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Sample records for tertiary urban academic

  1. Patient satisfaction with care in an urban tertiary referral academic glaucoma clinic in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson KM

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Kristen M Peterson, Carrie E Huisingh, Christopher Girkin, Cynthia Owsley, Lindsay A Rhodes Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the factors associated with glaucoma patients’ satisfaction with their medical care by fellowship-trained glaucoma specialists in an urban tertiary referral clinic in the US.Methods: A total of 110 established patients aged ≥60 years with a diagnosis of either primary open angle glaucoma, glaucoma suspect, or ocular hypertension monitored by an ophthalmologist with fellowship training in glaucoma were enrolled at an academic, urban, tertiary referral eye clinic. Enrolled patients were administered a general demographics questionnaire along with a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 (PSQ-18, a Likert scale validated tool. The seven dimensions of patient satisfaction from the PSQ-18 were summarized for the sample overall and by the patients’ age, race, employment status, education level, distance travelled from home address to clinic, and glaucoma therapy type. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare group means. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to correlate satisfaction scores with peripheral vision and visual acuity function.Results: Overall, the general satisfaction scores were high (mean 4.62. Patients ≥70 years of age had lower general satisfaction with their care (mean 4.5 vs 4.8, p=0.03, the interpersonal manner of their appointment (mean 4.7 vs 4.9, p=0.009, and with their time spent with their doctor (mean 4.4 vs 4.7, p=0.03 than patients aged 60–69 years. Non-European descent patients (47% African descent and 1% other of sample were more satisfied with the time they spent with the doctor (mean 4.7 vs 4.4, p=0.04 and with the communication during the appointment (mean 4.8 vs 4.6, p=0.04 than European descent patients (52% of sample. Patients with a higher level of

  2. Academic mentoring and the future of tertiary education in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tertiary education is a major outlet for the provision of high manpower for national development. This paper therefore highlighted the challenges of tertiary education in Nigeria, early perspectives of mentoring undergraduates, the rationale for academic mentoring, the role of a mentor, and the role of library as catalyst in the ...

  3. Research Productivity of ]unior Academic Staff at a Tertiary Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Productivity of ]unior Academic Staff at a Tertiary Medical College in South West, Nigeria. OA Lesi, OO Orenuga, A Roberts, OO Abudu. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  4. EXPLORING THE TERTIARY EFL STUDENTS' ACADEMIC WRITING COMPETENCIES

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    Aunurrahman Aunurrahman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For tertiary English as a Foreign Language (EFL students, academic writing is not an easy task. It requires knowledge of the academic writing genres with their particular linguistic features. Moreover, academic writing demands good critical thinking. This research aims to explore the students' academic writing competencies that also focus on critical thinking. The research involved thirty-six first-year tertiary EFL students from a regular class of a private university in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. The source for data collection was the students’ texts. Three texts were selected and the students were categorized into low, medium, and high levels of writing achievement. The text analysis utilized functional grammar rooted in systemic functional linguistics (Emilia, 2014. The analysis shows that the students, regardless of their levels of writing achievement, have little control over the schematic structure and linguistic features of an argumentative writing. The text analysis also shows that the students’ texts have some limitations as regards their critical thinking capacity. Still, a few examples of academic language were detected in the texts. The findings suggest that the lecturer should incorporate explicit teaching and cooperative learning activities to alleviate the students' difficulties and develop their academic writing and critical thinking capacity.

  5. Financial impact of tertiary care in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, T S; Carlton, L M; O'Hern, D G; Hardt, N S; Keith Ozaki, C; Flynn, T C; Seeger, J M

    2000-06-01

    To analyze the financial impact of three complex vascular surgical procedures to both an academic hospital and a department of surgery and to examine the potential impact of decreased reimbursements. The cost of providing tertiary care has been implicated as one potential cause of the financial difficulties affecting academic medical centers. Patients undergoing revascularization for chronic mesenteric ischemia, elective thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair, and treatment of infected aortic grafts at the University of Florida were compared with those undergoing elective infrarenal aortic reconstruction and carotid endarterectomy. Hospital costs and profit summaries were obtained from the Clinical Resource Management Office. Departmental costs and profit summary were estimated based on the procedural relative value units (RVUs), the average clinical cost per RVU ($33.12), surgeon charges, and the collection rate for the vascular surgery division (30.2%) obtained from the Faculty Group Practice. Surgeon work effort was analyzed using the procedural work RVUs and the estimated total care time. The analyses were performed for all payors and the subset of Medicare patients, and the potential impact of a 15% reduction in hospital and physician reimbursement was analyzed. Net hospital income was positive for all but one of the tertiary care procedures, but net losses were sustained by the hospital for the mesenteric ischemia and infected aortic graft groups among the Medicare patients. In contrast, the estimated reimbursement to the department of surgery for all payors was insufficient to offset the clinical cost of providing the RVUs for all procedures, and the estimated losses were greater for the Medicare patients alone. The surgeon work effort was dramatically higher for the tertiary care procedures, whereas the reimbursement per work effort was lower. A 15% reduction in reimbursement would result in an estimated net loss to the hospital for each of the tertiary

  6. Assessment of pediatric residents burnout in a tertiary academic centre

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    Roaa S. Jamjoom

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study burnout among pediatric residents at King Abdulazaiz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey that was administered to all pediatric residents enrolled in the Saudi Paediatric Board program (PGY1-PGY4 in a large tertiary academic hospital in the Western region of Saudi Arabia (King Abdulaziz University Hospital. The survey were sent via E-mail to 50 registered general pediatric residents. Results: Seventy percent of the pediatric residents completed the survey. More than 70% of residents experiencing severe burnout. Forty-three percent suffering emotional exhaustion, 71.8% experiencing depersonalization and 40.6% suffering from low accomplishment. Conclusion: Burnout syndrome appear to be a serious threat to resident well-being in our program. Moreover, pediatric residents in our institute experienced higher levels of depersonalization than their peers nationally and internationally.

  7. The Big Five and tertiary academic performance: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This article reports a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationships between the Big Five personality traits and tertiary academic performance. Five frequently used personality measures formed a restricted inclusion criteria pertaining to predictor variables: NEO Personality Inventory...... with Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Openness. Conscientiousness was the strongest predictor of GPA by far with a weighted summary effect of .26. Subgroup analyses tested a potential moderator variable not explored hitherto: academic major of study participants. Academic major was indeed found to moderate...

  8. Adapting the Academic Motivation Scale for Use in Pre-Tertiary Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) is a comprehensive and widely used instrument for assessing motivation based on the self-determination theory. Currently, no such comprehensive instrument exists to assess the different domains of motivation (stipulated by the self-determination theory) in mathematics education at the pre-tertiary level (grades…

  9. Pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement of Academic and non-Academic staff in tertiary Institutions in Ondo State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ajibua M.A.; Alla J.B

    2012-01-01

    Leisure signifies individual’s choice to spend his/her discretionary time fulfilling certain interest or needs or performing a gratifying experience for the sake of wellness or personal development. The aim of this study was to look into the pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement among academic and non-academic staff in tertiary institution in Ondo State. For the purpose of the study, 40 academic and 40 non-academic staff were selected from the five Government-owned tertiary in...

  10. Physical Education and Academic Performance in Urban African American Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to examine urban African American girls' participation in physical education and its association with academic performance. One hundred eighty four participants completed questionnaires assessing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and learning engagement in physical education while their academic performance was based…

  11. What is the role of general internists in the tertiary or academic setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Rigby, Shirley; van Hulsteijn, L Harry; Ferreira, Faustino; Oliveira, Narcisso; Schumm-Draeger, Petra-Maria; Weidanz, Frauke; Kramer, Mark H H

    2015-01-01

    The changing demography of European populations mandates a vital role for internists in caring for patients in each level of healthcare. Internists in the tertiary or academic setting are highly ranked in terms of their responsibilities: they are clinicians, educators, researchers, role models, mentors and administrators. Contrary to the highly focused approach of sub-specialties, general internists working in academic settings can ensure that coordinated care is delivered in the most cost-conscious and efficient way. Moreover, internal medicine is one of the most appropriate specialties in which to teach clinical reasoning skills, decision-making and analytical thinking, as well as evidence based, patient oriented medicine. Internists deal with challenging patients of the new millennium with a high burden of chronic diseases and polypharmacy; practice personalised medicine with a wide scientific background and so they are the perfect fit to establish and implement new tools for scientific research. In conclusion, internal medicine is developing a new identity as a specialty in its own right. The European Federation of Internal Medicine supports the concept of academic internists and calls upon the member countries to construct academic (general) internal medicine departments in their respective countries. As 'internal medicine is the cornerstone of every national healthcare system', academic (general) internal medicine should strive to be the cornerstone of every integrated, patient-centred, modern medical care and training system. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Starting School Age in the Academic Performance at the Tertiary Level

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    Mahwish Ali Baber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to find out whether starting school earlier than four years of age gave any academic benefit to the students in the long run. This research aimed to find out whether the students who started schooling earlier than four years of age are able to achieve better grades and are better at self-regulation at the tertiary level. For this purpose, a sample of 108 students from a private business school comprising both early and late school starters were made to fill in questionnaires reporting their school starting age, their CGPA and answering questions that showed their level of self-regulation. The findings of this study suggest that there is no difference in the academic performance of the two groups, both in terms of their CGPA and their self-regulation skills.

  13. Mental health lived experience academics in tertiary education: the views of nurse academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Wynaden, Dianne; Tohotoa, Jenny; Platania-Phung, Chris; Byrne, Louise; Martin, Graham; Harris, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Australian national mental health strategy emphasises inclusion of people diagnosed with mental illness in all areas of mental health care, policy development and education of health professionals. However, the way this inclusion has translated to Australian universities is relatively unexplored. Explore views of nurse academics regarding service user involvement in nursing education programmes. Qualitative exploratory. Australian universities offering educational programmes in nursing at postgraduate and undergraduate levels. Thirty four participants from 27 Australian universities participated. Data were collected using semi-structured telephone interviews with academics involved in teaching and/or coordinating undergraduate and/or postgraduate mental health nursing contents. Data were analysed using content analysis based on four cognitive processes: comprehending, synthesising, theorising and re-contextualising data. Four major themes emerged: good idea? long way to go; conceptualising the service user academic role; strengths of lived experience led student learning; and barriers to implementation. Findings indicated strong support for including mental health service users in teaching nursing students. However, at most universities service user engagement was often an informal arrangement, lacking clear guidelines and limited by financial barriers and the positioning of mental health nursing within curricula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing Human Capital Development and Service Delivery in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions through Effective Academic Staff

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    Chinyeaka Igbokwe-Ibeto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of bureaucratic and human capital theories, an eclectic approach, the study examines the nexus between academic staff recruitment in Nigerian tertiary institutions and human capital development as well as service delivery with specific reference to universities. It is generally agreed that higher education is a sine-qua-non for human capital development and efficient service delivery. Higher education is a prerequisite for the production of highly competent experts, which in turn, contributes to the development of organizations and the economy at large. For these to be achieved, the right content and academic staff  must be in place to perform this varied function.  However, over the years the quality of human capital coming out of Nigerian universities and its impact on service delivery has become a source of concern to employers of labour and all stakeholders. Inferential opinions have traced the problem to the recruitment of incompetent academic staff. To investigate the issues raised, the study relied heavily on primary and secondary data and multi stage sampling was used to select the sample population. The data collected was presented in pie chart and simple percentage. Similarly, in order to test the hypotheses and establish the degree of dependence or independence of the variables under investigation, the chi-square statistical technique was used. The findings of the study revealed among others, that Nigerian universities do not employ merit, qualification and competency in the academic staff recruitment. It also established that there is a significant relationship between merit, qualification and competency based academic staff recruitment and human capital development and service delivery. To enhance human capital development and service delivery in Nigerian universities, the study recommends among others, that an independent body like the National University Commission (NUC should be given the responsibility of

  15. Adapting the academic motivation scale for use in pre-tertiary mathematics classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale ( ams) is a comprehensive and widely used instrument for assessing motivation based on the self-determination theory. Currently, no such comprehensive instrument exists to assess the different domains of motivation (stipulated by the self-determination theory) in mathematics education at the pre-tertiary level (grades 11 and 12) in Asia. This study adapted the ams for this use and assessed the properties of the adapted instrument with 1610 students from Singapore. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated a five-factor structure for the modified instrument (the three original ams intrinsic subscales collapsed into a single factor). Additionally, the modified instrument exhibited good internal consistency (mean α = .88), and satisfactory test-retest reliability over a 1-month interval (mean r xx = .73). The validity of the modified ams was further demonstrated through correlational analyses among scores on its subscales, and with scores on other instruments measuring mathematics attitudes, anxiety and achievement.

  16. Pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement of Academic and non-Academic staff in tertiary Institutions in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajibua M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure signifies individual’s choice to spend his/her discretionary time fulfilling certain interest or needs or performing a gratifying experience for the sake of wellness or personal development. The aim of this study was to look into the pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement among academic and non-academic staff in tertiary institution in Ondo State. For the purpose of the study, 40 academic and 40 non-academic staff were selected from the five Government-owned tertiary institutions in the state using convenience sampling techniques. Thus, total respondents were 400. The instrument employed in the study was a structured and validated questionnaire, Pattern of Leisure Involvement Questionnaire (PLIQ to collect information on the pattern of leisure-time physical activity involvement among staff. The reliability test of the instrument was carried out by obtaining Cronbach’s Alpha statistic which is a measure of how reliable and consistent the instrument was. The result showed that Cronbach’s Alpha was 0.896. Since the value was above 0.5 which was the average, it showed that the research instrument was reliable and consistent. The information gathered from the subjects through the questionnaire was analyzedusing descriptive (mean, standard deviation and standard error and inferential statistics (t-test. The findings showed that academic and non-academic staff in tertiary institutions in Ondo State participate in leisure-time physical activity differently. It thus suggested that variety of leisure-time physical activities must be provided for members of tertiary institutions so that some groups will not be taken care of, while others will be isolated.

  17. Rural versus urban academic hospital mortality following stroke in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Richard; Bussières, Sylvain; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Turcotte, Stéphane; Légaré, France; Plant, Jeff; Poitras, Julien; Archambault, Patrick M; Dupuis, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death in Canada. While stroke care has improved dramatically over the last decade, outcomes following stroke among patients treated in rural hospitals have not yet been reported in Canada. To describe variation in 30-day post-stroke in-hospital mortality rates between rural and urban academic hospitals in Canada. We also examined 24/7 in-hospital access to CT scanners and selected services in rural hospitals. We included Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) data on adjusted 30-day in-hospital mortality following stroke from 2007 to 2011 for all acute care hospitals in Canada excluding Quebec and the Territories. We categorized rural hospitals as those located in rural small towns providing 24/7 emergency physician coverage with inpatient beds. Urban hospitals were academic centres designated as Level 1 or 2 trauma centres. We computed descriptive data on local access to a CT scanner and other services and compared mean 30-day adjusted post-stroke mortality rates for rural and urban hospitals to the overall Canadian rate. A total of 286 rural hospitals (3.4 million emergency department (ED) visits/year) and 24 urban hospitals (1.5 million ED visits/year) met inclusion criteria. From 2007 to 2011, 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke were significantly higher in rural than in urban hospitals and higher than the Canadian average for every year except 2008 (rural average range = 18.26 to 21.04 and urban average range = 14.11 to 16.78). Only 11% of rural hospitals had a CT-scanner, 1% had MRI, 21% had in-hospital ICU, 94% had laboratory and 92% had basic x-ray facilities. Rural hospitals in Canada had higher 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke than urban academic hospitals and the Canadian average. Rural hospitals also have very limited local access to CT scanners and ICUs. These rural/urban discrepancies are cause for concern in the context of Canada's universal health care system.

  18. Academic visibility for urban planning and the webometric future

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    Sanchez Thomas W.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The author focuses on the analysis problems of the main metrics of scientific productivity for the faculty in the USA universities specializing in the investigations and teaching in the field of urban planning. The increasing role of the Internet is highlighted in the process of communicating the ideas of planning scientists to the professionals and public, extending the reach of academic communications and possibilities of estimating the quality of the investigations and impact. Using case study the methods of applying webometrics for citation analysis in the Internet are investigated. The analysis focused on the main criteria: productivity, visibility, reputation, and impact. The article proposes an expanded approach for estimating general scientific popularity and impact of academics in the Internet, which includes publication analysis in frames of “gray literature”, teaching and outreach activity, which may also be a significant part of the scientific activity. The author stated the importance of academic visibility estimation both for promotion, improving competitiveness of a faculty member on the labor market in the sphere of educational services, and for urban planning schools’ development in general, raising their reputation, prestige and impact, getting the opportunities for financed researches, consolidating the positions on the global educational and science market.

  19. Birth preparedness and complication readiness in pregnant women attending urban tertiary care hospital

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    Vasundhara Kamineni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Birth preparedness and complication readiness (BP/CR is a strategy to promote the timely use of skilled maternal and neonatal care and is based on the theory that preparing for childbirth and being ready for complications reduce delay in obtaining care. Study Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence and predictors of birth preparedness, knowledge on danger signs, and emergency readiness among pregnant women attending outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital. Patients and Methods: Six hundred pregnant women attending the outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital for the first time in an urban setting were interviewed using a tool adapted from the “Monitoring BP/CR-tools and indicators for maternal and new born health” of the “JHPIEGO.” The outcomes of the study were birth preparedness, knowledge of severe illness, and emergency readiness. Results: Six hundred pregnant women were in the study. Mean age of respondents was 25.2 (±4 years. The mean gestation at enrolment was 18.7 ± 8 weeks. Among the women who participated in the survey, 20% were illiterate, 70% were homemakers and nearly 70% had a monthly family income >Rs. 15,197 (n = 405. Three hundred and sixteen mothers (52% were primigravida. As defined in the study, 71.5% were birth prepared. However, 59 women (9.8% did not identify a place of delivery, 102 (17% had not started saving money, and 99 mothers (16.5% were not aware of purchasing materials needed for delivery. The predictors of birth preparedness are multiparity (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–3.1, registration in the antenatal clinic in the first trimester (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.2–6.1, educational status of women (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.0, and pregnancy supervison by a doctor (OR: 5, 95% CI: 2.8–6.6. One hundred and sixty-four women (27% made no arrangements in the event of an emergency, 376 women (63% were not aware of their blood group

  20. Evaluation of a tertiary teledermatology service between peripheral and academic dermatologists in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Job P.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Witkamp, Leonard; Spuls, Phyllis I.

    2014-01-01

    Tertiary teledermatology (TTD)-secondary-care to tertiary-care teleconsultation-is applied rarely compared with the frequently applied secondary teledermatology (primary to secondary care). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of TTD on referrals from peripheral dermatologists to

  1. Academic Self-Concept and Academic Achievement of African American Students Transitioning from Urban to Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, La Shawn Catrice

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between academic self-concept and academic achievement in African American students who have experienced geographic mobility was the focus of this study. Specifically, this study used quantitative methods to assess African American students from counties in Iowa to obtain information about the students' relocation from urban to…

  2. At-Risk Student Mobility in an Urban Elementary School: Effects on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoho, Alan R.; Oleszewski, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of at-risk student mobility on academic achievement in an urban elementary school. Math and reading scores from the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) of 172 third, fourth, and fifth grade students from an urban school district in South Central Texas were examined to determine whether…

  3. Acknowleding attributes that enable the career academic nurse to thrive in the tertiary education sector: A qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Aileen; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Jackson, Debra; Davidson, Patricia; Phillips, Jane

    2016-10-01

    To optimise the career development in early career academic nurses by providing an overview of the attributes necessary for success. Evidence of early prospective career planning is necessary to optimise success in the tertiary sector. This is particularly important for nurse academics given the profession's later entry into academia, the ageing nursing workforce and the continuing global shortage of nurses. A qualitative systematic review. Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, ERIC, Professional Development Collection and Google Scholar databases were searched; resulting in the inclusion of nine qualitative nurse-only focussed studies published between 2004 and 2014. The studies were critically appraised and the data thematically analysed. Three abilities were identified as important to the early career academic nurse: a willingness to adapt to change, an intention to pursue support and embodying resilience. These abilities give rise to attributes that are recommended as key to successful academic career development for those employed on a continuing academic basis. The capacity to rely on one's own capabilities is becoming seen as increasingly important. It is proposed that recognition of these attributes, their skilful application and monitoring outlined in the review are recommended for a successful career in academia. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of recombinant activated protein C for severe sepsis at a tertiary academic medical center

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    Anger KE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kevin E Anger,1 Jeremy R DeGrado,1 Bonnie C Greenwood,1 Steven A Cohen,2 Paul M Szumita1 1Department of Pharmacy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Division of Epidemiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Purpose: Early clinical trials of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC for severe sepsis excluded patients at high risk of bleeding. Recent literature suggests bleeding rates are higher in clinical practice and may be associated with worsened outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate baseline demographics; incidence, and risk factors for major bleeding; and mortality of patients receiving rhAPC for severe sepsis at our institution. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for all patients receiving rhAPC for treatment of severe sepsis at a tertiary academic medical center from January 2002 to June 2009. Demographic information, clinical variables, intensive care unit, and hospital outcomes were recorded. Results: Of the 156 patients that received rhAPC, 54 (34.6% did not meet institutional criteria for safe use at baseline due to bleeding precaution or contraindication. Twenty-three (14.7% patients experienced a major bleeding event. Multivariate analysis demonstrated baseline International Normalized Ratio ≥2.5 (odds ratio [OR] 3.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–10.56; P = 0.03 and platelet count ≤100 × 103/mm3 (OR 2.86, 95% CI: 1.07–7.67; P = 0.01 as significant predictors of a major bleed. Overall hospital mortality was 57.7%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the presence of ≥3 organ dysfunctions (OR 2.46, 95% CI: 1.19–5.09; P < 0.05 and medical intensive care unit admission (OR 1.99, 95% CI: 1.00–3.98; P = 0.05 were independent variables associated with hospital mortality. Conclusion: Patients receiving rhAPC at our institution had higher APACHE II scores, mortality, and major bleeding events than published

  5. Binge drinking among young adults in an urban tertiary care emergency department in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Daphna; Rosca, Paola; Vilner, Doron; Brimberg, Idit; Stall, Yael; Rimon, Ayelet

    2017-07-01

    Alcohol use is a major preventable public health problem with serious health and social consequences especially among youth. In Israel, alcohol use has become an emerging problem during the last decade, and its use has increased among adolescents and young adults. Binge drinking is the common pattern of alcohol consumption among young adults who drink for recreational purposes. The present survey was conducted among 16-35 years old visitors to the ED. The aim was specifically to identify binge drinkers in order to assess the scope of the need for a brief counseling intervention among young people who arrive intoxicated to a large tertiary care urban ED in Israel. The survey was conducted throughout a 1 week period (24 h per day) at the general EDs in a large, tertiary care center, situated in Tel Aviv. During the survey week, 946 individuals, aged 16-35, visited the ED and 573 (63%) of them were approached for an interview. 89% of those approached agreed to be interviewed. Consenting patients [N = 348] were asked whether they drink any alcohol, how often they drink and how much. About one fifth of those interviewed were in the habit of consuming more than four units of alcohol per occasion. Drinking several times a week or every day was reported by 19% of the males and 26% of the females. Frequency of the drinking episodes was highly correlated with the number of units of drink per occasion. The study found a very high rate of binge drinking among ED visitors, and this suggests a need for large scale ED-based interventions. As binge drinkers are at elevated risk for accidents, violence and related problems, effective ED-based interventions could make an important contribution to public health. Accordingly, Israel is in the process of assessing the effectiveness of a large-scale ED-based counseling intervention. Trial registration number 0230-13-TLV.

  6. Epidemiology of Surgically Managed Mandibular Condylar Fractures at a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Urban Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Swosti; Wang, Jun; Hu, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Fu-Gui; Ji, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Mandibular condylar fracture is one of the commonest maxillofacial fractures treated by maxillofacial surgeons. Demography of the patients, causation, and characteristics of the fracture depends on various socio-economic factors. Hence, maxillofacial surgeons should be familiar with epidemiology of mandibular condylar fracture. This study retrospectively describes the demography, etiology, fracture characteristics, and hospital utilization of surgically treated mandibular condylar fractures in a tertiary referral hospital in urban China in past five years. Data of all patients who underwent surgical management between 2011 and 2015 were collected. This included aetiology, characteristics of fracture, time, age, sex, associated injuries, and hospital utilization of 166 patients with 208 mandibular condylar fractures. These patients had undergone open reduction and internal fixation with either miniplates or lag screws. Among the fracture of head of mandibular condyle, 21.28% of the patients had the fracture segments removed. These data were statistically analyzed to describe the epidemiology of mandibular condylar fracture. Most of the patients had unilateral mandibular condylar fractures (74.7%). Male patients (76.51%) outnumbered female patients (23.49%) in this cohort. The average age of the patients was 37 years. The fractures were mostly caused by fall from height (60.84%) and were located at the condylar neck (53.61%). Most of the patients had other associated maxillofacial injuries (71.08%) which were mostly located at symphysis and parasymphysis (44.59%). It took 12.58 +/- 0.35 days of hospitalization for the treatment. Fall from height was the most prevalent cause of mandibular condylar injury in mountainous urban China. The people at highest risk were middle-aged men. Mandibular condylar fracture was mostly located at the condylar neck and was usually associated with fracture at the symphysis and parasymphysis.

  7. Improving Exclusive Breastfeeding in an Urban Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Laura P; Williamson, Susan; Burke, Stephanie; Crawford-Hemphill, Ruby; Thompson, Amy M

    2017-02-01

    Breastfeeding has many well-established health benefits for infants and mothers. There is greater risk reduction in health outcomes with exclusive breastfeeding (EBF). Our urban academic facility has had long-standing low EBF rates, serving a population with breastfeeding disparities. We sought to improve EBF rates through a Learning Collaborative model by participating in the Best Fed Beginnings project. Formal improvement science methods were used, including the development of a key driver diagram and plan-do-study-act cycles. Improvement activities followed the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. We demonstrated significant improvement in the median adherence to 2 process measures, rooming in and skin-to-skin after delivery. Subsequently, the proportion of infants exclusively breastfed at hospital discharge in our facility increased from 37% to 59%. We demonstrated an increase in sustained breastfeeding in a subset of patients at a postpartum follow-up visit. These improvements led to Baby-Friendly designation at our facility. This quality improvement initiative resulted in a higher number of infants exclusively breastfed in our patient population at "high risk not to breastfeed." Other hospitals can use these described methods and techniques to improve their EBF rates. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Sociodemographic disparities in the utilization of proton therapy for prostate cancer at an urban academic center

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    Kristina D. Woodhouse, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Sociodemographic disparities exist in PT use for prostate cancer at an urban academic institution. Further investigation of potential barriers to access is warranted to ensure equitable distribution across all demographic groups.

  9. An Exploratory Study of Value-Added and Academic Optimism of Urban Reading Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff-Franklin, Clairie L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between state-recorded value- added (VA) scores and academic optimism (AO) scores, which measure teacher self-efficacy, trust, and academic emphasis. The sample for this study is 87 third through eighth grade Reading teachers, from fifty-five schools, in an urban school district in Ohio who…

  10. Cultivating the Academic Integrity of Urban Adolescents with Ethical Philosophy Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, Scott; Novick, Sarah; Gomez, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-methods study considered the effects of ethical philosophy programming at a high-performing, high-poverty urban high school upon the academic integrity of participating adolescents ("n" = 279). Analyses of pre-post survey data revealed that participating adolescents reported significantly higher levels of academic integrity…

  11. Academic Emphasis of Urban Elementary Schools and Student Achievement in Reading and Mathematics: A Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Roger D.; Sweetland, Scott R.; Hoy, Wayne K.

    2000-01-01

    Examines importance of a school climate characterized by high levels of academic emphasis. Drawing on effective-schools research and social-cognitive theory, uses hierarchical linear modeling to show that academic emphasis accounts for differences among urban elementary schools in student math and reading achievement. (Contains 48 references.)…

  12. Interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform. Influence on therapeutic decision-making and patient referral rates to an academic tertiary care center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helck, Andreas; Matzko, M.; Trumm, C.G.; Grosse, C.; Reiser, M.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Piltz, S.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to teleradiological reporting as a nighthawking or a regular service, teleradiological communication can be used for interdisciplinary expert consultation. We intended to evaluate an interdisciplinary consultation system based on a teleradiology platform with regard to its impact on therapeutic decision-making, directed patient referrals to an academic tertiary care center and the economic benefit for the hospital providing the service. Therefore, consultations from five secondary care centers and consecutive admissions to an academic tertiary care center were prospectively evaluated over a time period of six months. A total of 69 interdisciplinary expert consultations were performed. In 54% of the cases the patients were consecutively referred to the university hospital for further treatment. In all acutely life-threatening emergencies (n=9), fast and focused treatment by referral to the academic tertiary care center was achieved (average time to treat 130 min). The admissions to the academic tertiary care center led to improved utilization of its facilities with additional revenue of more than 1 000 000 Euro p.a. An interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform enables fast and efficient expert care with improved and accelerated patient management and improved utilization of the service providing hospital. (orig.)

  13. The Usage and Impact of Internet Enabled Phones on Academic Concentration among Students of Tertiary Institutions: A Study at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezemenaka, Emeka

    2013-01-01

    The usage of Internet enabled phones has been a 21st century phenomenon that spreads for different purposes and functions. This study looks into the usage and perceived effect implications internet enabled phones have on the academic performance of the tertiary students using University of Ibadan students in Nigeria as a case study. The study was…

  14. Use of Social Media and Its Impact on Academic Performance of Tertiary Institution Students: A Study of Students of Koforidua Polytechnic, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Acheaw, M.; Larson, Agatha Gifty

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to assess students' use of social media and its effect on academic performance of tertiary institutions students in Ghana with a focus on Koforidua Polytechnic students. Questionnaire was used for collecting data. Out of one thousand five hundred and seventy-eight copies of the questionnaire distributed, one thousand five hundred…

  15. Influence of Marital Stressors on Role Performance of Married Academic Women in Tertiary Institutions in Cross River State and Need for Counselling Therein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpechi, Philip A.; Usani, Michael Okoi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of marital stressors on role performance of married academic women of tertiary institutions in Cross River State. In order to accomplish the purpose of the study, two objectives and corresponding two hypotheses were postulated to guide the study. The survey research design was adopted in the study. A total of…

  16. A Review of Psychometric Data Analysis and Applications in Modelling of Academic Achievement in Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Geraldine; McGuinness, Colm; Owende, Philip; Carthy, Aiden

    2014-01-01

    Increasing college participation rates, and diversity in student population, is posing a challenge to colleges in their attempts to facilitate learners achieve their full academic potential. Learning analytics is an evolving discipline with capability for educational data analysis that could enable better understanding of learning process, and…

  17. A Case Study Analysis of Clt Methods to Develop Grammar Competency for Academic Writing Purposes at Tertiary Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almodad Biduk Asmani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research project is to find out how effective grammar teaching and learning using the Principled CLT method can improve the ability of freshman Binus University students to understand and use grammar knowledge for academic writing purposes. The research project is expected to result in computer-animated format which can be used as one of the main tools in teaching and learning grammar at tertiary level. The research project applies the descriptive quantitative approach, and thus uses numeric data. The research project involves two subject groups, which are experimental and control. The two groups are pre-tested so as to find out their level of grammar competency by their academic writing works. The experimental group receives the treatment of grammar learning by using the Principled CLT approach, while the control group receives the standard CLT approach. Then, the two groups have the post-test, and the results are compared. Through statistics, the numerical data show that there is no significant difference between the two methods’ results, and as a result, either method has its own strength and weaknesses. If one is to be implemented, it must be linked to the specific goals and purposes that each entails.  

  18. Urban Agriculture in Thessaloniki. An academic project meets reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Gavrilidou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nearly all projects with Urban Agriculture (UA impact in Western Europe, in the USA, and in the Developing World are started and thought by single initiatives. In so-called “bottom-up” processes of small scale, they gain energy and power by a fast and none formalized implementation. A master studio project at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, “Red and Green”, presents in contrast a proposal for a huge inner city area with focus on UA as generator for a socio-economic transformation towards a green economy based on social community spirit, considering in particular the crisis situation in Greece. The approach which combines the idea of integrating both top-down and bottom-up forces, attempts an integration of permanent and temporarily elements, and by this, the master plan searches qualities as an innovative planning tool. After a phase of intensive dissemination and evaluation on international level with encouraging attentiveness and recognition, a strategy for a realization in steps was created by KIPOS3, a start-up initiative organized by a group of master students to bring in the city of Thessaloniki the concept a common garden manageable by the residents under also the Municipality stewardship. A widespread network of small fallow islands in the city of Thessaloniki was detected and in a process of “mapping the city” several lots were analyzed referring for good chances of implementation. The description of the long way of discussions with landowners, the municipality and potentially users, the difficulties and obstacles, documents once more the initiators strong will and immense energy, which is necessary for a successful start-up. With financial support of a Greek Fellowship a first garden was created in 2015. The history of KIPOS3 garden in Thessaloniki consists finally a useful lesson on the role of “foodscape” on the reactivation of inactive institutions and communities, a lesson of resilience in a city of deep

  19. Life Cycle Assessment of urban wastewater reuse with ozonation as tertiary treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Ivan; Rodriguez, Antonio; Rosal, Roberto; Fernandez-Alba, Amadeo R.

    2009-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment has been used to compare different scenarios involving wastewater reuse, with special focus on toxicity-related impact categories. The study is based on bench-scale experiments applying ozone and ozone in combination with hydrogen peroxide to a wastewater effluent from a Spanish sewage treatment plant. Two alternative characterisation models have been used to account for toxicity of chemical substances, namely USES-LCA and EDIP97. Four alternative scenarios have been assessed: wastewater discharge plus desalination supply, wastewater reuse without tertiary treatment, wastewater reuse after applying a tertiary treatment consisting on ozonation, and wastewater reuse after applying ozonation in combination with hydrogen peroxide. The results highlight the importance of including wastewater pollutants in LCA of wastewater systems assessing toxicity, since the contribution of wastewater pollutants to the overall toxicity scores in this case study can be above 90%. Key pollutants here are not only heavy metals and other priority pollutants, but also non-regulated pollutants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Wastewater reuse after applying any of the tertiary treatments considered appears as the best choice from an ecotoxicity perspective. As for human toxicity, differences between scenarios are smaller, and taking into account the experimental and modelling uncertainty, the benefits of tertiary treatment are not so clear. From a global warming potential perspective, tertiary treatments involve a potential 85% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions when compared with desalination

  20. Rural–Urban Disparity in Students’ Academic Performance in Visual Arts Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Afia Amponsaa Opoku-Asare

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rural–urban disparity in economic and social development in Ghana has led to disparities in educational resources and variations in students’ achievement in different parts of the country. Nonetheless, senior high schools (SHSs in rural and urban schools follow the same curriculum, and their students write the same West Africa Senior Secondary Certificate Examination (WASSCE, which qualifies them to access higher education in Ghana’s public universities. Urban SHSs are also recognized nationwide as good schools where students make it to university. Moreover, performance patterns with regard to admission of SHS graduates into university also vary between rural and urban schools; consequently, some parents do everything to get their children in urban SHSs, even consenting to placement in visual arts, a program deemed appropriate only for academically weak students. This study therefore adopted the qualitative-quantitative research approach with interview, observation, and questionnaire administration to investigate the critical factors that affect academic performance of SHS students, particularly those in visual arts as case study. Findings from six public SHSs in Kumasi—two each in rural, peri-urban, and urban areas—revealed that urban schools perform better than rural and peri-urban schools because they attract and admit junior high school graduates with excellent Basic Education Certificate Examination (BECE grades, have better infrastructure, more qualified teachers, prestigious names, and character that motivate their students to do well. This suggests that bridging the rural–urban gap in educational resources could promote quality teaching and learning, and thereby raise academic achievement for SHS students in Ghana.

  1. Intermediate uveitis: pattern of etiology, complications, treatment and outcome in a tertiary academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Thomas; Boehringer, Daniel; Heinzelmann, Sonja

    2017-04-27

    Patients with intermediate uveitis (IU) represent a heterogenous group characterized by a wide spectrum of etiologies and regional differences. Aim of the study was to analyze the characteristics of patients with IU examined in an academic center in Germany. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the clinical records of all patients with intermediate uveitis referred to the Eye Center, University of Freiburg from 2007 to 2014. Diagnosis followed the Standardization in Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) criteria. Data analysis included: etiology of IU, demographics, complications, treatment and visual acuity. We identified 159 patients with intermediate uveitis during that period. Mean age at diagnosis was 35 years. Most are female (64%), and the mean duration of IU was 6.1 years (range 1 month - 35 years). Etiology of IU was idiopathic in 59%. Multiple sclerosis (MS) (20%) and sarcoidosis (10%) were frequent systemic causes of IU. Other etiologies including infectious diseases (tuberculosis, borreliosis) or immune-mediated conditions (eg, after vaccination) were present in 11%. The pattern of complications included macular edema (CME) (36%), cataract (24%), secondary glaucoma (7%), and epiretinal membrane formation (19%). Periphlebitis and optic neuritis were more frequent in conjunction with MS. Treatment comprised local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressive agents, biologics, and surgery. Best corrected visual acuity was better than 20/25 in 60% of the eyes after more than 10 years of follow-up. In our German academic center, most IU cases were idiopathic or associated with MS or sarcoidosis. In contrast to other countries, infectious cases were rare. Patients' overall visual prognosis is favorable even when the duration of IU has been long and and despite numerous complications.

  2. ACADEMIC MOTIVATION AMONG URBAN & RURAL STUDENTS: A Study on Traditional Vs Open Education System in India

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    Shashi SINGH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Higher education today is being viewed as a tool to achieve prosperity and high living standards. It is thus looked upon as a service to the society and a powerful weapon to change the society for its betterment. Motivation plays a crucial role in learning. Motivation energizes the behavior of the individual. It also directs the behavior towards specific goals. It helps in acquisition of knowledge, develops social qualities, increases initiation of persistence in activities, leads to improved performance and develops a sense of discipline in the individual. This paper aims to compare Open Education System and Traditional Education System with respect to Academic Motivation of students towards the two types of education systems. This paper also tries to compare the academic motivation of rural and urban based students. It has been found in this paper that there is significant different in Academic Motivation among students of the two types of education systems. The significant difference in academic motivation has also been found in urban and rural based students, compared between the two systems. The paper has also forwarded some suggestions which may be considered by the policy makers and administrators of OES to help increase the academic motivation of students of OES.Academic Motivation, Traditional Education System, Open Education System, Higher Education System, Rural based students, and Urban based students

  3. A study of factors influencing surgical cesarean delivery times in an academic tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Fiol, A; Meng, M-L; Danhakl, V; Kim, M; Miller, R; Smiley, R

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of hospital-specific average cesarean delivery operative times, and factors influencing length of surgery, can serve as a guide for anesthesiologists when choosing the optimal anesthetic technique. The aim of this study was to determine operative times and the factors influencing those times for cesarean delivery. We conducted a retrospective review of all 1348 cesarean deliveries performed at an academic hospital in 2011. The primary outcome was mean operative time for first, second, third and fourth or more cesarean deliveries. The secondary goal was to identify factors influencing operative time. Variables included age, body mass index, previous surgery, gestational age, urgency of cesarean delivery, anesthesia type, surgeon's seniority, layers closed, and performance of tubal ligation. Mean (standard deviation) operative times for first (n=857), second (n=353), third (n=108) and fourth or more (n=30) cesarean deliveries were 56 (19), 60 (19), 69 (28) and 82 (31) minutes, respectively (P cesarean delivery or the presence of other factors that could increase operative time may warrant catheter-based anesthetic techniques or the addition of adjunctive medications to prolong spinal anesthetic block. Institutional and individual surgeon factors may play an even more important role in determining surgical time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Creating a Successful Academic Climate for Urban Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Terri

    2009-01-01

    Teaching students in the inner city has been likened to hugging a porcupine--teachers nudge them toward success while getting pricked along the way. Many urban students perform below proficiency level and are difficult to manage. Their apathy toward completing class assignments, let alone homework, compounds the problem. As a whole, educators do…

  5. Needlestick and sharps injuries among health care workers at public tertiary hospitals in an urban community in Mongolia

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    Tsolmon Muugolog

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Needlestick and sharps injuries (NSSIs are one of the major risk factors for blood-borne infections at healthcare facilities. This study examines the current situation of NSSIs among health care workers at public tertiary hospitals in an urban community in Mongolia and explores strategies for the prevention of these injuries. Findings A survey of 621 health care workers was undertaken in two public tertiary hospitals in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, in July 2006. A semi-structured and self-administered questionnaire was distributed to study injection practices and the occurrence of NSSIs. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate factors associated with experiencing NSSIs. Among the 435 healthcare workers who returned a completed questionnaire, the incidence of NSSIs during the previous 3 months was 38.4%. Health care workers were more likely to report NSSIs if they worked longer than 35 hours per week (odds ratio, OR: 2.47; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.31-4.66 and administered more than 10 injections per day (OR: 4.76; 95% CI: 1.97-11.49. The likelihood of self-reporting NSSIs significantly decreased if health care workers adhered to universal precautions (OR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.17-0.68. Conclusions NSSIs are a common public health problem at public tertiary hospitals in Mongolia. The promotion of adequate working conditions, elimination of excessive injection use, and adherence to universal precautions will be important for the future control of potential infections with blood-borne pathogens due to occupational exposures to sharps in this setting.

  6. Descriptive Analysis on the Impacts of Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy on a Chinese Urban Tertiary Hospital.

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    Wei Tian

    Full Text Available Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy (UZMDP mandates no price mark-ups on any drug dispensed by a healthcare institution, and covers the medicines not included in the China's National Essential Medicine System. Five tertiary hospitals in Beijing, China implemented UZMDP in 2012. Its impacts on these hospitals are unknown. We described the effects of UZMDP on a participating hospital, Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, China (JST.This retrospective longitudinal study examined the hospital-level data of JST and city-level data of tertiary hospitals of Beijing, China (BJT 2009-2015. Rank-sum tests and join-point regression analyses were used to assess absolute changes and differences in trends, respectively.In absolute terms, after the UZDMP implementation, there were increased annual patient-visits and decreased ratios of medicine-to-healthcare-charges (RMOH in JST outpatient and inpatient services; however, in outpatient service, physician work-days decreased and physician-workload and inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges increased, while the inpatient physician work-days increased and inpatient mortality-rate reduced. Interestingly, the decreasing trend in inpatient mortality-rate was neutralized after UZDMP implementation. Compared with BJT and under influence of UZDMP, JST outpatient and inpatient services both had increasing trends in annual patient-visits (annual percentage changes[APC] = 8.1% and 6.5%, respectively and decreasing trends in RMOH (APC = -4.3% and -5.4%, respectively, while JST outpatient services had increasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges (APC = 3.4% and JST inpatient service had decreasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit medicine-charges (APC = -5.2%.Implementation of UZMDP seems to increase annual patient-visits, reduce RMOH and have different impacts on outpatient and inpatient services in a Chinese urban tertiary hospital.

  7. Descriptive Analysis on the Impacts of Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy on a Chinese Urban Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yuan, Jiangfan; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Lanjing

    2016-01-01

    Universal Zero-Markup Drug Policy (UZMDP) mandates no price mark-ups on any drug dispensed by a healthcare institution, and covers the medicines not included in the China's National Essential Medicine System. Five tertiary hospitals in Beijing, China implemented UZMDP in 2012. Its impacts on these hospitals are unknown. We described the effects of UZMDP on a participating hospital, Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, China (JST). This retrospective longitudinal study examined the hospital-level data of JST and city-level data of tertiary hospitals of Beijing, China (BJT) 2009-2015. Rank-sum tests and join-point regression analyses were used to assess absolute changes and differences in trends, respectively. In absolute terms, after the UZDMP implementation, there were increased annual patient-visits and decreased ratios of medicine-to-healthcare-charges (RMOH) in JST outpatient and inpatient services; however, in outpatient service, physician work-days decreased and physician-workload and inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges increased, while the inpatient physician work-days increased and inpatient mortality-rate reduced. Interestingly, the decreasing trend in inpatient mortality-rate was neutralized after UZDMP implementation. Compared with BJT and under influence of UZDMP, JST outpatient and inpatient services both had increasing trends in annual patient-visits (annual percentage changes[APC] = 8.1% and 6.5%, respectively) and decreasing trends in RMOH (APC = -4.3% and -5.4%, respectively), while JST outpatient services had increasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit healthcare charges (APC = 3.4%) and JST inpatient service had decreasing trend in inflation-adjusted per-visit medicine-charges (APC = -5.2%). Implementation of UZMDP seems to increase annual patient-visits, reduce RMOH and have different impacts on outpatient and inpatient services in a Chinese urban tertiary hospital.

  8. Classroom Practices and Academic Outcomes in Urban Afterschool Programs: Alleviating Social-Behavioral Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Hwang, Sophia H. J.; Kieffer, Michael J.; Yates, Miranda

    2018-01-01

    Given the potential of afterschool programs to support youth in urban, low-income communities, we examined the role of afterschool classroom ecology in the academic outcomes of Latino and African American youth with and without social-behavioral risk. Using multireporter methods and multilevel analysis, we find that positive classroom ecology…

  9. Parent Involvement and Academic Outcomes among Urban Adolescents: Examining the Role of School Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterer, Aryn M.; Wehrspann, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which parent involvement in education was directly and indirectly (via school engagement) related to academic outcomes in an effort to more fully understand the school experiences of urban adolescents. Participants (80% racial/ethnic minority; n = 108) were in grades 6, 7 or 8. In the Fall and subsequent…

  10. Adolescents' Motivation in the Context of an Academic Vocabulary Intervention in Urban Middle School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesaux, Nonie K.; Harris, Julie Russ; Sloane, Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    In a large urban district's ELA classrooms, an academic vocabulary intervention designed to improve linguistically diverse 6th-graders' reading and language skills was implemented and evaluated. These classrooms were characterized by high numbers of struggling readers, and linguistic diversity was the norm. As part of the evaluation, this study…

  11. The Relationship between Black Racial Identity and Academic Achievement in Urban Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brian E.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between Black racial identity and academic achievement in urban settings. Using Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1918) as a comparative framework, the author describes current practices and suggests practical applications of empirical findings for practicing classroom teachers of African American students.…

  12. Demographic and Educational Influences on Academic Motivation, Competence, and Achievement in Minority Urban Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Rebecca A.

    Using the Scale of Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Orientation in the Classroom (S. Harter, 1980) and the Self-Perception Profile for Children (S. Harter, 1985), this study of 222 urban early adolescents (median age=149 months) examined differences in motivation that might affect academic achievement and perceptions of competence. Socioeconomic status…

  13. Differences in Physical Activity and Academic Performance between Urban and Rural Schoolchildren in Slovenia

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    Vedrana Sember

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, the existing studies of relations between physical activity (PA, academic performance (AP and urbanization grade have used subjective self-reporting tools for assessing physical activity, which usually led to an underestimation of true PA. We have attempted to overcome this and have investigated the link between PA in rural and urban Slovenian schoolchildren by an objective assessment of PA, using a multi-sensor SenseWear PRO armband. The analysis showed that urban children in Slovenia are more physically active than rural children are and achieve better AP (mathematics grade. Additionally, children who are active between 60 and 120 minutes of MVPA/day have higher AP than their peers who are active less than 60 or more than 120 minutes, whereas the latter groups did not differ in academic performance.

  14. Treatment of patients with a history of penicillin allergy in a large tertiary-care academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Matthieu; Bégin, Philippe; Bouchard, Hugues; Cloutier, Jonathan; Lacombe-Barrios, Jonathan; Paradis, Jean; Des Roches, Anne; Laufer, Brian; Paradis, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing antibiotics to patients with a history of penicillin allergy is common in clinical practice. Opting for non-beta-lactam antibiotics has its inconveniences and is often unnecessary, because most of these patients are in fact not allergic. This study aimed to determine how physicians in a large Canadian tertiary-care academic hospital without allergists on staff treat patients with a history of penicillin allergy. A retrospective study was conducted during a 1-year period among all patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit, coronary care unit, and internal medicine wards. Files of patients with a record of penicillin allergy were reviewed to assess the need for antibiotics during their hospitalization and the decision-making process underlying the choice of antibiotic. The additional costs of alternative antibiotics were calculated. The files of 1738 patients admitted over a 1-year period were hand reviewed. A history of penicillin allergy was found in 172 patients (9.9%). The allergic reaction was described in only 30% of cases and left unmentioned in 20.7%. Beta-lactam antibiotics were used on 56 occasions despite a history of penicillin allergy. The use of alternative antibiotics in place of the beta-lactam standard of care carried an additional cost of $15,672 Canadian. Alleged penicillin allergy is common among hospitalized patients and leads to substantial additional costs. Poor documentation of penicillin allergy likely reflects a lack of knowledge on this issue in the medical community, which impairs optimal treatment of these patients. Increased education on this matter is needed, and allergists on staff could be part of the solution. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Perceived School and Neighborhood Safety, Neighborhood Violence and Academic Achievement in Urban School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    AJ, Milam; CDM, Furr-Holden; PJ, Leaf

    2010-01-01

    Community and school violence continue to be a major public health problem, especially among urban children and adolescents. Little research has focused on the effect of school safety and neighborhood violence on academic performance. This study examines the effect of the school and neighborhood climate on academic achievement among a population of 3rd-5th grade students in an urban public school system. Community and school safety were assessed using the School Climate Survey, an annual city-wide assessment of student’s perception of school and community safety. Community violence was measured using the Neighborhood Inventory for Environmental Typology, an objective observational assessment of neighborhood characteristics. Academic achievement was measured using the Maryland State Assessment (MSA), a standardized exam given to all Maryland 3rd-8th graders. School Climate Data and MSA data were aggregated by school and grade. Objective assessments of neighborhood environment and students’ self-reported school and neighborhood safety were both strongly associated with academic performance. Increasing neighborhood violence was associated with statistically significant decreases from 4.2%-8.7% in math and reading achievement; increasing perceived safety was associated with significant increases in achievement from 16%-22%. These preliminary findings highlight the adverse impact of perceived safety and community violence exposure on primary school children’s academic performance. PMID:21197388

  16. Acinetobacter baumannii: Epidemiological and Beta-Lactamase Data From Two Tertiary Academic Hospitals in Tshwane, South Africa

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    Michelle Lowe

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that is increasingly responsible for hospital-acquired infections. The increasing prevalence of carbapenem resistant A. baumannii has left clinicians with limited treatment options. Last line antimicrobials (i.e., polymyxins and glycylcyclines are often used as treatment options. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of selected β-lactamase genes from A. baumannii isolates obtained from patients with hospital-acquired infections and to determine the genetic relationship and epidemiological profiles among clinical A. baumannii isolates collected from two tertiary academic hospitals in the Tshwane region, South Africa (SA. Multiplex-PCR (M-PCR assays were performed to detect selected resistance genes. The collected isolates’ genetic relatedness was determined by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The acquired oxacillinase (OXA genes, notably blaOXA-23-like were prevalent in the A. baumannii isolates. The M-PCR assays showed that the isolates collected from hospital A contained the OXA-23-like (96%; n = 69/72 genes and the isolates collected from hospital B contained the OXA-23-like (91%; n = 63/69 and OXA-58-like (4%; n = 3/69 genes. Colistin resistance was found in 1% of the isolates (n = 2/141 and tigecycline intermediate resistance was found in 6% of the isolates (n = 8/141. The A. baumannii isolates were genetically diverse. Molecular epidemiological data showed that specific sequence types (STs (ST106, ST229, ST258 and ST208 were established in both hospitals, while ST848 was established in hospital A and ST502, ST339 and the novel ST1552 were established in hospital B. ST848 (established in hospital A was predominately detected in ICU wards whereas ST208, ST339 and the novel ST1552 (established in hospital B were detected in ICUs and the general wards. The origin of the A. baumannii isolates in the hospitals may be due to

  17. The impact of managed care and current governmental policies on an urban academic health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J L; Peterson, D J; Muehlstedt, S G; Zera, R T; West, M A; Bubrick, M P

    2001-10-01

    Managed care and governmental policies have restructured hospital reimbursement. We examined reimbursement trends in trauma care to assess the impact of this market driven change on an urban academic health center. Patients injured between January 1997 and December 1999 were analyzed for Injury Severity Score (ISS), length of hospital stay, hospital cost, payer, and reimbursement. Between 1997 and 1999, the volume of patients with an ISS less than 9 increased and length of stay decreased. In addition, overall cost, payment, and profit margin increased. Commercially insured patients accounted for this margin increase, because the margins of managed care and government insured patients experienced double-digit decreases. Patients with ISS of 9 or greater also experienced a volume increase and a reduction in length of stay; however, costs within this group increased greater than payments, thereby reducing profit margin. Whereas commercially insured patients maintained their margin, managed care and government insured patients did not (double- and triple-digit decreases). Managed care and current governmental policies have a negative impact on urban academic health center reimbursement. Commercial insurers subsidize not only the uninsured but also the government insured and managed care patients as well. National awareness of this issue and policy action are paramount to urban academic health centers and may also benefit commercial insurers.

  18. Contraceptive usage and awareness among postpartum mothers in urban field practice area of a tertiary hospital

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    Tanvir Kaur Sidhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study contraceptive usage and awareness among postpartum mothers. Objective: To assess prevalence of postpartum contraception and factors affecting the usage of contraceptives in Urban area. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in the Urban Field practice area of Adesh Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Bathinda. All females who delivered within last one year were included in the study. A pre-structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and other details. A total of 92 females were included. The appropriate statistical analysis was done to present the results. Results: 30.4% females had adopted one or the other postpartum contraceptive measure. Condom was the most common method used. Usage of postpartum contraception was significantly associated with women’s and husband’s education, type of delivery and availing of antenatal and postnatal visits. The main reason for not using postpartum contraception was lack of knowledge and access. 16.3% females had unmet need of postpartum contraception. Conclusions: Overall usage of postpartum contraception was low and mainly related to lack of awareness and knowledge.

  19. Emergent Awake tracheostomy--The five-year experience at an urban tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Christina H; Friedman, Remy; White, Priscilla E; Mady, Leila J; Kalyoussef, Evelyne

    2015-11-01

    There are few studies that discuss the issues surrounding emergent awake tracheostomy. We aim to review the indications, anesthesia used, complications, and outcomes of patients undergoing urgent awake tracheostomy. Chart review. Medical charts of patients who underwent an emergent awake tracheostomy at our institution-affiliated tertiary care center over a 5-year period from 2009 to 2014 were reviewed. Data were collected from inpatient, outpatient, and operative records. Sixty-eight patients underwent emergent awake tracheostomy. Over half presented with hoarseness (n=37, 54.4%) and/or stridor (n=37, 54.4%). Acute upper airway obstruction secondary to malignancy was the most common indication and accounted for 58 cases (85.3%). Thirty-nine (70.1%) of the 55 patients with squamous cell carcinoma presented with advanced disease (stage III or IV). Other indications included glottic or subglottic stenosis (4.4%), failure to intubate (2.9%), and other (7.4%). Local anesthesia was used alone in 35.3% of cases and in combination with conscious sedation in 64.7% of cases. Mild bleeding occurred postoperatively in five patients (7.4%). There were no other postoperative complications. Nineteen patients were lost to follow-up. The mean follow-up of 49 patients was 7.2 weeks, ranging from 2 to 261 weeks. Long-term complications occurred in three patients and included tracheitis 7.4% and suprastomal granuloma 2.9%. Eleven patients (22%) were decannulated at a mean of 11.8 months following tracheostomy. Emergent awake tracheostomy should be considered in patients with impeding airway obstruction and is a safe and effective method to secure an airway in these patients. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. The Relationship between Bible Literacy and Behavioral and Academic Outcomes in Urban Areas: A Meta-Analysis

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    Jeynes, William

    2010-01-01

    A meta-analysis is undertaken, including 11 studies, to determine whether there is a relationship between Bible knowledge on one hand and academic and behavioral outcomes on the other among those living in urban areas. The results indicate that increased Bible knowledge is associated with higher levels of student academic achievement and positive…

  1. An Evaluation of Training for Lay Providers in the Use of Motivational Interviewing to Promote Academic Achievement among Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Patricia; Ward, Nadia L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined training outcomes for lay service providers who participated in a motivational interviewing (MI) training program designed to help increase intrinsic motivation and academic achievement among urban, low-income minority youth. Seventeen lay academic advisors received 16 hours of workshop training in MI. Additionally, two 2-hour…

  2. The evolution of urban mobility: The interplay of academic and policy perspectives

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    Peter Jones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Urban mobility in Western countries has evolved substantially over the past fifty years, from an early interest in catering for growing car ownership and use through major road expansion, to the current emphasis on reducing car use and cutting back on road provision, encouraging sustainable travel and promoting liveable cities with a high quality of life. This can be observed in the changing patterns of car use in many European cities over time (i.e. a rapid increase followed by stabilisation and now decline. This evolution can be related to changes in the transport policy paradigm, which has been heavily influenced by the involvement of an increasing range of academic disciplines, many of which have contributed to modifying the supporting data collection, modelling and appraisal methodologies. The paper explores the varying interplay over time between academic/applied research and policy practice, and the methodological legacy left by earlier perspectives on urban mobility. It highlights a recent reinterpretation of mobility provided through taking a 'socio-technical perspective', and speculates on how policy thinking on urban mobility might further evolve over the next forty years.

  3. Experiences of violence and deficits in academic achievement among urban primary school children in Jamaica.

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    Baker-Henningham, Helen; Meeks-Gardner, Julie; Chang, Susan; Walker, Susan

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between children's experiences of three different types of violence and academic achievement among primary school children in Kingston, Jamaica. A cross-sectional study of 1300 children in grade 5 [mean (S.D.) age: 11 (0.5) years] from 29 government primary schools in urban areas of Kingston and St. Andrew, Jamaica, was conducted. Academic achievement (mathematics, reading, and spelling) was assessed using the Wide Range Achievement Test. Children's experiences of three types of violence - exposure to aggression among peers at school, physical punishment at school, and exposure to community violence - were assessed by self-report using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Fifty-eight percent of the children experienced moderate or high levels of all three types of violence. Boys had poorer academic achievement and experienced higher levels of aggression among peers and physical punishment at school than girls. Children's experiences of the three types of violence were independently associated with all three indices of academic achievement. There was a dose-response relationship between children's experiences of violence and academic achievement with children experiencing higher levels of violence having the poorest academic achievement and children experiencing moderate levels having poorer achievement than those experiencing little or none. Exposure to three different types of violence was independently associated with poor school achievement among children attending government, urban schools in Jamaica. Programs are needed in schools to reduce the levels of aggression among students and the use of physical punishment by teachers and to provide support for children exposed to community violence. Children in Jamaica and the wider Caribbean experience significant amounts of violence in their homes, communities, and schools. In this study, we demonstrate a dose-response relationship between primary school

  4. Multiple victimization experiences of urban elementary school students: associations with psychosocial functioning and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Melissa K; Finkelhor, David; Kantor, Glenda Kaufman

    2007-05-01

    This study explored the victimization experiences of urban elementary school students to determine whether subsets of youth emerged with similar victimization profiles (e.g., no victimization, multiple types of victimization). It also evaluated whether multiple victimization was associated with greater psychological distress and lower academic performance. Participants were 689 fifth grade students from an urban, ethnically diverse school district in the Northeast. Youth completed self-report measures in school about bullying victimization, victimization in the home and community, and psychosocial functioning. Cluster analysis suggested the existence of three distinct youth profiles: those with minimal victimization, those victimized primarily by their peers, and those with multiple types of victimizations. As hypothesized, youth with multiple victimizations experienced more psychological distress and earned lower grades than their peers. Findings highlight the heterogeneity of youth victimization experiences and their relations to functioning, and have implications for treatment planning among practitioners working with youth.

  5. EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND ACADEMIC SATISFACTION: A Study on Rural and Urban Students of Traditional Vs Open Education System in India

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    Shashi SINGH,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A satisfaction and dissatisfaction level within an individual influences the motivation level and his/her performance throughout the life. When an individual is satisfied with his/her work, he/she gets pleasure and feels motivated. Obtaining satisfaction from their education system is very important for students as this will lead to better learning possibilities. This paper aims to compare the level of academic satisfaction among the students of Traditional Education System and Open Education System. This paper also investigates academic satisfaction of urban and rural based students and comparing them over traditional (Urban: 110; Rural: 90, and open (Urban: 80; Rural: 71 education system. Statistical tests demonstrate that there is significant difference in the level of academic satisfaction among the students of Open Education System (OES and Traditional Education System (TES.

  6. A Study of African American Male Students' Academic Achievement and School Attitude in an Urban Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Roslyn J. F. Billy

    2013-01-01

    With the signing of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001, much emphasis has been placed on the accountability of schools and school districts to ensure higher academic achievement of all students. The achievement gap remains among African American male students in urban school districts. This purposed quantitative study explored the relationship…

  7. Recognizing Internet Addiction: Prevalence and Relationship to Academic Achievement in Adolescents Enrolled in Urban and Rural Greek High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Vasilis; Alexandraki, Kiriaki; Motti-Stefanidi, Frosso

    2013-01-01

    This study aims: a) to estimate the prevalence of internet addiction among adolescents of urban and rural areas in Greece, b) to examine whether the Internet Addiction Test cut-off point is applicable to them and c) to investigate the phenomenon's association with academic achievement. Participants were 2090 adolescents (mean age 16, 1036 males,…

  8. Do Intervention Impacts on Academic Achievement Vary by School Climate? Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Meghan P.; Cappella, Elise; O'Connor, Erin E.; McClowry, Sandee G.

    2015-01-01

    Given established links between social-emotional skills and academic achievement, there is growing support for implementing universal social/behavioral interventions in early schooling (Jones & Bouffard, 2012). Advocates have been particularly interested in implementing such programming in low income urban schools where students are likely to…

  9. Study of knowledge, attitude and practices regarding dengue in the urban and rural field practice area of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Pune, India

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    Samir Singru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dengue is the most common disease among all the arthropod-borne viral diseases. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available for dengue. The sole method of prevention and control is the knowledge attitude and practices (KAP for the same. Although, dengue is considered an urban- and semi-urban disease, in recent years, due to water storage practices and large-scale development activities in rural areas, dengue has become endemic in rural areas of India as well. Aims: To assess the KAP regarding dengue. Settings and Design: Urban and rural field practice area of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: A pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was used to study the knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding dengue. Stratified random sampling technique was used. A modified B. G. Prasad criterion was used for socio-economic classification. Statistical Analysis Used: KAP represented as proportion (%. Chi-square test was used as a test of significance. P value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: 68.4% in urban areas and 40.4% in rural area knew that dengue is transmitted by mosquito. 62.6% in urban areas and 48% in rural areas respectively stated fever as a symptom of dengue. The use of anti-adult mosquito measures was 48.05% and 51.42% in urban and rural area respectively Conclusions: There is a definite need to increase the information education communication activities for dengue in the study area.

  10. Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration under Ultrasound Guidance: Experience from an Academic Tertiary Care Center in Lebanon

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    Rita Hajj Boutros

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid nodules are common. Malignancy was reported in only 5-15% of cases. Fine needle aspiration under US guidance (USG-FNA proved to be accurate for the detection of thyroid cancer. This is a retrospective review of 400 radiology and cytology USG-FNA reports, randomly selected among those done at the Radiology Department at a tertiary care center in Beirut during the last five years. The specimen was inadequate in 60 (12% of cases but FNA was repeated in 10 cases only. The final diagnosis was benign in 76.7% of cases, mostly in women. 35% of the malignant and 19% of the benign nodules were hypoechoic, p=0.03. No significant correlation was observed between malignancy and other ultrasonic characteristics. Hypoechogenecity was also more common in nodules with inadequate specimen (40% versus 21.4%, p=0.01. Age, gender, location and size of the nodule did not differ between groups of adequate and inadequate specimen. In conclusion, 3 out of 4 thyroid nodules referred for USG-FNA are benign, mostly in women. Inadequate specimen was observed in 12% of cases. Hypoechogenecity but not other ultrasonic characteristics was associated with malignancy and with test failure.   Key words: Thyroid nodule, fine needle aspirate, ultrasound guidance, thyroid cancer, inadequate.

  11. Pathogenic factors associated with development of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) in a tertiary academic hospital in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Elizabeth S; Mayne, Anthony L H; Louw, Susan J

    2018-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is a thrombotic microangiopathy arising from consumption of both coagulation factors and platelets. DIC is triggered by a number of clinical conditions including severe infection, trauma and obstetric complications. Early diagnosis and treatment of the underlying condition is paramount. A high clinical index of suspicion is needed to ensure that patients at risk of developing DIC are appropriately investigated. In order to establish the clinical conditions most frequently associated with DIC, we reviewed all DIC screens received at a tertiary hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa over a 1 year period. The commonest clinical condition associated with DIC in our population was infection with 84% of patients infected with an identified pathogen. The most frequently diagnosed pathogen was HIV followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial infections. In the majority of cases, bacteria were isolated from blood cultures. In 47 patients, HIV was the only pathogen which could be isolated. A relative risk ratio of 2.73 and an odds ratio of 29.97 was attributed to HIV for development of a DIC. A malignancy was present in 51 of the patients of which approximately 60% had co-existing infection. No cause could be attributed in 30 patients. Infection was identified in the majority of the patients diagnosed with DIC in this study. HIV showed the highest relative risk ratio of all pathogens although previous studies have not suggested that HIV was strongly associated with DIC. In almost half of the HIV infected patients, there was no other pathogen isolated despite extensive investigation. This suggests that HIV has a strong association with the development of DIC, warranting further research into the relationship between HIV and disseminated microvascular thrombosis.

  12. Dissecting Costs of CT Study: Application of TDABC (Time-driven Activity-based Costing) in a Tertiary Academic Center.

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    Anzai, Yoshimi; Heilbrun, Marta E; Haas, Derek; Boi, Luca; Moshre, Kirk; Minoshima, Satoshi; Kaplan, Robert; Lee, Vivian S

    2017-02-01

    The lack of understanding of the real costs (not charge) of delivering healthcare services poses tremendous challenges in the containment of healthcare costs. In this study, we applied an established cost accounting method, the time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC), to assess the costs of performing an abdomen and pelvis computed tomography (AP CT) in an academic radiology department and identified opportunities for improved efficiency in the delivery of this service. The study was exempt from an institutional review board approval. TDABC utilizes process mapping tools from industrial engineering and activity-based costing. The process map outlines every step of discrete activity and duration of use of clinical resources, personnel, and equipment. By multiplying the cost per unit of capacity by the required task time for each step, and summing each component cost, the overall costs of AP CT is determined for patients in three settings, inpatient (IP), outpatient (OP), and emergency departments (ED). The component costs to deliver an AP CT study were as follows: radiologist interpretation: 40.1%; other personnel (scheduler, technologist, nurse, pharmacist, and transporter): 39.6%; materials: 13.9%; and space and equipment: 6.4%. The cost of performing CT was 13% higher for ED patients and 31% higher for inpatients (IP), as compared to that for OP. The difference in cost was mostly due to non-radiologist personnel costs. Approximately 80% of the direct costs of AP CT to the academic medical center are related to labor. Potential opportunities to reduce the costs include increasing the efficiency of utilization of CT, substituting lower cost resources when appropriate, and streamlining the ordering system to clarify medical necessity and clinical indications. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Successful strategies for the reduction of operating room turnover times in a tertiary care academic medical center.

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    Kodali, Bhavani S; Kim, Dennie; Bleday, Ronald; Flanagan, Hugh; Urman, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    Turnover time (TOT) is one of the classic measures of operating room (OR) efficiency. There have been numerous efforts to reduce TOTs, sometimes through the employment of a process improvement framework. However, most examples of process improvement in the TOT focus primarily on operational changes to workflows and statistical significance. These examples of process improvement do not detail the complex organizational challenges associated with implementing, expanding, and sustaining change. TOT data for general and gastrointestinal surgery were collected retrospectively over a 26-mo period at a large multispecialty academic institution. We calculated mean and median TOTs. TOTs were excluded if the sequence of cases was changed or cases were canceled. Data were retrieved from the perioperative nursing data entry system. Using performance improvement strategies, we determined how various events and organizational factors created an environment that was receptive to change. This ultimately led to a sustained decrease in the OR TOT both in the general and gastrointestinal surgery ORs that were the focus of the study (44.8 min versus 48.6 min; P managers, and change agents commonly face. Awareness of the numerous variables that may support or impede a particular change effort can inform effective change implementation strategies that are "organizationally compatible." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Attitudes and preferences toward the provision of medication abortion in an urban academic internal medicine practice.

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    Page, Cameron; Stumbar, Sarah; Gold, Marji

    2012-06-01

    Mifepristone offers internal medicine doctors the opportunity to greatly expand access to abortion for their patients. Almost 70% of pregnancy terminations, however, still occur in specialized clinics. No studies have examined the preferences of Internal Medicine patients specifically. Determine whether patient preference is a reason for the limited uptake of medication abortion among internal medicine physicians. Women aged 18-45 recruited from the waiting room in an urban academic internal medicine clinic. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to determine risk of unintended pregnancy and attitudes toward abortion. Support for provision of medication abortion in the internal medicine clinic was assessed with a yes/no question, followed by the open-ended question, "Why do you think this clinic should or should not offer medication abortion?" Subjects were asked whether it was very important, somewhat important, or not important for the internal medicine clinic to provide medication abortion. Of 102 women who met inclusion criteria, 90 completed the survey, yielding a response rate of 88%. Twenty-two percent were at risk of unintended pregnancy. 46.7% had had at least one lifetime abortion. Among those who would consider having an abortion, 67.7% responded yes to the question, "Do you think this clinic should offer medication abortions?" and 83.9% stated that it was "very important" or "somewhat important" to offer this service. Of women open to having an abortion, 87.1% stated that they would be interested in receiving a medication abortion from their primary care doctor. A clinically significant proportion of women in this urban internal medicine clinic were at risk of unintended pregnancy. Among those open to having an abortion, a wide majority would consider receiving it from their internal medicine doctor. The provision of medication abortion by internal medicine physicians has the potential to greatly expand abortion access for women.

  15. Billing and reimbursement for a bedside toxicology service at a tertiary care academic center during its first fiscal year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J; Crane, Peter W; Kamali, Michael; Reif, Marilynn; Wratni, Rose; Montante, Ronald; Loveland, Tracey

    2015-03-01

    A bedside toxicology consult service may improve clinical care, facilitate patient clearance and disposition, and result in potential cost savings for poisoning exposures. Despite this, there is scant data regarding economic feasibility for such a service. Previously published information suggests low hourly reimbursement at approximately $26.00/h at the bedside for toxicology consultations. A bedside toxicology consultant service was initiated in 2011. Coverage was available 24 h a day for 50 out of 52 weeks. Bedside rounding on toxicology consult patients was available 6/7 days per week. The practice is associated with >800 bed teaching institution in a large upstate NY region with elements of urban and suburban practice. Demographic and billing data was collected for all patients consulted upon from July 1, 2011 to June 31, 2012. In charges of $514,941 were generated during the period of data collection. Monthly average was $42,912. Net reimbursement of charges was 29 % of overall charges at $147,792. In terms of total encounters, net collection rate in which something was reimbursed or "paid" against charges for that encounter was 82.6 % of all encounters at 999/1,210. Average encounter time for inpatients, including critical care, was 1.05 h, and the average time spent for outpatients was 1.18 h. Reimbursement rates appear higher than previously reported. Revenue generated from reimbursement from toxicology consultation can result in recouping a substantial portion of a toxicologist's salary or potentially fund fellowship positions and salaries or toxicology division infrastructure.

  16. Leveraging community-academic partnerships to improve healthy food access in an urban, Kansas City, Kansas, community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabachi, Natabhona M; Kimminau, Kim S

    2012-01-01

    Americans can combat overweight (OW) and obesity by eating unprocessed, fresh foods. However, all Americans do not have equal access to these recommended foods. Low-income, minority, urban neighborhoods in particular often have limited access to healthy resources, although they are vulnerable to higher levels of OW and obesity. This project used community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles to investigate the food needs of residents and develop a business plan to improve access to healthy food options in an urban, Kansas City, Kansas, neighborhood. Partner community organizations were mobilized to conduct a Community Food Assessment survey. The surveys were accompanied by flyers that were part of the communication engagement strategy. Statistical analysis of the surveys was conducted. We engaged low-income, minority population (40% Latino, 30% African American) urban communities at the household level. Survey results provided in-depth information about residents' food needs and thoughts on how to improve food access. Results were reported to community members at a town hall style meeting. Developing a strategic plan to engage a community and develop trust is crucial to sustaining a partnership particularly when working with underserved communities. This project demonstrates that, if well managed, the benefits of academic and community partnerships outweigh the challenges thus such relationships should be encouraged and supported by communities, academic institutions, local and national government, and funders. A CBPR approach to understanding an urban community's food needs and opinions is important for comprehensive food access planning.

  17. An Examination of the Influence of Self Efficacy, Locus of Control, and Perceptions of Parent Involvement on Academic Achievement of Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myree, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Current research indicates that there is an on-going concern for the graduation rate of African American students in urban settings. This particular study sought to investigate the impact of students' self-efficacy, locus of control, and parental involvement on academic achievement via a targeted sample of urban African American high school…

  18. Health and Academic Achievement: Cumulative Effects of Health Assets on Standardized Test Scores Among Urban Youth in the United States*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Peters, Susan M.; Schwartz, Marlene; Gilstad-Hayden, Kathryn; McCaslin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine (2012) concluded that we must “strengthen schools as the heart of health.” To intervene for better outcomes in both health and academic achievement, identifying factors that impact children is essential. Study objectives are to (1) document associations between health assets and academic achievement, and (2) examine cumulative effects of these assets on academic achievement. Methods Participants include 940 students (grades 5 and 6) from 12 schools randomly selected from an urban district. Data include physical assessments, fitness testing, surveys, and district records. Fourteen health indicators were gathered including physical health (eg, body mass index [BMI]), health behaviors (eg, meeting recommendations for fruit/vegetable consumption), family environment (eg, family meals), and psychological well-being (eg, sleep quality). Data were collected 3-6 months prior to standardized testing. Results On average, students reported 7.1 health assets out of 14. Those with more health assets were more likely to be at goal for standardized tests (reading/writing/mathematics), and students with the most health assets were 2.2 times more likely to achieve goal compared with students with the fewest health assets (both p student health may also improve academic achievement, closing equity gaps in both health and academic achievement. PMID:24320151

  19. Self-medication practices in patients attending a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Urban North-West India

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    Shilpa Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to determine the frequency, reasons, and the association of self-medication with demographic and other factors reported by participants. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in 500 patients visiting a tertiary hospital in Ludhiana, North Western India. Participants were interviewed with a preset questionnaire. Data were entered into Microsoft Excel and analysis was performed using SPSS software version 16. Frequencies and proportions were calculated. Results: Of 500 study participants, 93.8% reported self-medication with no gender difference. The participants who took self-medication were of the opinion that self-medication resulted in quick cure of illness 50.75%, saved their time 17.46%, and gave them a sense of independence in 17.06%, respectively. The common reasons self-medication 45.84% for fever, 18.34% for pain, and 10.87% for headache with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs 49.4% followed by antibiotics (11.6% be the common medication. The most common source of information is local chemists/pharmacy 39%. Conclusions: Self-medication is described as a double-edged sword in India, and regulation of over-the-counter sale of antibiotics prescription medication is necessary to safeguard the populace.

  20. Parental involvement, adolescents' self-determined learning and academic achievement in Urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Cai, Tianji

    2017-02-01

    Self-determined learning is essential to academic success. The motivational resources development model argues that parents promote academic success in their children indirectly by nurturing self-determined learner. In this study, applying a structural equation modelling and using data collected from 8th graders in Zhuhai, China (n = 1009) in 2012, we aim to answer 2 research questions: (a) What forms of parental involvement are highly correlated with self-determined learning and (b) Can self-determined learning fully mediate the relationship between parental involvement and students' academic performance? We find that parental leisure involvement is positively and significantly associated with the development of self-determined learning, which in turn is significantly and positively correlated with academic achievement. Parental provision of structure or parental academic assistance is not significantly associated with students' self-regulation and students' academic achievement. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  1. Mortality pattern in otorhinolaryngology ward: A 5 years retrospective study at an urban tertiary health care center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Kumar, Satish; Chandra Sharma, Naresh; Kumar, Badal

    2017-10-01

    To recognize deaths in the otorhinolaryngology indoor wards, determine the reason behind the mortalities and recommend modifications for betterment of patient care and surgical outcomes. Data was collected from the mortality register, operation theatre registers, ward registers and case notes of patients declared dead at an urban tertiary health care center in India for a period of 5 years; from January 2012 to December 2016. The data included date of admission, age, sex, educational status, residence, and clinical diagnosis, course of hospital stay and medical cause of death. Data acquired was reviewed and statistically interpreted and presented in graphical and descriptive formats. 6157 admissions were made in otorhinolaryngology (ENT) ward in the 5 year period which included 3969 males and 2188 female patients. 58 deaths were recorded during this period which gives overall death per admission crude mortality rate of 9.42% at an average of about 12 (11.60) deaths per year. The major causes of death were malignancy and septicemia. The significance of health education, aggressive healthcare campaigns, enhancement of healthcare services and wide accessibility of healthcare services to remote areas has been emphasized. Role of structured study and protocols in the management of serious cases is highlighted along with the need for prompt referral and better interdepartmental cooperation. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Grading of Parameters for Urban Tree Inventories by City Officials, Arborists, and Academics Using the Delphi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östberg, Johan; Delshammar, Tim; Wiström, Björn; Nielsen, Anders Busse

    2013-03-01

    Tree inventories are expensive to conduct and update, so every inventory carried out must be maximized. However, increasing the number of constituent parameters increases the cost of performing and updating the inventory, illustrating the need for careful parameter selection. This article reports the results of a systematic expert rating of tree inventories aiming to quantify the relative importance of each parameter. Using the Delphi method, panels comprising city officials, arborists, and academics rated a total of 148 parameters. The total mean score, the top ranking parameters, which can serve as a guide for decision-making at practical level and for standardization of tree inventories, were: Scientific name of the tree species and genera, Vitality, Coordinates, Hazard class, and Identification number. The study also examined whether the different responsibilities and usage of urban tree databases among organizations and people engaged in urban tree inventories affected their prioritization. The results revealed noticeable dissimilarities in the ranking of parameters between the panels, underlining the need for collaboration between the research community and those commissioning, administrating, and conducting inventories. Only by applying such a transdisciplinary approach to parameter selection can urban tree inventories be strengthened and made more relevant.

  3. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors of Urban Chinese Children: Grade Level Prevalence and Academic Burden Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihe Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were (a to report grade level prevalence in physical activity and sedentary behaviors and (b to examine academic burden associations with these behaviors. School-aged children (n = 48,118 reported their physical activity, perception of physical activity sufficiency, factors for activity insufficiency, homework hours, and screen time in a typical week. Data were analyzed using general linear models and logistic regression models of Complex Samples. Prevalence results showed that children had lower physical activity and lower screen viewing time, but higher homework time during transition grades (6th, 9th, and 12th and high school years. Academic burden was cited as the primary reason for not having sufficient physical activity (76.6%. Compared to those citing academic burden, students who did not report academic burden were significantly more likely to meet physical activity guidelines (Odds Ratio (OR = 5.38, 95% CI = 4.74–6.11, but less likely to meet screen time guidelines (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.72–0.84, controlling for body mass index, gender, and grade level. Additionally, children who reported academic burdens had significantly longer average daily homework time than those who did not (p<0.01. Policy makers should promote physical activity and help children find a balance between homework and physical activity time particularly among the educational transition grades.

  4. School environmental conditions and links to academic performance and absenteeism in urban, mid-Atlantic public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, J D; McCormack, M C; Koehler, K A; Connolly, F; Clemons-Erby, D; Davis, M F; Gummerson, C; Leaf, P J; Jones, T D; Curriero, F C

    2018-05-02

    School facility conditions, environment, and perceptions of safety and learning have been investigated for their impact on child development. However, it is important to consider how the environment separately influences academic performance and attendance after controlling for school and community factors. Using results from the Maryland School Assessment, we considered outcomes of school-level proficiency in reading and math plus attendance and chronic absences, defined as missing 20 or more days, for grades 3-5 and 6-8 at 158 urban schools. Characteristics of the environment included school facility conditions, density of nearby roads, and an index industrial air pollution. Perceptions of school safety, learning, and institutional environment were acquired from a School Climate Survey. Also considered were neighborhood factors at the community statistical area, including demographics, crime, and poverty based on school location. Poisson regression adjusted for over-dispersion was used to model academic achievement and multiple linear models were used for attendance. Each 10-unit change in facility condition index, denoting worse quality buildings, was associated with a decrease in reading (1.0% (95% CI: 0.1-1.9%) and math scores (0.21% (95% CI: 0.20-0.40), while chronic absences increased by 0.75% (95% CI: 0.30-1.39). Each log increase the EPA's Risk Screening Environmental Indicator (RSEI) value for industrial hazards, resulted in a marginally significant trend of increasing absenteeism (p < 0.06), but no association was observed with academic achievement. All results were robust to school-level measures of racial composition, free and reduced meals eligibility, and community poverty and crime. These findings provide empirical evidence for the importance of the community and school environment, including building conditions and neighborhood toxic substance risk, on academic achievement and attendance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Social Media Use, Loneliness, and Academic Achievement: A Correlational Study with Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Roque; Golz, Nancy; Polega, Meaghan

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the association between social media use, loneliness, and academic achievement in high school students and identified the demographic characteristics associated with these three elements. This study also aimed to identify the percentage of variance in loneliness accounted for by social media use and GPA. Participants were 345…

  6. Academic Achievement and Transcendental Meditation: A Study with At-Risk Urban Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidich, Sanford; Mjasiri, Shujaa; Nidich, Randi; Rainforth, Maxwell; Grant, James; Valosek, Laurent; Chang, Walter; Zigler, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    The middle school level is of particular concern to educators because of poor standardized test performance. This study evaluated change in academic achievement in public middle school students practicing the Transcendental Meditation[R] program compared to controls. A total of 189 students who were below proficiency level at baseline in English…

  7. Improving Academic Outcomes in Poor Urban Schools through Nature-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camasso, Michael J.; Jagannathan, Radha

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents results from the evaluation of the Nurture thru Nature (NtN) programme, a natural science and environmental education intervention designed to help elementary school children from disadvantaged backgrounds increase their knowledge of science and strengthen overall academic performance. Using an experimental design the pilot NtN…

  8. Performing the Grade: Urban Latino Youth, Gender Performance, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foiles Sifuentes, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the intersection of race, gender, class, and academic success through an ethnographic case study in a Texas charter high school. The 98% working-class, Latino student population was exposed to an array of stigmas ascribed to their persons based on negative social stereotypes of race, ethnicity, gender, and class due to the…

  9. Homeless Students and Academic Achievement: Evidence from a Large Urban Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kerri J.

    2016-01-01

    Child homelessness has recently reached levels unprecedented in the United States since the Great Depression. Contemporary research has attempted to isolate the effects of homelessness on education, with mixed results. This study reports results from a study in one large urban area and finds that there is no meaningful difference in achievement…

  10. The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative: Working to Reverse the Obesity Epidemic through Academically Based Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Francis E.

    2009-01-01

    The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative (AUNI) presents a fruitful partnership between faculty and students at a premier research university and members of the surrounding community aimed at addressing the problem of childhood obesity. AUNI uses a problem-solving approach to learning by focusing course activities, including service-learning, on…

  11. Academic Success of Urban African American Elementary Students in Title I Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The researcher investigated the achievement of third- and fifth-grade urban African American students who attended science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Non-STEM, and Theme Title I schools in science and mathematics on the 2015 Georgia Milestones Assessment. The researcher used data from 29 Non-STEM, 14 STEM, and 10 Theme…

  12. Rethinking the Tertiary Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petocz, Peter; Reid, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics curriculum at the tertiary level is located within a range of social and cultural theories, and is often constructed by academics seeking to promulgate a particular view of mathematics. We argue that such a curriculum should incorporate a real acknowledgement of the different ways in which students understand the nature of mathematics…

  13. A Study of At-Risk Students' Perceptions of an Online Academic Credit Recovery Program in an Urban North Texas Independent School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Mychl K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to describe and analyze at-risk high school students' perceptions of their experiences with online academic credit recovery classes offered to them through an urban school district's dropout prevention department. The review of literature concerning curricula for online programs revealed that the variety of…

  14. Treatment and re-use of urban sewage by means of aerated submerged biological filters and tertiary treatment; Depuracion y reutilizacion de las aguas residuales urbanas mediante filtros biologicos sumergidos aireados con tratamiento terciario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujal, F. J.

    2000-07-01

    The installations required for treating and re-using urban waste waters are reviewed. The treatment system put forward is called AERATED SURMERGED BIOLOGICAL FILTER AQUA PROCESS (S.B.F.). In this system, once that water has been clarified, it is treated biologically in an aerated reactor containing porous ceramic balls. After this it is filtered with silica+anthracite as a tertiary treatment. This technique minimize energy consumption and achieve optimum treatment performance at low running costs, as it requires little maintenance. Once the waste water has been treated in this way, the effluent is suitable for re-use to irrigate crops or infiltrate into underground aquifers. (Author)

  15. Negative Academic Emotion and Psychological Well-being in Chinese Rural-to-Urban Migrant Adolescents: Examining the Moderating Role of Cognitive Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daoyang; Li, Shuting; Hu, Mingming; Dong, Dan; Tao, Sha

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the relationship among negative academic emotions (e.g., anxiety, shame, anger, boredom, hopelessness, disappointment, and hatred), psychological well-being (including life vitality, health concern, altruism commitment, self-value, friendly relationship, and personal development), and cognitive reappraisal in rural-to-urban migrant adolescents in China. Specifically, it was hypothesized that the relationship between psychological well-being and negative academic emotions is moderated by cognitive reappraisal. A total of 311 migrant adolescents aged 14-20 years were selected, including 132 boys and 179 girls. Results of a regression analysis showed that cognitive reappraisal (positive) and negative academic emotions were significant predictors of psychological well-being. The interaction effect between cognitive reappraisal and negative academic emotion was also a significant predictor of psychological well-being. In the simple slope analysis the group with a below average cognitive reappraisal score the negative academic emotions were associated with lower psychological well-being, whereas in the group with above average cognitive reappraisal the effect of negative academic emotions on psychological well-being was not significant. However, for those with a cognitive reappraisal score of 1 standard deviation above the average, the effect of negative academic emotions on psychological well-being was not significant. These results suggest that cognitive reappraisal was a significant moderator in the relationship between negative academic emotion and psychological well-being.

  16. Negative Academic Emotion and Psychological Well-being in Chinese Rural-to-Urban Migrant Adolescents: Examining the Moderating Role of Cognitive Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoyang Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to explore the relationship among negative academic emotions (e.g., anxiety, shame, anger, boredom, hopelessness, disappointment, and hatred, psychological well-being (including life vitality, health concern, altruism commitment, self-value, friendly relationship, and personal development, and cognitive reappraisal in rural-to-urban migrant adolescents in China. Specifically, it was hypothesized that the relationship between psychological well-being and negative academic emotions is moderated by cognitive reappraisal. A total of 311 migrant adolescents aged 14–20 years were selected, including 132 boys and 179 girls. Results of a regression analysis showed that cognitive reappraisal (positive and negative academic emotions were significant predictors of psychological well-being. The interaction effect between cognitive reappraisal and negative academic emotion was also a significant predictor of psychological well-being. In the simple slope analysis the group with a below average cognitive reappraisal score the negative academic emotions were associated with lower psychological well-being, whereas in the group with above average cognitive reappraisal the effect of negative academic emotions on psychological well-being was not significant. However, for those with a cognitive reappraisal score of 1 standard deviation above the average, the effect of negative academic emotions on psychological well-being was not significant. These results suggest that cognitive reappraisal was a significant moderator in the relationship between negative academic emotion and psychological well-being.

  17. Impact of a Dedicated Emergency Medicine Teaching Resident Rotation at a Large Urban Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, James; Golden, Andrew; Bryant, Alyssa; Babcock, Christine

    2016-03-01

    In the face of declining bedside teaching and increasing emergency department (ED) crowding, balancing education and patient care is a challenge. Dedicated shifts by teaching residents (TRs) in the ED represent an educational intervention to mitigate these difficulties. We aimed to measure the perceived learning and departmental impact created by having TR. TRs were present in the ED from 12 pm-10 pm daily, and their primary roles were to provide the following: assist in teaching procedures, give brief "chalk talks," instruct junior trainees on interesting cases, and answer clinical questions in an evidence-based manner. This observational study included a survey of fourth-year medical students (MSs), residents and faculty at an academic ED. Surveys measured the perceived effect of the TR on teaching, patient flow, ease of procedures, and clinical care. Survey response rates for medical students, residents, and faculty are 56%, 77%, and 75%, respectively. MSs perceived improved procedure performance with TR presence and the majority agreed that the TR was a valuable educational experience. Residents perceived increased patient flow, procedure performance, and MS learning with TR presence. The majority agreed that the TR improved patient care. Faculty agreed that the TR increased resident and MS learning, as well as improved patient care and procedure performance. The presence of a TR increased MS and resident learning, improved patient care and procedure performance as perceived by MSs, residents and faculty. A dedicated TR program can provide a valuable resource in achieving a balance of clinical education and high quality healthcare.

  18. Predictors of Radiation Therapy Noncompliance in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Guha, Debayan; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of patient noncompliance in an urban radiation oncology department and identify predictors of noncompliance. Methods and Materials: We identified patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent in our department from 2007 to 2012 for 1 of 7 commonly treated malignancies. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments were deemed “noncompliant.” An institutional database was referenced to obtain clinical and demographic information for each patient, as well as a quantitative estimate of each patient's socioeconomic status. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with RT noncompliance. Results: A total of 2184 patients met eligibility criteria. Of these, 442 (20.2%) were deemed “noncompliant.” On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of noncompliance included diagnosis of head-and-neck, cervical, or uterine cancer, treatment during winter months, low socioeconomic status, and use of a long treatment course (all P<.05). Conclusion: This is the first large effort examining patient noncompliance with daily RT. We have identified demographic, clinical, and treatment-related factors that can be used to identify patients at high risk for noncompliance. These findings may inform future strategies to improve adherence to prescribed therapy

  19. Predictors of Radiation Therapy Noncompliance in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce D. [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Debayan; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Garg, Madhur, E-mail: mgarg@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of patient noncompliance in an urban radiation oncology department and identify predictors of noncompliance. Methods and Materials: We identified patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent in our department from 2007 to 2012 for 1 of 7 commonly treated malignancies. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments were deemed “noncompliant.” An institutional database was referenced to obtain clinical and demographic information for each patient, as well as a quantitative estimate of each patient's socioeconomic status. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with RT noncompliance. Results: A total of 2184 patients met eligibility criteria. Of these, 442 (20.2%) were deemed “noncompliant.” On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of noncompliance included diagnosis of head-and-neck, cervical, or uterine cancer, treatment during winter months, low socioeconomic status, and use of a long treatment course (all P<.05). Conclusion: This is the first large effort examining patient noncompliance with daily RT. We have identified demographic, clinical, and treatment-related factors that can be used to identify patients at high risk for noncompliance. These findings may inform future strategies to improve adherence to prescribed therapy.

  20. Impact of a Dedicated Emergency Medicine Teaching Resident Rotation at a Large Urban Academic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ahn, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the face of declining bedside teaching and increasing emergency department (ED crowding, balancing education and patient care is a challenge. Dedicated shifts by teaching residents (TRs in the ED represent an educational intervention to mitigate these difficulties. We aimed to measure the perceived learning and departmental impact created by having TR. Methods: TRs were present in the ED from 12pm-10pm daily, and their primary roles were to provide the following: assist in teaching procedures, give brief “chalk talks,” instruct junior trainees on interesting cases, and answer clinical questions in an evidence-based manner. This observational study included a survey of fourth-year medical students (MSs, residents and faculty at an academic ED. Surveys measured the perceived effect of the TR on teaching, patient flow, ease of procedures, and clinical care. Results: Survey response rates for medical students, residents, and faculty are 56%, 77%, and 75%, respectively. MSs perceived improved procedure performance with TR presence and the majority agreed that the TR was a valuable educational experience. Residents perceived increased patient flow, procedure performance, and MS learning with TR presence. The majority agreed that the TR improved patient care. Faculty agreed that the TR increased resident and MS learning, as well as improved patient care and procedure performance. Conclusion: The presence of a TR increased MS and resident learning, improved patient care and procedure performance as perceived by MSs, residents and faculty. A dedicated TR program can provide a valuable resource in achieving a balance of clinical education and high quality healthcare.

  1. "Academic drug-detailing": from project to practice in a Swedish urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, C S; Hensjö, L O; Gustafsson, L L

    1997-01-01

    To develop and test the long-term feasibility of an interdisciplinary independent drug information service providing both written and oral drug information to physicians in an urban area of Sweden (> 400,000 inhabitants). A drug information service was developed encouraging a cooperative approach between a department of clinical pharmacology, general practitioners (GPs), pharmacists, and Drug and Therapeutic Committees. Scientifically-based drug information was condensed and interpreted by a team and presented in both written and oral form. In one part of the area, both oral and written information was provided, while in another part of the area, only written information was distributed. Questionnaires and one prescription survey were performed to elucidate the knowledge and attitudes of the GPs regarding drug treatment of one condition (urinary tract infection, UTI, and norfloxacin were used as examples), as well as their opinion of our services. Over a period of 10 years, 75 issues of a drug bulletin (2000 copies) were distributed. Oral producer-independent drug information, provided jointly by a GP and a pharmacist, was given on 16 occasions in each of 30 health centres (150 GPs). Around 80% of the GPs participated in the meetings. Of these GPs, 75% found the service important for their daily work. A majority of the GPs had prescribed the test drug, norfloxacin, not a first-line drug according to local recommendations, 1 year after approval. A significantly lower proportion of prescribers were observed in the area where the GPs had been provided with both written and oral information regarding recommended treatment (including first-line drugs) for uncomplicated cystitis. The approximate cost for this service in 1995 was SEK 0.685 million (USD 0.1 million); the prescribing costs of the 150 GPs were estimated at SEK 255 million per year. This means that the cost of the service per GP is only around 0.3% of normal prescribing costs. Over a period of 10 years the

  2. Trends in one-year mortality for stroke in a tertiary academic center in Saudi Arabia: a 5-year retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almekhlafi, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported a decline in stroke-related mortality in developed countries. To assess trends in one-year mortality following a stroke diagnosis in Saudi Arabia. Retrospective longitudinal cohort study. Single tertiary care center from 2010 through 2014. All patients admitted with a primary admitting diagnosis of stroke. Demographic data (age, gender, nationality), risk factor profile, stroke subtypes, in-hospital complications and mortality data as well as cause of death were collected for all patients. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess factors associated with one-year mortality following a stroke admission. One-year mortality. In 548 patients with a mean age of 62.9 years (SD 16.9), the most frequent vascular risk factors were hypertension (90.6%), diabetes (65.5%), and hyperlipidemia (27.2%). Hemorrhagic stroke was diagnosed in 9.9%. The overall mortality risk was 26.9%. Non-Saudis had a significantly higher one-year mortality risk compared with Saudis (25% vs. 16.8%, respectively; P=.025). The most frequently reported causes of mortality were neurological and related to the underlying stroke (32%), sepsis (30%), and cardiac or other organ dysfunction-related (each 9%) in addition to other etiologies (collectively 9.5%) such as pulmonary embolism or an underlying malignancy. Significant predictors in the multivariate model were age (P stroke mortality in our center over the 5-year span. The establishment of stroke systems of care, use of thrombolytic agents, and opening of a stroke unit should play an important role in a decline in stroke mortality. Retrospective single center study. Mortality data were available only for patients who died in our hospital.

  3. The Comfort Measures Order Set at a Tertiary Care Academic Hospital: Is There a Comparable Difference in End-of-Life Care Between Patients Dying in Acute Care When CMOS Is Utilized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christine; Stilos, Kalli; Nowell, Allyson; Lau, Fanchea; Moore, Jennifer; Wynnychuk, Lesia

    2018-04-01

    Standardized protocols have been previously shown to be helpful in managing end-of-life (EOL) care in hospital. The comfort measures order set (CMOS), a standardized framework for assessing imminently dying patients' symptoms and needs, was implemented at a tertiary academic hospital. We assessed whether there were comparable differences in the care of a dying patient when the CMOS was utilized and when it was not. A retrospective chart review was completed on patients admitted under oncology and general internal medicine, who were referred to the inpatient palliative care team for "EOL care" between February 2015 and March 2016. Of 83 patients, 56 (67%) received intiation of the CMOS and 27 (33%) did not for EOL care. There was significant involvement of spiritual care with the CMOS (66%), as compared to the group without CMOS (19%), P care, which was significantly less than the number of symptom management adjustments per patient when CMOS was not used (3.3), P care and assessment across the organization is still required.

  4. Age-dependent Characteristics in Women with Breast Cancer: Mastectomy and Reconstructive Trends at an Urban Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodby, Katherine A; Robinson, Emilie; Danielson, Kirstie K; Quinn, Karina P; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-03-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important aspect of treatment after breast cancer. Postmastectomy reconstruction bears a significant impact on a woman's postsurgical confidence, sexuality, and overall well-being. Previous studies have inferred that women under age 40 years have unique characteristics that distinguish them from an older cohort. Identifying age-dependent trends will assist with counseling women on mastectomy and reconstruction. To identify age-dependent trends, 100 consecutive women were sampled from a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database at an urban academic institution from June 2010 through June 2013. Women were placed into two cohorts mastectomy, reconstructive and symmetry procedures were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. In 100 patients of the sample study cohort, 151 reconstructions were performed. Increasing age was associated with one or more comorbidities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, P = 0.005], whereas younger age was associated with metastatic disease (OR = 0.88, P = 0.006), chemotherapy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.01), and radiation (OR = 0.94, P = 0.006); split cohorts demonstrated similar trends (P Mastectomy and reconstructive characteristics associated with younger age included bilateral mastectomy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.004), tissue expander (versus autologous flap) (OR = 0.94, P = 0.009), extra high implant type (OR = 0.94, P = 0.049), whereas increasing use of autologous flaps and contralateral mastopexy symmetry procedures (OR = 1.09, P = 0.02) were associated with an aging cohort. Increasing age was not associated with an increasing likelihood of complications (P = 0.75). Age-related factors play a role in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. Younger women typically present with more aggressive features requiring oncologic treatment including chemotherapy and radiation. Mastectomy and reconstructive choices also demonstrate age-dependent characteristics. Women in younger age groups are more

  5. Health and Academic Achievement: Cumulative Effects of Health Assets on Standardized Test Scores among Urban Youth in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Peters, Susan M.; Schwartz, Marlene; Gilstad-Hayden, Kathryn; McCaslin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Institute of Medicine (2012) concluded that we must "strengthen schools as the heart of health." To intervene for better outcomes in both health and academic achievement, identifying factors that impact children is essential. Study objectives are to (1) document associations between health assets and academic achievement,…

  6. Examining Cognitive Predictors of Academic Cheating among Urban Middle School Students: The Role of Home-School Dissonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Academic cheating within the middle grades has become a prevalent schooling dilemma for teachers and administrators. Among the various contextual and cognitive factors that promote academic cheating is home-school dissonance, which has been shown to predict the phenomenon among high school students. The current study extends this line of research…

  7. Yoga Improves Academic Performance in Urban High School Students Compared to Physical Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Yoga programs within schools have become more widespread but research regarding the potential effect on academic achievement remains limited. This study cluster-randomized 112 students within a single New York City public high school to participate in either school-based yoga or physical education (PE) for an entire academic year. The primary…

  8. Sexism and Sexual Harassment in Tertiary Institutions | Akpotor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender and Behaviour ... Sexual harassment is a recurring decimal in tertiary institutions. The paper therefore investigates the effects of sexual harassment on the academic performance of female students, using Delta State University, Abraka, ...

  9. Reclamation of urban wastewaters in an experimental plant with tertiary treatment; Regeneracion de aguas residuales urbanas en una planta piloto mediante tratamientos terciariarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Ramirez, J. A.; Sahuquillo, S.; Sales, D.; Quiroga, J. M. [Universidad de Cadiz (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    Among the most interesting techniques for reclamation or urban wastewaters, reverse osmosis stands out, because the good results obtained in several facilities. In this paper results of the operation of an experimental Reverse Osmosis (RO) pilot plant of 100 cu. m/day capacity, for the reuse or urban wastewaters are showed. Membranes used were of cellulose acetate and previously has been optimized in laboratory, the dose of reagents used in pretreatment in order to minimize, as far as possible, any type of fouling. The water quality obtained under the conditions determined as optimum is high, this quality allows the water to be injected into a local aquifer to counteract seawater intrusion. (Author) 16 refs.

  10. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 3. University Park Campus School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  11. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 1. Academy of the Pacific Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  12. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 2. Noble Street Charter High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  13. Xpert(®) MTB/RIF for improved case detection of extra-pulmonary TB in a tertiary care setting in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, G; Kanade, S; Mehta, P

    2016-07-01

    Department of microbiology at a tertiary care hospital, Mumbai, India. To determine 1) the sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay in comparison with microscopy and culture in extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), and 2) the number of additional cases of EPTB and rifampicin (RMP) resistance detected using this assay. The study was conducted from July 2013 to April 2015. All consecutive patients with clinically suspected EPTB referred for microscopic examination to the Department of Microbiology that were sufficient in specimen volume were included in the study. Of the 728 specimens included in the study, respectively 5.5%, 23.5% and 20.9% were positive on smear, culture and Xpert. Compared to culture, Xpert had a sensitivity of 84.2% (95%CI 81.4-86.6) and specificity of 98.2% (95%CI 90-104). All specimens with high and medium load on assay were positive on culture; 28 (18.4%) specimens were RMP-resistant and 124 (81.6%) were Xpert-susceptible. No additional RMP-resistant cases were detected using Xpert as compared to phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. The ability of the Xpert assay to rapidly detect a significantly greater number of bacteriologically confirmed EPTB cases, including RMP-resistant cases, makes it an important diagnostic tool in a TB-endemic country.

  14. Virtual Urbanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirc, Geoffrey

    2001-01-01

    Considers how visual literacy implies a poetics of technology, one rooted in basic human passion. Notes that most academic forms sanctioned for students to inhabit are as monumentally dull as the urban forms in which they pass an extra-academic portion of their lives. Concludes that technology is most useful when it allows the poetic spirit to…

  15. Correlation among academic performance, recurrent abdominal pain and other factors in Year-6 urban primary-school children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, C C M; Omar, A; Arul Phillips, J

    2003-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the extent to which recurrent abdominal pain and other factors were associated with academic achievement among Year-6 (12 years of age) schoolchildren. The present study was a cross-sectional survey conducted from September to November 2001. Schoolchildren were recruited from primary schools that were selected randomly from a list of all primary schools in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, using random sampling numbers. Information concerning recurrent abdominal pain, socio-economic status, life events, demographic and other details was obtained using a combination of questionnaires and interviews. Academic achievement was assessed using a score based on the Malaysian Primary School Achievement Examination. An overall score at or above the mean was taken to indicate high academic achievement while a score below the mean indicated poor academic achievement. A total of 1971 children were studied (958 boys and 1013 girls: 1047 Malays, 513 Chinese and 411 Indians). Of these children, 456 (23.1%) fulfilled the criteria for recurrent abdominal pain. Using the method of binary logistic regression analysis, the following factors were found to be independently associated with poor academic performance: a low socio-economic status (odds ratio (OR) 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.35); male sex (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.26-2.05); the death of a close relative (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.73-2.85); the divorce or separation of parents (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.73-5.40); the commencement of work by the mother (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.02-1.76); hospitalization of the child in the 12 months prior to the study (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.12-3.01); lack of health-care consultation (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.36-2.36); missing breakfast (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.07-2.02); and lack of kindergarten education (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.04-1.75). Many factors, such as socio-economic status and recent life events, were associated with poor academic performance. Recurrent abdominal pain did not correlate

  16. Implementation as a Focus of Consultation to Evaluate Academic Tutoring Services in an Urban School District: A Case Study Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Julie Q.; English, Sarah Baker

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a multiagency initiative to evaluate academic tutoring services by focusing on the processes that contribute to effective program implementation. Community-based tutoring service providers serving students in the Cincinnati Public Schools (OH) partnered to initiate a "Seal of Approval" process for promoting…

  17. Academic Attitudes and Achievement in Students of Urban Public Single-Sex and Mixed-Sex High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Else-Quest, Nicole M.; Peterca, Oana

    2015-01-01

    Publicly funded single-sex schooling (SSS) has proliferated in recent years and is touted as a remedy to gaps in academic attitudes and achievement, particularly for low-income students of color. Research on SSS is rife with limitations, stemming from selective admissions processes, selection effects related to socioeconomic status, a lack of…

  18. Urban Middle School Instructional Special Education: Tenured versus Non-Tenured Teachers and the Impact on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sheryl Marie

    2010-01-01

    The Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) is used in the Cahokia Unit School District No. 187 to give insight on student academic skill level in terms of years and months. Teacher strategies and expertise in the area of education are an integral part of the educational process. Tenure status, or the years of teaching experience, is plagued with the…

  19. An Analysis of the Academic Achievement of Urban and Rural Low-Socioeconomic Status Tennessee Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Johnny

    2010-01-01

    Comparing a small, rural school with sometimes less than 100 students to a massive inner-city school with greater than 2,500 students is crude and untenable. There are simply too many variables. Nonetheless, the No Child Left Behind Act treats these two very different schools the same. When urban and rural schools cannot meet AYP or highly…

  20. : Urban design, urban project, urban art, urban composition ... a question of vocabulary?

    OpenAIRE

    Pinson , Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Actes à paraître; International audience; The term "urbanism" of Pierre Clerget (1910) put the mess in the practice and the formations in France. Urban planning is thus, on the academic level, a coexistence of disciplinary approaches, which does not help to a multidisciplinary urban training. Thinking about "urban design", after beautifull city, urban composition, or alongside the urban project and other territorial approaches can help to see more clearly in town planning.; Le terme « urbanis...

  1. Development of Cities Mentor Project: An Intervention to Improve Academic Outcomes for Low-Income Urban Youth through Instruction in Effective Coping Supported by Mentoring Relationships and Protective Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kathryn E.; Farahmand, Farahnaz; Meyerson, David A.; Dubois, David L.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Gaylord-Harden, Noni K.; Barnett, Alexandra; Horwath, Jordan; Doxie, Jackie; Tyler, Donald; Harrison, Aubrey; Johnson, Sarah; Duffy, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes an iterative process used to develop a new intervention for low-income urban youth at risk for negative academic outcomes (e.g., disengagement, failure, drop-out). A series of seven steps, building incrementally one upon the other, are described: 1) identify targets of the intervention; 2) develop logic model; 3)…

  2. Predicting Academic Success of Health Science Students for First Year Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Ryan S.; Evans, Tess; Chivers, Paola T.

    2016-01-01

    Students commencing tertiary education enter through a number of traditional and alternative academic pathways. As a result, tertiary institutions encounter a broad range of students, varying in demographic, previous education, characteristics and academic achievement. In recent years, the relatively constant increase in tertiary applications in…

  3. Determinants of Perceived Students' Academic Performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities ... Performance in Vocational Education in Tertiary Institutions in Lagos State. GO Ojo ... title Home- School Factors and Students' Academic Performance in Vocational Education ...

  4. An Evaluation Of Academic Stress And Coping Mechanism Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed and evaluated academic stress coping mechanisms adopted by married female students in Nigerian tertiary institutions. This was with the aim of exploring the influence of academic stress on married female students‟ academic performance and their coping strategies used to enhance their academic ...

  5. Secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Sophie A; Miller, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the etiology and management of secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by an increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH) that is appropriate and in response to a stimulus, most commonly low serum calcium. In secondary hyperparathyroidism, the serum calcium is normal and the PTH level is elevated. Tertiary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by excessive secretion of PTH after longstanding secondary hyperparathyroidism, in which hypercalcemia has ensued. Tertiary hyperparathyroidism typically occurs in men and women with chronic kidney disease usually after kidney transplant. The etiology and treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism is relatively straightforward whereas data on the management of tertiary hyperparathyroidism is limited to a few small trials with short follow-up. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness among academic physicians and its impact on the quality of life and occupational performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozder, Aclan; Eker, Hasan Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders can affect health and occupational performance of physicians as well as outcomes in patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) among academic physicians at a tertiary academic medical center in an urban area in the northwest region of Turkey, and to establish a relationship between the self-perceived sleepiness and the quality of life using the EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D). A questionnaire prepared by the researchers after scanning the literature on the subject was e-mailed to the academic physicians of a tertiary academic medical center in Istanbul. The ESS and the EQ-5D were also included in the survey. The e-mail database of the institution directory was used to compile a list of active academic physicians who practiced clinical medicine. Paired and independent t tests were used for the data analysis at a significance level of p academic physicians were e-mailed and a total of 252 subjects replied resulting in a 63.6% response rate. There were 84 (33.3%) female and 168 (66.7%) male academic physicians participating in the study. One hundred and eight out of 252 (42.8%) academic physicians were taking night calls (p sleep and 84 (33.3%) reported napping daily (p 10) (p academic physicians was associated with a poorer quality of life (p academic physicians suffered from sleepiness. There was an association between the poor quality of life and daytime sleepiness. There was also a positive relationship between habitual napping and being sleepy during the day. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. The effect of the flipped classroom on urban high school students' motivation and academic achievement in a high school science course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Keshia L.

    This study investigated the effect of the flipped classroom on urban high school students' motivation and academic achievement in a high school science course. In this quantitative study, the sample population was comprised of North Star High School 12th grade students enrolled in human anatomy and physiology. A quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest non-equivalent group design was conducted. After receipt of Liberty University Institutional Review Board approval and the school district's Department of Research and Evaluation for School Improvement, students completed a pretest comprised of the Science Motivation Questionnaire II (SMQ-II) and the Human Anatomy and Physiology Unit Test. Participants in the experimental group engaged in the treatment, the flipped classroom, using instructional materials on the educational website, Edmodo(TM), and applied content material taught using hands-on activities inclusive of assigned laboratory experiments. Participants in the control group received instruction using traditional face-to-face lecture-homework format while also engaging in assigned laboratory experiments. After the completion of the treatment all participants completed a posttest. Data from both the pretest and posttest was statistically analyzed individually using two separate one-way ANOVA/ANCOVA analyses; and researcher reported the results of the statistical analyses. After completion of the analyses, and interpretation of the results, recommendations for future research were given.

  8. Development of a medical academic degree system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Youxin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Song, Manshu; Guo, Xiuhua; Nelson, Hugh; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese government launched a comprehensive healthcare reform to tackle challenges to health equities. Medical education will become the key for successful healthcare reform. We describe the current status of the Chinese medical degree system and its evolution over the last 80 years. Progress has been uneven, historically punctuated most dramatically by the Cultural Revolution. There is a great regional disparity. Doctors with limited tertiary education may be licensed to practice, whereas medical graduates with advanced doctorates may have limited clinical skills. There are undefined relationships between competing tertiary training streams, the academic professional degree, and the clinical residency training programme (RTP). The perceived quality of training in both streams varies widely across China. As the degrees of master or doctor of academic medicine is seen as instrumental in career advancement, including employability in urban hospitals, attainment of this degree is sought after, yet is often unrelated to a role in health care, or is seen as superior to clinical experience. Meanwhile, the practical experience gained in some prestigious academic institutions is deprecated by the RTP and must be repeated before accreditation for clinical practice. This complexity is confusing both for students seeking the most appropriate training, and also for clinics, hospitals and universities seeking to recruit the most appropriate applicants. The future education reforms might include: 1) a domestic system of 'credits' that gives weight to quality clinical experience vs. academic publications in career advancement, enhanced harmonisation between the competing streams of the professional degree and the RTP, and promotion of mobility of staff between areas of excellence and areas of need; 2) International - a mutual professional and academic recognition between China and other countries by reference to the Bologna Accord, setting up a system of easily comparable and

  9. Prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency in healthy personnel from an academic institution of an urban area in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamboa-Gamboa T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tatiana Gamboa-Gamboa,1 Gabriel Abarca-Soto,2 José G Jiménez-Montero3,4 1Department of Research and Nutrition, Universidad de Ciencias Médicas, San José, Costa Rica; 2Department of Research, School of Medicine, Universidad de Ciencias Médicas, San José, Costa Rica; 3Department of Postgraduate Studies, Universidad de Ciencias Médicas, San José, Costa Rica; 4Department of Endocrinology, Hospital CIMA, San José, Costa Rica Objective: The aim of this study was to determine 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in healthy employees of the Universidad de Ciencias Médicas, Costa Rica. Methods: Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, and creatinine were measured in 80 people. Solar ultraviolet radiation exposure and 25-hydroxyvitamin D intake were estimated using a previously designed questionnaire. Participants were 52 women aged (mean ± standard deviation 35.8±10.0 years old, body mass index of 27.1±5.9 kg/m2, and 26 men aged 36.4±10.8 years old, body mass index of 27.5±5.0 kg/m2. Results: All participants were normocalcemic, eight females were postmenopausal, three were hypertensive; none had renal, gastrointestinal, or thyroid disease. The level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 23.9±7.0 ng/dL and iPTH 40.1±17.5 pg/dL. A level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D $30 ng/dL was seen in 17% of the population. The eight participants with iPTH higher than 67 ng/dL, had 25-hydroxyvitamin D of 18.9±4.8 ng/dL. Two participants who received 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcium supplements were excluded. Conclusion: The 25-hydroxyvitamin D insufficiency and deficiency found in healthy employees from an academic center in Costa Rica may be due to working long hours in-doors and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure. It is unknown whether secondary hyperparathyroidism seen in nearly 10% of this population, may have long-term effects on bone health. Keywords: vitamin D deficiency, osteoporosis, secondary hyperparathyroidism

  10. Entrepreneurship Education in Delta State Tertiary Institution as a Means of Achieving National Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined entrepreneurship education in Delta Sate tertiary institutions as a means of national growth and development. Two research questions were asked to guide the study. The population comprised all the 1,898 academic staff in eight tertiary institutions in the state. A sample of 800 lecturers was drawn through the multi stage and…

  11. Ten-Year Trends and Independent Risk Factors for Unplanned Readmission Following Elective Total Joint Arthroplasty at a Large Urban Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varacallo, Matthew A; Herzog, Leah; Toossi, Nader; Johanson, Norman A

    2017-06-01

    Total joint arthroplasty procedures continue to provide consistent, long-term success and high patient satisfaction scores. However, early unplanned readmission to the hospital imparts significant financial risks to individual institutions as we shift away from the traditional fee-for-service payment model. Using a combination of our hospital's administrative database and retrospective chart reviews, we report the 30-day and 90-day readmission rates and all causes of readmission following all unilateral, primary elective total hip and knee arthroplasty procedures at a large, urban, academic hospital from 2004 to 2013. In total, 1165 primary total hip (511) and knee (654) arthroplasty procedures were identified, and the 30-day and 90-day unplanned readmission rates were 4.6% and 7.3%, respectively. A multivariate regression model controlled for a variety of potential clinical and surgical confounders. Increasing body mass index levels, an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of ≥3, and discharge to an inpatient rehab facility each independently correlated with risk of both 30-day and 90-day unplanned readmission to our institution. Additionally, use of general anesthesia during the procedure independently correlated with risk of readmission at 30 days only, while congestive heart failure independently correlated with risk of 90-day unplanned readmission. Readmissions related directly to the surgical site accounted for 47% of the cases, and collectively totaled more than any single medical or clinical complication leading to unplanned readmission within the 90-day period. Increasing body mass index values, general anesthesia, an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of ≥3, and discharge to an inpatient rehab facility each were independent risk factors for early unplanned readmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of optimal cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with Type 2 diabetes who attended urban medical health center with those attended a tertiary care center: Experiences from Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Moradi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Both centers have failure in target achievement in some risk factors; however, the inability of the primary care center in controlling hyperlipidemia in comparison with the tertiary center is a serious warning to provide training about managing dyslipidemia in these centers.

  13. Sexual Harassment in Tertiary Science: Implications for Gender Equity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper focuses on the incidence of sexual harassment in tertiary science education and its attendant effects on students and academics. Data from a survey of six higher institutions comprising two universities, two colleges of education and two polytechnics was used. Results indicate high rate of sexual harassment of ...

  14. Urban interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinder, David

    2008-01-01

    Challenging perspectives on the urban question have arisen in recent years from beyond academic realms through the work of artists and cultural practitioners. Often in dialogue with urban theory and political activism, and employing a range of tactical practices, they have engaged critically......, relationships and situations. Such interventionist practices may rarely be seen as part of the traditional purview of urban studies. Yet in asserting their significance here, this essay argues that growing dialogues across and between urban and spatial theory, and artistic and cultural practice, have...... considerable potential for inspiring and developing critical approaches to cities. The essay highlights a number of specific challenges thrown up by such interconnections that are of political and pedagogical significance and in need of further debate....

  15. Effects of Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Education on Conflict Intensity in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius A. Agbor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of different schooling dimensions (primary, secondary and tertiary on the intensity of intra-state conflicts in 25 African states during the period 1989–2008. It uses fixed-effects and Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM estimators in an annualized panel data framework. Parameter estimates suggest the following (1 primary schooling broadly mitigates conflicts in Africa. However, in environments with high natural resource rents, it could ignite conflicts; (2 there is evidence, although not overwhelming, that secondary schooling potentially drives conflicts in Africa. There is also evidence that urbanization potentially drives conflicts in Africa. However, although secondary schooling and urbanization potentially drives conflicts, in environments where secondary schooling (urbanization is high, urbanization (secondary schooling mitigates conflicts; (3 there is no evidence of a strong direct positive impact of tertiary education on conflicts and conditioning on tertiary schooling, income inequality potentially drives conflicts in African states. However, in contexts where income inequality (tertiary schooling is high, tertiary schooling (inequality mitigates conflict. Two important policy implications follow from this study. First, in contexts where income inequality is high (for instance, in South Africa, governments should strive to foster tertiary education in order to reduce conflict. Second, where urbanization rates are high, they should foster both secondary and tertiary education. This study contributes to existing knowledge by clearly demonstrating the utility of distinguishing between different educational dimensions and the contexts wherein they matter for conflict mitigation in Africa.

  16. Unpredictable Feelings: Academic Women under Research Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Barbara M.; Elizabeth, Vivienne

    2015-01-01

    Academic research is subject to audit in many national settings. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, the government regulates the flow of publicly funded research income into tertiary institutions through the Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF). This article enquires into the effects of the PBRF by exploring data collected from 16 academic women of…

  17. 2. Tertiary Foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umbgrove, J.H.F.

    1931-01-01

    In his review of the palaeozoology of Java, K. Martin could in 1919, record 49 foraminifera from tertiary strata of Java, on the strength of a critical study of the existant literature, and especially on the strength of his own studies and knowledge of the above mentioned fossils (Bibl. 49). In

  18. Motivation, Self-Regulated Learning Efficacy, and Academic Achievement among International and Domestic Students at an Urban Community College: A Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiang-Ann; Ferdenzi, Anita Cuttita; Edlin, Margot

    2012-01-01

    This study is designed to examine how intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and self-regulated learning efficacy influence academic achievement of international and domestic community college students. Results show that for both international and domestic students, motivation did not directly affect academic achievement. Self-regulated…

  19. A Comparison of the Academic Achievement and Perceptions of Leadership Skills and Citizenship Traits of JROTC, Student Athletes, and Other Students in an Urban High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Bonds, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three groups: JROTC students, student athletes, and other students, to determine if there were differences in academic achievement. Gaining an understanding of the necessary skills required to become academically successful and make healthy life choices, could provide educators working within an urban…

  20. Variations in Decision-Making Approach to Tertiary Teaching: A Case Study in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Tien

    2016-01-01

    Although the question of what to teach and how to teach has received much attention from the literature, little was known about the way in which academics in teaching groups make decision on what and how to teach. This paper reports an analysis of variations in the decision-making approach to tertiary teaching through academics' practices of…

  1. A Date With Academic Literacies: Using Brief Conversation to Facilitate Student Engagement With Academic Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The argument that de-contextualized deficit approaches to academic literacies were ineffective (Lea, 2004; Northedge, 2003), has led to expectations that New Zealand Higher Education institutions embed academic literacies within programmes and courses (Tertiary Education Commission, 2010). This paper reports on the use of a teaching and learning…

  2. The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness among academic physicians and its impact on the quality of life and occupational performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aclan Ozder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sleep disorders can affect health and occupational performance of physicians as well as outcomes in patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS among academic physicians at a tertiary academic medical center in an urban area in the northwest region of Turkey, and to establish a relationship between the self-perceived sleepiness and the quality of life using the EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D. Material and Methods: A questionnaire prepared by the researchers after scanning the literature on the subject was e-mailed to the academic physicians of a tertiary academic medical center in Istanbul. The ESS and the EQ-5D were also included in the survey. The e-mail database of the institution directory was used to compile a list of active academic physicians who practiced clinical medicine. Paired and independent t tests were used for the data analysis at a significance level of p 10 (p < 0.001. In the case of the EQ-5D index and visual analogue scale of the EQ-5D questionnaire (EQ-5D VAS, the status of sleepiness of academic physicians was associated with a poorer quality of life (p < 0.001. Conclusions: More than a 1/4 of the academic physicians suffered from sleepiness. There was an association between the poor quality of life and daytime sleepiness. There was also a positive relationship between habitual napping and being sleepy during the day.

  3. The equity imperative in tertiary education: Promoting fairness and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil; Bassett, Roberta Malee

    2014-06-01

    While the share of the tertiary education age cohort (19-25) which is being given the opportunity to study has increased worldwide over the past two decades, this does not in fact translate into reduced inequality. For many young people, especially in the developing world, major obstacles such as disparities in terms of gender, minority population membership or disabilities as well as academic and financial barriers are still standing in their way. The authors of this article propose a conceptual framework to analyse equity issues in tertiary education and document the scope, significance and consequences of disparities in tertiary education opportunities. They throw some light on the main determinants of these inequalities and offer suggestions about effective equity promotion policies directed towards widening participation and improving the chances of success of underprivileged youths in order to create societies which uphold humanistic values.

  4. Urban transportation: Perspectives on mobility and choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincoff, M. Z. (Editor); Dajani, J. S. (Editor); Arnold, G. R.; Bird, J. W.; Brooks, C. M. (Editor); Cobb, W. E.; Cross, J. E.; Darby, L. F.; Erb, N. H.; Ficht, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study of urban transportation systems are presented characterized by intensive scrutiny of many ideas, philosophies, and academic perspectives. This report is intended to communicate some dimensions of the urban transportation problem to the general public.

  5. The hydrogeology of urbanization: The lost springs of Washington, D.C., late Tertiary and Quaternary sediments of D.C., and the Baltimore Long Term Ecological Research site (LTER): Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Aditi; Pavich, Milan J.; Sharp, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization is a major process now shaping the environment. This field trip looks at the hydrogeology of the general Washington, D.C., area and focuses on the city's lost springs. Until 150 years ago, springs and shallow dug wells were the main source of drinking water for residents of Washington, D.C. Celebrating the nation's bicentennial, Garnett P. Williams of the U.S. Geological Survey examined changes in water supply and water courses since 1776. He examined old newspaper files to determine the location of the city's springs. This field trip visits sites of some of these springs (few of which are now flowing), discusses the hydrologic impacts of urbanization and the general geological setting, and finishes with the Baltimore Long Term Ecological Research site at Dead Run and its findings. The field trip visits some familiar locations in the Washington, D.C., area, and gives insights into their often hidden hydrologic past and present.

  6. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  7. Academic Library Administration: A Case Examination of Faculty-Librarian Perceptions of Journal Cancellations and the Decision-Making Process in a Large, Urban Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, James Harmon

    As the academic library plays the roles of intermediary and adjudicator of collection purchases and cancellations, faculty involvement in library resource decisions is not only commonplace, but essential to making such decisions. Faculty involvement in cancellation projects is often enhanced by a thorough explanation of the depth of financial…

  8. Evaluating the Impact of Conflict Resolution on Urban Children's Violence-Related Attitudes and Behaviors in New Haven, Connecticut, through a Community-Academic Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Pillsbury, Charles A.; Cavanaugh, Brenda; McGruder, La'rie; McKinney, Christy M.; Massey, Zohar; Groce, Nora E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous schools are implementing youth violence prevention interventions aimed at enhancing conflict resolution skills without evaluating their effectiveness. Consequently, we formed a community-academic partnership between a New Haven community-based organization and Yale's School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center to examine the…

  9. The Electrical and Technology Curriculum of an Urban Charter High School and Its Impact for the Female in Academic and Trades Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Thomas Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the impact of the electrical and technology curriculum of an urban charter high school in Philadelphia for the alumnae of the school. The study found a positive impact that empowered the alumnae to face gender and racial discrimination in their apprenticeship program. It also found a positive impact for alumnae that are not…

  10. Urban Modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gil

    2016-02-01

    that despite being planned following the same policy objectives, the neighbourhoods have different types of ‘urban modality’, thus present different levels of sustainable mobility potential. Neighbourhoods identified as underperformers within their context can be targeted for soft measures related to transport services, technology and individual attitudes to travel, to fulfil the potential of their ‘urban modality’ type. However, if this potential is not deemed satisfactory or if they already overachieve, only by retrofitting a set of infrastructure and land use characteristics will lead to a different ‘urban modality’ type, and a change in potential. Such a change can be lengthy, costly and sometimes impossible to implement ex-post. The thesis is based on a collection of published articles in peer-reviewed academic publications, with the first and last chapters providing an overview of the research and of its findings, and defining the main narrative thread.

  11. Exploring Vocational and Academic Fields of Study: Development and Validation of the Flemish SIMON Interest Inventory (SIMON-I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteyne, Lot; Wille, Bart; Duyck, Wouter; De Fruyt, Filip

    2017-01-01

    A new, Holland-based Interest Inventory is proposed, intended to facilitate the transition from secondary to tertiary education. Specific interest items were designed to grasp activities that are prevalent during tertiary studies, including an Academic-track-scale to assist in the choice between academic and vocational-oriented programs. Interest…

  12. Collaborative Writing to Enhance Academic Writing Development through Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robayo Lun, Alma Milena; Hernandez Ortiz, Luz Stella

    2013-01-01

    Advanced students at university level struggle with many aspects of academic writing in English as a foreign language. The purpose of this article is to report on an investigation aimed at analyzing what collaborative writing through project work tells us about students' academic writing development at the tertiary level. The compositions written…

  13. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  14. Challenges of student selection: Predicting academic performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finding accurate predictors of tertiary academic performance, specifically for disadvantaged students, is essential because of budget constraints and the need of the labour market to address employment equity. Increased retention, throughput and decreased dropout rates are vital. When making admission decisions, the

  15. Academic writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  16. Outcomes of neonates with perinatal asphyxia at a tertiary academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    data is lack of a common definition of the diagnostic criteria of ... Four hundred and fty infants were included in the study; 185 (41.1%) were females, the mean ... Signi cant predictors of survival were place of birth (p=0.006), mode of delivery.

  17. Building Social Justice among Academic Staffs of Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    Institutions, the Influence of Acculturation, Networking and. School Management .... research on predictors of social justice building among teachers, and how it is related ... Acculturation theory has historically focused on individual and group ... behaviors are used to build and maintain informal contacts that enhance career.

  18. The Use of Electronic Resources by Academic Staff at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tella, Adeyinka; Orim, Faith; Ibrahim, Dauda Morenikeji; Memudu, Suleiman Ajala

    2018-01-01

    The use of e-resources is now commonplace among academics in tertiary educational institutions the world over. Many academics including those in the universities are exploring the opportunities of e-resources to facilitate teaching and research. As the use of e-resources is increasing particularly among academics at the University of Ilorin,…

  19. Maritime Tactile Education for Urban Secondary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzer, Arthur Henry, IV

    2012-01-01

    Urban high-school students' low average level of academic achievement is a national problem. A lack of academic progress is a factor that contributes to students failing to graduate. In response to these urban high school student problems, a growing number of urban charter high schools have opened as an alternative to the traditional public high…

  20. Tertiary climatic fluctuations and methods of analysis of tertiary floras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, J.A.

    1971-01-01

    On theoretical grounds, an analysis of the physiognomy of a Tertiary leaf assemblage is more direct and reliable than a circuitous floristic analysis in assigning thermal regimes to fossil assemblages. Using primarily foliar physiognomy and secondarily floristic composition, it can be shown that: (1) some middle latitude Tertiary assemblages probably lived under meteoroligically tropical climates; (2) a major and rapid climatic deterioration occurred in the Oligocene; and (3) a major climatic fluctuation probably occurred in the Late Eocene. These analyses thus substantiate the conclusions of several other paleobotanists regarding climatic fluctuations. Recent criticisms of these analyses are shown to be invalid and to be based largely on misinterpretations. ?? 1971.

  1. Academic Success of Adolescents in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomar-Lever, Joaquina; Victorio-Estrada, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    This study identified significant predictors of important academic results such as academic performance and school desertion by adolescent students living in poverty in both urban and rural settings. The results indicate the relative importance of individual, family, educational and social variables reported by the young people, and the…

  2. The Underestimated Relevance and Value of Vocational Education in Tertiary Education--Making the Invisible Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippach-Schneider, Ute; Schneider, Verena; Ménard, Boris; Tritscher-Archan, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the number of tertiary graduates has been a priority on the political agenda of the EU for some years. The focus has mainly been on academic courses though, with less emphasis on the role of vocational education and training. International educational statistics indeed show a clear increase in the number of persons completing tertiary…

  3. Tertiary Students' Entrepreneurial Career Intentions of Entrepreneurship-Embedded Internship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chun-Mei; Shen, Chien-Hua; Hsiao, Hsi-Chi; Chen, Su-Chang

    2017-01-01

    This study examines 1630 tertiary students in regard to their entrepreneurial career intentions (ECIs) and their influencing factors. The findings may serve as academic reference for the development of entrepreneurship-related education. The results show that students' computer self-efficacy (CSE) has a significant direct effect on ECIs, and…

  4. Urbanization and Third World stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienen, H

    1984-07-01

    This essay reviews images of urbanization that have been held by academics and activists, including revolutionary leaders. It examines the methodology and findings of case studies in Nigeria, Mexico, Peru, Brazil, Kenya, Turkey, Malaysia and other countries with the aim of determining how well suited are the data and theories for assessing the relationship between urbanization and political stability. The review examines the following topics: migration; political participaton and the urban poor; radical parties and urban violence; the over-urbanization thesis; class and ethnicity. It especially evaluates the role of so-called urban marginals in urban political life and concludes that the evidence is overwhelming that there is no widespread culture of poverty or culture of apathy among the urban poor in developing countries. 119 references.

  5. Academic dishonsty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This study attempted to investigate students' self reported academic dishonesty in Ethiopian ... university programs can play a key role in ... serious problem in establishing academic ... and Rocha 2006); Asian-Pacific, ... and self-adjustment mediates the ..... In my suggestion, it is better that ..... Comparative and International.

  6. Parathyroid carcinoma in tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Seup; Ryu, Han Suk; Kang, Kyung Ho; Park, Sung Jun

    2016-10-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. This study presents a case of parathyroid carcinoma in a patient with tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Despite a successful kidney transplantation, the intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level of the patient was elevated consistently and could not be controlled by medical therapy. Due to the development of tertiary hyperparathyroidism with bone pain and osteoporosis, subtotal parathyroidectomy was performed 4 months after the kidney transplantation. Histological evaluation revealed that one of four parathyroid lesions was a parathyroid carcinoma, while the others were diffuse hyperplasia. Postoperative laboratory studies indicated a decreased level of iPTH. A positron emission tomography-computed tomography performed 6 months after the operation revealed no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  7. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Key words: academic libraries, open access, research, researchers, technology ... European commission (2012) reports that affordable and easy access to the results ...

  8. Academic Publications

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco H C Felix

    2017-01-01

    Alternative modes of academic publication. What it is: Page for the dissemination of academic papers in alternative formats. Aimed at the diffusion of the idea of open publication, or open access publication, a branch of open science, a multidisciplinary movement that seeks to modify the paradigm of knowledge production that centralizes it and prevents its spreading. Historically, Western tradition has become firmly rooted in the free dissemination of knowledge among peers. However, the c...

  9. Academic Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Daniela ZECA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Marketing is an investment in a future dominated by The Forth Industrial Revolution and Globalization and not an expense. This aspect will basically alter our way to teach and to learn. In its dimensions, arguably changes will be like anything we has seen before. We try to assess how will be all unfold but, anyway, academic field response at this challenge should be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders both public and private sectors, because these changes herald upheaval of whole organizations. The educational service is a special one, delivered today but with effects in the future, the future of the individual, the future of generation, the future of nations. The educational service policy adapted to the requirements of time, brings to the front the opportunity of academic marketing. To analyze demand in a professional way, to measure trends and correlated university programs with the forecast demand for jobs, it is the subject. In the case of academic education, we are talking also about cost, distribution and promotion policies, but being a special service we also discuss about ethic boundaries. This work is an open chapter focusing studies on academic megamarketing, the work keeping up with the pace of change, students enrolment mobility, overtakes job market, and an imposed win-win-win formula, applied for students, local community and academic field.

  10. Countering workplace aggression: an urban tertiary care institutional exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this process improvement project was to provide nursing staff with evidence-based knowledge and skills to manage patients and/or visitors with the potential for violence. Current statistics describing workplace violence in healthcare settings are alarming. Workplace violence significantly impacts nursing practice and may contribute to physical injuries, psychological trauma, decreased productivity, and low morale among nurses. This is particularly germane to those nurses who have been inadequately trained to manage aggressive patients and/or family behaviors. Following a series of disruptive episodes on the pulmonary-medical service that occurred at our facility in the winter of 2006, an employee safety team was formed to address the issue of workplace violence. Around this same time frame, a team comprising system hospital representatives was also initiated to globally address workplace violence. A Workplace Violence Education Program was devised to equip nurses with information, skills, and practical tools that will empower them when encountering clinical situations characterized by disruptive or abusive patient and/or family behaviors. The ultimate goal was to diffuse progressive, escalating aggressive behaviors in the clinical setting. FINDINGS/OUTCOMES: Evidence-based approaches formed the basis of an educational offering focusing on workplace violence prevention and management. This informational intervention was devised to empower clinical nursing staff with knowledge to enhance judgment, decision making, and implementation of behavioral strategies to reduce the likelihood of patient/family behaviors escalating to aggression. Interdisciplinary collaboration that included clinical experience, expertise, and knowledge generated from current literature reviews contributed to a successful educational program for nurses focusing on a historically neglected topic--workplace violence.

  11. Expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fill...... some of the gaps. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was directed electronically towards expatriate academics occupying regular positions in science faculty departments in universities in northern Europe. Findings – Results showed that job clarity was the dominating job factor with strong...... relationships with all of the five investigated work outcome variables, work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, job satisfaction, and time to proficiency. Job conflict and job freedom had an association with some of the work outcome variables but not with all of them. Neither workload nor job...

  12. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so......This doctoral thesis explores the key transnational institutions of European law academia and their role in the creation of a constitutional legal practice in the European Community from 1961 to 1993. Consisting of three case studies, it investigates the transnational federation gathering...

  13. Disruptive innovation in academic medical centers: balancing accountable and academic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel; Chen, Christopher; Ackerly, D Clay

    2015-05-01

    Numerous academic medicine leaders have argued that academic referral centers must prepare for the growing importance of accountability-driven payment models by adopting population health initiatives. Although this shift has merit, execution of this strategy will prove significantly more problematic than most observers have appreciated. The authors describe how successful implementation of an accountable care health strategy within a referral academic medical center (AMC) requires navigating a critical tension: The academic referral business model, driven by tertiary-level care, is fundamentally in conflict with population health. Referral AMCs that create successful value-driven population health systems within their organizations will in effect disrupt their own existing tertiary care businesses. The theory of disruptive innovation suggests that balancing the push and pull of academic and accountable care within a single organization is achievable. However, it will require significant shifts in resource allocation and changes in management structure to enable AMCs to make the inherent difficult choices and trade-offs that will ensue. On the basis of the theories of disruptive innovation, the authors present recommendations for how academic health systems can successfully navigate these issues as they transition toward accountability-driven care.

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  15. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  16. Academic Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  17. Urban mining systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the fundamental concept of and current endeavors in “urban mining” among those who are interested in both metal resources and ecology. Systems for recycling and reusing precious metals and rare-earth minerals contained in used and discarded electronics are introduced in this book. The target audience is not academic researchers in the resource management and ecology fields but, rather, citizens who are concerned about our future environment and want to do something for the future.

  18. Academic Words and Academic Capitalism Academic Words and Academic Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Billig

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artículo sugiere que esta época es la mejor y peor para la labor académica. La mejor en cuanto hay más publicaciones académicas que nunca. Y la peor porque sobra mucho de estas publicaciones. Trabajando en las condiciones competitivas del capitalismo académico, los académicos se sienten en la necesidad de continuar publicando, independientemente de que tengan algo que decir. Las presiones de publicar continuamente y promover la propia perspectiva se reflejan en la manera en la que los científicos sociales están escribiendo. Y es que los académicos utilizan un lenguaje técnico basado en sustantivos, con una precisión menor a la del lenguaje ordinario. Los estudiantes de postgrado han sido educados en esta manera de escribir como una condición previa a iniciarse en las ciencias sociales. Así, la naturaleza misma del capitalismo académico no sólo determina las condiciones en las que los académicos trabajan, sino que también afecta su manera de escribir.


    This paper suggests that it is the best and worst of times for academic work. It is the best of times because there are more academics publishing than ever before. It is the worst of times because there is much unnecessary publication. Working in the competitive conditions of academic capitalism, academics feel impelled to keep publishing, whether or not they have anything to say. The pressures to publish continually and to promote one’s own approach are reflected in the way that social scientists are writing. Academics use a noun-based technical language, which is less precise than ordinary language. Postgraduates are taught this way of writing as a precondition for entering the social sciences. In this way, the nature of academic capitalism not only determines the conditions under which academics are working but it affects the way that they are writing.

  19. The academic adjustment scale : Measuring the adjustment of permanent resident or sojourner students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joel R.; Guan, Yao; Koc, Yasin

    In this paper we developed and validated the Academic Adjustment Scale (AAS) - a new scale for measuring academic adjustment, which was developed with a focus on student sojourners who temporarily relocate to a new culture for the purpose of tertiary education, but also is validated for use with

  20. Philosophy of Education, Dialogue and Academic Life in Aotearoa-New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Georgina; Roberts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This collaborative paper reflects on academic life in Aotearoa-New Zealand. Drawing on our different personal histories, we examine the dominant influence of neoliberal ideas in shaping tertiary education reform, explore the importance of identity and worldview in structuring academic experience, and discuss the role of philosophy of education in…

  1. Providing Electronic Writing Resources for Academic Purposes: Issues of Control and Flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Nigel

    2001-01-01

    Reviews "Academic Writing: An Interactive Language Based CD-ROM for Teaching Academic Writing Skills to University Students." Suggests language teachers in the tertiary sector are required to accommodate the specific disciplinary needs of their students, and that it is rare for most commercial textbooks to find their way into an English for…

  2. Longitudinal trends in the treatment of abdominal pain in an academic emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Orhan; Jay, Loni; Fosnocht, David; Carey, Jessica; Rogers, LeGrand; Carey, Adrienne; Horne, Benjamin; Madsen, Troy

    2013-09-01

    Abdominal pain is a top chief complaint of patients presenting to Emergency Departments (ED). Historically, uncertainty surrounded correct management. Evidence has shown adequate analgesia does not obscure the diagnosis, making it the standard of care. We sought to evaluate trends in treatment of abdominal pain in an academic ED during a 10-year period. We prospectively evaluated a convenience sample of patients in an urban academic tertiary care hospital ED from September 2000 through April 2010. Adult patients presenting with a chief complaint of abdominal pain were included in this study. Analgesic administration rates and times, pain scores, and patient satisfaction at discharge were analyzed to evaluate trends by year. There were 2,646 patients presenting with abdominal pain who were enrolled during the study period. Rates of analgesic administration generally increased each year from 39.9% in 2000 to 65.5% in 2010 (p value for trend trend of increase in analgesic administration. In patients presenting to the ED with abdominal pain, analgesia administration increased and time to medication decreased during the 10-year period. Despite overall improvements in satisfaction, significant numbers of patients presenting with abdominal pain still reported moderate to severe pain at discharge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of technology on librarians in academic libraries in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of technology on librarians working in academic libraries in Nigeria with particular reference to Delta State. The descriptive survey design was adopted. The twelve (12) tertiary institutions libraries in Delta State were used for the study. The purposive sampling technique ...

  4. Motivation and librarians' productivity in academic libraries in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study therefore investigated the impact of motivation on the productivity of librarians in academic libraries from three different types of tertiary institutions aimed at elucidating the influence of monetary rewards and incentives, promotion and conducive workplace modalities on the personal growth and development of the ...

  5. Impact of the internet on academic performance of students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work investigates the impact of the internet on the academic performance of students in some selected tertiary institutions in Nigeria. A survey research design was adopted in conducting this research. Questionnaire was the instrument employed for data collection. Frequency count and simple percentage was ...

  6. Sustainability Champions? Academic Identities and Sustainability Curricula in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bronwyn E.; Cornforth, Sue; Beals, Fiona; Taylor, Mike; Tallon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of academic staff who are committed to embedding sustainability within tertiary curricula and pedagogy. Design/Methodology/Approach: The focus of this paper is on a New Zealand university. A survey of staff was undertaken and in-depth interviews conducted with 11 sustainability…

  7. Social conflict in response to urban sprawl in rural areas: urban reconfiguration of the Mezquital valley as influence area of the megalopolis of Mexico City

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, Brisa; Cadena, Edel; Campos, Juan; Hinojosa, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    The urban sprawl of metropolitan areas involves complex processes of coexistence between urban and rural dynamics, the functional redefining of central urban areas and rural areas or urban-rural surrounding transition generates land conflicts. In this paper the context of Mexico City megalopolis and its expansion process, will be discussed in the new specialization of the central city to tertiary services and increasing the value of land, it has resulted in the expulsion of the industry and s...

  8. Academic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive......Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt...

  9. Understanding spatial differentiation in urban decline levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekveld, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The economic and demographic changes currently manifest in many Western cities—referred to as urban decline or urban shrinkage—are receiving increased attention in public and academic debates. Although the general processes driving these changes have been identified, such processes cannot explain

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  11. Regionalised tertiary psychiatric residential facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Alain; Groden, David; Goldner, Elliot M; Gelinas, Daniel; Arnold, Leslie M

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitals remain the main venue for long-term mental health care and, despite widespread closures and downsizing, no country that built asylums in the last century has done away with them entirely--with the recent exception of Italy. Differentiated community-based residential alternatives have been developed over the past decades, with staffing levels that range from full-time professional, to daytime only, to part-time/on-call. This paper reviews the characteristics of community-based psychiatric residential care facilities as an alternative to long-term care in psychiatric hospitals. It describes five factors decision makers should consider: 1. number of residential places needed; 2. staffing levels; 3. physical setting; 4. programming; and 5. governance and financing. In Italy, facilities with full-time professional staff have been developed since the mid-1990s to accommodate the last cohorts of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals. In the United Kingdom, experiments with hostel wards since the 1980s have shown that home-like, small-scale facilities with intensive treatment and rehabilitation programming can be effective for the most difficult-to-place patients. More recently in Australia, Community Care Units (CCUs) have been applying this concept. In the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC), Tertiary Psychiatric Residential Facilities (TPRFs) have been developed as part of an effort to regionalise health and social services and downsize and ultimately close its only psychiatric hospital. This type of service must be further developed in addition to the need for forensic, acute-care and intermediate-level beds, as well as for community-based care such as assertive community treatment and intensive case management. All these types of services, together with long-term community-based residential care, constitute the elements of a balanced mental health care system. As part of a region's balanced mental health care plan, these Tertiary

  12. Urban bioclimatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, H

    1993-11-15

    This article deals with the part of urban climatology which is of particular relevance to human beings. Presented first is a summary of all human biometerologically effective complexes, as well as other factors which are relevant to urban planning and which depend on atmospheric conditions in urban structures in a direct or indirect manner. Later, methods for human biometerologically significant assessment of thermal and air pollution components of the urban climate are discussed in detail, because these components can be strongly influenced by urban planning. The application of these methods is illustrated by some results of appropriate investigations in urban areas.

  13. Participatory urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    2016-01-01

    cannot directly influence their structures, they can influence their contours through such leisure practices. In this chapter focus will be on how citizens’ engagement in locative leisure activities may allow them to co-create urban space. This participatory urbanism is a form of everyday democracy......Urban areas are planned structures that cannot easily be changed. Urban areas do however still afford physical spaces for various types of leisure expression and participation, from street art to parkour and from urban gaming to artistic happenings. Thus, while citizens who inhabit the urban areas...

  14. Medical student psychological distress and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendle, Claire; Baulch, Julie; Pellicano, Rebecca; Hay, Margaret; Lichtwark, Irene; Ayoub, Sally; Clarke, David M; Morand, Eric F; Kumar, Arunaz; Leech, Michelle; Horne, Kylie

    2018-01-21

    The impact of medical student psychological distress on academic performance has not been systematically examined. This study provided an opportunity to closely examine the potential impacts of workplace and study related stress factors on student's psychological distress and their academic performance during their first clinical year. This one-year prospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary hospital based medical school in Melbourne, Australia. Students completed a questionnaire at three time points during the year. The questionnaire included the validated Kessler psychological distress scale (K10) and the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), as well as items about sources of workplace stress. Academic outcome scores were aggregated and correlated with questionnaire results. One hundred and twenty six students participated; 126 (94.7%), 102 (76.7%), and 99 (74.4%) at time points one, two, and three, respectively. 33.1% reported psychological distress at time point one, increasing to 47.4% at time point three. There was no correlation between the K10 scores and academic performance. There was weak negative correlation between the GHQ-28 at time point three and academic performance. Keeping up to date with knowledge, need to do well and fear of negative feedback were the most common workplace stress factors. Poor correlation was noted between psychological distress and academic performance.

  15. Academic Dishonesty of Undergraduates: Methods of Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Michelle; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the frequency of engagement in academic dishonesty among undergraduate students at a large urban college and also explored the use of traditional cheating methods and contemporary cheating methods to determine various forms of cheating, the number of times students cheat, and the number of ways students cheat. The sample was…

  16. Technological Attitude and Academic Achievement of Physics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study was aimed at investigating the effect of technological attitude of students on academic achievement in Physics. Four co-education schools were randomly drawn from urban centers of Uyo and Abak Local Government Areas of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. This gave sample size of 110 senior secondary two ...

  17. Urban lifestyle and urban biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L. K.; Lyytimäki, J.; Normander, B.

    2007-01-01

    This report is concerned with the relations between lifestyles of urban populations on one hand and protection of biodiversity in urban areas on the other. Urban areas are of importance for the general protection of biodiversity. In the surroundings of cities and within urban sprawls there can...... biodiversity, recreational, educational and other needs. However, uncovered and unsealed space is constantly under pressure for building and infrastructure development in the urban landscape, and the design and usages of urban green structure is a matter of differing interests and expectations. Integrating...... the green needs of urban lifestyle in the planning process does not come by itself. Nor does finding the synergies between urban lifestyle and urban biodiversity. Careful planning including stakeholder involvement is required. In this process various mapping techniques and use of indicators can be most...

  18. Recruitment Of International Students Into Cameroon Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recruitment Of International Students Into Cameroon Tertiary Institutions In The Absence Of International Offices. ... The present system of recruiting international students is haphazardly been handled by ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  19. Learning Enhancement in Tertiary Institutions Using Mobile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... model that is still by far the dominant mode of education and learning in tertiary institutions. In addition to identifying ... education has there been a technology that ..... Determinant of Mobile Learning Acceptance: An Empirical.

  20. Urban physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Urban Physics is the multiscale and interdisciplinary research area dealing with physical processes in urban environments that influence our everyday health, comfort and productivity. It involves disciplines ranging from mesoscale meteorology to human thermophysiology. The introductory lecture

  1. Urban Times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This is a proposed special issue with six thematic articles by different contributors on 'urban times' edited by me.......This is a proposed special issue with six thematic articles by different contributors on 'urban times' edited by me....

  2. Urban streets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönfeld, von Kim Carlotta; Bertolini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Today's urban streets are usually planned for purposes of mobility: pedestrians, as well as a variety of vehicles such as cars, trucks, and sometimes bicycles, are usually factored into an urban street plan. However, urban streets are also increasingly recognized as public spaces, accommodating

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  4. Radioguided parathyroidectomy for tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnay, Yash R; Weinlander, Eric; Alfhefdi, Amal; Schneider, David; Sippel, Rebecca S; Chen, Herbert

    2015-05-15

    Tertiary hyperparathyroidism (3HPT) is defined as the persistent hyperproduction of parathyroid hormone and resulting hypercalcemia after renal transplantation. Here, we examine the utility of radioguided parathyroidectomy (RGP) in patients with 3HPT. We reviewed a prospective surgery database containing 80 3HPT patients who underwent RGP from January 2001-July 2014 at our institution. We evaluated patient demographics, operative management, radioguided neoprobe utilization, and operative outcomes. Data are reported as mean ± standard error of the mean. The mean age of the patients was 52 ± 1 y, and 46% were male. A total of 69 patients had hyperplasia and received subtotal parathyroidectomy, whereas 5 patients had double adenomas and 6 patients had single adenomas. The average calcium level among 3HPT patients was 10.8 ± 0.1 mg/dL preoperatively and 8.7 ± 0.1 mg/dL postoperatively. In vivo radioguided counts normalized to background counts averaged 145 ± 4%, whereas ex vivo counts normalized to background counts averaged 69 ± 5%. All but one ex vivo count was >20%. Ectopically located glands were successfully localized in 38 patients using the gamma probe. Ex vivo percentage did not correlate with parathyroid gland weight, preoperative parathyroid hormone, or preoperative calcium. Our radioguided approach achieved normocalcemia in 96% of 3HPT patients undergoing RGP; two patients developed recurrent disease. In this series, all enlarged parathyroid glands were localized and resected using the gamma probe. Thus, RGP reliably localizes adenomatous, hyperplastic, and ectopically located glands in patients with 3HPT, resulting in high cure rate after resection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Urban architecture in urban renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, Steen; Svensson, Ole

    2001-01-01

    and without obvious architectural value. These issues raise pertinent questions: what urban architectural problems and qualities exist in the complex, inner suburbs? What differences exist between professionals' and residents' perceptions and assessments of urban architecture? How can a shared language...

  6. Driving factors of urban land growth in Guangzhou and its implications for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuezhu; Li, Shaoying; Wang, Xuetong; Xue, Xiaolong

    2018-04-01

    Since 2000, China's urban land has expanded at a dramatic speed because of the country's rapid urbanization. The country has been experiencing unbalanced development between rural and urban areas, causing serious challenges such as agricultural security and land resources waste. Effectively evaluating the driving factors of urban land growth is essential for improving efficient land use management and sustainable urban development. This study established a principal component regression model based on eight indicators to identify their influences on urban land growth in Guangzhou. The results provided a grouping analysis of the driving factors, and found that economic growth, urban population, and transportation development are the driving forces of urban land growth of Guangzhou, while the tertiary industry has an opposite effect. The findings led to further suggestions and recommendations for urban sustainable development. Hence, local governments should design relevant policies for achieving the rational development of urban land use and strategic planning on urban sustainable development.

  7. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Urban design and architecture are increasingly used as material and affective strategies for setting the scene, for manipulation and the production of urban life: The orchestration of atmospheres, the framing and staging of urban actions, the programming for contemplation, involvement, play......, experience and consumption are all strategic design tools applied by planners and architects. Whereas urban design in former modernist planning served merely functional or political means, urban design has increasingly become an aesthetical mediator of ideologies embedded in the urban field of life forces....... Under these circumstances affective aesthetics operate strategically within the urban field of interests, capital flows and desires of the social. This ‘affective urbanism’ (Anderson & Holden 2008) is linked to a society influenced by new kinds of information flows, where culture is mediated and enacted...

  8. Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination and Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Itwas therefore recommended that efforts should be made to look into other pressing factors like self-esteem, teacher's attitude, student's attitude, parental background among others which may be influencing student's poor academic achievement. Key words: Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination, Academic ...

  9. Academic detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  10. Basic Risk Factors Awareness in Non-Communicable Diseases (BRAND) Study Among People Visiting Tertiary Care Centre in Mysuru, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippeswamy, Thippeswamy; Chikkegowda, Prathima

    2016-04-01

    Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are the major causes of mortality and morbidity globally. Awareness about NCDs and their risk factors has an important role in prevention and management strategies of these NCDs. 1) To assess the awareness of risk factors contributing to NCDs among the patients visiting tertiary care hospital in Mysuru district; 2) To compare the difference in awareness of risk factors for NCDs among the urban and rural patients with/ without NCD visiting the tertiary care hospital. A cross- sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care centre- JSS Hospital, Mysuru, Karnataka from March 2013 - August 2013. The patients visiting Medicine OPD during the period were the study subjects. The subjects were allocated into 4 groups: Urban without any NCD, Urban with atleast one NCD, rural without NCD, rural with atleast one NCD. A pretested questionnaire regarding awareness of risk factors for NCDs was used in the study and frequency and proportions were used to analyse the data. A total of 400 subjects, 100 subjects in each group were included in the study. Out of these subjects about 65% of the urban group and 42% of the rural group subjects were aware of the NCDs and their risk factors. Least awareness was observed among the rural subjects without any NCDs (35%). The awareness of risk factors of NCDs and knowledge regarding prevention of NCDs was not satisfactory. The results highlighted the need and scope for health education and interventions to improve the awareness about NCDs and their risk factors.

  11. An assessment on the trustworthiness of engineers in higher tertiary institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi Kuan, Tan; Lloyd, Ling; Mou Chuan, Cheng

    2017-10-01

    In Malaysian higher education history, the evolution from public funded to private funded and now to private non profit oriented model has been taking place since 80s. The evolution also demarcated higher learning institution into academic or research based university. As such, postgraduate studies became increasingly competitive in students intake. The evolution also created doubt to the public in term of the quality of postgraduate education offered by different classifications. This study investigates the gender specific perception and trustworthiness of engineering postgraduate students in private non profit oriented higher tertiary institution. An equally divided gender groups of 118 respondents were chosen for the study. Non-parametric statistics were used and the result showed that there was no difference and no correlation of genders in perception on teaching role and trustworthiness among the future engineers in private non profit oriented higher tertiary institution.

  12. Tertiary recovery and tritide injection equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin

    1989-01-01

    The exploitation of an oil field is a continously developing process, undergoing seveal stages, such as the low production, the high production, the stable production and the decline. The tertiary recovery is an important means of the enhanced oil recovery. Since the object of the tertiary recovery is to treat the oil in micropores which is difficult to be produced, it is more necessary to know further the reservoir. Tritide can be used as a tracer and is an ideal marker of knowing the reservoir and the state of the fluid movement. The paper presents the tritide injection equipment

  13. Actualizing Moral Education in Japan's Tertiary Sector: Reitaku University's Response to Today's Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    While moral education is taught in the primary--and some in--the secondary grades, morality and ethics education has not been a subject since World War II in tertiary grades. Neverless Japanese universities have neither academic departments nor courses solely devoted to scholarship or instruction in the area of moral studies. In this article, the…

  14. Urban blight and urban redesign

    OpenAIRE

    Zsilincsar, Walter

    2018-01-01

    The phenomenon of urban blight dates back to the 19th century when industrialisation starting in Europe and North America initiated an uncontrolled urban growth in combination with strong demand in cheap an quickly constructed housing. Ghettoisation of mainly the working-class population and other “marginal groups” were the consequence together with a constant decay of single buildings, whole blocks and quarters. These general aspects of urban blight with its additional facettes or aspects re...

  15. Plastic Surgery Complications from Medical Tourism Treated in a U.S. Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kimberly M; Moscoso, Andrea V; Bayer, Lauren R; Rosselli-Risal, Liliana; Orgill, Dennis P

    2018-04-01

    Medical tourism is a growing, multi-billion dollar industry fueled by improvements in the global transportation infrastructure. The authors studied patients living in the United States who travel to other countries for plastic surgical procedures and returned to have their complications treated in the authors' center. A retrospective patient evaluation was performed. Patients who had presented to an urban tertiary academic hospital plastic surgery service with complications or complaints associated with plastic surgery performed in a developing country were studied. The authors collected demographic information, types of surgery performed, destinations, insurance coverage, and complications. Seventy-eight patients were identified over 7 years. Most commonly, complications were seen following abdominoplasty (n = 35), breast augmentation (n = 25), and foreign body injections (n = 15). Eighteen patients underwent multiple procedures in one operative setting. The most common destination country was the Dominican Republic (n = 59). Complications included surgical-site infections (n = 14), pain (n = 14), and wound healing complications (n = 12). Eighty-six percent of patients (n = 67) relied on their medical insurance to pay for their follow-up care or manage their complications, with the most common type of health insurance coverage being Massachusetts Medicaid (n = 48). Cosmetic surgery performed in developing countries can carry substantial risks of complications that can be challenging to patients, primary care providers, insurers, and plastic surgical teams not associated with the original surgery. These complications pose significant burdens on our public health systems.

  16. Urban Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This anthology is the proceedings publication from the 2015 NAF Symposium in Malmö, Sweden. The aim of the 2015 NAF Symposium “Urban Mobility – Architectures, Geographies and Social Space” was to facilitate a cross-disciplinary discussion on urban mobility in which the juxtaposition of different...

  17. Urban Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This anthology is the proceedings publication from the 2015 NAF Symposium in Malmö, Sweden. The aim of the 2015 NAF Symposium “Urban Mobility – Architectures, Geographies and Social Space” was to facilitate a cross-disciplinary discussion on urban mobility in which the juxtaposition of different ...

  18. Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Nowak

    2016-01-01

    Urban forests (and trees) constitute the second forest resource considered in this report. We specifically emphasize the fact that agricultural and urban forests exist on a continuum defined by their relationship (and interrelationship) with a given landscape. These two forest types generally serve different purposes, however. Whereas agricultural forests are...

  19. Urbane Projekter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Juel

    2013-01-01

    of Chapter 1 ’problem and research questions’, Chapter 2 ’place, discourse and planning as a theoretical framework’ and Chapter 3 ’research design’. Part 2 ’urban practice locally, nationally and globally’ consisting of Chapter 4 ’background and context, urban trans- formations in Aalborg from 1950 to 2013...... of Chapter 9 with the same name. The analysis results and thus the conclusions are at 3 levels of knowledge: Historically specific development in terms of urban planning practices respectively in Aalborg and natio- nally/internationally The tools here have been a focus on different rationales or urban...... projects as a strategic tool in urban policy, development of place perceptions, the use of narratives in the planning processes, the functions of representations as discursive devised imagined realities, power structures and planning approaches - knowledge that can be used in the future practice of other...

  20. Urban performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Through three different urban performances, the paper investigates how, when and under which circumstances urban space is transformed and distorted from its every day use and power relations. Distortion is an annual street festival in Copenhagen with the objective to distort the functional city...... creates an intensive space for the empowerment and liberation of the body. Occupy Wall street and its action in the autumn 2001 is the ultimate example of how urban political performances intensifies and transform every day spaces. Through examples of how OWS tactically appropriates and transforms urban...... space, I seek to show how representational space, for instance the public square, is transformed and distorted by heterogeneous and unforeseen modes of operating. Despite differing in their goal and outset, I wish to unfold an alternative to urban transformation practices in planning and architecture...

  1. Success in One High-Poverty, Urban Elementary School: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Shavonna Leigh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the efforts implemented in a high-poverty, urban elementary school in order to increase academic achievement. The central research question was: (1) How do teachers and administrators in a high-poverty, urban school describe the strategies they use to achieve academic success? The sub-questions…

  2. Senge's Learning Organization and Teachers' Perceptions of Leadership at an Elementary School in Urban Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Urban public schools in the United States face the problem of failure to reach academic goals of performance mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act. It was hypothesized that use of Senge's leadership model might result in academic performance in one urban elementary school. Based on Senge's shared vision leadership model as the theoretical…

  3. Solvent effects on the magnetic shielding of tertiary butyl alcohol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )4 and tetramethyl ammonium cation N(CH3)4(+) have also been presented. KEY WORDS: Solvent effects, Magnetic shielding, Tertiary butyl alcohol, Tertiary butyl amine, Continuum solvation calculations, Chemical shift estimation methods

  4. Modelling the harmonized tertiary Institutions Salary Structure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analyses the Harmonized Tertiary Institution Salary Structure (HATISS IV) used in Nigeria. The irregularities in the structure are highlighted. A model that assumes a polynomial trend for the zero step salary, and exponential trend for the incremental rates, is suggested for the regularization of the structure.

  5. American Tertiary mollusks of the genus Clementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodring, W.P.

    1927-01-01

    Aside from its value as an aid in determining the age of Tertiary beds, the chief interest of the genus Clementia lies in the anomalous features of its present and former distribution. An attempt is made in this paper to trace its geologic history, to point out its paleobiologic significance, and to describe all the known American Tertiary species. The fossils from Colombia used in preparing this report were collected during explorations made under the direction of Dr. 0. B. Hopkins, chief geologist of the Imperial Oil Co. (Ltd.), who kindly donated them to the United States National Museum. Dr. T. Wayland Vaughan, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, furnished information relating to specimens collected by him in Mexico. Dr. Bruce L. Clark, of the University of California; Dr. G. Dallas Hanna, of the California Academy of Sciences; Dr. H. A. Pilsbry, of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences; and Dr. W. D. Matthew, of the American Museum of Natural History, generously loaned type specimens and other material. Doctor Clark and Doctor Hanna also gave information concerning the Tertiary species from California. Mr. Ralph B. Stewart, of the University of California, read the manuscript, and I have taken advantage of his suggestions. I am also indebted to Mr. L. R. Cox, of the British Museum, for information relating to the fossil species from Persia, Zanzibar, and Burma, and to Dr. Axel A. Olsson, of the International Petroleum Co., for data concerning undescribed Tertiary species from Peru.

  6. Misconception of emergency contraception among tertiary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the degree of awareness and use of emergency contraception among tertiary school students in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Design: A self-administered questionnaire survey. Setting: The Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, located on the outskirts of Ikot Ekpene local government area between ...

  7. Understanding Australian Aboriginal Tertiary Student Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith; Bennell, Debra; Anderson, Roz; Cooper, Inala; Forrest, Simon; Exell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from a study of the experiences of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander university students, this paper presents an overview of the specific needs of these students as they enter and progress through their tertiary education. Extracts from a set of case studies developed from both staff and student interviews and an online…

  8. Indigenous Students in the Tertiary Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandias, Susan; Fuller, Don; Larkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Important recent objectives of indigenous education policy in Australia have been aimed at redressing indigenous economic and social disadvantage through increasing student retention, progression and completion rates in both compulsory and post-compulsory education. The two sectors of the tertiary education system, vocational education and…

  9. SECTORAL ANALYSIS: GROWTH ACCOUNTING OF TERTIARY INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Z. ALSHEHHI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The tertiary sector is one of the modern styles of economic systems in view of the share it occupies in the field of production as well as employment occupied share. Hence, just like other lands, the UAE, witnessed an economic structural change similar to developed and developing nations, where the tertiary industries contributed 55.4% in 2015 to total country’s income. The empirical study aimed to analyze the contribution portion of growth in the tertiary industries through using the growth accounting framework in time-series from 1990 to 2015. The empirical study found that most of the industries contributed significantly to the growth of the tertiary sector. The contribution shares of growth due to labor and capital varied among industries. The main observed results show that there was a vice versa relationship between TFP performance and the size of labor, where the TFP positively corresponded with the decline in the size of labor specifically from 2010-2015.

  10. Economics of Tertiary Education - Challenges and dynamics of the public tertiary education in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gledian Llatja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The tertiary education is a critic mechanism for the socio-economic progress, for individuals who aspire a brighter future and it is also considered an important catalyzer of the economic mobility (Department of Treasury and Department of Education, 2012, 2. Based on the positive role and impact that the tertiary education has on the sustainable development, President Obama once stated that it is of damage to treat education as a luxurious public service. In line with the general considerations about the tertiary education in the U.S. the parallel comparison with Albania comes as a direct interpretation of utopia in the education policy-making. As policies are usually drafted based on data and findings, in the case of Albania there is a lack of data on expenses on tertiary education as share of GDP. This stands also for the main limitation of the paper.

  11. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  12. Datasets linking ethnic perceptions to undergraduate students learning outcomes in a Nigerian Tertiary Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke A. Badejo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article represents academic performances of undergraduate students in a select Nigerian Private Tertiary institution from 2008 to 2013. The 2413 dataset categorizes students with respect to their origins (ethnicity, pre-university admission scores and Cumulative Grade Point Averages earned at the end of their study at the university. We present a descriptive statistics showing mean, median, mode, maximum, minimum, range, standard deviation and variance in the performances of these students and a boxplot representation of the performances of these students with respect to their origins. Keywords: Learning analytics, Cultural impact, Ethnicity, Undergraduates, Education data mining, Smart campus, Nigerian university

  13. The use of blogging in tertiary healthcare educational settings to enhance reflective learning in nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Theodora C

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies such as blogs are increasingly used in academic settings; however, they are not widely used in hospital settings. This project explored the effectiveness of using a blog to enhance reflective learning in a nurse manager leadership development course of a tertiary care hospital setting. Differences in reflective learning between the blog group and traditional learning group were measured post training using a Reflective Learning and Interaction Questionnaire. Although the groups did not differ significantly on any reflective learning dimension (p educators contemplating to incorporate blogs into their learning strategies to enhance reflective learning.

  14. Diversification Management at Tertiary Education Level: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takwate, Kwaji Tizhe

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of management of diversification at tertiary education level in view of the growth of national secondary education system which vested high scramble for tertiary education was made in relation to question of access and expansion. This paper examines management of diversification at tertiary education level as a…

  15. Tertiary Education in the Czech Republic: The Pathway to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, Richard; Gounko, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes recent policy proposals to reform Czech tertiary education. A brief overview of the evolution of Czech tertiary education presents the background against which emerging policy trends in education are examined. We relate the changes in tertiary education to the policy framework and recommendations of the OECD, underpinned by…

  16. Urban Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    . Kracauer’s essay may even provide a conceptual basis for critical studies of modern urbanity. Yet one has to establish a clear distinction between culture industry (e.g. the Tiller Girls) and urban culture. In everyday life as well as in Kracauer’s writings about it, the sphere of city culture may...... transcend capitalist Ratio and enter the domain of utopian fantasy. Far from automatically reproducing the logic of capital, the ornaments of the city provide occasions for cultural and social change. This is what Kracauer is hinting at when he makes improvisation the prime criterion of urban quality....

  17. Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancer Use Among New Zealand Tertiary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Sanyogita Sanya; Hussainy, Safeera; Henning, Marcus; Stewart, Kay; Jensen, Maree; Russell, Bruce

    2017-09-19

    Cognitive enhancement is the use of prescription stimulant medicines by healthy individuals for nonmedical use in academic settings. Commonly used cognitive enhancers (CEs) include methylphenidate, amphetamines, and modafinil. To understand the motivation to use CEs, it is important to look beyond prevalence and explore the extent to which attitudes, beliefs, and intentions predict the decision to use CEs. The study aimed to investigate what factors explain the decision to use CEs among tertiary students in New Zealand, using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Students from the Schools of Pharmacy, Nursing, Medicine, Law, and Accounting at a university in New Zealand were invited to complete a paper-based questionnaire. The questionnaire elicited students' attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control toward illicit use of CEs using TPB. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted. Response rate was 88.6% (442/499). Students who perceived CE use to be socially and ethically acceptable were more likely to use CEs (odds ratio, OR: 1.56, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 1.153-2.105, p = 0.004). Students who were concerned about the health impact of CE use were less likely to use CEs (OR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.492-0.826, p = 0.001). Students who believed that CE use was approved were more likely to use them (OR: 1.648, CI: 1.193-2.278, p = 0.002). This research supports the notion that the decision to use CEs is not just an autonomous choice that occurs in isolation. Attitudes on the ethical and social acceptability of CE use were more likely to drive the decision to use CEs. The study provides the impetus for an integrative discussion by health care professionals and academics on the impact of attitudes, social norms, and advocates on the decision to use CEs.

  18. Predictors of Academic Success for Maori, Pacific and Non-Maori Non-Pacific Students in Health Professional Education: A Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikaire, Erena; Curtis, Elana; Cormack, Donna; Jiang, Yannan; McMillan, Louise; Loto, Rob; Reid, Papaarangi

    2017-01-01

    Tertiary institutions internationally aim to increase student diversity, however are struggling to achieve equitable academic outcomes for indigenous and ethnic minority students and detailed exploration of factors that impact on success is required. This study explored the predictive effect of admission variables on academic outcomes for health…

  19. Closing the Achievement Gap: Urban Schools. CSR Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kathleen; Soper, Stephanie

    This report reviews efforts to reform urban schools, focusing on initiatives in Tennessee and California as examples from which distric leaders may draw useful lessons. The report suggests that comprehensive school reform (CSR) offers promise to struggling urban schools by focusing on transforming the academic climate, school culture, and…

  20. Informational Urbanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang G. Stock

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary and future cities are often labeled as "smart cities," "ubiquitous cities," "knowledge cities" and "creative cities." Informational urbanism includes all aspects of information and knowledge with regard to urban regions. "Informational city" is an umbrella term uniting the divergent trends of information-related city research. Informational urbanism is an interdisciplinary endeavor incorporating on the one side computer science and information science and on the other side urbanism, architecture, (city economics, and (city sociology. In our research project on informational cities, we visited more than 40 metropolises and smaller towns all over the world. In this paper, we sketch the theoretical background on a journey from Max Weber to the Internet of Things, introduce our research methods, and describe main results on characteristics of informational cities as prototypical cities of the emerging knowledge society.

  1. Urban hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Third International Conference on Urban Storm Drainage will be held in Goteborg, Sweden, June 4-8, 1984. Contact A. Sjoborg, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden, for more information. The Fourth Conference will be in late August 1987 in Lausanne, Switzerland, and the Fifth Conference is planned for Tokyo in 1990. The proceedings of the First International Conference, held in Southampton, England, in April 1978, are available from Wiley-Interscience under the title “Urban Storm Drainage.”The proceedings of the Second International Conference, held in Urbana, Illinois, in June 1981, are available from Water Resources Publications, Littleton, Colo., under the title, “Urban Stormwater Hydraulics and Hydrology” and “Urban Stormwater Quality, Management, and Planning.”

  2. Graduate Students' Needs and Preferences for Written Feedback on Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine graduate students' needs and preferences for written feedback on academic writing from their lecturers and thesis supervisors. Quantitative method via survey questionnaire was used to collect data from 21 respondents. The data collection involved Master and Doctorate students at a tertiary level institution…

  3. Outsourcing Academic Development in Higher Education: Staff Perceptions of an International Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kerry; Hughes, Kate; Stephens, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education support services are being outsourced. Our case study was of a program from a global, USA-based, non-profit organisation. From in-depth interviews, we investigated staff perceptions of academic development workshops and the efficacy of outsourcing to a transnational tertiary-support program. We found that…

  4. Urban Mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The catalogue is one of the results of a small taught course at teh Aarhus School of Architecture. The course was offered to bachelor students and was specific focused on harvesting materials in an urban context and on building with waste.......The catalogue is one of the results of a small taught course at teh Aarhus School of Architecture. The course was offered to bachelor students and was specific focused on harvesting materials in an urban context and on building with waste....

  5. Academic Entitlement and Academic Performance in Graduating Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffres, Meghan N.; Barclay, Sean M.; Stolte, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine a measurable definition of academic entitlement, measure academic entitlement in graduating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, and compare the academic performance between students identified as more or less academically entitled.

  6. Commercializing Academic Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    the importance of academic patenting. Our findings suggest that academic involvement in patenting results in a citation premium, as academic patents appear to generate more forward citations. We also find that in the European context of changing research objectives and funding sources since the mid-1990s...

  7. The Academic Adviser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the idea that "academic" advisers are "academics" who play a major role in connecting the general education curriculum to the students' experience as well as connecting the faculty to the students' holistic experience of the curriculum. The National Academic Advising Association Concept of Academic…

  8. Tertiary Treatment Process of Preserved Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the composite coagulants on coagulation sedimentation for the preserved wastewater was investigated by changing the composite coagulant dosages, and the coagulant was composed of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS, polyaluminium chloride (PAC, and polyaluminum ferric silicate (PAFSC, while the effect of the tertiary treatment process on the preserved wastewater was tested, which was exceeded the standard seriously. The results showed that 400 mg/L was the optimum composite coagulant dosage. The removal rates of salt and sugar were as high as 99.1% and 99.5% respectively, and the removal rates of CODCr and SS were 99.3% and 96.0%, respectively after the preserved wastewater was treated by the tertiary treatment technology, which both reached the primary standard of “The Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard” (GB8978-1996.

  9. Academic Integration of Mainland Chinese Students in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanwei Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the academic integration experiences of mainland Chinese tertiary-level students in Germany. Using Tinto’s model, the article explores the challenges that Chinese students face during their academic integration, the strategies they employ, and the relationship between academic and social integration. The data were collected in spring 2016 by interviewing 26 mainland Chinese students studying either in German universities or universities of applied sciences. Four major challenges were identified and analyzed: language barrier, knowledge gap, pedagogical differences, and cultural differences. An important outcome of the study presented is that social integration serves as a facilitator for enhancing academic integration, but is not a prerequisite for academic success. Group learning with peers was found to enhance learning outcomes. Overall, Chinese students have exploited their own advantages in academic integration by exploring feasible strategies and benefiting from their past learning experiences. It is suggested that academic integration as a long and challenging process for international students should be acknowledged by the German HEIs, and that more institutional support and guidance are needed.

  10. Student Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty in a Private Middle Eastern University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawlah Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In varying degrees of severity and seriousness, evidence of academic dishonesty exists in tertiary institutions around the world. This paper examines academic misconduct in a tertiary-level institution in one of the Gulf countries to see if academic dishonesty prevails, and if so, how and why it happens. Method: To gauge students’ perceptions about academic dishonesty in this context, a survey was distributed to 111 junior, sophomore, and senior level students taking an advanced academic writing course in a private university. Results: Results show statistically significant evidence that cheating exists. Conclusions: While research on academic misconduct is extensive in Western contexts, less is documented in the Middle East and North Africa region besides conceptual papers that aim to create a general understanding of this issue and newspaper articles that discuss its prevalence. Implications for Theory and/or Practice: This paper underscores the existence of academic misconduct in the Middle East and North Africa region, identifying the need for further research and implementation of improved teaching strategies and increased attention regarding academic misconduct.

  11. Optimising Tertiary Student Accommodation within University Neighbourhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Ike, Nnenna; Baldwin, Claudia; Lathouras, Athena

    2017-01-01

    Tertiary students’ activities within neighbourhoods adjacent to universities engender positive and negative impacts that have consequences for neighbourhood sustainability. This might lead to studentification, a process that triggers physical, economic and socio-cultural transformation of university towns. Where non-student residents perceive negative impacts, it can lead to conflict and resentment towards the student population, mistrust between student and local resident groups and a decrea...

  12. Tertiary lymphoid organs in Takayasu Arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Marc eClement; Marc eClement; Adrien eGaly; Patrick eBruneval; Marion eMorvan; Fabien eHyafil; Fabien eHyafil; Khadija eBenali; Nicoletta ePasi; Lydia eDeschamps; Quentin ePellenc; Quentin ePellenc; Thomas ePapo; Antonino eNicoletti; Antonino eNicoletti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA) is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) in the aortic wall of TA patients.Methods: Hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21), and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune cells from t...

  13. Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Takayasu Arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Marc; Galy, Adrien; Bruneval, Patrick; Morvan, Marion; Hyafil, Fabien; Benali, Khadija; Pasi, Nicoletta; Deschamps, Lydia; Pellenc, Quentin; Papo, Thomas; Nicoletti, Antonino; Sacre, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA) is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) in the aortic wall of TA patients. Methods Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21), and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune ce...

  14. Urban agriculture in Africa : a bibliographical survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obudho, R.A.; Foeken, D.W.J.

    1999-01-01

    This bibliography is a listing of all materials that have ever been published or written on the subject of urban agriculture in Africa up to 1998. It records all books, chapters in books, discussion and conference papers, periodical literature and all types of academic theses, dissertations and

  15. School Uniforms in Urban Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draa, Virginia Ann Bendel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the implementation of a mandatory uniform policy in urban public high schools improved school performance measures at the building level for rates of attendance, graduation, academic proficiency, and student conduct as measured by rates of suspensions and expulsions. Sixty-four secondary…

  16. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  17. Influences on Academic Achievement of Primary School Pupils in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopheak Song

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Employing education production function approach, this article investigates the influences of school and pupil background factors on academic achievement of primary school pupils in Cambodia. Based on achievement data of 1,080 Grade 6 pupils from one rural and one semi-urban area, the study reveals that school and teacher quality exerts a considerable effect on pupils’ performance. Teachers’ experience and teacher guides are positively correlated with academic achievement, while instructional time loss is significantly associated with poor performance. In light of these results, policies to boost academic achievement of primary school pupils in Cambodia are discussed.

  18. Academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement : mediating and additive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guay, Frédéric; Ratelle, Catherine; Roy, Amélie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between autonomous academic motivation and achievement, or 3) both motivational constructs have an additive effect on academic achievement. A total of 925 hig...

  19. Urban atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    What is an urban atmosphere? How can we differentiate an 'atmosphere' from other facets of urban consciousness and experience? This essay explores some of the wider cultural, political, and philosophical connotations of atmospheres as a focal point for critical reflections on space and subjectivity. The idea of an 'affective atmosphere' as a distinctive kind of mood or shared corporeal phenomenon is considered in relation to recent developments in phenomenology, extended conceptions of agency, and new understandings of materialism. The essay draws in particular on the changing characteristics of air and light to reflect on different forms of sensory experience and their wider cultural and political connotations. The argument highlights some of the tensions and anomalies that permeate contemporary understandings of urban atmospheres.

  20. Urbane spil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssing, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    PhD afhandling: 1: Urbane spil 2: [brand TILST] - den nye forstad. 3: 6400:Kollision - udstilling på Sønderborg Slot 2001 4: 4: [0.2:Kollision] - Charlottenborgs Forårsudstilling 2002 5: Havnen på spil - debatten om de bynære havnearealer i Århus 2002-2004 Manual - uddybet guide til PhD-projektet......PhD afhandling: 1: Urbane spil 2: [brand TILST] - den nye forstad. 3: 6400:Kollision - udstilling på Sønderborg Slot 2001 4: 4: [0.2:Kollision] - Charlottenborgs Forårsudstilling 2002 5: Havnen på spil - debatten om de bynære havnearealer i Århus 2002-2004 Manual - uddybet guide til Ph......D-projektet Urbane spil Se også www.urbanespil.dk...

  1. A tertiary care-primary care partnership model for medically complex and fragile children and youth with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John B; Colby, Holly H; Bartelt, Tera; Jablonski, Debra; Krauthoefer, Mary L; Havens, Peter

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of a tertiary care center special needs program that partners with families and primary care physicians to ensure seamless inpatient and outpatient care and assist in providing medical homes. Up to 3 years of preenrollment and postenrollment data were compared for patients in the special needs program from July 1, 2002, through June 30, 2005. A tertiary care center pediatric hospital and medical school serving urban and rural patients. A total of 227 of 230 medically complex and fragile children and youth with special needs who had a wide range of chronic disorders and were enrolled in the special needs program. Care coordination provided by a special needs program pediatric nurse case manager with or without a special needs program physician. Preenrollment and postenrollment tertiary care center resource utilization, charges, and payments. A statistically significant decrease was found in the number of hospitalizations, number of hospital days, and tertiary care center charges and payments, and an increase was found in the use of outpatient services. Aggregate data revealed a decrease in hospital days from 7926 to 3831, an increase in clinic visits from 3150 to 5420, and a decrease in tertiary care center payments of $10.7 million. The special needs program budget for fiscal year 2005 had a deficit of $400,000. This tertiary care-primary care partnership model improved health care and reduced costs with relatively modest institutional support.

  2. EVALUATION OF URBANIZATION INFLUENCES ON URBAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2012-07-27

    Jul 27, 2012 ... climate over the cities that affect human comfort and his environment. Proper urban ... Key Words: Urbanization, Comfort, Pollution, Modification, Albedo, Urban Heat Island ... effects of land surface change on the climate of a.

  3. Innovations in urban agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, van der J.W.; Renting, Henk; Veenhuizen, Van René

    2014-01-01

    This issuehighlights innovations in urban agriculture. Innovation and the various forms of innovations are of particular importance because urban agriculture is adapted to specific urban challenges and opportunities. Innovation is taking place continuously, exploring the multiple fundions of urban

  4. Comparison of stress and burnout among anesthesia and surgical residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, K; Sahni, N; Padhy, S K; Mathew, P J

    2017-10-23

    The residents undergoing training at hospitals in our country face challenges in terms of infrastructure and high workload with undefined working hours. The aim of the study was to compare the stress and burnout levels in trainee doctors doing residency in surgical fields and anesthesia at a tertiary care academic center in North India. A comparative, observational study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. After Ethics Committee approval, 200 residents (100 each from surgical branches and anesthesia) were required to fill a questionnaire with information about age, sex, year of residency, marital status, and the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire-12. Burnout and perceived stress were compared between residents of anesthesia and surgical specialties. Residents of both surgical and anesthesia branches scored high in perceived stress, namely 21 and 18, respectively. The score was significantly higher in surgical residents (P = 0.03) and increased progressively with the year of residency. The majority of residents (90% surgical, 80% anesthesia) felt that they were being overloaded with work. However, only 20%-30% of respondents felt that there was lack of development of individual skills and still fewer (<10%) reported giving up in view of difficulties. There is high level of stress and overload dimension of burnout among the residents of anesthesia and surgical branches at our tertiary care academic institution and the surgical residents score marginally higher than anesthesia residents.

  5. Urban Poverty in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2014-01-01

    This report provides an overview of important urban poverty questions. What defines urban poverty and how is urban poverty being measured? What other factors beyond consumption poverty need to be tackled? Who are the urban poor? What relations exist between urban poverty and city size? What linkages exist between urbanization, income, and urban poverty? What policy responses to urban poverty are implemented in selected Asian countries? The report served as a background study for the Internati...

  6. Contested Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pløger, John

    2010-01-01

    Iconic architecture plays a crucial role in cities' interurban competition. This is also the case with Copenhagen which has used iconic architecture as part of its boosterism to gain investment, to increase tourism and to attract the creative class. This battle over the symbolic representation of...... intertwined through symbolic, visual and virtual representations of the wrongs of current urban planning...

  7. Financial Aid Tipping Points: An Analysis of Aid and Academic Achievement at a California Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Elizabeth; Hoffman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between financial aid awards and measures of student academic achievement. Financial aid and academic records for 11,956 students attending an urban California community college were examined and analyzed using simultaneous linear regression and two-way factorial ANOVAs. Findings revealed a…

  8. Improved Attitude and Achievement: A Case Study of an Elementary School Academic Advisement Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrath, Barry; Brooker, Teresa

    2018-01-01

    School counselors are often called upon to develop and implement academic interventions. In this case study of one urban elementary school, a school counselor conducted a small group academic advisement intervention. The results suggest that integrating the activities into the elementary school counseling program can be an effective Response to…

  9. Academic Performance and Personality Traits of Chinese Children: "Onlies" versus Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Dudley L., Jr.; Falbo, Toni

    1990-01-01

    Using data from a 1987 survey of 1,460 schoolchildren, their parents and teachers, in urban and rural areas of Changchun, China, examines academic and personality outcomes in only children. Finds results similar to Western surveys: only children are more likely to be academically talented. Reveals, however, Chinese rural only children do not score…

  10. Time Perspective and School Membership as Correlates to Academic Achievement among African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelabu, Detris Honora

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of academic achievement to time perspective (future, present) and school membership (belonging, acceptance, rejection) among 232 low-income, urban African American adolescents. Findings indicated positive, significant relationships among academic achievement, future time perspective, school belonging, and…

  11. Investigating the Link between Home-School Dissonance and Academic Cheating among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Wright, Lynda; Tyler, Kenneth M.; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Thomas, Deneia; Mulder, Shambra; Hughes, Travonia; Stevens-Morgan, Ruby; Roan-Belle, Clarissa; Gadson, Nadia; Smith, La Toya

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the association between home-school dissonance and academic cheating among 344 high school juniors and seniors at two urban high schools. Students completed two subscales of the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scale (PALS) and one subscale of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). Analyses revealed that home-school…

  12. Two ecological models of academic achievement among diverse students with and without disabilities in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Terrinieka T; McMahon, Susan D; Keys, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    School experiences can have positive effects on student academic achievement, yet less is known about intermediary processes that contribute to these positive effects. We examined pathways between school experiences and academic achievement among 117 low-income urban students of color, many with disabilities, who transitioned to other schools following a school closure. Using structural equation modeling, we tested two ecological models that examined the relationships among self-reported school experiences, school support, academic self-efficacy, and school-reported academic achievement. The model in which the relationship between school experiences and academic achievement is mediated by both school support and academic self-efficacy, and that takes previous academic achievement into account, was an excellent fit with the data. The roles of contextual and individual factors as they relate to academic achievement, and the implications of these findings, are discussed.

  13. Factors of academic procrastination

    OpenAIRE

    Kranjec, Eva; Košir, Katja; Komidar, Luka

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression as factors of academic procrastination. Our main research interest was to examine the role of specific dimensions of perfectionism as moderators in the relationship between anxiety and depression and academic procrastination. Four scales were administered on the sample of 403 students: perfectionism scale FMPS, academic procrastination scale APS-SI, depression scale CESD and anxiety scale STAI-X2. The results showed ...

  14. Stereoinversion of tertiary alcohols to tertiary-alkyl isonitriles and amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronin, Sergey V; Reiher, Christopher A; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2013-09-12

    The SN2 reaction (bimolecular nucleophilic substitution) is a well-known chemical transformation that can be used to join two smaller molecules together into a larger molecule or to exchange one functional group for another. The SN2 reaction proceeds in a very predictable manner: substitution occurs with inversion of stereochemistry, resulting from the 'backside attack' of the electrophilic carbon by the nucleophile. A significant limitation of the SN2 reaction is its intolerance for tertiary carbon atoms: whereas primary and secondary alcohols are viable precursor substrates, tertiary alcohols and their derivatives usually either fail to react or produce stereochemical mixtures of products. Here we report the stereochemical inversion of chiral tertiary alcohols with a nitrogenous nucleophile facilitated by a Lewis-acid-catalysed solvolysis. The method is chemoselective against secondary and primary alcohols, thereby complementing the selectivity of the SN2 reaction. Furthermore, this method for carbon-nitrogen bond formation mimics a putative biosynthetic step in the synthesis of marine terpenoids and enables their preparation from the corresponding terrestrial terpenes. We expect that the general attributes of the methodology will allow chiral tertiary alcohols to be considered viable substrates for stereoinversion reactions.

  15. managing tertiary institutions for the promotion of lifelong learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    KEYWORDS: Managing, tertiary institutions, promotion, lifelong learning. INTRODUCTION ... science, medicine and technology towards the ... different environments, whether formal, informal ... schools considering that each day gives birth to.

  16. School Climate and Academic Achievement in Suburban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Tracey N.

    2016-01-01

    School climate research has indicated a relationship between the climate of a school and academic achievement. The majority of explanatory models have been developed in urban schools with less attention given to suburban schools. Due to the process of formation of suburban schools, there is a likelihood these campuses differ from the traditional…

  17. School Mobility and Students' Academic and Behavioral Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    The study examined estimated effects of school mobility on students' academic and behaviouiral outcomes. Based on data for 2,560 public schools from the School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) 2007-2008, the findings indicate that high schools, urban schools, and schools serving a total student population of more than 50 percent minority…

  18. Bullying Experiences and Compromised Academic Performance across Middle School Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvonen, Jaana; Wang, Yueyan; Espinoza, Guadalupe

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study was to examine whether bullying experiences are associated with lower academic performance across middle school among urban students.The ethnically diverse sample was drawn from a longitudinal study of 2,300 sixth graders (44% Latino, 26% African American, 10% Asian, 10% White, and 10% mixed) from 11 public middle schools.…

  19. A Study of Secondary School Students' Academic Performance at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed and investigated the academic performance of secondary school students in two principal subjects (English Language and. Mathematics) at the Senior School Certificate Examinations (SSCE) in ten secondary schools typical of urban and rural locations in five randomised. Local Government Areas of ...

  20. Evaluation of free i-applications for tertiary level gross anatomy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F. Pollard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe use of electronic resources in education, including i-applications used on portable handheld devices, is increasing. Apple® handheld devices are popular, with free applications the most prevalent download form. Many gross anatomy i-applications are available, however no information on the quality of free anatomy products is available. Rating such products could therefore guide product recommendations.AimTo evaluate the quality and range of free iPod® applications that are applicable for tertiary level gross anatomy education.MethodsA search of the iTunes® Application Store with keywords anatomy, free, medical, functional, clinical, gross, and human was performed, with inclusion based on free applications containing human gross anatomy usable for tertiary education purposes. Application specification was noted; each was trialled independently and rated for usability, specification, academic level, and quality (image and programme.ResultsSixty-three applications were identified and eleven met inclusion criteria. Two provided gross anatomy of the entire body, nine examined specific regions or systems. Five were judged introductory in academic level, five intermediate, and one advanced. One application was rated low quality, and four excellent. None were considered difficult to use (six easy, five medium. Application size ranged between 1.2MB and 229MB (mean 27MB.ConclusionsThere are few free i-applications for learning gross anatomy and most concentrate on individual body systems, with the academic level and usability of all products well rated. Results suggest some free I-applications could be suitable adjuncts for gross anatomy education at both an undergraduate and graduate level.

  1. Procedural modeling of urban layout: population, land use, and road network

    OpenAIRE

    Lyu, X.; Han, Q.; de Vries, B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces an urban simulation system generating urban layouts with population, road network and land use layers. The desired urban spatial structure is obtained by generating a population map based on population density models. The road network is generated at two spatial levels corresponding to the road hierarchy. The land use allocation is based on the What If? allocation model. The expected results are urban layouts suitable for academic scenario analysis.

  2. From Academic to Post-Academic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Ghaneirad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the cultural change in science from academic science to post-academic science by the use of documentary studying and analytical reasoning. The aim of this study is determining the direction of cultural change in science and comparing it with cultural change in society.The knowledge production which surrounds academy has little relationship with the values of society and epistemological norms regulate scientists' behavior from within the scientific system. But in post-academic science the relationship between science and society operates in the same line with market and government and science produce within the social context and scientists' behavior controlled by the norms out of the scientific system. So the culture of science has changed because science applied to meet the requirements of market and industry. The result is that contrary to cultural change in society that goes from materialism to post-materialism, cultural change in science moves from post-materialism to materialism.

  3. Remote Sensing Tertiary Education Meets High Intensity Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, K. E.; White, B.

    2015-04-01

    Enduring a traditional lecture is the tertiary education equivalent of a long, slow, jog. There are certainly some educational benefits if the student is able to maintain concentration, but they are just as likely to get caught napping and fall off the back end of the treadmill. Alternatively, a pre-choreographed interactive workshop style class requires students to continually engage with the materials. Appropriately timed breaks or intervals allow students to recover briefly before being increasingly challenged throughout the class. Using an introductory remote sensing class at Charles Darwin University, this case study presents a transition from the traditional stand and deliver style lecture to an active student-led learning experience. The class is taught at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, with both on-campus as well as online distance learning students. Based on the concept that active engagement in learning materials promotes 'stickiness' of subject matter, the remote sensing class was re-designed to encourage an active style of learning. Critically, class content was reviewed to identify the key learning outcomes for the students. This resulted in a necessary sacrifice of topic range for depth of understanding. Graduates of the class reported high levels of enthusiasm for the materials, and the style in which the class was taught. This paper details a number of techniques that were used to engage students in active and problem based learning throughout the semester. It suggests a number of freely available tools that academics in remote sensing and related fields can readily incorporate into their teaching portfolios. Moreover, it shows how simple it can be to provide a far more enjoyable and effective learning experience for students than the one dimensional lecture.

  4. Students' Academic Performance: Academic Effort Is an Intervening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Students' Academic Performance: Academic Effort Is an Intervening Variable ... This study was designed to seek explanations for differences in academic performance among junior ...

  5. enforcing tertiary school library rules and regulations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-31

    Oct 31, 2014 ... beings -library users/patrons. It is also a standard rule that library ... degree of criminal behaviors in the use of their resources (Momodu, 2002). It is also a well known fact that some individual users of academic libraries display disruptive or criminal behaviors within the library and this often poses security ...

  6. Measuring Service Quality in a Tertiary Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutar, Geoffrey; McNeil, Margaret

    1996-01-01

    Measures service quality from the viewpoint of customers (students at an Australian university), using the SERVQUAL model. Obtains evaluations of academic and administrative aspects of the educational service. Makes significant negative evaluations of administrative service quality (resulting from communication problems). Satisfaction with the…

  7. Thinking Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Lis

    2016-01-01

    This lecture argues that the politicisation and instrumentalisation of the university caused by neoliberal frames has as a result the depoliticisation of knowledge and of the academic as individual. This depoliticisation has turned academic freedom into a right to disengage not only from the political fight around these issues but also from the…

  8. Academic Work and Performativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, John

    2017-01-01

    Neoliberal reforms in higher education have resulted in corporate managerial practices in universities and a drive for efficiency and productivity in teaching and research. As a result, there has been an intensification of academic work, increased stress for academics and an emphasis on accountability and performativity in universities. This paper…

  9. Patterns of Academic Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Victor; Mensink, David; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Uses the Academic Procrastination Questionnaire to measure procrastination and six possible patterns underlying it among undergraduate students. Finds that the most common patterns for clients involved Evaluation Anxiety or being Discouraged/Depressed, or Dependent. Supports individualized assessment and solutions for academic procrastination. (SC)

  10. Marketing Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  11. Green urbanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Fikfak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism and other culture-based types of small business, which are the leitmotif in the planning of the Europark Ruardi, are becoming the guiding motif in the spatial development of urban centres that are influenced by dynamic transformation processes. The system should build upon the exploitation of both local and regional environmental features. This would encourage the quest for special environmental features, with an emphasis on their conservation, i.e. sustainable development, and connections in a wider context.The Europark is seen as a new strategic point of the Zasavje Region (the region of the central Sava Valley, which is linked to other important points in a region relevant for tourism. Due to the "smallness" of the region and/or the proximity of such points, development can be fast and effective. The interaction of different activities in space yields endless opportunities for users, who choose their own goals and priorities in the use of space. Four theme areas of the Europark area planning are envisaged. The organisation of activities is based on the composition of the mosaic field patterns, where green fields intertwine with areas of different, existing and new, urban functions. The fields of urban and recreation programmes are connected with a network of green areas and walking trails, along which theme park settings are arranged.

  12. Urbanism & urban qualities New data and methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The interest in urban spaces and their qualities has become stronger in recent years. A substantial volume of projects aims to create attractive urban spaces reasons of Sustainability, Quality of Life and urban vitality. But who actually uses the urban spaces, which urban spaces are used? How do...... they use them? What characterizes the good urban space? And how and by who is it evaluated? How is a better co-operation between urban space researchers, decision makers and users established? Is it the right urban spaces which receive investments? How can research optimize the basis for decisions......?   Proceedings from the conference "Urbanism & urban qualities - new data & methodologies" held 24th of June 2009 at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen....

  13. Relocalising academic literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine the negot......This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine...... the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among students of the international master’s programme, Anthropology of Education and Globalisation (AEG), University of Aarhus, Denmark. The article draws on an understanding of academic literacy as a local practice situated in the social and institutional...... contexts in which it appears. Based on qualitative interviews with eleven AEG-students, we analyse students’ individual experiences of, and perspectives on, the academic literacy practices of this study programme. Our findings reveal contradictory understandings of internationalism and indicate a learning...

  14. Shape-Up and Eat Right Families Pilot Program: Feasibility of a Weight Management Shared Medical Appointment Model in African-Americans With Obesity at an Urban Academic Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Srivastava

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesDisparities in obesity care exist among African-American children and adults. We sought to test the feasibility of a pilot program, a 1-year family-based intervention for African-American families with obesity [shape up and eat right (SUPER], adopting the shared medical appointment model (SMA at an urban safety net hospital.OutcomesPrimary outcomes: (1 family attendance rate and (2 program satisfaction. Secondary outcomes: change in body mass index (BMI, eating behaviors, and sedentary activity.MethodsAdult parents (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 ≥18 years and their child(ren (BMI ≥ 85th percentile ages 6–12 years from adult or pediatric weight management clinics were recruited. One group visit per month (n = 12 consisting of a nutrition and exercise component was led by a nurse practitioner and registered dietitian. Height and weight were recorded during each visit. Participants were queried on program satisfaction, food logs and exercise journals, Food Stamp Program’s Food Behavior, and the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program food checklists.ResultsThirteen participants from lower socioeconomic zip codes consented [n = 5 mothers mean age 33 years, BMI of 47.4 kg/m2 (31.4–73.6 kg/m2; n = 8 children; mean age 9 years, BMI of 97.6th percentile (94–99th percentile; 60% enrolled in state Medicaid]. Average individual attendance was 23.4% (14–43%; n = 13; monthly session attendance rates declined from 100 to 40% by program completion; two families completed the program in entirety. Program was rated (n = 5 adults very satisfactory (40% and extremely satisfactory (60%. Pre-intervention, families rated their eating habits as fair and reported consuming sugar-sweetened beverages or sports drinks, more so than watching more than 1 h of television (p < 0.002 or video game/computer activity (p < 0.006 and consuming carbonated sodas (p < 0.004. Post-intervention, reducing salt

  15. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  16. Determinants of propensity of tertiary agricultural students in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to identify factors that affect the decision of tertiary agricultural students in Ghana to enter agribusiness as a self-employment venture after graduation. The results showed that tertiary agricultural students in Ghana were predominantly males with little or no farming background. They had a rather moderate ...

  17. Crime and Crime Management in Nigeria Tertiary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebanjo, Margaret Adewunmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines crime and its management in Nigerian tertiary institutions. Tertiary institutions today have become arenas for crime activities such as rape, cultism, murder, theft, internet fraud, drug abuse, and examination malpractices. This paper delves into what crime is, and its causes; and the positions of the law on crime management.…

  18. Massification and Quality Assurance in Tertiary Education: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sets out to examine massification and its impact on quality assurance in tertiary education and the extent to which lecturer–student ratio, adequacy of infrastructure and pedagogical resources affect quality in tertiary institutions. Two research questions and one hypothesis were posed to guide the investigation.

  19. Pushing the frontiers of atomic models for protein tertiary structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as an NP complete or NP hard problem.4,5 This notwith- standing, the dire need for tertiary structures of proteins in drug discovery and other areas6–8 has propelled the development of a multitude of computational recipes. In this article, we focus on ab initio/de novo strategies,. Bhageerath in particular, for protein tertiary ...

  20. Ensuring Effective Mentoring in Tertiary Institutions in Anambra State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper concerns itself only with ascertaining the strategies that could ensure effective mentoring in tertiary institutions. The survey method was employed. The study population comprised 78 teacher educators in tertiary institutions in Anambra State. One research question guided the study while one null hypothesis was ...

  1. 10 CFR 212.78 - Tertiary incentive crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tertiary incentive crude oil. 212.78 Section 212.78 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MANDATORY PETROLEUM PRICE REGULATIONS Producers of Crude Oil § 212.78 Tertiary incentive crude oil. Annual prepaid expenses report. By January 31 of each year after 1980, the project...

  2. Literacy Skills Development for Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literacy Skills Development for Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of the University of Calabar. ... These were drawn from five faculties, namely Education, Social Sciences, Law, Arts and Agriculture. The study observed that there is a ... more literacy skills. Key Words: Literacy skills, university, Nigeria, tertiary institution ...

  3. Cognitive Investments in Academic Success: The Role of Need for Cognition at University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Grass

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that Need for Cognition (NFC, the individual tendency to engage in and enjoy cognitive endeavors, contributes to academic performance. Most studies on NFC and related constructs have thereby focused on grades to capture tertiary academic success. This study aimed at a more comprehensive approach on NFC's meaning to success in university. We examined not only performance but also rather affective indicators of success. The current sample consisted of 396 students of different subjects with a mean age of 24 years (139 male. All participants took part in an online survey that assessed NFC together with school performance and further personality variables via self-report. Success in university was comprehensively operationalized including performance, satisfaction with one's studies, and thoughts about quitting/changing one's major as indicators. The value of NFC in predicting tertiary academic success was examined with correlation analyses and path analysis. NFC significantly correlated with all success variables with the highest correlation for study satisfaction. Path analysis confirmed the importance of NFC for study satisfaction showing that NFC had a significant direct effect on study satisfaction and via this variable also a significant indirect effect on termination thoughts. This study clearly indicates that NFC broadly contributes to the mastery of academic requirements and that it is worthwhile to intensify research on NFC in the context of tertiary education.

  4. Usage Analysis of Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 Tools by Librarians in Kwara State Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tella, Adeyinka; Soluoku, Taofeeqat

    2016-01-01

    This study analysed the usage of Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 tools by librarians in Kwara State academic libraries. A sample of 40 librarians was surveyed through total enumeration sampling technique from four different tertiary education institutions libraries in Kwara State, Nigeria. Questionnaire was used for the collection of data. The collected…

  5. Seepage characteristics of the second tertiary combined model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan ZHAO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The second tertiary combined model experiment zone has been developed in Block B, Field L. The percolation feature of the second tertiary combined develop model shows great importance to rational and efficient development of the reservoir. In order to clearly illuminate its percolation feature, the typical reservoir numerical model is built by Eclipse, which is a reservoir numerical simulation software. The percolation features of original and added perforation interval under the second tertiary combined model are studied, and the variation features of general water-cut, recovery percentage, wellbore pressure, reservoir pressure and water saturation on condition of higher injection rate under the second tertiary combined model are analyzed. The research indicates that the second tertiary combined enhances the recovery of remaining oil on top of thick reservoir by developing and enhancing original perforation interval under water drive, then improves development results by polymer flooding, and gains higher recovery rate by synthetic action of water driver and polymer flooding.

  6. Non-indicated use of prophylactic antibiotics in gynaecological surgery at an academic tertiary medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kevin M; Foster, Raymond T; Drobnis, Erma Z; Hyde, Kassie J; Brennaman, Lisa M

    2018-02-06

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are the most common surgical complication. Perioperative antibiotics can reduce SSI when used properly. Despite guidelines from The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, non-indicated antibiotic use is widespread which exposes women to unnecessary risks. This study represents a quality improvement analysis assessing surgeon compliance with established guidelines regarding antibiotic use in gynaecological surgery. This is a single centre, retrospective study examining gynaecological procedures over two years. Cases were identified using Current Procedure Terminology codes. Perioperative antibiotics were used contrary to published guidelines in 199 of 1046 cases. Three variables were independently associated with inappropriate administration of perioperative antibiotics: entrance into abdominal cavity, higher EBL, and longer procedures. Impact statement Overuse of antibiotics has unintended consequences including allergic sequelae, extended length of hospital stay, increased healthcare costs, and the formation of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Antibiotic stewardship programmes have been shown to reduce the number of resistant pathogens, decrease incidence of Clostridium difficile colitis, and decrease length of hospital stay without increasing infection rates. Further outcomes-based research is needed regarding the use of antibiotic stewardship programmes in gynaecological surgery.

  7. Surgical Pathology Resident Rotation Restructuring at a Tertiary Care Academic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea R. Mehr MD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the field of pathology and resident education necessitate ongoing evaluation of residency training. Evolutionary change is particularly important for surgical pathology rotations, which form the core of anatomic pathology training programs. In the past, we organized this rotation based on subjective insight. When faced with the recent need to restructure the rotation, we strove for a more evidence-based process. Our approach involved 2 primary sources of data. We quantified the number of cases and blocks submitted per case type to estimate workload and surveyed residents about the time required to gross specimens in all organ systems. A multidisciplinary committee including faculty, residents, and staff evaluated the results and used the data to model how various changes to the rotation would affect resident workload, turnaround time, and other variables. Finally, we identified rotation structures that equally distributed work and created a point-based system that capped grossing time for residents of different experience. Following implementation, we retrospectively compared turnaround time and duty hour violations before and after these changes and surveyed residents about their experiences with both systems. We evaluated the accuracy of the point-based system by examining grossing times and comparing them to the assigned point values. We found overall improvement in the rotation following the implementation. As there is essentially no literature on the subject of surgical pathology rotation organization, we hope that our experience will provide a road map to improve pathology resident education at other institutions.

  8. Sickness presenteeism among health care providers in an academic tertiary care center in Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Nuhait

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The term sickness presenteeism (SP has been described as the act of going to work despite having a state of health that may be regarded as poor enough to justify sick leave. SP has been observed to be prevalent among three-quarters of health care providers (HCPs. Working while sick not only puts patients at risk but also decreases productivity and increases the probability of medical errors. Moreover, SP has been identified as a risk factor for many negative health outcomes among the HCPs themselves, such as depression, burnout, and serious cardiac events. The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for and prevalence of SP and perceptions of the impact of this practice on patient safety among HCPs. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 279 purposively selected healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, dentists, pharmacists and other health care professionals working at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs—King Abdulaziz Medical City (MNGHA-KAMC. While nearly all of the participants (91% believed that working while sick exposed patients to risk, the rate of SP during the past year was reported as 74%, and one fourth of respondents reported working while sick 3–4 times during the past year. More than half of the participants were not aware of the existence of a departmental policy regarding sick leave. The most common reasons reported for working while sick were not wanting to burden co-workers (71%, feelings of duty toward patients (67%, and avoiding an increased future workload caused by absence (59%. A lack of awareness regarding the existing rules and polices related to sick leave was reported by more than half of the participants. Several predisposing and enabling factors were reported as determinants influencing SP, e.g., observation of the practice of SP by peers and feelings of sympathy towards coworkers, including not wanting to overburden them, were reported to be determinants informing the decision of whether to work while sick. Keywords: Sickness presenteeism, Working while sick, Health care provider health

  9. Surgical Pathology Resident Rotation Restructuring at a Tertiary Care Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Chelsea R; Obstfeld, Amrom E; Barrett, Amanda C; Montone, Kathleen T; Schwartz, Lauren E

    2017-01-01

    Changes in the field of pathology and resident education necessitate ongoing evaluation of residency training. Evolutionary change is particularly important for surgical pathology rotations, which form the core of anatomic pathology training programs. In the past, we organized this rotation based on subjective insight. When faced with the recent need to restructure the rotation, we strove for a more evidence-based process. Our approach involved 2 primary sources of data. We quantified the number of cases and blocks submitted per case type to estimate workload and surveyed residents about the time required to gross specimens in all organ systems. A multidisciplinary committee including faculty, residents, and staff evaluated the results and used the data to model how various changes to the rotation would affect resident workload, turnaround time, and other variables. Finally, we identified rotation structures that equally distributed work and created a point-based system that capped grossing time for residents of different experience. Following implementation, we retrospectively compared turnaround time and duty hour violations before and after these changes and surveyed residents about their experiences with both systems. We evaluated the accuracy of the point-based system by examining grossing times and comparing them to the assigned point values. We found overall improvement in the rotation following the implementation. As there is essentially no literature on the subject of surgical pathology rotation organization, we hope that our experience will provide a road map to improve pathology resident education at other institutions.

  10. Sickness presenteeism among health care providers in an academic tertiary care center in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nuhait, Mohammed; Al Harbi, Khaled; Al Jarboa, Amjad; Bustami, Rami; Alharbi, Shmaylan; Masud, Nazish; Albekairy, Abdulkareem; Almodaimegh, Hind

    The term sickness presenteeism (SP) has been described as the act of going to work despite having a state of health that may be regarded as poor enough to justify sick leave. SP has been observed to be prevalent among three-quarters of health care providers (HCPs). Working while sick not only puts patients at risk but also decreases productivity and increases the probability of medical errors. Moreover, SP has been identified as a risk factor for many negative health outcomes among the HCPs themselves, such as depression, burnout, and serious cardiac events. The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for and prevalence of SP and perceptions of the impact of this practice on patient safety among HCPs. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 279 purposively selected healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, dentists, pharmacists and other health care professionals) working at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs-King Abdulaziz Medical City (MNGHA-KAMC). While nearly all of the participants (91%) believed that working while sick exposed patients to risk, the rate of SP during the past year was reported as 74%, and one fourth of respondents reported working while sick 3-4 times during the past year. More than half of the participants were not aware of the existence of a departmental policy regarding sick leave. The most common reasons reported for working while sick were not wanting to burden co-workers (71%), feelings of duty toward patients (67%), and avoiding an increased future workload caused by absence (59%). A lack of awareness regarding the existing rules and polices related to sick leave was reported by more than half of the participants. Several predisposing and enabling factors were reported as determinants influencing SP, e.g., observation of the practice of SP by peers and feelings of sympathy towards coworkers, including not wanting to overburden them, were reported to be determinants informing the decision of whether to work while sick. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Tertiary lymphoid structures in cancer and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Goc, Jérémy; Giraldo, Nicolas A; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fridman, Wolf Herman

    2014-11-01

    Tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) are ectopic lymphoid formations found in inflamed, infected, or tumoral tissues. They exhibit all the characteristics of structures in the lymph nodes (LN) associated with the generation of an adaptive immune response, including a T cell zone with mature dendritic cells (DC), a germinal center with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and proliferating B cells, and high endothelial venules (HEV). In this review, we discuss evidence for the roles of TLS in chronic infection, autoimmunity, and cancer, and address the question of whether TLS present beneficial or deleterious effects in these contexts. We examine the relationship between TLS in tumors and patient prognosis, and discuss the potential role of TLS in building and/or maintaining local immune responses and how this understanding may guide therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Navigating the global space of tertiary education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne

    , and to the development of transnational elites. This is especially true for mobile students who attend “elite universities” in the USA, UK and France. As pointed out by sociologist Michael Börjesson (2005), an investment in an education at one of the American Ivy League universities or France’s Grand Ecoles, is not only......Over the past ten years the number of students who go abroad to pursue tertiary education has more than doubled, from 1, 9 million in 2000 to 4.1 million in 2010 (OECD 2012). This growing number of students studying abroad contributes to the overall flow of individuals and ideas across borders...... an investment in a significant educational capital with global applicability, but also an investment in an institutionalized transnational social capital that stretches across most of the world. It is less clear to what extent this also applies to students who go abroad to attend international programs...

  13. Some notions on urbanity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Bo

    According to International Federation of Housing and Planning the majority of the population of the planet will be urban in 2007. That definition of the urban, however, is based on zombie categories, to speak as Ulrich Beck. Urbanization and urban areas as we normally understand them are concepts...... of 'the first modernity'. Nowadays, in 'the second modernity', we have instead to aks: where in the city do you really find urbanity? A large part of what statistically is called urban areas lack urban quality and visible urban life. In the space syntax community urbanity is basically understood...

  14. The academic prince.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Maurice

    2002-12-01

    The author presents advice to deans and chairs of academia by imagining what Machiavelli might recommend were he to write a modern version of The Prince for academics. "Machiavelli" cautions that since modern academic "princes" have little power (except, perhaps, over teaching and laboratory space), the success of their rule depends upon respect. Regarding the choice of an academic prince, find someone who can be a good role model, set standards, and reward academic excellence, and who will, above all, be respected. Avoid choosing a prince who is a nice, nonthreatening candidate with "good human relations" and "good executive skills." Choose candidates who are already successful and fulfilled and who will see the new post not as a promotion or a balm for their insecurity, but as an intrusion into their academic lives. Fill empty positions as quickly as possible-better a weak prince than no prince at all. Seek short terms for princes, both because respected academics will want to return to their normal lives as soon as possible, and because with short mandates, greater chances can be taken with young, unproved, but promising candidates. At the same time, the appointment of aging administrators who have lost their academic skills is to be avoided. Above all, respect the throne-i.e., the position of chair or dean-even if the person holding the position may not deserve the respect, since when the prince retires with honor, the position becomes more attractive to future good candidates.

  15. Towards more effective academic liaison between academics, students and practitioners in the field of public administration and management in the North West Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nealer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the light of the changing tertiary education arena in South Africa, the Department of Public Management and Governance in the School for Social and Government Studies of the Arts Faculty, North-West University (NWU had to revisit its policy on macro organisational aspects. Issues such as more effective communication mediums, the merging and alignment of the University’s three campuses, the nature of the ever-increasing competition in the tertiary residential and distance teaching environment, the range, variety and quality of its products and the facilitation and rendering of an improved tertiary teaching service were identified. In this article the typical nature of the intra, inter and extra academic liaison regarding the Department at NWU are highlighted and some recommendations on more effective communication and work procedures as a result of academic liaison are presented. Examples being that academics and practitioners need to meet more frequently, upgrade effective communication media among them and undertake joint research in a more cooperative manner.

  16. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  17. Urban acupuncture

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    During his three terms as mayor of Curitiba, Brazil in the 1970s and ‘80s, architect and urbanist Jaime Lerner transformed his city into a global model of the sustainable and livable community. Through his pioneering work, Lerner has learned that changes to a community don’t need to be large-scale and expensive to have a transformative impact—in fact, one block, park or a single person can have an outsized effect on life in the surrounding city. In Urban Acupuncture, his first work published in English, Lerner celebrates these “pinpricks” of urbanism—projects, people and initiatives from around the world that ripple through their communities to uplift city life. With meditative and descriptive prose, Lerner brings readers around the world to streets and neighborhoods where urban acupuncture has been practiced best, from the bustling La Boqueria market in Barcelona to the revitalization of the Cheonggyecheon River in Seoul, South Korea. Through this journey, Lerner invites us to re-examine the true...

  18. Academic Capitalism and Academic Culture: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this…

  19. Academic Self-Perception and Its Relationship to Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Ronald W.; Heath, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-five students (average age, 10 years 7 months) were initially tested on reading, arithmetic, and academic self-perception. One year later they were tested again. Initial academic scores accounted for a large proportion of the variance in later academic scores. The children's self-perceptions of academic competence accounted…

  20. Academic librarianship today

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Intended for use by both librarians and students in LIS programs, Academic Librarianship Today is the most current, comprehensive overview of the field available today. Key features include: Each chapter was commissioned specifically for this new book, and the authors are highly regarded academic librarians or library school faculty— or both Cutting-edge topics such as open access, copyright, digital curation and preservation, emerging technologies, new roles for academic librarians, cooperative collection development and resource sharing, and patron-driven acquisitions are explored in depth Each chapter ends with thought-provoking questions for discussion and carefully constructed assignments that faculty can assign or adapt for their courses The book begins with Gilman’s introduction, an overview that briefly synthesizes the contents of the contributors’ chapters by highlighting major themes. The main part of the book is organized into three parts: The Academic Library Landscape Today, ...

  1. Declaration of Academic Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan ÇETİNSAYA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Universities are the institutions where all the opinions, various truth claims as well as social and political problems are discussed in a liberal and civilized way and the complicated problems are expressed clearly without any oppression and prevention. 2. Academic freedom includes first and foremost the right of freedom of research and thus freedom of using the essential knowledge methods, the right of possessing the necessary tools and conditions required for the research and the rights of scientific production, informing, learning and dissemination. 3. Academics possess the rights to benefit from the academic freedom without any limitation, to research and investigate according to their own preferences and interests, and to teach these without being exposed to any oppression and prevention. 4. This freedom of teaching that the academics have should not be used in a manner restricting students' freedom of learning; academics should avoid from being dogmatic in the research and education processes and respect students' rights of thinking differently and expressing themselves. 5. Academics accordingly should lead the students to evaluate and understand the new thoughts as a whole and to be tolerant to the thoughts they do not agree and to think in various ways. Also, academics should encourage the students to create their own opinions based on evidences and enable them to express these opinions freely and respect their freedom of expression. 6. Campuses should be safe environments where the students can express their own opinions freely. Suppressing the intellectual diversity and the plurality of viewpoints will decrease the productivity of teaching and learning process, restrict students' freedom of learning, and constrain the chance of formation of critical and in-depth thinking. 7. Critical thinking develops only in the campuses where various thoughts are expressed in a liberal way. Students should feel that they would not be prevented

  2. Googilum academic gaveshana librarikalum

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayakumar, J. K.

    2006-01-01

    Describes about two projects of Google such as "Google Scholar" and "Google Print".It also describes how the traditional library based academic research information search can be affected by these two projects.

  3. Academic goals in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleier, Joshua I S; Kann, Brian

    2013-12-01

    The development of an academic surgical career can be an overwhelming prospect, and one that is not intuitive. Establishing a structured plan and support structure is critical to success. Starting a successful academic surgical career begins with defining one's academic goals within several broad categories: personal goals, academic goals, research goals, educational goals, and financial goals. Learning the art of self-promotion is the means by which many of these goals are achieved. It is important to realize that achieving these goals requires a delicate personal balance between work and home life, and the key ways in which to achieve success require establishment of well thought-out goals, a reliable support structure, realistic and clear expectations, and frequent re-evaluation.

  4. Administering an Academic Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Donald W.; Sperry, John B.

    1986-01-01

    Clarifies the possible forms of leadership taken by the administrator of an academic department. Discusses such elements as authoritarian leadership, faculty consensus, power and responsibility, input factors, types of decision making, faculty recruiting, and authoritarian versus democratic approach. (CT)

  5. The academic quilting bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Anita P; Files, Julia A; Ko, Marcia G; Blair, Janis E

    2009-03-01

    In medicine, the challenges faced by female faculty members who are attempting to achieve academic advancement have been well described. Various strategies have been proposed to increase academic productivity to aid the promotion of women in medicine. We propose an innovative collaboration strategy that encourages completion of an academic writing project. This strategy acknowledges the challenges inherent in achieving work-life balance and utilizes a collaborative work style with a group of peer physicians. The model is designed to encourage the completion and collation of independently prepared sections of an academic paper within a setting that emphasizes social networking and collaboration. This approach has many similarities to the construction of a quilt during a "quilting bee."

  6. Urban Agriculture Guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.J.; Jansma, J.E.; Dekking, A.J.G.; Klieverik, M.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Urban Agriculture Guide describes the experiences, learning moments, tips and tricks of those involved in the initiatives of urban agriculture and an indication is provided of what is required to develop urban agriculture further in the Netherlands

  7. A Review of Criteria for Outdoor Classroom in Selected Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheran, Y.; Fadzidah, A.; Nur Fadhilah, R.; Farha, S.

    2017-12-01

    A proper design outdoor environment in higher institutions contributes to the students’ learning performances and produce better learning outcomes. Campus surrounding has the potential to provide an informal outdoor learning environment, especially when it has the existing physical element, like open spaces and natural features, that may support the learning process. However, scholarly discourses on environmental aspects in tertiary education have minimal environmental inputs to fulfill students’ needs for outdoor exposure. Universities have always emphasized on traditional instructional methods in classroom settings, without concerning the importance of outdoor classroom towards students’ learning needs. Moreover, the inconvenience and discomfort outdoor surrounding in campus environment offers a minimal opportunity for students to study outside the classroom, and students eventually do not favor to utilize the spaces because no learning facility is provided. Hence, the objective of this study is to identify the appropriate criteria of outdoor areas that could be converted to be outdoor classrooms in tertiary institutions. This paper presents a review of scholars’ work in regards to the characteristics of the outdoor classrooms that could be designed as part of contemporary effective learning space, for the development of students’ learning performances. The information gathered from this study will become useful knowledge in promoting effective outdoor classroom and create successful outdoor learning space in landscape campus design. It I hoped that the finding of this study could provide guidelines on how outdoor classrooms should be designed to improve students’ academic achievement.

  8. Increased helix and protein stability through the introduction of a new tertiary hydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R W; Nicholson, E M; Thapar, R; Klevit, R E; Scholtz, J M

    1999-03-12

    In an effort to quantify the importance of hydrogen bonding and alpha-helix formation to protein stability, a capping box motif was introduced into the small phosphocarrier protein HPr. Previous studies had confirmed that Ser46, at the N-cap position of the short helix-B in HPr, serves as an N-cap in solution. Thus, only a single-site mutation was required to produce a canonical S-X-X-E capping box: Lys49 at the N3 position was substituted with a glutamic acid residue. Thermal and chemical denaturation studies on the resulting K49E HPr show that the designed variant is approximately 2 kcal mol-1 more stable than the wild-type protein. However, NMR studies indicate that the side-chain of Glu49 does not participate in the expected capping H-bond interaction, but instead forms a new tertiary H-bond that links helix-B to the four-stranded beta-sheet of HPr. Here, we demonstrate that a strategy in which new non-native H-bonds are introduced can generate proteins with increased stability. We discuss why the original capping box design failed, and compare the energetic consequences of the new tertiary side-chain to main-chain H-bond with a local (helix-capping) side-chain to main-chain H-bond on the protein's global stability. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Academic Engagement and Commercialisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkmann, Markus; Tartari, Valentina; McKelvey, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    A considerable body of work highlights the relevance of collaborative research, contract research, consulting and informal relationships for university–industry knowledge transfer. We present a systematic review of research on academic scientists’ involvement in these activities to which we refer......, and pursued by academics to access resources supporting their research agendas. We conclude by identifying future research needs, opportunities for methodological improvement and policy interventions....

  10. Tertiary education and its association with mental health indicators and educational factors among Arctic young adults: the NAAHS cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bania, Elisabeth Valmyr; Kvernmo, Siv Eli

    2016-01-01

    Background Completed tertiary education is closely associated with employment and influences income, health and personal well-being. Objective The purpose of the study is to explore predictors for completed tertiary education among indigenous Sami and non-indigenous young people in relation to mental health indicators and educational factors in sociocultural rural and urban contexts across the Arctic part of Norway. Design The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study (NAAHS) is a cross-sectional, school-based survey that was conducted in 2003–2005. Of all 5,877 10th graders (aged 15–16 years) in north Norway, 83% from all 87 municipalities participated; 450 (9.2%) reported indigenous Sami ethnicity, and 304 (6.2%) reported Laestadian affiliation. Data from NAAHS were merged with registry data from the National Education Database and Norwegian Patient Register for 3,987 adolescents who gave their consent for follow-up studies. Results Completion of upper secondary school is the only common predictor of a completed tertiary education degree for both genders. Among females, conduct problems was a significant predictor of lower level education, typically vocational professions, while among males severe mental health problems requiring treatment by the specialist health care system reduced the opportunity to complete tertiary education at intermediate and higher level. Parental higher educational level was associated with less lower education among females and less higher education among males. Men residing in the northernmost and remote areas were less likely to complete education on higher level. Males’ completion of higher level education was strongly but not significantly associated (p=0.057) with higher average marks in lower secondary school. Conclusions The gender differences found in this study emphasize the need for gender-specific interventions to encourage, support and empower young people to attend and complete tertiary education. Young females with

  11. Tertiary education and its association with mental health indicators and educational factors among Arctic young adults: the NAAHS cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bania, Elisabeth Valmyr; Kvernmo, Siv Eli

    2016-01-01

    Background Completed tertiary education is closely associated with employment and influences income, health and personal well-being. Objective The purpose of the study is to explore predictors for completed tertiary education among indigenous Sami and non-indigenous young people in relation to mental health indicators and educational factors in sociocultural rural and urban contexts across the Arctic part of Norway. Design The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study (NAAHS) is a cross-sectional, school-based survey that was conducted in 2003-2005. Of all 5,877 10th graders (aged 15-16 years) in north Norway, 83% from all 87 municipalities participated; 450 (9.2%) reported indigenous Sami ethnicity, and 304 (6.2%) reported Laestadian affiliation. Data from NAAHS were merged with registry data from the National Education Database and Norwegian Patient Register for 3,987 adolescents who gave their consent for follow-up studies. Results Completion of upper secondary school is the only common predictor of a completed tertiary education degree for both genders. Among females, conduct problems was a significant predictor of lower level education, typically vocational professions, while among males severe mental health problems requiring treatment by the specialist health care system reduced the opportunity to complete tertiary education at intermediate and higher level. Parental higher educational level was associated with less lower education among females and less higher education among males. Men residing in the northernmost and remote areas were less likely to complete education on higher level. Males' completion of higher level education was strongly but not significantly associated (p=0.057) with higher average marks in lower secondary school. Conclusions The gender differences found in this study emphasize the need for gender-specific interventions to encourage, support and empower young people to attend and complete tertiary education. Young females with conduct

  12. Tertiary education and its association with mental health indicators and educational factors among Arctic young adults: the NAAHS cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Valmyr Bania

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Completed tertiary education is closely associated with employment and influences income, health and personal well-being. Objective: The purpose of the study is to explore predictors for completed tertiary education among indigenous Sami and non-indigenous young people in relation to mental health indicators and educational factors in sociocultural rural and urban contexts across the Arctic part of Norway. Design: The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study (NAAHS is a cross-sectional, school-based survey that was conducted in 2003–2005. Of all 5,877 10th graders (aged 15–16 years in north Norway, 83% from all 87 municipalities participated; 450 (9.2% reported indigenous Sami ethnicity, and 304 (6.2% reported Laestadian affiliation. Data from NAAHS were merged with registry data from the National Education Database and Norwegian Patient Register for 3,987 adolescents who gave their consent for follow-up studies. Results: Completion of upper secondary school is the only common predictor of a completed tertiary education degree for both genders. Among females, conduct problems was a significant predictor of lower level education, typically vocational professions, while among males severe mental health problems requiring treatment by the specialist health care system reduced the opportunity to complete tertiary education at intermediate and higher level. Parental higher educational level was associated with less lower education among females and less higher education among males. Men residing in the northernmost and remote areas were less likely to complete education on higher level. Males’ completion of higher level education was strongly but not significantly associated (p=0.057 with higher average marks in lower secondary school. Conclusions: The gender differences found in this study emphasize the need for gender-specific interventions to encourage, support and empower young people to attend and complete tertiary education

  13. Analyzing the Effects of Spatial Interaction among City Clusters on Urban Growth—Case of Wuhan Urban Agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghui Tan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For the past two decades, China’s urbanization has attracted increasing attention from scholars around the world. Numerous insightful studies have attempted to determine the socioeconomic causes of the rapid urban growth in Chinese cities. However, most of these studies regarded each city as a single entity, with few considering inter-city relationships. The present study uses a gravity-based model to measure the spatial interaction among city clusters in the Wuhan urban agglomeration (WUA, which is one of China’s most rapidly urbanizing regions. The effects of spatial interaction on urban growth area were also analyzed. Empirical results indicate that, similar to urban population or employment in secondary and tertiary industries in the WUA from 2000 to 2005, the spatial interaction among city clusters is one of the main drivers of urban growth. In fact, this study finds the effects of spatial interaction as the only socioeconomic factor that affected the spatial expansion from 2005 to 2010. This finding suggests that population migration and information and commodity flows showed greater influence than the socioeconomic drivers of each city did on promoting urbanization in the WUA during this period. We thus argue that spatial interaction among city clusters should be a consideration in future regional planning.

  14. Whistleblowing in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J J

    2004-02-01

    Although medical centres have established boards, special committees, and offices for the review and redress of breaches in ethical behaviour, these mechanisms repeatedly prove themselves ineffective in addressing research misconduct within the institutions of academic medicine. As the authors see it, institutional design: (1) systematically ignores serious ethical problems, (2) makes whistleblowers into institutional enemies and punishes them, and (3) thereby fails to provide an ethical environment. The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine.

  15. Transition pedagogies and the neoliberal episteme: What do academics think?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Hughes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been much discussion of the massification of higher education and its impact on contemporary universities in terms of increased demands on academic staff in the context of neoliberal managerialism, and the power regimes which govern the sector. Less is written about the pedagogies used under neoliberalism. Many academics view tertiary education as both an individually and socially transformative process, and there is a sense that the current discursive environment engenders an inertia wherein this commitment is lost. This paper focusses on a small qualitative study of staff working in two universities at the bottom of the league tables. Their perceptions of pedagogical work and their views of their transformative potential under neoliberalism is discussed. The argument is made that there is the potential for building a space for critical education in contemporary universities. This article explores these issues, arguing that the use of transition pedagogies can create a transformative education.

  16. Academic Motivations and Academic Self-Efficacy of Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gamze Sarikoc

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Academic motivation and academic self-efficacy play important roles in the learning process. They increase academic achievement and the attainment of educational goals, thus providing opportunities in the training of qualified nurses. This study was conducted to determine nursing students%u2019 academic motivation and academic self-efficacy levels. Material and Method: This is a descriptive study. A total of 346 students who are attending a nursing school as either a first, second, third...

  17. Regeneration Through Hidden Historical Landscape of Lecco. Urban Course Design Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Colucci

    2017-12-01

    The first part of paper presents the general learning process characterizing Urban Design course and the methodological process for the Urban Master Plan development in the studio modules. The second part presents the LeccoLAB didactical path developed in the Lecco Campus focusing on the urban design issues and presenting selected results and design proposals developed by students focusing on the Lecco Historical Urban Heritage issues. During the Academic Year 2016/2017 students’ work teams (27 applied the concepts, methods and techniques presented in Urban Design course to the Lecco waterfront urban systems developing proposal for Urban Master Plan aiming the regeneration of urban complex systems through principles of Nature Based Solutions and  Urban Resilience.

  18. Mixed La-Li heterobimetallic complexes for tertiary nitroaldol resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosaki, Shin-ya; Hara, Keiichi; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shinji; Sugita, Mari; Yamagiwa, Noriyuki; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2006-09-13

    A kinetic resolution of tertiary nitroaldols derived from simple ketones is described. Mixed BINOL/biphenol La-Li heterobimetallic complexes gave the best selectivity in retro-nitroaldol reactions of racemic tertiary nitroaldols. By using a mixture of La-Li3-(1a)3 complex (LLB 2a) and La-Li3-(1b)3 (LLB* 2b) complex in a ratio of 2/1, chiral tertiary nitroaldols were obtained in 80-97% ee and 30-47% recovery yield.

  19. EVALUATION OF URBANIZATION INFLUENCES ON URBAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2012-07-27

    Jul 27, 2012 ... direction greatly affects dispersion of pollutants in the city and distribution of heat which affect human comfort. ... The urbanization is evidenced by the reducing urban land surface reflectivity and the ..... Government Print Press.

  20. Collaborative autonomous systems in models of urban logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Arango Serna, Martín Darío; Serna Uran, Conrado Augusto; Alvarez Uribe, Karla Cristina; Arango Serna, Martín Darío

    2012-01-01

    Cities growth and along with them the exchange and distribution of goods and services has led in recent years to a greater increasing interest for the optimization of logistic processes carried out in urban areas. In this article, the main approaches and solutions which have been proposed from academic research will be described, focusing mainly on collaborative autonomic logistics, which is offered as an attractive solution to the urban goods distribution problems in complex cities.

  1. Burnout in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: A Single Academic Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelan-Hansen, Katie; Anne, Samantha; Benninger, Michael S

    2018-05-01

    Burnout in modern medicine is becoming more recognized and researched. The objective in this study is to evaluate burnout in a tertiary care academic institution and compare results among faculty, trainees, and advanced practice practitioners (APPs) in a cross-sectional survey using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Fifty-two surveys were distributed; 44 participants completed the survey (85%): 25 staff physicians (57%), 14 resident physicians (32%), and 5 nurse practitioners (11%). Staff physicians had low emotional exhaustion, moderate depersonalization, and low result for reduced personal accomplishments; trainees reported low emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and moderate reduced personal accomplishment; and nurse practitioners reported moderate on all 3 dimensions. There is overall low burnout in this tertiary care academic center of otolaryngologist providers and no difference in rates among the different groups (trainees, APPs, staff). Measures addressing specific deficiencies among dimensions of burnout would be helpful to prevent disintegration of physician satisfaction into burnout.

  2. Urban biomass - not an urban legend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utilizing biomass from urban landscapes could significantly contribute to the nation’s renewable energy needs. There is an estimated 16.4 million hectares of land in urban areas cultivated with turfgrass and associated vegetation. Vegetation in urban areas is intensely managed which lead to regula...

  3. Impact of domestic and tertiary buildings heating by natural gas in the Italian context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aste, Niccolò; Del Pero, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Natural Gas (NG) is commonly used for satisfying population needs for heating, domestic hot water production and cooking, particularly in countries where the price of electricity is high. Typically, NG is extensively distributed on urbanized territory and can be exploited by using different technologies. As a consequence, primary energy is usually consumed directly in buildings, allowing high efficiency conversion but also producing pollutants in urban areas. In this paper a comprehensive analysis on NG use in the Italian domestic and tertiary building sector has been carried out, in order to evaluate energy and environmental impact of this fuel on different climatic and geographical contexts, also considering the temporal fluctuation of consumption. The aim of the work is to trace a reliable and up-to-date scenario of NG employment for building heating in Italy, which is one of the EU countries where this source is more widely used. The study was carried out under the research program “Analysis and evaluation of the current status of the reduction measures of environmental impacts due to heating energy consumption in Italy”, funded by the Italian Ministry of Environment. The data presented are an essential basis for the development of building energy efficiency and consumption rationalization policies. - Highlights: ► Detailed assessment of natural gas consumption and emission for residential and tertiary buildings heating in Italy. ► Estimation of the average specific primary energy consumption for households heating in different climatic contexts. ► Nationwide, it is the first study on the whole country with this level of detail.

  4. Academic Procrastination on Worker Students

    OpenAIRE

    Muzaqi, Sugito; Arumsari, Andini Dwi

    2017-01-01

    Academic procrastination is to delay the work in the academic field. Academic procrastination occurs because students who work less able to divide his time well, between work and college. Students who work doing academic procrastination because it is less able to regulate themselves. Self-regulation is the ability to control their own behavior and one of the prime movers of the human personality. In the process of self-regulation, academic procrastination students who need to understand the i...

  5. Academic writing for business students: a case for a content and language integrated approach

    OpenAIRE

    Van Houtven, Tine; Kerkhofs, Goele; Peters, Elke

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that many students (Dutch L1/L2) do not meet academic language requirements upon entering Flemish higher education (Peters, Van Houtven, El Morabit, 2010). Many universities feel compelled to help their first-year students bridge the gap between secondary and tertiary education. This paper reports on a case study at the Integrated Faculty of Business and Economics of the University of Leuven that investigated how a language-sensitive instructional approach could improve bus...

  6. Social Activities and Manifest Anxiety among Freshmen in Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in tertiary institutions in Lagos state of Nigeria were analysed to determine the relationship between social activities and manifest anxiety. Social activities in the study were measured in terms of freshmen adjustment to religious activities and ...

  7. Factors affecting utilization of University health services in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-16

    Jan 16, 2013 ... Objective: To determine students' perception of health care services provided in a tertiary institution and ... evaluation of health services utilization among students in the .... African culture and health. ... Asian Am Pac Isl J.

  8. Assessment of job satisfaction among health workers in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of job satisfaction among health workers in a tertiary hospital in Zaria ... factors affecting job satisfaction and retention of health professionals working in ... help the hospital management to increase their employee's job satisfaction.

  9. Employees' Assessment Of Customer Focus In A Tertiary Hospital In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employees' Assessment Of Customer Focus In A Tertiary Hospital In ... tool 'Are we making progress?' were used by respondents to rate customer focus. ... that they were allowed to take decisions to solve problems for customers (p < 0.001).

  10. Helpless patients' perception of bed-bath in tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helpless patients' perception of bed-bath in tertiary health institutions in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria. ... Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (2005) > ... patients to bed bathing by nurses is a very important aspect of quality assurance in nursing care.

  11. Enhancing learning in tertiary institutions through multimedia based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing learning in tertiary institutions through multimedia based ... convenient and cost-effective courseware reengineering methodology of our age. ... Also discussed are the reasons for converting classroom courses to e-learning format.

  12. Effect of health education on knowledge and attitude of tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In order to make good decisions about their sexual and ... of health education on the knowledge and attitude of tertiary school students towards sexually ... Methods: The study employed a quasi-experimental study design in which ...

  13. Integrated Identity and Access Management System for Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology ... identity management and access control and the unavailability of actionable information on pattern of ... This Tertiary Identity and Access Management System (T-IAMS) is a fingerprint biometric database that ...

  14. The Seven Secrets of Successful Urban School Students: The Evidence Continues to Grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies seven specific attitudes, behaviors, and skills among academically successful urban Black students and explores the relationship to their achievement. This study examines the academic achievement of 157 Black students and finds that when specific "Successful Learner Characteristics" are present, above-average…

  15. Whistleblowing in academic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J

    2004-01-01

    The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine. PMID:14872069

  16. Challenges with Tertiary-Level Mechatronic Fluid Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dransfield, Peter; Conrad, Finn

    1996-01-01

    As authors we take the view that mechatronics, as it relates to fluid power, has three levels which we designate as primary, secondary and tertiary. A brief review of the current status of fluid power, hydraulic and pneumatic, and of electronic control of it is presented and discussed. The focus...... is then on tertiary-level mechatronic fluid power and the challenges to it being applied successfully....

  17. Interactive Intranet Portal for effective Management in Tertiary Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Idogho O. Philipa; Akpado Kenneth; James Agajo

    2011-01-01

    Interactive Intranet Portal for effective management in Tertiary Institution is an enhanced and interactive method of managing and processing key issues in Tertiary Institution, Problems of result processing, tuition fee payment, library resources management are analyzed in this work. An interface was generated to handle this problem; the software is an interactive one. Several modules are involved in the paper, like: LIBRARY CONSOLE, ADMIN, STAFF, COURSE REGISTRATION, CHECKING OF RESULTS and...

  18. Tertiary colleges: a study of perspectives on organizational innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Preedy, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore organisational innovation in education with reference to one particular type of organisation - the tertiary college. The research sought to examine the extent to which the intended objectives for new educational organisations are realised in practice, and how far the goals and ethos which organisational leaders seek to promote are shared by organisational members. The study focused on eleven tertiary colleges, comparing the 'official' view of ...

  19. Assessment Quality in Tertiary Education: An Integrative Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen-van Leeuwenkamp, Karin; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kester, Liesbeth

    2018-01-01

    In tertiary education, inferior assessment quality is a problem that has serious consequences for students, teachers, government, and society. A lack of a clear and overarching conceptualization of assessment quality can cause difficulties in guaranteeing assessment quality in practice. Thus, the aim of this study is to conceptualize assessment quality in tertiary education by providing an overview of the assessment quality criteria, their influences, the evaluation of the assessment quality ...

  20. PAEDIATRIC OCULAR INJURIES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vinayagamurthy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Childhood blindness constitutes a burden on the economy of the country and produces psychosocial and emotional disturbance to the child and family at large. Similar to the visual impairment produced by vitamin deficiency state in children, ocular injuries form another group which if identified early and treated promptly can reduce irreversible damage. Eye injuries are responsible for the large scale ocular morbidity worldwide. At extremes of age, the incidence of eye injuries are common because of the negligence in their care. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence, various mechanisms, agents of injury and environmental influence causing eye injuries in children brought to Ophthalmic Outpatient Department of Chengalpattu Medical College in Kanchipuram District, Tamilnadu. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective review of medical records of 230 children who attended Ophthalmic Outpatient in Chengalpattu Medical College Hospital between 01.09.2015 to 30.09.2016. Records of children of both genders between the age group of (0 to 12 years who attended the Ophthalmic Outpatient Department with history of ocular injury coming from both rural and urban areas of the district. Their data was collected and analysed and tabulated based on demography, mechanism and place of injury. RESULTS School going age groups (5-12 years, 84% sustained injuries more commonly. Children from rural areas sustained 54.7% injuries. Blunt trauma accounted for 65% injuries. 52.6% injuries occurred at home. 41.7% were due to stick and wood. Children were admitted to hospital for a mean of 4 days, range (1-25 days, 96% >6/12 v/a, 3% children had v/a (6/18-6/60, 1% blind 6/60 vision. Bilateral blindness was not reported. 1% visual impairment registered. CONCLUSION This study showed that rural children suffered more ocular injuries;commonest were injuries due to sticks followed by cracker injuries. Home-based injuries were more common. Visual prognosis was

  1. Personality, Academic Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control and Academic Procrastination Among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Yazıcı, Hikmet; Albayrak, Elif; Reisoğlu, Serpil

    2016-01-01

    There are several variables to determine academic procrastination behavior among university students. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among big five personality, academic self-efficacy, academic locus of control and academic procrastination. Research group consisted of 885 university students (Female=496, Male=389) in 2012/2013 academic year in Karadeniz Technical University. Results from study indicated that responsibility and amenability subscales of b...

  2. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  3. Academic Training: 2003 - 2004 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 3rd Term - 5 April to 2nd July 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 April Complex Systems, Chaos and Measurements by P. Collet / Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France 26, 27, 28, 29 April The Theory of Heavy Ion Collisions by U. Wiedemann / CERN-PH/TH 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 May Particle Identification at the LHC by D. Fournier / LAL, Orsay, France 1, 2, 3, 4 June Neural Systems, Genetic Algorithms by V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. Politecnica de Madrid E. 7, 8, 9, June Real Time Process Control by T. Riesco / CERN-TS 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June The Cosmic Microwave Background by M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA 21, 22, 23, June Fixed Target Physics at CERN : Results and Prospects by J. Engelen / CERN-DG 28, 29, 30 June, 1, 2, July Search for Dark Matter by B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstrac...

  4. Sustaining Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; David J. Nowak

    2003-01-01

    The significance of the urban forest resource and the powerful forces for change in the urban environment make sustainability a critical issue in urban forest management. The diversity, connectedness, and dynamics of the urban forest establish the context for management that will determine the sustainability of forest structure, health, functions, and benefits. A...

  5. Exercises in Urban Reconnaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Tripodi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exercises in Urban Reconnaissance is a toolbox to examine and disentangle urban complexities. Not the city, not the urban territory, not the urbanization process but the irreducible condition produced by the dialectical relation and the semantic stratification resulting from these factors.

  6. Bioethics and academic freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The author describes the events surrounding his attempts to lecture on the subject of euthanasia in West Germany in June 1989. Singer, who defends the view that active euthanasia for some newborns with handicaps may be ethically permissible, had been invited to speak to professional and academic groups. Strong public protests against Singer and his topic led to the cancellation of some of his engagements, disruptions during others, and harrassment of the German academics who had invited him to speak. These incidents and the subject of euthanasia became matters of intense national debate in West Germany, but there was little public or academic support for Singer's right to be heard. Singer argues that bioethics and bioethicists must have the freedom to challenge conventional moral beliefs, and that the events in West Germany illustrate the grave danger to that freedom from religious and political intolerance.

  7. Controlling Urban Sprawl with Integrated Approach of Space-Transport Development Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarwati, L.; Verhaeghe, R.; Pel, A.J.; Van Arem, B.

    2014-01-01

    Urban sprawl phenomenon has been a huge issue since 20th century characterized by a rapid and unbalanced settlement development with transportation network particularly in a suburban area. The improvement of public transport system is a major requirement to minimize urban sprawl. Academic

  8. Small Steps Make Meaningful Change in Transforming Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Antoinette Halsell; Radliff, Kisha M.; Della Flora, Olympia A.

    2018-01-01

    Urban schools in the United States are generally viewed as having greater challenges than their suburban and rural counterparts. Most notably, they often have lower academic achievement and much of the educational reform movement has been aimed at urban schools in an attempt to close the achievement gap. Although much of the focus in recent years…

  9. Blazing a New Path: Collaborating towards Best Practice in Urban Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Azure Dee; Drake, Jennifer; Sheehy, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    This study utilized qualitative means to gain a better understanding of the experiences of faculty members from a school of education, college of arts and sciences, and K-12 urban educators as they worked across academic disciplines to create and implement a collaborative secondary urban teacher fellowship program. This study is meant to inform…

  10. CLINICAL SPECTRUM OF HYPONATRAEMIA IN TERTIARY CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chincholi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hyponatraemia is defined as a serum sodium level less than 135 mEq/L. High mortality among the patients of hyponatraemia is secondary to the underlying medical condition. Frequency is high in elderly patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted at a tertiary care centre (Basaveshwar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, from the period September 2014 to August 2016. These patients were evaluated for the underlying cause of hyponatraemia, which included detailed history and physical examination followed by appropriate laboratory investigations. Patients were followed up till the hyponatraemia was treated or patients were discharged from the hospital. RESULTS 100 patients of hyponatraemia were included in the study. 46% of the patients were asymptomatic. 33% patients had lethargy, 28% patients had postural dizziness and 19% had abnormal behaviour. Overall incidence of hyponatraemia was 4.58% in the hospitalised population, whereas its incidence in ICU patients was 22.4%. Twelve patients of symptomatic severe hyponatraemia were treated with hypertonic saline infusion, 25% patients were given loop diuretics with oral supplementation of sodium chloride for free water excretion in SIADH cases and in patients with hypervolaemia, hyponatraemia, fluid restriction was advised to 44 patients, oral supplementation of sodium chloride was given in 36 patients and 64 patients received normal saline. 9 patients included in the study died, 5 of which had advanced cirrhosis of liver as underlying cause. One patient developed Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome (ODS. CONCLUSION The possible cause of hyponatraemia should always be sought as outcome in severe hyponatraemia is governed by aetiology, and not by the serum sodium level. Treatment of severe symptomatic hyponatraemia with hypertonic saline is safe if recommendation for the rate of correction of hyponatraemia is strictly followed.

  11. Tertiary lymphoid organs in Takayasu Arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eClement

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in the aortic wall of TA patients.Methods: Hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20, follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21, and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune cells from the adventitial layer of one patient were characterized by flow cytometry. Demographic, medical history, laboratory, imaging, treatment and follow up data were extracted from medical records.Results: Aorta specimens from Bentall procedures were available from 7 patients (five female, aged 22 to 57 years with TA. Surgical treatment was performed at TA diagnosis (n=4 or at a median of 108 months [84-156] after TA diagnosis. Disease was active at surgery in four patients according to NIH score. B cell aggregates-TLOs containing HEVs were observed in the adventitia of all but one patient.. Of note, ectopic follicles containing CD21+ FDCs were found in all patients (4/4 with increased aortic FDG uptake before surgery but were absent in all but one patients (2/3 with no FDG uptake. In addition, flow cytometry analysis confirmed the accumulation of memory/germinal center–like B cells in the adventitial layer and showed the presence of antigen-experienced T follicular helper cells.Conclusion: Ectopic lymphoid neogenesis displaying functional features can be found in the aortic wall of a subset of patients with active TA. The function of these local B cell clusters on the pathogenesis of TA remains to be elucidated.

  12. Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Takayasu Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Marc; Galy, Adrien; Bruneval, Patrick; Morvan, Marion; Hyafil, Fabien; Benali, Khadija; Pasi, Nicoletta; Deschamps, Lydia; Pellenc, Quentin; Papo, Thomas; Nicoletti, Antonino; Sacre, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA) is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) in the aortic wall of TA patients. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21), and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune cells from the adventitial layer of one patient were characterized by flow cytometry. Demographic, medical history, laboratory, imaging, treatment, and follow-up data were extracted from medical records. Aorta specimens from Bentall procedures were available from seven patients (5 females, aged 22-57 years) with TA. Surgical treatment was performed at TA diagnosis (n = 4) or at a median of 108 months (84-156) after TA diagnosis. Disease was active at surgery in four patients according to NIH score. B cell aggregates-TLOs containing HEVs were observed in the adventitia of all but one patient. Of note, ectopic follicles containing CD21(+) FDCs were found in all patients (4/4) with increased aortic (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake before surgery but were absent in all but one patients (2/3) with no FDG uptake. In addition, flow cytometry analysis confirmed the accumulation of memory/germinal center-like B cells in the adventitial layer and showed the presence of antigen-experienced T follicular helper cells. Ectopic lymphoid neogenesis displaying functional features can be found in the aortic wall of a subset of patients with active TA. The function of these local B cell clusters on the pathogenesis of TA remains to be elucidated.

  13. Comparison Analysis and Evaluation of Urban Competitiveness in Chinese Urban Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixiang Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With accelerating urbanization, urban competitiveness has become a worldwide academic focus. Previous studies always focused on economic factors but ignored social elements when measuring urban competitiveness. In this paper, a city was considered as a whole containing different units such as departments, individuals and economic activities, which interact with each other and affect its economic operation. Moreover, a city’s development was compared to an object’s movement, and the components were compared to different forces acting upon the object. With the analysis of the principle of object movement, this study has established a more scientific evaluation index system that involves 4 subsystems, 12 elements and 58 indexes. By using the TOPSIS method, the study has worked out the urban competitiveness of 141 cities from 28 Chinese urban clusters in 2009. According to the calculation results, these cities were divided into four levels: A, B, C, D. Furthermore, in order to analyze the competitiveness of cities and urban clusters, cities and urban clusters have been divided into four groups according to their distributive characteristics: the southeast, the northeast and Bohai Rim, the central region and the west. Suggestions and recommendations for each group are provided based on careful analysis.

  14. Patterns of privilege: A total cohort analysis of admission and academic outcomes for M?ori, Pacific and non-M?ori non-Pacific health professional students

    OpenAIRE

    Wikaire, Erena; Curtis, Elana; Cormack, Donna; Jiang, Yannan; McMillan, Louise; Loto, Rob; Reid, Papaarangi

    2016-01-01

    Background Tertiary institutions are struggling to ensure equitable academic outcomes for indigenous and ethnic minority students in health professional study. This demonstrates disadvantaging of ethnic minority student groups (whereby Indigenous and ethnic minority students consistently achieve academic outcomes at a lower level when compared to non-ethnic minority students) whilst privileging non-ethnic minority students and has important implications for health workforce and health equity ...

  15. The Academic Publishing Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip Christopher; Wenzel, Tim Ole; Schmidt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The case starts with introducing the outstanding profitability of academic journal publishers such as Elsevier and then dives into describing the research process from an idea to conducting research and to publishing the results in academic journals. Subsequently, demand and supply for scientific...... journals and papers are discussed including drivers and involved parties. Furthermore, the case describes competition between suppliers, customers, and publishers. In sum, the case study features a rich description of the industry’s many unusual attributes which allows for discussing the benefits...

  16. #IWD2016 Academic Inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2016-01-01

    What academics or books have inspired you in your writing and research, or helped to make sense of the world around you? In this feature essay, Ninna Meier returns to her experience of reading Hannah Arendt as she sought to understand work and how it relates to value production in capitalist...... economies. Meier recounts how Arendt’s book On Revolution (1963) forged connective threads between the ‘smallest parts’ and the ‘largest wholes’ and showed how academic work is never fully relegated to the past, but can return in new iterations across time....

  17. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  18. NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND GENRE VARIATION. PRINTED AND ELECTRONIC DOCUMENTS IN TERTIARY EDUCATION ESP' COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedad Fernandez Toledo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available New technologies are as present nowadays in university as they are in society in general, influencing all aspects OS the teaching-learning dynamics. Within this electronic environment new genre types have arisen which should be as familiar to students as computers themselves. In this chapter the impact of technologies on genre variation is discussed, especially in relation to aulthentic malerial as teaching support. This influence is shown in a specific ESP area, that OS English For Library and lnformation Science (LIS, examining the possibilities, based on the relationship between older and newer genres, that are brought into the classroom. An example of changes brought about by Information Technologies on a classroom project is given: this now involves using web sites as a resource for the construction of leaflets. Following this, some advantages derived from its implementation during two academic years are discussed. The conclusions point to the benefit that new genre exploration in the ESP classroom offers for the building of academic literacy at tertiary level.

  19. Productive procrastination: academic procrastination style predicts academic and alcohol outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Erin C.; Wormington, Stephanie V.; Oleson, Kathryn C.; Lindgren, Kristen P.

    2017-01-01

    Productive procrastination replaces one adaptive behavior with another adaptive—albeit less important—behavior (e.g., organizing notes instead of studying for an exam). We identified adaptive and maladaptive procrastination styles associated with academic and alcohol outcomes in 1106 college undergraduates. Cluster analysis identified five academic procrastination styles—non-procrastinators, academic productive procrastinators, non-academic productive procrastinators, non-academic procrastinators, and classic procrastinators. Procrastination style differentially predicted alcohol-related problems, cravings, risk of alcohol use disorders, and GPA (all ps procrastination and academic productive procrastination were most adaptive overall; non-academic productive procrastination, non-academic procrastination, and classic procrastination were least adaptive. Productive procrastination differed from other procrastination strategies, and maladaptive procrastination styles may be a useful risk indicator for preventative and intervention efforts. PMID:28804158

  20. Academic interventions for academic procrastination: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacks, Shlomo; Hen, Meirav

    2018-01-01

    Procrastination is a widespread phenomenon in academic settings. It has been studied from many different theoretical angles, and a variety of causes and consequences have been suggested. Recent studies support the notion that academic procrastination can be seen from a situational perspective and as a failure in learning self-regulation. It suggests that interventions should address situational as well as deficits in self-regulation to help students overcome their procrastinating tendencies. The present review examined the recent literature on causes and consequences of academic procrastination and the limited number of studies of academic interventions for academic procrastination. Findings of this review strengthen the need to further study the topic of academic interventions for academic procrastination and to develop effective interventions. At the end of this review, several suggestions for the development of academic interventions are outlined.

  1. Productive procrastination: academic procrastination style predicts academic and alcohol outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Erin C; Wormington, Stephanie V; Oleson, Kathryn C; Lindgren, Kristen P

    2017-03-01

    Productive procrastination replaces one adaptive behavior with another adaptive-albeit less important-behavior (e.g., organizing notes instead of studying for an exam). We identified adaptive and maladaptive procrastination styles associated with academic and alcohol outcomes in 1106 college undergraduates. Cluster analysis identified five academic procrastination styles- non-procrastinators , academic productive procrastinators , non-academic productive procrastinators, non-academic procrastinators , and classic procrastinators . Procrastination style differentially predicted alcohol-related problems, cravings, risk of alcohol use disorders, and GPA (all ps procrastination and academic productive procrastination were most adaptive overall; non-academic productive procrastination, non-academic procrastination, and classic procrastination were least adaptive. Productive procrastination differed from other procrastination strategies, and maladaptive procrastination styles may be a useful risk indicator for preventative and intervention efforts.

  2. Mapping and Evaluating the Urbanization Process in Northeast China Using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpeng Yi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an Urban Light Index (ULI is constructed to facilitate analysis and quantitative evaluation of the process of urbanization and expansion rate by using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data during the years from 1992 to 2010. A unit circle urbanization evaluation model is established to perform a comprehensive analysis of the urbanization process of 34 prefecture-level cities in Northeast China. Furthermore, the concept of urban light space is put forward. In this study, urban light space is divided into four types: the core urban area, the transition zone between urban and suburban areas, suburban area and fluorescent space. Proceeding from the temporal and spatial variation of the four types of light space, the pattern of morphologic change and space-time evolution of the four principal cities in Northeast China (Harbin, Changchun, Shenyang, Dalian is analyzed and given particular attention. Through a correlation analysis between ULI and the traditional urbanization indexes (urban population, proportion of the secondary and tertiary industries in the regional GDP and the built-up area, the advantages and disadvantages as well as the feasibility of using the ULI in the study of urbanization are evaluated. The research results show that ULI has a strong correlation with urban built-up area (R2 = 0.8277. The morphologic change and history of the evolving urban light space can truly reflect the characteristics of urban sprawl. The results also indicate that DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data is applicable for extracting urban space information and has strong potential to urbanization research.

  3. Relevance and Benefits of Urban Water Reuse in Tourist Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston Tong Sang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban water reuse is one of the most rapidly growing water reuse applications worldwide and one of the major elements of the sustainable management of urban water cycle. Because of the high probability of direct contact between consumers and recycled water, many technical and regulatory challenges have to be overcome in order to minimize health risks at affordable cost. This paper illustrates the keys to success of one of the first urban water reuse projects in the island Bora Bora, French Polynesia. Special emphasis is given on the reliability of operation of the membrane tertiary treatment, economic viability in terms of pricing of recycled water and operating costs, as well as on the benefits of water reuse for the sustainable development of tourist areas.

  4. Academic Nightmares: Predatory Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Sonya E.; Rogers, Kem A.

    2017-01-01

    Academic researchers who seek to publish their work are confronted daily with a barrage of e-mails from aggressive marketing campaigns that solicit them to publish their research with a specialized, often newly launched, journal. Known as predatory journals, they often promise high editorial and publishing standards, yet their exploitive business…

  5. Academic Work and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Reading current accounts of higher education demonstrates the flux and damage of rapid neoliberal changes to the type and conduct of academic work. Opening the Times Higher Education magazine on the 28 April 2011 shows articles about cuts in staffing and undergraduate provision in England, concerns about the quality of for-profit higher education…

  6. On Academic Boredom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadchi, Amir

    2005-01-01

    The kind of boredom experienced in academia is unique. Neither a purely subjective nor objective phenomenon, it is the product of the way research is organized into papers, seminars, and conferences, as well as of a deep implicit metaphor that academic argument is a form of warfare. In this respect, the concepts of boredom and rigour are closely…

  7. Towards Transnational Academic Capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to current debates on the relationship between globalisation and higher education. The main argument of the paper is that we are currently witnessing transnationalisation of academic capitalism. This argument is illustrated by examining the collaboration between transnational corporations and research universities, and how…

  8. Kompetenceprofil for academic developers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Rie; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    gerne vil udføre? Vi vil også diskutere hvilke positive og negative konsekvenser en (mulig fælles nordisk) kompetenceprofil kunne få.Referencer:Ansela, M. & Maikkola, M. (2007). ACADEMIC DEVELOPER’S COMPETENCE-BASED DESCRIPTION:Core and basic competences. Retrieved 22/01/15 at http://www.peda-forum.fi/index.php...

  9. Academic Vocational Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Søren; Keller, Hanne Dauer; Stegeager, Nikolaj

    2010-01-01

    Danish society puts a high value on education which is traditionally seen as a crucial vehicle for development in all spheres of social and economic life. Large sums are spent on work-related adult learning, an important example being academically based masters programs. Yet, the actual effects o......, with examples, a framework for designing educational programs which can help make academic teaching relevant to production-oriented life in organizations. The paper may be read as a statement from which criteria for evaluating the said masters programs can be generated.......Danish society puts a high value on education which is traditionally seen as a crucial vehicle for development in all spheres of social and economic life. Large sums are spent on work-related adult learning, an important example being academically based masters programs. Yet, the actual effects...... of such educational investment in terms of improved workplace efficiency remain obscure both with respect to the organization and the individual. Academically acquired knowledge is generally admitted not to affect work-related outcomes to any significant extent. The three authors of this paper are all involved...

  10. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  11. Participatory academic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Janus Holst; Nørgård, Rikke Toft

    2015-01-01

    understanding of participation in edu-cation can move educatees’ learning beyond institutions through focusing on educatees as researchers, participat-ing in society, building a research community and obtaining academic citizenship. Further, the article discusses how a value-based, vision-driven approach...

  12. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and…

  13. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  14. Academic streaming in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falaschi, Alessandro; Mønster, Dan; Doležal, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The TF-NETCAST task force was active from March 2003 to March 2004, and during this time the mem- bers worked on various aspects of streaming media related to the ultimate goal of setting up common services and infrastructures to enable netcasting of high quality content to the academic community...

  15. Contemporary Urban Media Art – Images of Urgency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    . Under the themes ‘intensity’, ‘intelligence’ and ‘immersion’ the dissertation examines some of the ways in which our experience is affected by ubiquitous technological mediation, especially in hi-tech urban contexts, and simultaneously how artistic interventions work towards a critical understanding......The dissertation examinesfrom a combined academic and curatorial perspective how urban media art – media aesthetic art forms situated in the urban context – may be considered contemporary in the understanding of art that departs from, responds to and co-exists with ‘time’ and temporal experience...... and exploitation of this new condition in our technological reality. I suggest that urban media art – as sensible constructions of temporal emergency images situated in the urban environment – potentially interfere with the temporal experiences we are offered in our communicative context. Based on this, we can...

  16. Summary of Research 1997, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boger, Dan

    1999-01-01

    This report contains information of research projects in the interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control, and Communications Academic Group, Information Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic...

  17. Leadership Diversity: A Study of Urban Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Mark; Li, Haipeng

    2007-01-01

    Diversity has been identified as a priority in library and information services for some time. The limited published research on diversity programs in libraries, though, has focused on academic libraries. This article represents the results of a study of leadership diversity in large, urban public libraries. In the study of members of the Urban…

  18. Attrition of Women Business Majors in an Urban Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Janice M.

    2004-01-01

    Identified intervention protocols that could help reduce the attrition of women business majors at an urban community college. Review of academic progress data and data from student surveys which examined students' reasons for leaving the institution indicated that there was a need for support mechanisms throughout the freshman year and extending…

  19. Teen Pregnancy and the Achievement Gap among Urban Minority Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To outline the prevalence and disparities of teen pregnancy among school-aged urban minority youth, causal pathways through which nonmarital teen births adversely affects academic achievement, and proven or promising approaches for schools to address this problem. Methods: Literature review. Results: In 2006, the birth rate among 15-…

  20. Asthma and the Achievement Gap among Urban Minority Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To outline the prevalence and disparities of asthma among school-aged urban minority youth, causal pathways through which poorly controlled asthma adversely affects academic achievement, and proven or promising approaches for schools to address these problems. Methods: Literature review. Results: Asthma is the most common chronic…

  1. Family Characteristics and Elementary School Achievement in an Urban Ghetto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The relationships of sex, father absence, family size, and birth order to factor scores representing general academic achievement'' were investigated in a sample of urban black ghetto fifth-grade children. Significant main effects were found for sex and family size. (Author)

  2. Why Do Academics Use Academic Social Networking Sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meishar-Tal, Hagit; Pieterse, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    Academic social-networking sites (ASNS) such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate are becoming very popular among academics. These sites allow uploading academic articles, abstracts, and links to published articles; track demand for published articles, and engage in professional interaction. This study investigates the nature of the use and the…

  3. The Effect of Academic Advising on Academic Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although academic advising in Kenyan universities exists, no research has been done to find out how it impacts on students' educational and career goals. This research aimed at establishing the effect of academic advising on academic performance and the influence of year of study and gender on students' tendency to ...

  4. Is Your Academic Library Pinning? Academic Libraries and Pinterest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Academic libraries are flocking to online social networking sites in an effort to meet users where they are. Pinterest is the latest of these rapidly growing online social networking tools. The author of this article reports results from a survey on academic libraries' presence on Pinterest. The survey found most academic library pinboards are in…

  5. Running continuous academic adoption programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tobias Alsted

    Running successful academic adoption programmes requires executive support, clear strategies, tactical resources and organisational agility. These two presentations will discuss the implementation of strategic academic adoption programs down to very concrete tool customisations to meet specific...

  6. Physical Activity and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between physical activity and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a comprehensive school physical activity program to improve academic achievement.

  7. Healthy Eating and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between healthy eating and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a healthy school nutrition environment to improve academic achievement.

  8. Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic Achievement in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. ... AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities ... Thus, it is study investigated the integrated factors determining academic performance of students in public secondary schools in Bayelsa State, Nigeria.

  9. Comparing Satisfaction, Life-Stress, Coping and Academic Performance of Counselling Students in On-Campus and Distance Education Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlonger, Brett; Gencic, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Distance education students are confronted with a range of additional challenges as part of their tertiary study experience. A quantitative approach was used to identify the challenges they face, their relative levels of satisfaction, coping strategies, and academic performance. Two hundred and ninety-five students (64 male and 231 female)…

  10. Urban forests for sustainable urban development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundara, Denny M.; Hartono, Djoko M.; Suganda, Emirhadi; Haeruman, S. Herman J.

    2017-11-01

    This paper explores the development of the urban forest in East Jakarta. By 2030 Jakarta area has a target of 30% green area covering 19,845 hectares, including urban forest covering an area of 4,631 hectares. In 2015, the city forest is only 646 hectares, while the city requires 3,985 hectares of new land Urban forest growth from year to year showed a marked decrease with increasing land area awoke to commercial functions, environmental conditions encourage the development of the city to become unsustainable. This research aims to support sustainable urban development and ecological balance through the revitalization of green areas and urban development. Analytical methods for urban forest area is calculated based on the amount of CO2 that comes from people, vehicles, and industrial. Urban spatial analysis based on satellite image data, using a GIS program is an analysis tool to determine the distribution and growth patterns of green areas. This paper uses a dynamic system model to simulate the conditions of the region against intervention to be performed on potential areas for development of urban forests. The result is a model urban forest area is integrated with a social and economic function to encourage the development of sustainable cities.

  11. Relationship between Academic Performance, Spatial Competence, Learning Styles and Attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Noriega Biggio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the results of research on factors affecting academic performance and attrition in a sample of 1,500 freshman students majoring in architecture, design and urbanism at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina [University of Buenos Aires, Argentina] who were enrolled in a drafting course. The hypotheses we tested concern the mediating role of learning styles on the relationship between spatial competence and academic performance, learning-style differences by gender and cohort, and the relationship between attrition, spatial competence level and learning style. Statistical analysis of the data was performed and spatial competence enhanced by motivational profile was found to predict final achievement. Educational implications are identified, highlighting the need to promote in students those academic behaviors that characterize a self-regulated learning style and encourage the use of specific intellectual abilities.

  12. Information and communications technology facilities at the tertiary level education in some urban universities in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Shahriar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of digitalization, information and communications technology facilities have become an indispensable part of education especially at the universities. This study has been undertaken with dual purposes - to find the existing scenario of information and communications technology facilities and to gauge the perception of the students onthe quality of those facilities - at the universities in Bangladesh. To that end, a survey was conducted on the undergraduate and graduate students of 9 private and public universities. To assess the quality of information and communications technology services, participants’ views on various aspects like the sufficiency of computers, availability of required software, maintenance and troubleshooting, internet and data sharing facilities, etc. were collected and analyzed. The study finds that although students are on the happier side with the information and communications technology installations and equipment, they are fairly unhappy about the maintenance services and internet facilities available at their universities. It gives some valuable insights about the information and communications technology facilities scenario at the universities that can be taken into consideration while planning future action plan and development of information and communications technology at the universities in Bangladesh.

  13. Acute perforated peptic ulcer: on clinical experience in an urban tertiary hospital in south east Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, A I; Amu, O C; Nzegwu, M A; Dilibe, U C

    2013-01-01

    Acute perforated peptic ulcer is a leading cause of generalized peritonitis and its management has continued to be a challenging task in our environment. There is a paucity of published reports on acute perforated peptic ulcers in our environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the different pattern of risk factors clinical presentations, management and clinical outcome of patients with acute perforated peptic ulcer in our setting and to highlight the factors that continue to account for the high mortality and morbidity as seen here. A retrospective study where data of seventy-six (76) patients managed for generalized peritonitis due to acute peptic ulcer perforation over a five year period (January 2006-December 2010) were retrieved from medical records of Enugu State University of Science and Technology Hospital (ESUTH). The patients' biodata, clinical and operative findings and treatment outcome were extracted and analysed, after institutional ethical approval was secured. All other cases of generalized peritonitis not traceable to acute peptic ulcer perforation were excluded from the study. There were76 patients; 58 males and 18 females (M:F = 3.2:1) Their ages ranged from 20 to 80years with a mean of 39.5yr and SD ± 13.10years. Majority of the patients 49(64.4%) were 40years of age and below and only 24 (31.6%) had a previous history suggestive of chronic peptic ulcer disease. Twenty five (32.9%) patients presented within 24 h of onset of symptoms of perforation with a mortality of 8.0%. Slightly more than half of our patients 39(51.3%) presented between 24 and 48 h with mortality of 17.9%. Twelve patients (15.8%) presented between 48 and 72 h and the mortality in this group was 58.3%. The latter two groups accounted for most of the mortality in our series. All perforations were anterior perforations within the first 2.5 cm of the duodenum and all had simple closure with pedicled omental patch and peritoneal toilet with copious volumes of warm normal saline. Postoperatively all received Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy and proton pump inhibitors for at least two months. Patient groups who presented early had low mortality rates, but patient groups who presented late had higher mortality rates. Overall mortality was 21%. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Missed Testing Opportunities for HIV Screening and Early Diagnosis in an Urban Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph DeRose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Newark, New Jersey, is disproportionally affected by HIV with one of the highest prevalence rates in the United States. Rutgers New Jersey Medical School is a major healthcare provider to Newark’s underserved population and has implemented a HIV testing program that can diagnose and link newly diagnosed individuals to care. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all new patients seen in the Infectious Disease Practice from January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2014, to determine the proportion of patients with a missed testing opportunity (MTO (patients with a new HIV diagnosis with an encounter at the institution in the 1 year prior to their first appointment. 117 newly diagnosed patients were identified. 36 (31% had at least one MTO. A total of 34 (29% of newly diagnosed patients had AIDS at presentation and 17% had CD4 counts of 50 cells/μL (p value 0.5. The two most common locations of a missed testing opportunity were the hospital ED (45% and subspecialty clinics (37%. This study demonstrates that, even in a high prevalence institution with HIV counseling, testing, and referral service, HIV screening is lacking at multiple points of care and patients are missing opportunities for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis clinical features and management strategies at an urban tertiary facility in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais, Rehan; Saeed, Mohammad; Haider, Rimsha; Jassani, Zahra; Riaz, Amir; Perveen, Tahira

    2014-12-01

    To determine the presentation patterns, biologically vulnerable patient groups and treatment strategies of rheumatoid arthritis. The retrospective study was conducted at the Rheumatology Clinic of Liaquat National Hospital and Medical College, Karachi, and comprised data of rheumatology patients who presented between September 2006 and September 2012. After screening all the files, rheumatoid arthritis cases were identified. Data collection was done using a questionnaire that included patient demographics, co-morbidities, clinical manifestations and drug therapy. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 2300 files screened, 500(21.7%) related to patients of rheumatoid arthritis. The mean age at presentation of these 500 patients was 41±15 years. There were 367(73.4%) women and they presented at an earlier age compared to men (p<0.024). Erosions were present in 198(40%) patients on X-rays and 22(4.4%) had joint deformities. Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis was associated with higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels (p<0.014), but did not differ from seronegative rheumatoid arthritis in terms of Disease Activity Score-28 levels (p<0.21). The skewed gender distribution was likely an effect of rheumatoid arthritis biology rather than due to issues of healthcare accessibility. Seronegative RA is likely to present late though it is as destructive as the seropositive disease.

  16. Academic capitalism and academic culture: A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this department and they consider industrial sponsorship as a highly effective vehicle for enhancing the quality of education of students and pursuing their scientific interests. This study provides valuable insights to federal and institutional policiescreated to foster industry-academia partnerships and commercialization of academic research.

  17. Another Discussion about Academic Corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changgeng, Li

    2007-01-01

    Academic corruption is a commonplace matter about which all people are clearly aware. However, people often overlook many hidden or latent manifestations of academic corruption. This article discusses eight of these manifestations: indiscriminate use of the academic team spirit, the proliferation of "word games," deliberate attacks on…

  18. Life Stress and Academic Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Huang, Yun-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Stress has been shown to negatively affect learning. Academic burnout is a significant problem associated with poor academic performance. Although there has been increased attention on these two issues, literature on the relationship between students' life stress and burnout is relatively limited. This study surveys academic burnout and life…

  19. Academic Freedom Requires Constant Vigilance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, academic freedom has been understood as an individual right and a negative liberty. As William Tierney and Vincente Lechuga explain, "Academic freedom, although an institutional concept, was vested in the individual professor." The touchstone document on academic freedom, the American Association of University Professor's (AAUP)…

  20. Academic Freedom and Indentured Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Discussion of academic freedom usually focuses on faculty, and it usually refers to speech. That is the gist of the 1915 "General Report of the Committee on Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure," appearing in the inaugural AAUP "Bulletin" as a kind of mission statement. Given the conditions of the American system of higher education--decentralized…

  1. The Constitution and Academic Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Eric R.

    During the past 150 years U.S. courts have demonstrated a special protectiveness toward academics and academic institutions. Academic freedom was not a concern when the U.S. Constitution and the First Amendment were drafted and is not mentioned in the "Federalist Papers." However, decisions by a series of Supreme Court justices led to…

  2. Early to bed: a study of adaptation among sexually active urban adolescent girls younger than age sixteen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.; Ruchkin, V.; Caminis, A.; Vermeiren, R; Henrich, C.C.; Schwab-Stone, M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between sexual activity among urban adolescent girls and four global measures of psychosocial adaptation (academic motivation, school achievement, depressive symptoms, and expectations about the future). Method: Data derived from the Social and Health

  3. Computer Anxiety, Academic Stress, and Academic Procrastination on College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Rahardjo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic procrastination is fairly and commonly found among college students. The lack of understanding in making the best use of computer technology may lead to anxiety in terms of operating computer hence cause postponement in completing course assignments related to computer operation. On the other hand, failure in achieving certain academic targets as expected by parents and/or the students themselves also makes students less focused and leads to tendency of postponing many completions of course assignments. The aim of this research is to investigate contribution of anxiety in operating computer and academic stress toward procrastination on students. As much as 65 students majoring in psychology became participants in this study. The results showed that anxiety in operating computer and academic stress play significant role in influencing academic procrastination among social sciences students. In terms of academic procrastination tendencies, anxiety in operating computer and academic stress, male students have higher percentage than female students.

  4. "The university didn't actually tell us this is what you have to do": Social inclusion through embedding of academic skills in first year professional courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Goldingay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The widening participation agenda means that students will be entering degree courses with increasingly diverse needs, particularly with respect to the academic skills necessary for successful tertiary study in Australia. This paper presents findings from a mixed methods project investigating first year social work students’ perceived role in academic skills and their development. Students expressed the perception that academic skill requirements and how they would be assessed should be made explicit, and identified a stigma associated with accessing study support services. The paper concludes that an intentional design strategy, such as embedding academic skills into the curriculum, helps bridge the different expectations between academics and students in the teaching and learning of academic skills, and hence constitutes a socially inclusive strategy to teaching professional courses such as social work, within higher education.  Recommendations to enhance the success and sustainability of such an initiative in the current higher education environment are offered.

  5. Plagiarism in Academic Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eugenia Rojas-Porras

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ethical and social responsibility of citing the sources in a scientific or artistic work is undeniable. This paper explores, in a preliminary way, academic plagiarism in its various forms. It includes findings based on a forensic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness on the importance of considering these details when writing and publishing a text. Hopefully, this analysis may put the issue under discussion.

  6. Service Innovation In Academic Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate whether management and employees in academic libraries involve users in library service innovations and what these user roles are. Design/methodology/approach – The article first reviews the literature focusing on innovation, new product...... development, new service development and library science with specific focus on users and management. Subsequently the research uses a case study approach to investigate management and customer involvement in a Danish academic library. Findings – Results from the case study show that academic libraries...... in academic library service innovations on the basis of an in-depth case study of a Danish academic library....

  7. Academic Manager or Managed Academic? Academic Identity Schisms in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between values and academic identity has received scant attention in the higher education literature with some notable exceptions (Churchman, 2006; Harley, 2002; Henkel, 2005). This paper contends that the perceived need to align all academics around corporate values and goals has given rise to academic identity schisms in higher…

  8. Gender Differences in the Relationship between Academic Procrastination, Satisfaction with Academic Life and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkis, Murat; Duru, Erdinç

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Procrastination has become one of the most researched topics due its adverse effects on the both general and student population in social sciences. The general tendency toward delaying academic tasks has been conceptualized as academic procrastination in academic setting. It is a prevalent issue among students and a numerous students…

  9. Spatio-temporal observations of the tertiary ozone maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We present spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum (TOM, based on GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars ozone measurements in 2002–2006. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically observed in the high-latitude winter mesosphere at an altitude of ~72 km. Although the explanation for this phenomenon has been found recently – low concentrations of odd-hydrogen cause the subsequent decrease in odd-oxygen losses – models have had significant deviations from existing observations until recently. Good coverage of polar night regions by GOMOS data has allowed for the first time to obtain spatial and temporal observational distributions of night-time ozone mixing ratio in the mesosphere.

    The distributions obtained from GOMOS data have specific features, which are variable from year to year. In particular, due to a long lifetime of ozone in polar night conditions, the downward transport of polar air by the meridional circulation is clearly observed in the tertiary ozone maximum time series. Although the maximum tertiary ozone mixing ratio is achieved close to the polar night terminator (as predicted by the theory, TOM can be observed also at very high latitudes, not only in the beginning and at the end, but also in the middle of winter. We have compared the observational spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum with that obtained using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model and found that the specific features are reproduced satisfactorily by the model.

    Since ozone in the mesosphere is very sensitive to HOx concentrations, energetic particle precipitation can significantly modify the shape of the ozone profiles. In particular, GOMOS observations have shown that the tertiary ozone maximum was temporarily destroyed during the January 2005 and December 2006 solar proton events as a result of the HOx enhancement from the increased ionization.

  10. Urban Greening Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the San Francisco Bay Water Quality Project (SFBWQP) Urban Greening Bay Area, a large-scale effort to re-envision urban landscapes to include green infrastructure (GI) making communities more livable and reducing stormwater runoff.

  11. Urban growth management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gertrud; Alexander Sick Nielsen, Thomas; Grünfelder, Julien

    2011-01-01

    , and finally urban attractivity policies. Effective regional bodies are needed to deal with urban expansion and peri-urbanisation at a relevant scale; European rural and agricultural policies makes up the main ‘policy complex’ targeting the non-urban area including its land uses; while lastly leverage of urban...... urban growth and curb urban sprawl in a wider sense. Methodology The main methodology of the paper is a desk-research based review of policy options supplemented with field study and interviews in selected cased study regions. This paper consists of two parts. The first part is based on literature...... there are contradictions in the evidence presented in the literature, we believe that it may be safely said that urban growth management policies have an influence on urban growth under certain preconditions including: sufficient time for implementation and continuity of efforts; choice of appropriate policy measures...

  12. Urban mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Niels; Kristiansen, Christina Blanner; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2018-01-01

    . Fast and unstructured urbanization, such as that seen in many developing countries, further exacerbates these challenges. There are promising initiatives emerging including initiatives to end homelessness, to improve access to green areas in urban environments, to provide emergency psychiatric services...

  13. Performative Urban Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    visitors and participants to engage and interact with the city. Inspired by Lefebvre statement that "the most beautiful cities were those where festivals were not planned in advance” (Lefebvre 1987:36), I will discuss how urban designers can design engaging spaces, where the potentials of the city can...... unfold. Is it, for instance, the formal aesthetics of the design or rather the socio-cultural codes of the existing urban space that engage people? The paper engages in three urban performance designs: 1) The 10th Avenue Plaza at the Highline in New York 2) The temporary installations at Boble Plads......Urban design has come to mean many things. From the architectural masterplans to the informal urban design in temporary spaces and event designs. The paper will focus on urban designs engaging urban designs. Engaging urban design can broadly be understood as temporary design installations inviting...

  14. African Urban Harvest

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Urban Harvest, a system-wide initiative of the Consultative Group on Agricultural ...... and urban old, using criteria of population density, land availability, and the prevalence of crop ...... Contact between milk and containers or the environment;.

  15. Urban restrukturering og byidentitet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvorning, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Bidrag til publikationen i forbindelse med EU-konference samt uddrag af forskningsprojektet: Urban restrukturering......Bidrag til publikationen i forbindelse med EU-konference samt uddrag af forskningsprojektet: Urban restrukturering...

  16. Nonpoint Source: Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanization increases the variety and amount of pollutants carried into our nation's waters. Pavement and compacted landscapes do not allow rain and snow melt to soak into the ground. List of typical pollutants from Urban runoff.

  17. Urban Waters Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Includes information on 14 Federal member agencies for the Urban Waters Federal Partnership and 19 designated urban waters locations and the local stakeholder groups and activities. Content was formerly at www.epa.gov/urbanwaters/

  18. Monuments to Academic Carelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In 1942, Katherine Frost Bruner published an article titled “Of psychological writing: Being some valedictory remarks on style.” It was published in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, the journal for which she served as editorial assistant between 1937 and 1941. Her collection of advice to writing scholars has been widely quoted, including by several editions of The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The most frequently quoted message in Bruner’s article deals with the importance of making sure that references in academic texts are complete and accurate. Exploring the citation history of this particular message reveals an ironic point: the great majority of those who have quoted Bruner’s words on reference accuracy have not done so accurately. The case may serve as a reminder of the importance of the basic academic principle of striving to use primary sources. The most startling finding in this study is how frequently this principle is violated, even by authors who advise and educate academic writers. PMID:28479644

  19. Discovery of tertiary sulfonamides as potent liver X receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, William J; Buckholz, Richard G; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L; Galardi, Cristin M; Gampe, Robert T; Hyatt, Stephen M; Merrihew, Susan L; Moore, John T; Oplinger, Jeffrey A; Reid, Paul R; Spearing, Paul K; Stanley, Thomas B; Stewart, Eugene L; Willson, Timothy M

    2010-04-22

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  20. Usability of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a tertiary memory clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.; Bahl, J.C.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assays for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid 1-42 have been available for some years. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of these biomarkers in a mixed population of tertiary dementia referral patients in a university-based memory......, the sensitivity of a single abnormal value was between 33 and 66%. The specificity was high except when discriminating AD from amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Two or more abnormal markers further increased the specificity and decreased the sensitivity. CONCLUSION: In a tertiary setting, abnormal CSF biomarker...

  1. Sexual harassment in tertiary institutions: A comparative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Janice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual harassment is not a new phenomenon in tertiary institutions. It has been receiving considerable attention in research and the media and public awareness has increased dramatically. However, the term sexual harassment is not used uniformly across the globe because countries have defined it differently. Consequently, prevalence of sexual harassment in education varies across cultures. This paper examines sexual harassment from a comparative perspective. It specifically focuses on the definition of sexual harassment, incidence of sexual harassment of students in tertiary institutions, effects of sexual harassment on victims; and victims’ responses to sexual harassment. It also offers suggestions for curtailing sexual harassment in these institutions.

  2. Associated Factors of Sleep Quality and Behavior among Students of Two Tertiary Institutions in Northern Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, P P; Say, Y H

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the associated factors of sleep quality and behavior among Malaysian tertiary students. The response rate to the questionnaire study was 41.0%. 1,118 students (M = 486, F = 632; mean age = 20.06 ± 1.53 years) were recruited from Universiti and Kolej Tunku Abdul Rahman (Perak campuses) who completed a sleep quality and behavior questionnaire based on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Scale (MES) and craving of high-calorie foods. Results showed that students had the following sleeping habits - bed time = 2.41 a.m. ± 3.35 hr, rise time = 9.00 a.m. ± 1.76 hr, sleep latency = 16.65 ± 14.30 min and sleep duration = 7.31 ± 1.45 hr. 32.9% of the students were defined as poor quality sleepers, 30.6% suffering excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and 81.6% were categorized as individuals with 'definitely eveningness', defined as people who are definitely most alert in the late evening hours and prefer to go to bed late. There were no significant gender differences in sleep quality, 'chronotype' and EDS. Although there was no association of sleep quality and EDS with cumulative Grade Point Average (cGPA) and class skipping, EDS was associated with the tendency to fall asleep in class. Body Mass Index (BMI) was not associated with total sleep, PSQI, ESS and MES scores. Meanwhile, high-calorie food craving was associated with sleep duration, PSQI and ESS, but not MES. In conclusion, poor sleep behavior among Malaysian tertiary students in this study was not associated with gender, academic performance and BMI, but was associated with craving of high-calorie foods instead.

  3. Administrative skills for academic physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluise, J J; Scmitz, C C; Bland, C J; McArtor, R E

    1989-01-01

    To function effectively within the multifaceted environment of the academic medical center, academic physicians need to heighten their understanding of the economics of the health care system, and further develop their leadership and managerial skills. A literature base on organizational development and management education now exists that addresses the unique nature of the professional organization, including academic medical centers. This article describes an administration development curriculum for academic physicians. Competency statements, instructional strategies and references provide the academic physician with guidelines for expanding their professional expertise to include organizational and management skills. The continuing success of the academic medical center as a responsive health care system may depend upon the degree to which academic physicians gain sophistication in self-management and organizational administration.

  4. Parametrics in Urban Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai; Obeling, Esben

    2013-01-01

    The design of urban space has always been contested. Whether imposed by autocratic rulers, emerged as a result of market forces, or implemented as a result of democratic planning processes, urban space design shapes the lives of urban dwellers. Yet rarely does the average urban dweller have any r...... implementation by means of CityEngine is given and discussed with respect to it pros and cons. And finally, the potential implications of this approach are touched as an outline for further research....

  5. The Urbanism of Material

    OpenAIRE

    LAURA MARY HARPER

    2018-01-01

    This thesis investigates how the urban environment is constructed over time. The aim of this research is to understand the relationship between the decisions, logic and methods used at the scale of an individual site to the wider organisation and form of the urban environment. The thesis draws on the concept of bottom up systems to investigate ideas of collective organisation and characteristics in the urban environment. Using a series of architectural and urban case studies in Melbourne and ...

  6. New urban theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Bo

    2002-01-01

    Concept of urbanity, urban theory a short overview, Johan Asplund, William Whyte, Henri Lefebvre, Richard Serenelt, Bill Hillrer and Spree Syntax Analyses. Forelæsningsnoter til kursus 3.314 i 2001 og 3.308 i 2002.......Concept of urbanity, urban theory a short overview, Johan Asplund, William Whyte, Henri Lefebvre, Richard Serenelt, Bill Hillrer and Spree Syntax Analyses. Forelæsningsnoter til kursus 3.314 i 2001 og 3.308 i 2002....

  7. the urban jungle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the most significant problems facing urban communities today is the ... attempts to address such an ethic. THE URBAN ... (a) picture building; (b) problem solving; and (c) action taking. ... need to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The urban ... environment is regarded as important by the school, and ...

  8. China's Urban Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, Clifton

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that Chinese urbanization is proceeding rapidly in step with population growth and a structural shift in employment patterns. Discusses governmental policies and economic reforms that enhance the urbanization process. Describes four extended metropolitan areas and maintains they will be the models for future urbanization. (CFR)

  9. Housing consumption and urbanization

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Gracia, Nancy; Young, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Rapid urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa places immense pressure on urban services to meet the needs of the burgeoning urban population. Although several country- or city-level reports offer insight into the housing challenges of specific places, little is known about regional patterns affecting housing markets. This lack of clear knowledge on the relative importance of the factors influen...

  10. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    . The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...

  11. Urban development in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, Steven; Garretsen, J.H.; van Marrewijk, J.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Urbanization is important for economic development. As the largest country in the world in terms of population, China has experienced a remarkable history of urbanization; one 1000 years ago it housed the largest cities in world, it went through a counter-urbanization revolution during the Mao

  12. Relationship between physical fitness and academic performance in South African children

    OpenAIRE

    Du Toit, Dorita; Pienaar, Anita Elizabeth; Truter, Leani

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between physical fitness and academic achievement in an urban South African group of primary school children. A one-way cross-sectional design was used to assess physical fitness of children 9 to12 years (N=212) by means of the Fitnessgram, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency II, percentage body fat and Body Mass Index (BMI). Average end-of-the-year academic marks served as measurement of academic achievement. Relationships...

  13. FINANCING PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS OF ACADEMIC EDUCATION IN SPAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRĂGUŞIN CRISTINA-PETRINA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Spanish universities meet the educational needs of the students with a wide offer of courses and the opportunity to study at all levels. They appear as an attractive option in the context of the relatively low cost of living compared to other countries in the EU area and under conditions of a tax system controlled by the Government. Starting from the assumption that the financing model of the academic education public institutions represents the foundation of their modernization in the current society based on changes and evolution, in this paper we propose to bring into the light of the concerns of those who are interested, through a persuasive exhibit, the Spanish model and its specific features. To this end, our debate will begin with a description of the Spanish system of academic education under the decentralized model of financing imprint, continuing with the presentation of specific skills in terms of funding on the triptych template: state - autonomous communities - universities. Subsequently, our investigative approach will focus on detailing the tertiary education financing sources: public resources, private and patrimonial revenues. The end of our presentation will be intended for conclusions, through which we aim to advance our vision regarding the investigated problems. In fact, the paper is intended to be a precursor step in carrying out a comparative study between the academic education funding mechanism in Romania and the Spanish one.

  14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL TERTIARY EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciumas Cristina

    2013-07-01

    teaching and research process, greater mobility among teachers and students and last but not least, scientific and academic recognition worldwide. However, these reforms, even if they are creating value in an initial stage, over the long term can negatively affect the social situation of the country.

  15. Urban Renewal as an Urban Hegemony Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönül İÇLİ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an organic relationship between capitalism and urban space. Thisrelationship is a dynamic one which reproduces and renovates itself constantlyaccording to the conjuncture of each period and which evolves / changes inparallel with the necessities and rationalities of capital accumulation in historicalprocess. Therefore, neither reproduction of capitalist urban space with the regimeof capital accumulation nor the process of restructuring following a crisis in theregime of capital accumulation with spatial organization of capitalism can becompared independently. Today, in the concrete phase that capitalism hasreached, urban space has become one of the most important parts of direct capitalaccumulation under the hegemony of financial capital. In this context, urbantransformation projects and various strategies ofthe process becomes significantwith the instrumentalization of space by capital rationality. However, this processcarries the internal paradoxes of capitalism into the urban space at the same time,and cities, competing as candidates to be financial centres where the capital hasintensified and centralized, also transforms into spaces of violent socialpolarization. At this point, especially the reformation of squatter settlements has astrategic importance in the process of urban transformation and there are attemptsto attach the urban poor, who are the addressee of the process, under a widerurban hegemony project with the strategy of urban renovation.

  16. Urban Space as the Commons - New Modes for Urban Space Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrejicka, Vladimir; Finka, Maros; Husar, Milan; Jamecny, Lubomir

    2017-12-01

    The significant growing of urban population, globalization of social-ecological systems, fuzzification of spatial structures, the diversity of actors in spatial development, their power and interest in using the resources including space, especially in high-density urban areas. Spatial development is connected with a high concentration of economic activities and population in urban systems. In many cases very rapid processes of urbanization and suburbanization approach natural spatial/territorial limits, such as carrying capacity of land, transport and infrastructural systems, absorption capacities of recipients and others [1]. Growing shortage of space and problems in their accessibility (physical, functional, etc.) leads to growing tension and conflicts among the actors/users of urban spaces and represent the initial phase of space deprivations processes. There is a parallel with “tragedy of commons” as defined by Hardin [2] and was reinterpreted by many other academics and researchers. Urban space can be clearly interpreted as the commons or commons good for their community of users and relevant actors, so innovative governance modes overlapping defined “tragedy of commons” representing a possible approach for a new concept of urban public spaces management. This paper presents a possible new approach to the management of urban spaces reflecting the current challenges in spatial development based on the theory of commons and innovative governance modes. The new approach is built on innovations in institutional regimes, the algorithm of decision-making and economic expression and interpretation of quality of the space. The theory of the commons as the base source for this approach has been broadly proved in practice and Elinor Ostrom as the author of this theory [3-5] was awarded by Nobel Prize in 2009.

  17. Academic workload management towards learning, components of academic work

    OpenAIRE

    Ocvirk, Aleksandra; Trunk Širca, Nada

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with attributing time value to academic workload from the point of view of an HEI, management of teaching and an individual. We have conducted a qualitative study aimed at analysing documents on academic workload in terms of its definition, and at analysing the attribution of time value to components of academic work in relation to the proportion of workload devoted to teaching in the sense of ensuring quality and effectiveness of learning, and in relation to financial implic...

  18. Montane pollen from the Tertiary of NW. Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, J.

    1966-01-01

    In NW. Borneo thick series of Tertiary sediments occur which are rich in fossil pollen and spores. The majority of these plant microfossils were derived from the various types of tropical lowland vegetation such as mangrove (Muller, 1964), mixed peat swamp forest and mixed Dipterocarp forest. Some

  19. Adults Studying Pure Mathematics in Adult Tertiary Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennison, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the experiences of a group of adults enrolled in the Pure Mathematics module of the Certificate IV in Adult Tertiary Preparation in 2000 at one of the Institutes of TAFE in Brisbane, Australia. Classroom learning experiences, exposure to technology, and the impact of returning to study on other facets of students' lives were…

  20. Indications for and outcomes of tertiary referrals in refractive surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patryn, Eliza K.; Vrijman, Violette; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    To review the spectrum of disease, symptomatology, and management offered to patients referred for a second opinion after refractive surgery. A prospective cohort study was done on all patients referred from October 1, 2006, to September 30, 2011, to a tertiary eye clinic after refractive surgery of

  1. Knowledge and perception of plastic surgery among tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-16

    Oct 16, 2015 ... tertiary education students in Enugu, South‑East. Nigeria. CM Isiguzo ..... This finding should be a motivation for plastic surgeons who have private ... population of this country some of whom travel abroad to source for these ...

  2. Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs: A Comparison of Tertiary and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To compare the quality of antihypertensive prescriptions at 2 different health care levels in a hypertensive Nigerian population.We carried out a retrospective comparative analysis of the quality and pattern of antihypertensive and low-dose aspirin prescription in a tertiary and two secondary health care institutions providing ...

  3. Improving listening skills of tertiary level students for effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Listening is essential to the leaming process. Students in tertiary institutions of learning need to acquire effective listening and note-taking skiils in order to benefit from lectures. This paper focused on factors militating against effective listening during lectures such as poor rate of presentation, poor communication skills, ...

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and infection control practices of two tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... This study assessed the effects of the implementation of the policy in a tertiary hospital in Port Harcourt, ... malpractice suit in developing countries, not only for the ... Infection control policy has however been shown to reduce the burden of ..... SSIs‑activities that mirror the plan‑do‑check‑act that is applied in ...

  5. Counselling for Sustainable Peace in Tertiary Institutions in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduka-Ozo, Stella Ngozi

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed the nature of peace in Tertiary Institutions in Nigeria using Ebonyi State University as a case study. The purpose of the study was to review the various factors responsible for lack of peace. The sample was drawn from the three hundred level students of the Faculty of Education. Thirty students were selected from each of the…

  6. Food Insecurity: Is It an Issue among Tertiary Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Danielle; Ramsey, Rebecca; Ong, Kai Wen

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient access to food is known to compromise tertiary studies. Students often belong to groups known to have poor food security such as those renting or relying on government payments. The present study administered a cross-sectional survey incorporating the USDA food security survey module (FSSM) to 810 students at a metropolitan university…

  7. Sexual behaviours of undergraduates of tertiary institutions in Kwara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study also examined whether or not variables of gender and school type had significant influence on the sexual behaviours of undergraduates of tertiary ... the school counsellors and teachers should provide guidance to students on developmental challenges and help youths to abstain from risky sexual behaviours.

  8. Tertiary Institutions, Entrepreneurship Education and Youth Empowerment in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasunkanmi, Abari Ayodeji; Olufunke, Oyetola Idowu; Adetayo, Okunuga Adedapo

    2013-01-01

    Entrepreneurship Education has recently become a global phenomenon in the development of world youths for self employment and self-reliance. The Nigerian nation cannot afford to be left out and left behind in this new trend in education both at the secondary and tertiary levels. However, while the Universal Basic Education (UBE) curriculum has…

  9. Epilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Jarlath; Delanty, Norman; Normand, Charles; Coyne, Imelda; McQuaid, Louise; Collins, Claire; Boland, Michael; Grimson, Jane; Fitzsimons, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease affecting people of every age, gender, race and socio-economic background. The diagnosis and optimal management relies on contribution from a number of healthcare disciplines in a variety of healthcare settings. To explore the interface between primary care and specialist epilepsy services in Ireland. Using appreciative inquiry, focus groups were held with healthcare professionals (n=33) from both primary and tertiary epilepsy specialist services in Ireland. There are significant challenges to delivering a consistent high standard of epilepsy care in Ireland. The barriers that were identified are: the stigma of epilepsy, unequal access to care services, insufficient human resources, unclear communication between primary-tertiary services and lack of knowledge. Improving the management of people with epilepsy requires reconfiguration of the primary-tertiary interface and establishing clearly defined roles and formalised clinical pathways. Such initiatives require resources in the form of further education and training and increased usage of information communication technology (ICT). Epilepsy services across the primary-tertiary interface can be significantly enhanced through the implementation of a shared model of care underpinned by an electronic patient record (EPR) system and information communication technology (ICT). Better chronic disease management has the potential to halt the progression of epilepsy with ensuing benefits for patients and the healthcare system. Copyright 2009 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relevance of Donation to Special Federal Tertiary Institution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While structured and open-ended interview and relevant documents, including gift and donation files, acquisition records and library accession registers were used to collect data for the study. The population of the study consisted of the Special Federal Tertiary Institution Libraries under study while the subjects of the study ...

  11. Epidemiology of paediatric poisoning reporting to a tertiary hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2007 to January 2012 at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, a tertiary hospital in Ghana. Results. Poisoning is a significant health problem in the study area. A total of 253 children reported to the hospital with poisoning over the 61month period, with an average ...

  12. Noble metals in cretaceous/tertiary sediments from El Kef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuslys, M.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    1983-01-01

    Sediments from El Kef, Tunisia, were analysed by RNAA for Au, Ir and Os. All three elements show a 10-20 fold enrichment at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. This enrichment must be the result of the addition of material with a high concentration of noble metals. It is plausible that this exotic material has an extra-terrestrial origin. (orig.)

  13. Noble metals in Cretaceous/Tertiary sediments from El Kef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuslys, M.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    1983-01-01

    Sediments from El Kef, Tunisia, were analysed by RNAA for Au, Ir and Os. All three elements show a 10-20 fold enrichment at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. This enrichment must be the result of the addition of material with a high concentration of noble metals. It is plausible that this exotic material has an extraterrestrial origin. (orig.)

  14. Initial Educational Experiences of Tertiary Students. LSAY Briefing Number 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Kylie

    2008-01-01

    This "Briefing" presents information about the initial tertiary education experiences, such as satisfaction with aspects of student life and changes to initial enrolments, of two groups of young people, based on two recent Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) research reports. One study focused on the first year experiences of…

  15. Hand hygiene amongst dental professionals in a tertiary dental clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate hand washing attitude and practices among Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in a Nigerian Tertiary Dental Clinic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in University of Benin Teaching Hospital was conducted between February ...

  16. Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary care hospital in Mangalore Karnataka, India. ... Conclusions: Self‑care practices were found to be unsatisfactory in almost all aspects except for blood sugar monitoring and treatment adherence. As these practices are essential for prevention of ...

  17. Accountability of Tertiary Education at the National Level: A Chimera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alan; O'Byrne, Garry

    1979-01-01

    The concept of accountability and its application to Australian higher education are discussed. It is suggested that due to political, financial, and educational characteristics of tertiary education at the national system level there are fundamental and insoluble problems associated with achieving accountability. (SF)

  18. An audit of colorectal cancer histopathology reports in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To audit the completeness of histopathologic reports of Colorectal Cancer for prognostic information in a tertiary care hospital in the light of the minimum reporting standards for colorectal cancer resections recently proposed for use in Nigeria. Material and Methods: Twenty–five histopathology reports of colorectal ...

  19. Maternal mortality audit in a tertiary health institution in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Nigeria has the second highest number of maternal deaths in the world.The study aimed at determining the causes of and non-obstetric contributors to maternal mortality at a tertiary referral hospital. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective audit of all consecutive maternal deaths in the hospital over a ...

  20. Drug Production in Tertiary Health Institutions – Needs, Constraints ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of questionnaires was employed in the study covering all pharmacists in the pharmaceutical services department, pharmacy technicians and quality control technologist in the drug production unit of the hospital. It was unanimously agreed by the respondents that local drug production was necessary in tertiary ...

  1. Omalizumab use during pregnancy for CIU: a tertiary care experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo-Pardo, L; Barcena-Blanch, M; Radojicic, C

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of antihistamine and steroid resistant Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIU) during pregnancy poses a challenge due to teratogenicity of immunosuppressants. Omalizumab is a recently FDA approved therapy for CIU and is classified as pregnancy category B. We present an initial series of subjects treated at a tertiary care center for antihistamine and steroid resistant CIU with omalizumab who became pregnant during therapy.

  2. A sequence of events across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.; Romein, A.J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The lithological and biological sequence of events across the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T), as developed in thick and complete landbased sections and termed the standard K/T event sequence, is also found in many DSDP cores from all over the globe. Microtektite-like spherules have been found in

  3. Ectopic pregnancy experience in a tertiary health facility in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ectopic pregnancy is a life-threatening gynecological emergency, and a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. Objective: To determine the incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors and management outcomes of ectopic pregnancies in a tertiary health facility. Methods: A retrospective ...

  4. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  5. Effectiveness of Using Games in Tertiary-Level Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afari, Ernest; Aldridge, Jill M.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of games when used in tertiary-level mathematics classes in the United Arab Emirates. Our study incorporated a mixed-method approach that involved surveys (to assess students' perceptions of the learning environment and attitudes towards mathematics), interviews, observations of…

  6. Obesity and associated factors in young adults attending tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obesity and associated factors in young adults attending tertiary institutions ... and associated factors in a group of university undergraduates in south-east Nigeria. ... being a female (X2 = 47.91), first year student (X2 = 41.82), and having high ...

  7. Outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Providencia rettgeri in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is often plasmid mediated, necessitating stringent infection control practices. We describe an outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Providencia rettgeri involving 4 patients admitted to intensive care and high-care units at a tertiary hospital. Clinical and demographic characteristics ...

  8. Tertiary Educational Institutions for Teaching, Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoo, Sikiru A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the quality of teaching and research in developing human resources to facilitate the development of tertiary education in the nation. It discusses the challenges and the roles of research in higher education. The author argues that the combination of content and pedagogical knowledge could help to develop human resources for…

  9. Motivation in vocational education: a reform issue in tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Working in a non-motivating environment is a nagging issue in various tertiary institutions in Cross River State .This dampens staff morale a great deal. However, the provision of motivation in work places will be a great boost to staff morale especially in Vocational Education. This paper discusses the meaning of motivation, ...

  10. Patient satisfaction in neurological second opinions and tertiary referrals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, D.; Wieske, L.; Vergouwen, M. D. I.; Richard, E.; Stam, J.; Smets, E. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of neurological second opinions (SOs) and tertiary referrals (TRs) is increasing, only little is known about expectations and patient satisfaction in this group of patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore expectations of patients who get a neurological SO or

  11. Fuego Volcano eruption (Guatemala, 1974): evidence of a tertiary fragmentation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenes-Andre, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Values for mode and dispersion calculated from SFT were analyzed using the SFT (Sequential Fragmentation/Transport) model to Fuego Volcano eruption (Guatemala, 1974). Analysis results have showed that the ideas initially proposed for Irazu, can be applied to Fuego Volcano. Experimental evidence was found corroborating the existence of tertiary fragmentations. (author) [es

  12. Sexual harassment in tertiary institutions: A comparative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Janice

    2015-01-01

    Sexual harassment is not a new phenomenon in tertiary institutions. It has been receiving considerable attention in research and the media and public awareness has increased dramatically. However, the term sexual harassment is not used uniformly across the globe because countries have defined it differently. Consequently, prevalence of sexual harassment in education varies across cultures. This paper examines sexual harassment from a comparative perspective...

  13. The Equity Imperative in Tertiary Education: Promoting Fairness and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil; Bassett, Roberta Malee

    2014-01-01

    While the share of the tertiary education age cohort (19-25) which is being given the opportunity to study has increased worldwide over the past two decades, this does not in fact translate into reduced inequality. For many young people, especially in the developing world, major obstacles such as disparities in terms of gender, minority population…

  14. Constructing Knowledge Societies: New Challenges for Tertiary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil

    2003-01-01

    The principal set of challenges facing tertiary education today is that set which links it to the construction of knowledge societies. Governments, the private sector, and the World Bank have specific tasks to perform in meeting these challenges. Countries--depending upon whether or not they are transition economies, low-income countries, or small…

  15. Induction of secondary and tertiary lymphoid structures in the skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cupedo, T.; Jansen, W.; Kraal, G.; Mebius, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    During embryogenesis a developmental program leading to the formation of lymph nodes and Peyer's patches is initiated. We now show that lymph node-like structures as well as tertiary lymphoid structures can ectopically be induced by intradermal injection of newborn lymph node-derived cells.

  16. Patterns of Eye Diseases in Children Visiting a Tertiary Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: About 19 million children worldwide live with visual impairments resulting from different ocular morbidities. This study aimed to identify the different causes of eye diseases in children visiting a tertiary eye centre at Jimma University Hospital. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of charts of patients of ...

  17. PASS Student Leader and Mentor Roles: A Tertiary Leadership Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalicky, Jane; Caney, Annaliese

    2010-01-01

    In relation to developing leadership skills during tertiary studies, this paper considers the leadership pathway afforded by a Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) program which includes the traditional PASS Leader role and a more senior PASS Mentor role. Data was collected using a structured survey with open-ended questions designed to capture the…

  18. Anti Diabetic Drug Utilization by Elderly Patients in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is intended to determine the pattern and rational use of drugs in the elderly diabetic patients in a tertiary health care facility in Western Nigeria. ... Metformin was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication for the patients followed by glimepiride (52.8%) (highest within age 50-59 years) and then ...

  19. Automated Stock Control System for Bookshops in Tertiary Institutions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recent need for automated stock control system for bookshops in tertiary institutions was generated by unequal availability of books and stiff scarcity of books in some areas while in ... This approach provides for faster response times for users because the database is local to each business unit within the organization.

  20. Assessment Quality in Tertiary Education: An Integrative Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen-van Leeuwenkamp, Karin; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kester, Liesbeth

    2018-01-01

    In tertiary education, inferior assessment quality is a problem that has serious consequences for students, teachers, government, and society. A lack of a clear and overarching conceptualization of assessment quality can cause difficulties in guaranteeing assessment quality in practice. Thus, the