rhabdomyoma, 1 with left atrial myxoma, and 2 with tumor of the left ventricular wall) for morphological evaluation of the tumor. ECG-gated MRI was performed by the spin echo imaging technique using a superconducting MRI system operating at 0.5 tesla. Spatial extension of the tumor was clearly demonstrated in all the patients. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), was used in the 2 patients with tumor of the left ventricular myocardium to enhance the contrast, and allowed clear visualization of the tumor. These findings show the usefulness of MRI and MRI with Gd-DTPA for morphological evaluation of cardiac tumor.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of pericardial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori

    1988-10-01

    We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients, ranged from 4 to 15 years in age, with pericardial disease (1 with pericaditis with JRA, 1 with chylopericardium, and 2 with pericarditis) for morphological and histological evaluation of the percardial disease. ECG-gated MRI was performed by the spin echo method using a superconducting MRI system operating at 0.5 tesla. In all the patients pericardial diseases were clearly demonstrated. MRI visualized the thickened pericardium as 2 to 4 mm thick curvilinear line of high signal intensity in all the patients. Pericardial effusion was detected in all the patients. Two of them showed low signal intensity and 1 showed high signal intensity. Pericardial effusion in patient with chylopericardium had markedly high signal intensity, similar to that of the subcutaneous far tissue. MRI appears to be an important modality for the evaluation of pericardial disease.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  15. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an IV line, into a vein in your hand or arm. A saline solution may be used ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  4. Effect of field strengths on magnetic resonance angiography: comparison of an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide blood-pool contrast agent and gadopentetate dimeglumine in rabbits at 1.5 and 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allkemper, Thomas; Heindel, Walter; Kooijman, Hendrik; Ebert, Wolfgang; Tombach, Bernd

    2006-02-01

    We sought to compare the intravascular enhancement of an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) blood-pool contrast agent to gadopentetate dimeglumine for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) at field strengths of 1.5 and 3.0 T in rabbits. CE-MRA at 1.5 and 3.0 T was performed at several time points (50 seconds and 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes) after the manual intravenous injection of 40 micromol Fe/kg body weight of an USPIO (SH U 555 C; Schering AG, Berlin, Germany) and 100 micromol/kg body weight gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist; Schering AG, Berlin, Germany). MRA was performed with comparable acquisition parameters at both field strengths (Turbo-gradient sequence; 1.5 T: TR/TE/alpha: 5.5/1.7 milliseconds/40 degrees ; 3.0 T: TR/TE/alpha: 5.1/1.8 milliseconds/40 degrees ) on clinical imaging systems (both: Gyroscan Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). At either field strength, 6 rabbits were studied with both contrast agents (n = 24 in total). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated from signal intensity measurements in the abdominal aorta. Compared with 1.5 T, the SNR and CNR of gadopentetate dimeglumine significantly increased at 3.0 T by a factor of 2.2 and 2.3, respectively (P or= 0.05). At both field strength and either time point, CNR and SNR of SH U 555 C were significantly higher compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine at 3.0 T (P gadopentetate dimeglumine significantly increased with increasing field strength. No SNR or CNR gain was observed for SH U 555 C. However, blood-pool MRA with SH U 555 C is feasible at 3.0 T. Compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine, SNR and CNR of SH U 555 C were significantly higher from 5 to 30 minutes at both field strengths (P

  5. 3.0 Tesla high spatial resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the pulmonary circulation: initial experience with a 32-channel phased array coil using a high relaxivity contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nael, Kambiz; Fenchel, Michael; Krishnam, Mayil; Finn, J Paul; Laub, Gerhard; Ruehm, Stefan G

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility of high spatial resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) with highly accelerated parallel acquisition at 3.0 T using a 32-channel phased array coil, and a high relaxivity contrast agent. Ten adult healthy volunteers (5 men, 5 women, aged 21-66 years) underwent high spatial resolution CE-MRA of the pulmonary circulation. Imaging was performed at 3 T using a 32-channel phase array coil. After intravenous injection of 1 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) at 1.5 mL/s, a timing bolus was used to measure the transit time from the arm vein to the main pulmonary artery. Subsequently following intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA at the same rate, isotropic high spatial resolution data sets (1 x 1 x 1 mm3) CE-MRA of the entire pulmonary circulation were acquired using a fast gradient-recalled echo sequence (TR/TE 3/1.2 milliseconds, FA 18 degrees) and highly accelerated parallel acquisition (GRAPPA x 6) during a 20-second breath hold. The presence of artifact, noise, and image quality of the pulmonary arterial segments were evaluated independently by 2 radiologists. Phantom measurements were performed to assess the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Statistical analysis of data was performed by using Wilcoxon rank sum test and 2-sample Student t test. The interobserver variability was tested by kappa coefficient. All studies were of diagnostic quality as determined by both observers. The pulmonary arteries were routinely identified up to fifth-order branches, with definition in the diagnostic range and excellent interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.90). Phantom measurements showed significantly lower SNR (P < 0.01) using GRAPPA (17.3 +/- 18.8) compared with measurements without parallel acquisition (58 +/- 49.4). The described 3 T CE-MRA protocol in addition to high T1 relaxivity of Gd-BOPTA provides sufficient SNR to support highly accelerated parallel acquisition

  6. Performance of new automated transthoracic three-dimensional echocardiographic software for left ventricular volumes and function assessment in routine clinical practice: Comparison with 3 Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Dan Schouver, Elie; Iacuzio, Laura; Civaia, Filippo; Rusek, Stephane; Dommerc, Carinne; Marechaux, Sylvestre; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is superior to two-dimensional Simpson's method for assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). Nevertheless, 3D TTE is not incorporated into everyday practice, as current LV chamber quantification software products are time-consuming. To evaluate the feasibility, accuracy and reproducibility of new fully automated fast 3D TTE software (HeartModelA.I.; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA) for quantification of LV volumes and LVEF in routine practice; to compare the 3D LV volumes and LVEF obtained with a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) reference; and to optimize automated default border settings with CMR as reference. Sixty-three consecutive patients, who had comprehensive 3D TTE and CMR examinations within 24hours, were eligible for inclusion. Nine patients (14%) were excluded because of insufficient echogenicity in the 3D TTE. Thus, 54 patients (40 men; mean age 63±13 years) were prospectively included into the study. The inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities of 3D TTE were excellent (coefficient of variation<10%) for end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and LVEF. Despite a slight underestimation of EDV using 3D TTE compared with CMR (bias=-22±34mL; P<0.0001), a significant correlation was found between the two measurements (r=0.93; P=0.0001). Enlarging default border detection settings leads to frequent volume overestimation in the general population, but improved agreement with CMR in patients with LVEF≤50%. Correlations between 3D TTE and CMR for ESV and LVEF were excellent (r=0.93 and r=0.91, respectively; P<0.0001). 3D TTE using new-generation fully automated software is a feasible, fast, reproducible and accurate imaging modality for LV volumetric quantification in routine practice. Optimization of border detection settings may increase agreement with CMR for EDV assessment in dilated ventricles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS

  7. Laser Femto-Tesla Magnetic Gradiometer (LFMG) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LFMG instrument is used to make extremely high resolution scalar magnetic field and difference measurements at the Earthfs surface. The Phase 1 effort included...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  11. Design and Fabrication Study on the TESLA500 Superconducting Magnet Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Tabares, L.; Toral, F.; Calero, J.; Abramian, P.; Iturbe, R.; Etxeandia, J.; Lucia, C.; Landete, R.; Gomez, J.

    2001-07-01

    An international collaboration at DESY is currently studying the possibilities of a new type of particle accelerator: the superconducting linear collider (1). Developed under the project name TESLA, which stands for TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator, the facility would be placed in a 33 km long tunnel and would work at the energy range of 0.5 to 0.8 TeV. TESLA opens up new horizons not only as a particle accelerator because it can be also used to generate laser-type X-ray beams: the accelerated electrons would be guided through a refined system of magnetic fields to form a Free Electron Laser (FEL). This study is about one of the components of the accelerator: the magnet package. A technical design of this device and a cost estimate of the series production have been performed. The present report should be understood as a Spanish contribution to the TESLA project. The study has been lead by CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas) [2], and several Spanish companies have also been involved: ANTEC, JEMA and INGOVI. Special thanks are given to the Oficina de Ciencia y Tecnologia, which has granted this work. (Author) 16 refs.

  12. [Comparison of susceptibility artifacts generated by microchips with different geometry at 1.5 Tesla magnet resonance imaging. A phantom pilot study referring to the ASTM standard test method F2119-07].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengg, S; Kneissl, S

    2013-01-01

    Ferromagnetic material in microchips, used for animal identification, causes local signal increase, signal void or distortion (susceptibility artifact) on MR images. To measure the impact of microchip geometry on the artifact's size, an MRI phantom study was performed. Microchips of the labels Datamars®, Euro-I.D.® and Planet-ID® (n  =  15) were placed consecutively in a phantom and examined with respect to the ASTM Standard Test Method F2119-07 using spin echo (TR 500 ms, TE 20 ms), gradient echo (TR 300 ms, TE 15 ms, flip angel 30°) and otherwise constant imaging parameters (slice thickness 3 mm, field of view 250 x 250 mm, acquisition matrix 256 x 256 pixel, bandwidth 32 kHz) at 1.5 Tesla. Image acquisition was undertaken with a microchip positioned in the x- and z-direction and in each case with a phase-encoding direction in the y- and z-direction. The artifact size was determined with a) a measurement according to the test method F2119-07 using a homogeneous point operation, b) signal intensity measurement according to Matsuura et al. and c) pixel counts in the artifact according to Port and Pomper. There was a significant difference in artifact size between the three microchips tested (Wilcoxon p = 0.032). A two- to three-fold increase in microchip volume generated an up to 76% larger artifact, depending on the sequence type, phase-encoding direction and chip position to B0. The smaller the microchip geometry, the less is the susceptibility artifact. Spin echoes (SE) generated smaller artifacts than gradient echoes (GE). In relation to the spatial measurement of the artifact, the switch in phase-encoding direction had less influence on the artifact size in GE- than in SE-sequences. However, the artifact shape and direction of SE-sequences can be changed by altering the phase. The artifact size, caused by the microchip, plays a major clinical role in the evaluation of MRI from the head, shoulder and neck regions.

  13. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...

  14. Safety of magnetic resonance scanning without monitoring of patients with pacemakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Litten; Petersen, Helen Høgh; Philbert, Berit Thornvig

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The objective of this study was to investigate whether it is safe to perform 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in pacemaker (PM) patients without pulse oximetry or electrocardiogram monitoring and with no special specific absorption rate (SAR) or time limits, provided...

  15. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  20. Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

  1. Effects of magnetic stray fields from a 7 Tesla MRI scanner on neurocognition: a double-blind randomised crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nierop, L.E.; Slottje, P.; van Zandvoort, M.J.; de Vocht, F.; Kromhout, H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study characterises neurocognitive domains that are affected by movement-induced time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF) within a static magnetic stray field (SMF) of a 7 Tesla (T) MRI scanner. METHODS Using a double-blind randomised crossover design, 31 healthy volunteers were tested in

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s ( ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and ... no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... monitors so that your child may watch a movie or TV show during the exam. It is ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine is used to: detect a variety ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT ... and Radiation Safety ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  2. Micromechanical ``Trampoline'' Magnetometers for Use in Pulsed Magnetic Fields Exceeding 60 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakirev, F. F.; Boebinger, G. S.; Aksyuk, V.; Gammel, P. L.; Haddon, R. C.; Bishop, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    We present the design, construction, and operation of a novel magnetometer for use in intense pulsed magnetic fields. The magnetometer consists of a silicon micromachined "trampoline" to which the sample is attached. The small size of the device (typically 400 microns on a side) gives a fast mechanical response (10,000 to 50,000 Hz) and extremely high sensitivity (10-11 Am^2, corresponding to 10-13 Am^2/Hz^(1/2)). The device is robust against electrical and mechanical noise and requires no special vibration isolation from the pulsed magnet. As a demonstration, we present data taken in a 60 tesla pulsed magnetic field which show clear de Haas-van Alphen oscillations in a one microgram sample of the organic superconductor K-(BEDT-TTF)_2Cu(NCS)_2.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  5. A 5 tesla superconducting magnet and cryostats for an EPR/FMR spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvekamp, E.M.C.M.; Gerritsma, G.J.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of the cryogenic part of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectrometer using Ka-band (26.5-40 GHz) and U-band (40-60 GHz) frequencies for resonance measurements on large magnetic thin-films. The unit has two cryostats; the first has a

  6. A Novel X-ray Diffractometer for the Florida Split Coil 25 Tesla Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengyu; Kovalev, Alexey; Suslov, Alexey; Siegrist, Theo

    2014-03-01

    At National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), we are developing a unique X-ray diffractometer for the 25 Tesla Florida Split Coil Magnet for scattering experiments under extremely high static magnetic fields. The X-ray source is a sealed tube (copper or molybdenum anode), connected to the magnet by an evacuated beam tunnel. The detectors are either an image plate or a silicon drift detector, with the data acquisition system based on LabVIEW. Our preliminary experimental results showed that the performance of the detector electronics and the X-ray generator is reliable in the fringe magnetic fields produced at the highest field of 25 T. Using this diffractometer, we will make measurements on standard samples, such as LaB6, Al2O3 and Si, to calibrate the diffraction system. Magnetic samples, such as single crystal HoMnO3 and stainless steel 301 alloys will be measured subsequently. The addition of X-ray diffraction to the unique split coil magnet will significantly expand the NHMFL experimental capabilities. Therefore, external users will be able to probe spin - lattice interactions at static magnetic fields up to 25T. This project is supported by NSF-DMR Award No.1257649. NHMFL is supported by NSF Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-1157490, the State of Florida, and the U.S. DoE.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  8. Value of magnetic resonance mammographic at 1.5 T in the differential diagnosis of mastitis versus inflammatory carcinoma; Der Wert der MR-Mammographie in der Differentialdiagnostik von non-puerperaler Mastitis und inflammatorischem Mammakarzinom bei 1,5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, R. [Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Univ. Ulm (Germany); Rieber, A. [Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Univ. Ulm (Germany); Zeitler, H. [Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Univ. Ulm (Germany); Rilinger, N. [Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Univ. Ulm (Germany); Kreienberg, R. [Klinik fuer Frauenheilkunde, Univ. Ulm (Germany); Brambs, H.J. [Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Univ. Ulm (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    Purpose: The distinction between mastitis and inflammatory breast carcinoma is an important one. Current methods of evaluation including mammography, ultrasound and clinical examination do not enable this distinction. Dynamic magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) is a study with potential in this regard. Material and methods: 12 patients, in whom clinical examination, mammography and ultrasound could not distinguish between both diseases, were reviewed retrospectively by means of MRM using a 1.5 T Siemens Magnetom SP and a circular mamma coil. We used dynamic 3-D gradient echo sequences with a duration of one minute. Results: At present MRM cannot definitely distinguish between mastitis and inflammatory carcinoma, 80% of the inflammatory carcinomas were found to enhance more than 100% in the first minute, compared to 43% for mastitis. No other differences were seen. Conclusion: MRM proved useful in the follow-up of treated mastitis to demonstrate the success of antibiotic treatment of mastitis and to diagnose a histologically unconfirmed inflammatory carcinoma by means of a different follow-up. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Weder klinische Untersuchung, Ultraschall noch Mammographie erlauben die wichtige Unterscheidung zwischen non-puerperaler Mastitis und inflammatorischem Karzinom. Die Magnetresonanzmammographie (MRM) bietet sich als zusaetzliche Untersuchungsmethode zur Differenzierung an. Patienten und Methoden: Retrospektiv wurden 12 Patientinnen, bei denen klinische Untersuchung, Mammographie und Sonographie keine endgueltige Diagnose erbracht hatten, MR-mammographisch mit einem 1,5 Tesla Siemens Magnetom SP in der zirkulaeren Mammadoppelspule untersucht. Es wurden dynamische 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen von einer Minute Dauer verwendet. Ergebnisse: Auch die MRM leistete keinen sicheren Beitrag zur endgueltigen Diagnose. 80% der beobachteten inflammatorischen Karzinome gegenueber 43% der Mastitiden zeigten eine Kontrastmittelanreicherung ueber 100% in der ersten

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Fan, Jin; Bai, Jianling; Tang, Pengyu; Chen, Jian; Luo, Yongjun; Zhou, Kuai; Cai, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives: Convincing evidence supporting the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an effective tool for evaluating cervical sagittal alignment is lacking. This study aims to analyze the differences and correlations between cervical sagittal parameters on x-ray and MRI in patients with cervical disc herniation and to determine whether MRI could substitute for cervical x-ray for measurement of cervical sagittal parameters. Methods: One hundred forty-three adults with cervical disc herniation were recruited. Each patient had both an x-ray and MRI examination of the cervical spine. The cervical sagittal parameters were measured and compared on x-ray and MRI including: C2–C7 Cobb angle, C2–C7 sagittal vertical axis (C2–C7 SVA), cervical tilt (CT), T1 Slope (T1S), and neck tilt (NT). The data were analyzed using a paired-samples t test, a Pearson correlation test, and linear regression. Results: The values of C2–C7 Cobb angle, C2–C7 SVA, CT and T1S on X-ray were larger than those on MRI (P sagittal parameters had a significant correlation with the corresponding one on MRI (r = 0.699, 0.585, 0.574, 0.579 and 0.613, respectively) (C2–C7 Cobb MRI = 0.957 + 0.721 C2–C7 Cobb X, C2–C7 SVA MRI = 6.423 + 0.500 C2–C7 SVAX, CT MRI = 3.121 + 0.718 CTX, T1S MRI = 7.416 + 0.613 T1SX, NT MRI = 22.548 + 0.601 NTX). Conclusion: Although MRI and x-ray measurements of cervical sagittal parameters were different, there were significant correlations between the results. MRI could be used to evaluate the sagittal balance of the cervical spine with great reliability. PMID:28953681

  10. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Olofsson, K; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neon......Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term...

  11. Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Canine Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Adamiak* and M. Jaskólska and A. Pomianowski1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of presented study was to evaluate selected surface spine coil, and low-field magnetic resonance (MR selected sequences in diagnosing hydrocephalus in dogs. This paper discusses 19 dogs (14 canine patients with hydrocephalus and 5 healthy dogs, of five breeds, subjected to low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of hydrocephalus. Area of the lateral ventricles and brain were examined in dogs with hydrocephalus using low-field MRI (at 0.25 Tesla. The MRI of FSE REL, SE, FLAIR, STIR, 3D HYCE, T3DT1, GE STIR 3D and 3D SHARC sequences with an indication of the most effective sequences are described. Additionally, coils for MR were compared, and models for infusion anesthesia were described. As a result of performed study all estimated sequences were diagnostically useful. However, spinal coil No. 2 (ESAOTE was the most optimal for examining and positioning the cranium.

  12. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  13. Optimal sequence for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Akata, Soichi; Ozuki, Taizo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has attracted attention as a useful examination for abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, because it is a simple procedure. Since there are few detailed reports on optimal sequences for MRCP, we attempted to clarify the topic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment we used was a 1.0 Tesla super-conductive type. A fast spin echo (16 echo train) was used, and the echo space was set at 17 msec. TE was changed from 17 msec to 272 msec in 17 msec increments. TR was changed from 1,000 msec to 9,000 msec by 1,000 msec increments. Bile juice which had been collected from the PTCD tube of a patient with common bile duct cancer, was put in a test tube of 10 mm internal diameter. Saline was used as a substitute for pancreatic juice, because collection of pancreatic juice was difficult. Fat was used for contrast. Each signal intensity inside the test tube was measured and evaluated. We attempted to evaluate the signal of gastric juice by adding blueberry juice, making use of its manganese ion (Mn{sup ++}). With longer TR, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice increased. As TE became longer, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice decreased slightly, while that of fat decreased much more. In MRCP, it is necessary to set up a long TE to increase the relative signal intensity difference of fat in bile and pancreas juice. The signal intensity of gastric juice was made to disappear by the addition of blueberry juice diluted to a ratio of 1:3. (author)

  14. Diagnostic MR imagings of temporomandibular joint disorders by 1. 5 tesla superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Ken-ichiro; Tsuda, Yoshitugu; Moriya, Hiroyuki; Segami, Natsuki; Konishi, Junji; Iizuka, Tadahiko (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-01-01

    For diagnostic imaging of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, 1.5 tesla superconducting magnet system was applied in 65 patients with 75 joints. MR imaging was performed with GE-Signa 1.5 tesla MR imaging system with the body coil used as the transmitter and 3 inch surface coil as the receiver. For detecting T{sub 1} weighted images, the following parameters were used; TR: 1000, TE: 25, Excitation: 1. Data matrix: 256 x 128, FOV: 8 cm, Slice thickness: 3 mm. For taking T{sub 2} weighted images, TR: 2200, TE:80 was used. For anatomical interpretation of TMJ, 3-mm thick images with a 1-mm interspace sagittal multiplane with TR: 1000/TE: 25 sequence was useful, and additional coronal images were beneficial for examining condylar morphology as well as mediolateral disk position. T{sub 2} weighted imaging obtained the joint effusion suspected of intra-articular inflammation. These findings suggest that MR imaging is useful in the detection and evaluation of TMJ patho-morphology. (author).

  15. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  17. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  18. Aging and magnetism: Presenting a possible new holistic paradigm for ameliorating the aging process and the effects thereof, through externally applied physiologic PicoTesla magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jerry; Sherlag, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    A new holistic paradigm is proposed for slowing our genomic-based biological clocks (e.g. regulation of telomere length), and decreasing heat energy exigencies for maintenance of physiologic homeostasis. Aging is considered the result of a progressive slow burn in small volumes of tissues with increase in the quantum entropic states; producing desiccation, microscopic scarring, and disruption of cooperative coherent states. Based upon piezoelectricity, i.e. photon-phonon transductions, physiologic PicoTesla range magnetic fields may decrease the production of excessive heat energy through target specific, bio molecular resonant interactions, renormalization of intrinsic electromagnetic tissue profiles, and autonomic modulation. Prospectively, we hypothesize that deleterious effects of physical trauma, immunogenic microbiological agents, stress, and anxiety may be ameliorated. A particle-wave equation is cited to ascertain magnetic field parameters for application to the whole organism thereby achieving desired homeostasis; secondary to restoration of structure and function on quantum levels. We hypothesize that it is at the atomic level that physical events shape the flow of signals and the transmission of energy in bio molecular systems. References are made to experimental data indicating the aspecific efficacy of non-ionizing physiologic magnetic field profiles for treatment of various pathologic states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Mathias M., E-mail: Mathias.Beck@tum.de [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lammel, Christian [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Institute of Medical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 11, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles are aligned using a static three tesla magnetic field. • Inductive heating depends on the particles pre-orientation in a solid matrix. • Alignment increases the heat generation significantly.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain caused by an injury or a stroke diagnose infectious or autoimmune diseases like encephalopathy or ... broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, and muscular and bone ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  3. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI is used to help diagnose ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance with Squeezed Microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfait, A.; Campagne-Ibarcq, P.; Kiilerich, A. H.; Zhou, X.; Probst, S.; Pla, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Morton, J. J. L.; Moelmer, K.; Bertet, P.

    2017-10-01

    Vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field set a fundamental limit to the sensitivity of a variety of measurements, including magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We report the use of squeezed microwave fields, which are engineered quantum states of light for which fluctuations in one field quadrature are reduced below the vacuum level, to enhance the detection sensitivity of an ensemble of electronic spins at millikelvin temperatures. By shining a squeezed vacuum state on the input port of a microwave resonator containing the spins, we obtain a 1.2-dB noise reduction at the spectrometer output compared to the case of a vacuum input. This result constitutes a proof of principle of the application of quantum metrology to magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What It ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – Dynamic Pelvic Floor Dynamic pelvic floor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive test that uses a ...

  12. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information. And check out the MRM blog: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Highlights Featured Journal Research Submit Research | ... Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, Suite 620 | Concord, ...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Child Cope With a Parent's Suicide? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A What's ... Child If You Have Questions What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe and painless ...

  15. 1.5 versus 3 versus 7 Tesla in abdominal MRI: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laader, Anja; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Kraff, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan; Wrede, Karsten; Ladd, Mark E; Lauenstein, Thomas C; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H; Nassenstein, Kai; Umutlu, Lale

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the feasibility as well as potential impact of altered magnetic field properties on image quality and potential artifacts of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla and 7 Tesla non-enhanced abdominal MRI. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging of the upper abdomen was performed in 10 healthy volunteers on a 1.5 Tesla, a 3 Tesla and a 7 Tesla MR system. The study protocol comprised a (1) T1-weighted fat-saturated spoiled gradient-echo sequence (2D FLASH), (2) T1-weighted fat-saturated volumetric interpolated breath hold examination sequence (3D VIBE), (3) T1-weighted 2D in and opposed phase sequence, (4) True fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence (TrueFISP) and (5) T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. For comparison reasons field of view and acquisition times were kept comparable for each correlating sequence at all three field strengths, while trying to achieve the highest possible spatial resolution. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were tested for significant differences. While 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI revealed comparable results in all assessed features and sequences, 7 Tesla MRI yielded considerable differences in T1 and T2 weighted imaging. Benefits of 7 Tesla MRI encompassed an increased higher spatial resolution and a non-enhanced hyperintense vessel signal at 7 Tesla, potentially offering a more accurate diagnosis of abdominal parenchymatous and vasculature disease. 7 Tesla MRI was also shown to be more impaired by artifacts, including residual B1 inhomogeneities, susceptibility and chemical shift artifacts, resulting in reduced overall image quality and overall image impairment ratings. While 1.5 and 3 Tesla T2w imaging showed equivalently high image quality, 7 Tesla revealed strong impairments in its diagnostic value. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and overall comparable imaging ability of T1-weighted 7 Tesla abdominal MRI towards 3 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI, yielding a promising diagnostic potential for

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesch, C.; Issakainen, J.; Kewitz, G.; Kikinis, R.; Martin, E.; Boltshauser, E.

    1989-01-01

    The children (age 2 months to 8 years) with a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.35 Tesla magnet. CMV infection was confirmed by serological investigations and virus culture in the neonatal period. Nine children had severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy, 1 patient suffered from microcephaly, ataxia and deafness. The cranial MRI examination showed the following abnormalities (N): Dilated lateral ventricles (10) and subarachnoid space (8), oligo/pacgyria (8), delayed/pathological myelination (7), paraventricular cysts (6), intra-cerebral calcification (1). This lack of sensitivity for calcification is explainable by the basic principles of MRI. The paraventricular cystic lesions were adjacent ot the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles and separated only by a thin membrane. This finding might represent a 'new sign' for congenital CMV infection in MRI examinations, being characteristic but nevertheless nonspecific, like calcification in CT.

  17. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  18. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten H Wrede

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF magnetic resonance angiography (MRA in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11 with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. RESULTS: A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4. Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3. Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4. Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. CONCLUSION: 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a

  19. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H; Dammann, Philipp; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Müller, Oliver; Özkan, Neriman; Ladd, Mark E; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc U; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11) with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel), presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4). Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3). Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4). Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a high-quality diagnostic tool for pretherapeutic assessment and

  20. Decoupling capabilities of split-loop resonator structure for 7 Tesla MRI surface array coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurshkainen, A.; Kurdjumov, S.; Simovski, C.; Glybovski, S.; Melchakova, I.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Raaijmakers, A.; Belov, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we studied electromagnetic properties of one-dimentional periodic structures composed of split-loop res-onators (SLRs) and investigated their capabilities in decoupling of two dipole antennas for full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two different finite structures comprising a single-SLR and a double-SLR constitutive elements were studied. Numerical simulations of the structures were performed to evaluate their decoupling capabilities. As it was demonstrated two dipole antennas equipped with either a single or a double-SLR structure exhibit high isolation even for an electrically short distance between the dipoles. Double-SLR structure while dramatically improving isolation of the dipoles keeps the field created by each of the decoupled dipoles comparable with one of a single dipole inside the target area.

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  2. Magnetic field measurements of a clinical MR imager at 1.5 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhech, A.; Tellez, I.; Esteva, M.; Marrufo, O.; Jimenez, L.; Vazquez, F.; Taboada, J.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    In the clinical environment is mandatory to run periodically measurements of uniformity of the magnetic field produced by the magnet to assure good image quality. The phase difference method was used to measure the magnetic field uniformity of the 1.5 T scanner of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia MVS. The uniformity field values showed that the imager performance is reasonably good for clinical imaging. Some concern was raised since results may not be good enough for magnetic resonance spectroscopy runs.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in hemosiderosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessing, P.H.L.; Falke, T.H.M.; Steiner, R.M.; Bloem, H.; Peters, A. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1985-01-15

    The case of a patient with iron deposition disease is presented to illustrate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of this entity. The image characteristics of MRI are discussed and the results are compared with those of computer tomography (CT). The importance of a decrease in T2 relaxation time as the determinant parameter for signal intensity in MRI of the liver in such patients is emphasized.

  4. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  5. Magnetic resonance urography in children: evaluation of suspected ureteral ectopia in duplex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, G; Rohrmann, D; Nolte-Ernsting, C C; Stollbrink, C; Haage, P; Schmidt, T; Günther, R W

    2001-12-01

    We evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance urography in children with suspected ectopic ureters and ureteroceles in duplex systems. A total of 14 children 4 weeks to 8 years old with a total of 18 duplex systems underwent magnetic resonance urography using a 1.5 tesla scanner. After injection of low dose furosemide, half-Fourier rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement images were obtained for T2-weighted static fluid magnetic resonance urography. Respiratory gated 3-dimensional gradient echo images were acquired for T1-weighted excretory magnetic resonance urography 5 to 30 minutes after intravenously administered gadolinium. All magnetic resonance examinations were successfully performed without sedation. The diagnostic accuracy of T1-weighted excretory magnetic resonance urography depended on the renal function. Twelve duplex systems with a normal excretory function, including 6 bifid ureters and 6 upper moieties with inferomedial ectopic ureters, were analyzed correctly with the exception of a 6 mm. ureterocele in 1 case. In 6 duplex systems with poor or nonfunctioning upper moieties ectopic ureters were only demonstrated on T2-weighted magnetic resonance urograms. Respiratory gated excretory and static fluid magnetic resonance urography complement each other in the evaluation of duplex systems in children and provide high accuracy in the evaluation of suspected ectopic ureters and ureteroceles.

  6. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues for a wirelessly powered lead used for epidural, spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellock, Frank G; Audet-Griffin, Annabelle J

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues (magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts) for a wirelessly powered lead used for spinal cord stimulation (SCS). A newly developed, wirelessly powered lead (Freedom-4, Stimwave Technologies Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, USA) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (translational attraction and torque) at 3 Tesla, MRI-related heating at 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz and 3 Tesla/128 MHz, and artifacts at 3 Tesla using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating tests were conducted by placing the lead in a gelled-saline-filled phantom and performing MRI procedures using relatively high levels of radiofrequency energy. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, spin echo (SE), and gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequences. The lead exhibited minor magnetic field interactions (2 degree deflection angle and no torque). Heating was not substantial under 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz (highest temperature change, 2.3°C) and 3 Tesla/128 MHz (highest temperature change, 2.2°C) MRI conditions. Artifacts were moderate in size relative to the size and shape of the lead. These findings demonstrated that it is acceptable for a patient with this wirelessly powered lead used for SCS to undergo MRI under the conditions utilized in this investigation and according to other necessary guidelines. Artifacts seen on magnetic resonance images may pose possible problems if the area of interest is in the same area or close to this lead. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mathias M.; Lammel, Christian; Gleich, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation.

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  9. [Use of magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Larsen, Lone; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Møller, Jakob M; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2014-01-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the four imaging modalities used in radiology. In contrast to computed tomography (CT), it does not use radiation. MRI is still developing and the diagnostic capabilities are growing. There are many indications for MRI and in some fields it has replaced CT. With few exceptions MRI is used mainly for elective examinations, and because of the new techniques like diffusion and perfusion MRI in cancer imaging the use is increasing both with regard to work-up and follow-up. For non-malignant lesions MRI is increasingly used thanks to its great soft-tissue contrast capabilities.

  10. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  11. Cine magnetic resonance imaging of left ventricular volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Uchishiba, Mika; Aotsuka, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Kozo; Fujiwara, Tadashi (Chiba Children' s Hospital (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 27 patients with various heart diseases has been undertaken. The children ranged from 11 months to 16 years old (average age: 6.8 years), so as to assess the MRI capability to evaluate the left ventricular volumes, which were previously calculated by angiography. ECG-gated MRI was performed by spin echo and gradient refocused imaging techniques at 0.5 tesla. Ventricular volumes were determined using a single slice comparable with the right anterior oblique projection of the ventriculogram. Comparison of the left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume yielded a high correlation between MRI (y) and ventriculography (x) (y=0.83x + 4.1, r=0.98 and y=0.88x - 1.74, r=0.98, respectively). It is concluded that the cine MRI provides an accurate non-invasive means for quantification of left ventricular volumes. (author).

  12. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  13. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  14. Improvements in Mechanical Detection of Magnetic Resonance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fainchtein, Raul

    2005-01-01

    This program intended to provide substantial improvements to conditions that affect imaging nanoscale structures with atomic resolution and chemical specificity by magnetic resonance force microscopy...

  15. A concept for magnetic resonance visualization of surgical textile implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Nils A; Donker, Hank C W; Otto, Jens; Hodenius, Michael; Sénégas, Julien; Slabu, Ioana; Klinge, Uwe; Baumann, Martin; Müllen, Andreas; Obolenski, Boris; Günther, Rolf W; Krombach, Gabriele A

    2010-08-01

    To develop a method for visualizing surgical textile implant (STI) with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO), using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, positive-contrast inversion-recovery with on-resonant water suppression (IRON) was applied and its properties were evaluated in vitro. STI with different concentrations of SPIO integrated into the base material were produced. Imaging was performed on a clinical 1.5 Tesla scanner, using conventional balanced gradient echo sequences (SSFP), T2*-weighted sequences, and IRON-imaging. In vitro experiments were conducted in an agarose phantom. On MR-images, contrast-to-noise-ratios, and the dimensions of the implant were assessed. Conventional MRI exhibited SPIO-loaded STI as signal voids. Using IRON, the mesh was clearly exhibited hyperintensely with suppression of on-resonant background signals with a distinct differentiation to other sources of off-resonances. Concentrations of approximately 9 mg/g led to best positive contrast and highest contrast-to-noise-ratios using IRON. Depending on B0-orientation, phase encoding direction and the STI's SPIO-load, the IRON-signal showed a characteristic pattern and an overestimation of STI size up to 4.6 mm. The integration of SPIOs into the base material combined with IRON is a feasible approach to visualize STI with MRI. This method could help to identify mesh-related problems in time and to reduce the need for surgical revision.

  16. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral arteriovenous malformations at 7 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Dammann, Philipp [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurosurgery, Essen (Germany); Johst, Soeren; Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Moenninghoff, Christoph; Forsting, Michael [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Sandalcioglu, I.E. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurosurgery, Essen (Germany); Nordstadtkrankenhaus Hannover, Department of Neurosurgery, Hannover (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology (E020), Heidelberg (Germany); Sure, Ulrich [University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurosurgery, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, Lale [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate prospectively 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and 7 Tesla non-contrast-enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Twenty patients with single or multifocal AVMs were enrolled in this trial. The study protocol comprised 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast-enhanced MPRAGE sequences. All patients underwent an additional four-vessel 3D DSA. Image analysis of the following five AVM features was performed individually by two radiologists on a five-point scale: nidus, feeder(s), draining vein(s), relationship to adjacent vessels, and overall image quality and presence of artefacts. A total of 21 intracerebral AVMs were detected. Both sequences at 7 Tesla were rated superior over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered AVM features. Image quality at 7 Tesla was comparable with DSA considering both sequences. Inter-observer accordance was good to excellent for the majority of ratings. This study demonstrates excellent image quality for depiction of intracerebral AVMs using non-contrast-enhanced 7 Tesla MRA, comparable with DSA. Assessment of untreated AVMs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Ginat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosarcoidosis is an uncommon condition with protean manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often used in the diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Therefore, familiarity with the variety of MRI appearances is important. In this pictorial essay, the range of possible patterns of involvement in neurosarcoidosis are depicted and discussed. These include intracranial and spine leptomeningeal involvement, cortical and cerebral white matter lesions, corpus callosum involvement, sellar and suprasellar involvement, periventricular involvement, cranial nerve involvement, cavernous sinus involvement, hydrocephalus, dural involvement, ischemic lesions, perivascular involvement, orbit lesions, osseous involvement, nerve root involvement, and spinal cord intramedullary involvement. Differential diagnoses for each pattern of involvement of neurosarcoidosis are also provided.

  19. In Vivo Assessment of Neurotransmitters and Modulators with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Application to Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Yang, Shaolin; Fischer, Bernard A.; Rowland, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo measurement of neurotransmitters and modulators is now feasible with advanced proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) techniques. This review provides a basic tutorial of MRS, describes the methods available to measure brain glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutathione, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glycine, and serine at magnetic field strengths of 3Tesla or higher, and summarizes the neurochemical findings in schizophrenia. Overall, 1H-MRS holds great promise for producing biomarkers that can serve as treatment targets, prediction of disease onset, or illness exacerbation in schizophrenia and other brain diseases. PMID:25614132

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  1. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  2. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and meningioma surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine if intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging improves surgical resection and postoperative outcome of intracranial meningioma. Study design: Prospective, non-randomized, cohort study. Method: Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (iMRI) was used to evaluate patients with meningioma ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  8. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  9. resonant inverter supplied interior permanent magnet (ipm)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. In this paper, rotor position in relation to the resonant frequency component current in the stator winding of DC-voltage link resonant inverter supplied Interior Permanent Magnet. (IPM) motor has been developed. Six reference frames are used to relate the rotor position angle to the resonant frequency ...

  10. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  12. In vivo measurements of the T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Nielsen, H; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    Nine patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow in a 1.5 tesla whole body scanner. Two patients underwent transformation to acute myeloid leukemia and were evaluated at follow-...... not differ from patients with polycythemia vera....

  13. In vivo measurements of the T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Nielsen, H; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    Nine patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow in a 1.5 tesla whole body scanner. Two patients underwent transformation to acute myeloid leukemia and were evaluated at follow...

  14. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  15. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Microscopic FMR Using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P. C.; Wigen, P. E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a new 3-D imaging technique with ultra-high spatial resolution. This technique, discussed primarily in the context of nuclear magnetic resonance, can also be applied as a microscopic ferromagnetic resonance probe to investigate the distributions of magnetic anisotropy and magnetic exchange interactions within magnetic materials (for example, magnetic multilayer systems). We report the first MRFM experiment on a single crystal Yittrium Iron Garnet film. A non-resonance mode and a family of magneto-static modes were observed in the MRFM spectra. The non-resonance mode is due to the response of the sample magnetization to the applied, time dependent bias field. This will be the main noise source when a magnet is mounted on the cantilever, an arrangement which is necessary in order to perform 3-D imaging in MRFM. The behavior of the magneto-static modes is in qualitative accord with theoretical expectations. The MRFM signal intensity is so large that the experiment is performed under ambient pressure instead of vacuum to reduce the response of the detector (cantilever). This indicates that MRFM will allow micron or sub-micron spatial resolution in studies of a wide variety of magnetic materials.

  17. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yong; Xie, Zhentian; Li, Ye; Xu, Duan; Vigneron, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2011-07-28

    In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF) field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  18. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Malaria Patients Reveals Distinct Pathogenetic Processes in Different Parts of the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjib Mohanty; Benjamin, Laura A; Megharay Majhi; Premanand Panda; Sam Kampondeni; Sahu, Praveen K.; Akshaya Mohanty; Mahanta, Kishore C.; Rajyabardhan Pattnaik; Rashmi R. Mohanty; Sonia Joshi; Anita Mohanty; Ian W. Turnbull; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Taylor, Terrie E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms underlying the rapidly reversible brain swelling described in patients with cerebral malaria (CM) are unknown. Using a 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, we undertook an observational study in Rourkela, India, of 11 Indian patients hospitalized with CM and increased brain volume. Among the 11 cases, there were 5 adults and 6 children. All patients had reduced consciousness and various degrees of cortical swelling at baseline. The latter was predomi...

  1. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  2. Statistical Evaluations of the Reproducibility and Reliability of 3-Tesla High Resolution Magnetization Transfer Brain Images: A Pilot Study on Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly H. Zou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetization transfer imaging (MT may have considerable promise for early detection and monitoring of subtle brain changes before they are apparent on conventional magnetic resonance images. At 3 Tesla (T, MT affords higher resolution and increased tissue contrast associated with macromolecules. The reliability and reproducibility of a new high-resolution MT strategy were assessed in brain images acquired from 9 healthy subjects. Repeated measures were taken for 12 brain regions of interest (ROIs: genu, splenium, and the left and right hemispheres of the hippocampus, caudate, putamen, thalamus, and cerebral white matter. Spearman's correlation coefficient, coefficient of variation, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC were computed. Multivariate mixed-effects regression models were used to fit the mean ROI values and to test the significance of the effects due to region, subject, observer, time, and manual repetition. A sensitivity analysis of various model specifications and the corresponding ICCs was conducted. Our statistical methods may be generalized to many similar evaluative studies of the reliability and reproducibility of various imaging modalities.

  3. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Kose, Katsumi

    2016-10-11

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (~54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach.

  4. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    KODAMA, Nao; KOSE, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (∼54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach. PMID:27001398

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ...

  7. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University MRI department. Subject: Seventy four consecutive patients.

  8. Review of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent times, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has emerged as the gold standard tool for assessment of a variety of indications, allowing comprehensive characterisation of functional, morphological, metabolic and haemodynamic sequelae of several cardiovascular pathologies. Furthermore, continued ...

  9. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dr. Elliot Fishman, a radiologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Breast Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikeda, Debra

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a unique magnetic resonance imaging multi voxel pulse sequence producing spectroscopic images of key metabolites found in breast cancer, and validated our work with in vitro spectra and pathology...

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ...

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  18. Influence on flux density of intraoral dental magnets during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI; Beeinflussung der Flussdichte intraoraler Dentalmagnete im 1,5 und 3 Tesla-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenstein, F.H.; Peroz, I. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Charite Centrum 3 - Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde; Truong, B. [Zahnarztpraxis Berlin (Germany); Thomas, A. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Charite Centrum 6 - Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Boeckler, A. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: When using dental duo-magnet systems, a mini-magnet remains in the jaw after removal of the prosthesis. In some cases, implant-borne magnets may be removed, whereas tooth-borne magnets are irreversibly fixed on a natural tooth root. The goal of this paper is to identify the impacts of the duration and orientation of exposure on these magnets in a 1.5 or 3 Tesla MRI. Materials and Methods: For this study, 30 SmCo and 60 NdFeB magnets were used. During the first experiment, they were exposed with free orientation for 64 minutes. During the second experiment, the magnets were fixed in position and exposed at 1.5 and 3 Tesla while aligned in a parallel or antiparallel direction. Results: While the duration of exposure in MRI is irrelevant, the orientation is not. The coercive field strength of these NdFeB and SmCo alloys is not sufficient to reliably withstand demagnetization in a 1.5 or 3 T MRI when aligned in an antiparallel direction. At 1.5 T neodymium magnets were reduced to approx. 34 % and samarium magnets to approx. 92 % of their initial values. At 3 T all magnets were reversed. Conclusion: As a precaution, the worst-case scenario, i.e. an antiparallel orientation, should be assumed when using a duo-magnet system. If an MRI can be postponed, the general dentist should remove implant-borne magnets. If there is a vital indication, irreversible damage to the magnets is acceptable in consultation with the patient since the replacement costs are irrelevant given the underlying disease. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance force microscopy using ferromagnetic resonance of a magnetic tip excited by microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yukinori; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The present work proposes magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) based on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) modulation of a magnetic tip using microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator instead of using conventional microwave irradiation by an external antenna. In this MRFM, the coaxial resonator is electrically connected to the magnetic cantilever tip, which enables simple implementation of FMR excitation of a magnetic tip in conventional magnetic force microscopy. The FMR frequency of the tip can be easily extracted from the reflection spectrum of a transmission line connected to the magnetic tip. The excitation of tip FMR is confirmed from the microwave frequency dependence of the mechanical response of the tip oscillation. This MRFM is effective for extracting the magnetic interaction force near a sample surface without perturbation of its magnetic state. Nanometer-scale imaging of magnetic domain structures on a demagnetized thin-film permanent magnet is successfully demonstrated.

  20. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: An Objectives Technique for the Quantification of Prostate Cancer Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    the magnetic field strength of 1.5T (T – Tesla , the unit for magnetic field strength, named after Nikola Tesla 1856-1943). To give context to this... Tesla , the unit for magnetic field strength TE = Echo time TLE = Temporal lobe epilepsy TM = Mixing time TR = Recycle time VOI = Volume of interest WHO...Ugurbil K. Localized in vivo 13C- NMR of glutamate metabolism in the human brain: initial results at 4 tesla . Dev Neurosci 1998; 20(4-5): 380-388. [297

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie bei ultrahohen Feldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Zentrum fuer Medizinische Physik und Biomedizinische Technik, Wien (Austria); Fischmeister, F.P.S. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria); Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Psychologie, Wien (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) stellt zurzeit die wichtigste Methode zur nichtinvasiven Funktionslokalisation im Gehirn dar. Mit der Verfuegbarkeit von MRT-Geraeten mit Magnetfeldstaerken von 4 Tesla (T) und darueber ergeben sich neue Moeglichkeiten, mittels fMRT die neuronale Aktivitaet in bislang unerreichter Genauigkeit zu untersuchen. In diesem Artikel zeigen wir anhand mehrerer Studien bei 7 T, in wieweit die Zugewinne an Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet verwendet werden koennen, um die bisherigen Grenzen der fMRT-Aufloesung in raeumlicher und zeitlicher Hinsicht auszuweiten. Die neuen Herausforderungen, die mit dem Schritt zu ultrahohen Magnetfeldern einhergehen, werden dabei ebenso diskutiert wie moegliche Ansaetze zu deren Loesung. (orig.)

  4. Artefacts induced by coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla versus 1.5-Tesla MR angiography--An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Vincken, Koen L; de Kort, Gerard A P; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2014-05-01

    To compare metal-induced artefacts from coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla and 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), since concerns persist on artefact enlargement at 3.0Tesla. We scanned 19 patients (mean age 53; 16 women) with 20 saccular aneurysms treated with coils only, at 1.5 and 3.0Tesla according to standard clinical 3D TOF-MRA protocols containing a shorter echo-time but weaker read-out gradient at 3.0Tesla in addition to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA). Per modality two neuro-radiologists assessed the occlusion status, measured residual flow, and indicated whether coil artefacts disturbed this assessment on MRA. We assessed relative risks for disturbance by coil artefacts, weighted kappa's for agreement on occlusion levels, and we compared remnant sizes. For artefact measurements, a coil model was created and scanned with the same protocols followed by 2D MR scans with variation of echo-time and read-out gradient strength. Coil artefacts disturbed assessments less frequently at 3.0Tesla than at 1.5Tesla (RR: 0.3; 95%CI: 0.1-0.8). On 3.0-Tesla MRA, remnants were larger than on 1.5-Tesla MRA (difference: 0.7mm; 95%CI: 0.3-1.1) and larger than on IA-DSA (difference: 1.0mm; 95%CI: 0.6-1.5) with similar agreement on occlusion levels with IA-DSA for both field strengths (κ 0.53; 95%CI: 0.23-0.84 for 1.5-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA; κ 0.47; 95%CI: 0.19-0.76 for 3.0-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA). Coil model artefacts were smaller at 3.0Tesla than at 1.5Tesla. The echo-time influenced artefact size more than the read-out gradient. Artefacts were not larger, but smaller at 3.0Tesla because a shorter echo-time at 3.0Tesla negated artefact enlargement. Despite smaller artefacts and larger remnants at 3.0Tesla, occlusion levels were similar for both field strengths. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-Enhanced MR Imaging of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H; Dammann, Philipp; Johst, Sören; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Schlamann, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Ladd, Mark E; Forsting, Michael; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate prospectively 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and 7 Tesla non-contrast-enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Twenty patients with single or multifocal AVMs were enrolled in this trial. The study protocol comprised 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast-enhanced MPRAGE sequences. All patients underwent an additional four-vessel 3D DSA. Image analysis of the following five AVM features was performed individually by two radiologists on a five-point scale: nidus, feeder(s), draining vein(s), relationship to adjacent vessels, and overall image quality and presence of artefacts. A total of 21 intracerebral AVMs were detected. Both sequences at 7 Tesla were rated superior over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered AVM features. Image quality at 7 Tesla was comparable with DSA considering both sequences. Inter-observer accordance was good to excellent for the majority of ratings. This study demonstrates excellent image quality for depiction of intracerebral AVMs using non-contrast-enhanced 7 Tesla MRA, comparable with DSA. Assessment of untreated AVMs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA. • Non-contrast-enhanced 7 Tesla MRA demonstrates excellent image quality for intracerebral AVM depiction. • Image quality at 7 Tesla was comparable with DSA considering both sequences. • Assessment of intracerebral AVMs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Motor Cortex: Hemispheric Asymmetry and Handedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Ashe, James; Hendrich, Kristy; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Merkle, Hellmut; Ugurbil, Kamil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    1993-07-01

    A hemispheric asymmetry in the functional activation of the human motor cortex during contralateral (C) and ipsilateral (I) finger movements, especially in right-handed subjects, was documented with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength (4 tesla). Whereas the right motor cortex was activated mostly during contralateral finger movements in both right-handed (C/I mean area of activation = 36.8) and left-handed (C/I = 29.9) subjects, the left motor cortex was activated substantially during ipsilateral movements in left-handed subjects (C/I = 5.4) and even more so in right-handed subjects (C/I = 1.3).

  7. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  17. Construction of 0.15 Tesla Overhauser Enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yuumi; Nakao, Motonao; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Overhauser enhanced MRI (OMRI) is one of the free radical imaging technologies and has been used in biomedical research such as for partial oxygen measurements in tumor, and redox status in acute oxidative diseases. The external magnetic field of OMRI is frequently in the range of 5-10 mTesla to ensure microwave penetration into small animals, and the S/N ratio is limited. In this study, a 0.15 Tesla OMRI was constructed and tested to improve the S/N ratio for a small sample, or skin measurement. Specification of the main magnet was as follows: 0.15 Tesla permanent magnet; gap size 160 mm; homogenous spherical volume of 80 mm in diameter. The OMRI resonator was designed based on TE101 cavity mode and machined from a phosphorus deoxidized copper block for electron spin resonance (ESR) excitation and a solenoid transmission/receive resonator for NMR detection. The resonant frequencies and Q values were 6.38 MHz/150 and 4.31-4.41 GHz/120 for NMR and ESR, respectively. The Q values were comparable to those of conventional low field OMRI resonators at 15 mTesla. As expected, the MRI S/N ratio was improved by a factor of 30. Triplet dynamic nuclear polarization spectra were observed for 14N carboxy-PROXYL, along the excitation microwave sweep. In the current setup, the enhancement factor was ca. 0.5. In conclusion, the results of this preliminary evaluation indicate that the 0.15 Tesla OMRI could be useful for free radical measurement for small samples.

  18. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzaro, N; Ruchotzke, W; Belding, A; Cardellino, J; Blomberg, E C; McCullian, B A; Bhallamudi, V P; Pelekhov, D V; Hammel, P C

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q∼10(6)[1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300K is 4fN/Hz, indicating a potential low temperature (4K) sensitivity of 25aN/Hz. Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring photothermal effects of interstitial laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jessica; Jose, Jessnie; Figueroa, Daniel; Le, Kelvin; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Selective photothermal interaction using dye-assisted non-invasive laser irradiation has limitations when treating deeper tumors or when the overlying skin is heavily pigmented. We developed an interstitial laser irradiation method to induce the desired photothermal effects. An 805-nm near-infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors by placing the active tip of the fiber inside the target tumors. Three different power settings (1.0 to 1.5 watts) were applied to treat animal tumors with an irradiation duration of 10 minutes. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager using proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. Three-dimensional temperature profiles were reconstructed and assessed using PRF. This is the first time a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. This study provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside tumor using interstitial laser irradiation. It also shows that PRF can be used effectively in monitoring photothermal interaction. Our long-term goal is to develop a PRF-guided laser therapy for cancer treatment.

  20. Quantitative assessment of magnetic resonance derived myocardial perfusion measurements using advanced techniques: microsphere validation in an explanted pig heart system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Andreas; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Ishida, Masaki; Sinclair, Matthew; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen Phm; Morton, Geraint; Hautvast, Gilion Ltf; Bigalke, Boris; van Horssen, Pepijn; Smith, Nicolas; Spaan, Jos Ae; Siebes, Maria; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Nagel, Eike

    2014-10-14

    Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to evolve into a method allowing full quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) in clinical routine. Multiple quantification pathways have been proposed. However at present it remains unclear which algorithm is the most accurate. An isolated perfused, magnetic resonance (MR) compatible pig heart model allows very accurate titration of MBF and in combination with high-resolution assessment of fluorescently-labeled microspheres represents a near optimal platform for validation. We sought to investigate which algorithm is most suited to quantify myocardial perfusion by CMR at 1.5 and 3 Tesla using state of the art CMR perfusion techniques and quantification algorithms. First-pass perfusion CMR was performed in an MR compatible blood perfused pig heart model. We acquired perfusion images at physiological flow ("rest"), reduced flow ("ischaemia") and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia ("hyperaemia") as well as during coronary occlusion. Perfusion CMR was performed at 1.5 Tesla (n = 4 animals) and at 3 Tesla (n = 4 animals). Fluorescently-labeled microspheres and externally controlled coronary blood flow served as reference standards for comparison of different quantification strategies, namely Fermi function deconvolution (Fermi), autoregressive moving average modelling (ARMA), exponential basis deconvolution (Exponential) and B-spline basis deconvolution (B-spline). All CMR derived MBF estimates significantly correlated with microsphere results. The best correlation was achieved with Fermi function deconvolution both at 1.5 Tesla (r = 0.93, p < 0.001) and at 3 Tesla (r = 0.9, p < 0.001). Fermi correlated significantly better with the microspheres than all other methods at 3 Tesla (p < 0.002). B-spline performed worse than Fermi and Exponential at 1.5 Tesla and showed the weakest correlation to microspheres (r = 0.74, p < 0.001). All other comparisons

  1. Development and manufacturing of a Nb$_{3}$Sn quadrupole magnet Model at CEA/Saclay for TESLA Interaction Region

    CERN Document Server

    Durante, Maria; Fratini, M; Leboeuf, D; Segreti, M; Védrine, Pierre; 10.1109/TASC.2004.829129

    2004-01-01

    One possible application of Nb/sub 3/Sn, whose superconducting properties far exceed those of NbTi, is the fabrication of short and powerful quadrupole magnets for the interaction regions of large particle accelerators. In some projects, as in the future linear collider TESLA, the quadrupole magnets are inside the detector solenoid and must operate in its background field. This situation gives singular Lorentz force distribution in the ends of the magnet. To learn about Nb/sub 3/Sn technology, evaluate fabrication techniques and test the interaction with a solenoidal field, DAPNIA /SACM at CEA/Saclay has started the manufacturing of a 1-m-long, 56- mm-single-aperture quadrupole magnet model. The model relies on the same coil geometry as the LHC arc quadrupole magnets, but has no iron yoke. It will produce a nominal field gradient of 211 T/m at 11,870 A. The coils are wound from Rutherford-type cables insulated with glass fiber tape, before being heat-treated and vacuum-impregnated with epoxy resin. Laminated,...

  2. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  3. The use of magnetic resonance imaging in the obstetric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenaude, Yves; Pugash, Denise; Lim, Kenneth; Morin, Lucie; Lim, Kenneth; Bly, Stephen; Butt, Kimberly; Cargill, Yvonne; Davies, Gregory; Denis, Nanette; Hazlitt, Gail; Morin, Lucie; Naud, Kentia; Ouellet, Annie; Salem, Shia

    2014-04-01

    To review the biological effects and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the obstetric patient and to review procedural issues, indications, and contraindications for obstetrical MRI. This guideline is intended to reassure patients and clinicians of the safety of MRI in pregnancy and to provide a framework for its use. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline in 2013 using controlled vocabulary and key words (e.g., MRI, safety, pregnancy). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English and in French. There were no date restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to July 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). This article is intended to reassure obstetric care providers that if used in an appropriate manner without the use of contrast agents, MRI in the obstetrical patient is safe for mother and fetus in the second and third trimesters. Because obstetrical MRI is expensive and has limited availability in Canada, this clinical guideline is intended to encourage the judicious use of this resource. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging is safe at 3.0 tesla or less during the second and third trimesters. (II-2) 2. It is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving a gadolinium contrast agent. (III) RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. Use of magnetic resonance imaging during the first trimester of pregnancy should be restricted to maternal indications for which the information is considered

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  5. Coherence of magnetic resonators in a metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The coherence of periodic magnetic resonators (MRs under oblique incidence is studied using simulations. The correlated phase of interaction including both the retardation effect and relative phase difference between two MRs is defined, and it plays a key role in the MR interaction. The correlated phase is anisotropic, as is the coherence condition. The coherence condition is the same as the Wood's anomaly and verified by the Fano resonance. This study shows that the applications of the Fano resonance of periodic MRs will become widespread owing to achieving the Fano resonance simply by tuning the incident angle.

  6. A study of nasal cavity volume by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosa, Yasuyoshi (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-04-01

    The nasal cavity volume in 69 healthy volunteers from 8 to 23 years old (17 males and 52 females) was studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Merits of MRI such as no radiation exposure, less artifact due to bone and air and measurement of intravascular blood flow; and demerits such as contraindication in users of heart pace-makers or magnetic clips, contraindication in people with claustrophobia and influence of environmental magnetic fields must be considered. A Magunetom M10 (Siemens), a superconduction device with 1.0 Tesla magnetic flux density was used. Enhanced patterns of T[sub 1], and pulse lines were photographed at 600 msec TR (repetition time) and 19 msec TE (echo time) using SE (spin echo) and short SE (spin echo), and 3 or 4 mm slices. Photographs were made of the piriform aperture, choana, superior-middle-inferior concha including the nasal meatus, the frontal sinus, maxillary sinus, cribriform plate, and upper surface of the palate. The line connecting the maximum depression point in the nasal root and the pontomedullary junction was selected by sagittal median section, because this corresponds well with the CM (canthomeatal) line which is useful in CT (computed tomography). The transverse section of the nasal cavity volume was traced by display console with an accessory MRI device and calculated by integration of the slice width. The increase of height and body weight neared a plateau at almost 16 years, whereas increase of nasal cavity volume continued until about 20 years. Pearson's coefficient of correlation and regression line were significant. There were no significant differences in these parameters between male and female groups. Comparatively strong correlation between nasal cavity volume, and age, height and body weight was statistically evident. (author).

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  9. Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Feasibility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion for Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Jones, Tonye A; Priester, Alan M; Geoghegan, Rory; Lieu, Patricia; Delfin, Merdie; Felker, Ely; Margolis, Daniel J A; Sisk, Anthony; Pantuck, Allan; Grundfest, Warren; Marks, Leonard S

    2017-10-01

    Focal laser ablation is a potential treatment in some men with prostate cancer. Currently focal laser ablation is performed by radiologists in a magnetic resonance imaging unit (in bore). We evaluated the safety and feasibility of performing focal laser ablation in a urology clinic (out of bore) using magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion for guidance. A total of 11 men with intermediate risk prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective, institutional review board approved pilot study. Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion was used to guide laser fibers transrectally into regions of interest harboring intermediate risk prostate cancer. Thermal probes were inserted for real-time monitoring of intraprostatic temperatures during laser activation. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (3 Tesla) was done immediately after treatment and at 6 months along with comprehensive fusion biopsy. Ten of 11 patients were successfully treated while under local anesthesia. Mean procedure time was 95 minutes (range 71 to 105). Posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging revealed a confined zone of nonperfusion in all 10 men. Mean zone volume was 4.3 cc (range 2.1 to 6.0). No CTCAE grade 3 or greater adverse events developed and no changes were observed in urinary or sexual function. At 6 months magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion biopsy of the treatment site showed no cancer in 3 patients, microfocal Gleason 3 + 3 in another 3 and persistent intermediate risk prostate cancer in 4. Focal laser ablation of prostate cancer appears safe and feasible with the patient under local anesthesia in a urology clinic using magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion for guidance and thermal probes for monitoring. Further development is necessary to refine out of bore focal laser ablation and additional studies are needed to determine appropriate treatment margins and oncologic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  10. Magnetic material arrangement in oriented termites: a magnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, O. C.; Wajnberg, E.; de Oliveira, J. F.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2004-06-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetic resonance is used to study the magnetic material in oriented Neocapritermes opacus (N.o.) termite, the only prey of the migratory ant Pachycondyla marginata (P.m.). A broad line in the g=2 region, associated to isolated nanoparticles shows that at least 97% of the magnetic material is in the termite's body (abdomen + thorax). From the temperature dependence of the resonant field and from the spectral linewidths, we estimate the existence of magnetic nanoparticles 18.5 ± 0.3 nm in diameter and an effective magnetic anisotropy constant, Keff between 2.1 and 3.2 × 10 4 erg/cm 3. A sudden change in the double integrated spectra at about 100 K for N.o. with the long body axis oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can be attributed to the Verwey transition, and suggests an organized film-like particle system.

  11. Magnetic resonance elastography: Inversions in bounded media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Glaser, Kevin J; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, magnetic resonance elastography inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord, in which the shear wavelength approaches the geometric dimensions of the object. The aim of this study was to develop and test mathematical inversion algorithms capable of resolving shear stiffness from displacement maps of flexural waves propagating in bounded media such as beams, plates, and spherical shells, using geometry-specific equations of motion. Magnetic resonance elastography and finite element modeling of beam, plate, and spherical shell phantoms of various geometries were performed. Mechanical testing of the phantoms agreed with the stiffness values obtained from finite element modeling and magnetic resonance elastography data, and a linear correlation of r(2) >or= 0.99 was observed between the stiffness values obtained using magnetic resonance elastography and finite element modeling data. In conclusion, we have demonstrated new inversion methods for calculating shear stiffness that may be more appropriate for waves propagating in bounded media. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Generating Long Scale-Length Plasma Jets Embedded in a Uniform, Multi-Tesla Magnetic-Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Rasmus, Alex; Klein, Sallee; Fein, Jeff; Belancourt, Patrick; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, Brad; Hazi, Andrew; Park, Jaebum; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Collimated plasma jets emerge in many classes of astrophysical objects and are of great interest to explore in the laboratory. In many cases, these astrophysical jets exist within a background magnetic field where the magnetic pressure approaches the plasma pressure. Recent experiments performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility utilized a custom-designed solenoid to generate the multi-tesla fields necessary to achieve proper magnetization of the plasma. Time-gated interferometry, Schlieren imaging, and proton radiography were used to characterize jet evolution and collimation under varying degrees of magnetization. Experimental results will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850, by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC, grant number DEFC52-08NA28616, and by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  14. Analysis and tests of TF magnet insulation samples for the JET upgrade to 4 tesla

    CERN Document Server

    Miele, P; Bettinali, L; Kaye, A; Last, J; Papastergiou, S; Riccardo, V; Visca, E

    2000-01-01

    The JET Toroidal Field (TF) coils were originally designed for operation at 3.4 tesla. In order to upgrade the field to 4 tesla and thus improve the performance of the JET machine, new mechanical tests and analysis were carried out on the insulation of TF coil samples. They are aimed at investigating the mechanical properties and the status of the insulation in order to set allowable stresses and force limits. In particular since the shear stress in the insulation is strongly affected by the shear modulus of elasticity G, it is important to measure this parameter. A method for the measurement of G in glass-resin fibres, the V-notched beam method (Iosipescu method) , was applied. The particular shape of the rectangular Iosipescu V- notched sample and the particular modality of force application produce pure shear stress for a reliable measurement of the G value and of the shear strength of the insulation. The effect of temperature on these mechanical properties was also investigated. Results show higher averag...

  15. A Study on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Temporomandibular Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, HYung Sick; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    Examinations of the temporomandibular joints were performed on a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. An MR surface receiver coil 3 inch in diameter was placed on plastic frame, the patient's head being placed in the frame so that the coil was pressed against the temporal region. In taking advantage of the magnetic resonance imaging that has been studied briskly till now, author obtained the images of parasagittal and paracoronal planes about the temporomandibular joint by using MPGR (Multi-Planar Gradient Recalled), GRASS (Gradient Recalled Acquisition in the Steady State), and CSMEMP (Contiguous Slice Multiple Echo, Multi-Planar), that differ from the Spin Echo pulse sequence which the previous author used. Five subjects with no symptoms of temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction were studied. The plane images obtained by these methods were compared with those by Spin Echo pulse sequence. The results were as follows: 1. The optimal repetition times (TR) and echo times (TE) for T.M.J. image were; a. 400 msec and 18 msec in PMGR pulse sequence. b. 40 msec and 12 msec in GRASS pulse sequence. c. 700 msec and 30 msec in CSMEMP pulse sequence. d. 500 msec and 20 msec in Spin Echo pulse sequence. 2. When the MPGR pulse sequence was using, T2-weighted image was obtained in very short time. 3. On the image of the paracoronal plane by GRASS pulse sequence, meniscus showed the moderate signal intensity, and the meniscus and its anteromedial, posterolateral attachments were observed definitely with gray color. 4. The signal intensity of Spin Echo pulse sequence was equal to of CSMEMP pulse sequence, but the image by CSMEMP pulse sequence showed relatively lower level in its resolution.

  16. [Quantification of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alústiza Echeverría, J M; Castiella Eguzkiza, A; Zapata Morcillo, E; Jáuregui Garmendia, L; Gabilondo Aguirregabiria, A; Paloc, C

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the quantification of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its ability to diagnose or rule out hemochromatosis. To evaluate the role of 1.5-Tesla MRI in inconclusive cases. Between 2002 and 2006, we used 1-Tesla MRI (Gandon method) and liver biopsy to quantify the liver iron concentration in 31 patients. Moreover, we used 1.5-Tesla MRI (according to Alústiza's model) and liver biopsy to determine the liver iron concentration in 10 additional patients and to check the results of 10 patients in whom 1-Tesla MRI detected iron overload. In the first group of 31 patients, liver biopsy classified the liver iron concentration as normal (80 micromol.Fe/g) in 5. The correlation with the values calculated at MRI was 100% in the 5 cases with hemochromatosis; in the 15 patients with hemosiderosis, 5 were correctly classified and the liver iron concentration was overestimated in 10; of the 11 patients with normal liver iron concentration, 6 were correctly classified and 5 were overestimated. Quantification >80 at MRI has a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 100% and specificity of 50% for the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Quantification Tesla MRI, there was a high correlation between the two techniques. The reliability of the evaluation of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla MRI is useful for ruling out hemochromatosis and identifying patients without iron overload. We observed a tendency to overestimate liver iron concentration in both patients with overload and in those without, and this limits the reliability of the technique. 1.5-Tesla MRI is a good alternative for quantifying liver iron concentration more precisely.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Medical Imaging (MRI)-from the inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Paul

    There are about 36,000 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners in the world, with annual sales of 2500. In the USA about 34 million MRI studies are done annually, and 60-70% of all scanners operate at 1.5 Tesla (T). In 1982 there were none. How MRI got to be-and how it got to1.5T is the subject of this talk. Its an insider's view-mine-as a physics PhD student at Nottingham University when MRI (almost) began, through to the invention of the 1.5T clinical MRI scanner at GE's research center in Schenectady NY.Before 1977 all MRI was done on laboratory nuclear magnetic resonance instruments used for analyzing small specimens via chemical shift spectroscopy (MRS). It began with Lauterbur's 1973 observation that turning up the spectrometer's linear gradient magnetic field, generated a spectrum that was a 1D projection of the sample in the direction of the gradient. What followed in the 70's was the development of 3 key methods of 3D spatial localization that remain fundamental to MRI today.As the 1980's began, the once unimaginable prospect of upscaling from 2cm test-tubes to human body-sized magnets, gradient and RF transmit/receive systems, was well underway, evolving from arm-sized, to whole-body electromagnet-based systems operating at body MRS machine. The largest uniform magnet possible-then, a 1.5T superconducting system-was required. Body MRI was first thought impossible above 0.35T due to RF penetration, detector coil and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) issues. When GE finally did take on MRI, their plan was to drop the field to 0.3T. We opted to make MRI work at 1.5T instead. The result was a scanner that could study both anatomy and metabolism with a SNR way beyond its lower field rivals. MRI's success truly reflects the team efforts of many: from the NMR physics to the engineering of magnets, gradient and RF systems.

  18. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ...

  2. MAGNETIC RESONANCE SEMIOTICS OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Serebryakova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC that is the most common malignancy in women presents an indubitable threat to their life and health. The basis for this investigation was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data of 203 women with histologically verified malignan- cies. The patients' mean age was 53±10.2 years. The paper describes the magnetic resonance semiotics of BC; the authors have developed criteria for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography used in the differential diagnosis of nodules.Due to high soft-tissue contrast, the use of thin sections, and the possibility of examining in any projection, MRI allows one not only to accurately visualize a pathological mass as compared with X-ray mammography or ultrasound study, but also to characterize its vascularization, which is a major criteria for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast nodules.

  3. Should the orthodontic brackets always be removed prior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Arash; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr

    2015-01-01

    Request for temporary removal of orthodontic appliances due to medical conditions that require magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is not uncommon in daily practice in the field of orthodontics. This may be at the expense of time and cost. Metal Orthodontic appliances cause more signal loss and image distortion as compared to ceramic and titanium ones. Stainless steel and large brackets in addition to the oriented miniscrews in relation to the axis of magnetic field may cause severe signal loss and image distortion. Moreover, gradient echo and frequency-selective fat saturation MR protocols are more susceptible to metal artifacts. The spin echo and fat-suppression protocols, low magnetic field strength (e.g., 1.5 Tesla vs. 3 Tesla), small field of view, high-resolution matrix, thin slice, increased echo train length and increased receiver band width could be applied to lessen the metal artifacts in MR images. The larger the distance between an appliance and desired location to be imaged, the lower the distortion and signal loss. Decision to remove brackets should be made based on its composition and desired anatomic location. In this review, first the principles of MR imaging are introduced (Part-I) and then the interactions of orthodontic appliances and magnetic field are farther discussed (Part-II). PMID:27195213

  4. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Introduction to magnetic resonance methods in photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and, more recently, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study photosynthetic processes, primarily related to the light-induced charge separation. Information obtained on the electronic structure, the relative orientation of the cofactors, and the changes in structure during these reactions should help to understand the efficiency of light-induced charge separation. A short introduction to the observables derived from magneti...

  6. Degeneration of pyramidal tract of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Harada, Noboru; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Kinuta, Yuji; Okumura, Teizo; Niijima, Kyo; Taki, Waro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1988-02-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) examinaion was performed on cases of hemiplegia and hemiparesis. These included seven cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, four cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of cerebral infarct, and two cases of head trauma. The pyramidal tract in the brain stem was studied in five patients with complete hemiplegia and in nine with incomplete hemiparesis. The scanner of the MRI was a resistive type operating at a field of 0.2 Tesla. The inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) techniques were utilized. The pyramidal tract at the level of the midbrain and the pons was recognized as a low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image (IR 150043) in the cases of complete hemiplegia. However, it was recognized as a high intensity area on the SR image (SR 100060) and the T/sub 2/ image (SR 2000100). No abnormal signal intensity was found in the cases of incomplete hemiparesis. A low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image and a high intensity area on the T/sub 2/ image were recognized in the ventral portion of the midbrain and the pons on the affected side. These findings indicate a degeneration of the pyramidal tract at the level of the brain stem in patients with complete hemiplegia.

  7. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Rodriguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Fischmann, Arne; Thornton, John S.; Knight, Steve; Norbury, Ray; White, Mel; Al‐hajjar, Michal; Carboni, Nicola; Jayawant, Sandeep; Robb, Stephanie A.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Beeson, David; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction In this study we investigated muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). Methods Twenty‐six patients with 9 CMS subtypes and 10 controls were imaged. T1‐weighted (T1w) and short‐tau inversion recovery (STIR) 3‐Tesla MRI images obtained at thigh and calf levels were scored for severity. Results Overall mean the T1w score was increased in GFPT1 and DPAGT1 CMS. T1w scans of the AChR‐deficiency, COLQ, and CHAT subjects were indistinguishable from controls. STIR images from CMS patients did not differ significantly from those of controls. Mean T1w score correlated with age in the CMS cohort. Conclusions MRI appearances ranged from normal to marked abnormality. T1w images seem to be especially abnormal in some CMS caused by mutations of proteins involved in the glycosylation pathway. A non‐selective pattern of fat infiltration or a normal‐appearing scan in the setting of significant clinical weakness should suggest CMS as a potential diagnosis. Muscle MRI could play a role in differentiating CMS subtypes. Muscle Nerve 54: 211–219, 2016 PMID:26789134

  8. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cortical Multiple Sclerosis Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Tardif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although significant improvements have been made regarding the visualization and characterization of cortical multiple sclerosis (MS lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cortical lesions (CL continue to be under-detected in vivo, and we have a limited understanding of the causes of GM pathology. The objective of this study was to characterize the MRI signature of CLs to help interpret the changes seen in vivo and elucidate the factors limiting their visualization. A quantitative 3D high-resolution (350 μm isotropic MRI study at 3 Tesla of a fixed post mortem cerebral hemisphere from a patient with MS is presented in combination with matched immunohistochemistry. Type III subpial lesions are characterized by an increase in T1, T2 and M0, and a decrease in MTR in comparison to the normal appearing cortex (NAC. All quantitative MR parameters were associated with cortical GM myelin content, while T1 showed the strongest correlation. The histogram analysis showed extensive overlap between CL and NAC for all MR parameters and myelin content. This is due to the poor contrast in myelin content between CL and NAC in comparison to the variability in myelo-architecture throughout the healthy cortex. This latter comparison is highlighted by the representation of T1 times on cortical surfaces at several laminar depths.

  9. Effects of Refractive Errors on Visual Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Akça

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the effects of refractive errors on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of visual cortex. METHODS: We performed a prospective study. The study included 13 patients with refractive error (group 1 and 30 emetropic volunteers (group 2. Group 2 was also subgrouped as 20-32 years old (young and over 45 years old (old to analyse accomodation effect. fMRI data were acquired with a block design paradigm with 3 Tesla MR system. In both groups, images initially were acquired in normal refractive state. fMRI was performed again in both groups during refractive error. Activation areas on visual cortex were calculated as square centimeter. Total activated areas on visual cortex was compared between normal refractive state and induced/ uncorrected refractive error. RESULTS: In group 1, activation areas of visual cortex during uncorrected refractive error revealed significantly decrease compared with activation areas during corrected refractive error (p=0.001. In group 2, induced myopia resulted significant decrease in activation areas compared with normal refractive state. Decrease in activation areas were significant both in 2 and 4 diopters (D of myopia compared with normal refractive state (p=0.003, p<0.001 respectively. Both in young and old subgroup, activation areas were significantly decreased during induced myopia. We revealed no difference between young and old subgroups. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The refractive errors have a clear effect on fMRI of visual cortex. Thus, to a

  10. Artifacts by dental materials on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a valuable method for evaluation of the head and neck. Unfortunately, metallic devices associated with certain dental fillings and appliances often cause variable artifacts that can obscure normal or pathologic conditions on MR and computed tomography. In this work, we assessed the MR appearance of dental prosthetic materials in vitro and in vivo including precious alloys, nonprecions alloys, resin, amalgam and titanium alloy. For in vivo studies, these materials were placed in healthy volunteer's mouths and then images were assessed. Analysis of the appearance of shape and extent of artifact, and observed influence of these artifacts on the image interpretation at 0.2 Tesla permanent type MR scanner were valuated. Material used as temporary or permanent filling of crowns such as amalgam, precious alloy and, microfilled resin did not cause artifact on the image. The size of the artifact produced by the nonprecious alloys was influenced by the ferromagnetism of the object and the volume prosthesis, and was related to the scanning sequence. Nonprecious alloys produced minimal local signal distortion, where precious alloys, and dental resin had no effect on the MR images in vivo. These results were mainly from a low field strength MR scanner used in this study.

  11. Atlantoaxial subluxation. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging correlated to myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, R.

    Twenty-nine patients with atlantoaxial subluxation (18 with rheumatoid arthritis, 2 due to trauma, 4 with os odontoideum, and one each with polyarteritis nodosa, rheumatic fever, Klippel-Feil syndrome, achondroplasia, and cause unknown) were evaluated using a 0.22 tesla resistive MRI unit. Cord compression was classified into four grades according to the degree on magnetic resonance imaging. There were 7 patients with no thecal sac compression (grade 0), 10 with a minimal degree of subarachnoid space compression without cord compression (grade 1), 7 with mild cord compression (grade 2), and 5 with severe cord compression or cord atrophy (grade 3). Although the severity of myelopathy showed poor correlation with the atlantodental interval on conventional radiography, high correlation was observed between MR grading and the degree of myelopathy. The high signal intensity foci were observed in 7 or 12 patients with cord compression (grades 2 and 3) on T2 weighted images. Other frequently observed findings in rheumatoid arthritis included soft tissue masses of low to intermediate signal intensity in the paraodontoid space, erosions of the odontoid processes, and atlanto-axial impaction on T1 and T2 weighted images.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a ... resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an ... take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. top of ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... into the scanning room also need to remove metal objects and notify the technologist of any medical or electronic devices they may have. If your child has ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... into the scanning room also need to remove metal objects and notify the technologist of any medical or electronic devices they may have. top of page What ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed ... in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should always tell the technologist if ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not recommended for ... Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pieces of metal which may be present in your child’s body due to prior accidents. Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the eyes are particularly important. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor ...

  6. Design of a 2 Tesla transmission line magnet for the VLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, G W; Novitski, I

    2000-01-01

    A prototype of the transmission line magnet for the Very Large Hadron Collider is being designed at Fermilab. This is a single-turn warm iron superconducting magnet in a "Double-C" configuration. Iron poles form a high quality alternating-gradient magnet field in two 20 mm height beam gaps. Simple magnet construction and manufacturing processes and a room temperature iron yoke give a significant reduction in magnet cost. Open beam gaps simplify magnetic measurements and vacuum chamber installation. The magnet mechanical stability was investigated for several mechanical models. A high field quality over the whole range (0.1 T-2.0 T) of field variation was calculated using correcting holes in the iron poles. The magnet optimization was carried out by POISSON, OPERA 2D and ANSYS codes. The results of magnet design and model tests are presented. (6 refs).

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... problems, recent surgeries and allergies. If you’re female and there’s a possibility that you’re pregnant ... doctor for a mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any specific ... Sponsored by About Us | ...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-02

    Nov 2, 2014 ... We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions,. CC length and total brain volume ...

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tumours and the peritumoural oedema. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging increases the overall diagnostic accuracy in brain tumours: Correlation with histopathology. K Abul-Kasim, M Thurnher, S Puchner, P Sundgren. Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Division of Neuroradiology, Diagnostic Centre for Imaging ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ...

  12. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness...

  13. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  14. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can

  16. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  17. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  18. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  19. Moving dislocations studied by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, Gezinus

    1976-01-01

    In this thesis a new approach to the study of moving dislocations in crystalline solids during plastic deformation will be presented. Since the process of dislocation motion is made up of atomic movements nuclear magnetic resonance techniques should offer a possibility to determine the manner in

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    ... these two signs,. 7. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • October 2005. REVIEW ARTICLE. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses. P Corr. FFRad (D) SA. P Seolall. Nat Dip Rad (D). H Booth. Nat Dip Rad (D). Department of Radiology. Nelson Mandela School of Medicine and Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital. Durban ...

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  2. Magnetic Resonance Lithography with Nanometer Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad AlGhannam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is capable of producing arbitrary one and two dimensional high-resolution patterns with high contrast.

  3. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions ... Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot Fishman, ...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions, CC length and total brain volume were compared ...

  6. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is ...

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaney, M.B. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with DC SQUID amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, M. B.

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al2O3/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 10(exp 17) in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  12. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  14. [Magnetic resonance in AIDS-related encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, G F; Di Biasi, C; D'Agostino, A; Trasimeni, G; Melone, A

    1995-12-01

    Fifty-eight patients with AIDS disease were studied with MR imaging in the aim of detecting the grade of brain involvement. The examinations were performed with a 1.5 Tesla magnet. Thirty-seven showed white matter lesion (63.5%), twenty-five patients showed cerebral atrophy (43%), in eight patients the MR appearance was consistent with toxoplasmosis infection (13.5%), two patients showed a linfoma (3.4%) and two patients micrococcosis (3.4%). Seventeen out of the thirty-seven patients with white matter disease showed focal well circumscribed lesion (46%), while twenty showed diffuse involvement. Between the twenty-five patients with cerebral atrophy, twelve showed a prevalence of the cortical involvement and eight a subcortical atrophy. In five patients a concomitant, cortical and subcortical atrophy was found. Between the eight patients with neurotoxolesion and two of them a widespread encephalitis picture. The MR appearance of the two limphomas was that of periventricular, space occupying, masses. In two patients with micrococcis a nodular aspect of leptomeningeal lesions was found.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? What ...

  16. Role of magnetic resonance venography in evaluation of cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eman Abd-El Latif Abd-Elaziz El Damarawy

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... Abbreviations: MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; MRV, magnetic resonance venography; SSS, superior sagittal sinus; CVO, cerebral venous occlusion; CVT, cerebral venous thrombosis; DSA, digital subtraction angiography; CT, computed tomography; CTV, computed tomography venography; CVST ...

  17. Brain magnetic resonance imaging examination in a patient with non-magnetic resonance conditional pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Nakai, MD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical dilemmas arise when patients with a non-magnetic resonance (MR conditional pacemaker are required to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We encountered a pacemaker patient with debilitating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson׳s disease, who required an MRI prior to deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery. MRI was performed safely without adverse events despite the presence of a conventional pacemaker.

  18. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings of children with kernicterus

    OpenAIRE

    Sarı, Sahabettin; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Batur, Aabdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Caksen, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The term kernicterus, or bilirubin encephalopathy, is used to describe pathological bilirubin staining of the basal ganglia, brain stem, and cerebellum, and is associated with hyperbilirubinemia. Kernicterus generally occurs in untreated hyperbilirubinemia or cases where treatment is delayed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based studies have shown characteristic findings in kernicterus. The objective of our study was to describe the role of 1H magnetic resonance spectrosc...

  19. Spin echo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bernd André; Weigel, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    The spin echo sequence is a fundamental pulse sequence in MRI. Many of today's applications in routine clinical use are based on this elementary sequence. In this review article, the principles of the spin echo formation are demonstrated on which the generation of the fundamental image contrasts T1, T2, and proton density is based. The basic imaging parameters repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) and their influence on the image contrast are explained. Important properties such as the behavior in multi-slice imaging or in the presence of flow are depicted and the basic differences with gradient echo imaging are illustrated. The characteristics of the spin echo sequence for different magnetic field strengths with respect to clinical applications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic Resonance...