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Sample records for tesla linear collider

  1. Science and technology of the TESLA electron-positron linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, A

    2002-01-01

    Recent analyses of the long term future of particles physics in Asia, Europe, and the U.S.A. have led to the consensus that the next major facility to be built to unravel the secrets of the microcosms is an electron-positron linear collider in the energy range of 500 to 1000 GeV. This collider should be constructed in an as timely fashion as possible to overlap with the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN. Here, the scientific potential and the technological aspects of the TESLA projects, a superconducting collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory, are summarised. (1 refs).

  2. Simulations of the TESLA Linear Collider with a Fast Feedback System

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel; White, G

    2003-01-01

    The tolerances on the beams as they collide at the interaction point of the TESLA linear collider are very tight due to the nano-metre scale final vertical bunch spot sizes. Ground motion causes the beams to increase in emittance and drift out of collision leading to dramatic degradation of luminosity performance. To combat this, both slow orbit and fast intra-train feedback systems will be used. The design of these feedback systems depends critically on how component misalignment effects the beam throughout the whole accelerator. A simulation has been set up to study in detail the accelerator performance under such conditions by merging the codes of PLACET, MERLIN and GUINEA-PIG together with Simulink code to model feedback systems, all under a Matlab environment.

  3. Bunch Compressor Beamlines for the Tesla and S Band Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Emma, P

    2003-01-01

    A detailed design for a single stage beam bunch length compressor for both the TESLA and the S-Band Linear Collider (SBLC) is presented. Compression is achieved by introducing an energy-position correlation along the bunch with an rf section at zero-crossing phase followed by a short bending section with energy dependent path length (momentum compaction). The motivation for a wiggler design is presented and many of the critical single bunch tolerances are evaluated. A solenoid based spin rotator is included in the design and transverse emittance tuning elements, diagnostics and tuning methods are described. Bunch length limitations due to second order momentum compaction and sinusoidal rf shape are discussed with options for compensation. Finally, the disadvantages of bunch compression using a 180 sup o arc are discussed.

  4. A feasibility study of high intensity positron sources for the S-band and TESLA linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, R.

    1997-10-01

    Future high energy linear colliders require luminosities above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Therefore beam intensities have to be provided up to two orders of magnitude higher than achieved at present. It is comparably simple to reach high electron intensities. Positron intensities in this range, however, are difficult to realize with conventional positron sources. A new method of positron production was proposed in 1979 by V.E. Balakin and A.A. Mikhailichenko. The photons, necessary for pair production, are not generated by bremsstrahlung but by high energy electrons passing through an undulator. Based on this principle, a high intensity, unpolarized and polarized positron source for linear colliders was developed by K.Floettmann. In the present work, the requirements derived by K.Floettmann are used to study the feasibility of both the polarized and the unpolarized positron source. For economical reasons it is advantageous to use the beam after the interaction for positron production. In the main part of the present work a beam line is developed which guarantees a stable operation of the unpolarized wiggler-based positron source for the S-Band and TESLA linear collider. The requirements on the electron beam emittances are much higher for the polarized undulator-based source. For TESLA it is shown, that an operation of the polarized source is possible for design interactions. For a stable operation, taking into account perturbations at the interaction point, further investigations are necessary. For the SBLC, an operation of the polarized source is not possible with the present design.

  5. Electromagnetic fields and beam dynamics simulation for the superstructure of tesla linear collider considering field asymmetry caused by hom and power couplers

    CERN Document Server

    Lalayan, M V; Sobenin, N P; Shvedunov, V I; Zavadtsev, A A; Dohlus, M

    2001-01-01

    Some features of accelerating section field computation presented by the development of power and high order mode couplers for TESLA linear collider are considered. The devices mentioned produce electromagnetic field asymmetry in the beam area, thus causing transverse kick. For this kick and its influence on beam under acceleration parameters estimation the dynamics modelling calculations were done. 3D-simulation code MAFIA was used for field computation. These data were further used in beam dynamics calculations by means of TRMTrace code. Standing wave mode was simulated while considering HOM couplers, and travelling wave in case of power couplers. Transverse kicks and focussing forces are calculated for one HOM coupler design and two coaxial FM couplers.

  6. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  7. Tutorial on Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Proceeding from the collision point towards the source, we discuss purpose and design concepts of the various linear-collider subsystems, as well as important mechanisms of emittance dilution, beam diagnostics, and advanced tuning methods. In particular, we address beamstrahlung, linac emittance degradation due to dispersion and wake fields, scaling of damping-ring parameters with collider energy, fast beam-ion and electron-cloud instabilities, coherent synchrotron radiation, and rf guns. Five case studies are examined in detail.

  8. The International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    List Benno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Linear Collider (ILC is a proposed e+e− linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200–500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  9. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  10. [New technology for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  11. CLIC: developing a linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a CERN project to provide high-energy electron-positron collisions. Instead of conventional radio-frequency klystrons, CLIC will use a low-energy, high-intensity primary beam to produce acceleration.

  12. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  13. Physics at the linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Baer, H.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P. M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bagger, J.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brümmer, F.; Choi, S. Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grünewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Höcker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Mönig, K.; Mühlleitner, M. M.; Pöschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stål, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stöckinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G. W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Brau, J.; Ellis, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Mnich, J.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review of physics at an linear collider in the energy range of GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  14. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  15. Vertex Tracking at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated physics program at an high energy e+e- linear collider places special emphasis on the accuracy in extrapolating charged particle tracks to their production vertex to tag heavy quarks and leptons. This paper reviews physics motivations and performance requirements, sensor R&D directions and current results of the studies for a vertex tracker at a future linear collider.

  16. The International Linear Collider Progress Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yamamoto, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) set up the Global Design Effort (GDE) for the design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) in 2005. Drawing on the resources of over 300 national laboratories, universities and institutes worldwide, the GDE produced a Reference Design Report in 2007, followed by a more detailed Technical Design Report (TDR) in 2013. Following this report, the GDE was disbanded. A compact core team, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC), replaced it. This is still under the auspices of ICFA and is directly overseen by the Linear Collider Board, which reports to ICFA. The LCC is charged with continuing the design effort on a much-reduced scale until the Project is approved for construction. An additional mandate of the LCC was to bring together all linear collider work, including the CERN-based Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under one structure in order to exploit synergies between the two studies.

  17. The charged beam dumps for the international linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R; Broome, T; Densham, C; Vincke, H

    2006-01-01

    The baseline configuration of the International Linear Collider requires 2 beam dumps per interaction region, each rated to 18MW of beam power, together with additional beam dumps for tuning purposes and machine protection. The baseline design uses high pressure moving water dumps, first developed for the SLC and used in the TESLA design, although a gas based dump is also being considered. In this paper we discuss the progress made by the international community on both physics and engineering studies for the beam dumps.

  18. US panel backs linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A draft report from a working group examining the future of American particle physics has stated that the US should give top priority to a high energy e-p collider, wherever it is built (2 paragraphs).

  19. Physics prospects at a linear -collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The talk described the prospects of studying standard model parameters as well as scenarios beyond the standard model, like the minimal supersymmetric standard model, theories with extra dimensions and theories with extra neutral gauge bosons, at a future linear + - collider.

  20. Photon Linear Collider Gamma-Gamma Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J

    2012-02-27

    High energy photon - photon collisions can be achieved by adding high average power short-pulse lasers to the Linear Collider, enabling an expanded physics program for the facility. The technology required to realize a photon linear collider continues to mature. Compton back-scattering technology is being developed around the world for low energy light source applications and high average power lasers are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  1. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kozanecki, W. (DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France))

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  2. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  3. Progress on $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Siemann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Physics issues. The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Stanford Linear Collider where many ideas changed and new ones were developed in response to operational experience. the requirements for future linear colliders. The different approaches for reac...

  4. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based egamma colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kirca, Z; Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron- photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions egamma yields egamma, egamma yields eZ and egamma yields vW. Excited electrons with masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy can be probed down to the coupling f = f prime = 0.05(0.1) at TESLA(CLIC) based egamma colliders. 22 Refs.

  5. Druid, event display for the linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M; Musat, G; Jeans, D; Pande, J

    2013-01-01

    Druid is a dedicated event display designed for the future e +e − linear colliders. Druid takes standard linear collider data files and detector geometry description files as input, it can visualize both physics event and detector geometry. Many displaying options are provided by Druid, giving easy access to different information. As a versatile event display, Druid supports all the latest linear collider detector models, Silicon Detector and International Large Detector, as well as the calorimeter prototypes operated in the CALICE test beam experiments. It has been utilized in many studies such as the verification of detector geometry, analysis of the simulated full events and test beam data as well as reconstruction algorithm development and code debugging.

  6. A TeV linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hinchliffe, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Various strategies for the development of a linear collider, capable of firing electrons and positrons at each other at collision energies up to about 1 TeV, are discussed. The linear collider's detector will have to detect and precisely measure the energies of electrons, muons, and hadrons. It is suggested that precision must be maintained over the large span of final-state particle energies. Both the superconducting and warm accelerating technologies have demonstrated their viability for a machine starting out with a collision energy of about 500 GeV that could later be upgraded to 1 TeV. (Edited abstract) 9 Refs.

  7. Calorimetry at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090195; Marshall, John

    This thesis describes the optimisation of the calorimeter design for collider experiments at the future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). The detector design of these experiments is built around high-granularity Particle Flow Calorimetry that, in contrast to traditional calorimetry, uses the energy measurements for charged particles from the tracking detectors. This can only be realised if calorimetric energy deposits from charged particles can be separated from those of neutral particles. This is made possible with fine granularity calorimeters and sophisticated pattern recognition software, which is provided by the PandoraPFA algorithm. This thesis presents results on Particle Flow calorimetry performance for a number of detector configurations. To obtain these results a new calibration procedure was developed and applied to the detector simulation and reconstruction to ensure optimal performance was achieved for each detector configuration considered. This thesis a...

  8. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  9. Linear Collider partners woo newly opened India

    CERN Multimedia

    Bagla, Pallava

    2006-01-01

    "With the wheels of Air Force One barely off the tarmac following U.S. President George W. Bush's visit, which ended India's 3 decades as a nuclear pariah state, a delegation of U.S. and European physicists arrived here last week to discuss India's involvement in the International Linear Collider."

  10. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Grojean, Christophe; /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; /SLAC; Gao, Yuanning; /Tsinghua U., Beijing, CHEP; Kanemura, Shinya; /Toyama U.; Kim, Hyungdo; /Seoul Natl U.; List, Jenny; /DESY; Nojiri, Mihoko; /KEK, Tsukuba; Perelstein, Maxim; /Cornell U., LEPP; Poeschl, Roman; /LAL, Orsay; Reuter, Juergen; /DESY; Simon, Frank; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Tanabe, Tomohiko; /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Yu, Jaehoon; /Texas U., Arlington; Wells, James D.; /Michigan U., MCTP; Murayama, Hitoshi; /UC, Berkeley /LBNL /Tokyo U., IPMU; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  11. Plans for 40 km linear collider unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Particle physicists have released their first tentative design for the International Linear Collider (ILC), a multibillin dollar accelerator that could switch on by the middle of the next decade. The plans also state that the machine should be built in two underground tunnels even though it would be much cheaper to use just one (1 page)

  12. Physics possibilities at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some recent studies about the parameter determination of top quarks, bosons, Higgs bosons, supersymmetric particles and in the ADD model of extra dimensions at a linear collider. Author Affiliations. Alfred Bartl1 Stefan Hesselbach1. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, ...

  13. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, Junji [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.).

  14. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  15. "Towards a Future Linear Collider" and "The Linear Collider Studies at CERN"

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN’s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  16. International linear collider reference design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  17. Beam-beam instability driven by wakefield effects in linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The vertical beam profile distortions induced by wakefield effects in linear colliders (the so-called ``banana effect'') generate a beam-beam instability at the collision point when the vertical disruption parameter is large. We illustrate this effect in the case of the TESLA linear collider project. We specify the tolerance on the associated emittance growth, which translates into tolerances on injection jitter and, for a given tuning procedure, on structure misalignments. We look for possible cures based on fast orbit correction at the interaction point and using a fast luminosity monitor.

  18. Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Organizers of the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    2012-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. This school is a continuation of the series of schools which began six years ago.  The first school was held in 2006 in Sokendai, Japan, the second in 2007 in Erice, Italy, the third in 2008 in Oakbrook Hills, USA, the fourth in 2009 in Huairou, China, the fifth in 2010 in Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, and the sixth in 2011 in Pacific Grove, USA.   The school is organized by the International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE), the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) Beam Dynamics Panel. The school this year will take place at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Indore, India from November 27 to December 8, 2012. It is hosted by the Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) and sponsored by a number of funding agencies and institutions around the world including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. National Science...

  19. Druid, displaying root module used for linear collider detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the ROOT TEve/TGeo classes and the standard linear collider data structure, a dedicated linear collider event display has been developed. It supports the latest detector models for both International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider as well as the CALICE test beam prototypes. It can be used to visualise event information at the generation, simulation and reconstruction levels. Many options are provided in an intuitive interface. It has been heavily employed in a variety of analyses.

  20. 2001 Report on the Next Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronnberg, J; Breidenbach; Burke, D; Corlett, J; Dombeck, T; Markiewicz, T

    2001-08-28

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  1. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-08-21

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  2. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  3. Moeller scattering polarimetry for high energy e sup + e sup - linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, G

    2002-01-01

    The general features of the Moeller scattering and its use as an electron polarimeter are described and studied in view of the planned future high energy e sup + e sup - linear colliders. In particular the study concentrates on the TESLA collider which is planned to operate with longitudinal polarised beams at a centre of mass energy of the order of 0.5 TeV with a luminosity of 3.4x10 sup 3 sup 4 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1.

  4. Calorimetry at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repond, Jose [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)]. E-mail: respond@hep.anl.gov

    2007-03-01

    The physics potential of the International Linear Collider depends critically on the jet energy resolution of its detector. Detector concepts are being developed which optimize the jet energy resolution, with the aim of achieving {sigma}{sub jet}=30%/E{sub jet}. Under the assumption that Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs), which combine tracking and calorimeter information to reconstruct the energy of hadronic jets, can provide this unprecedented jet energy resolution, calorimeters with very fine granularity are being developed. After a brief introduction outlining the principles of PFAs, the current status of various calorimeter prototype construction projects and their plans for the next few years will be reviewed.

  5. Calorimetry at the International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repond, José

    2007-03-01

    The physics potential of the International Linear Collider depends critically on the jet energy resolution of its detector. Detector concepts are being developed which optimize the jet energy resolution, with the aim of achieving σjet=30%/√{Ejet}. Under the assumption that Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs), which combine tracking and calorimeter information to reconstruct the energy of hadronic jets, can provide this unprecedented jet energy resolution, calorimeters with very fine granularity are being developed. After a brief introduction outlining the principles of PFAs, the current status of various calorimeter prototype construction projects and their plans for the next few years will be reviewed.

  6. Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, M.; Ruchti, R.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided.

  7. Ground Motion Models for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-06-28

    Optimization of the parameters of a future linear collider requires comprehensive models of ground motion. Both general models of ground motion and specific models of the particular site and local conditions are essential. Existing models are not completely adequate, either because they are too general, or because they omit important peculiarities of ground motion. The model considered in this paper is based on recent ground motion measurements performed at SLAC and at other accelerator laboratories, as well as on historical data. The issues to be studied for the models to become more predictive are also discussed.

  8. Scaling Laws for $e^+ e^-$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e+e- Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency structures becomes very adv...

  9. Frequency scaling of linear super-colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondelli, A.; Chernin, D.; Drobot, A.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V.

    1986-06-01

    The development of electron-positron linear colliders in the TeV energy range will be facilitated by the development of high-power rf sources at frequencies above 2856 MHz. Present S-band technology, represented by the SLC, would require a length in excess of 50 km per linac to accelerate particles to energies above 1 TeV. By raising the rf driving frequency, the rf breakdown limit is increased, thereby allowing the length of the accelerators to be reduced. Currently available rf power sources set the realizable gradient limit in an rf linac at frequencies above S-band. This paper presents a model for the frequency scaling of linear colliders, with luminosity scaled in proportion to the square of the center-of-mass energy. Since wakefield effects are the dominant deleterious effect, a separate single-bunch simulation model is described which calculates the evolution of the beam bunch with specified wakefields, including the effects of using programmed phase positioning and Landau damping. The results presented here have been obtained for a SLAC structure, scaled in proportion to wavelength.

  10. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper.

  11. Conventional 20-TeV, 10-Tesla, p/sup +-/ colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, R.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Collins, T.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of various 20-TeV colliders is discussed assuming 10-Tesla bending magnets. For bunched beams, the luminosity for anti pp collisions will be approximately < n > x 10/sup 31/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ where < n > is the average number of interactions per bunch collision desired by the experimenters; for pp collisions this becomes < n > x 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Values of < n > up to 25 can be accommodated in a straightforward manner. Continuous beam pp collisions may yield a luminosity of 10/sup 33/ to 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ if the large amount of energy in the intense beams can be handled. Assuming that adequate and reliable 10-Tesla magnets can be built without unforeseen difficulties, the construction cost of such a collider, together with its new laboratory in the desert, would cost 2 to 3 billion dollars (FY-82 dollars) using present-day, conventional techniques. Although such a machine appears straightforward to build, considerable R and D will be required in order to optimize the design and bring down costs.

  12. Alignment Challenges for a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, H; Stern, G

    2013-01-01

    The preservation of ultra-low emittances in the main linac and Beam Delivery System area is one of the main challenges for linear colliders. This requires alignment tolerances never achieved before at that scale, down to the micrometre level. As a matter of fact, in the LHC, the goal for the smoothing of the components was to obtain a 1σ deviation with respect to a smooth curve of 0.15 mm over a 150 m long sliding window, while for the CLIC project for example, it corresponds to 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m in the Beam Delivery System area. Two complementary strategies are being studied to fulfil these requirements: the development and validation of long range alignment systems over a few hundreds of metres and short range alignment systems over a few metres. The studies undertaken, with associated tests setups and the latest results will be detailed, as well as their application for the alignment of both CLIC and ILC colliders.

  13. Femtosecond laser technologies for linear collider designs

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    A highly stabilized high-energy femtosecond laser system was developed for Compton X-ray experiments. The laser system is based on the chirped pulse amplification, and each component is actively or passively stabilized. A master oscillator with less than 100 fs timing jitter, two independent oscillators with 300 fs relative timing lag, a new measurement technique of timing fluctuation of low-repetition amplified pulse, and a special designed regenerative amplifier with high quality beam were developed. New technical options for linear collider are proposed based on these expertises. The options are temporally square pulse for low emittance electron generation, a timing stabilized seeder for CO sub 2 amplifier, and multi-pulse high-energy lasers for gamma-gamma collision and for multi-bunch electron generation.

  14. Radiative corrections for the LHC and linear collider era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laenen, E.; Wackeroth, D.

    2009-01-01

    We emphasize the importance of including radiative corrections when extracting physics from colliders such as the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and a future linear collider (LC). We review both well-tested methods and recent advances for calculating these

  15. The polarized electron beam for the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, M.

    1996-10-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been colliding a polarized electron beam with an unpolarized positron beam at the Z{sup 0} resonance for the SLD experiment since 1992. An electron beam polarization of close to 80% has been achieved for the experiment at luminosities up to 8 {center_dot} 10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This is the world`s first and only linear collider, and is a successful prototype for the next generation of high energy electron linear colliders. This paper discusses polarized beam operation for the SLC, and includes aspects of the polarized source, spin transport and polarimetry.

  16. Linear Collider Flavour Identification status report: Sensors for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration is continuing the work to develop column-parallel CCDs (CPCCD) and CMOS readout chips to be used in the vertex detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The CPCCD achieves several orders of magnitude faster readout than conventional CCDs ...

  17. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, have demonstrated the power of a pixel vertex detector in experiments at a future high energy linear collider. Silicon CCDs. (charged coupled devices) [1] seemed like the vertex detector sensors of choice for the international linear collider (ILC) until the accelerator technology decision.

  18. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  19. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency

  20. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mail: telnov@inp.nsk.su. Abstract. At linear colliders, the e+e− luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In γγ collisions at the photon collider, these effects are ...

  1. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At linear colliders, the + - luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In collisions at the photon collider, these effects are absent, and so smaller emittances are desirable. In the present damping ring designs, nominal DR parameters ...

  2. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the SM Higgs boson it will be therefore, necessary to establish its properties such as hypercharge, CP parity etc. At an e+e− collider the dominant Higgs production processes are e+e− → f ¯fH, which proceed via the VVH coupling with V = W, Z and f any light fermion. Demanding Lorentz invariance, the VVH couplings can.

  3. New physics with the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the 'strong' interactions between particles would be best investigated using a lepton-antilepton collider of energy 2 TeV or more. Plans for an accelerator of this type, called CLIC, have been underway at CERN for many years in collaboration with other accelerator laboratories (5 pages).

  4. Physics possibilities at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clarifying the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking will be the central problem which we have to solve with the next generation of high energy colliders. In the SM, electroweak symmetry breaking is achieved by the Higgs mechanism. The scalar Higgs boson, also predicted by this mechanism, has not been found so.

  5. NICADD scientists develop detector technology for International Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Scientist at the Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) are celebrating the successful run of a prototype subdetector for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC)." (1 page)

  6. Physics prospects at a linear e+e− collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the virtual Z in the decay H → Z∗Z for mH < 2mZ. The angular distribution of decay products in ..... become a reality. References. [1] American Linear Collider Working Group: J Bagger et al, arXiv:hep-ex/0007022. ACFA Linear Collider Working Group: K Abe et al, arXiv:hep-ph/0109166. ECFA/DESY LC Physics Working ...

  7. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kozanecki, W. [DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France)

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  8. Adjustable Permanent Quadrupoles Using Rotating Magnet Material Rods for the Next Linear Collider.

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, C M

    2002-01-01

    The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) will require over 1400 adjustable quadrupoles between the main linacs' accelerator structures. These 12.7 mm bore quadrupoles will have a range of integrated strength from 0.6 to 132 Tesla, with a maximum gradient of 135 Tesla per meter, an adjustment range of +0 -20% and effective lengths from 324 mm to 972 mm. The magnetic center must remain stable to within 1 micrometer during the 20% adjustment. In an effort to reduce estimated costs and increase reliability, several designs using hybrid permanent magnets have been developed. All magnets have iron poles and use either Samarium Cobalt or Neodymium Iron to provide the magnetic fields. Two prototypes use rotating rods containing permanent magnetic material to vary the gradient. Gradient changes of 20% and center shifts of less than 20 microns have been measured. These data are compared to an equivalent electromagnet prototype. See High Reliability Prototype Quadrupole for the Next Linear Collider by C.E Rago, C.M SPENC...

  9. Prospects for Multi-Tev Two-Beam Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Ronald D

    2002-08-12

    Recent work at CERN and SLAC has opened the possibility of the development of concrete designs for electron positron linear colliders that have a center of mass energy substantially above 1 TeV [1,2]. These designs are based on high gradient, normal conducting acceleration with the power provided by an auxiliary beam that is efficiently accelerated in a fully loaded, low frequency linac. This type of power source offers a flexibility to develop linear collider designs that have a wide range of parameters. In particular, the choice of frequency can be made without regard to the availability of high power RF sources, at least up to about 30 GHz. This paper explores possible linear collider designs taking into account limits on acceleration gradient and beam-beam effects. The study shows that electron positron linear colliders have an energy reach far in excess of 1 TeV. In particular we show that an X-band linear collider powered with conventional sources might be upgraded using two-beam techniques to an energy far above 1 TeV. Thus, the linear collider offers a platform for continued exploration at the energy frontier of High Energy Physics.

  10. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B., E-mail: CBSchroeder@lbl.gov; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron–positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  11. Alternate approaches to future electron-positron linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, G.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this article is two-fold: to review the current international status of various design approaches to the next generation of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders, and on the occasion of his 80th birthday, to celebrate Richard B. Neal`s many contributions to the field of linear accelerators. As it turns out, combining these two tasks is a rather natural enterprise because of Neal`s long professional involvement and insight into many of the problems and options which the international e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider community is currently studying to achieve a practical design for a future machine.

  12. Heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons at the photon linear collider – a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    spectra for the PLC at the TESLA collider [6,7]. One-year run of PLC was as- sumed with the center-of-mass energy of the colliding electron beams optimized for the production of the pseudoscalar Higgs bosons. The distribution of the primary vertex and the beam crossing angle were taken into account. The total widths.

  13. Summary of the Linear Collider Testbeam Workshop 2009 - LCTW09

    CERN Document Server

    Boudry, V; Frey, R E; Gaede, F; Hast, C; Hauptman, J; Kawagoe, K; Linssen, L; Lipton, R; Lohmann, W; Matsuda, T; Nelson, T; Poeschl, R; Ramberg, E; Sefkow, F; Vos, M; Wing, M; Yu, J

    2010-01-01

    This note summarises the workshop LCTW09 held between the 3.11.2009 and 5.11.2009 at LAL Orsay. The workshop was dedicated to discuss the beam tests in the years 2010 up to 2013 for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. The document underlines the rich R&D program on these detectors in the coming years. Large synergies were identified in the DAQ and software systems. Considerable consolidation of resources are expected from the establishment of semi-permanent beam lines for linear collider detector R&D at major centres like CERN and FNAL. Reproducing a beam structure as foreseen for the International Linear Collider (ILC) would clearly enhance the value of the obtained beam test results. Although not ultimately needed for every research program, all groups would exploit such a feature if it is available.

  14. Lepton Colliders at the Energy and Luminosity Frontiers Linear Colliders and SuperB Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, Jean Pierre

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of the performance of the various Lepton Colliders presently in operation at the energy and luminosity frontiers, the article describes their possible evolution and the envisaged new projects to improve their performances. Beauty Factories have the potential to extend the present luminosity frontier of Lepton Colliders by two orders of magnitude into the 1036 cm-2 sec-1 range. Linear Colliders have the potential to extend the present energy frontier of Lepton Colliders by one order of magnitude into the Multi-TeV energy range. The ideas and challenges to boost these frontiers in the next future are described as well as the R&D plans to demonstrate their feasibility and/or to prepare projects proposals through engineering design optimisation and industrialisation. Technically driven schedule for their possible fabrication and installation are presented.

  15. Physics and technology of the Next Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlman, S; Aiello, R; Akemoto, M; Alley, R; Assmann, R W; Baer, Howard W; Baltay, C; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Barakat, B; Barker, A; Barklow, Timothy L; Barletta, W A; Bauer, D A; Bertolini, L R; Bharadwaj, V K; Bogart, J R; Bowden, G B; Bower, G; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Brown, K L; Burke, D L; Burrows, P N; Byrd, J M; Cai, Y; Caryotakis, G; Cassel, R L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, P; Clark, S L; Cleaver, G B; Clem, D; Clendenin, J E; Corlett, J N; Corvin, C; Couture, G; Cuypers, F; Danielson, M; Deadrick, F J; Decker, Franz Josef; Donaldson, A R; Dragt, A J; Dubois, R; Early, R A; Ecklund, S D; Eichner, J; Einhorn, Martin B; Emma, P; Eppley, K R; Eriksson, L; Fahey, S; Farkas, Z D; Fawley, W M; Feng, J L; Fero, M J; Fisher, A S; Foundoulis, C; Fowkes, W R; Frey, R E; Frisch, J; Fuller, R W; Furman, M A; Genova, L F; Gintner, M; Giordano, G; Gluckstern, R L; Godfrey, S; Gold, S; Goluboff, M; Gross, G; Gunion, J F; Haber, Howard E; Han, T; Hanna, S; Hartman, S; Heifets, S A; Helm, R H; Hendrickson, L; Henestroza, E; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hewett, J L; Higashi, K; Higo, T; Hoag, H A; Hodgson, J; Hollebeek, R J; Holt, J A; Houck, T L; Humphrey, J W; Humphrey, R; Irwin, J; Jackson, A; Jacobsen, R A; Jaros, J A; Jobe, R Keith; Jones, R M; Kalyniak, P A; Kane, G L; Keller, L P; Kim, K J; Klem, D E; Ko, K; Koontz, R F; Kraft, E; Krejcik, P; Kroll, N M; Kubo, K; Kulikov, A; Lavine, T L; Li, H; Li, Z; Lidia, S M; Linebarger, W A; Loew, G A; Loewen, R J; Maeshima, K; Manly, S L; Marciano, W J; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Mattison, T S; McDonald, K F; McKee, B; Messner, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Miller, R H; Minkowski, Peter; Minty, Michiko G; Moshammer, W; Munro, M H; Munroe, R; Murayama, H; Nantista, C D; Nauenberg, U; Nelson, E M; Nelson, H; Nelson, W R; Ng, C K; Nosochkov, Yu M; Ohgaki, T; Oide, K; Paige, Frank E; Palmer, D; Palmer, R B; Paterson, J M; Pearson, C; Perry, M; Peskin, Michael E; Phillips, R M; Phinney, N; Pope, R S; Raja, R; Raubenheimer, T O; Reginato, L; Rifkin, J; Riles, K; Rimmer, R A; Rinolfi, Louis; Rizzo, T; Robin, D; Rokni, S H; Ronan, Michael T; Rosenzweig, J; Ross, M C; Rowson, P C; Ruland, R E; Ruth, Ronald D; Saab, A; Sawyer, L; Schumm, B; Schwarz, H; Scott, B; Sessler, Andrew M; Sheppard, J C; Shoaee, H; Smith, S; Spence, W L; Spencer, C M; Spencer, J E; Sprehn, D; Strom, D; Stupakov, G; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, K; Tang, H; Tantawi, S G; Tata, Xerxes; Telnov, V I; Tenenbaum, P G; Thomas, S; Thompson, K A; Tian, F; Turner, J; Usher, T; Van Bibber, K; Van Kooten, R; Vanecek, D L; Vlieks, A E; Wagner, D L; Walz, D R; Wang, J W; Ward, B F L; Weidemann, A W; Westenskow, G A; White, T; Whittum, D H; Wilson, P B; Wilson, Z; Woodley, M; Woods, M; Wudka, J; Wurtele, J S; Xie, M; Yan, Y T; Yeremian, A D; Yokoya, K; Yu, S S; Zholents, A A; Zimmermann, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We present the current expectations for the design and physics program of an e+e- linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV -- 1 TeV. We review the experiments that would be carried out at this facility and demonstrate its key role in exploring physics beyond the Standard Model over the full range of theoretical possibilities. We then show the feasibility of constructing this machine, by reviewing the current status of linear collider technology and by presenting a precis of our `zeroth- order' design.

  16. Detectors and Physics at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090240

    An electron-positron linear collider is an option for future large particle accelerator projects. Such a collider would focus on precision tests of the Higgs boson properties. This thesis describes three studies related to the optimisation of highly granular calorimeters and one study on the sensitivity of Higgs couplings at CLIC. Photon reconstruction algorithms were developed for highly granular calorimeters of a future linear collider detector. A sophisticated pattern recognition algorithm was implemented, which uses the topological properties of electromagnetic showers to identify photon candidates and separate them from nearby particles. It performs clustering of the energy deposits in the detector, followed by topological characterisation of the clusters, with the results being considered by a multivariate likelihood analysis. This algorithm leads to a significant improvement in the reconstruction of both single photons and multiple photons in high energy jets compared to previous reconstruction softwar...

  17. The lay-out of the photon collider at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One of the interaction regions at the linear colliders should be compatible both with + - and , modes of operation. In this paper, the differences in requirements and possible design solutions are discussed. Author Affiliations. V I Telnov1. Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia. Pramana ...

  18. Physics at a future collider beyond the LHC and a TeV class linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC will have probed the physics at the TeV frontier, new generations of colliders capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain will need to be considered. Concepts for both high energy e+e- linear colliders and muon storage rings have been proposed as well as hadron colliders. Highly challenging R&D programs are presently pursued to demonstrate their principles. The definition of a physics programme in the multi-TeV range still requires essential data that is likely to become available only after the first years of LHC operation and, possibly, also the results from a TeV-class linear collider. At present we have to envisage several possible scenarios for the fundamental questions to be addressed by collider experiments in the next decade, to guide the choices in the accelerator designs and parameters. After a brief review of the main accelerator projects and the present status of their R&D, I shall discuss the main signatures of the physics of possible relevance in relation to the e...

  19. Considerations about an improved superconducting cable for Linear Collider Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2009-01-01

    This note puts together arguments, discussed within the Linear Collider Detector community in the last months, about setting up an R&D program aiming to demonstrate the industrial feasibility and build a significant prototype length (tbd) of superconducting cable for next HEP detector magnets.

  20. Software for the international linear collider: Simulation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the internationalization of the international linear collider project, increasing demands are put on the software, its availability, ease of use, and ease of distrib- ution. Software plays an important role in all aspects of the development of the experimental program at the ILC. Software is used to design optimized detectors,.

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING Progress on e+e- Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    27, 28, 29, 30, 31 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Progress on e+e- Linear Colliders by P. Zerwas / Desy, D and R. Siemann / Slac, USA Physics issues (P. Zerwas - 27, 28 May)The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Sta...

  2. Academic Training: Physics at e+e- linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics at e+e- linear collider K. DESCH / Desy, Hamburg, D Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale to very high precision. The lecture series introduces the possibilities of a TeV linear collider (the International Linear Collider, ILC) in the fields of Higgs physics, alternative Electro-weak Symmetry Breaking scenarios, Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions, and more exotic models. Also the prospects for highly improved measurements of SM parameters such as the top quark mass and electro-weak gauge boson properties are discussed. The implications for the design of an appropriate detector are outlined and current R&D developments are explained. Particular emphasis will be given to the complementarity and intimate interplay of physics at the LHC and the ILC. The additional benefit of multi-TeV e+e- collisions as envisaged i...

  3. Meeting to discuss laser cavity design for photon linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The motivation to use a cavity at the photon linear collider (PLC) is that there are 1010 electrons in each electron bunch. The small cross-section for the Compton scattering process dictates having at least 1019 photons in the laser pulse to obtain an efficient conversion of the incoming beam. This means that less than 1 in ...

  4. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed. (GHT)

  5. R&D progress toward future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Voss, G A

    1999-01-01

    During the last 20 years there has been a worldwide effort to develop the physics and technology of linear colliders. Present goals at SLAC, KEK and DESY are to bring the R&D efforts to the point where proposals for 500/1000 GeV cms electron-positron colliders can be officially submitted in the years 2002/2003. The CLIC study at CERN aims at a second generation very high energy electron-positron collider, to be considered after completion of the LHC. The main areas of hardware R&D include efficient accelerating waveguides without harmful higher order mode (h.o.m) effects, high peak power klystrons, klystron modulators and RF-power compression. Test facilities have been put in place for the testing of h.o.m behavior of new waveguide designs (ASSET), focusing on low emittance beams to spot sizes in the nanometer range (FFTB) and damping particle oscillations in a special damping ring (ATF) to prepare low emittance bunch trains of electrons for injection into linear colliders. (0 refs).

  6. Design Issues of TeV Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P

    1996-01-01

    Within the frame work of a world-wide collabora-tion, various possible approaches for Linear Colliders in the TeV energy range (TLC) and high luminosity (~ 1034 cm-2 sec-1) are explored in different laboratories and periodically compared in international workshops. The main accelerator physics issues required to meet the requested performance improvement by three orders of magnitude in luminosity and by a factor 10 in beam energy with respect to the unique linear collider presently operational, the SLC at SLAC, are reviewed, pointing out the main challenges common to all designs as well as the possible technological choices. Corresponding designs based on the improve-ment of present standard or the development of new tech-nologies are presented, emphasizing their main issues and specific challenges. The main goals of ambitious test facilities presently set-up to study the feasibility and cost of the various schemes in the next few years are introduced.

  7. International Linear Collider Physics and detectors: 2011 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Fuster, Juan [IFIC- Valencia (Spain); Hesla, Leah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Illenseer, Monika [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Royole-Degieux, Perrine [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Caen (France). Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Takahashi, Rika [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Warmbein, Barbara [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yamada, Sakue [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Zhang, Min [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)

    2012-08-29

    The studies of physics and detectors for the International Linear Collider are an important parallel element to the effort for the ILC Technical Design Report. The studies comprise the physics opportunities, detector requirements, and detector development to achieve the challenging high performance demanded by the physics, as well as integration of detectors into the accelerator. The current phase of this effort began with a call for Letters of Intent (LOIs) in 2007 and will lead to the submission of Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) report together with the ILC Technical Design Report at the end of 2012. Here we summarise the current status of this process, review what it has accomplished and identify the work that still needs to be completed. This report, titled International Linear Collider Physics and Detectors: 2011 Status Report, does just this.

  8. Design of a dependable Interlock System for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Nouvel, Patrice

    For high energy accelerators, the interlock system is a key part of the machine protection. The interlock principle is to inhibit the beam either on failure of critical equipment and/or on low beam quality evaluation. The dependability of such a system is the most critical parameter. This thesis presents the design of an dependable interlock system for linear collider with an application to the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project. This design process is based on the IEEE 1220 standard and is is divided in four steps. First, the specifications are established, with a focus on the dependability, more precisely the reliability and the availability of the system. The second step is the design proposal based on a functional analysis, the CLIC and interfaced systems architecture. Third, the feasibility study is performed, applying the concepts in an accelerator facility. Finally, the last step is the hardware verification. Its aim is to prove that the proposed design is able to reach the requirements.

  9. Polarized positrons and electrons at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [CERN TH Division, Department of Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); IPPP, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: g.a.moortgat-pick@durham.ac.uk; Abe, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Alexander, G. [University of Tel-Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Ananthanarayan, B. [Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Babich, A.A. [Pavel Sukhoi Technical University, Gomel, 246746 (Belarus); Bharadwaj, V. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Barber, D. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bartl, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Brachmann, A. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Chen, S. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Clarke, J. [CCLRC, ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Clendenin, J.E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dainton, J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Desch, K. [Phys. Institut, Albert-Ludwigs Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Diehl, M. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Dobos, B.; Dorland, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Dreiner, H.K. [Phys. Institut, Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Eberl, H. [Inst. f. Hochenergiephysik, Osterr. Akademie d. Wissenschaften, A-1050 Wien (Austria); Ellis, J. [CERN TH Division, Department of Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  10. Active quadrupole stabilization for future linear particle colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, Christophe; Kuzmin, Andrey; Janssens, Stef; Sylte, Magnus; Guinchard, Michael; Hauviller, Claude

    2010-01-01

    The future Compact LInear particle Collider (CLIC) under study at CERN will require to stabilize heavy electromagnets, and also to provide them some positioning capabilities. Firstly, this paper presents the concept adopted to address both requirements. Secondly, the control strategy adopted for the stabilization is studied numerically, showing that the quadrupole can be stabilized in both lateral and vertical direction. Finally, the strategy is validated experimentally on a single degree of freedom scaled test bench.

  11. Photon-Photon Scattering at the Photon Linear Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Jikia, G.; Tkabladze, A.

    1993-01-01

    Photon-photon scattering at the Photon Linear Collider is considered. Explicit formulas for helicity amplitudes due to $W$ boson loops are presented. It is shown that photon-photon scattering should be easily observable at PLC and separation of the $W$ loop contribution (which dominates at high energies) will be possible at $e^+e^-$ c.m. energy of 500~GeV or higher.

  12. High Momentum Resolution tracking In a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ljunggren, M; Oskarsson, A

    2011-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been made within the LCTPC-collaboration, an international collaboration for studying the technical aspects af a possible tracking detector at a linear collider. The collaboration has built a prototype Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for testing the properties of dierent readout structures. A TPC is a tracking detector consisting of a gas lled drift volume placed in a solenoidal magnetic eld where the readout is made using a segmented plane of so called pads. When a char...

  13. Effect of CSR shielding in the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, J; Apsimon, R; Schulte, D

    2014-01-01

    The Drive Beam complex of the Compact Linear Collider must use short bunches with a large charge making beam transport susceptible to unwanted effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation emitted in the dipole magnets. We present the effects of transporting the beam within a limited aperture which decreases the magnitude of the CSR wake. The effect, known as CSR shielding, eases the design of key components of the facility.

  14. Single charged Higgs boson production at next generation linear colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemura, S; Moretti, S; Odagiri, K

    2001-01-01

    We study the single production of charged Higgs bosons in e+e- collisions, chiefly in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Our analysis complements foregoing studies of the pair production channel especially in regions where the kinematic constraint suppresses pair production. We present cross sections relevant to experiments at the next generation linear colliders and some brief discussions of their phenomenology. Our analysis shows that the single production is a useful alternative ch...

  15. 9th International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This school is a continuation of the series of schools that began nine years ago: Japan 2006, Italy 2007, United States 2008, China 2009, Switzerland 2010, United States 2011, India 2012 and Turkey 2013. Based on needs from the accelerator community, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC) and ICFA Beam Dynamics Panel are organising the Ninth International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. The school will present instruction in TeV-scale linear colliders including the ILC, CLIC and other advanced accelerators. An important change of this year’s school from previous LC schools is that it will also include the free electron laser (FEL), a natural extension for applications of the ILC/CLIC technology. The school is offered to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and junior researchers from around the world. We welcome applications from physicists who are considering changing to a career in accelerator physics and technology. This school adopts an in depth approach. A selective course on the FEL has b...

  16. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Schroeder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultrahigh accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasilinear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultrashort bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10^{17}  cm^{-3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1  μm wavelength lasers with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  17. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E

    2001-06-05

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide.

  18. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  19. Toward Precision Top Quark Measurements in $e^+e^−$ Collisions at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Van Der Kolk, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Linear lepton colliders offer an excellent environment for precision measurements of the top quark. An overview is given of the current prospects on the measurement of the top quark mass, rare top quark decays and top quark couplings at the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC).

  20. Status and plans of the Compact Linear Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Doebert, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project is exploring the possibility of constructing a multiTeV linear electron-positron collider for high-energy frontier physics studies beyond the LHC era. The CLIC concept is based on high-gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures. The RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is produced by a two-beam acceleration scheme, where power is extracted from a high current drive beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The key ongoing studies involve accelerator parameter optimisation, technical studies and component development, alignment and stability, and include a number of system performance studies in test-facilities around the world. The CLIC physics potential and main detector issues, as well as possible implementation staging, are being studied in parallel. A summary of the progress and status of the corresponding studies will be given, as well as an outline of the preparation and work towards developing a CLIC implementation plan by 2018/19

  1. Updated baseline for a staged Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Boland, M J; Giansiracusa, P J; Lucas, T G; Rassool, R P; Balazs, C; Charles, T K; Afanaciev, K; Emeliantchik, I; Ignatenko, A; Makarenko, V; Shumeiko, N; Patapenka, A; Zhuk, I; Abusleme Hoffman, A C; Diaz Gutierrez, M A; Gonzalez, M Vogel; Chi, Y; He, X; Pei, G; Pei, S; Shu, G; Wang, X; Zhang, J; Zhao, F; Zhou, Z; Chen, H; Gao, Y; Huang, W; Kuang, Y P; Li, B; Li, Y; Shao, J; Shi, J; Tang, C; Wu, X; Ma, L; Han, Y; Fang, W; Gu, Q; Huang, D; Huang, X; Tan, J; Wang, Z; Zhao, Z; Laštovička, T; Uggerhoj, U; Wistisen, T N; Aabloo, A; Eimre, K; Kuppart, K; Vigonski, S; Zadin, V; Aicheler, M; Baibuz, E; Brücken, E; Djurabekova, F; Eerola, P; Garcia, F; Haeggström, E; Huitu, K; Jansson, V; Karimaki, V; Kassamakov, I; Kyritsakis, A; Lehti, S; Meriläinen, A; Montonen, R; Niinikoski, T; Nordlund, K; Österberg, K; Parekh, M; Törnqvist, N A; Väinölä, J; Veske, M; Farabolini, W; Mollard, A; Napoly, O; Peauger, F; Plouin, J; Bambade, P; Chaikovska, I; Chehab, R; Davier, M; Kaabi, W; Kou, E; LeDiberder, F; Pöschl, R; Zerwas, D; Aimard, B; Balik, G; Baud, J-P; Blaising, J-J; Brunetti, L; Chefdeville, M; Drancourt, C; Geoffroy, N; Jacquemier, J; Jeremie, A; Karyotakis, Y; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Vouters, G; Bernard, A; Peric, I; Gabriel, M; Simon, F; Szalay, M; van der Kolk, N; Alexopoulos, T; Gazis, E N; Gazis, N; Ikarios, E; Kostopoulos, V; Kourkoulis, S; Gupta, P D; Shrivastava, P; Arfaei, H; Dayyani, M K; Ghasem, H; Hajari, S S; Shaker, H; Ashkenazy, Y; Abramowicz, H; Benhammou, Y; Borysov, O; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Levy, I; Rosenblat, O; D'Auria, G; Di Mitri, S; Abe, T; Aryshev, A; Higo, T; Makida, Y; Matsumoto, S; Shidara, T; Takatomi, T; Takubo, Y; Tauchi, T; Toge, N; Ueno, K; Urakawa, J; Yamamoto, A; Yamanaka, M; Raboanary, R; Hart, R; van der Graaf, H; Eigen, G; Zalieckas, J; Adli, E; Lillestøl, R; Malina, L; Pfingstner, J; Sjobak, K N; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Hoorani, H; Bugiel, S; Dasgupta, R; Firlej, M; Fiutowski, T A; Idzik, M; Kopec, M; Kuczynska, M; Moron, J; Swientek, K P; Daniluk, W; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Lesiak, T; Moszczynski, A; Pawlik, B; Sopicki, P; Wojtoń, T; Zawiejski, L; Kalinowski, J; Krawczyk, M; Żarnecki, A F; Firu, E; Ghenescu, V; Neagu, A T; Preda, T; Zgura, I-S; Aloev, A; Azaryan, N; Budagov, J; Chizhov, M; Filippova, M; Glagolev, V; Gongadze, A; Grigoryan, S; Gudkov, D; Karjavine, V; Lyablin, M; Olyunin, A; Samochkine, A; Sapronov, A; Shirkov, G; Soldatov, V; Solodko, A; Solodko, E; Trubnikov, G; Tyapkin, I; Uzhinsky, V; Vorozhtov, A; Levichev, E; Mezentsev, N; Piminov, P; Shatilov, D; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Kacarevic, G; Lukic, S; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G; Pandurovic, M; Iriso, U; Perez, F; Pont, M; Trenado, J; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Calero, J; Garcia-Tabares, L; Gavela, D; Gutierrez, J L; Lopez, D; Toral, F; Moya, D; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Vila, I; Argyropoulos, T; Blanch Gutierrez, C; Boronat, M; Esperante, D; Faus-Golfe, A; Fuster, J; Fuster Martinez, N; Galindo Muñoz, N; García, I; Giner Navarro, J; Ros, E; Vos, M; Brenner, R; Ekelöf, T; Jacewicz, M; Ögren, J; Olvegård, M; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V; Aguglia, D; Alipour Tehrani, N; Aloev, A; Andersson, A; Andrianala, F; Antoniou, F; Artoos, K; Atieh, S; Ballabriga Sune, R; Barnes, M J; Barranco Garcia, J; Bartosik, H; Belver-Aguilar, C; Benot Morell, A; Bett, D R; Bettoni, S; Blanchot, G; Blanco Garcia, O; Bonnin, X A; Brunner, O; Burkhardt, H; Calatroni, S; Campbell, M; Catalan Lasheras, N; Cerqueira Bastos, M; Cherif, A; Chevallay, E; Constance, B; Corsini, R; Cure, B; Curt, S; Dalena, B; Dannheim, D; De Michele, G; De Oliveira, L; Deelen, N; Delahaye, J P; Dobers, T; Doebert, S; Draper, M; Duarte Ramos, F; Dubrovskiy, A; Elsener, K; Esberg, J; Esposito, M; Fedosseev, V; Ferracin, P; Fiergolski, A; Foraz, K; Fowler, A; Friebel, F; Fuchs, J-F; Fuentes Rojas, C A; Gaddi, A; Garcia Fajardo, L; Garcia Morales, H; Garion, C; Gatignon, L; Gayde, J-C; Gerwig, H; Goldblatt, A N; Grefe, C; Grudiev, A; Guillot-Vignot, F G; Gutt-Mostowy, M L; Hauschild, M; Hessler, C; Holma, J K; Holzer, E; Hourican, M; Hynds, D; Inntjore Levinsen, Y; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jonker, M; Kastriotou, M; Kemppinen, J M K; Kieffer, R B; Klempt, W; Kononenko, O; Korsback, A; Koukovini Platia, E; Kovermann, J W; Kozsar, C-I; Kremastiotis, I; Kulis, S; Latina, A; Leaux, F; Lebrun, P; Lefevre, T; Linssen, L; Llopart Cudie, X; Maier, A A; Mainaud Durand, H; Manosperti, E; Marelli, C; Marin Lacoma, E; Martin, R; Mazzoni, S; Mcmonagle, G; Mete, O; Mether, L M; Modena, M; Münker, R M; Muranaka, T; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nikiforou, N; Nisbet, D; Nonglaton, J-M; Nuiry, F X; Nürnberg, A; Olvegard, M; Osborne, J; Papadopoulou, S; Papaphilippou, Y; Passarelli, A; Patecki, M; Pazdera, L; Pellegrini, D; Pepitone, K; Perez, F; Perez Codina, E; Perez Fontenla, A; Persson, T H B; Petrič, M; Pitters, F; Pittet, S; Plassard, F; Rajamak, R; Redford, S; Renier, Y; Rey, S F; Riddone, G; Rinolfi, L; Rodriguez Castro, E; Roloff, P; Rossi, C; Rude, V; Rumolo, G; Sailer, A; Santin, E; Schlatter, D; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Shipman, N; Sicking, E; Simoniello, R; Skowronski, P K; Sobrino Mompean, P; Soby, L; Sosin, M P; Sroka, S; Stapnes, S; Sterbini, G; Ström, R; Syratchev, I; Tecker, F; Thonet, P A; Timeo, L; Timko, H; Tomas Garcia, R; Valerio, P; Vamvakas, A L; Vivoli, A; Weber, M A; Wegner, R; Wendt, M; Woolley, B; Wuensch, W; Uythoven, J; Zha, H; Zisopoulos, P; Benoit, M; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M; Bopp, M; Braun, H H; Csatari Divall, M; Dehler, M; Garvey, T; Raguin, J Y; Rivkin, L; Zennaro, R; Aksoy, A; Nergiz, Z; Pilicer, E; Tapan, I; Yavas, O; Baturin, V; Kholodov, R; Lebedynskyi, S; Miroshnichenko, V; Mordyk, S; Profatilova, I; Storizhko, V; Watson, N; Winter, A; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Marshall, J S; Thomson, M A; Xu, B; Gillespie, W A; Pan, R; Tyrk, M A; Protopopescu, D; Robson, A; Apsimon, R; Bailey, I; Burt, G; Constable, D; Dexter, A; Karimian, S; Lingwood, C; Buckland, M D; Casse, G; Vossebeld, J; Bosco, A; Karataev, P; Kruchinin, K; Lekomtsev, K; Nevay, L; Snuverink, J; Yamakawa, E; Boisvert, V; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Gibson, S; Lyapin, A; Shields, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; West, S; Jones, R; Joshi, N; Bodenstein, R; Burrows, P N; Christian, G B; Gamba, D; Perry, C; Roberts, J; Clarke, J A; Collomb, N A; Jamison, S P; Shepherd, B J A; Walsh, D; Demarteau, M; Repond, J; Weerts, H; Xia, L; Wells, J D; Adolphsen, C; Barklow, T; Breidenbach, M; Graf, N; Hewett, J; Markiewicz, T; McCormick, D; Moffeit, K; Nosochkov, Y; Oriunno, M; Phinney, N; Rizzo, T; Tantawi, S; Wang, F; Wang, J; White, G; Woodley, M

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a multi-TeV high-luminosity linear e+e- collider under development. For an optimal exploitation of its physics potential, CLIC is foreseen to be built and operated in a staged approach with three centre-of-mass energy stages ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The first stage will focus on precision Standard Model physics, in particular Higgs and top-quark measurements. Subsequent stages will focus on measurements of rare Higgs processes, as well as searches for new physics processes and precision measurements of new states, e.g. states previously discovered at LHC or at CLIC itself. In the 2012 CLIC Conceptual Design Report, a fully optimised 3 TeV collider was presented, while the proposed lower energy stages were not studied to the same level of detail. This report presents an updated baseline staging scenario for CLIC. The scenario is the result of a comprehensive study addressing the performance, cost and power of the CLIC accelerator complex as a function of...

  2. International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee: Second Report, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Gregory

    2003-02-21

    As this report is being published, the international high energy physics (HEP) community finds itself confronting a set of fascinating discoveries and new questions regarding the nature of matter and its fundamental particles and forces. The observation of neutrino oscillations that indicates that neutrinos have mass, measurements of the accelerating expansion of the universe that may be due to dark energy, and evidence for a period of rapid inflation at the beginning of the Big Bang are stimulating the entire field. Looming on the horizon are the potential discoveries of a Higgs particle that may reveal the origin of mass and of a whole family of supersymmetric particles that may be part of the cosmic dark matter. For the HEP community to elucidate these mysteries, new accelerators are indispensable. At this time, after careful deliberations, all three regional organizations of the HEP community (ACFA in Asia, HEPAP in North America, and ECFA in Europe) have reached the common conclusion that the next accelerator should be an electron-positron linear collider with an initial center-of-mass energy of 500 Giga-electronvolts (GeV), later upgradable to higher energies, and that it should be built and operated in parallel with the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN. Hence, this second report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC) comes at a very timely moment. The report was requested by the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) in February 2001 to assess the current technical status of electron-positron linear collider designs in the various regions. Note that the ILC-TRC was not asked to concern itself with either cost studies or the ultimate selection process of a machine. This Executive Summary gives a short outline of the genesis of the report, the charge given to the committee, and its organization. It then presents a brief description of four electron-positron linear collider designs at hand. The

  3. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  4. Electroweak Precision Tests with a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Menges, W

    2001-01-01

    Future high energy linear electron positron colliders with centre-of-mass enegies between 90 and 1000 GeV offer a unique opportunity to study precisely the Standard Model and phenomena from new physics. Most important, the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking can be established in full depth if one or more Higgs bosons are observed. Precision measurements of electroweak processes open a window into the multi-TeV energy range for searching for new physics, which is of particular importance if no light Higgs boson is observed.

  5. Probing LINEAR Collider Final Focus Systems in SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Thrane, Paul Conrad Vaagen

    2017-01-01

    A challenge for future linear collider final focus systems is the large chromaticity produced by the final quadrupoles. SuperKEKB will be correcting high levels of chromaticity using the traditional scheme which has been also proposed for the CLIC FFS. We present early simulation results indicating that lowering β*у in the SuperKEKB Low Energy Ring might be possible given on-axis injection and low bunch current, opening the possibility of testing chromaticity correction beyond FFTB level, similar to ILC and approaching that of CLIC. CLIC – Note – 1077

  6. arXiv Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P.M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brummer, F.; Choi, S.Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grunewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Hocker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Monig, K.; Muhlleitner, M.M.; Poschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stal, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stockinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G.W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Ellis, J.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  7. The International Linear Collider: An R&D Progress Report

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Mike; Ross, Marc; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; Takahashi, Rika; Walker, Nicholas; Warmbein, Barbara; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru; Zhang, Min; Elsen, Eckhard

    2011-01-01

    The International Linear Collider: An R&D Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk.

  8. A RECIPE FOR LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL FOCUS SYSTEM DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-27

    The design of Final Focus systems for linear colliders is challenging because of the large demagnifications needed to produce nanometer-sized beams at the interaction point. Simple first- and second-order matrix matching have proven insufficient for this task, and minimization of third- and higher-order aberrations is essential. An appropriate strategy is required for the latter to be successful. A recipe for Final Focus design, and a set of computational tools used to implement this approach, are described herein. An example of the use of this procedure is given.

  9. R&D with very forward detectors at linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenescu, Veta; FCAL Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The very forward region of the detector at a future linear collider will be instrumented with two sampling calorimeters - BeamCal and LumiCal - for fast beam parameter estimates, precise luminosity measurements, as well as for the improvement of the hermeticity of the detector at small angles. These very forward calorimeters are designed to sustain high radiation doses and deliver precise and valuable data for the machine- and physics-related measurements. Sensor and ASIC prototypes were developed and tested. Here we report on sensor characteristics and test-beam results obtained from a sensor plane assembled with front-end and ADC ASICs.

  10. arXiv Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P.M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brummer, F.; Choi, S.Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grunewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Hocker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Monig, K.; Muhlleitner, M.M.; Poschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stal, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stockinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G.W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Ellis, J.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  11. Approaches to Beam Stabilization in X-Band Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, J; Markiewicz, T W; Seryi, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    In order to stabilize the beams at the interaction point, the X-band linear collider proposes to use a combination of techniques: inter-train and intra-train beam-beam feedback, passive vibration isolation, and active vibration stabilization based on either accelerometers or laser interferometers. These systems operate in a technologically redundant fashion: simulations indicate that if one technique proves unusable in the final machine, the others will still support adequate luminosity. Experiments underway for all of these technologies, have already demonstrated adequate performance.

  12. Physics at the [Formula: see text] linear collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat-Pick, G; Baer, H; Battaglia, M; Belanger, G; Fujii, K; Kalinowski, J; Heinemeyer, S; Kiyo, Y; Olive, K; Simon, F; Uwer, P; Wackeroth, D; Zerwas, P M; Arbey, A; Asano, M; Bagger, J; Bechtle, P; Bharucha, A; Brau, J; Brümmer, F; Choi, S Y; Denner, A; Desch, K; Dittmaier, S; Ellwanger, U; Englert, C; Freitas, A; Ginzburg, I; Godfrey, S; Greiner, N; Grojean, C; Grünewald, M; Heisig, J; Höcker, A; Kanemura, S; Kawagoe, K; Kogler, R; Krawczyk, M; Kronfeld, A S; Kroseberg, J; Liebler, S; List, J; Mahmoudi, F; Mambrini, Y; Matsumoto, S; Mnich, J; Mönig, K; Mühlleitner, M M; Pöschl, R; Porod, W; Porto, S; Rolbiecki, K; Schmitt, M; Serpico, P; Stanitzki, M; Stål, O; Stefaniak, T; Stöckinger, D; Weiglein, G; Wilson, G W; Zeune, L; Moortgat, F; Xella, S; Bagger, J; Brau, J; Ellis, J; Kawagoe, K; Komamiya, S; Kronfeld, A S; Mnich, J; Peskin, M; Schlatter, D; Wagner, A; Yamamoto, H

    A comprehensive review of physics at an [Formula: see text] linear collider in the energy range of [Formula: see text] GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  13. GARLIC: GAmma Reconstruction at a LInear Collider experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, D.; Brient, J.-C.; Reinhard, M.

    2012-06-01

    The precise measurement of hadronic jet energy is crucial to maximise the physics reach of a future Linear Collider. An important ingredient required to achieve this is the efficient identification of photons within hadronic showers. One configuration of the ILD detector concept employs a highly granular silicon-tungsten sampling calorimeter to identify and measure photons, and the GARLIC algorithm described in this paper has been developed to identify photons in such a calorimeter. We describe the algorithm and characterise its performance using events fully simulated in a model of the ILD detector.

  14. Physics with e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, Timothy L

    2003-05-05

    We describe the physics potential of e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders in this report. These machines are planned to operate in the first phase at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, before being scaled up to about 1 TeV. In the second phase of the operation, a final energy of about 2 TeV is expected. The machines will allow us to perform precision tests of the heavy particles in the Standard Model, the top quark and the electroweak bosons. They are ideal facilities for exploring the properties of Higgs particles, in particular in the intermediate mass range. New vector bosons and novel matter particles in extended gauge theories can be searched for and studied thoroughly. The machines provide unique opportunities for the discovery of particles in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the spectrum of Higgs particles, the supersymmetric partners of the electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, and of the matter particles. High precision analyses of their properties and interactions will allow for extrapolations to energy scales close to the Planck scale where gravity becomes significant. In alternative scenarios, like compositeness models, novel matter particles and interactions can be discovered and investigated in the energy range above the existing colliders up to the TeV scale. Whatever scenario is realized in Nature, the discovery potential of e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders and the high-precision with which the properties of particles and their interactions can be analyzed, define an exciting physics programme complementary to hadron machines.

  15. Scaling Laws for Normal Conducting $e^{\\pm}$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1998-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e± Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enabl es an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac paramet ers are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation durin g acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency struct ures becomes very ...

  16. Scaling laws for e sup + /e sup - linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e sup + e sup - Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake fields with frequency, the single-bunch emittance blow-up during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high-frequency structures becomes ve...

  17. A multi-TeV compact $e^{+} e^{-}$ linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Ian H

    2000-01-01

    The CLIC study of a high energy (0.5-5 TeV), high luminosity (10/sup 34/-10/sup 35/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) e/sup +or-/ linear collider is presented. Beam acceleration using high frequency (30 GHz) normal- conducting structures operating at high accelerating fields (150 MV /m) significantly reduces the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. Based on new beam and linac parameters derived from a recently developed set of general scaling laws for linear colliders, the beam stability is shown to be similar to lower frequency designs in spite of the strong wake-field dependency on frequency. The drive beam generation scheme for RF power production by the so-called "Two Beam Acceleration (TBA)" method is described. It uses a thermionic gun and a fully-loaded normal-conducting linac operating at low frequency (937 MHz) to generate and accelerate the drive beam bunches, and RF multiplication by funnelling in compressor rings to produce the desired bunch structure. Recent 30 GHz hardware developments and r...

  18. Linear polarization of gluons and photons in unpolarized collider experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, Cristian; Boer, Daniël; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Buffing, Maarten G. A.; Mulders, Piet J.

    2013-10-01

    We study azimuthal asymmetries in heavy quark pair production in unpolarized electron-proton and proton-proton collisions, where the asymmetries originate from the linear polarization of gluons inside unpolarized hadrons. We provide cross section expressions and study the maximal asymmetries allowed by positivity, for both charm and bottom quark pair production. The upper bounds on the asymmetries are shown to be very large depending on the transverse momentum of the heavy quarks, which is promising especially for their measurements at a possible future Electron-Ion Collider or a Large Hadron electron Collider. We also study the analogous processes and asymmetries in muon pair production as a means to probe linearly polarized photons inside unpolarized protons. For increasing invariant mass of the muon pair the asymmetries become very similar to the heavy quark pair ones. Finally, we discuss the process dependence of the results that arises due to differences in color flow and address the problem with factorization in case of proton-proton collisions.

  19. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Burrows, Philip N.; Fuster, Juan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Sakue; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  20. The International Linear Collider - Volume 1: Executive Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Brau, James E.; Foster, Brian; Fuster, Juan; Harrison, Mike; Paterson, James McEwan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  1. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather E; Nomerotski, Andrei; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael E; Pöschl, Roman; Reuter, Jürgen; Riemann, Sabine; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Servant, Geraldine; Tait, Tim M P

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  2. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Barklow, Tim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fujii, Keisuke [National Lab. for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tokai (Japan); Gao, Yuanning [Unlisted; Hoang, Andre [Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kanemura, Shinya [Univ. of Toyama (Japan); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Logan, Heather E. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Nomerotski, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Perelstein, Maxim [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Peskin, Michael E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pöschl, Roman [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL); Reuter, Jürgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Savoy-Navarro, Aurore [CNRS/IN2P3. Univ. Paris (France). Observatoire de Paris. AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC); Servant, Geraldine [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tait, Tim P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  3. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  4. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abusleme, A.; Afanaciev, K.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Balázs, C.; Benhammou, Y.; Benoit, M.; Bilki, B.; Blaising, J.-J.; Boland, M. J.; Boronat, M.; Borysov, O.; Božović-Jelisavčić, I.; Buckland, M.; Bugiel, S.; Burrows, P. N.; Charles, T. K.; Daniluk, W.; Dannheim, D.; Dasgupta, R.; Demarteau, M.; Díaz Gutierrez, M. A.; Eigen, G.; Elsener, K.; Felzmann, U.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabriel, M.; Gaede, F.; García, I.; Ghenescu, V.; Goldstein, J.; Green, S.; Grefe, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Kačarević, G.; Kalinowski, J.; Kananov, S.; Klempt, W.; Kopec, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Krupa, B.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kulis, S.; Laštovička, T.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Linssen, L.; Lukić, S.; Maier, A. A.; Makarenko, V.; Marshall, J. S.; Martin, V. J.; Mei, K.; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G.; Moroń, J.; Moszczyński, A.; Moya, D.; Münker, R. M.; Münnich, A.; Neagu, A. T.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nürnberg, A.; Pandurović, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perez Codina, E.; Peric, I.; Petric, M.; Pitters, F.; Poss, S. G.; Preda, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Rassool, R.; Redford, S.; Repond, J.; Robson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ros, E.; Rosenblat, O.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Shumeiko, N.; Sicking, E.; Simon, F.; Simoniello, R.; Sopicki, P.; Stapnes, S.; Ström, R.; Strube, J.; Świentek, K. P.; Szalay, M.; Tesař, M.; Thomson, M. A.; Trenado, J.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; van der Kolk, N.; van der Kraaij, E.; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M.; Vila, I.; Vogel Gonzalez, M.; Vos, M.; Vossebeld, J.; Watson, M.; Watson, N.; Weber, M. A.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J. D.; Weuste, L.; Winter, A.; Wojtoń, T.; Xia, L.; Xu, B.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.-S.

    2017-07-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future {e+}{e-} collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 {TeV} , providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: √{s} = 350 {GeV} , 1.4 and 3 {TeV} . The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e+e- → ZH) and {W} {W} -fusion (e+e- → H ν_{!e} {\\bar{{ν }}_{!e} ), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Γ_{{H}}, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at √{s} > 1 {TeV} provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through {W} {W} -fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes {e+}{e-} → t {\\bar{t}} {H} and {e+}{e-} → {H} {H} {{ν}}_{!e} {\\bar{{ν }}}_{!e} allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit.

  5. The Linear Collider TPC: Revised Magnetic-field Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Settles, R

    2008-01-01

    A Time Projection Chamber is being developed as central tracker for a detector at the International Linear Collider. The LCTPC has to perform better and to face more complicated event topologies and higher backgrounds than TPC's at previous e+e- colliders: this puts additional requirements on the overall system design. At present the technical design of the ILC machine is considering the use of special magnetic-field elements to guide the beams as they pass along the axis of the detector. Since the B-fields from such elements affect the TPC volume, the present note revisits the requirements on the magnetic field for the LCTPC. It is proposed to replace the original requirement on the homogeneity of the B-field by one on the accuracy of the B-field map. The purpose of this study is to achieve the best possible momentum resolution for the TPC, and it is demonstrated that the goal for the Aleph B-map accuracy is also sufficient for the LCTPC. Simulations should be made to cross-check these ideas, and suggestions...

  6. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Benhammou, Y.; Borysov, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Rosenblat, O. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abusleme, A.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Afanaciev, K.; Makarenko, V.; Shumeiko, N. [Belarusian State University, National Scientific and Educational Centre of Particle and High Energy Physics, Minsk (Belarus); Alipour Tehrani, N.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Grefe, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hynds, D.; Klempt, W.; Kulis, S.; Linssen, L.; Maier, A.A.; Muenker, R.M.; Muennich, A.; Nikiforou, N.; Nuernberg, A.; Perez Codina, E.; Petric, M.; Pitters, F.; Poss, S.G.; Redford, S.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sicking, E.; Simoniello, R.; Stapnes, S.; Stroem, R.; Strube, J.; Weber, M.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Balazs, C.; Charles, T.K. [Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Benoit, M.; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire (DPNC), Geneva (Switzerland); Bilki, B.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Weerts, H.; Xia, L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Blaising, J.J. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Boland, M.J.; Felzmann, U.; Rassool, R. [University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Boronat, M.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I.; Ros, E.; Vos, M. [CSIC-University of Valencia, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Kacarevic, G.; Lukic, S.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Pandurovic, M. [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Buckland, M.; Vossebeld, J. [University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bugiel, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kopec, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Crakow (Poland); Burrows, P.N. [Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Daniluk, W.; Krupa, B.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lesiak, T.; Moszczynski, A.; Pawlik, B.; Sopicki, P.; Wojton, T.; Zawiejski, L. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Crakow (Poland); Eigen, G.; Kraaij, E. van der [University of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, Bergen (Norway); Firu, E.; Ghenescu, V.; Neagu, A.T.; Preda, T.; Zgura, I.S. [Institute of Space Science, Bucharest (Romania); Gabriel, M.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Kolk, N. van der; Weuste, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Gaede, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Goldstein, J. [University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Green, S.; Marshall, J.S.; Mei, K.; Thomson, M.A.; Xu, B. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, C.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Watson, M.; Watson, N.; Winter, A. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Zarnecki, A.F. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Lastovicka, T. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Martin, V.J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Moya, D.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Vila, I. [CSIC-University of Cantabria, IFCA, Santander (Spain); Peric, I. [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik (IPE), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Protopopescu, D.; Robson, A. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Trenado, J. [University of Barcelona, Barcelona (ES); Uggerhoej, U.I. [Aarhus University, Aarhus (DK); Wells, J.D. [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (US)

    2017-07-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: √(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e{sup +}e{sup -} → ZH) and WW-fusion (e{sup +}e{sup -} → Hν{sub e} anti ν{sub e}), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Γ{sub H}, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at √(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e{sup +}e{sup -} → t anti tH and e{sup +}e{sup -} → HHν{sub e} anti ν{sub e} allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit. (orig.)

  7. ILCDIRAC, a DIRAC extension for the Linear Collider community

    CERN Document Server

    Grefe, C; Sailer, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2014-01-01

    ILCDIRAC is a complete distributed computing solution for the Linear Collider community. It's an extension of the Dirac system and now used by all detector concepts of the LC community. ILCDIRAC provides a unified interface to the distributed resources for the ILC Virtual Organization and provides common interfaces to all ILC applications via a simplified API. It supports the overlay of beam-induced backgrounds with minimal impact on the Storage Elements by properly scheduling the jobs attempting to access the files. ILCDIRAC has been successfully used for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report and the ILC SiD Detailed Baseline Design, and is now adopted by the LC community as the official grid production tool. Members of the CALICE collaboration also use ILCDIRAC within their own Virtual Organization.

  8. Optimum Choice of RF Frequency for Two Beam Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    Recent experimental results on normal conducting RF structures indicate that the scaling of the gradient limit with frequency is less favourable than what was believed. We therefore reconsider the optimum choice of RF frequency and iris aperture for a normal conducting, two-beam linear collider with E_CMS=3 TeV, a loaded accelerating gradient of 150 MV/m and a luminosity of 8 10^34 cm-^2 s^-1. The optimisation criterion is minimizing overall RF costs for investment and operation with constraints put on peak surface electric fields and pulsed heating of accelerating structures. Analytical models are employed where applicable, while interpolation on simulation program results is used for the calculation of luminosity and RF structure properties.

  9. Signals for Non-Cummutative Interactions at Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-07-23

    Recent theoretical results have demonstrated that non-commutative geometries naturally appear within the context of string/M-theory. One consequence of this possibility is that QED takes on a non-abelian nature due to the introduction of 3- and 4-point functions. In addition, each QED vertex acquires a momentum dependent phase factor. We parameterize the effects of non-commutative space-time co-ordinates and show that they lead to observable signatures in several 2 {yields} 2 QED processes in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. In particular, we examine pair annihilation, Moller and Bhabha scattering, as well as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} scattering and show that non-commutative scales of order a TeV can be probed at high energy linear colliders.

  10. Tracking studies of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Agapov

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A collimation system performance study includes several types of computations performed by different codes. Optics calculations are performed with codes such as MADX, tracking studies including additional effects such as wakefields, halo and tail generation, and dynamical machine alignment are done with codes such as PLACET, and energy deposition can be studied with BDSIM. More detailed studies of hadron production in the beam halo interaction with collimators are better performed with Geant4 and FLUKA. A procedure has been developed that allows one to perform a single tracking study using several codes simultaneously. In this paper we study the performance of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system using such a procedure.

  11. International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, Eckhard; /DESY; Harrison, Mike; /Brookhaven; Hesla, Leah; /Fermilab; Ross, Marc; /Fermilab; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; /Paris, IN2P3; Takahashi, Rika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Walker, Nicholas; /DESY; Warmbein, Barbara; /DESY; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Yokoya, Kaoru; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhang, Min; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2011-11-04

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  12. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 3 Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, D.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Balazs, C.; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, U.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, I.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Burke, D.; Burrows, P.; Butler, J.N.; Chakraborty, D.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Choi, S.Y.; Cinabro, D.; Corcella, G.; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, H.; Dawson, S.; Denner, A.; Derwent, P.; Diaz, M.A.; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, S.; Dixit, M.; Dixon, L.; Dobrescu, B.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, J.; Feng, J.L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.E.; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, D.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Gronberg, J.; Gunion, J.; Haber, H.E.; Han, T.; Hawkings, R.; Hearty, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Heusch, C.; Hewett, J.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, A.; Hollebeek, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, R.; Jaros, J.; Juste, A.; Kadyk, J.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, T.; Karlen, D.; Keller, L.; Koltick, D.; Kribs, G.; Kronfeld, A.; Leike, A.; Logan, H.E.; Lykken, J.; Macesanu, C.; Magill, S.; Marciano, W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, K.; Moenig, K.; Montgomery, H.E.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, S.; Murakami, B.; Murayama, H.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, M.; Orr, L.H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, M.E.; Plehn, T.; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, D.; Raubenheimer, T.; Repond, J.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, T.; Ronan, M.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, J.; Roth, M.; Rowson, P.; Schumm, B.; Seppala, L.; Seryi, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, X.; Telnov, V.; Teubner, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, A.S.; van Bibber, K.; van Kooten, R.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, D.; Wagner, D.; Waite, A.; Walkowiak, W.; Weiglein, G.; Wells, J.D.; W. Wester, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, O.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  13. International linear collider physics and detectors. 2011 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Oregon Univ., OR (United States); Fuster, Juan [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Hesla, Leah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center; Illenseer, Monika; Warmbein, Barbara [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Royole-Degieux, Perrine [CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Takahashi, Rika [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamada, Sakue [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Gakuin Univ., Sendai (Japan); Min, Zhang (eds.) [IHEP, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    The studies of physics and detectors for the International Linear Collider are an important parallel element to the effort for the ILC Technical Design Report. The studies comprise the physics opportunities, detector requirements, and detector development to achieve the challenging high performance demanded by the physics, as well as integration of detectors into the accelerator. The current phase of this effort began with a call for Letters of Intent (LOIs) in 2007 and will lead to the submission of Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) report together with the ILC Technical Design Report at the end of 2012. Here we summarise the current status of this process, review what it has accomplished and identify the work that still needs to be completed. This report, titled International Linear Collider Physics and Detectors: 2011 Status Report, does just this. This report begins with a discussion of the outstanding issues in physics that motivate the construction of the ILC. It describes the organisation of the LOI process, the validation of the LOIs by the International Detector Advisory Group, and the results of R and D carried out to support the detector designs. The details of the concept detectors have already been published in the LOIs, which were completed in 2009. This report will, in a complementary way, describe the status of the detector R and D for each individual detector component and the status of the physics simulation infrastructure that has been built for the detector design process. Much of this work is carried out in cooperation between the two detector concept groups. This report describes the five common task groups and two working groups that have organised these cooperative activities. Many members of the detector concept groups and the common task groups have contributed to this report. Many more people have carried out the actual work that is reviewed. The complete list of members of each detector concept group can be found from the author lists of

  14. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 2 Higgs and Supersymmetry Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, David Mark; Baer, H.; Bagger, Jonathan A.; Balazs, Csaba; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, Ulrich J.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, Ikaros I.Y.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, James E.; Breidenbach, Martin; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Burke, David L.; Burrows, Philip N.; Butler, Joel N.; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Choi, Seong-Youl; Cinabro, David; Corcella, Gennaro; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dawson, S.; Denner, Ansgar; Derwent, P.; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, Stefan; Dixit, M.; Dixon, Lance J.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, Jens; Feng, Jonathan L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.Eugene; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, David W.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Graf, N.; Grannis, Paul D.; Gronberg, Jeffrey Baton; Gunion, John F.; Haber, Howard E.; Han, Tao; Hawkings, Richard; Hearty, Christopher; Heinemeyer, Sven; Hertzbach, Stanley S.; Heusch, Clemens A.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, Andre H.; Hollebeek, Robert; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, Robert Gibbs; Jaros, John Alan; Juste, A.; Kadyk, John A.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, Teruki; Karlen, Dean; Keller, L; Koltick, D.; Kribs, Graham D.; Kronfeld, Andreas Samuel; Leike, A.; Logan, Heather E.; Lykken, Joseph D.; Macesanu, Cosmin; Magill, Stephen R.; Marciano, William Joseph; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, Konstantin Tzvetanov; Monig, Klaus; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, Stephen; Murakami, Brandon; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nauenberg, Uriel; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Orr, Lynne H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, Michael E.; Plehn, Tilman; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, David Landry; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Repond, J.; Riles, Keith; Rizzo, Thomas Gerard; Ronan, Michael T.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Roth, M.; Rowson, Peter C.; Schumm, Bruce Andrew; Seppala, L.; Seryi, Andrei; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, Xerxes Ramyar; Telnov, Valery I.; Teubner, Thomas; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, Andre S.; van Bibber, Karl A.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Wagner, D.; Waite, Anthony P.; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Weiglein, Georg; Wells, James Daniel; Wester, William Carl, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, Oleg I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, Hai Jun

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 2 reviews the possible experiments on Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles that can be done at a linear collider.

  15. Members of the global linear-collider community who attended IWLC2010 in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC2010) recently brought together many experts involved in research and development for an electron–positron linear collider – the favoured future facility to complement the LHC. Organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) and hosted by CERN, the meeting took place on 18–22 October and attracted 479 registered participants.

  16. Particle flow calorimetry at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    jet energy resolution. It is widely believed that the particle flow approach to calorimetry is the key to achieving the goal of 0.3/. √. E(GeV). This paper describes the current performance of the PandoraPFA particle flow algorithm. For 45GeV jets in the Tesla. TDR detector concept, the ILC jet energy resolution goal is reached.

  17. COLLIDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Howie Day, Collide, Based on the original parody "Collide" by USLHC, inspired by the original song "Collide" written by Howie Day and Kevin Griffin. Re-record Produced by Mike Denneen Engineered by Patrick DiCenso -Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards- Howie Day -Guitar Patrick DiCenso -Bass- Ed Valuskas -Drums- Dave Brophy

  18. Design of Precision Alignment of Compact Linear Colliders Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, Jouni; Taborelli, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    This thesis evaluates different assembly methods for particle accelerator called Compact Linear Colliders(CLIC) accelerating components. This work focuses on the definition of a strategy and mechanical design for the assembly of four quadrants in radial and longitudinal direction. The study takes into account the constraints specified by the various aspects of the physics involved in the application of such accelerating structures. The possible deformations due to a kinematic or elastic assembly and its influence on the final accuracy are calculated. Also the work considers the effect of a moderate temperature rise due to the steady state heating during machine operation and other loads due to the function of the machine. Accelerating structures must be aligned around the beam axis with a transversal accuracy of +/-0.003 mm and longitudinal accuracy of +/-0.01 mm over the length of a single module. This requirement includes the accuracy of the parts to be manufactured and the precision of the assembly of the ...

  19. Beam parametr measurements for the SLAC linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Blocker, C.; Breidenbach, M.

    1981-01-01

    A stable, closely-controlled, high-intensity, single-bunch beam will be required for the SLAC Linear Collider. The characteristics of short-pulse, low-intensity beams in the SLAC linac have been studied. A new, high-intensity thermionic gun, subharmonic buncher and S-band buncher/accelerator section were installed recently at SLAC. With these components, up to 10/sup 11/ electrons in a single S-band bunch are available for injection into the linac. the first 100-m accelerator sector has been modified to allow control of short-pulse beams by a model-driven computer program. Additional instrumentation, including a computerized energy analyzer and emittance monitor have been added at the end of the 100-m sector. The beam intensity, energy spectrum, emittance, charge distribution and the effect of wake fields in the first accelerator sector have been measured. The new source and beam control system are described and the most recent results of the beam parameter measurements are discussed.

  20. German lab unveils plan to build physicists' next collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Abott, A

    2001-01-01

    An international team of physicists are to propose the construction of a major collider. 'TESLA' - the 'Tera electron volt Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator' will be a linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting resonators. It will be based at DESY and cost around three billion US dollars (2 pages).

  1. Calorimetry at the international linear collider. From simulation to reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattimena, Nanda

    2010-02-15

    Calorimetry plays a crucial role in ongoing and upcoming high-energy physics experiments. To build a powerful calorimetric system with a performance tailored to the expected physics signatures, demands dedicated research and development of new readout technologies as well as dedicated reconstruction algorithms. The presented design of a calorimetric system which meets the high demands of precision physics at the future linear collider ILC, follows the paradigm of particle ow. Particle ow is a reconstruction principle that relies on a calorimetric system with high spatial granularity. In the detector optimisation process, the development of hardware and software are interlinked and cannot be judged independently. This thesis addresses two different aspects of detector optimisation, a test of the detector design against one example physics scenario and the development of a stable calibration procedure. In the rst part, a gauge-mediated Supersymmetry breaking scenario is used to test the design of the electromagnetic calorimeter in a full detector simulation study. The reconstruction of the neutralino properties, each decaying into a photon and a gravitino, requires a good energy resolution, as well as excellent position and angular resolution. The error bounds on the neutralino mass is strongly linked to the energy resolution, while the position and angular reconstruction of neutral particles is essential for the determination of the neutralino lifetime. The second part of this thesis focuses on the calibration procedure for a prototype of the hadron calorimeter. 7608 novel photodetectors are operated and tested in this prototype. They are exposed to beams of well de ned particle type and energy. The calibration is tested with a detailed study of electromagnetic showers inside the cubic-metre-sized prototype, with special attention paid towards the non-linearity correction. (orig.)

  2. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  3. Acclerator R&D for a Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, D.L.; Dugan, G.; Gibbons, L.; Palmer, M.; Patterson, R.; Sagan, D.; Smith, J.C.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Fields, J.; Urban, J.

    2008-11-26

    The goal of this project was to perform simulations of beam transport in linear colliders, with an emphasis on emittance dilution, spin polarization transport, and development and testing of beam based tuning algorithms. Our simulations are based on an existing object-oriented particle-tracking library, Bmad. To facilitate the efficient development of simulations, an accelerator design and analysis program based on Bmad has been developed called Tao (Tool for Accelerator Optics). The three beam-based alignment algorithms, Dispersion Free Steering, Ballistic Alignment (BA), and the Kubo Method have been implemented in Tao. We have studied the effects of magnet misalignments, BPM resolution, beam jitter, stray fields, BPM and steering magnet failure and the effects of various cavity shape wakefields. A parametric study has been conducted in the presence of the above types of errors for all three alignment algorithms. We find that BPM resolution has only modest impact on the effectiveness of beam based alignment. The DFS correction algorithm was found to be very robust in situations where there were BPM and/or steering magnet failures. The wakefields in the main linac are very weak and cause negligible emittance growth. Spin tracking was extended to study all accelerator components between the damping ring and the interaction point, including RF cavities and the helical undulator. We find that there is no significant depolarization in the RTML, main linac or beam delivery system and that the polarization is relatively insensitive to misalignment. We have developed an effective spin rotator. During the final year of the grant we exploited the computing power of our new linux cluster, along with the modeling codes that we had developed, to investigate damping ring physics and design, specifically as it relates to the CESR Test Accelerator project.

  4. SiD Linear Collider Detector R&D, DOE Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Demarteau, Marcel [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The Department of Energy’s Office of High Energy Physics supported the SiD university detector R&D projects in FY10, FY11, and FY12 with no-cost extensions through February, 2015. The R&D projects were designed to advance the SiD capabilities to address the fundamental questions of particle physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC): • What is the mechanism responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of mass? • How do the forces unify? • Does the structure of space-time at small distances show evidence for extra dimensions? • What are the connections between the fundamental particles and forces and cosmology? Silicon detectors are used extensively in SiD and are well-matched to the challenges presented by ILC physics and the ILC machine environment. They are fast, robust against machine-induced background, and capable of very fine segmentation. SiD is based on silicon tracking and silicon-tungsten sampling calorimetry, complemented by powerful pixel vertex detection, and outer hadronic calorimetry and muon detection. Radiation hard forward detectors which can be read out pulse by pulse are required. Advanced calorimetry based on a particle flow algorithm (PFA) provides excellent jet energy resolution. The 5 Tesla solenoid is outside the calorimeter to improve energy resolution. PFA calorimetry requires fine granularity for both electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, leading naturally to finely segmented silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimetry. Since silicon-tungsten calorimetry is expensive, the detector architecture is compact. Precise tracking is achieved with the large magnetic field and high precision silicon microstrips. An ancillary benefit of the large magnetic field is better control of the e⁺e⁻ pair backgrounds, permitting a smaller radius beampipe and improved impact parameter resolution. Finally, SiD is designed with a cost constraint in mind. Significant advances and new capabilities have been made and

  5. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  6. Power losses in the international linear collider 20 mrad extraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    collision extraction line of a TeV e+e− collider with a crossing angle of 20 mrad at the interaction point. Five cases were considered: four luminosity configurations for ILC and one for. CLIC. For all of them, the strong beam–beam effects at the ...

  7. Power losses in the international linear collider 20 mrad extraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We have performed a detailed study of the power losses in the post-collision extraction line of a TeV + − collider with a crossing angle of 20 mrad at the interaction point. Five cases were considered: four luminosity configurations for ILC and one for CLIC. For all of them, the strong beam–beam effects at ...

  8. The road towards the international linear collider: Higgs, top ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory calculations for Higgs production at the γγ collider in the minimal supersymmetric standard model ... Measurement of tan β in the MSSM via heavy Higgs boson production [21]. • Progress for the MSSM .... is indicated in figure 1 as the orange shaded areas, which will have to be under full control for the ILC precision ...

  9. [New technology for linear colliders]. Annual progress report and renewal proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  10. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Foster, Brian; Fuster, Juan; Harrison, Mike; McEwan Paterson, James; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Hitoshi (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    A review is given about the planned International Linear Collider. Especially described are the technical design, the accelerator layout and design, the R and D during the technical design phase, and the detectors. (HSI)

  11. Of Linear Colliders, the GDE Workshop at Bangalore, Mughals, Camels, Elephants and Sundials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Greg

    2006-04-17

    In this colloquium, the speaker will give a summary of the recent International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE) Workshop at Bangalore and how the High Energy Physics community converged to this meeting after many years of electron-positron linear collider design and experimental work. Given that this workshop for the first time took place in India, the speaker will also show a few pictures and talk briefly about what he learned in that fascinating country.

  12. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  13. Future Linear Colliders: Detector R&D, Jet Reconstruction and Top Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2098729; Ros Martinez, Eduardo

    During the 20th century, discoveries and measurements at colliders, combined with progress in theoretical physics, allowed us to formulate the Standard Model of the in- teractions between the constituents of matter. Today, there are two advanced projects for a new installation that will collide electrons and positrons covering an energy range from several hundreds of GeV to the multi-TeV scale, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). These Future Linear Colliders give the opportunity to study the top quark with unprecedented precision. Measurements of top quark properties are of special interest, as the top quark is the heaviest ele- mentary particle of the SM. Precision measurements of top quark properties at e+e colliders promise therefore to be highly sensitive to physics beyond the SM. This thesis has three complementary parts. The first is dedicated to the R&D of the ILD detector concept for future e+e- colliders, more precisely, the innermost region of the de...

  14. A New Interlock Design for the TESLA RF System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Leich; J.Kahl; 等

    2001-01-01

    The RF system for TESLA requires a comprehensive interlock system.Usually interlock systems are organized in a hierarchical way,In order to react to different fault conditions in a fast and flexible manner a nonhierarchical organization seems to be the better solution ,At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY we will install a nonhierarchical interlock system that is based on user desgned reprogrammable gate-arrays (FPGA's) which incorporate an embedded microcontroller system.This system could beused later for the TESLA linear collider replacing a strictly hierarchical design.

  15. The International Linear Collider - A Worldwide Event: From Design to Reality

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The official and worldwide handover ceremony of the Technical Design Report for the International Linear Collider will happen on 12 June 2013 in all three regions of the ILC. Many years of globally coordinated R&D culminate in the Technical Design Report, which presents the latest, most technologically advanced and most thoroughly scrutinised design for the potential next-generation particle collider to complement and advance beyond the physics of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In a global event starting in Japan and ending in the United States, scientists and their guests will celebrate this achievement in symposia, public events, receptions and a series of handover ceremonies.

  16. Development of an ASIC for CCD readout at the vertex detectors of the intrenational linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, P; Stefanov, K D; Woolliscroft, T

    2007-01-01

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification Collaboration is developing sensors and readout electronics suitable for the International Linear Collider vertex detector. In order to achieve high data rates the proposed detector utilises column parallel CCDs, each read out by a custom designed ASIC. The prototype chip (CPR2) has 250 channels of electronics, each with a preamplifier, 5-bit flash ADC, data sparsification logic for identification of significant data clusters, and local memory for storage of data awaiting readout. CPR2 also has hierarchical 2-level data multiplexing and intermediate data memory, enabling readout of the sparsified data via the 5-bit data output bus.

  17. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    OpenAIRE

    Olvegård, M.; Adli, E.; Andreazza, W; Bolzon, B; Bravin, E.; Chritin, N; Dabrowski, A.; Döbert, S; Duraffourg, M; Lefèvre, T.; Lillestøl, R.; Ziemann, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addre...

  18. Beamstrahlung and QED backgrounds at future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, D.V.

    1990-10-01

    This dissertation is a detailed study of several aspects of beamstrahlung and related phenomena. The problem is formulated as the relativistic scattering of an electron from a strong but slowly varying potential. The solution is readily interpreted in terms of a classical electron trajectory, and differs from the solution of the corresponding classical problem mainly in the effect of quantum recoil due to the emission of hard photons. When the general solution is expanded for the case of an almost-uniform field, the leading term is identical to the well-known formula for quantum synchrotron radiation. The first non-leading term is negligible in all cases of interest where the expansion is valid. In applying the standard synchrotron radiation formula to the beamstrahlung problem, the effects of radiation reaction on the emission of multiple photons can be significant for some machine designs. Another interesting feature is the helicity dependence of the radiation process, which is relevant to the case where the electron beam is polarized. The inverse process of coherent electron-positron pair production by a beamstrahlung photon is a potentially serious background source at future colliders, since low-energy pairs can exit the bunch at a large angle. Pairs can also be produced incoherently by the collision of the two photons, either real or virtual. The rates, spectra, and angular distributions for both the coherent and incoherent processes are estimated here. At a 1/2 TeV machine the incoherent process will be more common, resulting in roughly 10{sup 6} pairs per bunch crossing. One member of each pair is always pushed outward, at an angle determined by its energy, by the field of the oncoming bunch. In addition, a small number of pairs are initially produced with a comparable or larger angle.

  19. Linear polarization of gluons and photons in unpolarized collider experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisano, Cristian; Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Buffing, Maarten G. A.; Mulders, Piet J.

    2013-01-01

    We study azimuthal asymmetries in heavy quark pair production in unpolarized electron-proton and proton-proton collisions, where the asymmetries originate from the linear polarization of gluons inside unpolarized hadrons. We provide cross section expressions and study the maximal asymmetries allowed

  20. Grid Interface Design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Jankovic, Maria; Clare, Jon; Wheeler, Pat; Aguglia, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the grid interface challenges for CERN’s proposed Compact Linear Colliders’ (CLIC) klystron modulators, including a 280 MW power system optimisation. The modular multilevel converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for a Medium Voltage grid interface along with a control method for reducing the impact of klystron modulators on the electrical network.

  1. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, B.; Bandelmann, R.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D. A.; Edwards, H. T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P.-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W.-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H.-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-09-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of Eacc>=25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0>=5×109. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set to the more moderate value of Eacc>=15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5×109 was measured to be 20.1+/-6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5×109 amounts to 25.0+/-3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  2. Proceedings of the international workshop on next-generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, M. (ed.)

    1988-12-01

    This report contains papers on the next-generation of linear colliders. The particular areas of discussion are: parameters; beam dynamics and wakefields; damping rings and sources; rf power sources; accelerator structures; instrumentation; final focus; and review of beam-beam interaction.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Progress of Linear Collider Final Focus Design and ATF2 Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Zimmermann, Frank; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    In this brief overview we will reflect on the process of the design of the linear collider (LC) final focus (FF) optics, and will also describe the theoretical and experimental efforts on design and practical realisation of a prototype of the LC FF optics implemented in the ATF2 facility at KEK, Japan, presently being commissioned and operated.

  4. New developments of the R & D silicon tracking for linear collider on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. New generation of silicon tracking; new sensors; large area tracking systems for international linear collider; deep sub-micron electronics. ... are discussed. Combined tests with other sub-detectors are finally addressed. This test beam program is inserted in the framework of the EUDET European project.

  5. Dedicated front-end electronics for the next generation of linear collider electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Manen, S; Lecoq, J; Fleury, J; de La Taille, C; Martin, G

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an R&D electronic program for the next generation of linear collider electromagnetic calorimeter. After a brief presentation of the requirements, a global scheme of the electronics is given. Then, we describe the three different building blocks developed in 0.35\\mum CMOS technology: an amplifier, a comparator and finally the pipelined ADC

  6. ICFA announces launch of technology recommendation process for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators has announced the membership and chair of the 12-person International Technology Recommendation Panel. The ITRP, with four members each from Europe, North America and Asia, is charged with recommending which of two leading accelerating technologies will form the best choice for a future international linear collider (1 page).

  7. Baseline Configuration of the Cryogenic System for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Casas-Cubillos, J; Claudet, S; Ganni, R; Klebaner, A; Parma, V; Peterson, T; Riddone, G; Rode, C; Rousset, B; Serio, L; Tavian, L; Theilacker, J; Vullierme, B; Van Weelderen, R; Weisend, J

    2007-01-01

    The paper discusses the main constraints and boundary conditions and describes the baseline configuration of the International Linear Collider (ILC) cryogenic system. The cryogenic layout, architecture and the cooling principle are presented. The paper addresses a plan for study and development required to demonstrate and improve the performance, to reduce cost and to attain the desired reliability.

  8. The Case for a 500 GeV e+e- Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggers, J.; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Bauer, U.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.; Burrows, P.; Dixon, L.; Fisk, H.E.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, D.; Graf, D.; Grannis, P.; Haber, H.E.; Hearty, C.; Hertzbach, S.; Heusch, C.; Hewett, J.; Hollebeek, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jaros, J.; Kamon, T.; Karlen, D.; Koltick, D.; Kronfeld, A.; Marciano, W.; Markiewicz, T.; Murayama, H.; Nauenberg, U.; Orr, L.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Peskin, M. E.; Porter, F.; Riles, K.; Ronan, M.; Rosenberg, L.; Schumm, B.; Stroynowski, R.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, A.S.; van Bibber, K.; van Kooten, R.; Wells, J.D.; Yamamoto, H.

    2000-07-05

    Several proposals are being developed around the world for an e+e- linear collider with an initial center of mass energy of 500 GeV. In this paper, we will discuss why a project of this type deserves priority as the next major initiative in high energy physics.

  9. THE CASE FOR A 500 GEV E+E- LINEAR COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAGGER,J.; BALTAY,C.; ET AL; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; AMERICAN LINEAR COLLIDER WORKING GROUP

    2000-06-30

    There are now several proposals that have been put forward from around the world for an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider with an initial center of mass energy of 500 GeV. In this paper, the authors discuss why a project of this type deserves priority as the next, major initiative in high energy physics.

  10. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001 - Part 3: Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, T.; et al.

    2001-06-13

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  11. Experimental Validation of a Novel Compact Focusing Scheme for Future Energy-Frontier Linear Lepton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, G. R.; Ainsworth, R.; Akagi, T.; Alabau-Gonzalvo, J.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Bai, S.; Bambade, P.; Bett, D. R.; Blair, G.; Blanch, C.; Blanco, O.; Blaskovic-Kraljevic, N.; Bolzon, B.; Boogert, S.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G.; Corner, L.; Davis, M. R.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Fukuda, M.; Gao, J.; García-Morales, H.; Geffroy, N.; Hayano, H.; Heo, A. Y.; Hildreth, M.; Honda, Y.; Huang, J. Y.; Hwang, W. H.; Iwashita, Y.; Jang, S.; Jeremie, A.; Kamiya, Y.; Karataev, P.; Kim, E. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. I.; Komamiya, S.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuroda, S.; Lam, B.; Lekomtsev, K.; Liu, S.; Lyapin, A.; Marin, E.; Masuzawa, M.; McCormick, D.; Naito, T.; Nelson, J.; Nevay, L. J.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Oroku, M.; Park, H.; Park, Y. J.; Perry, C.; Pfingstner, J.; Phinney, N.; Rawankar, A.; Renier, Y.; Resta-López, J.; Ross, M.; Sanuki, T.; Schulte, D.; Seryi, A.; Shevelev, M.; Shimizu, H.; Snuverink, J.; Spencer, C.; Suehara, T.; Sugahara, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, R.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomás, R.; Urakawa, J.; Wang, D.; Warden, M.; Wendt, M.; Wolski, A.; Woodley, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Yan, J.; Yokoya, K.; Zimmermann, F.; ATF2 Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    A novel scheme for the focusing of high-energy leptons in future linear colliders was proposed in 2001 [P. Raimondi and A. Seryi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3779 (2001)]. This scheme has many advantageous properties over previously studied focusing schemes, including being significantly shorter for a given energy and having a significantly better energy bandwidth. Experimental results from the ATF2 accelerator at KEK are presented that validate the operating principle of such a scheme by demonstrating the demagnification of a 1.3 GeV electron beam down to below 65 nm in height using an energy-scaled version of the compact focusing optics designed for the ILC collider.

  12. Summary of the ECFA Linear Collider Working Group on Beamstrahlung and Photon-Photon Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-07-14

    This paper presents a concise summary of the developments achieved in the context of the ''Photons'' Working Group of the 1991 ECFA Workshop on Physics with Linear Colliders. After reviewing, in Section 2, the current knowledge on the beam-beam interaction and its main physics implications, they calculate in Section 3 effective photon and electron luminosity spectra. Section 4 discusses background issues associated with photon-photon processes. Finally, they briefly survey, in Section 5, recent updates on the principle issues and the physics potential of the so-called ''Compton Collider''.

  13. Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

  14. Physics at TeV e sup + e sup minus linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is presented of the physics opportunities at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. Examples are given of physics that might emerge in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions and in {gamma}{gamma} collisions using the back-scattered laser technique, including {gamma}{gamma} {yields} ZZ scattering as a probe of ultraheavy quanta. The second portion of the talk focuses on physics that must emerge at or below the TeV scale--the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. In particular a very rough estimate is presented of the most challenging possible signal of symmetry breaking, strong WW scattering, as a function of collider energy. A subtheme, made explicit in the concluding section, is the continuing complementarity of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and pp colliders in the domain of TeV physics.

  15. Physics at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is presented of the physics opportunities at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. Examples are given of physics that might emerge in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions and in {gamma}{gamma} collisions using the back-scattered laser technique, including {gamma}{gamma} {yields} ZZ scattering as a probe of ultraheavy quanta. The second portion of the talk focuses on physics that must emerge at or below the TeV scale--the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. In particular a very rough estimate is presented of the most challenging possible signal of symmetry breaking, strong WW scattering, as a function of collider energy. A subtheme, made explicit in the concluding section, is the continuing complementarity of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and pp colliders in the domain of TeV physics.

  16. Simulation studies for a high resolution time projection chamber at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muennich, A.

    2007-03-26

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is planned to be the next large accelerator. The ILC will be able to perform high precision measurements only possible at the clean environment of electron positron collisions. In order to reach this high accuracy, the requirements for the detector performance are challenging. Several detector concepts are currently under study. The understanding of the detector and its performance will be crucial to extract the desired physics results from the data. To optimise the detector design, simulation studies are needed. Simulation packages like GEANT4 allow to model the detector geometry and simulate the energy deposit in the different materials. However, the detector response taking into account the transportation of the produced charge to the readout devices and the effects ofthe readout electronics cannot be described in detail. These processes in the detector will change the measured position of the energy deposit relative to the point of origin. The determination of this detector response is the task of detailed simulation studies, which have to be carried out for each subdetector. A high resolution Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with gas amplification based on micro pattern gas detectors, is one of the options for the main tracking system at the ILC. In the present thesis a detailed simulation tool to study the performance of a TPC was developed. Its goal is to find the optimal settings to reach an excellent momentum and spatial resolution. After an introduction to the present status of particle physics and the ILC project with special focus on the TPC as central tracker, the simulation framework is presented. The basic simulation methods and implemented processes are introduced. Within this stand-alone simulation framework each electron produced by primary ionisation is transferred through the gas volume and amplified using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The output format of the simulation is identical to the raw data from a

  17. Scintillator calorimeters for a future linear collider experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartbrich, Oskar

    2016-07-15

    shower start shows considerable differences between physics lists, especially for the higher end of beam energies available in this analysis. Two separate energy reconstruction algorithms are presented in this thesis. The standard reconstruction uses constant weights per sub-detector to reconstruct the primary pion energy. The implementation of a software compensation reconstruction developed for this analysis aims to distinguish electromagnetic sub-shower depositions in hadronic showers by the deposited energy in each hit. The implementation differs from a previous software compensation scheme used within CALICE by forcing less dependencies on the shapes of the optimised weights, increasing the number of free parameters but ultimately resulting in a more stable parameter optimisation. The software compensation reconstruction improves the energy resolution of data events by 10% to 20%. Applying the software compensation weights obtained from simulations to data events yields a similar performance compared to the native data weights, slightly degrading the response linearity while even slightly improving the energy resolution. The calorimeter prototypes used in the testbeam analysis presented in this thesis were built to prove the general feasibility of high granularity scintillator-SiPM calorimeters, which they fully accomplished. To demonstrate the scalability of such calorimeters to the size and requirements of a full-scale particle physics experiment as ILD, second generation prototypes with fully integrated readout electronics are developed within the CALICE collaboration. A toy simulation study performed for this thesis shows that the development of scintillator-SiPM tile systems should target a lightyield of 15 (px)/(MIP) in order to maintain a 95% MIP efficiency even for 2σ outliers, when assuming a hit energy threshold of 0.5 MIP. An efficient method to extract and validate trigger thresholds positions for all cells of the detector system is presented, requiring

  18. 1995 second modulator-klystron workshop: A modulator-klystron workshop for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This second workshop examined the present state of modulator design and attempted an extrapolation for future electron-positron linear colliders. These colliders are currently viewed as multikilometer-long accelerators consisting of a thousand or more RF sources with 500 to 1,000, or more, pulsed power systems. The workshop opened with two introductory talks that presented the current approaches to designing these linear colliders, the anticipated RF sources, and the design constraints for pulse power. The cost of main AC power is a major economic consideration for a future collider, consequently the workshop investigated efficient modulator designs. Techniques that effectively apply the art of power conversion, from the AC mains to the RF output, and specifically, designs that generate output pulses with very fast rise times as compared to the flattop. There were six sessions that involved one or more presentations based on problems specific to the design and production of thousands of modulator-klystron stations, followed by discussion and debate on the material.

  19. SIMDET - Version 4 A Parametric Monte Carlo for a TESLA Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, M.; Schreiber, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    A new release of the parametric detector Monte Carlo program \\verb+SIMDET+ (version 4.01) is now available. We describe the principles of operation and the usage of this program to simulate the response of a detector for the TESLA linear collider. The detector components are implemented according to the TESLA Technical Design Report. All detector component responses are treated in a realistic way using a parametrisation of results from the {\\em ab initio} Monte Carlo program \\verb+BRAHMS+. Pa...

  20. Alighment and Vibration Issues in TeV Linear Collider Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of particle-beam-derived placement information are mentioned.

  1. Four weak gauge boson production at photon linear collider and heavy Higgs signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jikia, G.

    1995-02-01

    We study the signals and backgrounds for a heavy Higgs boson in the processes γγ → WWWW, γ → WWZZ at the proton linear collider. The results are based on the complete tree-level SM calculation for these reactions. We show that the invariant mass spectrum of central WW, ZZ pairs is sensitive to the signal from Higgs boson with a mass up to 1 TeV linear collider for integrated luminosity of 300 fb -1. At 1.5 TeV PLC Higgs boson with a mass up to 700 GeV can be studied. The nonresonant longitudinal gauge boson scattering ( mH = ∞) can be detected in photon-photon collisions at e+e- center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV.

  2. Advances in Normal Conducting Accelerator Technology from the X-Band Linear Collider Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris

    2005-01-01

    In the early 1990's, groups at SLAC and KEK began dedicated development of X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology for a next generation, TeV-scale linear collider. The choice of a relatively high frequency, four times that of the SLAC 50 GeV Linac, was motivated by the cost benefits of having lower rf energy per pulse (hence fewer rf components) and reasonable efficiencies at high gradients (hence shorter linacs). However, to realize such savings requires operation at gradients and peak powers much higher than that hitherto achieved. During the past 15 years, these challenges were met through innovations on several fronts, and resulted in a viable rf system design for a linear collider. This paper reviews these achievements, which include developments in the generation and transport of high power rf, and new insights into high gradient limitations.

  3. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  4. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-06

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  5. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  6. Physics at a gamma gamma, e gamma and e-e- Option for a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    de Roeck, A

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a review of the studies made in the working group on gamma gamma and e gamma physics" of the ECFA/DESY workshop on linear collider physics. It reports on several new physics studies, in particular s-channel Higgs production. A summary of R&D activities for the interaction region is presented. The merits of e-e- collisions are briefly recalled.

  7. Final Report for the UNIVERSITY-BASED DETECTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E [Univ. of Oregon

    2013-04-22

    The U.S Linear Collider Detector R&D program, supported by the DOE and NSF umbrella grants to the University of Oregon, made significant advances on many critical aspects of the ILC detector program. Progress advanced on vertex detector sensor development, silicon and TPC tracking, calorimetry on candidate technologies, and muon detection, as well as on beamline measurements of luminosity, energy, and polarization.

  8. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.; Nixon, R. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken.

  9. Supersymmetric Dark Matter and the Energy of a Linear Electron-Positron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Olive, Keith A.; Ellis, John; Ganis, Gerardo; Olive, Keith A.

    2000-01-01

    We suggest that supersymmetric dark matter be used to set the energy scale of a linear $e^+ e^-$ collider. Assuming that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is a stable neutralino $\\chi$, as in many incarnations of the MSSM with conserved R parity, previous calculations that include coannihilation effects have delineated the region of the $(m_{1/2}, m_0)$ plane where the LSP cosmological relic density lies in the preferred range $0.1 \\la \\Omega_{\\chi} h^2 \\la 0.3$. We evaluate here the total cross section for $e^+ e^- \\to$ visible pairs of supersymmetric particles, for different values of $m_{1/2}$ and $m_0$, and investigate how much of the dark matter region can be explored by $e^+ e^-$ colliders with different centre-of-mass energies $E_{CM}$. We find that a collider with $E_{CM} = 500$ GeV or 1 TeV can only explore part of the cosmological region, and that a collider with $E_{CM} = 1.5$ TeV with sufficient luminosity can explore all of the supersymmetric dark matter region.

  10. Precise and fast beam energy measurement at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viti, Michele

    2010-02-15

    The international Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy between 200 and 500 GeV and a peak luminosity of 2 . 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. For the physics program at this machine, an excellent bunch-by-bunch control of the beam energy is mandatory. Several techniques are foreseen to be implemented at the ILC in order to achieve this request. Energy spectrometers upstream and downstream of the electron/positron interaction point were proposed and the present default option for the upstream spectrometer is a beam position monitor based (BPM-based) spectrometer. In 2006/2007, a prototype of such a device was commissioned at the End Station A beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in order to study performance and reliability. In addition, a novel method based on laser Compton backscattering has been proposed, since as proved at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), complementary methods are necessary to cross-check the results of the BPM-based spectrometer. In this thesis, an overview of the experiment at End Station A is given, with emphasis on the performance of the magnets in the chicane and first energy resolution estimations. Also, the novel Compton backscattering method is discussed in details and found to be very promising. It has the potential to bring the beam energy resolution well below the requirement of {delta}E{sub b}/E{sub b}=10{sup -4}. (orig.)

  11. Design and System Integration of the Superconducting Wiggler Magnets for the Compact Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard, A; Bragin, A; Karppinen, M; Maccaferri, R; Mezentsev, N; Papaphilippou, Y; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Rumolo, G; Russenschuck, S; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K

    2012-01-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 nm and 4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultra-low emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86 GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. This paper describes a technical design concept for the CLIC damping wigglers.

  12. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  13. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The design presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume one covers the following: the introduction; electron source; positron source; NLC damping rings; bunch compressors and prelinac; low-frequency linacs and compressors; main linacs; design and dynamics; and RF systems for main linacs.

  14. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The ``design`` presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume II covers the following: collimation systems; IP switch and big bend; final focus; the interaction region; multiple bunch issues; control systems; instrumentation; machine protection systems; NLC reliability considerations; NLC conventional facilities. Also included are four appendices on the following topics: An RF power source upgrade to the NLC; a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron; ground motion: theory and measurement; and beam-based feedback: theory and implementation.

  15. The Art and Science of Planning for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    There is a consensus among the worldwide high energy physics community that a TeV scale linear electron positron collider is the highest priority long term goal for a new facility for the field. This new particle accelerator, together with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, will enable a comprehensive exploration of the TeV energy scale where many of the new phenomena we seek, like supersymmetry or possibly even extra dimensions could reveal themselves. The international community has chosen superconducting RF technology to be the basis of the ILC concept, and a global design effort has been created to guide the R&D and technical design toward construction. In this presentation, I will discuss the science motivation, the technology, recent progress and plans, and personally assess the prospects.

  16. Mitigation of ground motion effects via feedback systems in the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, Jürgen; Schmickler, Hermann; Schulte, Daniel

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future multi-TeV electron positron collider, which is currently being designed at CERN. To achieve its ambitious goals, CLIC has to produce particle beams of the highest quality, which makes the accelerator very sensitive to ground motion. Four mitigation methods have been foreseen by the CLIC design group to cope with the feasibility issue of ground motion. This thesis is concerned with the design of one of these mitigation methods, named linac feedback (L-FB), but also with the simultaneous simulation and validation of all mitigation methods. Additionally, a technique to improve the quality of the indispensable system knowledge has been developed. The L-FB suppresses beam oscillations along the accelerator. Its design is based on the decoupling of the overall accelerator system into independent channels. For each channel an individual compensator is found with the help of a semi- automatic control synthesis procedure. This technique allows the designer to incorporate ...

  17. DEPFET active pixel detectors for a future linear $e^+e^-$ collider

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, O; Dieguez, A; Dingfelder, J; Hemperek, T; Kishishita, T; Kleinohl, T; Koch, M; Krueger, H; Lemarenko, M; Luetticke, F; Marinas, C; Schnell, M; Wermes, N; Campbell, A; Ferber, T; Kleinwort, C; Niebuhr, C; Soloviev, Y; Steder, M; Volkenborn, R; Yaschenko, S; Fischer, P; Kreidl, C; Peric, I; Knopf, J; Ritzert, M; Curras, E; Lopez-Virto, A; Moya, D; Vila, I; Boronat, M; Esperante, D; Fuster, J; Garcia Garcia, I; Lacasta, C; Oyanguren, A; Ruiz, P; Timon, G; Vos, M; Gessler, T; Kuehn, W; Lange, S; Muenchow, D; Spruck, B; Frey, A; Geisler, C; Schwenker, B; Wilk, F; Barvich, T; Heck, M; Heindl, S; Lutz, O; Mueller, Th; Pulvermacher, C; Simonis, H.J; Weiler, T; Krausser, T; Lipsky, O; Rummel, S; Schieck, J; Schlueter, T; Ackermann, K; Andricek, L; Chekelian, V; Chobanova, V; Dalseno, J; Kiesling, C; Koffmane, C; Gioi, L.Li; Moll, A; Moser, H.G; Mueller, F; Nedelkovska, E; Ninkovic, J; Petrovics, S; Prothmann, K; Richter, R; Ritter, A; Ritter, M; Simon, F; Vanhoefer, P; Wassatsch, A; Dolezal, Z; Drasal, Z; Kodys, P; Kvasnicka, P; Scheirich, J

    2013-01-01

    The DEPFET collaboration develops highly granular, ultra-transparent active pixel detectors for high-performance vertex reconstruction at future collider experiments. The characterization of detector prototypes has proven that the key principle, the integration of a first amplification stage in a detector-grade sensor material, can provide a comfortable signal to noise ratio of over 40 for a sensor thickness of 50-75 $\\mathrm{\\mathbf{\\mu m}}$. ASICs have been designed and produced to operate a DEPFET pixel detector with the required read-out speed. A complete detector concept is being developed, including solutions for mechanical support, cooling and services. In this paper the status of DEPFET R & D project is reviewed in the light of the requirements of the vertex detector at a future linear $\\mathbf{e^+ e^-}$ collider.

  18. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; Linde, Frank; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  19. SIMDET—a parametric Monte Carlo for a TESLA detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Martin; Schreiber, H. Jürgen

    2001-07-01

    We briefly describe the principles of operation of the program package SIMDET, a parametric Monte Carlo program to simulate the response of a detector for the TESLA linear collider. Main detector components are implemented according to the TESLA Conceptual Design report, with a tracking system, an electromagnetic and a hadronic calorimeter, a vertex and a luminosity detector. Using the results from the ab initio Monte Carlo program BRAHMS, track parameters and calorimetric deposits are treated in a realistic way. Pattern recognition is emulated using cross references between generated particles and detector response. An energy flow algorithm defines the output of the program. Further improvements and completions of SIMDET are also discussed.

  20. Sources of Charged Higgs Pair through Double or Triple Higgs Production at Linear Colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of triple Higgs (H+H-H0, (H+H-h0 and pairwise charged Higgs boson (H+H- is studied in the context of future linear colliders within the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM type II. The aim is to compare sources of charged Higgs pair through the above processes, that is, double and triple Higgs production. Cross sections are calculated at the leading order in 2HDM type II and Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM. Several orders of magnitude (~104 enhancement are observed in 2HDM compared to MSSM, while no sizable enhancement is seen in muon collider versus electron-positron collider. The analysis is based on a heavy charged Higgs with mass above 500 GeV. It is found that double charged Higgs production cross section (being the same in 2HDM and MSSM is few femtobarns, while the triple Higgs production cannot exceed a fraction of femtobarn within the parameter space under study.

  1. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, P; Draper, M; Garvey, T; Lebrun, P; Peach, K; Phinney, N; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Toge, N

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from ...

  2. Tests of the left-right electroweak model at linear collider

    OpenAIRE

    Huitu, K.; Maalampi, J.; Pandita, P. N.; Puolamaki, K.; Raidal, M.; Romanenko, N.

    1999-01-01

    The left-right model is a gauge theory of electroweak interactions based on the gauge symmetry SU(2)_R . The main motivations for this model are that it gives an explanation for the parity violation of weak interactions, provides a mechanism (see-saw) for generating neutrino masses, and has B-L as a gauge symmetry. The quark-lepton symmetry in weak interactions is also maintained in this theory. The model has many predictions one can directly test at a TeV-scale linear collider. We will consi...

  3. Physics at the e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Liebler, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Baer, H. [University of Oklahoma, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Norman, OK (United States); Battaglia, M.; Stefaniak, T. [University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Belanger, G.; Serpico, P. [Universite Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), B.P.110, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Fujii, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Kiyo, Y. [Juntendo University, Department of Physics, Inzai, Chiba (Japan); Olive, K. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Simon, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Uwer, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Berlin (Germany); Wackeroth, D. [SUNY at Buffalo, Department of Physics, Buffalo, NY (United States); Zerwas, P.M.; List, J.; Mnich, J.; Moenig, K.; Stanitzki, M.; Weiglein, G.; Mnich, J. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Arbey, A.; Mahmoudi, F. [Universite de Lyon, Villeurbonne Cedex (France); Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5574, Saint-Genis Laval Cedex (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Asano, M. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Bagger, J.; Bagger, J. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD (United States); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bechtle, P.; Desch, K.; Kroseberg, J. [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Bharucha, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department T31, Garching (Germany); CNRS, Aix Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, Marseille (France); Brau, J.; Brau, J. [University of Oregon, Department of Physics, Eugene, OR (United States); Bruemmer, F. [LUPM, UMR 5299, Universite de Montpellier II et CNRS, Montpellier (France); Choi, S.Y. [Chonbuk National University, Department of Physics, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Denner, A.; Porod, W. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dittmaier, S. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Ellwanger, U.; Mambrini, Y. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique, UMR 8627, CNRS, Orsay (France); Englert, C. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Freitas, A. [University of Pittsburgh, PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ginzburg, I. [Sobolev Institute of Mathematics and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Godfrey, S. [Carleton University, Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Ottawa (Canada); Greiner, N. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Grojean, C. [ICREA at IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Gruenewald, M. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Heisig, J. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany); Hoecker, A.; Moortgat, F.; Schlatter, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kanemura, S. [University of Toyama, Department of Physics, Toyama (Japan); Kawagoe, K.; Kawagoe, K. [Kyushu University, Department of Physics, Fukuoka (Japan); Kogler, R. [University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kronfeld, A.S.; Kronfeld, A.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study, Garching (Germany); Matsumoto, S. [The University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Muehlleitner, M.M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Poeschl, R. [Laboratoire de L' accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (FR); Porto, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (DE); Rolbiecki, K. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (PL); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (ES); Schmitt, M. [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, IL (US); Staal, O. [Stockholm University, The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (SE); Stoeckinger, D. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (DE); Wilson, G.W. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (US); Zeune, L. [ITFA, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (NL); Xella, S. [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute, Kobenhavn (DK); Ellis, J. [CERN, Geneva (CH); King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, Strand, London (GB); Komamiya, S. [The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, and International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, Tokyo (JP); Peskin, M. [SLAC, Stanford University, CA (US); Wagner, A. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (DE); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (DE); Yamamoto, H. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Sendai, Miyagi (JP)

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider in the energy range of √(s) = 92 GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well. (orig.)

  4. Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Higashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuriki, M.; Kuroda, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Naito, T.; Okugi, T.; Sugahara, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Toge, N.; Urakawa, J.; Vogel, V.; Yamaoka, H.; Yokoya, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /CERN /Hiroshima

    2005-05-27

    To reach design luminosity, the International Linear Collider (ILC) must be able to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittances are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 37 nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

  5. Digital low level rf control system with four different intermediate frequencies for the International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Sigit Basuki; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Qiu, Feng; Liu, Na

    2017-09-01

    A field programmable gate array-based digital low level rf (LLRF) control system will be used in the International Linear Collider (ILC) in order to satisfy the rf stability requirements. The digital LLRF control system with four different intermediate frequencies has been developed to decrease the required number of analog-to-digital converters in this system. The proof of concept of this technique was demonstrated at the Superconducting RF Test Facility in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan. The amplitude and phase stability has fulfilled the ILC requirements.

  6. An L-Band Polarized Electron PWT Photoinjector for the International Linear Collider (ILC)

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, David; Chen Ping; Lundquist, Martin; Luo, Yan; Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2005-01-01

    A multi-cell, standing-wave, L-band, p-mode, plane-wave-transformer (PWT) photoinjector with an integrated photocathode in a novel linac structure is proposed by DULY Research Inc. as a polarized electron source. The PWT photoinjector is capable of operation in ultra high vacuum and moderate field gradient. Expected performance of an L-band polarized electron PWT injector operating under the parameters for the International Linear Collider is presented. The projected normalized transverse rms emittance is an order of magnitude lower than that produced with a polarized electron dc gun followed by subharmonic bunchers.

  7. Selection of the optimum magnet design for the International Linear Collider positron source helical undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of possible undulator designs for the International Linear Collider positron source has resulted in a superconducting bifilar wire design being selected. After a comprehensive paper study and fabrication of the two preeminent designs, the superconducting undulator was chosen instead of the permanent magnet alternative. This was because of its superior performance in terms of magnetic field strength and quality, operational flexibility, risk of radiation damage, ease in achieving the required vacuum, and cost. The superconducting undulator design will now be developed into a complete system design for the full 200 m long magnet that is required.

  8. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olvegård

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high-intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addressed experimentally at the CLIC test facility where up to 55% of the power is extracted from the beam in the test beam line, a small-scale version of the CLIC drive-beam decelerator, leaving the beam with a very wide energy profile. For monitoring of the transverse beam profile and Twiss parameters we use optical transition radiation screens and quadrupole scans. The intra-pulse-train energy spectrum before and after deceleration is measured with segmented beam dumps. In this paper we discuss the performance of these diagnostic devices with a particular emphasis on the large energy spread and its effect on the beam imaging techniques, and with a final outlook to the CLIC drive-beam diagnostics.

  9. Fundamental Design Principles of Linear Collider Damping Rings, with an Application to CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Potier, J P

    2000-01-01

    Damping Rings for Linear Colliders have to produce very small normalised emittances at a high repetition rate. A previous paper presented analytical expressions for the equilibrium emittance of an arc cell as a function of the deflection angle per dipole. In addition, an expression for the lattice parameters providing the minimum emittance, and a strategy to stay close to this, were proposed. This analytical approach is extended to the detailed design of Damping Rings, taking into account the straight sections and the damping wigglers. Complete rings, including wiggler and injection insections, were modelled with the MAD [1] program, and their performance was found to be in good agreement with the analytical calculation. With such an approach it is shown that a Damping Ring corresponding to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) parameters at 0.5 and 1 TeV centre-of-mass energy, and tunable for two different sets of emittance and injection repetition rate, can be designed using the same ring layout.

  10. DCal: A custom integrated circuit for calorimetry at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, James R.; Mekkaoui, Abderrazek; Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab; Drake, Gary; Repond, Jose; /Argonne

    2005-10-01

    A research and development collaboration has been started with the goal of producing a prototype hadron calorimeter section for the purpose of proving the Particle Flow Algorithm concept for the International Linear Collider. Given the unique requirements of a Particle Flow Algorithm calorimeter, custom readout electronics must be developed to service these detectors. This paper introduces the DCal or Digital Calorimetry Chip, a custom integrated circuit developed in a 0.25um CMOS process specifically for this International Linear Collider project. The DCal is capable of handling 64 channels, producing a 1-bit Digital-to-Analog conversion of the input (i.e. hit/no hit). It maintains a 24-bit timestamp and is capable of operating either in an externally triggered mode or in a self-triggered mode. Moreover, it is capable of operating either with or without a pipeline delay. Finally, in order to permit the testing of different calorimeter technologies, its analog front end is capable of servicing Particle Flow Algorithm calorimeters made from either Resistive Plate Chambers or Gaseous Electron Multipliers.

  11. Design optimization of the International Linear Collider Final Focus System with a long L*

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, Fabien

    This Master's Thesis work has been done in the Aerospace Engineering master's programme framework and carried out at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It was conducted under the 500 GeV e-e+ International Linear Collider (ILC) study and focused on the design and performance optimization of the Final Focus System (FFS). The purpose of the final focus system of the future linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) is to demagnify the beam to the required transverse size at the interaction point (IP). The FFS is designed for a flat-beam in a compact way based on a local chromaticity correction which corrects both horizontal and vertical chromaticities simultaneously. An alternative FFS configuration based on the traditional scheme with two dedicated chromatic correction sections for horizontal and vertical chromaticities and a long L * option has been developed. A longer free space between the last quadrupole and the IP allows to place the last quadrupole on a stable ground, with fewer engineering ...

  12. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  13. Wakefield damping in a pair of X-band accelerators for linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger M. Jones

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the means to damp the wakefield left behind ultrarelativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of traveling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wakefield left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wakefield on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make up the electromagnetic field, damping the wakefield, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wakefield and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wakefield conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wakefields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  14. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  15. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γϵx = 3x10-6 m-rad and γϵy = 3x10-8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  16. CLIC, a Multi-TeV $e^{\\pm}$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Bossart, Rudolf; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Carron, G; Coosemans, Williame; Corsini, R; D'Amico, T E; Godot, J C; Guignard, Gilbert; Hutchins, S; Jensen, E; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Potier, J P; Riche, A J; Rinolfi, Louis; Schulte, Daniel; Suberlucq, Guy; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wuensch, Walter; Zimmermann, Frank; Napoly, O; Raubenheimer, T O; Ruth, Ronald D; Syratchev, I V

    1999-01-01

    The CLIC study of a high energy (0.5 - 5 TeV), high luminosity (1034 - 1035 cm-2 sec-1) e± linear collider is presented. Beam acceleration using high frequency (30 GHz) normal-conducting structures operating at high accelerating fields (150 MV/m) significantly reduces the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. Based on new beam and linac parameters derived from a recently developed set of general scaling laws for linear colliders, the beam stability is shown to be similar to lower frequency designs in spite of the strong wake-field dependency on frequency. A new cost-effective and efficient drive beam generation scheme for RF power production by the so-called "Two Beam Acceleration (TBA)" method is described. It uses a thermionic gun and a fully-loaded normal-conducting linac operating at low frequency (937 MHz) to generate and accelerate the drive beam bunches, and RF multiplication by funnelling in compressor rings to produce the desired bunch structure. Recent 30 GHz hardware developments and ...

  17. CLIC, a 0.5 to 5 TeV e$^{\\pm}$ Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Carron, G; Chautard, F; Coosemans, Williame; Corsini, R; D'Amico, T E; Dehler, M; Godot, J C; Guignard, Gilbert; Hagel, J; Hutchins, S; Johnson, C D; Jensen, E; Kamber, I; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Potier, J P; Riche, A J; Rinolfi, Louis; Schulte, Daniel; Suberlucq, Guy; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Warner, D J; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter; Napoly, O; Raubenheimer, T O; Ruth, Ronald D

    1998-01-01

    The CLIC study of a high energy (0.5 - 5 TeV), high luminosity (10^34 - 10^35 cm^-2 sec^-1) e± linear collider is presented. Beam acceleration using high frequency (30 GHz) normal-conducting structure s operating at high accelerating fields (100 to 200 MV/m) significantly reduces the length and, in consequence the cost of the linac. Based on new beam and linac parameters derived from a recently dev eloped set of general scaling laws for linear colliders, the beam stability is shown to be similar to lower frequency designs in spite of the strong wake-field dependency on frequency. A new cost effe ctive and very efficient drive beam generation scheme for RF power production by the so-called "Two Beam Acceleration (TBA)" method is described. It uses a conventional thermionic gun and a fully-load ed normal-conducting linac operating at low frequency (937 MHz) to generate and accelerate the drive beam bunches and RF multiplication by funneling in compressor rings to produce the desired bunch st ructure. Recent 30...

  18. Effective Yukawa couplings and flavor-changing Higgs boson decays at linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, Emidio

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the advantages of a linear-collider program for testing a recent theoretical proposal where the Higgs-boson Yukawa couplings are radiatively generated, keeping unchanged the standard-model mechanism for electroweak-gauge-symmetry breaking. Fermion masses arise at a large energy scale through an unknown mechanism, and the standard model at the electroweak scale is regarded as an effective field theory. In this scenario, Higgs boson decays into photons and electroweak gauge-boson pairs are considerably enhanced for a light Higgs boson, which makes a signal observation at the LHC straightforward. On the other hand, the clean environment of a linear collider is required to directly probe the radiative fermionic sector of the Higgs boson couplings. Also, we show that the flavor-changing Higgs-boson decays are dramatically enhanced with respect to the standard model. In particular, we find a measurable branching ratio in the range (10^{-4}-10^{-3}) for the decay H\\to bs for a Higgs boson lighter than 140...

  19. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 1: Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Foster, Brian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fuster, Juan [Univ. of Valencia (Spain); Harrison, Mike [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Paterson, James McEwan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Peskin, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanitzki, Marcel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Walker, Nicholas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  20. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator \\& in the Technical Design Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  1. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  2. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Helene Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  3. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lilje, L; Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Bloess, D; Charrier, J P; Chiaveri, Enrico; Ferreira, L; Losito, R; Matheisen, A; Preis, H; Proch, D; Reschke, D; Safa, H; Schmüser, P; Trines, D; Visentin, B; Wenninger, Horst

    2004-01-01

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper, results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity.

  4. Design of a Multi-Bunch BPM for the Next Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Young, A

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) design requires precise control of colliding trains of high-intensity (1.4 x 10 sup 1 sup 0 particles/bunch) and low-emittance beams. High-resolution multi-bunch beam position monitors (BPMs) are required to ensure uniformity across the bunch trains with bunch spacing of 1.4ns. A high bandwidth (approx 350 MHz) multi-bunch BPM has been designed based on a custom-made stripline sum and difference hybrid on a Teflon-based material. High bandwidth RF couplers were included to allow injection of a calibration tone. Three prototype BPMs were fabricated at SLAC and tested in the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK and in the PEP-II ring at SLAC. Tone calibration data and single-bunch and multi-bunch beam data were taken with high-speed (5Gsa/s) digitizers. Offline analysis determined the deconvolution of individual bunches in the multi-bunch mode by using the measured single bunch response. The results of these measurements are presented in this paper.

  5. Studies of radiation hardness of MOS devices for application in a linear collider vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyu

    2008-10-17

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) together with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN serve as a combined tool to explore the mysteries of the universe: the former is a precision machine and the latter can be considered as a finding machine. The key component of the ILC is the vertex detector that should be placed as close as possible to the Interaction Point (IP) and has better radiation tolerance against the dominant electron-positron pair production background from beam-beam interactions. A new generation of MOS-type Depleted-Field-Effect Transistor (MOSDEPFET) active pixel detectors has been proposed and developed by Semiconductor Labor Munich for Physics and for extraterrestrial Physics in order to meet the requirements of the vertex detector at the ILC. Since all MOS devices are susceptible to ionizing radiation, the main topic is focused on the radiation hardness of detectors, by which a series of physical processes are analyzed: e.g. surface damage due to ionizing radiation as well as damage mechanisms and their associated radiation effects. As a consequence, the main part of this thesis consists of a large number of irradiation experiments and the corresponding discussions. Finally, radiation hardness of the detectors should be improved through a set of concluded experiences that are based on a series of analysis of the characteristic parameters using different measurement techniques. The feasibility of the MOSDEPFET-based vertex detector is, therefore, predicted at ILC. (orig.)

  6. CP-violating top quark couplings at future linear $e^+e^-$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bernreuther, Werner; Garcia Garcia, Ignacio; Perello Rosello, Martin; Poeschl, Roman; Richard, Francois; Ros, Eduardo; Vos, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    We study the potential of future lepton colliders to probe violation of the CP symmetry in the top quark sector. In certain extensions of the Standard Model, such as the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM), sizeable anomalous top quark dipole moments can arise, that may be revealed by a precise measurement of top quark pair production. We present results from detailed Monte Carlo studies for the ILC at 500 GeV and CLIC at 380 GeV and use parton level simulations to explore the potential of high-energy operation. We find that precise measurements in $e^+e^- \\rightarrow t \\bar{t}$ production with subsequent decay to lepton plus jets final states can provide sufficient sensitivity to detect Higgs-boson-induced CP violation in a viable two-Higgs-doublet model. The potential of a linear $e^+e^-$ collider to detect CP-violating electric and weak dipole form factors of the top quark exceeds the prospects of the HL-LHC by over an order of magnitude.

  7. Design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure made from two halves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Milling on two longitudinally split halves is one method to manufacture accelerating structures. This method is simple and allows one to avoid electromagnetic fields at bonding joints, making it attractive in manufacturing high-gradient accelerating structures. An X-band structure design with strong wakefield damping based on this manufacturing approach is studied in this work as an alternative design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC main linac accelerating structures. The geometry of the structure is optimized to greatly reduce the surface fields, improve the efficiency, and suppress the wakefield. This structure features the baseline design of the CLIC main linac with additional advantages. This study may serve as a reference for designing other high frequency-band corrugated structures.

  8. State of the art in electromagnetic modeling for the Compact Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Kabel, Andreas; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Schussman, Greg; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2009-07-10

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D electromagnetic time-domain code T3P for simulations of wakefields and transients in complex accelerator structures. T3P is based on state-of-the-art Finite Element methods on unstructured grids and features unconditional stability, quadratic surface approximation and up to 6th-order vector basis functions for unprecedented simulation accuracy. Optimized for large-scale parallel processing on leadership supercomputing facilities, T3P allows simulations of realistic 3D structures with fast turn-around times, aiding the design of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Applications include simulations of the proposed two-beam accelerator structures for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) - wakefield damping in the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) and power transfer to the main beam accelerating structures are investigated.

  9. Development of prototype luminosity detector modules for future experiments on linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081248; Idzik, Marek

    The main objective of this dissertation is to develop and validate the prototype module of the LumiCal luminosity detector. The dissertation presents the works executed from the first detector concept, through all subsequent R&D stages, ending with the test beam results obtained using the complete detector module. Firstly, the linear electron positron colliders and planned experiments are introduced, together with their role in our understanding of the basis of matter and sensing for the New Physics. The signal extraction from radiation sensors and further signal processing techniques are discussed in chapter 2. Besides the commonly accepted techniques of amplitude and time measurements, a novel readout implementation, utilizing digital signal processing and deconvolution principle, is proposed, and its properties are analyzed in details. The architecture, design, and measurements of the LumiCal readout chain components are presented in chapter 3. A dedicated test setups prepared for their parameterizatio...

  10. Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on the Beam Size in Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosochkov, Y.

    2004-08-05

    In this paper, the authors discuss the optics effects of the realistic detector solenoid field on beam size at the Interaction Point (IP) of a future Linear Collider and their compensation. It is shown that most of the adverse effects on the IP beam size arise only from the part of the solenoid field which overlaps and extends beyond the final focusing quadrupoles. It is demonstrated that the most efficient and local compensation can be achieved using weak antisolenoids near the IP, while a correction scheme which employs only skew quadrupoles is less efficient, and compensation with strong antisolenoids is not appropriate. One of the advantages of the proposed antisolenoid scheme is that this compensation works well over a large range of the beam energy

  11. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    CERN Document Server

    Inntjore Levinsen, Y.; Tomás, Rogelio; Schulte, Daniel

    2014-05-27

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of {\\sigma} = 1 nm vertically and {\\sigma} = 45 nm horizontally. Given the small and very flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded from the impact of the experimental solenoid field in combination with a large crossing angle. Main effects include y-x'-coupling and increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field, increases the beam emittance. A detailed study of the impact from a realistic solenoid field and the associated correction techniques for the CLIC Final Focus is presented. In particular, the impact of techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions due to the detector solenoid main field and its overlap with the final focus magnets are shown. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR has been evaluated, and found to...

  12. Compensation of detector solenoid effects on the beam size in a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Nosochkov

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the optics effects of the realistic detector solenoid field on beam size at the interaction point (IP of a future linear collider and their compensation. It is shown that most of the adverse effects on the IP beam size arise only from the part of the solenoid field which overlaps and extends beyond the final focusing quadrupoles. It is demonstrated that the most efficient and local compensation can be achieved using the novel method of weak antisolenoids near the IP, while a correction scheme which employs only skew quadrupoles is less efficient, and compensation with strong antisolenoids is not appropriate. One of the advantages of the proposed antisolenoid scheme is that this compensation works well over a large range of the beam energy.

  13. Saw-tooth Instability Studies At The Stanford Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Podobedov, B V

    2000-01-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the p...

  14. Status report on active stabilisation of a linear collider final focus quadrupole mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, J.; Brunetti, L.; Formosa, F. [Universite de Savoie, ESIA, 74 - Annecy (France); Adloff, C.; Bastian, Y.; Bolzon, B.; Cadoux, F.; Geffroy, N.; Girard, C.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Peltier, F. [LAPP-IN2P3-CNRS, 74 - Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

    2006-07-01

    The measurements done with the sensors available in our laboratories used for ground motion analysis are presented. The first sensors studied are seismic sensors measuring ground velocity, other sensors are accelerometers available for measuring ground acceleration. The first step has been to characterize the sensors, the second step has been to model and simulate the acceleration in order to identify Eigen frequencies and to display mode shapes. The third step has been to assess the performances of a new algorithm for disturbance rejection. In order to facilitate the analysis, a reduced-size mock-up has been used. The goal was to eliminate or at least to reduce as much as possible the main frequencies of the disturbance. A new mock-up is currently being developed that will have a geometry closer to a final focus quadrupole. Measurements will be done to validate the whole system in view of active stabilization for a future linear collider.

  15. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittenden, J. A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G. F.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D. L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K. G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M. A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.

    2014-03-01

    We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications

  16. Beam delivery system tuning and luminosity monitoring in the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dalena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Emittance preservation in the beam delivery system (BDS is one of the major challenges in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC. The fast detuning of the final focus optics requires an on-line tuning procedure in order to keep luminosity close to the maximum. In this paper we discuss different tuning techniques to mitigate the displacement of magnets in the CLIC BDS and in particular in the final focus system. Some of them require a fast luminosity measurement. Here we study the possibility to use beam-beam background processes at CLIC 3 TeV c.m. energy as a fast luminosity signal. In particular, the hadron multiplicity in the detector region is investigated.

  17. High-power multimode X-band rf pulse compression system for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami G. Tantawi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC. The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  18. Stripline design for the extraction kicker of Compact Linear Collider damping rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Belver-Aguilar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the design study of future linear colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, predamping rings (PDRs and damping rings (DRs are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several kicker systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. In order to achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedance matching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. In this paper, we present the complete design of the striplines for the DR extraction kicker, since it is the most challenging from the field homogeneity point of view. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most common shapes introduce separately. Furthermore, a detailed study of the different operating modes of a stripline kicker allowed the beam coupling impedance to be reduced at low frequencies: this cannot be achieved by tapering the electrodes. The optimum design of the striplines and their components has been based on studies of impedance matching, field homogeneity, power transmission, beam coupling impedance, and manufacturing tolerances. Finally, new ideas for further improvement of the performance of future striplines are reported.

  19. Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornuelle, John C.

    2002-08-30

    In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If

  20. Dynamic imperfections and optimized feedback design in the Compact Linear Collider main linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peder Eliasson

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC main linac is sensitive to dynamic imperfections such as element jitter, injected beam jitter, and ground motion. These effects cause emittance growth that, in case of ground motion, has to be counteracted by a trajectory feedback system. The feedback system itself will, due to jitter effects and imperfect beam position monitors (BPMs, indirectly cause emittance growth. Fast and accurate simulations of both the direct and indirect effects are desirable, but due to the many elements of the CLIC main linac, simulations may become very time consuming. In this paper, an efficient way of simulating linear (or nearly linear dynamic effects is described. The method is also shown to facilitate the analytic determination of emittance growth caused by the different dynamic imperfections while using a trajectory feedback system. Emittance growth expressions are derived for quadrupole, accelerating structure, and beam jitter, for ground motion, and for noise in the feedback BPMs. Finally, it is shown how the method can be used to design a feedback system that is optimized for the optics of the machine and the ground motion spectrum of the particular site. This feedback system gives an emittance growth rate that is approximately 10 times lower than that of traditional trajectory feedbacks. The robustness of the optimized feedback system is studied for a number of additional imperfections, e.g., dipole corrector imperfections and faulty knowledge about the machine optics, with promising results.

  1. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology : CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aicheler, M [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Draper, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Garvey, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Lebrun, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Peach, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Phinney, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schmickler, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schulte, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Toge, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-02-13

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from the CLIC test facility at CERN (CTF3). Both the machine and detector/physics studies for CLIC have primarily focused on the 3 TeV implementation of CLIC as a benchmark for the CLIC feasibility. This report also includes specific studies for an initial 500 GeV machine, and some discussion of possible intermediate energy stages. The performance and operation issues related to operation at reduced energy compared to the nominal, and considerations of a staged construction program are included in the final part of the report. The CLIC accelerator study is organized as an international collaboration with 43 partners in 22 countries. An associated report describes the physics potential and experiments at CLIC and a shorter report in preparation will focus on the CLIC implementation strategy, together with a plan for the CLIC R&D studies 2012–2016. Critical and important implementation issues such as cost, power and schedule will be addressed there.

  2. Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, M.

    2011-04-30

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  3. A study of measurement precision of the Higgs boson branching ratios at the International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Akiya

    2013-03-01

    Precise measurement of the Higgs boson couplings is an important task for International Linear Collider (ILC) experiments and will clarify the understanding of the particle mass generation mechanism. In particular, high precision measurement of Higgs branching ratios plays a key role in the search for the origin of the Yukawa and Higgs interactions. In this study, the measurement accuracies of Higgs boson branching ratios to b and c quarks and gluons were evaluated using a full detector simulation based on the International Large Detector, and assuming a Higgs mass of 120 GeV/ c 2. We analyze two center-of-mass (CM) energies, 250 and 350 GeV, close to the e + e -→ ZH and e+e-to tbar{t} production thresholds. At both energies, an integrated luminosity of 250 fb-1 and an electron (positron) beam polarization of -80 % (+30 %) were assumed. We obtain the following measurement accuracies for the product of the Higgs production cross section and the branching ratio of the Higgs into bbar{b}, cbar{c}, and gg: 1.0 %, 6.9 %, and 8.5 % at a CM energy of 250 GeV and 1.0 %, 6.2 %, and 7.3 % at 350 GeV. (After writing our article, Large Hadron Collider experiments reported the observation of a new resonance around the mass of 125 GeV/ c 2 (ATLAS Collaboration, arXiv:1207.7214v1 [hep-ex]; CMS Collaboration, arXiv:1207.7235v1 [hep-ex]). Considering the small difference in branching ratios of the Higgs at masses of 120 and 125 GeV/ c 2, our results are not significantly affected by this mass difference.)

  4. Low-level RF signal processing for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, S.; Ziomek, C.; Adolphsen, C. [and others

    1997-05-12

    In the X-band accelerator system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA), the Low Level RF (LLRF) drive system must be very phase stable, but concurrently, be very phase agile. Phase agility is needed to make the Stanford Linear Doubler (SLED) power multiplier systems Energy work and to shape the RF waveforms to compensate beam loading in the accelerator sections. Similarly, precision fast phase and amplitude monitors are required to view, track, and feed back on RF signals at various locations throughout the system. The LLRF is composed of several subsystems: the RF Reference System generates and distributes a reference 11.424 GHz signal to all of the RF stations, the Signal Processing Chassis creates the RF waveforms with the appropriate phase modulation, and the Phase Detector Assembly measures the amplitude and phase of monitor3ed RF signals. The LLRF is run via VXI instrumentation. These instruments are controlled using HP VEE graphical programming software. Programs have been developed to shape the RF waveform, calibrate the phase modulators and demodulators, and display the measured waveforms. This paper describes these and other components of the LLRF system.

  5. Physics Case and Challenges for the Vertex Tracker at Future High Energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2001-01-01

    The physics programme of high energy e+e- linear colliders relies on the accurate identification of fermions in order to study in details the profile of the Higgs boson, search for new particles and probe the multi-TeV mass region by means of precise electro-weak measurements and direct searches.

  6. Stabilization of Nanometre-Size Particle Beams in the Final Focus System of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S

    2003-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is developing the design of a 3 TeV e+ e- linear collider. The discovery reach of this machine depends on obtaining a luminosity of 1035 cm_2s_1, which will be done by colliding beams with transverse spot sizes in the nanometre range ≈ 60 × 0:7 nm2). Tolerances on fast mechanical stability of the focusing quadrupoles reach the 0.2 nm level. The serious concern of magnet stabilization for future linear colliders has been addressed by building a CERN test stand on magnet stability, bringing together state-of-the-art stabilization technology, latest equipment for vibration measurements and realistic magnet prototypes. For the first time an accelerator magnet was successfully stabilized to the sub-nanometre level, reducing its vibrations level by one order of magnitude with respect to the supporting ground. The best measurements indicate transverse RMS vibration amplitudes (above 4 Hz) of (0.79+0.08) nm ho...

  7. Damped accelerator structures for future linear e/sup/plus minus// colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deruyter, H.; Hoag, H.A.; Lisin, A.V.; Loew, G.A.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Rago, C.E.; Wang, J.W.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes preliminary work on accelerator structures for future TeV linear colliders which use trains of e/sup +-/ bunches to reach the required luminosity. These bunch trains, if not perfectly aligned with respect to the accelerator axis, induce transverse wake field modes into the structure. Unless they are sufficiently damped, these modes cause cummulative beam deflections and emittance growth. The envisaged structures, originally proposed by R. B. Palmer, are disk-loaded waveguides in which the disks are slotted radially into quadrants. Wake field energy is coupled via the slots and double-ridged waveguides into a lossy region which is external to the accelerator structure. The requirement is that the Q of the HEM/sub 11/ mode be reduced to a value of less than 30. The work done so far includes MAFIA code computations and low power rf measurements to study the fields. A four-cavity 2..pi../3 mode standing-wave structure has been built to find whether the slots lower the electric breakdown thresholds below those reached with conventional disk-loaded structures. We set out to assess the microwave properties of the structure and the problems which might be encountered in fabricating it. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Studies towards optimisation of the analog hadronic calorimeter for future linear collider detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Huong Lan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Collaboration: CALICE-D-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Analog Hadronic Calorimeter (AHCAL) is a highly granular calorimeter developed in the CALICE collaboration for future linear collider detectors. Its design concept is based on 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} scintillator tiles readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). With this design the ambitious required jet energy resolution of 3-4 % can be achieved using the Pandora Particle Flow Algorithm (PandoraPFA). Recent discussions concerning the overall size and cost of the ILD detector has triggered new studies to optimise AHCAL cell size. A smaller number of cells can reduce the detector cost but the corresponding larger cell size can lead to a degradation of the jet energy resolution. The AHCAL optimisation study therefore has to achieve the best balance between physics performance and cost. Recent studies using the latest version of PandoraPFA with improved pattern recognition have shown significant improvement of jet energy resolution. Moreover, a better energy reconstruction of single particles, in which software compensation plays an important role, can lead to further improvements. This talk will discuss the software compensation technique and its impact on the final cell size optimisation.

  9. Improvements in emittance wake field optimization for the SLAC Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef

    2003-01-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time ...

  10. Leptophilic neutral Higgs bosons in two Higgs doublet model at a linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Majid [Shiraz University, Physics Department, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This paper addresses the question of the observability of neutral Higgs bosons through the leptonic decay in a two Higgs doublet model (2HDM). Both scalar and pseudo-scalar Higgs bosons (H, A) are considered. The model is set to type IV to enhance the leptonic decay. In such a scenario, a signal production process like e{sup +}e{sup -} → A{sup 0}H{sup 0} → ττμμ or μμττ would provide a clear signal on top of the background in a di-muon invariant mass distribution far from the Z boson pole mass. The analysis is based on a τ-id algorithm which preselects events if they have two τ jets by requiring a hadronic τ decay. Several benchmark points are defined for the search, requiring a linear collider operating at √(s) = 0.5 and 1 TeV. It is shown that the signal can be observed on top of the background in all benchmark points at an integrated luminosity of 1000 fb{sup -1}. (orig.)

  11. Application of International Linear Collider superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on π-mode to provide a maximum accelerating gradient. A significant research and development effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its rf system which resulted in excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above ∼1.2  GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for β_{G}=0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H^{-} from ∼420  MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new β_{G}=0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9π-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  12. Damage test for International Linear Collider positron generation target at KEKB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kuriki

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ILC (International Linear Collider is aiming to conduct electron-positron collisions at 1 TeV center-of-mass energy. One bunch train will contain up to 2800 3.2 nC bunches with a 308 ns bunch spacing or 5600 1.6 nC bunches with a 154 ns spacing. The bunch-train length will be 0.9 ms. Because of this extremely large amount of beam in a train, serious damage to a positron production target driven by 6 GeV incident electron beam is of concern. As the ILC positron source, several different methods have been proposed. The target hardness is a key point concerning the selection. In this article, we report on a test experiment to examine the target hardness by using a stored electron beam in KEKB HER (High Energy Ring. The project name is IPPAK (ILC Positron Project At KEKB. By manipulating the abort kicker, a condition similar to that of the ILC positron production target can be reproduced. The experiment was carried out on June 29 and 30, 2005. The target was seriously damaged under the heaviest condition (KEKB mode, but the damage was less and nothing for those of the ILC mode. Possible impacts to the ILC positron production scheme are also discussed.

  13. A CMOS pixel sensor prototype for the outer layers of linear collider vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Himmi, A.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) expresses a stringent requirement for high precision vertex detectors (VXD). CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have been considered as an option for the VXD of the International Large Detector (ILD), one of the detector concepts proposed for the ILC. MIMOSA-31 developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first CPS integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers of the VXD, adapted to an original concept minimizing the power consumption. It is composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation in order to reduce the temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). At the bottom of the pixel array, each column is terminated with a self-triggered analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The ADC design was optimized for power saving at a sampling frequency of 6.25 MS/s. The prototype chip is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. This paper presents the details of the prototype chip and its test results.

  14. R&D of MPGD-readout TPC for the International Linear Collider experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonamine, R.

    2012-06-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is chosen for the central tracker of the ILD detector, one of two detector concepts planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Physics goals at the ILC will require a TPC with a position resolution of 100 μm and superior track separation, which are not achievable with a conventional Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) readout. A MPGD readout offers improved position resolution and track separation due to measuring the signal at the anode and minimization of E × B effect. For several years, the LC TPC collaboration has been developing a MPGD readout using various small TPC prototypes and the Large Prototype TPC that is operated in a test beam at DESY. The MPGD technologies being tested are GEM and Micromegas with resistive charge broadening, with both traditional pad and CMOS pixel readout. Readout modules with both GEM and Micromegas gas amplification have achieved a position resolution on the order of 100 μm at B = 1 T. In this paper we report on the recent R&D toward the ILD TPC.

  15. A scalable gigabit data acquisition system for calorimeters for linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gastaldi, F; Magniette, F; Boudry, V

    2015-01-01

    prototypes of ultra-granular calorimeters for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Our design is generic enough to cope with other applications with some minor adaptations. The DAQ is made up of four different modules, including an optional concentrator. A Detector InterFace (DIF) is placed at one end of the detector elements (SLAB) holding up to 160 ASICs. It is connected by a single HDMI cable which is used to transmit both slow-control and readout data over a serial link 8b/10b encoded characters at 50 Mb/s to the Gigabit Concentrator Card (GDCC). One GDCC controls up to 7 DIFs, distributes the system clock and ASICs configuration, and collects data from them. Each DIFs data packet is encapsulated in Ethernet format and sent out via an optical or copper link. The Data Concentrator Card (DCC) is a multiplexer (1 to 8) that can be optionally inserted between the GDCC and the DIFs, increasing the number of managed ...

  16. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  17. Multimoded rf delay line distribution system for the Next Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Tantawi

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The delay line distribution system is an alternative to conventional pulse compression, which enhances the peak power of rf sources while matching the long pulse of those sources to the shorter filling time of accelerator structures. We present an implementation of this scheme that combines pairs of parallel delay lines of the system into single lines. The power of several sources is combined into a single waveguide delay line using a multimode launcher. The output mode of the launcher is determined by the phase coding of the input signals. The combined power is extracted from the delay line using mode-selective extractors, each of which extracts a single mode. Hence, the phase coding of the sources controls the output port of the combined power. The power is then fed to the local accelerator structures. We present a detailed design of such a system, including several implementation methods for the launchers, extractors, and ancillary high power rf components. The system is designed so that it can handle the 600 MW peak power required by the Next Linear Collider design while maintaining high efficiency.

  18. A vertically integrated pixel readout device for the Vertex Detector at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Christian, David; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    3D-Integrated Circuit technology enables higher densities of electronic circuitry per unit area without the use of nanoscale processes. It is advantageous for mixed mode design with precise analog circuitry because processes with conservative feature sizes typically present lower process dispersions and tolerate higher power supply voltages, resulting in larger separation of a signal from the noise floor. Heterogeneous wafers (different foundries or different process families) may be combined with some 3D integration methods, leading to the optimization of each tier in the 3D stack. Tracking and vertexing in future High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments involves construction of detectors composed of up to a few billions of channels. Readout electronics must record the position and time of each measurement with the highest achievable precision. This paper reviews a prototype of the first 3D readout chip for HEP, designed for a vertex detector at the International Linear Collider. The prototype features 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 64 x 64 elements and was fabricated in a 3-tier 0.18 {micro}m Fully Depleted SOI CMOS process at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory. The tests showed correct functional operation of the structure. The chip performs a zero-suppressed readout. Successive submissions are planned in a commercial 3D bulk 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process to overcome some of the disadvantages of an FDSOI process.

  19. High-gradient breakdown studies of an X-band Compact Linear Collider prototype structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A Compact Linear Collider prototype traveling-wave accelerator structure fabricated at Tsinghua University was recently high-gradient tested at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK. This X-band structure showed good high-gradient performance of up to 100  MV/m and obtained a breakdown rate of 1.27×10^{−8} per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 250 ns. This performance was similar to that of previous structures tested at KEK and the test facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN, thereby validating the assembly and bonding of the fabricated structure. Phenomena related to vacuum breakdown were investigated and are discussed in the present study. Evaluation of the breakdown timing revealed a special type of breakdown occurring in the immediately succeeding pulse after a usual breakdown. These breakdowns tended to occur at the beginning of the rf pulse, whereas usual breakdowns were uniformly distributed in the rf pulse. The high-gradient test was conducted under the international collaboration research program among Tsinghua University, CERN, and KEK.

  20. Study and development of a laser based alignment system for the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083149

    The first objective of the PhD thesis is to develop a new type of positioning sensor to align components at micrometre level over 200 m with respect to a laser beam as straight line reference. The second objective is to estimate the measurement accuracy of the total alignment system over 200 m. The context of the PhD thesis is the Compact Linear Collider project, which is a study for a future particle accelerator. The proposed positioning sensor is made of a camera and an open/close shutter. The sensor can measure the position of the laser beam with respect to its own coordinate system. To do a measurement, the shutter closes, a laser spot appears on it, the camera captures a picture of the laser spot and the coordinates of the laser spot centre are reconstructed in the sensor coordinate system with image processing. Such a measurement requires reference targets on the positioning sensor. To reach the rst objective of the PhD thesis, we used laser theory...

  1. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Cullinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC requires beam position monitors (BPMs with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3 at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2/3  ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  2. Optical System Of The Powerful Multiple Beam L-band Klystron For Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A

    2004-01-01

    An optical system reported here was proposed and designed for Toshiba MBK (E3736). Toshiba MBK is the 10MW L-band multiple beam klystron being developed for TESLA (XFEL) project. The key features of this device are following. A new compact scheme of confined flow focusing, which allows using ring shape cavities at the klystron, operating on the fundamental mode. Low cathodes loading (2

  3. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  4. Spin transport at the international linear collider and its impact on the measurement of polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Moritz

    2013-12-15

    At the planned International Linear Collider (ILC), the longitudinal beam polarization needs to be determined with an unprecedented precision. For that purpose, the beam delivery systems (BDS) are equipped with two laser Compton polarimeters each, which are foreseen to achieve a systematic uncertainty of {<=} 0.25 %. The polarimeters are located 1.6 km upstream and 150 m downstream of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point (IP). The average luminosity-weighted longitudinal polarization P{sup lumi}{sub z}, which is the decisive quantity for the experiments, has to be determined from these measurements with the best possible precision. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the spin transport in the BDS is mandatory to estimate how precise the longitudinal polarization at the IP is known from the polarimeter measurements. The envisaged precision for the propagation of the measurement value is {<=} 0.1 %. This thesis scrutinizes the spin transport in view of the achievable precision. A detailed beamline simulation for the BDS has been developed, including the simulation of the beam-beam collisions at the IP. The following factors which might limit the achievable precision is investigated: a variation of the beam parameters, the beam alignment precision at the polarimeters and the IP, the bunch rotation at the IP, the detector magnets, the beam-beam collisions, the emission of synchrotron radiation and misalignments of the beamline elements. In absence of collisions, a precision of 0.085% on the propagation of the measured longitudinal polarization has been found achievable. This result however depends mainly on the presumed precisions for the parallel alignment of the beam at the polarimeters and for the alignment of polarization vector. In presence of collisions, the measurement at the downstream polarimeter depends strongly on the intensity of the collision and the size of the polarimeter laser spot. Therefore, a more detailed study of the laser-bunch interaction is

  5. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podobedov, B.

    1999-12-14

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch, and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blow-up in quadruple or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of the instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional the authors had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency ({approximately}10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. The authors have also employed a state-of-the-art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of the streak camera experiments the authors have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. The authors have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments the authors have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, the authors have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive observation and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally, the authors performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance.

  6. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  7. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobedov, Boris Vyacheslavovich

    2000-08-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. We have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments we have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, we have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally we performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance. We also present some analytical results regarding the instability and compare them to the observations. In

  8. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC. Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi and 3.45 MPa (500 psi], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa, full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two

  9. Realization of beam polarization at the linear collider and its application to EW processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Sollova, F.

    2006-07-15

    The use of beam polarization at the future ILC e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will benefit the physics program significantly. This thesis explores three aspects of beam polarization: the application of beam polarization to the study of electroweak processes, the precise measurement of the beam polarization, and finally, the production of polarized positrons at a test beam experiment. In the first part of the thesis the importance of beam polarization at the future ILC is exhibited: the benefits of employing transverse beam polarization (in both beams) for the measurement of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the W-pair production process are studied. The sensitivity to anomalous TGC values is compared for the cases of transverse and longitudinal beam polarization at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV. Due to the suppressed contribution of the t-channel {nu} exchange, the sensitivity is higher for longitudinal polarization. For some physics analyses the usual polarimetry techniques do not provide the required accuracy for the measurement of the beam polarization (around 0.25% with Compton polarimetry). The second part of the thesis deals with a complementary method to measure the beam polarization employing physics data acquired with two polarization modes. The process of single-W production is chosen due to its high cross section. The expected precision for 500 fb{sup -1} and W{yields}{mu}{nu} decays only, is {delta}P{sub e{sup -}}/P{sub e{sup -}}=0.26% and {delta}P{sub e{sup +}}/P{sub e{sup +}}=0.33%, which can be further improved by employing additional W-decay channels. The first results of an attempt to produce polarized positrons at the E-166 experiment are shown in the last part of the thesis. The E-166 experiment, located at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC's LINAC employs a helical undulator to induce the emission of circularly polarized gamma rays by the beam electrons. These gamma rays are converted into longitudinally polarized electron

  10. Performance of fully instrumented detector planes of the forward calorimeter of a Linear Collider detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abusleme, A.; Afanaciev, K.; Aguilar, J.; Alvarez, E.; Avila, D.; Benhammou, Y.; Bortko, L.; Borysov, O.; Bergholz, M.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Castro, E.; Chelkov, G.; Coca, C.; Daniluk, W.; Dumitru, L.; Elsener, K.; Fadeyev, V.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Ghenescu, V.; Gostkin, M.; Henschel, H.; Idzik, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Kananov, S.; Kollowa, S.; Kotov, S.; Kotula, J.; Kozhevnikov, D.; Kruchonok, V.; Krupa, B.; Kulis, Sz.; Lange, W.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Lohmann, W.; Lukic, S.; Milke, C.; Moron, J.; Moszczynski, A.; Neagu, A. T.; Novgorodova, O.; Oliwa, K.; Orlandea, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Pawlik, B.; Preda, T.; Przyborowski, D.; Rosenblat, O.; Sailer, A.; Sato, Y.; Schumm, B.; Schuwalow, S.; Smiljanic, I.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Swientek, K.; Teodorescu, E.; Terlecki, P.; Wierba, W.; Wojton, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2015-05-01

    Detector-plane prototypes of the very forward calorimetry of a future detector at an e+e- collider have been built and their performance was measured in an electron beam. The detector plane comprises silicon or GaAs pad sensors, dedicated front-end and ADC ASICs, and an FPGA for data concentration. Measurements of the signal-to-noise ratio and the response as a function of the position of the sensor are presented. A deconvolution method is successfully applied, and a comparison of the measured shower shape as a function of the absorber depth with a Monte-Carlo simulation is given.

  11. Performance of fully instrumented detector planes of the forward calorimeter of a Linear Collider detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H.; Afanaciev, K.; Aguilar, J.; Alvarez, E.; Avila, D.; Benhammou, Y.; Bortko, L.; Borysov, O.; Bergholz, M.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Castro, E.; Chelkov, G.; Coca, C.; Daniluk, W.; Dumitru, L.; Elsener, K.; Fadeyev, V.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Ghenescu, V.; Gostkin, M.; Henschel, H.; Idzik, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Kananov, S.; Kollowa, S.; Kotov, S.; Kotula, J.; Kozhevnikov, D.; Kruchonok, V.; Krupa, B.; Kulis, Sz.; Lange, W.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Lohmann, W.; Lukic, S.; Milke, C.; Moron, J.; Moszczynski, A.; Neagu, A.T.; Novgorodova, O.; Oliwa, K.; Orlandea, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Pawlik, B.; Preda, T.; Przyborowski, D.; Rosenblat, O.; Sailer, A.; Sato, Y.; Schumm, B.; Schuwalow, S.; Smiljanic, I.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Swientek, K.; Teodorescu, E.; Terlecki, P.; Wierba, W.; Wojton, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.S.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Detector-plane prototypes of the very forward calorimetry of a future detector at an $e^+e^-$ collider have been built and their performance was measured in an electron beam. The detector plane comprises silicon or GaAs pad sensors, dedicated front-end and ADC ASICs, and an FPGA for data concentration. Measurements of the signal-to-noise ratio for different feedback schemes and the response as a function of the position of the sensor are presented. A deconvolution method is successfully applied, and a comparison of the measured shower shape as a function of the absorber depth with a Monte-Carlo simulation is given.

  12. A Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter and Top Quark Production at the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rouëné, J

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with two aspects of the International Linear Collider (ILC) which is a project of a linear electron-positron collider of up to at least 500 GeV center of mass energy. The first aspect is the development of a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter (SiW-ECAL) for one of the detectors of the ILC. The concept of this detector is driven by the ILC beam specifications and by the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). This requires highly granular calorimeter and very compact one with integrated electronics. To prove the capability of the SiW- ECAL a technological prototype has been built and tested in test beam at DESY. The results are presented here, and show, after the calibration procedure a signal over noise ratio of 10, even in the power pulsing mode. The second aspect is the study of one of the important physics channels of the ILC, the top anti-top quark pairs production. The main goal of this study is to determine the precision that we can expect at the ILC on the top coupling with the W bos...

  13. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator R&D in the Technical Design Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Hélène Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  14. Parametric study of the cost estimate for radio frequency system of compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Nummela, Antti; Österberg, Kenneth

    In this thesis the cost of so called RF units of CLIC particle collider was examined when RF units’ configuration was considered to be lengthened according to several alternative scenarios. According to current estimates these structures correspond to approximately 20 % of the total cost of CLIC collider and as such the savings achieved in their cost could be significant when total cost of CLIC project is looked into. The unit cost of longer RF units would be greater when compared to the baseline scenario but as smaller quantity would be required cost savings might be achieved. The aim was to find out if cost savings would accumulate and if so, how significant these savings might be. Research material used was mainly internal CERN resources such as earlier cost estimates and tenders received from the industry for production of different components. Based on these cost estimate models were created for three different configurations for lengthening the RF units. The research was limited to the cost of RF unit...

  15. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: Physics at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; /SLAC /Tokyo U. /Victoria U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Tel Aviv U. /Birmingham U. /Annecy, LAPP /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /DESY /Royal Holloway, U. of London /CERN /Pusan Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Notre Dame U. /Frascati /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Oxford U. /Hefei, CUST /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Fermilab

    2011-11-14

    The triumph of 20th century particle physics was the development of the Standard Model and the confirmation of many of its aspects. Experiments determined the particle constituents of ordinary matter, and identified four forces that hold matter together and transform it from one form to another. Particle interactions were found to obey precise laws of relativity and quantum theory. Remarkable features of quantum physics were observed, including the real effects of 'virtual' particles on the visible world. Building on this success, particle physicists are now able to address questions that are even more fundamental, and explore some of the deepest mysteries in science. The scope of these questions is illustrated by this summary from the report Quantum Universe: (1) Are there undiscovered principles of nature; (2) How can we solve the mystery of dark energy; (3) Are there extra dimensions of space; (4) Do all the forces become one; (5) Why are there so many particles; (6) What is dark matter? How can we make it in the laboratory; (7) What are neutrinos telling us; (8) How did the universe begin; and (9) What happened to the antimatter? A worldwide program of particle physics investigations, using multiple approaches, is already underway to explore this compelling scientific landscape. As emphasized in many scientific studies, the International Linear Collider is expected to play a central role in what is likely to be an era of revolutionary advances. Discoveries from the ILC could have breakthrough impact on many of these fundamental questions. Many of the scientific opportunities for the ILC involve the Higgs particle and related new phenomena at Terascale energies. The Standard Model boldly hypothesizes a new form of Terascale energy, called the Higgs field, that permeates the entire universe. Elementary particles acquire mass by interacting with this field. The Higgs field also breaks a fundamental electroweak force into two forces, the electromagnetic

  16. Beam Collimation and Machine-Detector Interface at the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Nikolai V; Kostin, Mikhail A

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, spray from the dumps and extraction lines, beam-gas and beam halo interactions with collimators and other components in the ILC beam delivery system create fluxes of muons and other secondaries which can exceed the tolerable levels at a detector by a few orders of magnitude. It is shown that with a multi-stage collimation system, magnetized iron spoilers which fill the tunnel and a set of masks in the detector, one can hopefully meet the design goals. Results of modeling with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss and energy deposition effects are presented in this paper. We concentrate on collimation system and mask design and optimization, short- and long-term survivability of the critical components (spoilers, absorbers, magnets, separators, dumps), dynamic heat loads and radiation levels in magnets and other components, machine-related backgrounds and damage in collider detectors, and environmental aspects (prompt dose, ground-water and air activation).

  17. A Method for the Precision Mass Measurement of the Stop Quark at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Ayres; /Chicago U. /Argonne /Zurich U.; Milstene, Caroline; /Fermilab; Schmitt, Michael; /Northwestern U.; Sopczak, Andre; /Lancaster U.

    2007-12-01

    Many supersymmetric models predict new particles within the reach of the next generation of colliders. For an understanding of the model structure and the mechanism(s) of symmetry breaking, it is important to know the masses of the new particles precisely. In this article the measurement of the mass of the scalar partner of the top quark (stop) at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is studied. A relatively light stop is motivated by attempts to explain electroweak baryogenesis and can play an important role in dark matter relic density. A method is presented which makes use of cross-section measurements near the pair-production threshold as well as at higher center-of-mass energies. It is shown that this method not only increases the statistical precision, but also greatly reduces the systematic uncertainties, which can be important. numerical results are presented, based on a realistic event simulation, for two signal selection strategies: using conventional selection cuts, and using an Iterative Discriminant Analysis (IDA). The studies indicate that a precision of {Delta}m{sub {bar t}{sub 1}} = 0.42 GeV can be achieved, representing a major improvement over previous studies. While the analysis of stops is particularly challenging due to the possibility of stop hadronization, the general procedure could be applied to the mass measurement of other particles as well. They also comment on the potential of the IDA to discover a stop quark in this scenario, and they revisit the accuracy of the theoretical predictions for the neutralino relic density.

  18. A new method of RF power generation for two-beam linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; D'Amico, T E; Delahaye, J P; Guignard, Gilbert; Johnson, C; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Rinolfi, Louis; Riche, A J; Schulte, Daniel; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wilson, Ian H; Ruth, Ronald D

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a new approach to two-beam acceleration. The energy for RF production is initially stored in a long-pulse electron beam which is efficiently accelerated to about 1.2 GeV by a fully loaded, conventional, low frequency (~1 GHz) linac. The beam pulse length is twice the length of the high-gradient linac. Segments of this long pulse beam are compressed using combiner rings to create a sequence of higher peak power drive beams with gaps in between. This train of drive beams is distributed from the end of the linac against the main beam direction down a common transport line so that each drive beam can power a section of the main linac. After a 180-degree turn, each high-current, low-energy drive beam is decelerated in low-impedance decelerator structures, and the resulti ng power is used to accelerate the low-current, high-energy beam in the main linac. The method discussed here seems relatively inexpensive is very flexible and can be used to accelerate beams for lin ear colliders over the...

  19. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1  V/(pC mm m.

  20. Theoretical and practical feasibility demonstration of a micrometric remotely controlled pre-alignment system for the CLIC linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, H; Chritin, N; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Sosin, M; Touze, T

    2011-01-01

    The active pre-alignment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is one of the key points of the project: the components must be pre-aligned w.r.t. a straight line within a few microns over a sliding window of 200 m, along the two linacs of 20 km each. The proposed solution consists of stretched wires of more than 200 m, overlapping over half of their length, which will be the reference of alignment. Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS), coupled to the supports to be pre-aligned, will perform precise and accurate measurements within a few microns w.r.t. these wires. A micrometric fiducialisation of the components and a micrometric alignment of the components on common supports will make the strategy of pre-alignment complete. In this paper, the global strategy of active pre-alignment is detailed and illustrated by the latest results demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed solution.

  1. rf design of a pulse compressor with correction cavity chain for klystron-based compact linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Zha, Hao; Syratchev, Igor; Shi, Jiaru; Chen, Huaibi

    2017-11-01

    We present an X-band high-power pulse compression system for a klystron-based compact linear collider. In this system design, one rf power unit comprises two klystrons, a correction cavity chain, and two SLAC Energy Doubler (SLED)-type X-band pulse compressors (SLEDX). An rf pulse passes the correction cavity chain, by which the pulse shape is modified. The rf pulse is then equally split into two ways, each deploying a SLEDX to compress the rf power. Each SLEDX produces a short pulse with a length of 244 ns and a peak power of 217 MW to power four accelerating structures. With the help of phase-to-amplitude modulation, the pulse has a dedicated shape to compensate for the beam loading effect in accelerating structures. The layout of this system and the rf design and parameters of the new pulse compressor are described in this work.

  2. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  3. Optics Design and Performance of an Ultra-Low Emittance Damping Ring for the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Korostelev, M S

    2006-01-01

    A high-energy (0.5-3.0 TeV centre of mass) electron-positron Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is being studied at CERN as a new physics facility. The design study has been optimized for 3 TeV centre-of-mass energy. Intense bunches injected into the main linac must have unprecedentedly small emittances to achieve the design luminosity 1035cm-2s-1 required for the physics experiments. The positron and electron bunch trains will be provided by the CLIC injection complex. This thesis describes an optics design and performance of a positron damping ring developed for producing such ultra-low emittance beam. The linear optics of the CLIC damping ring is optimized by taking into account the combined action of radiation damping, quantum excitation and intrabeam scattering. The required beam emittance is obtained by using a TME (Theoretical Minimum Emittance) lattice with compact arcs and short period wiggler magnets located in dispersionfree regions. The damping ring beam energy is chosen as 2.42 GeV. The lattice featu...

  4. Report of Snowmass 2001 Working Group E2: Electron-Positron Colliders from the Phi to the Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Franz-Josef

    2002-08-07

    We report on the status and plans of experiments now running or proposed for electron-positron colliders at energies between the {phi} and the Z. The e{sup +}e{sup -} B and charm factories we considered were PEP-II/BABAR, KEKB/Belle, superKEK, SuperBABAR, and CESR-c/CLEO-c. We reviewed the programs at the {phi} factory at Frascati and the proposed PEP-N facility at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We studied the prospects for B physics with a dedicated linear collider Z factory, associated with the TESLA high energy linear collider. In all cases, we compared the physics reach of these facilities with that of alternative experiments at hadron colliders or fixed target facilities.

  5. Synchrotron radiation and absence of linear polarization in the colliding wind binary WR 146

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, C. A.; Benaglia, P.; del Palacio, S.; Romero, G. E.; Koribalski, B. S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Several massive early-type binaries exhibit non-thermal emission which has been attributed to synchrotron radiation from particles accelerated by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the wind-collision region (WCR). If the magnetic field in the strong shocks is ordered, its component parallel to the shock front should be enhanced, and the resultant synchrotron radiation would be polarized. However, such polarization has never been measured. Aims: We aim to determine the percentage of linearly polarized emission from the well-known non-thermal radio emitter WR 146, a WC6+O8 system. Methods: We performed spatially-unresolved radio continuum observations of WR 146 at 5 cm and 20 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We constructed a numerical model to investigate a scenario where particles are accelerated by turbulent magnetic reconnection (MR), and we performed a quantitative analysis of possible depolarization effects. Results: No linearly polarized radio emission was detected. The data constrain the fractional linear polarization to less than 0.6% between 1 to 8 GHz. This is compatible with a high level of turbulence and a dominant random component in the magnetic field. In this case the relativistic particles could be produced by turbulent magnetic reconnection. In order for this scenario to satisfy the required non-thermal energy budget, the strength of the magnetic field in the WCR must be as high as 150 mG. However, if the magnetic field is ordered and DSA is ongoing, then a combination of internal and external Faraday rotation could equally account for the depolarization of the emission. Conclusions: The absence of polarization could be caused by a highly turbulent magnetic field, other depolarization mechanisms such as Faraday rotation in the stellar wind, or a combination of these processes. It is not clear whether it is possible to develop the high level of turbulence and strong magnetic fields required for efficient MR in a long

  6. Reach of future colliders in probing the structure of the photon

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, M; Wing, M

    2001-01-01

    A comparison of the potentials of ep and e^+e^-$machines to probe the structure of the photon is performed. In particular, the kinematic reach of a proposed future ep facility, THERA, is compared with those of current colliders, LEP and HERA, and with the proposed linear collider, TESLA. THERA like HERA will use a proton beam of 920 GeV but with an increased electron beam energy of 250 GeV allowing higher scales, Q^2, and lower values of parton momentum fraction in the photon, x_\\gamma, to be probed.

  7. Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Grojean, Christophe [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Inst. Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Inst. de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE); Peskin, Michael E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barklow, Tim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gao, Yuanning [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Center for High Energy Physics; Kanemura, Shinya [Univ. of Toyama (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kim, Hyungdo [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Nojiri, Mihoko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe; Perelstein, Maxim [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. for Elementary Particle Physics; Poschl, Roman [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL). Centre Scientifique d' Orsay; Reuter, Jurgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Simon, Frank [Max Planck Inst. for Physics (MPP), Munich (Germany); Tanabe, Tomohiko [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). International Center for Elementary Particle Physics (ICEPP); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wells, James D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics; Falkowski, Adam [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Lab. of Theoretical Physics (LPT); Matsumoto, Shigeki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe; Moroi, Takeo [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Richard, Francois [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL). Centre Scientifique d' Orsay; Tian, Junping [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). International Center for Elementary Particle Physics (ICEPP); Vos, Marcel [Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain) and Univ. of Valencia (Spain). Inst. for Corpuscular Physics (IFIC); Yokoya, Hiroshi [Korean Inst. for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of ). Quantum Universe Center; Murayama, Hitoshi [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-14

    If the γγ resonance at 750 GeV suggested by 2015 LHC data turns out to be a real effect, what are the implications for the physics case and upgrade path of the International Linear Collider? Whether or not the resonance is confirmed, this question provides an interesting case study testing the robustness of the ILC physics case. In this note, we address this question with two points: (1) Almost all models proposed for the new 750 GeV particle require additional new particles with electroweak couplings. The key elements of the 500 GeV ILC physics program - precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark, and 4-fermion interactions - will powerfully discriminate among these models. This information will be important in conjunction with new LHC data, or alone, if the new particles accompanying the 750 GeV resonance are beyond the mass reach of the LHC. (2) Over a longer term, the energy upgrade of the ILC to 1 TeV already discussed in the ILC TDR will enable experiments in γγ and e+e- collisions to directly produce and study the 750 GeV particle from these unique initial states.

  8. Neutralino production and decay at en e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with transversely polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea). Dept. of Physics; Drees, M. [Korea Inst. for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea)]|[Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Song, J. [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Physics

    2006-02-15

    Once supersymmetric neutralinos anti {chi}{sup 0} are produced copiously at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders, their characteristics can be measured with high precision. In particular, the fundamental parameters in the gaugino/higgsino sector of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) can be analyzed. Here we focus on the determination of possible CP-odd phases of these parameters. To that end, we exploit the electron/positron beam polarization, including transverse polarization, as well as the spin/angular correlations of the neutralino production e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{chi}{sub i}{sup 0}{chi}{sub j}{sup 0} and subsequent 2-body decays {chi}{sub i}{sup 0}{yields}{chi}{sub k}{sup 0}h, {chi}{sub k}{sup 0}Z, l{sub R}{sup {+-}}l{sup -+}, using (partly) optimized CP-odd observables. If no final-state polarizations are measured, the Z and h modes are independent of the {chi}{sub i}{sup 0} polarization, but CP-odd observables constructed from the leptonic decay mode can help in reconstructing the neutralino sector of the CP-noninvariant MSSM. However, transverse beam polarization does nto seem to be particularly useful in this context. (orig.)

  9. Search for heavy neutral CP-even Higgs within lepton-specific 2HDM at a future linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Hashemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the production process e−e+→AH is analyzed in the context of the lepton-specific (or type Image 1 2HDM and the question of observability of a neutral CP-even Higgs boson H at a linear collider operating at s=1 TeV is addressed. The CP-odd Higgs is assumed to experience a gauge-Higgs decay as A→ZH with hadronic decay of Z boson as the signature of signal events. The production chain is thus e+e−→AH→ZHH→jjℓℓℓℓ where ℓ is a τ or μ. Four benchmark points with different mass hypotheses are assumed for the analysis. The Higgs mass mH is assumed to vary within the range 150–300 GeV in increments of 50 GeV. The anti-kt algorithm is used to perform the jet reconstruction. Results indicate that the neutral CP-even Higgs H is observable through this production mechanism using the di-muon invariant mass distribution with possibility of mass measurement. The corresponding signal significances exceed 5σ at integrated luminosity of 3000 fb−1.

  10. A 130 nm CMOS mixed mode front end readout chip for silicon strip tracking at the future linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.H., E-mail: pham@lpnhe.in2p3.f [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Charpy, A.; Ciobanu, C. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Comerma, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); David, J.; Dhellot, M. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dieguez, A.; Gascon, D. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Genat, J.F.; Savoy Navarro, A.; Sefri, R. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-11-01

    A 130 nm mixed (analog and digital) CMOS chip intended to read silicon strip detectors for future linear collider experiments was developed. Currently under testing, this chip has been optimized for a silicon micro-strip tracking device. It includes 88 channels of a full analog signal processing chain with the corresponding digital control and readout. Every analog channel includes (i) a low noise charge amplifier and integration with long pulse shaping, (ii) an eight by eight positions analog sampler for both storing successive events and reconstructing the full pulse shape, and (iii) a sparsifier performing analog sum of three adjacent inputs to decide whether there is signal or not. The whole system is controlled by the digital part, which allows configuring all the reference currents and voltages, drives the control signals to the analog memories, records the timing and channel information and subsequently performs the conversion to digital values of samples. The total surface of the circuit is 10x5 mm{sup 2}, with each analog channel occupying an area of 105x3500 {mu}m{sup 2}, and the remaining space of about 9000x700 {mu}m{sup 2} being filled by the analog channels on the silicon.

  11. Measurement of quartic boson couplings at the international linear collider and study of novel particle flow algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstonosic, P.

    2008-02-15

    In the absence of the Standard Model Higgs boson the interaction among the gauge bosons becomes strong at high energies ({approx}1 TeV) and influences couplings between them. Trilinear and quartic gauge boson vertices are characterized by set of couplings that are expected to deviate from Standard Model at energies significantly lower then the energy scale of New Physics. Estimation of the precision with which we can measure quartic couplings at International Linear Collider (ILC) is one of two topics covered by this theses. There are several measurement scenarios for quartic couplings. One that we have chosen is weak boson scattering. Since taking of the real data is, unfortunately, still far in the future running options for the machine were also investigated with their impact on the results. Analysis was done in model independent way and precision limits were extracted. Interpretation of the results in terms of possible scenarios beyond Standard Model is then performed by combining accumulated knowledge about all signal processes. One of the key requirements for achieving the results of the measurement in the form that is presented is to reach the detector performance goals. This is possible only with ''Particle Flow'' reconstruction approach. Performance limit of such approach and various contribution to it is discussed in detail. Novel reconstruction algorithm for photon reconstruction is developed, and performance comparison of such concept with more traditional approaches is done. (orig.)

  12. Mass measurement of right-handed scalar quarks and time measurement of hadronic showers for the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Weuste, Lars

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a 48.3km long e+ e- accelerator with a center-of-mass energy of 3TeV. Its purpose is the precise measurement of particles discovered by the LHC as well as the discovery of yet unknown particles. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of its detector concepts which was specifically designed for the usage of the Particle Flow Algorithm. This thesis is divided into two parts, both within the context of CLIC. In the first part of this thesis the unprecedented measurement on time structure of hadronic showers in calorimeters with tungsten absorber material, which is used in the ILD concept for CLIC, will be presented. It shows the development and the construction of a small testbeam experiment called Tungsten Timing Testbeam (T3B) which consists of only 15 scintillator tiles of 30mm x 30mm x 5mm, read out with Silicon Photomultipliers which in turn were connected to USB oscilloscopes. T3B was placed downstream of the CALICE tungsten analog hadron calorimet...

  13. A precise measurement of the left-right asymmetry of Z Boson production at the SLAC linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    We present a precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry of Z boson production (A{sub LR}) observed in 1993 data at the SLAC linear collider. The A{sub LR} experiment provides a direct measure of the effective weak mixing angle through the initial state couplings of the electron to the Z. During the 1993 run of the SLC, the SLD detector recorded 49,392 Z events produced by the collision of longitudinally polarized electrons on unpolarized positrons at a center-of-mass energy of 91.26 GeV. A Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron polarization to be (63.4{+-}1.3)%. ALR was measured to be 0.1617{+-}0.0071(stat.){+-}0.0033(syst.), which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin {sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2292{+-}0.0009(stat.){+-}0.0004(syst.). This measurement of A{sub LR} is incompatible at the level of two standard deviations with the value predicted by a fit of several other electroweak measurements to the Standard Model.

  14. Cp Violating Effects In W And Z Boson Pair Production At The International Linear Collider In The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Pahel, D J

    2005-01-01

    In the standard electroweak model, the sole source of CP violation is a CP violating phase of the CKM quark mixing matrix. The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model offers a large number of possible new sources of CP violation; these include both flavor dependent and flavor independent sources. These CP violating effects are studied in gauge boson production and decay processes with intermediate W and Z boson exchange. The prospects of measuring these effects in the International Linear Collider are explored.

  15. Design, Construction and Commissioning of the CMS Tracker at CERN and Proposed Improvements for Detectors at the Future International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bergauer, T

    The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) detector is a huge particle physics experiment located at one of the four proton-proton interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (Geneva, Switzerland). With 27 km circumference it is the not only the largest particle accelerator in size, but with a center of mass energy of 2x7 TeV it will also set the world record in terms of energy. The inner tracking system of the CMS experiment has a diameter of 2.4 m and a length of 5.4 m and is representing the largest silicon tracker ever built. About 15,000 detector modules consisting of more than 24,000 silicon sensors create a silicon area of 206 m2 to detect charged particles from proton collisions. They are placed on a rigid carbon fibre structure in the center of the experiment, and have to operate reliably within a harsh radiation environment and the working conditions of a 3.8 Tesla solenoid magnetic field at -10 degree C temperature. This thesis was conducted ...

  16. High-gradient near-quench-limit operation of superconducting Tesla-type cavities in scope of the International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Omet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful demonstration of an ILC-like high-gradient near-quench-limit operation at the Superconducting RF Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK in Japan. Preparation procedures necessary for the accelerator operation were conducted, such as rf phase calibration, beam-based gradient calibration, and automated beam compensation. Test runs were performed successfully for nominal operation, high-loaded Q (Q_{L} operation, and automated P_{k}Q_{L} operation. The results are described in terms of the achieved precision and stabilities of gradients and phases.

  17. Minimal supersymmetric B – L extension of the standard model, heavy H and light h Higgs boson production and decay at future e + e ‑ linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Sánchez, F.; Gutierrez-Rodríguez, A.; Hernández-Ruiz, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    We study the phenomenology of the light h and heavy H Higgs boson production and decay in the context of a U(1) B ‑ L extension of the standard model with an additional Z´ boson at future e + e ‑ linear colliders with center-of-mass energies of √𝑠 = 500 – 3000 GeV and integrated luminosities of L = 500 ‑ 2000 fb‑1. The study includes the processes e + e ‑ → (Z, Z´) → Zh and e + e ‑ → (Z, Z´) → ZH, considering both the resonant and non-resonant effects. We find that the total number of expected Zh and ZH events can reach 106 and 105, respectively, which is a very optimistic scenario allowing us to perform precision measurements for both Higgs bosons h and H, as well as for the Z‧ boson in future high-energy and high-luminosity e + e ‑ colliders.

  18. Cryogenic controls for the TESLA test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M.; Gerke, Chr.; Knopf, U.; Rettig, S.; Schoeneburg, B.

    1994-12-01

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is designed to perform intensive testing of the superconducting cavities foreseen for the next generation of linear colliders. The cryogenic system is one part of this facility. The controls for this system will initially use the existing software and hardware to be able to cool down the first cavities fabricated in the TTF workshop. Later the control system will be modified to meet the current standards in process and accelerator controls. The hardware will be changed to use the VME system as the major platform. The operating system and the communication will be based on de-facto standards such as UNIX for the workstations and the front-end computers and TCP/IP for network communication. The application software (EPICS) will be part of a collaboration with several other institutes. The final goal is to port all the software to the POSIX standard and to use Object-Oriented tools wherever possible. The first part of this paper describes the migration from the existing control system to the future design. Special decisions on hardware and software solutions are highlighted. Nonproprietary field busses for remote process I/O are becoming usual for slow control. A suitable bus for our future basic I/O system had to be selected. Finally a new temperature monitor module working on the CAN-bus and its measurement procedure will be explained.

  19. Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

  20. Design and Fabrication Study on the TESLA500 Superconducting Magnet Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Tabares, L.; Toral, F.; Calero, J.; Abramian, P.; Iturbe, R.; Etxeandia, J.; Lucia, C.; Landete, R.; Gomez, J.

    2001-07-01

    An international collaboration at DESY is currently studying the possibilities of a new type of particle accelerator: the superconducting linear collider (1). Developed under the project name TESLA, which stands for TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator, the facility would be placed in a 33 km long tunnel and would work at the energy range of 0.5 to 0.8 TeV. TESLA opens up new horizons not only as a particle accelerator because it can be also used to generate laser-type X-ray beams: the accelerated electrons would be guided through a refined system of magnetic fields to form a Free Electron Laser (FEL). This study is about one of the components of the accelerator: the magnet package. A technical design of this device and a cost estimate of the series production have been performed. The present report should be understood as a Spanish contribution to the TESLA project. The study has been lead by CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas) [2], and several Spanish companies have also been involved: ANTEC, JEMA and INGOVI. Special thanks are given to the Oficina de Ciencia y Tecnologia, which has granted this work. (Author) 16 refs.

  1. Mass measurement of right-handed scalar quarks and time measurement of hadronic showers for the compact linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weuste, Lars

    2013-06-12

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a 48.3 km long e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerator with a center-of-mass energy of 3TeV. Its purpose is the precise measurement of particles discovered by the LHC as well as the discovery of yet unknown particles. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of its detector concepts which was specifically designed for the usage of the Particle Flow Algorithm. This thesis is divided into two parts, both within the context of CLIC. In the first part of this thesis the unprecedented measurement on time structure of hadronic showers in calorimeters with tungsten absorber material, which is used in the ILD concept for CLIC, is presented. It shows the development and the construction of a small testbeam experiment called Tungsten Timing Testbeam (T3B) which consists of only 15 scintillator tiles of 30 x 30 x 5 mm{sup 3}, read out with Silicon Photomultipliers which in turn were connected to USB oscilloscopes. T3B was placed downstream of the CALICE tungsten analog hadron calorimeter (W-AHCal) during beam tests performed at CERN in 2010 and 2011. The resulting data is compared to simulation obtained with three different hadronic shower physics models of the Geant4 simulation toolkit: QGSPBERT, QGSPBERTHP and QBBC. The results from 60 GeV high statistics run show that QBBC and QGSPBERTHP are mostly consistent with the testbeam data, while QGSPBERT, which is lacking a sophisticated treatment of neutrons, overestimates the late energy depositions. The second part of this thesis presents one out of the six benchmark processes that were part of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report (CDR) to verify the detector performance at CLIC. This benchmark process is the measurement of the mass and cross-section of two supersymmetric right-handed scalar quarks. In the underlying SUSY model these almost exclusively decay into the lightest neutralino (missing energy) and the corresponding standard model quark (jet). Within this analysis pile

  2. Nikola Tesla: een biografie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ir.ing Ruud Thelosen

    2015-01-01

    De Technische uitvinder Tesla heeft 700 patenten op zijn naam staan als hij overlijdt. Zijn uitvindingen hebben de wereld in de 20e eeuw volledig veranderd. Zijn wisselstroom generator hebben heel de VS van elektriciteit voorzien. Radioverkeer , remote control werd mogelijk dankzij Tesla. Volgens

  3. Manual of Tesla Experiments; Handbuch Tesla Experimente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The first part, ''Making Lightning and Thunder'', describes a number of Tesla generators that can generate, e.g., coloured light arcs, ball lightning and swords of lightning. The second part, ''New Experiments with EMP, Tesla Waves and Microwaves'', presents a solid state Tesla generator for generating electrodynamic vortices and proposes circuiting alternatives to generate electromagnetic pulses (EMP). Further, mysterious Teslar wave, microwave and scalar wave generators are presented, as well as exotic Star Wars experiments like mass accelerators and plasma guns. The third section describes, among others, a tube-driven Tesla generator with 50 cm streamers. The reader will also find a catalogue of Messrs. Information Unlimited, USA, who are providers of many of the kits, circuiting diagrams and apparatuses presented here. (orig.) [German] Der erste Teil mit dem Titel ''Blitz und Donner selbst erzeugt'' beschreibt eine Reihe von Teslageneratoren, mit denen zum Beispiel bunte Lichtbogen, Kugelblitze und Blitzschwerter erzeugt werden koennen. Im zweiten Teil ''Neue Experimente mit EMPs, Tesla- and Mikrowellen'' findet der Leser einen Solid-State-Teslagenerator zur Erzeugung elektrodynamischer Wirbel sowie Schaltungsvorschlaege zum Thema ''Elektromagnetischer Impuls'' (EMP). Des Weiteren werden geheimnisumwitterte Tesla-, Mikro- und Skalarwellengeneratoren vorgestellt. Exotische Star-Wars-Experimente wie Massenbeschleuniger und Plasmakanonen fehlen ebenfalls nicht. Im dritten Teil wird unter anderem ein roehrenbetriebener Teslagenerator mit Streamern von 50 cm Laenge beschrieben. Ausserdem findet der Leser hier einen Katalog der US-Firma Information Unlimited, bei der viele im Buch besprochenen Bausaetze, Schaltplaene und Fertiggeraete bezogen werden koennen. (orig.)

  4. Electromagnetic characterization of nonevaporable getter properties between 220–330 and 500–750 GHz for the Compact Linear Collider damping rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Koukovini-Platia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its effective pumping ability, nonevaporable getter (NEG coating is considered for the vacuum chambers of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC electron damping rings (EDR. The aim is to suppress fast beam ion instabilities. The electromagnetic (EM characterization of the NEG properties up to ultra-high frequencies is required for the correct impedance modeling of the damping ring (DR components. The properties are determined using rectangular waveguides which are coated with NEG. The method is based on a combination of complex transmission coefficient S_{21} measurements with a vector network analyzer (VNA and 3D simulations using CST Microwave Studio® (CST MWS. The frequency ranges discussed in this paper are 220–330 and 500–750 GHz.

  5. 3D integration of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes aimed to very high fill-factor pixels for future linear colliders 

    CERN Document Server

    Vilella, E; Dieguez, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the maximum achievable fill-factor by a pixel detector of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes with the Chartered 130 nm/Tezzaron 3D process. The analysis shows that fillfactors between 66% and 96% can be obtained with different array architectures and a time-gated readout circuit of minimum area. The maximum fill-factor is achieved when the two-layer vertical stack is used to overlap the non-sensitive areas of one layer with the sensitive areas of the other one. Moreover, different sensor areas are used to further increase the fill-factor. A chip containing a pixel detector of the Geigermode avalanche photodiodes and aimed to future linear colliders has been designed with the Chartered 130 nm/Tezzaron 3D process to increase the fill-factor.

  6. Linear Collider Test Facility: Twiss Parameter Analysis at the IP/Post-IP Location of the ATF2 Beam Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, Benoit; /Annecy, LAPP; Jeremie, Andrea; /Annecy, LAPP; Bai, Sha; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bambade, Philip; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    At the first stage of the ATF2 beam tuning, vertical beam size is usually bigger than 3 {micro}m at the IP. Beam waist measurements using wire scanners and a laser wire are usually performed to check the initial matching of the beam through to the IP. These measurements are described in this paper for the optics currently used ({beta}{sub x} = 4cm and {beta}{sub y} = 1mm). Software implemented in the control room to automate these measurements with integrated analysis is also described. Measurements showed that {beta} functions and emittances were within errors of measurements when no rematching and coupling corrections were done. However, it was observed that the waist in the horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane was abnormally shifted and simulations were performed to try to understand these shifts. They also showed that multiknobs are needed in the current optics to correct simultaneously {alpha}{sub x}, {alpha}{sub y} and the horizontal dispersion (D{sub x}). Such multiknobs were found and their linearity and orthogonality were successfully checked using MAD optics code. The software for these multiknobs was implemented in the control room and waist scan measurements using the {alpha}{sub y} knob were successfully performed.

  7. Design of an 18 MW vortex flow water beam dump for 500 GeV electrons/positrons of an international linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyamurthy, Polepalle; Rai, Pravin; Tiwari, Vikas; Kulkarni, Kiran; Amann, John; Arnold, Raymond G.; Walz, Dieter; Seryi, Andrei; Davenne, Tristan; Caretta, Ottone; Densham, Chris; Appleby, Robert B.

    2012-07-01

    Beam dumps are essential components of any accelerator system. They are usually located at the end of the beam delivery systems and are designed to safely absorb and dissipate the particle energy. In the second stage of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), the electron and positron beams are accelerated to 500 GeV each (1 TeV total). Each bunch will have 2×1010 electrons/positrons, and 2820 bunches form one beam bunch train with time duration of 0.95 ms and 4 Hz frequency. The average beam power will be 18 MW with a peak power of 4.5 GW. The FLUKA code was used to determine the power deposited by the beam at all critical locations. This data forms the input into the thermal hydraulic analysis CFD code for detailed flow and thermal evaluation. Both 2D and 3D flow analyses were carried out at all the critical regions to arrive at optimum geometry and flow parameters of the beam dump. The generation and propagation of pressure waves due to rapid deposition of heat has also been analyzed.

  8. Study of the performance of a compact sandwich calorimeter for the instrumentation of the very forward region of a future linear collider detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghenescu, V., E-mail: veta.ghenescu@cern.ch [Institute of Space Science, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Benhammou, Y. [Tel Aviv University, TelAviv (Israel)

    2017-02-11

    The FCAL collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes of special calorimeters to be used in the very forward region at a future linear electron positron collider for a precise and fast luminosity measurement and beam-tuning. These calorimeters are designed as sensor-tungsten calorimeters with very thin sensor planes to keep the Moliere radius small and dedicated FE electronics to match the timing and dynamic range requirements. A partially instrumented prototype was investigated in the CERN PS T9 beam in 2014 and at the DESY-II Synchrotron in 2015. It was operated in a mixed particle beam (electrons, muons and hadrons) of 5 GeV from PS facilities and with secondary electrons of 5 GeV energy from DESY-II. The results demonstrated a very good performance of the full readout chain. The high statistics data were used to study the response to different particles, perform sensor alignment and measure the longitudinal shower development in the sandwich. In addition, Geant4 MC simulations were done, and compared to the data.

  9. Muon colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108556; Blondel, Alain; CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    1999-01-01

    Muon Colliders - Prospective Physics (J. Ellis). Muon storage rings can address fundamental issues in neutrino physics, enable precision Higgs physics, and advance the high-energy frontier in lepton-antilepton collisions. In this lecture, the principa with particular emphasis on neutrino and Higgs factories. Muon Colliders (D. Neuffer). In these lectures the concept of a high-energy high-luminosity µ+ - µ- collider is developed. A µ+ - µ- colliderwould provide heavy lepton collisions, with uniqu of Higgs bosons at 100-180 GeV energies, and it could be extended to multi-TeV energies.A µ+-µ- collider requires a high-intensity proton source for ¼-production, a high-acceptance decay channel to collect µ?s from ¼-decay, a µ-cooling system, a r system, and a high-luminosity collider ring for the collisions of short, intense µ+-µ- bunches. Critical problems exist in each of the collider concept components, and in the interaction-region detectors needed to analyze the collisions. These pro within the curr...

  10. Higgs and SUSY searches at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/054/04/0499-0518. Keywords. Higgs; supersymmetry; colliders. Abstract. In this talk, I discuss some aspects of Higgs searches at future colliders, particularly comparing and contrasting the capabilities of LHC and next linear collider (NLC), including the aspects of Higgs searches in ...

  11. Review of diagnostics for next generation linear accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, M

    2001-01-01

    New electron linac designs incorporate substantial advances in critical beam parameters such as beam loading and bunch length and will require new levels of performance in stability and phase space control. In the coming decade, e- (and e+) linacs will be built for a high power linear collider (TESLA, CLIC, JLC/NLC), for fourth generation X-ray sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) and for basic accelerator research and development (Orion). Each project assumes significant instrumentation performance advances across a wide front. This review will focus on basic diagnostics for beam position and phase space monitoring. Research and development efforts aimed at high precision multi-bunch beam position monitors, transverse and longitudinal profile monitors and timing systems will be described.

  12. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  13. Nikola Tesla and robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukobratović Miomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes some of Tesla's works and his most remarkable views concerning the problem of formulating theoretical bases of automatic control. As a tribute to Tesla's work on remote control of automated systems, as well to his (at the time far-seeing visions, special attention is paid to solving complex problem of control and feedback application. A more detailed discussion of the way and origin of formulating theoretical bases of automatic control are given. Besides, in more detail are presented the related pioneering works of Professor Nicholas Bernstein, great Russian physiologist who formulated the basic rules of the self-regulating movements of the man. Bernstein has achievements of highest scientific significance that has been in a direct function of identifying and proving the priority of his pioneering contributions in the domain of feedback, i.e. control and principles of cybernetics.

  14. Study of the neutralino sector and analysis of the muon response of a highly granular hadron calorimeter at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ascenzo, Nicola

    2009-01-15

    The studies presented in this thesis concern the physics potential and the detector R and D program of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with a centre of mass energy extendible up to 1 TeV. The first part of the thesis presents the study of the neutralino system in the SPS1a SUSY scenario. The process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sub L}{mu}{sub L}{yields}{mu}{chi}{sub 1}{sup 0}{mu}{chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} is proposed for the analysis of the {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0}. From the kinematic edges of the energy distribution of the muons in the final state the mass of the {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} (97.71 GeV) can be estimated with a relative statistical uncertainty of 1.09%. The mass of the {mu}{sub L} (189.87 GeV) can be estimated with a relative statistical uncertainty of 0.21%. The cross section of this process (54.32 fb) can be estimated with a relative statistical uncertainty of 2.47% at 68% C.L. The {chi}{sub 2}{sup 0} is investigated in the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{chi}{sub 2}{sup 0}{chi}{sub 1}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sub R}{mu}{yields}{chi}{sub 1}{sup 0}{mu}{mu}{chi}{sub 1}{sup 0}. The mass of the {chi}{sub 2}{sup 0} (183.89 GeV) is estimated with a relative statistical uncertainty of 0.75% from the detection of the kinematic edge of the di-muon invariant mass. The cross section of the process (4.2 fb) can be determined within the confidence band (3.75, 5.57) fb, at 95% C.L. The second part of the thesis reports the analysis of the experimental data collected in the test beam of the prototype of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter (AHCAL) build by the CALICE collaboration. The aim of the analysis is to measure the response of the hadronic calorimeter to muons with momentum ranging between 6 GeV and 120 GeV and incidence angle up to 28.3 {+-}0.1 . The energy and angular dependence of the muon response are found in agreement with the Monte Carlo. The effects of the higher order electromagnetic interaction of muons in the detector are

  15. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC and ILC, which led to a host of good results and important decisions. The International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) studies both call for cutting-edge technologies. At first glance they may appear to be in competition, but they are in fact complementary and have a common objective – namely to propose a design , as soon as possible and at the lowest possible cost, for the linear accelerator best suited to taking over the baton of physics research at the high-energy frontier after the LHC.

  16. Projekt Nikola Tesla

    OpenAIRE

    Ivasić, Bernarda

    2007-01-01

    U Dječjem vrtiću Karlovac tijekom 2006. započet je projekt Nikola Tesla. Djeca su sudjelovala u svim etapama rada na projektu (odabir teme, prikupljanje podataka, istraživanje, bilježenje...). Odgajateljice procjenjuju da je ovim projektom, između ostalih dobrobiti, i podignuta socijalna kompetencija djece te ostvareno kvalitetno sudjelovanje obitelji. Pročitajte u kojim su sve zanimljivim aktivnostima i na koji način sudjelovala djeca i odgajatelji.

  17. Two-Layer 16 Tesla Cosθ Dipole Design for the FCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holik, Eddie Frank [Fermilab; Ambrosio, Giorgio [Fermilab; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab

    2018-02-13

    The Future Circular Collider or FCC is a study aimed at exploring the possibility to reach 100 TeV total collision energy which would require 16 tesla dipoles. Upon the conclusion of the High Luminosity Upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Upgrade Pro-ject in collaboration with CERN will have extensive Nb3Sn magnet fabrication experience. This experience includes robust Nb3Sn conductor and insulation scheming, 2-layer cos2θ coil fabrication, and bladder-and-key structure and assembly. By making im-provements and modification to existing technology the feasibility of a two-layer 16 tesla dipole is investigated. Preliminary designs indicate that fields up to 16.6 tesla are feasible with conductor grading while satisfying the HE-LHC and FCC specifications. Key challenges include accommodating high-aspect ratio conductor, narrow wedge design, Nb3Sn conductor grading, and especially quench protection of a 16 tesla device.

  18. [70 years of Nikola Tesla studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juznic, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Nikola Tesla's studies of chemistry are described including his not very scholarly affair in Maribor. After almost a century and half of hypothesis at least usable scenario of Tesla's life and "work" in Maribor is provided. The chemistry achievements of Tesla's most influential professors Martin Sekulić and Tesla's Graz professors are put into the limelight. The fact that Tesla in Graz studied on the technological chemistry Faculty of Polytechnic is focused.

  19. TESLA & ILC Cryomodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Weisend, II, J. G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration developed a unique variant of SRF cryomodule designs, the chief feature being use of the large, low pressure helium vapor return pipe as the structural support backbone of the cryomodule. Additional innovative features include all cryogenic piping within the cryomodule (no parallel external cryogenic transfer line), long strings of RF cavities within a single cryomodule, and cryomodules connected in series. Several projects, including FLASH and XFEL at DESY, LCLS-II at SLAC, and the ILC technical design have adopted this general design concept. Advantages include saving space by eliminating the external transfer line, relatively tight packing of RF cavities along the beamline due to fewer warm-cold transitions, and potentially lower costs. However, a primary disadvantage is the relative lack of independence for warm-up, replacement, and cool-down of individual cryomodules.

  20. NLO QCD predictions for off-shell t anti t and t anti tH production and decay at a linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, Bijan Chokoufe; Reuter, Juergen [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Kilian, Wolfgang [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Physik-Inst.; Lindert, Jonas M.; Pozzorini, Stefano [Emmy-Noether Campus, Siegen (Germany); Weiss, Christian [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Physik-Inst.

    2016-09-15

    We present predictions for t anti t and t anti tH production and decay at future lepton colliders including non-resonant and interference contributions up to next-to-leading order (NLO) in perturbative QCD. The obtained precision predictions are necessary for a future precise determination of the top-quark Yukawa coupling, and allow for top-quark phenomenology in the continuum at an unprecedented level of accuracy. Simulations are performed with the automated NLO Monte-Carlo framework WHIZARD interfaced to the OpenLoops matrix element generator.

  1. Nikola Tesla: the Moon's rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, A.; Jovanović, B. S.

    1993-09-01

    The review of three articles by N. Tesla, published in the year 1919 in the journal "Electrical experimenter" is given, with special reference to the astronomical contents and to circumstances in which they appeared.

  2. [Nikola Tesla in medicine, too].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzek, Branko; Jakobović, Zvonimir

    2007-12-01

    Using primary and secondary sources we have shown in this paper the influence of Nikola Tesla's work on the field of medicine. The description of his experiments conduced within secondary-school education programs aimed to present the popularization of his work in Croatia. Although Tesla was dedicated primarily to physics and was not directly involved in biomedical research, his work significantly contributed to paving the way of medical physics particularly radiology and high-frequency electrotherapy.

  3. Multibillion-dolalr collider plans unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    "Particle physicists released an outline design for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) at a meeting in Beijing this morning. The design details the components needed to build the 31 km-long facility and comes with and initial estimate of the collider's cost: a cool $6.5bn for the core project. (1 page)

  4. Beam Losses in the Extraction Line of a TeV E+ E- Linear Collider With a 20-Mrad Crossing Angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A.; /Uppsala U.; Nosochkov, Y.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    In this paper, we perform a detailed study of the power losses along the postcollision extraction line of a TeV e+e- collider with a crossing angle of 20 mrad between the beams at the interaction point. Five cases are considered here: four luminosity configurations for ILC and one for CLIC. For all of them, the strong beam-beam effects at the interaction point lead to an emittance growth for the outgoing beams, as well as to the production of beamstrahlung photons and e+e- pairs. The power losses along the 20 mrad extraction line, which are due to energy deposition by a fraction of the disrupted beam, of the beamstrahlung photons and of the e+e- coherent pairs, were estimated in the case of ideal collisions, as well as with a vertical position or angular o set at the interaction point.

  5. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  6. The TESLA physics program

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T

    2002-01-01

    The TESLA accelerator concept is based on superconducting cavities, which are operated at comparatively low frequencies (L-Band, 1.3 GHz) . Superconducting cavities in connection with the low frequency offer a number of significant advantages. Because the power dissipation in the superconducting cavity walls is very small, the accelerating field can be produced with long, low peak-power RF pulses. Thus the total power consumption of the accelerator can be kept at an acceptable limit, while still maintaining a high current and a long bunch train in the machine. In fact it is possible to use a long RF pulse (of 1 ms length) and large inter-bunch spacing within one pulse (337 ns at E/sub cms/ = 500 GeV). This allows collisions with zero- crossing angle at the experiment, and gives enough time between two bunches to operate a fast feedback system to maintain stable collisions. Even more important, the relatively low RF frequency results in significant smaller wake field effects than at machine operating at larger...

  7. In vivo high-resolution 7 Tesla MRI shows early and diffuse cortical alterations in CADASIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guio, François; Reyes, Sonia; Vignaud, Alexandre; Duering, Marco; Ropele, Stefan; Duchesnay, Edouard; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Recent data suggest that early symptoms may be related to cortex alterations in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), a monogenic model of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). The aim of this study was to investigate cortical alterations using both high-resolution T2* acquisitions obtained with 7 Tesla MRI and structural T1 images with 3 Tesla MRI in CADASIL patients with no or only mild symptomatology (modified Rankin's scale ≤1 and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥24). Complete reconstructions of the cortex using 7 Tesla T2* acquisitions with 0.7 mm isotropic resolution were obtained in 11 patients (52.1±13.2 years, 36% male) and 24 controls (54.8±11.0 years, 42% male). Seven Tesla T2* within the cortex and cortical thickness and morphology obtained from 3 Tesla images were compared between CADASIL and control subjects using general linear models. MMSE, brain volume, cortical thickness and global sulcal morphology did not differ between groups. By contrast, T2* measured by 7 Tesla MRI was significantly increased in frontal, parietal, occipital and cingulate cortices in patients after correction for multiple testing. These changes were not related to white matter lesions, lacunes or microhemorrhages in patients having no brain atrophy compared to controls. Seven Tesla MRI, by contrast to state of the art post-processing of 3 Tesla acquisitions, shows diffuse T2* alterations within the cortical mantle in CADASIL whose origin remains to be determined.

  8. [Tesla's First Footsteps into Chemical Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Južnič, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a complete list of Tesla's High School professors is provided. The excellency of his lecturers of chemistry and related sciences is put into the limelight. The books and articles about chemistry which Tesla read in his High School times are focused together with the related published works of his teachers. The pioneering spectroscopic research of Kirchhoff and Bunsen began in Tesla's early youth and had a considerable impact on Tesla's professors, especially on Martin Sekulić.

  9. Tesla man out of time

    CERN Document Server

    Cheney, Margaret

    1981-01-01

    Called a madman by some, a genius by others, and an enigma by nearly everyone, Nikola Tesla created astonishing, world-transforming devises that were virtually without theoretical precedent. Tesla not only discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating current machinery, but also introduced the fundamentals of robotry, computers, and missile science and helped pave the way for such technologies as satellites, microwaves, beam weapons, and nuclear fusion. Almost supernaturally gifted, Tesla was also unusually erratic, flamboyant, and neurotic. He was J. P. Morgan's client, counted Mark Twain as a friend, and considered Thomas Edison an enemy. But above all, he was the hero and mentor to many of the last century's most famous scientists. In a meticulously researched, engagingly written biography, Margaret Cheney presents the many different dimensions of this extraordinary man, capturing his human qualities and quirks as she chronicles a lifetime of discoveries that continue to alter our ...

  10. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  11. Study of vibrations and stabilization of linear collider final doublets at the sub-nanometer scale; Etude des vibrations et de la stabilisation a l'echelle sous-nanometrique des doublets finaux d'un collisionneur lineaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, B

    2007-11-15

    CLIC is one of the current projects of high energy linear colliders. Vertical beam sizes of 0.7 nm at the time of the collision and fast ground motion of a few nanometers impose an active stabilization of the final doublets at a fifth of nanometer above 4 Hz. The majority of my work concerned vibrations and active stabilization study of cantilever and slim beams in order to be representative of the final doublets of CLIC. In a first part, measured performances of different types of vibration sensors associated to an appropriate instrumentation showed that accurate measurements of ground motion are possible from 0.1 Hz up to 2000 Hz on a quiet site. Also, electrochemical sensors answering a priori the specifications of CLIC can be incorporated in the active stabilization at a fifth of nanometer. In a second part, an experimental and numerical study of beam vibrations enabled to validate the efficiency of the numerical prediction incorporated then in the simulation of the active stabilization. Also, a study of the impact of ground motion and of acoustic noise on beam vibrations showed that an active stabilization is necessary at least up to 1000 Hz. In a third part, results on the active stabilization of a beam at its two first resonances are shown down to amplitudes of a tenth of nanometer above 4 Hz by using in parallel a commercial system performing passive and active stabilization of the clamping. The last part is related to a study of a support for the final doublets of a linear collider prototype in phase of finalization, the ATF2 prototype. This work showed that relative motion between this support and the ground is below imposed tolerances (6 nm above 0.1 Hz) with appropriate boundary conditions. (author)

  12. A new jet reconstruction algorithm for lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Boronat, Marça; Vos, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new sequential jet reconstruction algorithm for future lepton colliders at the energy frontier. The Valencia algorithm combines the natural distance criterion for lepton colliders with the greater robustness against backgrounds of algorithms adapted to hadron colliders. Results on a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of $t\\bar{t}$ and $ZZ$ production at future linear $e^+e^-$ colliders (ILC and CLIC) with a realistic level of background overlaid, show that it achieves better performance in the presence of background.

  13. The Legacy of Nikola Tesla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Today, the power generating capacity is around 120,000 MW. The polyphase. AC system, which is to a large extent the legacy of Nikola. Tesla, is central to all power generation. Power systems these days are complex interconnected networks spread across the country. How are they structured? How have we been doing.

  14. The Legacy of Nikola Tesla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 3. The Legacy of Nikola Tesla - The AC System that he Helped to Usher in. D P Sen Gupta. General Article Volume 12 Issue 3 March 2007 pp 54-69. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. The Legacy of Nikola Tesla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 4. The Legacy of Nikola Tesla - AC Power System and its Growth in India. D P Sen Gupta. General Article Volume 12 Issue 4 April 2007 pp 69-79. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the architectural design, costs, general description, and square footage data for the Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School in Colorado Springs, Colorado. A floor plan and photos are included along with a list of manufacturers and suppliers used for the project. (GR)

  17. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossbach, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  18. A highly granular semi-digital hadron calorimeter for a future linear e + e − collider and a model independent Higgs boson measurement in the ZH→qq+X channel

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Yacine

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a concept for a linear electron-positron accelerator with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 1 TeV. Its main purpose is the precise measurement of particles discovered by the LHC such as the Higgs boson particle. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of its detector concepts, specifically designed for the usage of Particle Flow Algorithms requiring highly granular calorimeters. Within the CALICE collaboration, several prototypes of such calorimeters, exploring different technologies, have been developed and tested. This thesis focuses on one of them: a semi-digital hadron calorimeter (SDHCAL) equipped with Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) sensors. It is a sampling calorimeter composed of 48 layers segmented in cells of one square centimetre for a total of half a millions channels. The first part of the present thesis describes the analysis of the data taken during beam tests at CERN, in which the detector was operated in a trigger less mode; saving of all ...

  19. New Tesla-Experiment; Neue Tesla-Experimente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Guenter; Harthun, Norbert

    2010-07-01

    Mysterious Teslar wave, microwave and scalar wave generators are presented, as well as exotic Star Wars experiments like mass accelerators and plasma guns. The third section describes, among others, a tube-driven Tesla generator with 50 cm streamers. The reader will also find a catalogue of Messrs. Information Unlimited, USA, who are providers of many of the kits, circuiting diagrams and apparatuses presented here. Main topic in this issue is wireless energy transfer and telecommunication engineering.(orig./GL)

  20. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  1. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  2. Effective field theory analysis of new physics in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} at a linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchalla, G.; Cata, O.; Rahn, R. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Schlaffer, M. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    We analyze new physics contributions to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} at the TeV energy scale, employing an effective field theory framework. A complete basis of next-to-leading order operators in the standard model effective Lagrangian is used, both for the nonlinear and the linear realization of the electroweak sector. The elimination of redundant operators via equations-of-motion constraints is discussed in detail. Polarized cross sections for e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} (on-shell) are computed and the corrections to the standard model results are given in an expansion for large s/M{sup 2}{sub W}. The dominant relative corrections grow with s and can be fully expressed in terms of modified gauge-fermion couplings. These corrections are interpreted in the context of the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem. Explicit new physics models are considered to illustrate the generation and the potential size of the coefficients in the effective Lagrangian. Brief comments are made on the production of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs at the LHC.

  3. Nell’anno di Nikola Tesla

    OpenAIRE

    Persida Lazarević Di Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    The 150th Anniversary Celebration of Nikola Tesla The paper deals with the 150th anniversary celebration of Nikola Tesla, the greatest ever Yugoslav scientist. Due to his origins, Tesla is contended between Serbia and Croatia, but he is also considered to be an American scientist since he registered most of his patents in the USA. Although there is some dissension between Serbia and Croatia regarding the historical facts about Tesla’s life, it can be asserted that Tesla appears to be an...

  4. Tesla - A Flash of a Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorani, M.

    2005-10-01

    This book, which is entirely dedicated to the inventions of scientist Nikola Tesla, is divided into three parts: a) all the most important innovative technological creations from the alternate current to the death ray, Tesla research in fundamental physics with a particular attention to the concept of "ether", ball lightning physics; b) the life and the bright mind of Nikola Tesla and the reasons why some of his most recent findings were not accepted by the establishment; c) a critical discussion of the most important work by Tesla followers.

  5. Tesla coil theoretical model and experimental verification

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkans, Janis; Voitkans, Arnis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract – In this paper a theoretical model of a Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wired format, where the line voltage is measured against electrically neutral space. It is shown that equivalent two-wired scheme can be found for a single-wired scheme and already known long line theory can be applied to a Tesla coil. Formulas for calculation of voltage in a Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance fre...

  6. Muon Collider Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-06-02

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed.

  7. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CDF Collaboration; Jensen, Hans B.

    1986-02-01

    A description of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is given. It is a calorimetric detector, which covers almost the complete solid angle around the interaction region with segmented calorimeter "towers". A 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, 3m in diameter and 5m long, provides a uniform magnetic field in the central region for magnetic analysis of charged particles. The magnetic field volume is filled with a large cylindrical drift chamber and a set of Time Projection Chambers. Muon detection is accomplished with drift chambers outside the calorimeters in the central region and with large magnetized steel toroids and associated drift chambers in the forward-backward regions. The electronics has a large dynamic range to allow measurement of both high energy clusters and small energy depositions made by penetrating muons. Interesting events are identified by a trigger system which, together with the rest of the data acquisition system, is FASTBUS based.

  8. International linear collider simulations using BDSIM

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Power loss simulations for the 2, 14, and 20 mrad extraction line designs using the BDSIM toolkit are presented. A preliminary study on the backgrounds from the beam losses along the extraction line in the case of 20 mrad with high luminosity parameters is also given.

  9. The International Linear Collider Progress Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akira [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The ILC technical design is now being adapted to the preferred candidate site. Changes in layout are being managed by a rigorous change-control procedure. Series production of cavities for the European XFEL has shown that cavities can be mass-produced in industry with a performance well above XFEL requirements and close to that needed for the ILC. A number of technical developments are under way with a view to further reducing the ILC cost. This work must continue through the preparatory stage for ILC construction once resources become available. A summary of the design updates and of the further preparatory work needed is summarized in tabular form in the Appendix.

  10. Physics at the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka

    2017-01-01

    This paper (based on an invited talk at the 18th Lomonosov Conference on Elementary Particle Physics) provides an overview of the physics program at CLIC, including updates on the ongoing studies on t-quark precision observables, massive vector-boson scattering and di-photon processes at high energies.

  11. Biological responses of human solid tumor cells to X-ray irradiation within a 1.5-Tesla magnetic field generated by a magnetic resonance imaging–linear accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Li; Hoogcarspel, Stan Jelle; Wen, Zhifei; van Vulpen, Marco; Molkentine, David P.; Kok, Jan; Lin, Steven H.; Broekhuizen, Roel; Ang, Kie Kian; Bovenschen, Niels; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Frank, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Devices that combine magnetic resonance imaging with linear accelerators (MRL) represent a novel tool for MR-guided radiotherapy. However, whether magnetic fields (MFs) generated by these devices affect the radiosensitivity of tumors is unknown. We investigated the influence of a 1.5-T MF on cell

  12. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  13. Development and manufacturing of a Nb$_{3}$Sn quadrupole magnet Model at CEA/Saclay for TESLA Interaction Region

    CERN Document Server

    Durante, Maria; Fratini, M; Leboeuf, D; Segreti, M; Védrine, Pierre; 10.1109/TASC.2004.829129

    2004-01-01

    One possible application of Nb/sub 3/Sn, whose superconducting properties far exceed those of NbTi, is the fabrication of short and powerful quadrupole magnets for the interaction regions of large particle accelerators. In some projects, as in the future linear collider TESLA, the quadrupole magnets are inside the detector solenoid and must operate in its background field. This situation gives singular Lorentz force distribution in the ends of the magnet. To learn about Nb/sub 3/Sn technology, evaluate fabrication techniques and test the interaction with a solenoidal field, DAPNIA /SACM at CEA/Saclay has started the manufacturing of a 1-m-long, 56- mm-single-aperture quadrupole magnet model. The model relies on the same coil geometry as the LHC arc quadrupole magnets, but has no iron yoke. It will produce a nominal field gradient of 211 T/m at 11,870 A. The coils are wound from Rutherford-type cables insulated with glass fiber tape, before being heat-treated and vacuum-impregnated with epoxy resin. Laminated,...

  14. Nell’anno di Nikola Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persida Lazarević Di Giacomo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The 150th Anniversary Celebration of Nikola Tesla The paper deals with the 150th anniversary celebration of Nikola Tesla, the greatest ever Yugoslav scientist. Due to his origins, Tesla is contended between Serbia and Croatia, but he is also considered to be an American scientist since he registered most of his patents in the USA. Although there is some dissension between Serbia and Croatia regarding the historical facts about Tesla’s life, it can be asserted that Tesla appears to be an example of collaboration among the former Yugoslav countries. Tesla, however, deserves to be remembered as well as the author of autobiographical prose (My Inventions; Some Personal Recollections; A Strange Experience by Nikola Tesla and as the protagonist of many works published in Serbo-Croatian and in English, such as Miloš Crnjanski’s drama Tesla (1969 or The Hunger and Ecstasy of Vampires (1996 by Brian M. Stableford, for example. This fact should not be neglected and actually should be researched more fully.

  15. Higgs physics at future colliders: Recent theoretical developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I review the physics of the Higgs sector in the standard model and its minimal supersymmetric extension, the MSSM. I will discuss the prospects for discovering the Higgs particles at the ungraded Tevatron, at the large hadron collider, and at a future high-energy e + e − linear collider with centre-of-mass energy in the ...

  16. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  17. NIKOLA TESLA AND THE X-RAY

    OpenAIRE

    Rade R. Babic

    2005-01-01

    After professor Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen published his study of an x-ray discovery (Academy Bulletin, Berlin, 08. 11. 1895.), Nikola Tesla published his first study of an x-ray on the 11th of March in 1896. (X-ray, Electrical Review). Until the 11th of August in 1897 he had published ten studies on this subject. All Tesla,s x-ray studies were experimental, which is specific to his work. Studying the nature of the x-ray, he established a new medical branch-radiology. He wrote:” There’s no doubt...

  18. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions.

  19. Dreams collide with reality for international experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Three weeks ago, an international team released a design and cost estimate for the International Linear Collider (ILC). American physicists want to build the ILC at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, and researchers had hoped to break ground in 2012 and fire up the ILC's beams of electrons and positrons in 2019." (1 page)

  20. Emotions run high in race for collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, E

    2001-01-01

    The head of KEK expressed his dismay that SLAC has entered into a collaboration with 3 other US labs and proposes to build the next linear collider at Fermilab, Ilinois. KEK wants the next accelerator to be built somewhere in the Asian Pacific region (1 page).

  1. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  2. Majorana Higgses at colliders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Collider signals of heavy Majorana neutrino mass origin are studied in the minimal Left-Right symmetric model, where their mass is generated spontaneously together with the breaking of lepton number...

  3. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The internat...

  4. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The interna...

  5. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  6. TeSLA e-assessment workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, José

    2016-01-01

    Presentatie ten behoeve van de e-assessment workshop voor docenten van de Open Universiteit Nederland betrokken in de eerste TeSLA pilot. Topics: toetsfraude, toetsdesign, technologie voor authenticatie en verificatie van auteurschap.

  7. The Large Hadron Collider Present Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), due to be commissioned in 2005, will provide particle physics with the first laboratory tool to access the energy frontier above 1 TeV. In order to achieve this , protons must be accelerated and stored at 7 TeV, colliding with an unprecedented luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The 8.3 Tesla guide field is obtained using conventional NbTi technology cooled to below the lambda point of helium. Considerable modification of the infrastructure around the existing LEP tunnel is needed to house the LHC machine and detectors. The project is advancing according to schedule with most of the major hardware systems including cryogenics and magnets under construction. A brief status report is given and future prospects are discussed.

  8. The QCD pomeron at TESLA motivation and exclusive $J/\\psi$ production

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiecinski, J.; De Roeck, A.

    2001-01-01

    We briefly present the motivation for studying the processes mediated by the QCD pomeron at high energy e+e- colliders. We describe the behaviour of the cross-section for the reaction gamma gamma to J/psi J/psi obtained from the BFKL equation with dominant non-leading corrections. We give the predictions for the rates of anti-tagged e+e- to e+e- J/psi J/psi events in TESLA and conclude that such reactions may be excellent probes of the hard pomeron.

  9. FFAG Designs for Muon Collider Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-01-13

    I estimate FFAG parameters for a muon collider with a 70mm longitudinal emittance. I do not discuss the lower emittance beam for a Higgs factory. I produce some example designs, giving only parameters relevant to estimating cost and performance. The designs would not track well, but the parameters of a good design will be close to those described. I compare these cost estimates to those for a fast-ramping synchrotron and a recirculating linear accelerator. I conclude that FFAGs do not appear to be cost-effective for the large longitudinal emittance in a high-energy muon collider.

  10. PHOTON09. Proceedings of the international conference on the structure and interactions of the photon including the 18th international workshop on photon-photon collisions and the international workshop on high energy photon linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Olaf; Diehl, Markus; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Steinbrueck, Georg (eds.)

    2010-01-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Electroweak and new physics, photon-collider technology, low-energy photon experiments, prompt photons, photon structure, jets and heavy flavours, vacuum polarization and light-by-light scattering, small-x processes, diffraction, total cross sections, exclusive channels and resonances, photons in astroparticle physics. (HSI)

  11. Lightest Higgs boson production at photon colliders in the two Higgs doublet model type III

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, R; Rodríguez, José Alberto; 10.1103/PhysRevD.72.035017

    2005-01-01

    The branching ratios of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson h/sup 0/ are calculated in the framework of the general two higgs doublet model. Different scenarios are presented taking into account constraints on the flavor changing neutral currents factors obtained in previous works. Plausible scenarios where appear flavor changing processes at tree level like bs and tc are analyzed for relevant parameters. The loop-induced Higgs couplings to photon pairs can be tested with a photon collider. The number of events of h/sup 0/ as a resonance in photon colliders are calculated taking into account its corresponding background signal at TESLA, CLIC, and NLC.

  12. Pairs of charged heavy fermions from an $SU(3)_{L}(-)U(1)_{N}$ model at $e^{+}e^{-}$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Cieza-Montalvo, J E; 10.1103/PhysRevD.67.075022

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the production, backgrounds, and signatures of pairs of charged heavy fermions using the SU(3)/sub L/(-)U(1)/sub N/ electroweak model in e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders (Next Linear Collider and CERN Linear Collider). We also analyze the indirect evidence for a boson Z'. (23 refs).

  13. Conduction-coupled Tesla transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J L

    2015-03-01

    A proof-of-principle Tesla transformer circuit is introduced. The new transformer exhibits the high voltage-high power output signal of shock-excited transformers. The circuit, with specification of proper circuit element values, is capable of obtaining extreme oscillatory voltages. The primary and secondary portions of the circuit communicate solely by conduction. The destructive arcing between the primary and secondary inductors in electromagnetically coupled transformers is ubiquitous. Flashover is eliminated in the new transformer as the high-voltage inductors do not interpenetrate and so do not possess an annular volume of electric field. The inductors are remote from one another. The high voltage secondary inductor is isolated in space, except for a base feed conductor, and obtains earth by its self-capacitance to the surroundings. Governing equations, for the ideal case of no damping, are developed from first principles. Experimental, theoretical, and circuit simulator data are presented for the new transformer. Commercial high-temperature superconductors are discussed as a means to eliminate the counter-intuitive damping due to small primary inductances in both the electromagnetic-coupled and new conduction-coupled transformers.

  14. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  15. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron–positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  16. The Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-02-28

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron-positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  17. The gluon content of the photon from di-jet production at the photon-photon collider

    OpenAIRE

    Wengler, Thorsten; De Roeck, Albert

    2000-01-01

    A study of di-jet measurements at a future photon collider is reported. The sensitivity to extract the gluon distribution is discussed. The results are compared with calculations for a linear e+e- collider.

  18. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  19. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  20. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten H Wrede

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF magnetic resonance angiography (MRA in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11 with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. RESULTS: A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4. Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3. Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4. Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. CONCLUSION: 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a

  1. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H; Dammann, Philipp; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Müller, Oliver; Özkan, Neriman; Ladd, Mark E; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc U; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11) with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel), presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4). Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3). Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4). Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a high-quality diagnostic tool for pretherapeutic assessment and

  2. Tesla Coil Theoretical Model and its Experimental Verification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janis Voitkans; Arnis Voitkans

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a theoretical model of Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wire form, where the line voltage is measured across electrically neutral space...

  3. TeSLA e-assessment workshop pilot 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, José

    2017-01-01

    Presentatie ten behoeve van de e-assessment workshop voor docenten van de Open Universiteit Nederland betrokken in de tweede TeSLA pilot. Topics: toetsfraude, toetsdesign, technologie voor authenticatie en verificatie van auteurschap, TeSLA instrument.

  4. TeSLA workshop betrouwbaar toetsen op afstand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Francis; Janssen, José

    2017-01-01

    Presentatie ten behoeve van workshop betrouwbaar toetsen op afstand voor docenten van de Open Universiteit Nederland betrokken in de derde TeSLA pilot. Topics: toetsfraude, toetsdesign, technologie voor authenticatie en verificatie van auteurschap, TeSLA instrumenten.

  5. Science up to 100 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, L.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab.

    1995-05-01

    100 Tesla is the highest attainable field that can be held for milli-sec in a non-destructive magnet. The strongest steels turn soft under stresses of 4GPa, which is the magnetic pressure of 100 T. Until there is a breakthrough in materials, magnets having all the low temperature and high pressure trimmings will be limited to about 100 T. Within the field range 1-100 T far more resources are now devoted to producing the highest possible continuous fields (40+5 T) than to producing longer pulsed fields above 50 T. This illustrates that the utility of the field can be more important than the strength of the field to researchers in condensed matter. Discoveries are typically made in new territory, but this can be new combinations of pressure, temperature, and magnetic field, or new probes and new materials. If any activity has kept up with the proliferation of new experiments and new facilities in high magnetic field research it is the listing of experiments that could and should be done in high fields. Part of the reason for the vitality of high field research is that high fields provide a generic environment. Compared to particle accelerators and plasma machines a high field laboratory is a setting for generic science, like synchrotron light sources or neutron scattering centers. Although the latter two installations probes states, while a magnetic field creates a state. Because it is unrealistic to try to list all the science opportunities at high fields, the author list sources for lists in the public domain and gives a few examples.

  6. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  7. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  8. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  9. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  10. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  11. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... ... I discuss the high energy colliders leading up to LHC and their role in the discovery of these SM particles. Then I discuss the two main physics issues of LHC, i.e. Higgs mechanism and supersymmetry. I briefly touch upon Higgs and SUSY searches at LHC along with their cosmological implications.

  12. When stars collide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.; Pols, O.R.

    2007-01-01

    When two stars collide and merge they form a new star that can stand out against the background population in a star cluster as a blue straggler. In so called collision runaways many stars can merge and may form a very massive star that eventually forms an intermediate mass blackhole. We have

  13. Tesla inventor of the electrical age

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, W Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Nikola Tesla was a major contributor to the electrical revolution that transformed daily life at the turn of the twentieth century. His inventions, patents, and theoretical work formed the basis of modern AC electricity, and contributed to the development of radio and television. Like his competitor Thomas Edison, Tesla was one of America's first celebrity scientists, enjoying the company of New York high society and dazzling the likes of Mark Twain with his electrical demonstrations. An astute self-promoter and gifted showman, he cultivated a public image of the eccentric genius. Even at t

  14. Cavity parameters identification for TESLA control system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). ELHEP Lab., ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The control system modeling for the TESLA - TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator project has been developed for the efficient stabilization of the pulsed, accelerating EM field of the resonator. The cavity parameters identification is an essential task for the comprehensive control algorithm. The TESLA cavity simulator has been successfully implemented by applying very high speed FPGA - Field Programmable Gate Array technology. The electromechanical model of the cavity resonator includes the basic features - Lorentz force detuning and beam loading. The parameters identification bases on the electrical model of the cavity. The model is represented by the state space equation for the envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. For a given model structure, the over-determined matrix equation is created covering the long enough measurement range with the solution according to the least squares method. A low degree polynomial approximation is applied to estimate the time-varying cavity detuning during the pulse. The measurement channel distortion is considered, leading to the external cavity model seen by the controller. The comprehensive algorithm of the cavity parameters identification has been implemented in the Matlab system with different modes of the operation. Some experimental results have been presented for different cavity operational conditions. The following considerations have lead to the synthesis of the efficient algorithm for the cavity control system predicted for the potential FPGA technology implementation. (orig.)

  15. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  16. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  17. Novel techniques for 7 tesla breast MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, T.A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis introduced several new techniques to the field of 7 tesla breast MRI, enabling high field multi-parametric MR imaging and, potentially, patient specific treatment planning. Chapter 2 described the development of a RF coil setup for bilateral breast MR imaging and 31P spectroscopy. This

  18. MODERN ELECTRIC CARS OF TESLA MOTORS COMPANY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O. F. Vynakov; E. V. Savolova; A. I. Skrynnyk

    2016-01-01

    This overview article shows the advantages of a modern electric car as compared with internal combustion cars by the example of the electric vehicles of Tesla Motors Company. It (в смысле- статья...

  19. Nikola Tesla, the Ether and his Telautomaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milar, Kendall

    2014-03-01

    In the nineteenth century physicists' understanding of the ether changed dramatically. New developments in thermodynamics, energy physics, and electricity and magnetism dictated new properties of the ether. These have traditionally been examined from the perspective of the scientists re-conceptualizing the ether. However Nikola Tesla, a prolific inventor and writer, presents a different picture of nineteenth century physics. Alongside the displays that showcased his inventions he presented alternative interpretations of physical, physiological and even psychical research. This is particularly evident in his telautomaton, a radio remote controlled boat. This invention and Tesla's descriptions of it showcase some of his novel interpretations of physical theories. He offered a perspective on nineteenth century physics that focused on practical application instead of experiment. Sometimes the understanding of physical theories that Tesla reached was counterproductive to his own inventive work; other times he offered new insights. Tesla's utilitarian interpretation of physical theories suggests a more scientifically curious and invested inventor than previously described and a connection between the scientific and inventive communities.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement of brain tumors at 3 tesla versus 1.5 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöbauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Barth, Markus; Schöggl, Alexander; Heimberger, Karl; Matula, Christian; Fog, Amura; Kaider, Alexandra; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2002-03-01

    To compare the diagnostic efficacy of a standard dose of MRI contrast agent in the evaluation of primary brain tumors and metastases using a high-field 3 tesla MR unit versus a 1.5 tesla MR unit. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were examined at both field strengths using identical axial T1-SE protocols pre- and postcontrast (0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium), and postcontrast coronal 3D GRE with magnetization preparation (MP-RAGE), which was adjusted separately for each field strength. Evaluation of the images was performed quantitatively and, in the case of T1-SE images, also by visual assessment. Tumor-to-brain-contrast after gadolinium administration using statistical evaluation of MP-RAGE scans was significantly higher at 3 tesla (97.5) than at 1.5 tesla (46.3). The same was true for T1-SE sequences (93.0 vs. 72.1). Signal enhancement of the lesions in T1-SE sequences was not significantly different between both field strengths. Administration of a gadolinium contrast agent produces higher contrast between tumor and normal brain at 3 tesla than at 1.5 tesla.

  1. A robust jet reconstruction algorithm for high-energy lepton colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boronat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new sequential jet reconstruction algorithm for future lepton colliders at the energy frontier. The Valencia algorithm combines the natural distance criterion for lepton colliders with the greater robustness against backgrounds of algorithms adapted to hadron colliders. Results on a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of tt¯ and ZZ production at future linear e+e− colliders (ILC and CLIC with a realistic level of background overlaid, show that it achieves better performance in the presence of background than the classical algorithms used at previous e+e− colliders.

  2. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  3. The Big Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Barna-Alper Productions Inc. Toronto

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is a gigantic particle-smasher, designed to discover the origins of the universe. Awe-inspiring in vision and scope, it’s also the most expensive physics experiment in history with a price-tag of 4 billion dollars.Documentary series "Mega builders" : a fast-paced, character-driven show that focuses on the world’s biggest and most intriguing engineering challenges – the projects that are making history, and the people who are making it happen.

  4. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brivio, I. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gavela, M.B.; Merlo, L.; Rey, R. del [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Mimasu, K. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universite Catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); No, J.M. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Sanz, V. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is determined and compared with that for the linear expansion. Associated phenomenological signals at colliders are explored for both scenarios, deriving new bounds and analyzing future prospects, including LHC and High Luminosity LHC sensitivities. Mono-Z, mono-W, W-photon plus missing energy and on-shell top final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations. (orig.)

  5. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  6. MODERN ELECTRIC CARS OF TESLA MOTORS COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Vynakov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This overview article shows the advantages of a modern electric car as compared with internal combustion cars by the example of the electric vehicles of Tesla Motors Company. It (в смысле- статья describes the history of this firm, provides technical and tactical characteristics of three modifications of electric vehicles produced by Tesla Motors. Modern electric cars are not less powerful than cars with combustion engines both in speed and acceleration amount. They are reliable, economical and safe in operation. With every year the maximum range of an electric car is increasing and its battery charging time is decreasing.Solving the problem of environmental safety, the governments of most countries are trying to encourage people to switch to electric cars by creating subsidy programs, lending and abolition of taxation. Therefore, the advent of an electric vehicle in all major cities of the world is inevitable.

  7. Beam-Based Nonlinear Optics Corrections in Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Malitsky, Nikolay; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, which gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 3 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non linear correction techniques.

  8. The Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2011-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most complex instrument ever built for particle physics research. It will, for the first time, provide access to the TeV-energy scale. Numerous technological innovations are necessary to achieve this goal. For example, two counterrotating proton beams are guided and focused by superconducting magnets whose novel two-in-one structure saves cost and allowed the machine to be installed in an existing tunnel. The very high (>8-T) field in the dipoles can be achieved only by cooling them below the transition temperature of liquid helium to the superfluid state. More than 80 tons of superfluid helium are needed to cool the whole machine. So far, the LHC has behaved reliably and predictably. Single-bunch currents 30% above the design value have been achieved, and the luminosity has increased by five orders of magnitude. In this review, I briefly describe the design principles of the major systems and discuss some initial results.

  9. Physics at Hadronic Colliders course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Present and future hadron colliders play an important role in the investigation of fundamental questions of particle physics. After an introductory lecture, tests of the Standard Model and measurements of its parameters (like the mass of the top quark) at hadron colliders are presented. In addition, it will be discussed how the Higgs boson can be searched for at hadron colliders and how "New Physics", i.e. physics beyond the Standard Model, can be explored. Results are presented from the currently ongoing run at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at the US research lab Fermilab. In addition, the rich physics potential of the experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is discussed. Note: Prerequisite Knowledge: - The Standard Model (Lecture by A. Pich) - Beyond The Standard Model (Lecture by E. Kiritsis)

  10. Soviet Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  11. MRI of the carotid artery at 7 Tesla: Quantitative comparison with 3 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Wouter; De Rotte, Alexandra A J; Bluemink, Johanna J.; Van Der Velden, Tijl A.; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, DWJ; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 7 Tesla (T) MRI of the carotid arteries, as quantitatively compared with 3T. Materials and Methods: The 7T MRI of the carotid arteries was performed in six healthy subjects and in two patients with carotid stenosis. The healthy group was scanned at 3T and at 7T, using

  12. N/Z dependence of balance energy throughout the colliding geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Sakshi; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2011-01-01

    We study the N/Z dependence of balance energy throughout the mass range for colliding geometry varying from central to peripheral ones. Our results indicate that balance energy decreases linearly with increase in N/Z ratio for all the masses throughout the colliding geometry range. Also, the N/Z dependence of balance energy is sensitive to symmetry energy.

  13. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  14. Status of muon collider research and development and future plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The status of the research on muon colliders is discussed and plans are outlined for future theoretical and experimental studies. Besides work on the parameters of a 3–4 and 0.5 TeV center-of-mass (COM energy collider, many studies are now concentrating on a machine near 0.1 TeV (COM that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. We discuss the research on the various components in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate pions from a heavy-Z target and proceeding through the phase rotation and decay (π→μν_{μ} channel, muon cooling, acceleration, storage in a collider ring, and the collider detector. We also present theoretical and experimental R&D plans for the next several years that should lead to a better understanding of the design and feasibility issues for all of the components. This report is an update of the progress on the research and development since the feasibility study of muon colliders presented at the Snowmass '96 Workshop [R. B. Palmer, A. Sessler, and A. Tollestrup, Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on High-Energy Physics (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA, 1997].

  15. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2015-09-20

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  16. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  17. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  18. TeSLA pilot 2 pedagogical & quality aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, José

    2018-01-01

    Presentation given at the TeSLA project meeting at the Open University of the Netherlands, addressing pedagogical aspects of pilot 2 and clarification of the scope and limitations of the TeSLA instruments with respect to pedagogy, assessment activity and type of academic dishonesty.

  19. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko-Tesla ``Predecessor''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Kiselev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko (1947-1905) is a bright figure in the history of science of the XIXth century. His major discoveries are: Electrography - the method of the visualization of electric discharge from the bodies due to the application of high strength and high frequency electric fields, and one of the first observations of the propagation of the electromagnetic waives and information transfer over the distances. We review Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko's research results and explain our point why we consider him as the predecessor of Nikola Tesla.

  20. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  1. Higgs physics at future colliders: Recent theoretical developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at future e+e-linear colliders, where the clean environment and the expected high ... In this talk, I will summarize the studies that were performed recently in the sM ..... CTEQ4 PDF's. Figure 3. SM Higgs boson production cross-sections at the LHC. Left: σ(gg. H) as a function of MА at LO (dotted), NLO (dashed) and NLLO.

  2. Budget cuts force early closure of Stanford collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    in Brief Stanford's B-meson work is coming to an early end.SLACIn early March, California's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) will shut down a collider that produces B mesons. The closure means that the lab's commitment to BaBar - an international collaboration studying the differences between matter and antimatter - will now end seven months early.

  3. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Neal K; Taylor, Meredith D; Tarbox, Grayson J; Palmer, Antony J; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems.

  5. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  6. Lare Hadron Collider faces today

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2007-01-01

    "The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN could be delayed after three of the magnets used to focus and manipulate the accelerator's proton beams failed premilinary tests at CERN earlier this week." (1 page)

  7. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  8. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  9. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  10. Nikola Tesla - genije koji je premostio vekove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir T. Ristić

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Ispisujući prve stranice svoje obimne knjige o životnom putu Nikole Tesle, američki pisac Džon Oí Nil kaže: Tesla je bio mislilac i pronalazač najvišeg reda, onaj što mišljenjem, a ne slučajem, dolazi do otkrića, dok mu eksperiment služi samo za potvrdu njegove teze. On je bio i matematičar, znao je bezbroj formula napamet, tako da se najčešće nije morao služiti priručnicima; osim toga, imao je najsolidnije tehničko obrazovanje, što je, na primer, Edisonu nedostajalo. Nikola Tesla je osnovno školovanje započeo u rodnom Smiljanu, a nastavio i dovršio u Gospiću gde se sa roditeljima, posle smrti starijeg brata, preselio. Gimnaziju je upisao u Karlovcu. Bila je to ugledna škola, a u profesoru fizike Nikola je imao izuzetnog pedagoga, koji je svojim đacima umeo vrlo vešto da dočara čak i ono što je u fizici teško razumljivo.

  11. Neuromagnetic effects of pico-Tesla stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troebinger, Luzia; Anninos, Photios; Barnes, Gareth

    2015-09-01

    We used a double-blind experimental design to look for an effect of pico-Tesla magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects. Pico-Tesla stimulation is thought to increase the dominant frequency of 2-7 Hz oscillations in the human brain. We used magnetoencephalography to measure resting state brain activity. Each subject had two separate recording sessions consisting of three runs in between which they were given real or sham pT stimulation. We then tried to predict the real and sham stimulation sessions based on changes in the mean peak frequency in the 2-7 Hz band. Our predictions for these individual runs were 8 out of 14 at chance level (p = 0.39). After unblinding, we found no significant effect (p = 0.11) of an increase in the frequency range (2-7 Hz) across the subject group. Finally, we performed a Bayesian model comparison between the effect size predicted from previous clinical studies and a null model. Even though this study had a sensitivity advantage of at least one order of magnitude over previous work, we found the null model to be significantly (2000 times) more likely.

  12. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  13. When Moons Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Impacts between two orbiting satellites is a natural consequence of Moon formation. Mergers between moonlets are especially important for the newly proposed multiple-impact hypothesis as these moonlets formed from different debris disks merge together to form the final Moon. However, this process is relevant also for the canonical giant impact, as previous work shows that multiple moonlets are formed from the same debris disk.The dynamics of impacts between two orbiting bodies is substantially different from previously heavily studied planetary-sized impacts. Firstly, the impact velocities are smaller and limited to, thus heating is limited. Secondly, both fragments have similar mass therefore, they would contribute similarly and substantially to the final satellite. Thirdly, this process can be more erosive than planetary impacts as the velocity of ejected material required to reach the mutual Hill sphere is smaller than the escape velocity, altering the merger efficiency. Previous simulations show that moonlets inherit different isotopic signatures from their primordial debris disk, depending on the parameters of the collision with the planet. We therefore, evaluate the degree of mixing in moonlet-moonlet collisions in the presence of a planetary gravitational field, using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Preliminary results show that the initial thermal state of the colliding moonlets has only a minor influence on the amount of mixing, compared to the effects of velocity and impact angle over their likely ranges. For equal mass bodies in accretionary collisions, impact angular momentum enhances mixing. In the hit-and-run regime, only small amounts of material are transferred between the bodies therefore mixing is limited. Overall, these impacts can impart enough energy to melt ~15-30% of the mantle extending the magma ocean phase of the final Moon.

  14. Hippocampal disconnection in early Alzheimer's disease: a 7 tesla MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, Laura E M; Reijmer, Yael D; ter Telgte, Annemieke; Kuijf, Hugo J; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R; Koek, Huiberdina L; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), atrophy of the entorhinal cortex (ERC) and hippocampal formation may induce degeneration of connecting white matter tracts. We examined the association of hippocampal subfield and ERC atrophy at 7 tesla MRI with fornix and parahippocampal cingulum (PHC) microstructure in patients with early AD. Twenty-five patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) (n = 15) or early AD (n = 10) and 17 controls underwent 3 tesla diffusion MRI to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) of the fornix and PHC and 7 tesla MRI to obtain ERC and hippocampal subfield volumes. Linear regression analyses were performed, adjusted for age, gender, and intracranial volume. Fornix FA was significantly lower and subiculum, cornu ammonis (CA) 1, and dentate gyrus &CA4 volume were significantly smaller in patients with MCI or AD as compared to controls. In patients with MCI or AD, fornix FA was positively associated with subiculum volume (β = 0.53, 95% CI 0.10; 0.96), but not with ERC/other subfield volumes. PHC FA was not associated with ERC/subfield volumes. These findings indicate that in early AD subiculum atrophy is associated with lower FA of the fornix, which primarily consists of axons originating in the subiculum. This suggests that degeneration of subicular cell bodies and their axons are related processes in early AD.

  15. Tesla Coil Theoretical Model and its Experimental Verification

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkans Janis; Voitkans Arnis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a theoretical model of Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wire form, where the line voltage is measured across electrically neutral space. By applying the principle of equivalence of single-wire and two-wire schemes an equivalent two-wire scheme can be found for a single-wire scheme and the already known long line theory can be applied to the Tesla coil. A new method of multiple reflections is develope...

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI at 7 Tesla utilizing a single-loop coil: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umutlu, Lale; Maderwald, Stefan; Kraff, Oliver; Theysohn, Jens M; Kuemmel, Sherko; Hauth, Elke A; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultra-high-field breast imaging at 7 Tesla. A total of 15 subjects, including 5 patients with histologically proven breast cancer, were examined on a 7 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging system using a unilateral linearly polarized single-loop coil. Subjects were placed in prone position on a biopsy support system, with the coil placed directly below the region of interest. The examination protocol included the following sequences: 1) T2-weighted turbo spin echo sequence; 2) six dynamic T1-weighted spoiled gradient-echo sequences; and 3) subtraction imaging. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging at 7 Tesla could be obtained at high spatial resolution with short acquisition times, providing good image accuracy and a conclusively good delineation of small anatomical and pathological structures. T2-weighted imaging could be obtained with high spatial resolution at adequate acquisition times. Because of coil limitations, four high-field magnetic resonance examinations showed decreased diagnostic value. This first scientific approach of dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla demonstrates the complexity of ultra-high-field breast magnetic resonance imaging and countenances the implementation of further advanced bilateral coil concepts to circumvent current limitations from the coil and ultra-high-field magnetic strength. 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laser Femto-Tesla Magnetic Gradiometer (LFMG) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase 1 SBIR proposal describes development of a conceptual design for a Laser Femto-Tesla Magnetic Gradiometer (LFMG). The LFMG innovations include the ability...

  18. Transverse mode coupling instability of colliding beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. White

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In high brightness circular colliders, coherent and incoherent beam dynamics are dominated by beam-beam interactions. It is generally assumed that the incoherent tune spread introduced by the beam-beam interactions is sufficiently large to cure any instabilities originating from impedance. However, as the two counterrotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes and therefore modify the coherent beam dynamics and stability conditions. In this case, coherent beam-beam effects and impedance cannot be treated independently and their interplay should be taken into account in any realistic attempt to study the beam stability of colliding beams. Due to the complexity of these physics processes, numerical simulations become an important tool for the analysis of this system. Two approaches are proposed in this paper: a fully self-consistent multiparticle tracking including particle-in-cell Poisson solver for the beam-beam interactions and a linearized model taking into account finite bunch length effects. To ensure the validity of the results a detailed benchmarking of these models was performed. It will be shown that under certain conditions coherent beam-beam dipole modes can couple with higher order headtail modes and lead to strong instabilities with characteristics similar to the classical transverse mode coupling instability originating from impedance alone. Possible cures for this instability are explored both for single bunch and multibunch interactions. Simulation results and experimental evidences of the existence of this instability at the LHC will be presented for the specific case of offset collisions.

  19. [Quantification of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alústiza Echeverría, J M; Castiella Eguzkiza, A; Zapata Morcillo, E; Jáuregui Garmendia, L; Gabilondo Aguirregabiria, A; Paloc, C

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the quantification of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its ability to diagnose or rule out hemochromatosis. To evaluate the role of 1.5-Tesla MRI in inconclusive cases. Between 2002 and 2006, we used 1-Tesla MRI (Gandon method) and liver biopsy to quantify the liver iron concentration in 31 patients. Moreover, we used 1.5-Tesla MRI (according to Alústiza's model) and liver biopsy to determine the liver iron concentration in 10 additional patients and to check the results of 10 patients in whom 1-Tesla MRI detected iron overload. In the first group of 31 patients, liver biopsy classified the liver iron concentration as normal (80 micromol.Fe/g) in 5. The correlation with the values calculated at MRI was 100% in the 5 cases with hemochromatosis; in the 15 patients with hemosiderosis, 5 were correctly classified and the liver iron concentration was overestimated in 10; of the 11 patients with normal liver iron concentration, 6 were correctly classified and 5 were overestimated. Quantification >80 at MRI has a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 100% and specificity of 50% for the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Quantification Tesla MRI, there was a high correlation between the two techniques. The reliability of the evaluation of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla MRI is useful for ruling out hemochromatosis and identifying patients without iron overload. We observed a tendency to overestimate liver iron concentration in both patients with overload and in those without, and this limits the reliability of the technique. 1.5-Tesla MRI is a good alternative for quantifying liver iron concentration more precisely.

  20. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  1. Tesla the life and times of an electric messiah

    CERN Document Server

    Cawthorne, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Despite being incredibly popular during his time, Nikola Tesla today remains largely overlooked among lists of the greatest inventors and scientists of the modern era.  Thomas Edison gets all the glory for discovering the light bulb, but it was his one time assistant and life long arch nemesis, Tesla, who made the breakthrough in alternating current technology.  Edison and Tesla carried on a bitter feud for years, but it was Tesla's AC generators that illuminated the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago; the first time that an event of such magnitude had ever taken place under artificial light.  Today, all homes and electrical appliances run on Tesla's AC current.Born in Croatia in 1856, Tesla spoke eight languages and as well as almost single handedly developing household electricity.  During his life, he patented more than 700 inventions.  He invented electrical generators, FM radio, remote control robots, spark plugs and fluorescent lights.  He had a photographic memory and did advanced calculus and physic...

  2. Tesla Coil Theoretical Model and its Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voitkans Janis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a theoretical model of Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wire form, where the line voltage is measured across electrically neutral space. By applying the principle of equivalence of single-wire and two-wire schemes an equivalent two-wire scheme can be found for a single-wire scheme and the already known long line theory can be applied to the Tesla coil. A new method of multiple reflections is developed to characterize a signal in a long line. Formulas for calculation of voltage in Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance frequencies are proposed. The theoretical calculations are verified experimentally. Resonance frequencies of Tesla coil are measured and voltage standing wave characteristics are obtained for different output capacities in the single-wire mode. Wave resistance and phase coefficient of Tesla coil is obtained. Experimental measurements show good compliance with the proposed theory. The formulas obtained in this paper are also usable for a regular two-wire long line with distributed parameters.

  3. Design of a 6 TeV muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M. -H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Palmer, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-19

    A design of a muon collider ring with the center of mass energy of 6 TeV is presented. The ring circumference is about 6.3 km, and the beta functions at collision point are 1 cm in both planes. The ring linear optics, the non-linear chromaticity correction scheme in the Interaction Region (IR), and the additional non-linear field orthogonal knobs are described. The IR magnet specifications are based on the maximum pole tip field of 20 T in dipoles and 15 T in quadrupoles. The results of the beam dynamics optimization for maximum dynamic aperture are presented.

  4. Design of a 6 TeV Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M-H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Palmer, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A design of a muon collider ring with the center of mass energy of 6 TeV is presented. The ring circumference is about 6.3 km, and the $\\beta$ functions at collision point are 1 cm in both planes. The ring linear optics, the non-linear chromaticity correction scheme in the Interaction Region (IR), and the additional non-linear field orthogonal knobs are described. The IR magnet specifications are based on the maximum pole tip field of 20 T in dipoles and 15 T in quadrupoles. The results of the beam dynamics optimization for maximum dynamic aperture are presented.

  5. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  6. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  7. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  8. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  9. Unraveling supersymmetry at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    After a quick review of the current limits on sparticle masses, we outline the prospects for their discovery at future colliders. We then proceed to discuss how precision measurements of sparticle masses can provide information about how SM suprpartners acquire their masses. Finally, we examine how we can proceed to ...

  10. B physics at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  11. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  12. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument. It is being constructed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest particle physics laboratories.

  13. The very large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  14. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  15. and collider physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This report summarises [1] the activities of the working group on ' and collider physics'. Presented are the results of investigations relating to various scenarios of su- persymmetry breaking and their collider signatures and the consequences of violation of. К-parity for both collider signals as well as various -meson decay ...

  16. Shedding Light on Dark Matter at Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A

    2013-01-01

    Dark matter remains one of the most puzzling mysteries in Fundamental Physics of our times. Experiments at high-energy physics colliders are expected to shed light to its nature and determine its properties. This review focuses on recent searches for dark-matter signatures at the Large Hadron Collider, also discussing related prospects in future e+e- colliders.

  17. The lay-out of the photon collider at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAMANA. cO Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 69, No. 6. — journal of ... a large crossing angle (14 or 20 mrad). While this paper was in preparation, the beam-delivery group suggested 14 mrad. 1177 ... At present, the ILC beam delivery group has the following suggestion [5]. The extraction lines and the beam dump for ...

  18. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Detector design for a Future Electron-Positron Collider (4/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    In this lecture I will discuss the issues related to the overall design and optimization of a detector for ILC and CLIC energies. I will concentrate on the two main detector concepts which are being developed in the context of the ILC. Here there has been much recent progress in developing realistic detector models and in understanding the physics performance of the overall detector concept. In addition, I will discuss the how the differences in the detector requirements for the ILC and CLIC impact the overall detector design.

  19. Probing universal extra dimension at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    positron pair at the ILC. A few hundred GeV KK electron decays into a nearly degenerate KK photon, which carries away missing energy, and the standard electron. The mass splitting between the KK electron and KK photon is controlled by the ...

  20. Using WIRED to study Simulated Linear Collider Detector Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, A

    2004-02-05

    The purpose of this project is to enhance the properties of the LCD WIRED Event Display. By extending the functionality of the display, physicists will be able to view events with more detail and interpret data faster. Poor characteristics associated with WIRED can severely affect the way we understand events, but by bringing attention to specific attributes we open doors to new ideas. Events displayed inside of the LCD have many different properties; this is why scientists need to be able to distinguish data using a plethora of symbols and other graphics. This paper will explain how we can view events differently using clustering and displaying results with track finding. Different source codes extracted from HEP libraries will be analyzed and tested to see which codes display the information needed. It is clear that, through these changes certain aspects of WIRED will be recognized more often allowing good event display which lead to better physics results.

  1. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    periments, fulfilling three basic tasks: identification, trigger and momentum measurement. The muon spectrometers of ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb experiments comprise large arrays of several thousand m2 of active detector surface to cover a large rapidity interval. The challenge is the construction of sensitive detectors, ...

  2. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 4. Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Burrows, Philip; Fuster, Juan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Sakue; Yamamoto, Hitoshi (eds.)

    2013-10-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The Si Vertex detectors, the main tracker, calorimetry, muon detectors, the superconducting spectrometer magnet, the detector electronics and data acquisition, simulation and reconstruction, benchmarking, costs. (HSI)

  3. Physics overview: Introduction to international linear collider physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    measurements of electroweak processes at LEP and SLC in the 1990s have led us to confidence that gauge ... sis, inflation and dark energy require understanding physics scenario beyond the standard model. ..... sectors from ILC allow us to extrapolate SUSY breaking mass parameters toward the high energy scale.

  4. Linear Collider Flavour Identification status report: Sensors for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based vertex detector ... fully symmetrical layouts we hope to reduce the feedthrough and the CCD noise below 100 electrons at the design speed of 50 MHz. ... This drastically reduces the parasitic resistance and inductance associated with the ...

  5. Software for the international linear collider: Simulation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Software plays an increasingly important role already in the early stages of a large project like the ILC. In international collaboration a data format for the ILC detector and physics studies has been developed. Building upon this software frameworks are made available which ease the event reconstruction and analysis.

  6. A laser-wire system for the International Linear Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the. ATF damping rings, a system based on a precise optical cavity has been used to good effect [1] and an alternative approach based on a high-power pulsed laser is being pursued at PETRA. For the ILC beam delivery system, the single- shot nature of the electron beam requires the use of high-power pulsed lasers,.

  7. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Tracking and Vertexing (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Efficient and precise determination of the flavour of partons in multi-hadron final states is essential to the anticipated LC physics program. This makes tracking in the vicinity of the interaction region of great importance. Tracking extrapolation and momentum resolution are specified by precise physics requirements. The R&D towards detectors able to meet these specifications will be discussed, together with some of their application beyond particle physics.

  8. The International Linear Collider Machine Staging Report 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyn

    2017-01-01

    The Technical Design Report (TDR) of the ILC mainly concentrates on a baseline machine of 500 GeV centre-of-mass with detailed cost and manpower estimates consistent with this option. However, the discovery of a Higgs Boson with a mass of 125 GeV opens up the possibility of reducing cost by starting at a centre-of-mass energy of 250 GeV with the possibility of future upgrades to 500 GeV or even 1 TeV should the physics case for such an upgrade be compelling. The rest of this paper outlines the options for the design of a 250 GeV Higgs factory”. The scientific programme that the machine would offer is the subject of a separate report.

  9. Precision measurement of a particle mass at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milstene, C.; /Fermilab; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.; Schmitt, M.; /Northwestern U.; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2007-06-01

    Precision measurement of the stop mass at the ILC is done in a method based on cross-sections measurements at two different center-of-mass energies. This allows to minimize both the statistical and systematic errors. In the framework of the MSSM, a light stop, compatible with electro-weak baryogenesis, is studied in its decay into a charm jet and neutralino, the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP), as a candidate of dark matter. This takes place for a small stop-neutralino mass difference.

  10. Solid State Modulators for the International Linear Collider (ILC)

    CERN Document Server

    Kempkes, Michael; Casey, Jeffrey; Gaudreau, Marcel; Roth, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Diversified Technologies, Inc. is developing two solid state modulator designs for the ILC under SBIR funding from the DOE. The first design consists of a 150 kV hard switch. The key development in this design is the energy storage system, which must provide 25 kJ per pulse, at very tight voltage regulation over the 1.5 millisecond pulse. DTI's design uses a quasi-resonant bouncer (with a small auxiliary power supply and switch) to maintain the voltage flattop, eliminating the need for massive capacitor banks. The second design uses a solid state Marx bank, with ~10 kV stages, to drive the ILC klystron. In this design, staggered turn-on of the Marx stages provides voltage regulation without the need for large capacitor banks. This paper will discuss design tradeoffs, power supply and control considerations, and energy storage requirements and alternatives for both designs.

  11. Particle flow calorimetry at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... One of the most important requirements for a detector at the ILC is good jet energy resolution. It is widely believed that the particle flow approach to calorimetry is the key to achieving the goal of 0.3 / E ( G e V ) . This paper describes the current performance of the PandoraPFA particle flow algorithm. For 45 ...

  12. Pulse Capacitors for Next Generation Linear Colliders. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, M.W.

    2000-03-03

    During this Phase I SBIR research program, Nanomaterials Research Corporation (NRC) successfully demonstrated high-voltage multilayer capacitors produced from sub-100 nm ceramic powders. The devices produced by NRC exhibited properties that make them particularly useful for pulse power applications. These properties include (1) high capacitance (2) low loss (3) high breakdown voltage (4) high insulation resistance and (5) rapid discharge characteristics. Furthermore, the properties of the nanostructured capacitors were consistently found to exceed those of components that represent the state of the art within the industry. Encouraged by these results, NRC is planning to submit a Phase II proposal with the objective of securing seed capital to continue this development effort.

  13. Signals of universal extra dimension at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New Physics at TeV Scale and Electroweak Precision Test Volume 69 Issue 5 November 2007 pp 855-860 ... Department of Physics, Calcutta University, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700 009, India ... Proceedings of the International Workshop/Conference on Computational Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science

  14. The road towards the international linear collider: Higgs, top ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experimental analyses and theory calculations for the physics at the ILC are currently performed. We review recent progress, as presented at the LCWS06 in Bangalore, India, in the fields of Higgs boson physics and top/QCD ... Author Affiliations. S Heinemeyer1. Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander, Spain ...

  15. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gaseous detectors have been pushed to the limits when required to operate in the ferocious and aggressive rate environment of the new generation of HEP experiments. A great effort has resulted in the optimization and construction of large systems of gas detectors, some operational and some due for installation.

  16. Fermilab's new management looks to land linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2007-01-01

    "As of 1 January, the Universities Research Association (URA), which has managed Fermilab since the lab's inception 40 years ago, is sharing the responsibility with the University of Chicago." (1,5 page)

  17. A laser-wire system for the International Linear Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser-wire; accelerator test facility; laser; optical system; Compton; beam emittance; MOPA; fiber laser. ... John Adams Institute at the University of Oxford, UK; John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, UK; KEK, 1-1 Oho, 305-0801 Tsukuba Science City, Japan; SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, ...

  18. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  19. Solid targetry at the TESLA Accelerator Installation

    CERN Document Server

    Comor, J J; Rajcevic, M; Kosutic, D; Spasic, M; Vidovic, A; Duricic, J; Nedeljkovic, N

    2002-01-01

    According to the concept of the TESLA Accelerator Installation, the channel for production of radioisotopes has to routinely produce sup 2 sup 0 sup 1 Tl, sup 1 sup 1 sup 1 In, sup 6 sup 7 Ga, sup 1 sup 2 sup 3 I and sup 1 sup 8 F, and a number of other radionuclides for experimental purposes. The production of sup 1 sup 2 sup 3 I and sup 1 sup 8 F will be performed in dedicated, commercial target stations, while a versatile solid target irradiation system is designed for the routine and experimental production of all other radioisotopes. The solid target station is designed to accept targets for both the 7 deg. and 90 deg. irradiation geometry. The targets used for the routine production will be prepared by electroplating on a silver substrate. They can be irradiated with a 1.5 kW beam using the 7 deg. geometry. The cooling of these targets is enhanced by fins on the back of the silver substrate designed so that the highest temperature on the surface of the target does not exceed 110 deg. C. The irradiation ...

  20. Infrastructure for Detector Research and Development towards the International Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kulis, Sz.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Bamberger, A.; Kohli, M.; Lupberger, M.; Renz, U.; Schumacher, M.; Zwerger, Andreas; Calderone, A.; Cussans, D.G.; Heath, H.F.; Mandry, S.; Page, R.F.; Velthuis, J.J.; Attie, D.; Calvet, D.; Colas, P.; Coppolani, X.; Degerli, Y.; Delagnes, E.; Gelin, M.; Giomataris, I.; Lutz, P.; Orsini, F.; Rialot, M.; Senee, F.; Wang, W.; Alozy, J.; Apostolakis, J.; Aspell, P.; Bergsma, F.; Campbell, M.; Formenti, F.; Santos, H.Franca; Garcia, E.Garcia; de Gaspari, M.; Giudice, P.A.; Grefe, Ch.; Grichine, V.; Hauschild, M.; Ivantchenko, V.; Kehrli, A.; Kloukinas, K.; Linssen, L.; Cudie, X.Llopart; Marchioro, A.; Musa, L.; Ribon, A.; Trampitsch, G.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Anduze, M.; Beyer, E.; Bonnemaison, A.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.C.; Cauchois, A.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Jauffret, C.; Jeans, D.; Karar, A.; Mathieu, A.; de Freitas, P.Mora; Musat, G.; Rouge, A.; Ruan, M.; Vanel, J.C.; Videau, H.; Besson, A.; de Masi, G.Claus.R.; Doziere, G.; Dulinski, W.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Morel, F.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Cornebise, P.; Dulucq, F.; Giannelli, M.Faucci; Fleury, J.; Guilhem, G.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Poschl, R.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Benyamna, M.; Bonnard, J.; Carloganu, C.; Fehr, F.; Gay, P.; Mannen, S.; Royer, L.; Charpy, A.; Da Silva, W.; David, J.; Dhellot, M.; Imbault, D.; Ghislain, P.; Kapusta, F.; Pham, T.Hung; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sefri, R.; Dzahini, D.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Bassignana, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Quirion, D.; Fernandez, M.; Jaramillo, R.; Munoz, F.J.; Vila, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Kvasnicka, P.; Aplin, S.; Bachynska, O.; Behnke, T.; Behr, J.; Dehmelt, K.; Engels, J.; Gadow, K.; Gaede, F.; Garutti, E.; Gottlicher, P.; Gregor, I.M.; Haas, T.; Henschel, H.; Koetz, U.; Lange, W.; Libov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mnich, J.; Muhl, C.; Ohlerich, M.; Potylitsina-Kube, N.; Prahl, V.; Reinecke, M.; Roloff, P.; Rosemann, Ch.; Rubinski, Igor; Schade, P.; Schuwalov, S.; Sefkow, F.; Terwort, M.; Volkenborn, R.; Kalliopuska, J.; Mehtaelae, P.; Orava, R.; van Remortel, N.; Cvach, J.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Haensel, S.; Irmler, C.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Valentan, M.; Piemontese, L.; Cotta-Ramusino, A.; Bulgheroni, A.; Jastrzab, M.; Caccia, M.; Re, V.; Ratti, L.; Traversi, G.; Dewulf, J.P.; Janssen, X.; De Lentdecker, G.; Yang, Y.; Bryngemark, L.; Christiansen, P.; Gross, P.; Jonsson, L.; Ljunggren, M.; Lundberg, B.; Mjornmark, U.; Oskarsson, A.; Richert, T.; Stenlund, E.; Osterman, L.; Rummel, S.; Richter, R.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovich, J.; Koffmane, Ch.; Moser, H.G.; Boisvert, V.; Green, B.; Green, M.G.; Misiejuk, A.; Wu, T.; Bilevych, Y.; Carballo, V.M.Blanco; Chefdeville, M.; de Nooij, L.; Fransen, M.; Hartjes, F.; van der Graaf, H.; Timmermans, J.; Abramowicz, H.; Ben-Hamu, Y.; Jikhleb, I.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Sadeh, I.; Schwartz, R.; Stern, A.; Goodrick, M.J.; Hommels, L.B.A.; Ward, R.Shaw.D.R.; Daniluk, W.; Kielar, E.; Kotula, J.; Moszczynski, A.; Oliwa, K.; Pawlik, B.; Wierba, W.; Zawiejski, L.; Bailey, D.S.; Kelly, M.; Eigen, G.; Brezina, Ch.; Desch, K.; Furletova, J.; Kaminski, J.; Killenberg, M.; Kockner, F.; Krautscheid, T.; Kruger, H.; Reuen, L.; Wienemann, P.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Corrin, E.; Haas, D.; Pohl, M.; Diener, R.; Fischer, P.; Peric, I.; Kaukher, A.; Schafer, O.; Schroder, H.; Wurth, R.; Zarnecki, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    The EUDET-project was launched to create an infrastructure for developing and testing new and advanced detector technologies to be used at a future linear collider. The aim was to make possible experimentation and analysis of data for institutes, which otherwise could not be realized due to lack of resources. The infrastructure comprised an analysis and software network, and instrumentation infrastructures for tracking detectors as well as for calorimetry.

  1. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  2. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  3. Leptoquarks at Future Lepton Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    In this talk I summarize the capability of future lepton colliders to discover leptoquarks and to determine their electroweak quantum numbers. This analysis is an updated discussion based on the results presented in the Snowmass 1996 New Phenomena Working Group report as well as some more recent work that has appeared in the literature as a result of the HERA high-$Q^2$ excess.

  4. State of hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grannis, P.D. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  5. Extra dimensions at particle colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvergsnes, Erik Wolden

    2004-08-01

    This thesis consists of an introduction where we consider different aspects of theories involving extra dimensions, together with four research publications (Papers I-IV) attached at the end. The introductional chapters should serve as background material for better understanding the models on which the articles are based. In Chap. 4 we also present some plots not included in the papers. The topic of Papers I-III is graviton induced Bremsstrahlung. In Paper I we consider the contribution to this process from graviton exchange through gluon-gluon fusion at the LHC, compared to the QED background. Only final-state radiation is considered in Paper I, whereas in Paper II we extend this work to include also the quark-antiquark annihilation with graviton exchange, as well as initial-state radiation for both graviton and Standard Model exchange. Paper III is a study of graviton-induced Bremsstrahlung at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, including both initial- and final-state radiation. Paper IV is devoted to a study of the center-edge asymmetry at hadron colliders, an asymmetry which previously had been studied for e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. The center-edge asymmetry can be used as a method of distinguishing between spin-1 and spin-2 exchange, something which will be of major importance if a signal is observed.

  6. 77 FR 60672 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger Vehicles), Palo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger... electric passenger vehicles and related powertrain components at the Tesla Motors, Inc., facilities located... establish a special-purpose subzone at the electric passenger vehicle manufacturing facilities of Tesla...

  7. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI: clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, J.W. van; Scuric, E.E.; Veluw, S.J. van; Caan, M.W.; Nederveen, A.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Richard, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. METHODS: We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a

  8. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 tesla MRI : Clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, Jan Willem; Scuric, Eva E M; Van Veluw, Susanne J.; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Van Gool, Willem A.; Richard, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. Methods-We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a

  9. Plan de marketing de la empresa Tesla Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Falcón, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    El presente trabajo de fin de grado contiene información sobre los detalles del diseño del plan de marketing de la empresa Tesla Motors para el mercado español, desde donde se busca aumentar la participación en el mercado y la notoriedad de la marca, centrando los esfuerzos desde Cataluña para, progresivamente, actuar en el resto de territorios. El present treball de fi de grau conté informació sobre els detalls del disseny del pla de màrqueting de l'empresa Tesla Motors per al mercat espa...

  10. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  11. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  12. Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    INSTR17, the International Conference on Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics, will be held in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, on 27 February – 4 March, 2017. The conference covers novel methods of particle detection used in various experiments at particle accelerators as well as in astrophysics. It is organized in close relationship with the Vienna Conference on Instrumentation (last held in 2016) and the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors (last held in 2015). The deadline for registration and abstract submission is 15 January. For more details visit the conference website instr17.inp.nsk.su. Will be published in: JINST

  13. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  14. Standard Model Background of the Cosmological Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2017-06-30

    The inflationary universe can be viewed as a "cosmological collider" with an energy of the Hubble scale, producing very massive particles and recording their characteristic signals in primordial non-Gaussianities. To utilize this collider to explore any new physics at very high scales, it is a prerequisite to understand the background signals from the particle physics standard model. In this Letter we describe the standard model background of the cosmological collider.

  15. Probing contact interactions at high energy lepton colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, K. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Godfrey, S. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Ottawa Carleton Inst. for Physics; Hewett, J.A. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Fermion compositeness and other new physics can be signaled by the presence of a strong four-fermion contact interaction. Here the authors present a study of {ell}{ell}qq and {ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime} contact interactions using the reactions: {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} {ell}{prime}{sup +} {ell}{prime}{sup {minus}}, b{anti b}, c{anti c} at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders with {radical}s = 0.5--5 TeV and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders with {radical}s = 0.5, 4 TeV. They find that very large compositeness scales can be probed at these machines and that the use of polarized beams can unravel their underlying helicity structure.

  16. 76 FR 33402 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Renewal of Temporary Exemption from the Advanced Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Renewal of... Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc., has petitioned the agency for renewal of a temporary exemption from... procedures in 49 CFR Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc., (Tesla) has submitted a petition asking the agency for...

  17. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  18. Disentangling heavy flavor at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilten, Philip; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike

    2017-09-01

    We propose two new analysis strategies for studying charm and beauty quarks at colliders. The first strategy is aimed at testing the kinematics of heavy-flavor quarks within an identified jet. Here, we use the SoftDrop jet-declustering algorithm to identify two subjets within a large-radius jet, using subjet flavor tagging to test the heavy-quark splitting functions of QCD. For subjets containing a J /ψ or ϒ , this declustering technique can also help probe the mechanism for quarkonium production. The second strategy is aimed at isolating heavy-flavor production from gluon splitting. Here, we introduce a new FlavorCone algorithm, which smoothly interpolates from well-separated heavy-quark jets to the gluon-splitting regime where jets overlap. Because of its excellent ability to identify charm and beauty hadrons, the LHCb detector is ideally suited to pursue these strategies, though similar measurements should also be possible at ATLAS and CMS. Together, these SoftDrop and FlavorCone studies should clarify a number of aspects of heavy-flavor physics at colliders, and provide crucial information needed to improve heavy-flavor modeling in parton-shower generators.

  19. The traveling heads: multicenter brain imaging at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voelker, M.N.; Kraff, O.; Kraff, O.; Brenner, D.; Wollrab, A.; Weinberger, O.; Berger, M.C.; Robinson, S.; Bogner, W.; Wiggins, C.; Trampel, R.; Stöcker, T.; Niendorf, T.; Quick, H.H.; Norris, David Gordon; Ladd, M.E.; Speck, O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluates the inter-site and intra-site reproducibility of 7 Tesla brain imaging and compares it to literature values for other field strengths. Materials and methods The same two subjects were imaged at eight different 7 T sites. MP2RAGE, TSE, TOF, SWI, EPI as well as B1 and B0

  20. Excerpts from Prodigal Genius: The Life of Nikola Tesla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 3. Excerpts from Prodigal Genius: The Life of Nikola Tesla. John J O Neill. Classics Volume 12 Issue 3 March 2007 pp 91-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/03/0091-0096 ...