WorldWideScience

Sample records for tertiary storage organization

  1. Tertiary lymphoid organs in Takayasu Arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Marc eClement; Marc eClement; Adrien eGaly; Patrick eBruneval; Marion eMorvan; Fabien eHyafil; Fabien eHyafil; Khadija eBenali; Nicoletta ePasi; Lydia eDeschamps; Quentin ePellenc; Quentin ePellenc; Thomas ePapo; Antonino eNicoletti; Antonino eNicoletti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA) is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) in the aortic wall of TA patients.Methods: Hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21), and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune cells from t...

  2. Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Takayasu Arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Marc; Galy, Adrien; Bruneval, Patrick; Morvan, Marion; Hyafil, Fabien; Benali, Khadija; Pasi, Nicoletta; Deschamps, Lydia; Pellenc, Quentin; Papo, Thomas; Nicoletti, Antonino; Sacre, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA) is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) in the aortic wall of TA patients. Methods Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21), and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune ce...

  3. Tertiary lymphoid organs in Takayasu Arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eClement

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in the aortic wall of TA patients.Methods: Hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20, follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21, and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune cells from the adventitial layer of one patient were characterized by flow cytometry. Demographic, medical history, laboratory, imaging, treatment and follow up data were extracted from medical records.Results: Aorta specimens from Bentall procedures were available from 7 patients (five female, aged 22 to 57 years with TA. Surgical treatment was performed at TA diagnosis (n=4 or at a median of 108 months [84-156] after TA diagnosis. Disease was active at surgery in four patients according to NIH score. B cell aggregates-TLOs containing HEVs were observed in the adventitia of all but one patient.. Of note, ectopic follicles containing CD21+ FDCs were found in all patients (4/4 with increased aortic FDG uptake before surgery but were absent in all but one patients (2/3 with no FDG uptake. In addition, flow cytometry analysis confirmed the accumulation of memory/germinal center–like B cells in the adventitial layer and showed the presence of antigen-experienced T follicular helper cells.Conclusion: Ectopic lymphoid neogenesis displaying functional features can be found in the aortic wall of a subset of patients with active TA. The function of these local B cell clusters on the pathogenesis of TA remains to be elucidated.

  4. Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Takayasu Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Marc; Galy, Adrien; Bruneval, Patrick; Morvan, Marion; Hyafil, Fabien; Benali, Khadija; Pasi, Nicoletta; Deschamps, Lydia; Pellenc, Quentin; Papo, Thomas; Nicoletti, Antonino; Sacre, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of Takayasu arteritis (TA) is controversial. We aimed to study the presence of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) in the aortic wall of TA patients. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from aorta specimens from patients with TA were screened for TLOs. The presence of B cell aggregates (CD20), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, CD21), and high endothelial venules (HEVs, PNAd) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immune cells from the adventitial layer of one patient were characterized by flow cytometry. Demographic, medical history, laboratory, imaging, treatment, and follow-up data were extracted from medical records. Aorta specimens from Bentall procedures were available from seven patients (5 females, aged 22-57 years) with TA. Surgical treatment was performed at TA diagnosis (n = 4) or at a median of 108 months (84-156) after TA diagnosis. Disease was active at surgery in four patients according to NIH score. B cell aggregates-TLOs containing HEVs were observed in the adventitia of all but one patient. Of note, ectopic follicles containing CD21(+) FDCs were found in all patients (4/4) with increased aortic (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake before surgery but were absent in all but one patients (2/3) with no FDG uptake. In addition, flow cytometry analysis confirmed the accumulation of memory/germinal center-like B cells in the adventitial layer and showed the presence of antigen-experienced T follicular helper cells. Ectopic lymphoid neogenesis displaying functional features can be found in the aortic wall of a subset of patients with active TA. The function of these local B cell clusters on the pathogenesis of TA remains to be elucidated.

  5. Fair-share scheduling algorithm for a tertiary storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakl, Pavel; Sumbera, Michal; Lauret, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Any experiment facing Peta bytes scale problems is in need for a highly scalable mass storage system (MSS) to keep a permanent copy of their valuable data. But beyond the permanent storage aspects, the sheer amount of data makes complete data-set availability onto live storage (centralized or aggregated space such as the one provided by Scalla/Xrootd) cost prohibitive implying that a dynamic population from MSS to faster storage is needed. One of the most challenging aspects of dealing with MSS is the robotic tape component. If a robotic system is used as the primary storage solution, the intrinsically long access times (latencies) can dramatically affect the overall performance. To speed the retrieval of such data, one could organize the requests according to criterion with an aim to deliver maximal data throughput. However, such approaches are often orthogonal to fair resource allocation and a trade-off between quality of service, responsiveness and throughput is necessary for achieving an optimal and practical implementation of a truly faire-share oriented file restore policy. Starting from an explanation of the key criterion of such a policy, we will present evaluations and comparisons of three different MSS file restoration algorithms which meet fair-share requirements, and discuss their respective merits. We will quantify their impact on a typical file restoration cycle for the RHIC/STAR experimental setup and this, within a development, analysis and production environment relying on a shared MSS service [1].

  6. Storage facilities for radioactive waste in tertiary education environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, G.; Benke, G.

    1994-01-01

    The research and teaching endeavors of the university environment generate an assortment of radioactive waste that is unique in the range of isotopes and activities present, although the physical quantities of the waste may not be large. Universities may also be subject to unexpected, close public scrutiny of their operations due to the diverse nature of the university campus. This is rarely the case for other generators of radioactive waste. The experience of Monash University in formulating solutions for long term storage of radioactive waste is examined with respect to design, location and administration of the waste stores that were finally constructed. 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  7. Metal–organic frameworks for hydrogen storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has received increasing attention worldwide because they possess versatile structures, high surface areas, large free volumes, ultrahigh porosities, and tunable pore...

  8. Methane storage in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yabing; Zhou, Wei; Qian, Guodong; Chen, Banglin

    2014-08-21

    Natural gas (NG), whose main component is methane, is an attractive fuel for vehicular applications. Realization of safe, cheap and convenient means and materials for high-capacity methane storage can significantly facilitate the implementation of natural gas fuelled vehicles. The physisorption based process involving porous materials offers an efficient storage methodology and the emerging porous metal-organic frameworks have been explored as potential candidates because of their extraordinarily high porosities, tunable pore/cage sizes and easily immobilized functional sites. In this view, we provide an overview of the current status of metal-organic frameworks for methane storage.

  9. Organic Carbon Storage in China's Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuqing; Zhu, Chao; Zhou, Decheng; Huang, Dian; Werner, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    China has been experiencing rapid urbanization in parallel with its economic boom over the past three decades. To date, the organic carbon storage in China's urban areas has not been quantified. Here, using data compiled from literature review and statistical yearbooks, we estimated that total carbon storage in China's urban areas was 577±60 Tg C (1 Tg  = 1012 g) in 2006. Soil was the largest contributor to total carbon storage (56%), followed by buildings (36%), and vegetation (7%), while carbon storage in humans was relatively small (1%). The carbon density in China's urban areas was 17.1±1.8 kg C m−2, about two times the national average of all lands. The most sensitive variable in estimating urban carbon storage was urban area. Examining urban carbon storages over a wide range of spatial extents in China and in the United States, we found a strong linear relationship between total urban carbon storage and total urban area, with a specific urban carbon storage of 16 Tg C for every 1,000 km2 urban area. This value might be useful for estimating urban carbon storage at regional to global scales. Our results also showed that the fraction of carbon storage in urban green spaces was still much lower in China relative to western countries, suggesting a great potential to mitigate climate change through urban greening and green spaces management in China. PMID:23991014

  10. Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Central Nervous System Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Mitsdoerffer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS, which results in permanent neuronal damage and substantial disability in patients. Autoreactive T cells are important drivers of the disease, however, the efficacy of B cell depleting therapies uncovered an essential role for B cells in disease pathogenesis. They can contribute to inflammatory processes via presentation of autoantigen, secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and production of pathogenic antibodies. Recently, B cell aggregates reminiscent of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs were discovered in the meninges of MS patients, leading to the hypothesis that differentiation and maturation of autopathogenic B and T cells may partly occur inside the CNS. Since these structures were associated with a more severe disease course, it is extremely important to gain insight into the mechanism of induction, their precise function and clinical significance. Mechanistic studies in patiens are limited. However, a few studies in the MS animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE recapitulate TLO formation in the CNS and provide new insight into CNS TLO features, formation and function. This review summarizes what we know so far about CNS TLOs in MS and what we have learned about them from EAE models. It also highlights the areas that are in need of further experimental work, as we are just beginning to understand and evaluate the phenomenon of CNS TLOs.

  11. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The design and characterization of new materials for hydrogen storage is an important area of research, as the ability to store hydrogen at lower pressures and higher temperatures than currently feasible would lower operating costs for small hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In particular, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent promising materials for use in storing hydrogen in this capacity. MOFs are highly porous, three-dimensional crystalline solids that are formed via linkages between metal ions (e.g., iron, nickel, and zinc) and organic molecules. MOFs can store hydrogen via strong adsorptive interactions between the gas molecules and the pores of the framework, providing a high surface area for gas adsorption and thus the opportunity to store hydrogen at significantly lower pressures than with current technologies. By lowering the energy required for hydrogen storage, these materials hold promise in rendering hydrogen a more viable fuel for motor vehicles, which is a highly desirable outcome given the clean nature of hydrogen fuel cells (water is the only byproduct of combustion) and the current state of global climate change resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. The work presented in this report is the result of collaborative efforts between researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and General Motors Corporation (GM) to discover novel MOFs promising for H2 storage and characterize their properties. Described herein are several new framework systems with improved gravimetric and volumetric capacity to strongly bind H2 at temperatures relevant for vehicle storage. These materials were rigorously characterized using neutron diffraction, to determine the precise binding locations of hydrogen within the frameworks, and high-pressure H2 adsorption measurements, to provide a comprehensive picture of H2 adsorption at all relevant pressures. A

  12. Symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse: Experience at a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    information was recorded after a detailed history, physical examination and completion of a self-administered symptom questionnaire. ... due to anatomical restoration of prolapse in ..... of terminology of female pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic.

  13. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  14. Identification of novel genes associated with renal tertiary lymphoid organ formation in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Caputo, Christina R; Noordmans, Gerda A; Yazdani, Saleh; Monteiro, Luiz Henrique; van den Born, Jaap; van Goor, Harry; Heeringa, Peter; Korstanje, Ron; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of aging-related organ deterioration is a dysregulated immune response characterized by pathologic leukocyte infiltration of affected tissues. Mechanisms and genes involved are as yet unknown. To identify genes associated with aging-related renal infiltration, we analyzed kidneys from aged mice (≥20 strains) for infiltrating leukocytes followed by Haplotype Association Mapping (HAM) analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed CD45+ cell clusters (predominantly T and B cells) in perivascular areas coinciding with PNAd+ high endothelial venules and podoplanin+ lymph vessels indicative of tertiary lymphoid organs. Cumulative cluster size increased with age (analyzed at 6, 12 and 20 months). Based on the presence or absence of clusters in male and female mice at 20 months, HAM analysis revealed significant associations with loci on Chr1, Chr2, Chr8 and Chr14 in male mice, and with loci on Chr4, Chr7, Chr13 and Chr14 in female mice. Wisp2 (Chr2) showed the strongest association (P = 5.00×10(-137)) in male mice; Ctnnbip1 (P = 6.42×10(-267)) and Tnfrsf8 (P = 5.42×10(-245)) (both on Chr4) showed the strongest association in female mice. Both Wisp2 and Ctnnbip1 are part of the Wnt-signaling pathway and the encoded proteins were expressed within the tertiary lymphoid organs. In conclusion, this study revealed differential lymphocytic infiltration and tertiary lymphoid organ formation in aged mouse kidneys across different inbred mouse strains. HAM analysis identified candidate genes involved in the Wnt-signaling pathway that may be causally linked to tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

  15. The roles of tertiary amine structure, background organic matter and chloramine species on NDMA formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Kim, Daekyun; Ates, Nuray; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-02-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a probable human carcinogen, is a disinfection by-product that has been detected in chloraminated and chlorinated drinking waters and wastewaters. Formation mechanisms and precursors of NDMA are still not well understood. The main objectives of this study were to systematically investigate (i) the effect of tertiary amine structure, (ii) the effect of background natural organic matter (NOM), and (iii) the roles of mono vs. dichloramine species on the NDMA formation. Dimethylamine (DMA) and 20 different tertiary aliphatic and aromatic amines were carefully examined based on their functional groups attached to the basic DMA structure. The wide range (0.02-83.9%) of observed NDMA yields indicated the importance of the structure of tertiary amines, and both stability and electron distribution of the leaving group of tertiary amines on NDMA formation. DMA associated with branched alkyl groups or benzyl like structures having only one carbon between the ring and DMA structure consistently gave higher NDMA yields. Compounds with electron withdrawing groups (EWG) reacted preferentially with monochloramine, whereas compounds with electron donating group (EDG) showed tendency to react with dichloramine to form NDMA. When the selected amines were present in NOM solutions, NDMA formation increased for compounds with EWG while decreased for compounds with EDG. This impact was attributed to the competitions between NOM and amines for chloramine species. The results provided additional information to the commonly accepted mechanism for NDMA formation including chloramine species reacting with tertiary amines and the role of the leaving group on overall NDMA conversion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal organic frameworks for gas storage

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2016-06-09

    Embodiments provide a method of storing a compound using a metal organic framework (MOF). The method includes contacting one or more MOFs with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as O2 and CH4. O2 and CH4 can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF, wherein M can include aluminum, iron, gallium, indium, vanadium, chromium, titanium, or scandium.

  17. Hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for hydrogen storage have continued to receive intense interest over the past decade. MOFs are a class of organic-inorganic hybrid crystalline materials consisting of metallic moieties that are linked by strong...

  18. Metal organic frameworks for gas storage

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments provide a method of storing a compound using a metal organic framework (MOF). The method includes contacting one or more MOFs with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as O2 and CH4. O2 and CH4 can be sorbed simultaneously

  19. Organic petrological and organic geochemical characterisation of the Tertiary coal-bearing sequence of Batu Arang, Selangor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Hasiah, Abdullah; Abolins, Peter

    1998-08-01

    The Tertiary coal-bearing sequence at Batu Arang in Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia consists of a sandstone-coal-oil shale facies assemblage. A detailed organic petrological and organic geochemical study was carried out on several organic-rich sediments from this sequence. The oil shales are dominated by Botryococcus-derived telalginite and Pediastrum-derived lamalginite. The coals, hypautochthonous in origin, are mainly duroclarite-type, although other minor microlithotypes also occur. Alginite is not observed in the coals, but other liptinitic constituents are very common, particularly thin-walled cutinite and sporinite. The oil shales and the coals are thermally immature. This immaturity has a considerable influence on the biomarker distributions, particularly so on the triterpanes which are dominated by C 31αβ 22R and C 30ββ compounds. Interestingly, for Tertiary aged sediments of continental origin, the diagnostic biomarker compounds such as 18 α(H)-oleanane and bicadinanes, normally linked to the higher land plant group of angiosperms, are not observed in the samples analysed. Tricyclic terpanes occur only in very low relative abundance or are virtually absent. A clear distinction, however, in the biomarker distributions of the shales and the coals/carbargilite can be made based upon the distribution of C 27-C 29 regular steranes: the shales, with a source input being predominantly planktonic algae, are dominated by 5 α(H),14 α(H),17 α(H) 20R cholestane, while the coals/carbargilites, with a source input consisting mainly of higher plant material, are dominated by 5 α(H),14 α(H),17 α(H) 20R ethyl cholestane. The depositional environment of the Batu Arang coal-bearing sequence is interpreted as varying from an alluvial flood plain peat-swamp to fluvio-lacustrine depositional setting.

  20. Understanding Immune Cells in Tertiary Lymphoid Organ Development: It Is All Starting to Come Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth W.; Hill, David G.; Jones, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) are frequently observed in tissues affected by non-resolving inflammation as a result of infection, autoimmunity, cancer, and allograft rejection. These highly ordered structures resemble the cellular composition of lymphoid follicles typically associated with the spleen and lymph node compartments. Although TLOs within tissues show varying degrees of organization, they frequently display evidence of segregated T and B cell zones, follicular dendritic cell networks, a supporting stromal reticulum, and high endothelial venules. In this respect, they mimic the activities of germinal centers and contribute to the local control of adaptive immune responses. Studies in various disease settings have described how these structures contribute to either beneficial or deleterious outcomes. While the development and architectural organization of TLOs within inflamed tissues requires homeostatic chemokines, lymphoid and inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules, our understanding of the cells responsible for triggering these events is still evolving. Over the past 10–15 years, novel immune cell subsets have been discovered that have more recently been implicated in the control of TLO development and function. In this review, we will discuss the contribution of these cell types and consider the potential to develop new therapeutic strategies that target TLOs. PMID:27752256

  1. Building an organic block storage service at CERN with Ceph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ster, Daniel van der; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Emerging storage requirements, such as the need for block storage for both OpenStack VMs and file services like AFS and NFS, have motivated the development of a generic backend storage service for CERN IT. The goals for such a service include (a) vendor neutrality, (b) horizontal scalability with commodity hardware, (c) fault tolerance at the disk, host, and network levels, and (d) support for geo-replication. Ceph is an attractive option due to its native block device layer RBD which is built upon its scalable, reliable, and performant object storage system, RADOS. It can be considered an 'organic' storage solution because of its ability to balance and heal itself while living on an ever-changing set of heterogeneous disk servers. This work will present the outcome of a petabyte-scale test deployment of Ceph by CERN IT. We will first present the architecture and configuration of our cluster, including a summary of best practices learned from the community and discovered internally. Next the results of various functionality and performance tests will be shown: the cluster has been used as a backend block storage system for AFS and NFS servers as well as a large OpenStack cluster at CERN. Finally, we will discuss the next steps and future possibilities for Ceph at CERN.

  2. Building an organic block storage service at CERN with Ceph

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ster, Daniel; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-06-01

    Emerging storage requirements, such as the need for block storage for both OpenStack VMs and file services like AFS and NFS, have motivated the development of a generic backend storage service for CERN IT. The goals for such a service include (a) vendor neutrality, (b) horizontal scalability with commodity hardware, (c) fault tolerance at the disk, host, and network levels, and (d) support for geo-replication. Ceph is an attractive option due to its native block device layer RBD which is built upon its scalable, reliable, and performant object storage system, RADOS. It can be considered an "organic" storage solution because of its ability to balance and heal itself while living on an ever-changing set of heterogeneous disk servers. This work will present the outcome of a petabyte-scale test deployment of Ceph by CERN IT. We will first present the architecture and configuration of our cluster, including a summary of best practices learned from the community and discovered internally. Next the results of various functionality and performance tests will be shown: the cluster has been used as a backend block storage system for AFS and NFS servers as well as a large OpenStack cluster at CERN. Finally, we will discuss the next steps and future possibilities for Ceph at CERN.

  3. High Endothelial Venules and Lymphatic Vessels in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs: Characteristics, Functions, and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy H Ruddle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High endothelial venules (HEVs and lymphatic vessels (LVs are essential for the function of the immune system, by providing communication between the body and lymph nodes (LNs, specialized sites of antigen presentation and recognition. HEVs bring in naïve and central memory cells and LVs transport antigen, antigen presenting cells, and lymphocytes in and out of LNs. Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs are accumulations of lymphoid and stromal cells that arise and organize at ectopic sites in response to chronic inflammation in autoimmunity, microbial infection, graft rejection, and cancer. TLOs are distinguished from primary lymphoid organs-the thymus and bone marrow, and secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs-the LNs, spleen, and Peyer’s patches, in that they arise in response to inflammatory signals, rather than in ontogeny. TLOs usually do not have a capsule, but are rather contained within the confines of another organ. Their structure, cellular composition, chemokine expression, and vascular and stromal support resemble SLOs and are the defining aspects of TLOs. T and B cells, antigen presenting cells, fibroblast reticular cells and other stromal cells and vascular elements including HEVs and LVs are all typical components of TLOS. A key question is whether the HEVs and LVs play comparable roles and are regulated similarly to those in LNs. Data are presented that support this concept, especially with regard to TLO HEVs. Emerging data suggest that the functions and regulation of TLO LVs are also similar to those in LNs. These observations support the concept that TLOs are not merely cellular accumulations, but are functional entities that provide sites to generate effector cells, and that their HEVs and LVs are crucial elements in those activities.

  4. The rise of organic electrode materials for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Tyler B; McAllister, Bryony T; Li, Peng-Fei; Seferos, Dwight S

    2016-11-07

    Organic electrode materials are very attractive for electrochemical energy storage devices because they can be flexible, lightweight, low cost, benign to the environment, and used in a variety of device architectures. They are not mere alternatives to more traditional energy storage materials, rather, they have the potential to lead to disruptive technologies. Although organic electrode materials for energy storage have progressed in recent years, there are still significant challenges to overcome before reaching large-scale commercialization. This review provides an overview of energy storage systems as a whole, the metrics that are used to quantify the performance of electrodes, recent strategies that have been investigated to overcome the challenges associated with organic electrode materials, and the use of computational chemistry to design and study new materials and their properties. Design strategies are examined to overcome issues with capacity/capacitance, device voltage, rate capability, and cycling stability in order to guide future work in the area. The use of low cost materials is highlighted as a direction towards commercial realization.

  5. New organic materials for optics: optical storage and nonlinear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, F.

    1996-01-01

    New organic materials have received considerable attention recently, due to their easy preparation and different variety. The most application fields in optics are optical storage and nonlinear optics. In optical storage the organic dyes have been used for example, in record able and erasable compact disks (CD-R, CD-E) nonlinear optical effects, such as nonlinear optical absorption, second and third order optical absorption, second and third order optical nonlinearities, can be applied for making optical limiters, optical modulators, as well as laser second and third harmonic generations. Due to high value of optical absorption and optical nonlinearity organic materials are always used as thin films in optical integration. In this paper the new experimental results have been presented, and future development has been also discussed. (author)

  6. Refractory Hyperlactatemia with Organ Insufficiency in Lipid Storage Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanda; Zhou, Li; Liang, Weibo; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liang, Xiuling; Zhong, Nanshan; Li, Yimin

    2015-08-01

    Lipid storage myopathy is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal lipid accumulation in muscle fibers and progressive muscle weakness. Here, we report the case of a 17-year-old woman with progressive muscle weakness, refractory hyperlactatemia, and multiple organ insufficiency. Severe pneumonia was the initial diagnosis. After anti-infective treatment, fluid resuscitation, and mechanical ventilation, the patient's symptoms improved but hyperlactatemia and muscle weakness persisted. She was empirically treated with carnitine. Biochemical tests, electromyography, and muscle biopsy confirmed lipid storage myopathy. After 7 weeks of treatment, the patient resumed normal daily life. An empirical treatment with carnitine may be beneficial for patients before an accurate diagnosis of lipid storage myopathy is made.

  7. Metal organic framework MIL-101 for radioiodine capture and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Thaer; Assfour, Bassem

    2017-09-01

    we report on the use of metal organic frameworks(MOFs) for radioiodine recovery and storage. One MOF (namely MIL-101) was prepared and investigated in detail to demonstrate the iodine removal efficiency and capacity of MOFs. The typical sorption kinetics and uptake isotherms were measured using radioactive iodine (123 I) for the first time. Our measurements indicate that MOFs can capture and store radioiodine in very high efficiency and fast kinetics.

  8. Development and function of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs in the small intestine and the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Buettner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer’s patches (PP in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programmed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT. In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF. Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO. While so far it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation.

  9. Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Manuela; Lochner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer’s patches (PP) in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT). In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP) to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF). Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ) receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). While, so far, it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation. PMID

  10. Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Manuela; Lochner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer's patches (PP) in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT). In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP) to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF). Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ) receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). While, so far, it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation.

  11. Safety Climate of Ab-Initio Flying Training Organizations: The Case of an Australian Tertiary (Collegiate) Aviation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yi; Rajendran, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    A healthy safety culture is essential to the safe operation of any aviation organization, including flight schools. This study aimed to assess the safety climate of an Australian tertiary (collegiate) aviation program using a self-constructed instrument. Factor analysis of the instrument identified four safety themes, which are Safety Reporting Culture, Safety Reporting Procedure, Organizational Culture and Practice, and General Safety Knowledge. The responses of student pilots suggested that...

  12. Sustainable Materials for Sustainable Energy Storage: Organic Na Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, Viorica-Alina; Renault, Stéven; Valvo, Mario; Brandell, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we summarize research efforts to realize Na-based organic materials for novel battery chemistries. Na is a more abundant element than Li, thereby contributing to less costly materials with limited to no geopolitical constraints while organic electrode materials harvested from biomass resources provide the possibility of achieving renewable battery components with low environmental impact during processing and recycling. Together, this can form the basis for truly sustainable electrochemical energy storage. We explore the efforts made on electrode materials of organic salts, primarily carbonyl compounds but also Schiff bases, unsaturated compounds, nitroxides and polymers. Moreover, sodiated carbonaceous materials derived from biomasses and waste products are surveyed. As a conclusion to the review, some shortcomings of the currently investigated materials are highlighted together with the major limitations for future development in this field. Finally, routes to move forward in this direction are suggested. PMID:28773272

  13. Leaching of organic contaminants from storage of reclaimed asphalt pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, Malin; Strömvall, A M

    2004-03-01

    Recycling of asphalt has been promoted by rapid increases in both the use and price of petroleum-based bitumen. Semi-volatile organic compounds in leachates from reclaimed asphalt pavement, measured in field samples and in laboratory column test, were analysed through a GC/MS screen-test methodology. Sixteen PAH (polyaromatic hydrocarbons) were also analysed in leachates from the column study. The highest concentrations of semi-volatile compounds, approximately 400 microg l(-1), were measured in field samples from the scarified stockpile. Naphthalene, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) were the most dominant of the identified semi-volatiles. The occurrence of these compounds in urban groundwater, also indicate high emission rates and persistent structures of the compounds, making them potentially hazardous. Car exhausts, rubber tires and the asphalt material itself are all probable emission sources, determined from the organic contaminants released from the stockpiles. The major leaching mechanism indicated was dissolution of organic contaminants from the surface of the asphalt gravels. In the laboratory column test, the release of high-molecular weight and more toxic PAH was higher in the leachates after two years than at the commencement of storage. The concentrations of semi-volatiles in leachates, were also several times lower than those from the field stockpile. These results demonstrate the need to follow up laboratory column test with real field measurements.

  14. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  15. [Effects of climate change on forest soil organic carbon storage: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-yu; Zhang, Cheng-yi; Guo, Guang-fen

    2010-07-01

    Forest soil organic carbon is an important component of global carbon cycle, and the changes of its accumulation and decomposition directly affect terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage and global carbon balance. Climate change would affect the photosynthesis of forest vegetation and the decomposition and transformation of forest soil organic carbon, and further, affect the storage and dynamics of organic carbon in forest soils. Temperature, precipitation, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and other climatic factors all have important influences on the forest soil organic carbon storage. Understanding the effects of climate change on this storage is helpful to the scientific management of forest carbon sink, and to the feasible options for climate change mitigation. This paper summarized the research progress about the distribution of organic carbon storage in forest soils, and the effects of elevated temperature, precipitation change, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on this storage, with the further research subjects discussed.

  16. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect

  17. The potential of organic polymer-based hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Peter M; Butler, Anna; Selbie, James; Mahmood, Khalid; McKeown, Neil B; Ghanem, Bader; Msayib, Kadhum; Book, David; Walton, Allan

    2007-04-21

    The challenge of storing hydrogen at high volumetric and gravimetric density for automotive applications has prompted investigations into the potential of cryo-adsorption on the internal surface area of microporous organic polymers. A range of Polymers of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIMs) has been studied, the best PIM to date (a network-PIM incorporating a triptycene subunit) taking up 2.7% H(2) by mass at 10 bar/77 K. HyperCrosslinked Polymers (HCPs) also show promising performance as H(2) storage materials, particularly at pressures >10 bar. The N(2) and H(2) adsorption behaviour at 77 K of six PIMs and a HCP are compared. Surface areas based on Langmuir plots of H(2) adsorption at high pressure are shown to provide a useful guide to hydrogen capacity, but Langmuir plots based on low pressure data underestimate the potential H(2) uptake. The micropore distribution influences the form of the H(2) isotherm, a higher concentration of ultramicropores (pore size <0.7 nm) being associated with enhanced low pressure adsorption.

  18. Lymphoid Aggregates That Resemble Tertiary Lymphoid Organs Define a Specific Pathological Subset in Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Francesca; Hardie, Debbie L.; Matharu, Gulraj S.; Davenport, Alison J.; Martin, Richard A.; Grant, Melissa; Mosselmans, Frederick; Pynsent, Paul; Sumathi, Vaiyapuri P.; Addison, Owen; Revell, Peter A.; Buckley, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL) has been used to describe the histological lesion associated with metal-on-metal (M-M) bearings. We tested the hypothesis that the lymphoid aggregates, associated with ALVAL lesions resemble tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). Histopathological changes were examined in the periprosthetic tissue of 62 M-M hip replacements requiring revision surgery, with particular emphasis on the characteristics and pattern of the lymphocytic infiltrate. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to study the classical features of TLOs in cases where large organized lymphoid follicles were present. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements were undertaken to detect localisation of implant derived ions/particles within the samples. Based on type of lymphocytic infiltrates, three different categories were recognised; diffuse aggregates (51%), T cell aggregates (20%), and organised lymphoid aggregates (29%). Further investigation of tissues with organised lymphoid aggregates showed that these tissues recapitulate many of the features of TLOs with T cells and B cells organised into discrete areas, the presence of follicular dendritic cells, acquisition of high endothelial venule like phenotype by blood vessels, expression of lymphoid chemokines and the presence of plasma cells. Co-localisation of implant-derived metals with lymphoid aggregates was observed. These findings suggest that in addition to the well described general foreign body reaction mediated by macrophages and a T cell mediated type IV hypersensitivity response, an under-recognized immunological reaction to metal wear debris involving B cells and the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs occurs in a distinct subset of patients with M-M implants. PMID:23723985

  19. Aims, organization and activities of the consortium for underground storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucky, G.

    1977-01-01

    The consortium of Swiss authorities interested in underground storage (the petroleum oil and gas industries, for fuel storage; the nuclear industry for radioactive waste disposal), was initiated in 1972. The author outlines the motives behind the formation of the consortium and outlines its structure and objectives. The envisaged projects are outlined. (F.Q.)

  20. Characterization of Tertiary Catalan lacustrine oil shales: Discovery of extrmely organic sulphur-rich Type I kerogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Heras, F.X.C. De Las; Bergen, P.F. Van; Leeuw, J.W. De (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

    1993-01-01

    The kerogens of three Tertiary Catalan lacustrine oil shales were analyzed by light microscopy, flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and bulk composition methods (elemental analysis, Rock Eval pyrolysis). Two of the three kerogens (Ribesalbes and Campins) are extremely rich in organic sulfur (atomic S[sub org]/C ratio > 0.04) and hydrogen (atomic ratio H/C ratio > 1.5) and are, consequently, classified as Type I-S kerogens. Very characteristic distribution patterns of flash pyrolysis products (e.g., alkan-9- and -10-ones, alkadienes) of the Ribesalbes kerogen revealed that it is predominantly composed of fossilized organic matter of the freshwater alga Botryococcus braunii. These two findings demonstrate that sulfurization of organic matter may also occur in lacustrine sediments provided that sulfate is supplied by external sources. Data on the third kerogen sample (Cerdanya) suggest that the freshwater alga Pediastrum may contain a (partly) aromatic biomacromolecule that is selectively preserved upon diagenesis. These findings testify to the large variability in palaeodepositional conditions in lacutrine environments. A comparison of the biomarker composition of the extract of the Ribesalbes oil shale with the kerogen composition indicate that biomarkers often cannot be used to assess the major sources of organic matter in such settings. A similar conclusion can be drawn from a comparison of literature data concerning the Messel Oil Shale. 75 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Characterization of Tertiary Catalan lacustrine oil shales: Discovery of extremely organic sulphur-rich Type I kerogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; de las Heras, F. Xavier C.; van Bergen, Pim F.; de Leeuw, Jan W.

    1993-01-01

    The kerogens of three Tertiary Catalan lacustrine oil shales were analyzed by light microscopy, flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and bulk composition methods (elemental analysis, Rock Eval pyrolysis). Two of the three kerogens (Ribesalbes and Campins) are extremely rich in organic sulphur (atomic S org/C ratio > 0.04) and hydrogen (atomic ratio H/C ratio > 1.5) and are, consequently, classified as Type I-S kerogens. Very characteristic distribution patterns of flash pyrolysis products (e.g., alkan-9- and -10-ones, alkadienes) of the Ribesalbes kerogen revealed that it is predominantly composed of fossilized organic matter of the freshwater alga Botryococcus braunii. These two findings demonstrate that sulphurization of organic matter may also occur in lacustrine sediments provided that sulphate is supplied by external sources. Data on the third kerogen sample (Cerdanya) suggest that the freshwater alga Pediastrum may contain a (partly) aromatic biomacromolecule that is selectively preserved upon diagenesis. These findings testify to the large variability in palaeodepositional conditions in lacustrine environments. A comparison of the biomarker composition of the extract of the Ribesalbes oil shale with the kerogen composition indicate that biomarkers often cannot be used to assess the major sources of organic matter in such settings. A similar conclusion can be drawn from a comparison of literature data concerning the Messel Oil Shale.

  2. Beyond Rote Learning in Organic Chemistry: The Infusion and Impact of Argumentation in Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabuccu, Aybuke; Erduran, Sibel

    2017-01-01

    There exists bias among students that learning organic chemistry topics requires rote learning. In this paper, we address such bias through an organic chemistry activity designed to promote argumentation. We investigated how pre-service science teachers engage in an argumentation about conformational analysis. Analysis of the outcomes concentrated…

  3. Gel-trapped lymphorganogenic chemokines trigger artificial tertiary lymphoid organs and mount adaptive immune responses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Watanabe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously generated artificial lymph node-like tertiary lymphoid organs (artTLOs in mice using lymphotoxin α-expressing stromal cells. Here, we show the construction of transplantable and functional artTLOs by applying soluble factors trapped in slow-releasing gels in the absence of lymphoid tissue organizer- (LTo stromal cells. The resultant artTLOs were easily removable, transplantable, and were capable of attracting memory B and T cells. Importantly, artTLOs induced a powerful antigen-specific secondary immune response, which was particularly pronounced in immune-compromised hosts. Synthesis of functionally stable immune tissues/organs like those described here may be a first step to eventually develop immune system-based therapeutics. Although much needs to be learned from the precise mechanisms of action, they may offer ways in the future to reestablish immune functions to overcome hitherto untreatable diseases including severe infection, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and various forms of immune deficiencies including immune-senescence during aging.

  4. Artery Tertiary Lymphoid Organs Control Aorta Immunity and Protect against Atherosclerosis via Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Lymphotoxin β Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Desheng; Mohanta, Sarajo K.; Yin, Changjun; Peng, Li; Ma, Zhe; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Grassia, Gianluca; MacRitchie, Neil; Dever, Gary; Gordon, Peter; Burton, Francis L.; Ialenti, Armando; Sabir, Suleman R.; McInnes, Iain B.; Brewer, James M.; Garside, Paul; Weber, Christian; Lehmann, Thomas; Teupser, Daniel; Habenicht, Livia; Beer, Michael; Grabner, Rolf; Maffia, Pasquale; Weih, Falk; Habenicht, Andreas J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) emerge during nonresolving peripheral inflammation, but their impact on disease progression remains unknown. We have found in aged Apoe−/− mice that artery TLOs (ATLOs) controlled highly territorialized aorta T cell responses. ATLOs promoted T cell recruitment, primed CD4+ T cells, generated CD4+, CD8+, T regulatory (Treg) effector and central memory cells, converted naive CD4+ T cells into induced Treg cells, and presented antigen by an unusual set of dendritic cells and B cells. Meanwhile, vascular smooth muscle cell lymphotoxin β receptors (VSMC-LTβRs) protected against atherosclerosis by maintaining structure, cellularity, and size of ATLOs though VSMC-LTβRs did not affect secondary lymphoid organs: Atherosclerosis was markedly exacerbated in Apoe−/−Ltbr−/− and to a similar extent in aged Apoe−/−Ltbrfl/flTagln-cre mice. These data support the conclusion that the immune system employs ATLOs to organize aorta T cell homeostasis during aging and that VSMC-LTβRs participate in atherosclerosis protection via ATLOs. PMID:26084025

  5. Gel-Trapped Lymphorganogenic Chemokines Trigger Artificial Tertiary Lymphoid Organs and Mount Adaptive Immune Responses In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We previously generated artificial lymph node-like tertiary lymphoid organs (artTLOs) in mice using lymphotoxin α-expressing stromal cells. Here, we show the construction of transplantable and functional artTLOs by applying soluble factors trapped in slow-releasing gels in the absence of lymphoid tissue organizer stromal cells. The resultant artTLOs were easily removable, transplantable, and were capable of attracting memory B and T cells. Importantly, artTLOs induced a powerful antigen-specific secondary immune response, which was particularly pronounced in immune-compromised hosts. Synthesis of functionally stable immune tissues/organs like those described here may be a first step to eventually develop immune system-based therapeutics. Although much needs to be learned from the precise mechanisms of action, they may offer ways in the future to reestablish immune functions to overcome hitherto untreatable diseases, including severe infection, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and various forms of immune deficiencies, including immune-senescence during aging.

  6. Utilization of the organ care system as ex-vivo lung perfusion after cold storage transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, P N; Maunz, O; Popov, A-F; Zych, B; Patil, N P; Simon, A R

    2015-11-01

    The Organ Care System (OCS) allows perfusion and ventilation of the donor lungs under physiological conditions. Ongoing trials to compare preservation with OCS Lung with standard cold storage do not include donor lungs with suboptimal gas exchange and donor lungs treated with OCS following cold storage transportation. We present a case of a 48-yr-old man who received such lungs after cold storage transportation treated with ex-vivo lung perfusion utilizing OCS. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Third phase formation in organic solutions in the extraction of mono-acids by tertiary trialcoyl-amines diluted in very slightly polar organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robaglia, Michele

    1973-01-01

    The phenomena of third phase formation which can occur during the extraction of an acid with a tertiary amine diluted in a low polarity diluent are studied. In the first part a system including water (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - H 2 O) is compared with an anhydrous system (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - N 2 ). There are two kinds of gaps. One during amine salification, another one during the extraction of excess acid. The important part of the water content of the organic phase is demonstrated. The presence of water enhances the gaps. The polar water molecules are dissolved inside the tri-octylamine salt micelles. The heavy phase is formed by aggregates, the light phase represents the solubility of the non soluble species in the medium. In the second part are studied the influence of some parameters (like nature of diluent, acid, amine and temperature) on the gaps formation and on the extraction of excess acid and water. In every cases the part played by water remains the same. Finally some comparisons are made between tertiary systems and binary systems which formed them. The binary systems were studied by the mean of crystallization curves. (author) [fr

  8. Geophysical Research in the Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary Basin (Murcia, Spain), as a Natural Analogue of CO2 Storage and Leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo-Naharro, J.; Aracil, E.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine the depth, morphology and extent of the CO 2 -enriched deep saline aquifer in the Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary basin (Murcia, Spain), it was necessary reprocessing the vertical electrical soundings performed by IGME-ADARO in the eighties and to perform several geophysical campaigns by means of electrical tomography, time domain electromagnetic surveys and gravimetry. Densities of the outcropping lithologies in the studied basin were also determined in order to refine the model obtained from gravimetric data. The geophysical results, particularly from gravimetric data, seem to indicate that the CO 2 -enriched deep saline aquifer, located in the contact or within the carbonate materials of the Nevado-Filabride Complex, could reach a depth greater than 800 m. For this reason, the possibility that this CO 2 is in supercritical state in certain areas of the aquifer, is not discardable. Thus, the studied basin would be an excellent natural analogue of a CO 2 -deep geological storage in a deep saline aquifer in volcanic and/or carbonate rocks, anthropogenically perturbed by geothermal exploration wells (La Ermita de El Saladillo and El Alto de El Reventon) and hydrogeological wells for agricultural purposes. (Author)

  9. Status of Co-Curricular and Extra Class Activities of Student Organizations from Selected Tertiary Institutions in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena R. Abrea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the co-curricular and extra class activities of selected Tertiary Education Institutions (TEIs in Batangas Province and the impact of these activities to students’ development. The descriptive method of research was utilized with the use of a questionnaire as the main data gathering instrument, supplemented by documentary analysis, interview and focus group discussion. Respondents of the study were 16 administrators, 96 faculty members and 494 student officers from nine selected colleges in the province. Frequency, percentage, ranking, weighted mean, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA or F-test were the statistical tools used in the study. Results of the study revealed that all the colleges have recognized student organizations, and its membership except in student government was based on students’ interests. The goals were in line with the vision and mission of the institution and membership fee was the primary source of fund. The respondents assessed that there was an extensive participation of students in co-curricular and extra class activities. The strategies applied were effective and delivery systems were frequently used by the students’ organization. It was found out that the administration was supportive in student activities specifically in the use of physical facilities. The findings revealed that the identified activities contributed to a great extent to students’ mental, social, physical, behavioral and moral development. The strengths of the activities were evident, however, weaknesses were sometimes observed. A management guide on co-curricular and extra class activities was the output of the study.

  10. COMMON ORGANISMS AND ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY OF E COLI IN URINARY TRACT INFECTION, IN A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL, NORTHERN KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanavas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI includes a spectrum of Asymptomatic Bacteruria (ABU, Cystitis, Prostitis and Pyelonephritis. Except in ABU, UTI is represented by symptomatic disease that warrants antimicrobial therapy. 1 Many of the studies have shown increasing antibiotic resistance to these agents. This study consists of a retrospective observational study of culture and sensitivity of 150 urinary samples, collected from patients who presented with symptoms of UTI, in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Northern Kerala, irrespective of their age and sex for a period of six months from June 2015 to November 2015. These results are then analyzed to find common organisms causing UTI in different age groups in either sex and their respective antibiotic resistance are noted. Out of 150 urinary samples 69.34% were sterile, while 30.66% were culture positive. Among the culture positive patients sex distribution was almost equal, with a slight female predominance, having a contribution of 54.35% females and 45.65% males. The most common organism was found to be E.coli, which contributed more than 50 per cent of total culture positivity (54.35%. Others include Staphylococci, Klebsiella Pnuemoniae, Proteus species, Pseudomonas, Enterococci, Candida Albicans etc. Collateral damage is an ecological adverse effect that resist the use of a highly efficacious drug to be considered as first line agent. Our study shows that drugs causing minimal collateral damages like Nitrofurantoin and Fosfomycin can be used as first line agent for treatment of UTI.

  11. Identification of novel genes associated with renal tertiary lymphoid organ formation in aging mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yuan; Caputo, Christina R.; Noordmans, Gerda A.; Yazdani, Saleh; Monteiro, Luiz Henrique; van den Born, Jaap; van Goor, Harry; Heeringa, Peter; Korstanje, Ron; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of aging-related organ deterioration is a dysregulated immune response characterized by pathologic leukocyte infiltration of affected tissues. Mechanisms and genes involved are as yet unknown. To identify genes associated with aging-related renal infiltration, we analyzed kidneys from

  12. Removal of organic contaminants from secondary effluent by anodic oxidation with a boron-doped diamond anode as tertiary treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Segura, Sergi, E-mail: sergigarcia@ub.edu [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Level 4, Gehrmann Bld. (60), St Lucia, QLD 072 (Australia); Laboratori d’Electroquímica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Química Física, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Keller, Jürg [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Level 4, Gehrmann Bld. (60), St Lucia, QLD 072 (Australia); Brillas, Enric [Laboratori d’Electroquímica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Química Física, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Radjenovic, Jelena, E-mail: j.radjenovic@awmc.uq.edu.au [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Level 4, Gehrmann Bld. (60), St Lucia, QLD 072 (Australia)

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mineralization of secondary effluent by anodic oxidation with BDD anode. • Complete removal of 29 pharmaceuticals and pesticides at trace level concentrations. • Organochlorine and organobromine byproducts were formed at low μM concentrations. • Chlorine species evolution assessed to evaluate the anodic oxidation applicability. - Abstract: Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) have been widely investigated as promising technologies to remove trace organic contaminants from water, but have rarely been used for the treatment of real waste streams. Anodic oxidation with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode was applied for the treatment of secondary effluent from a municipal sewage treatment plant containing 29 target pharmaceuticals and pesticides. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed from the contaminants decay, dissolved organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removal. The effect of applied current and pH was evaluated. Almost complete mineralization of effluent organic matter and trace contaminants can be obtained by this EAOP primarily due to the action of hydroxyl radicals formed at the BDD surface. The oxidation of Cl{sup −} ions present in the wastewater at the BDD anode gave rise to active chlorine species (Cl{sub 2}/HClO/ClO{sup −}), which are competitive oxidizing agents yielding chloramines and organohalogen byproducts, quantified as adsorbable organic halogen. However, further anodic oxidation of HClO/ClO{sup −} species led to the production of ClO{sub 3}{sup −} and ClO{sub 4}{sup −} ions. The formation of these species hampers the application as a single-stage tertiary treatment, but posterior cathodic reduction of chlorate and perchlorate species may reduce the risks associated to their presence in the environment.

  13. Effect of the waste products storage on the environmental pollution by toxic organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Lewkiewicz-Małysa

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A permanent deposition of industrial wastes is a method of its neutralization. A storage yard for toxic materials must meet specific site and construction conditions. The storage place region of toxic organic waste materials has to be monitored. The environmental impact of this waste on the groundwater quality, especially the migration of persistent organic pollutants, was discussed on the example of a chemical plant.

  14. Pristine Metal-Organic Frameworks and their Composites for Energy Storage and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zibin; Qu, Chong; Guo, Wenhan; Zou, Ruqiang; Xu, Qiang

    2017-11-22

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new class of crystalline porous organic-inorganic hybrid materials, have recently attracted increasing interest in the field of energy storage and conversion. Herein, recent progress of MOFs and MOF composites for energy storage and conversion applications, including photochemical and electrochemical fuel production (hydrogen production and CO 2 reduction), water oxidation, supercapacitors, and Li-based batteries (Li-ion, Li-S, and Li-O 2 batteries), is summarized. Typical development strategies (e.g., incorporation of active components, design of smart morphologies, and judicious selection of organic linkers and metal nodes) of MOFs and MOF composites for particular energy storage and conversion applications are highlighted. A broad overview of recent progress is provided, which will hopefully promote the future development of MOFs and MOF composites for advanced energy storage and conversion applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Impact of effluent organic matter on low-pressure membrane fouling in tertiary treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ayache, C.; Pidou, Marc; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Labanowski, Jé rô me; Poussade, Yvan; Tazi-Pain, Annie; Keller, Jurg R.; Gernjak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at comparing low-pressure membrane fouling obtained with two different secondary effluents at bench and pilot-scale based on the determination of two fouling indices: the total fouling index (TFI) and the hydraulically irreversible fouling index (HIFI). The main objective was to investigate if simpler and less costly bench-scale experimentation can substitute for pilot-scale trials when assessing the fouling potential of secondary effluent in large scale membrane filtration plants producing recycled water. Absolute values for specific flux and total fouling index for the bench-scale system were higher than those determined from pilot-scale, nevertheless a statistically significant correlation (r2 = 0.63, α = 0.1) was obtained for the total fouling index at both scales. On the contrary no such correlation was found for the hydraulically irreversible fouling index. Advanced water characterization tools such as excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEM) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) were used for the characterization of foulants. On the basis of statistical analysis, biopolymers and humic substances were found to be the major contribution to total fouling (r2 = 0.95 and r2 = 0.88, respectively). Adsorption of the low molecular weight neutral compounds to the membrane was attributed to hydraulically irreversible fouling (r2 = 0.67). © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Prevalence of carbapenemase-producing organisms in a tertiary care hospital in Ludhiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuniti Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was done to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of imipenem for multidrug-resistant (MDR clinical isolates and identify carbapenemase-producing organisms among these MDR isolates. Materials and Methods: The antibiotic susceptibility of clinical isolates was determined by Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method. MDR isolates showing resistance or reduced susceptibility to carbapenems were further tested for MIC with imipenem and carbapenemase production by Modified Hodge test (MHT. Results: A total of 65 MDR isolates were tested, of which 46 (70.77%, 15 (23%, and 4 (6.15% had MIC in resistant, sensitive, and intermediate range, respectively. MHT was positive for 37 (57% isolates. The most common carbapenemase producers in order of frequency were Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp. Conclusion: Phenotypic tests such as MHT are simple, cost-effective, and easy to perform and hence can be used in any microbiology laboratory to detect carbapenemase production and applied clinically to guide the antimicrobial therapy, especially in severe and life-threatening infections.

  17. Impact of effluent organic matter on low-pressure membrane fouling in tertiary treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ayache, C.

    2013-05-01

    This study aims at comparing low-pressure membrane fouling obtained with two different secondary effluents at bench and pilot-scale based on the determination of two fouling indices: the total fouling index (TFI) and the hydraulically irreversible fouling index (HIFI). The main objective was to investigate if simpler and less costly bench-scale experimentation can substitute for pilot-scale trials when assessing the fouling potential of secondary effluent in large scale membrane filtration plants producing recycled water. Absolute values for specific flux and total fouling index for the bench-scale system were higher than those determined from pilot-scale, nevertheless a statistically significant correlation (r2 = 0.63, α = 0.1) was obtained for the total fouling index at both scales. On the contrary no such correlation was found for the hydraulically irreversible fouling index. Advanced water characterization tools such as excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEM) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) were used for the characterization of foulants. On the basis of statistical analysis, biopolymers and humic substances were found to be the major contribution to total fouling (r2 = 0.95 and r2 = 0.88, respectively). Adsorption of the low molecular weight neutral compounds to the membrane was attributed to hydraulically irreversible fouling (r2 = 0.67). © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Pulse-modulated multilevel data storage in an organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, J.; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Khikhlovskyi, V.; Kemerink, M.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate multilevel data storage in organic ferroelectric resistive memory diodes consisting of a phase-separated blend of P(VDF-TrFE) and a semiconducting polymer. The dynamic behaviour of the organic ferroelectric memory diode can be described in terms of the inhomogeneous field mechanism

  19. Zirconium-Based metal organic framework (Zr-MOF) material with high hydrostability for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Material-based solutions, such as metal organic frameworks (MOFs), continue to attract increasing attention as viable options for hydrogen storage applications. MOFs are widely regarded as promising materials for hydrogen storage due to their high...

  20. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA reg-sign canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA reg-sign, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities

  1. Organic Rankine Cycle with Solar Heat Storage in Paraffin Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin LUCA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an electricity generation system based on an Organic Rankine Cycle and proposed storing the amount of the heat produced by the solar panels using large volume of paraffin wax. The proposed working fluid is R-134a refrigerant. The cycle operates at very low temperatures. A efficiency of 6,55% was obtained.

  2. Soil organic matter regulates molybdenum storage and mobility in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jade A; Perakis, Steven; King, Elizabeth K.; Pett-Ridge, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is essential to a suite of nitrogen (N) cycling processes in ecosystems, but there is limited information on its distribution within soils and relationship to plant and bedrock pools. We examined soil, bedrock, and plant Mo variation across 24 forests spanning wide soil pH gradients on both basaltic and sedimentary lithologies in the Oregon Coast Range. We found that the oxidizable organic fraction of surface mineral soil accounted for an average of 33 %of bulk soil Mo across all sites, followed by 1.4 % associated with reducible Fe, Al, and Mn-oxides, and 1.4 % in exchangeable ion form. Exchangeable Mo was greatest at low pH, and its positive correlation with soil carbon (C) suggests organic matter as the source of readily exchangeable Mo. Molybdenum accumulation integrated over soil profiles to 1 m depth (τMoNb) increased with soil C, indicating that soil organic matter regulates long-term Mo retention and loss from soil. Foliar Mo concentrations displayed no relationship with bulk soil Mo, and were not correlated with organic horizon Mo or soil extractable Mo, suggesting active plant regulation of Mo uptake and/or poor fidelity of extractable pools to bioavailability. We estimate from precipitation sampling that atmospheric deposition supplies, on average, over 10 times more Mo annually than does litterfall to soil. In contrast, bedrock lithology had negligible effects on foliar and soil Mo concentrations and on Mo distribution among soil fractions. We conclude that atmospheric inputs may be a significant source of Mo to forest ecosystems, and that strong Mo retention by soil organic matter limits ecosystem Mo loss via dissolution and leaching pathways.

  3. Storage effects on anthocyanins, phenolics and antioxidant activity of thermally processed conventional and organic blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Andrews, Preston K; Davies, Neal M; Walters, Thomas; Sablani, Shyam S

    2012-03-15

    Consumer demand for products rich in phytochemicals is increasing as a result of greater awareness of their potential health benefits. However, processed products are stored for long-term and the phytochemicals are susceptible to degradation during storage. The objective of this study was to assess the storage effects on phytochemicals in thermally processed blueberries. Thermally processed canned berries and juice/puree were analysed for phytochemicals during their long-term storage. The phytochemical retention of thermally processed blueberries during storage was not influenced by production system (conventional versus organic). During 13 months of storage, total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity in canned blueberry solids decreased by up to 86, 69 and 52% respectively. In canned blueberry syrup, total anthocyanins and total antioxidant activity decreased by up to 68 and 15% respectively, while total phenolic content increased by up to 117%. Similar trends in phytochemical content were observed in juice/puree stored for 4 months. The extent of changes in phytochemicals of thermally processed blueberries during storage was significantly influenced by blanching. Long-term storage of thermally processed blueberries had varying degrees of influence on degradation of total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity. Blanching before thermal processing helped to preserve the phytochemicals during storage of blueberries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Identification of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA)-utilizing organisms in BioGAC reactors using 13C-DNA stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslett, Denise; Haas, Joseph; Hyman, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Biodegradation of the gasoline oxygenates methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE) can cause tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) to accumulate in gasoline-impacted environments. One remediation option for TBA-contaminated groundwater involves oxygenated granulated activated carbon (GAC) reactors that have been self-inoculated by indigenous TBA-degrading microorganisms in ground water extracted from contaminated aquifers. Identification of these organisms is important for understanding the range of TBA-metabolizing organisms in nature and for determining whether self-inoculation of similar reactors is likely to occur at other sites. In this study (13)C-DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify TBA-utilizing organisms in samples of self-inoculated BioGAC reactors operated at sites in New York and California. Based on 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences, all TBA-utilizing organisms identified were members of the Burkholderiales order of the β-proteobacteria. Organisms similar to Cupriavidus and Methylibium were observed in both reactor samples while organisms similar to Polaromonas and Rhodoferax were unique to the reactor sample from New York. Organisms similar to Hydrogenophaga and Paucibacter strains were only detected in the reactor sample from California. We also analyzed our samples for the presence of several genes previously implicated in TBA oxidation by pure cultures of bacteria. Genes Mpe_B0532, B0541, B0555, and B0561 were all detected in (13)C-metagenomic DNA from both reactors and deduced amino acid sequences suggested these genes all encode highly conserved enzymes. One gene (Mpe_B0555) encodes a putative phthalate dioxygenase-like enzyme that may be particularly appropriate for determining the potential for TBA oxidation in contaminated environmental samples.

  5. Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, Scott [Oakland University, Rochester, MI; Lamberti, Gary A. [University of Notre Dame, IN; Entrekin, Sally A. [University of Central Arkansas; Griffiths, Natalie A. [ORNL

    2017-08-01

    Coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM, is a basal energy and nutrient resource in many stream ecosystems and is provided by inputs from the riparian zone, incoming tributaries, and to a lesser extent from in-stream production. The ability of a stream to retain CPOM or slow its transport is critical to its consumption and assimilation by stream biota. In this chapter, we describe basic exercises to measure (1) the amount of CPOM in the streambed and (2) the retention of CPOM from standardized particle releases. We further describe advanced exercises that (1) experimentally enhance the retentiveness of a stream reach and (2) measure organic carbon transport and turnover (i.e., spiraling) in the channel.

  6. Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, Scott [Oakland University, Rochester, MI; Lamberti, Gary A. [University of Notre Dame, IN; Entrekin, Sally A. [University of Central Arkansas; Griffiths, Natalie A. [ORNL

    2017-06-01

    Coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM, is a basal energy and nutrient resource in many stream ecosystems and is provided by inputs from the riparian zone, incoming tributaries, and to a lesser extent from in-stream production. The ability of a stream to retain CPOM or slow its transport is critical to its consumption and assimilation by stream biota. In this chapter, we describe basic exercises to measure (1) the amount of CPOM in the streambed and (2) the retention of CPOM from standardized particle releases. We further describe advanced exercises that (1) experimentally enhance the retentiveness of a stream reach and (2) measure organic carbon transport and turnover (i.e., spiraling) in the channel.

  7. A Kind of Energy Storage Technology: Metal Organic Frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, Zeynel; Kose, D. A.; Asan, A.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    For last fifteen years energy has been transferred by using electricity and as an energy carrier media electricity has some disadvantages like its wire need for transportation and its being non-storable for large amounts. To store more energy safely and for transportation it easily, new storing medias and devices are needed. For easy and safe energy transport there are many technologies and some of these contain hydrogen energy. Metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, metal organic frameworks (MOFs...

  8. Carriage of multidrug-resistant organisms in a tertiary university hospital in Albania—a point prevalence survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falzon A. Parascandalo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance has been recognised as a serious global Public Health problem. Prevalence of Multiple-Drug-Resistant (MDR organism carriage in Albania is largely unknown since no national surveillance system is in place and few publications are accessible in the literature. Methods A 1-day point-prevalence-survey (PPS screening for nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and rectal MDR Gram-negative carriage was carried out at the high-dependency wards in the country’s only tertiary care hospital, in Tirana. Results A total of 106 nasal and 104 rectal swabs were collected. 14.2 % of patients (95 % Confidence Interval [95 CI]: 8.1–22.3 % were MRSA nasal carriers. Resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones was common in these isolates (≥80 % but no resistance was identified against glycopeptides, nitrofurantoin and the relatively newer agents, tigecycline and linezolid. Fifty Enterobacteriaceae isolates were cultivated from 33 of 104 screened patients (31.7 % [95 CI: 22.9–41.6 % 95 CI]. The prevalence of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL production in Enterobacteriaceae was 41.3 % (95 CI: 31.8–51.4 %. The two more commonly isolated Enterobacteriaceae were E. coli ([n = 28], 24 ESBL positive; 1 AmpC positive and 3 without an identified mechanism of resistance and Klebsiella pneumoniae ([n = 13], all ESBL positive; 1 also AmpC and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL positive. Susceptibility to carbapenems (≥98 %, fosfomycin (90 % and amikacin (70 + 20 % intermediate was high but a high level of resistance to all other agents tested was noted. Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli were less commonly isolated {22 isolates: Acinetobacter baumannii (9; Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (5}. Conclusion Although a significant rate of MRSA carriage was identified, the main resistance challenge in Albania appears to be linked with Gram

  9. A Unique Cellular and Molecular Microenvironment Is Present in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs of Patients with Spontaneous Prostate Cancer Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Luz García-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMultiple solid cancers contain tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO. However, it is unclear whether they promote tumor rejection, facilitate tumor evasion, or simply whether they are a byproduct of chronic inflammation. We hypothesize that although chronic inflammation induces TLO formation, the tumor milieu can modulate TLO organization and functions in prostate cancer. Therefore, our study seeks to elucidate the cellular and molecular signatures in unique prostatectomy specimens from evanescent carcinoma patients to identify markers of cancer regression, which could be harnessed to modulate local immunosuppression or potentially enhance TLO function.MethodsWe used multicolor immunofluorescence to stain prostate tissues, collected at different stages of cancer progression (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intermediate and advanced cancer or from patients with evanescent prostate carcinoma. Tissues were stained with antibodies specific for pro-inflammatory molecules (cyclooxygenase 2, CXCL10, IL17, tumor-infiltrating immune cells (mature DC-LAMP+ dendritic cells, CD3+ T cells, CD3+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg, T bet+ Th1 cells, granzyme B+ cytotoxic cells, and stromal cell populations (lymphatic vessels, tumor neovessels, high endothelial venules (HEV, stromal cells, which promote prostate tumor growth or are critical components of tumor-associated TLO.ResultsGenerally, inflammatory cells are located at the margins of tumors. Unexpectedly, we found TLO within prostate tumors from patients at different stages of cancer and in unique samples from patients with spontaneous cancer remission. In evanescent prostate carcinomas, accumulation of Treg was compromised, while Tbet+ T cells and CD8 T cells were abundant in tumor-associated TLO. In addition, we found a global decrease in tumor neovascularization and the coverage by cells positive for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2. Finally, consistent with tumor regression, prostate stem cell antigen was

  10. Improved synthesis and hydrogen storage of a microporous metal-organic framework material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Shaojuan; Liu Shaobing; Zhao Qiang; Li Jinping

    2009-01-01

    A microporous metal-organic framework MOF-5 [Zn 4 O(BDC) 3 , BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic] was synthesized with and without H 2 O 2 by improved methods based on the previous studies. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption, and their hydrogen storage capacities were measured. The synthesis experiments showed that H 2 O 2 favored the growth of high quality sample, large pore volume and high specific surface area. The measurements of hydrogen storage indicated that the sample with higher specific surface area and large pore volume showed better hydrogen storage behavior than other samples. It was suggested that specific surface area and pore volume influenced the capacity of hydrogen storage for MOF-5 material.

  11. Hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with a metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqin; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Taylor, Jared M.; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen is an essential component in many industrial processes. As a result of the recent increase in the development of shale gas, steam reforming of shale gas has received considerable attention as a major source of H2, and the more efficient use of hydrogen is strongly demanded. Palladium is well known as a hydrogen-storage metal and an effective catalyst for reactions related to hydrogen in a variety of industrial processes. Here, we present remarkably enhanced capacity and speed of hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 (copper(II) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The Pd nanocrystals covered with the MOF have twice the storage capacity of the bare Pd nanocrystals. The significantly enhanced hydrogen storage capacity was confirmed by hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms and solid-state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The speed of hydrogen absorption in the Pd nanocrystals is also enhanced by the MOF coating.

  12. Characterisation of Tertiary Catalan lacustrine oil shales: Discovery of extremely organic sulphur-rich type I kerogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Las Heras, F.X.C. de; Bergen, P.F. van; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1993-01-01

    The kerogens of three Tertiary Catalan lacustrine oil shales were analyzed by light microscopy, flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and bulk composition methods (elemental analysis, Rock Eval pyrolysis). Two of the three kerogens (Ribesalbes and Campins) are extremely rich in

  13. Organization and costs of repurchasing, transportation, warehousing and storage of raspberry fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalanović-Bulatović Branka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its characteristic, apart from nutritive and medical significance, raspberry is particularly important for our country in social and economic terms, since its export attracts foreign currency inflow. Since the quality of raspberry decreases rapidly after picking, it is utterly important that the whole process, from picking to cold storage of fruit, should be rationally organized, thus finally reducing the costs and increasing the production value. For these reasons precisely the research deals with organization of the entire process, from repurchase to cold storage of raspberry fruits, as well as the analysis of pertaining costs. Necessary information for the preparation of the paper has been obtained from cold storage plants engaged in raspberry storage and preservation. Necessary information has been gathered using several methods, viz: observation, interview and content analysis methods. Furthermore, analysis, comparison and calculation methods have also been used in the preparation of the paper. The raspberry fruit repurchase, transport and storage costs range from 1,6 to 1,8 EUR per kg, exclusive of storage (store-housing. To this one should add store-housing costs ranging from 0,009 to 0,013 EUR per kg on a monthly basis. Modern organization of production and communication between producers, repurchasers, processors and exporters is essential in order to decrease fluctuations in repurchase and sales price of fresh raspberry and its products and the improvement of overall financial effect of all links within the chain of this economy activity. Cold storage plants, even if of minor capacities, are beneficial not only for the immediate participants in the producer-buyer chain, but it also makes an important stimulating factor for rural development and economy of the country.

  14. The effects of feed composition on the sensory quality of organic rainbow trout during ice storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green-Pedersen, Ditte; Hyldig, Grethe; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    fishmeal and a mixture of protein from organic vegetable, while the lipid sources were fish oil and organic oil from linseed, sunflower, rapeseed and grape seed. Sensory analysis was performed after 3, 5, 7 and 14 days of storage in ice. The results showed that both protein and lipid source in the feed can...... after 14 days of storage, indicating that vegetable protein in the feed increases the self-life of organic rainbow trout.......The focus of this work was to study which effects the type of protein and lipid source in the feed for organic Rainbow trout influences had on the sensory quality of final product. Two and four different protein and lipid sources were used in the experiment respectively. The protein sources were...

  15. Hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications: Challenges, opportunities and prospects for metal-organic frameworks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available and release, and cycle life of the materials. In the past decade, there has been growing interest in metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as hydrogen storage materials and significant progress has been made in this regard. The challenges, opportunities...

  16. Modulated synthesis of zirconium-metal organic framework (Zr-MOF) for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modulated synthesis of Zr-metal organic framework (Zr-MOF) with improved ease of handling and decreased reaction time is reported to yield highly crystalline Zr-MOF with well-defined octahedral shaped crystals for practical hydrogen storage...

  17. Multi-scale theoretical investigation of hydrogen storage in covalent organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylianakis, Emmanuel; Klontzas, Emmanouel; Froudakis, George E

    2011-03-01

    The quest for efficient hydrogen storage materials has been the limiting step towards the commercialization of hydrogen as an energy carrier and has attracted a lot of attention from the scientific community. Sophisticated multi-scale theoretical techniques have been considered as a valuable tool for the prediction of materials storage properties. Such techniques have also been used for the investigation of hydrogen storage in a novel category of porous materials known as Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs). These framework materials are consisted of light elements and are characterized by exceptional physicochemical properties such as large surface areas and pore volumes. Combinations of ab initio, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC) calculations have been performed to investigate the hydrogen adsorption in these ultra-light materials. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the theoretical hydrogen storage studies that have been published after the discovery of COFs. Experimental and theoretical studies have proven that COFs have comparable or better hydrogen storage abilities than other competitive materials such as MOF. The key factors that can lead to the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of COFs are highlighted, accompanied with some recently presented theoretical multi-scale studies concerning these factors.

  18. Organ culture storage of pre-prepared corneal donor material for Descemet's membrane endothelial keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, Maninder; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S; Allan, Bruce D

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of media composition and storage method on pre-prepared Descemet's membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) grafts. 50 corneas were used. Endothelial wound healing and proliferation in different media were assessed using a standard injury model. DMEK grafts were stored using three methods: peeling with free scroll storage; partial peeling with storage on the stroma and fluid bubble separation with storage on the stroma. Endothelial cell (EC) phenotype and the extent of endothelial overgrowth were examined. Global cell viability was assessed for storage methods that maintained a normal cell phenotype. 1 mm wounds healed within 4 days. Enhanced media did not increase EC proliferation but may have increased EC migration into the wounded area. Grafts that had been trephined showed evidence of EC overgrowth, whereas preservation of a physical barrier in the bubble group prevented this. In grafts stored in enhanced media or reapposed to the stroma after trephination, endothelial migration occurred sooner and cells underwent endothelial-mesenchymal transformation. Ongoing cell loss, with new patterns of cell death, was observed after returning grafts to storage. Grafts stored as free scrolls retained more viable ECs than grafts prepared with the fluid bubble method (74.2± 3% vs 60.3±6%, p=0.04 (n=8). Free scroll storage is superior to liquid bubble and partial peeling techniques. Free scrolls only showed overgrowth of ECs after 4 days in organ culture, indicating a viable time window for the clinical use of pre-prepared DMEK donor material using this method. Methods for tissue preparation and storage media developed for whole corneas should not be used in pre-prepared DMEK grafts without prior evaluation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Developments in organic solid–liquid phase change materials and their applications in thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.K.; Ganesan, P.; Tyagi, V.V.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; Sandaran, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of organic phase change materials for thermal energy storage. • Review of the eutectic mixtures of organic PCMs. • Review of the techniques of PCM encapsulations and enhancing the thermal conductivity. • Applications of low and medium temperature organic PCMs are listed in detail. • Recommendations are made for future applications of organic PCMs. - Abstract: Thermal energy storage as sensible or latent heat is an efficient way to conserve the waste heat and excess energy available such as solar radiation. Storage of latent heat using organic phase change materials (PCMs) offers greater energy storage density over a marginal melting and freezing temperature difference in comparison to inorganic materials. These favorable characteristics of organic PCMs make them suitable in a wide range of applications. These materials and their eutectic mixtures have been successfully tested and implemented in many domestic and commercial applications such as, building, electronic devices, refrigeration and air-conditioning, solar air/water heating, textiles, automobiles, food, and space industries. This review focuses on three aspects: the materials, encapsulation and applications of organic PCMs, and provides an insight on the recent developments in applications of these materials. Organic PCMs have inherent characteristic of low thermal conductivity (0.15–0.35 W/m K), hence, a larger surface area is required to enhance the heat transfer rate. Therefore, attention is also given to the thermal conductivity enhancement of the materials, which helps to keep the area of the system to a minimum. Besides, various available techniques for material characterization have also been discussed. It has been found that a wide range of the applications of organic PCMs in buildings and other low and medium temperature solar energy applications are in abundant use but these materials are not yet popular among space applications and virtual data storage media. In

  20. Three-dimensional metal-intercalated covalent organic frameworks for near-ambient energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Ding, Zijing; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    A new form of nanoporous material, metal intercalated covalent organic framework (MCOF) is proposed and its energy storage property revealed. Employing density functional and thermodynamical analysis, we find that stable, chemically active, porous materials could form by stacking covalent organic framework (COF) layers with metals as a gluing agent. Metal acts as active sites, while its aggregation is suppressed by a binding energy significantly larger than the corresponding cohesive energy of bulk metals. Two important parameters, metal binding and metal-metal separation, are tuned by selecting suitable building blocks and linkers when constructing COF layers. Systematic searches among a variety of elements and organic molecules identify Ca-intercalated COF with diphenylethyne units as optimal material for H2 storage, reaching a striking gravimetric density ~ 5 wt% at near-ambient conditions (300 K, 20 bar), in comparison to < 0.1 wt% for bare COF-1 under the same condition. PMID:23698018

  1. Model predictions of long-lived storage of organic carbon in river deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Torres

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The mass of carbon stored as organic matter in terrestrial systems is sufficiently large to play an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of CO2 and O2. Field measurements of radiocarbon-depleted particulate organic carbon (POC in rivers suggest that terrestrial organic matter persists in surface environments over millennial (or greater timescales, but the exact mechanisms behind these long storage times remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we developed a numerical model for the radiocarbon content of riverine POC that accounts for both the duration of sediment storage in river deposits and the effects of POC cycling. We specifically target rivers because sediment transport influences the maximum amount of time organic matter can persist in the terrestrial realm and river catchment areas are large relative to the spatial scale of variability in biogeochemical processes.Our results show that rivers preferentially erode young deposits, which, at steady state, requires that the oldest river deposits are stored for longer than expected for a well-mixed sedimentary reservoir. This geometric relationship can be described by an exponentially tempered power-law distribution of sediment storage durations, which allows for significant aging of biospheric POC. While OC cycling partially limits the effects of sediment storage, the consistency between our model predictions and a compilation of field data highlights the important role of storage in setting the radiocarbon content of riverine POC. The results of this study imply that the controls on the terrestrial OC cycle are not limited to the factors that affect rates of primary productivity and respiration but also include the dynamics of terrestrial sedimentary systems.

  2. Organic carbon storage in four ecosystem types in the karst region of southwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguo Liu

    Full Text Available Karst ecosystems are important landscape types that cover about 12% of the world's land area. The role of karst ecosystems in the global carbon cycle remains unclear, due to the lack of an appropriate method for determining the thickness of the solum, a representative sampling of the soil and data of organic carbon stocks at the ecosystem level. The karst region in southwestern China is the largest in the world. In this study, we estimated biomass, soil quantity and ecosystem organic carbon stocks in four vegetation types typical of karst ecosystems in this region, shrub grasslands (SG, thorn shrubbery (TS, forest - shrub transition (FS and secondary forest (F. The results showed that the biomass of SG, TS, FS, and F is 0.52, 0.85, 5.9 and 19.2 kg m(-2, respectively and the corresponding organic cabon storage is 0.26, 0.40, 2.83 and 9.09 kg m(-2, respectively. Nevertheless, soil quantity and corresponding organic carbon storage are very small in karst habitats. The quantity of fine earth overlaying the physical weathering zone of the carbonate rock of SG, TS, FS and F is 38.10, 99.24, 29.57 and 61.89 kg m(-2, respectively, while the corresponding organic carbon storage is only 3.34, 4.10, 2.37, 5.25 kg m(-2, respectively. As a whole, ecosystem organic carbon storage of SG, TS, FS, and F is 3.81, 4.72, 5.68 and 15.1 kg m(-2, respectively. These are very low levels compared to other ecosystems in non-karst areas. With the restoration of degraded vegetation, karst ecosystems in southwestern China may play active roles in mitigating the increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere.

  3. Gas storage in porous metal-organic frameworks for clean energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shengqian; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-01-07

    Depletion of fossil oil deposits and the escalating threat of global warming have put clean energy research, which includes the search for clean energy carriers such as hydrogen and methane as well as the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions, on the urgent agenda. A significant technical challenge has been recognized as the development of a viable method to efficiently trap hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide gas molecules in a confined space for various applications. This issue can be addressed by employing highly porous materials as storage media, and porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) which have exceptionally high surface areas as well as chemically-tunable structures are playing an unusual role in this respect. In this feature article we provide an overview of the current status of clean energy applications of porous MOFs, including hydrogen storage, methane storage and carbon dioxide capture.

  4. Evaluation of storage conditions for tritiated thymidine as reference organically-bound tritium in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, T.; Trivedi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Interlaboratory intercomparison exercises have used tritiated thymidine as a reference material for organically-bound tritium (OBT) measurements in urine. We have examined the effects of storage conditions on the degradation behavior of tritium from OBT to tritiated water (HTO) in artificial and natural human urine samples. Tritiated thymidine decomposed less readily in artificial urine than natural urine samples. The degradation rate of tritiated thymidine in artificial urine, at -20 deg C, is about 10% for the first month. The rate of tritium conversion from OBT to HTO is the same at 4 deg C, but this storage temperature is less preferable, because of the danger of microbial contamination in the reference samples. The storage of the reference urine samples beyond three months after the preparation date is not recommended for quality control measurement data. (author)

  5. Improving the hydrogen storage properties of metal-organic framework by functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liangzhi; Liu, Qing; Wang, Fengling; Lu, Jinming

    2016-10-01

    Based on the structure of MOF-808, different substituents were introduced to replace hydrogen atom on the phenyl ring of MOF-808. The GCMC method was used to study the effect of functional groups on the hydrogen storage properties of MOF-808-X (X = -OH, -NO 2 , -CH 3 , -CN, -I). The H 2 uptakes and isosteric heat of adsorption were simulated at 77 K. The results indicate that all these substituents have favorable impact on the hydrogen storage capacity, and -CN is found to be the most promising substituent to improve H 2 uptake. These results may be helpful for the design of MOFs with higher hydrogen storage capacity. Graphical abstract Atomistic structures of MOFs. (a) The structures of MOF-808-X. (b) Model of organic linker. Atom color scheme: C, gray; H, white; O, red; X, palegreen (X = -OH, -NO 2 , -CH 3 , -CN, -I).

  6. [Spatial characteristics of soil organic carbon and nitrogen storages in Songnen Plain maize belt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Hua; Wang, Zong-Ming; Ren, Chun-Ying; Song, Kai-Shan; Zhang, Bai; Liu, Dian-Wei

    2010-03-01

    By using the data of 382 typical soil profiles from the second soil survey at national and county levels, and in combining with 1:500000 digital soil maps, a spatial database of soil profiles was established. Based on this, the one meter depth soil organic carbon and nitrogen storage in Songnen Plain maize belt of China was estimated, with the spatial characteristics of the soil organic carbon and nitrogen densities as well as the relationships between the soil organic carbon and nitrogen densities and the soil types and land use types analyzed. The soil organic carbon and nitrogen storage in the maize belt was (163.12 +/- 26.48) Tg and (9.53 +/- 1.75) Tg, respectively, mainly concentrated in meadow soil, chernozem, and black soil. The soil organic carbon and nitrogen densities were 5.51-25.25 and 0.37-0.80 kg x m(-2), respectively, and the C/N ratio was about 7.90 -12.67. The eastern and northern parts of the belt had much higher carbon and nitrogen densities than the other parts of the belt, and upland soils had the highest organic carbon density [(19.07 +/- 2.44) kg x m(-2)], forest soils had the highest nitrogen density [(0.82 +/- 0.25) kg x m(-2)], while lowland soils had the lower organic carbon and nitrogen densities.

  7. Fires at storage sites of organic materials, waste fuels and recyclables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim; Alriksson, Stina; Kaczala, Fabio; Hogland, William

    2013-09-01

    During the last decade, the European Union has enforced the diversion of organic wastes and recyclables to waste management companies operating incineration plants, composting plants and recycling units instead of landfills. The temporary storage sites have been established as a buffer against fluctuations in energy demand throughout the year. Materials also need to be stored at temporary storage sites before recovery and recycling. However, regulations governing waste fuel storage and handling have not yet been developed, and, as a result, companies have engaged in risky practices that have resulted in a high number of fire incidents. In this study, a questionnaire survey was distributed to 249 of the 400 members of Avfall Sverige (Swedish Waste Management Association), which represents the waste management of 95% of the Swedish population. Information regarding 122 storage facilities owned by 69 companies was obtained; these facilities were responsible for the storage of 47% of the total treated waste (incineration + digestion + composting) in 2010 in Sweden. To identify factors related to fire frequency, the questionnaire covered the amounts of material handled and burnt per year, financial losses due to fires, storage duration, storage method and types of waste. The results show that 217 fire incidents corresponded to 170 kilotonnes of material burnt and cumulative losses of 49 million SEK (€4.3 million). Fire frequency and amount of material burnt per fire was found to be dependent upon type of management group (waste operator). Moreover, a correlation was found between fire frequency and material recycled during past years. Further investigations of financial aspects and externalities of fire incidents are recommended.

  8. Metal-Organic Framework-Derived Materials for Sodium Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Guoqiang; Hou, Hongshuai; Ge, Peng; Huang, Zhaodong; Zhao, Ganggang; Yin, Dulin; Ji, Xiaobo

    2018-01-01

    Recently, sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) are extensively explored and are regarded as one of the most promising alternatives to lithium-ion batteries for electrochemical energy conversion and storage, owing to the abundant raw material resources, low cost, and similar electrochemical behavior of elemental sodium compared to lithium. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted enormous attention due to their high surface areas, tunable structures, and diverse applications in drug delivery, gas storage, and catalysis. Recently, there has been an escalating interest in exploiting MOF-derived materials as anodes for sodium energy storage due to their fast mass transport resulting from their highly porous structures and relatively simple preparation methods originating from in situ thermal treatment processes. In this Review, the recent progress of the sodium-ion storage performances of MOF-derived materials, including MOF-derived porous carbons, metal oxides, metal oxide/carbon nanocomposites, and other materials (e.g., metal phosphides, metal sulfides, and metal selenides), as SIB anodes is systematically and completely presented and discussed. Moreover, the current challenges and perspectives of MOF-derived materials in electrochemical energy storage are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Design and Synthesis of Novel Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) Toward High Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Eddaoudi [USF; Zaworotko, Michael [USF; Space, Brian [USF; Eckert, Juergen [USF

    2013-05-08

    Statement of Objectives: 1. Synthesize viable porous MOFs for high H2 storage at ambient conditions to be assessed by measuring H2 uptake. 2. Develop a better understanding of the operative interactions of the sorbed H2 with the organic and inorganic constituents of the sorbent MOF by means of inelastic neutron scattering (INS, to characterize the H2-MOF interactions) and computational studies (to interpret the data and predict novel materials suitable for high H2 uptake at moderate temperatures and relatively low pressures). 3. Synergistically combine the outcomes of objectives 1 and 2 to construct a made-to-order inexpensive MOF that is suitable for super H2 storage and meets the DOE targets - 6% H2 per weight (2kWh/kg) by 2010 and 9% H2 per weight (3kWh/kg) by 2015. The ongoing research is a collaborative experimental and computational effort focused on assessing H2 storage and interactions with pre-selected metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolite-like MOFs (ZMOFs), with the eventual goal of synthesizing made-to-order high H2 storage materials to achieve the DOE targets for mobile applications. We proposed in this funded research to increase the amount of H2 uptake, as well as tune the interactions (i.e. isosteric heats of adsorption), by targeting readily tunable MOFs:

  10. Applications of covalent organic frameworks (COFs): From gas storage and separation to drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Xue Wu; Ying-Wei Yang

    2017-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are an emerging class of porous covalent organic structures whose backbones were composed of light elements (B,C,N,O,Si) and linked by robust covalent bonds to endow such material with desirable properties,i.e.,inherent porosity,well-defined pore aperture,ordered channel structure,large surface area,high stability,and multi-dimension.As expected,the abovementioned properties of COFs broaden the applications of this class of materials in various fields such as gas storage and separation,catalysis,optoelectronics,sensing,small molecules adsorption,and drug delivery.In this review,we outlined the synthesis of COFs and highlighted their applications ranging from the initial gas storage and separation to drug delivery.

  11. Landform partitioning and estimates of deep storage of soil organic matter in Zackenberg, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Palmtag

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Soils in the northern high latitudes are a key component in the global carbon cycle, with potential feedback on climate. This study aims to improve the previous soil organic carbon (SOC and total nitrogen (TN storage estimates for the Zackenberg area (NE Greenland that were based on a land cover classification (LCC approach, by using geomorphological upscaling. In addition, novel organic carbon (OC estimates for deeper alluvial and deltaic deposits (down to 300 cm depth are presented. We hypothesise that landforms will better represent the long-term slope and depositional processes that result in deep SOC burial in this type of mountain permafrost environments. The updated mean SOC storage for the 0–100 cm soil depth is 4.8 kg C m−2, which is 42 % lower than the previous estimate of 8.3 kg C m−2 based on land cover upscaling. Similarly, the mean soil TN storage in the 0–100 cm depth decreased with 44 % from 0.50 kg (± 0.1 CI to 0.28 (±0.1 CI kg TN m−2. We ascribe the differences to a previous areal overestimate of SOC- and TN-rich vegetated land cover classes. The landform-based approach more correctly constrains the depositional areas in alluvial fans and deltas with high SOC and TN storage. These are also areas of deep carbon storage with an additional 2.4 kg C m−2 in the 100–300 cm depth interval. This research emphasises the need to consider geomorphology when assessing SOC pools in mountain permafrost landscapes.

  12. Landform partitioning and estimates of deep storage of soil organic matter in Zackenberg, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmtag, Juri; Cable, Stefanie; Christiansen, Hanne H.; Hugelius, Gustaf; Kuhry, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Soils in the northern high latitudes are a key component in the global carbon cycle, with potential feedback on climate. This study aims to improve the previous soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) storage estimates for the Zackenberg area (NE Greenland) that were based on a land cover classification (LCC) approach, by using geomorphological upscaling. In addition, novel organic carbon (OC) estimates for deeper alluvial and deltaic deposits (down to 300 cm depth) are presented. We hypothesise that landforms will better represent the long-term slope and depositional processes that result in deep SOC burial in this type of mountain permafrost environments. The updated mean SOC storage for the 0-100 cm soil depth is 4.8 kg C m-2, which is 42 % lower than the previous estimate of 8.3 kg C m-2 based on land cover upscaling. Similarly, the mean soil TN storage in the 0-100 cm depth decreased with 44 % from 0.50 kg (± 0.1 CI) to 0.28 (±0.1 CI) kg TN m-2. We ascribe the differences to a previous areal overestimate of SOC- and TN-rich vegetated land cover classes. The landform-based approach more correctly constrains the depositional areas in alluvial fans and deltas with high SOC and TN storage. These are also areas of deep carbon storage with an additional 2.4 kg C m-2 in the 100-300 cm depth interval. This research emphasises the need to consider geomorphology when assessing SOC pools in mountain permafrost landscapes.

  13. High performance hydrogen storage from Be-BTB metal-organic framework at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wei-Xian; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M; Hill, Matthew R

    2013-07-09

    The metal-organic framework beryllium benzene tribenzoate (Be-BTB) has recently been reported to have one of the highest gravimetric hydrogen uptakes at room temperature. Storage at room temperature is one of the key requirements for the practical viability of hydrogen-powered vehicles. Be-BTB has an exceptional 298 K storage capacity of 2.3 wt % hydrogen. This result is surprising given that the low adsorption enthalpy of 5.5 kJ mol(-1). In this work, a combination of atomistic simulation and continuum modeling reveals that the beryllium rings contribute strongly to the hydrogen interaction with the framework. These simulations are extended with a thermodynamic energy optimization (TEO) model to compare the performance of Be-BTB to a compressed H2 tank and benchmark materials MOF-5 and MOF-177 in a MOF-based fuel cell. Our investigation shows that none of the MOF-filled tanks satisfy the United States Department of Energy (DOE) storage targets within the required operating temperatures and pressures. However, the Be-BTB tank delivers the most energy per volume and mass compared to the other material-based storage tanks. The pore size and the framework mass are shown to be contributing factors responsible for the superior room temperature hydrogen adsorption of Be-BTB.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF PHYSIOLOGICAL-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DERMAL ABSORPTION NAD PENETRATION OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic chemical that is added to gasoline as an octane booster and to reduce vehicular emissions of carbon monoxide. MTBE is introduced into the environment through fuel spills, leakage of storage tanks, and evaporat...

  15. Boosting lithium storage in covalent organic framework via activation of 14-electron redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhendong; Yang, Qinsi; Xu, Yi; Guo, Siyu; Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Hao; Lv, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yong

    2018-02-08

    Conjugated polymeric molecules have been heralded as promising electrode materials for the next-generation energy-storage technologies owing to their chemical flexibility at the molecular level, environmental benefit, and cost advantage. However, before any practical implementation takes place, the low capacity, poor structural stability, and sluggish ion/electron diffusion kinetics remain the obstacles that have to be overcome. Here, we report the synthesis of a few-layered two-dimensional covalent organic framework trapped by carbon nanotubes as the anode of lithium-ion batteries. Remarkably, upon activation, this organic electrode delivers a large reversible capacity of 1536 mAh g -1 and can sustain 500 cycles at 100 mA g -1 . Aided by theoretical calculations and electrochemical probing of the electrochemical behavior at different stages of cycling, the storage mechanism is revealed to be governed by 14-electron redox chemistry for a covalent organic framework monomer with one lithium ion per C=N group and six lithium ions per benzene ring. This work may pave the way to the development of high-capacity electrodes for organic rechargeable batteries.

  16. Partitioning Behavior of Organic Contaminants in Carbon Storage Environments: A Critical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2012-12-04

    Carbon capture and storage is a promising strategy for mitigating the CO{sub 2} contribution to global climate change. The large scale implementation of the technology mandates better understanding of the risks associated with CO{sub 2} injection into geologic formations and the subsequent interactions with groundwater resources. The injected supercritical CO{sub 2} (sc-CO{sub 2}) is a nonpolar solvent that can potentially mobilize organic compounds that exist at residual saturation in the formation. Here, we review the partitioning behavior of selected organic compounds typically found in depleted oil reservoirs in the residual oil–brine–sc-CO{sub 2} system under carbon storage conditions. The solubility of pure phase organic compounds in sc-CO{sub 2} and partitioning of organic compounds between water and sc-CO{sub 2} follow trends predicted based on thermodynamics. Compounds with high volatility and low aqueous solubility have the highest potential to partition to sc-CO{sub 2}. The partitioning of low volatility compounds to sc-CO{sub 2} can be enhanced by co-solvency due to the presence of higher volatility compounds in the sc-CO{sub 2}. The effect of temperature, pressure, salinity, pH, and dissolution of water molecules into sc-CO{sub 2} on the partitioning behavior of organic compounds in the residual oil-brine-sc-CO{sub 2} system is discussed. Data gaps and research needs for models to predict the partitioning of organic compounds in brines and from complex mixtures of oils are presented. Models need to be able to better incorporate the effect of salinity and co-solvency, which will require more experimental data from key classes of organic compounds.

  17. Organic nitrogen storage in mineral soil: Implications for policy and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Andrew H., E-mail: drew_bingham@nps.gov [Air Resources Division, National Park Service, P.O. Box 25287, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Cotrufo, M. Francesca [Department of Soil and Crop Sciences and Natural Resources Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, 200 West Lake Street, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most important ecosystem nutrients and often its availability limits net primary production as well as stabilization of soil organic matter. The long-term storage of nitrogen-containing organic matter in soils was classically attributed to chemical complexity of plant and microbial residues that retarded microbial degradation. Recent advances have revised this framework, with the understanding that persistent soil organic matter consists largely of chemically labile, microbially processed organic compounds. Chemical bonding to minerals and physical protection in aggregates are more important to long-term (i.e., centuries to millennia) preservation of these organic compounds that contain the bulk of soil nitrogen rather than molecular complexity, with the exception of nitrogen in pyrogenic organic matter. This review examines for the first time the factors and mechanisms at each stage of movement into long-term storage that influence the sequestration of organic nitrogen in the mineral soil of natural temperate ecosystems. Because the factors which govern persistence are different under this newly accepted paradigm we examine the policy and management implications that are altered, such as critical load considerations, nitrogen saturation and mitigation consequences. Finally, it emphasizes how essential it is for this important but underappreciated pool to be better quantified and incorporated into policy and management decisions, especially given the lack of evidence for many soils having a finite capacity to sequester nitrogen. - Highlights: • We review the current framework for long-term nitrogen stabilization in soils. • We highlight the most important factors according to this framework. • We discuss how these factors may influence management and policy decisions.

  18. Carotenoids and flavonoids in organically grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea L) genotypes after deep frozen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidmose, U.; Knuthsen, Pia; Edelenbos, M.

    2001-01-01

    storage the green colour was determined by sensory evaluation and HunterLab colorimetry. The content of individual chlorophylls, carotenoids and flavonoids was determined using HPLC. Lutein, beta -carotene, violaxanthin and 9 '-(Z)-neoxanthin were the main carotenoids in processed spinach. The total......After frozen storage the content of individual carotenoids and flavonoids was determined in organically grown spinach genotypes (Spinacia oleracea L) which differed in leaf colour and shape. The spinach was sorted, washed, blanched in steam for 3 min and frozen in liquid nitrogen. After frozen...... of lutein and neoxanthin varied significantly between genotypes, and the highest content was found in the dark green genotype (76.0 and 25.4 mg kg(-1) 'wet weight' as eaten respectively). The total flavonoid content and the relative content of individual flavonoids were found to vary between the six...

  19. Thermal energy storage for low grade heat in the organic Rankine cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Michael John

    Limits of efficiencies cause immense amounts of thermal energy in the form of waste heat to be vented to the atmosphere. Up to 60% of unrecovered waste heat is classified as low or ultra-low quality, making recovery difficult or inefficient. The organic Rankine cycle can be used to generate mechanical power and electricity from these low temperatures where other thermal cycles are impractical. A variety of organic working fluids are available to optimize the ORC for any target temperature range. San Diego State University has one such experimental ORC using R245fa, and has been experimenting with multiple expanders. One limitation of recovering waste heat is the sporadic or cyclical nature common to its production. This inconsistency makes sizing heat recovery ORC systems difficult for a variety of reasons including off-design-point efficiency loss, increased attrition from varying loads, unreliable outputs, and overall system costs. Thermal energy storage systems can address all of these issues by smoothing the thermal input to a constant and reliable level and providing back-up capacity for times when the thermal input is deactivated. Multiple types of thermal energy storage have been explored including sensible, latent, and thermochemical. Latent heat storage involves storing thermal energy in the reversible phase change of a phase change material, or PCM, and can have several advantages over other modalities including energy storage density, cost, simplicity, reliability, relatively constant temperature output, and temperature customizability. The largest obstacles to using latent heat storage include heat transfer rates, thermal cycling stability, and potentially corrosive PCMs. Targeting 86°C, the operating temperature of SDSU's experimental ORC, multiple potential materials were explored and tested as potential PCMs including Magnesium Chloride Hexahydrate (MgCl2˙6H2O), Magnesium Nitrate Hexahydrate (Mg(NO3)2˙6H 2O), montan wax, and carnauba wax. The

  20. Assessment of concentration mechanisms for organic wastes in underground storage tanks at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.A.; Burger, L.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Ryan, J.L.; Zollars, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted an initial conservative evaluation of physical and chemical processes that could lead to significant localized concentrations of organic waste constituents in the Hanford underground storage tanks (USTs). This evaluation was part of ongoing studies at Hanford to assess potential safety risks associated with USTs containing organics. Organics in the tanks could pose a potential problem if localized concentrations are high enough to propagate combustion and are in sufficient quantity to produce a large heat and/or gas release if in contact with a suitable oxidant. The major sources of oxidants are oxygen in the overhead gas space of the tanks and sodium nitrate and nitrite either as salt cake solids or dissolved in the supernatant and interstitial liquids

  1. Organic n-type materials for charge transport and charge storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolar, Monika; Baumgartner, Thomas

    2013-06-21

    Conjugated materials have attracted much attention toward applications in organic electronics in recent years. These organic species offer many advantages as potential replacement for conventional materials (i.e., silicon and metals) in terms of cheap fabrication and environmentally benign devices. While p-type (electron-donating or hole-conducting) materials have been extensively reviewed and researched, their counterpart n-type (electron-accepting or electron-conducting) materials have seen much less popularity despite the greater need for improvement. In addition to developing efficient charge transport materials, it is equally important to provide a means of charge storage, where energy can be used on an on-demand basis. This perspective is focused on discussing a selection of representative n-type materials and the efforts toward improving their charge-transport efficiencies. Additionally, this perspective will also highlight recent organic materials for battery components and the efforts that have been made to improve their environmental appeal.

  2. Assessment of concentration mechanisms for organic wastes in underground storage tanks at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.A.; Burger, L.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Ryan, J.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Zollars, R.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted an initial conservative evaluation of physical and chemical processes that could lead to significant localized concentrations of organic waste constituents in the Hanford underground storage tanks (USTs). This evaluation was part of ongoing studies at Hanford to assess potential safety risks associated with USTs containing organics. Organics in the tanks could pose a potential problem if localized concentrations are high enough to propagate combustion and are in sufficient quantity to produce a large heat and/or gas release if in contact with a suitable oxidant. The major sources of oxidants are oxygen in the overhead gas space of the tanks and sodium nitrate and nitrite either as salt cake solids or dissolved in the supernatant and interstitial liquids.

  3. Current Travertines Precipitation from CO2-rich Groundwaters as an alert of CO2 Leakages from a Natural CO2 Storage at Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary Basin (Murcia, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo-Naharro, J.; Delgado, A.; Herrero, M. J.; Granados, A.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage technologies represent the most suitable solutions related to the high anthropogenic CO 2 emissions to the atmosphere. As a consequence, monitoring of the possible CO 2 leakages from an artificial deep geological CO 2 storage is indispensable to guarantee its safety. Fast surficial travertine precipitation related to these CO 2 leakages can be used as an alert for these escapes. Since few studies exist focusing on the long-term behaviour of an artificial CO 2 DGS, natural CO 2 storage affected by natural or artificial escapes must be studied as natural analogues for predicting the long-term behaviour of an artificial CO 2 storage. In this context, a natural CO 2 reservoir affected by artificial CO 2 escapes has been studied in this work. This study has mainly focused on the current travertines precipitation associated with the upwelling CO 2 -rich waters from several hydrogeological wells drilled in the Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary basin (SE Spain), and consists of a comprehensive characterisation of parent-waters and their associated carbonates, including elemental and isotopic geochemistry, mineralogy and petrography. Geochemical characterisation of groundwaters has led to recognise 4 hydrofacies from 3 different aquifers. These groundwaters have very high salinity and electrical conductivity; are slightly acid; present high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and free CO 2 ; are oversaturated in both aragonite and calcite; and dissolve, mobilize and transport low quantities of heavy and/or toxic elements. Isotopic values indicate that: i) the origin of parent-waters is related to rainfalls from clouds originated in the Mediterranean Sea or continental areas; ii) the origin of C is mainly inorganic; and iii) sulphate anions come mainly from the dissolution of the Messinian gypsum from the Tertiary Basin sediments. Current travertines precipitation seems to be controlled by a combination of several factors, such as: i) a fast decrease of the

  4. Current Travertines Precipitation from CO{sub 2}-rich Groundwaters as an alert of CO{sub 2} Leakages from a Natural CO{sub 2} Storage at Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary Basin (Murcia, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo-Naharro, J.; Delgado, A.; Herrero, M. J.; Granados, A.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon capture and storage technologies (CCS) represent the most suitable solutions related to the high anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere. As a consequence, monitoring of the possible CO{sub 2} leakages from an artificial deep geological CO{sub 2} storage (DGS) is indispensable to guarantee its safety. Fast surficial travertine precipitation related to these CO{sub 2} leakages can be used as an alert for these escapes. Since few studies exist focusing on the long-term behaviour of an artificial CO{sub 2} DGS, natural CO{sub 2} storage affected by natural or artificial escapes must be studied as natural analogues for predicting the long-term behaviour of an artificial CO{sub 2} storage. In this context, a natural CO{sub 2} reservoir affected by artificial CO{sub 2} escapes has been studied in this work. This study has mainly focused on the current travertines precipitation associated with the upwelling CO{sub 2}-rich waters from several hydrogeological wells drilled in the Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary basin (SE Spain), and consists of a comprehensive characterisation of parent-waters and their associated carbonates, including elemental and isotopic geochemistry, mineralogy and petrography. Geochemical characterisation of groundwaters has led to recognise 4 hydrofacies from 3 different aquifers. These groundwaters have very high salinity and electrical conductivity; are slightly acid; present high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and free CO{sub 2}; are oversaturated in both aragonite and calcite; and dissolve, mobilize and transport low quantities of heavy and/or toxic elements. Isotopic values indicate that: i) the origin of parent-waters is related to rainfalls from clouds originated in the Mediterranean Sea or continental areas; ii) the origin of C is mainly inorganic; and iii) sulphate anions come mainly from the dissolution of the Messinian gypsum from the Tertiary Basin sediments. Current travertines precipitation seems to be controlled by a

  5. Influence of dietary lipid and protein sources on the sensory quality of organic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after ice storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green-Petersen, Ditte; Hyldig, Grethe; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The influence of dietary protein and lipid sources on the quality of organic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied. The protein and oil sources were fishmeal, fish oil, and organic vegetable protein and oils. Sensory profiling was performed during 3 to 14 days of ice storage along...... with lipid analyses of the fillet. Overall, the results showed that the sensory characteristics of the trout were affected in different ways during ice storage. The source of lipid seemed to affect the sensory quality at the beginning of the storage period, while the protein source seemed to have a more...

  6. Thermal energy storage for organic Rankine cycle solar dynamic space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, G. R.; Parekh, M. B.

    An organic Rankine cycle-solar dynamic power system (ORC-SDPS) comprises a concentrator, a radiator, a power conversion unit, and a receiver with a thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem which charges and discharges energy to meet power demands during orbital insolation and eclipse periods. Attention is presently given to the criteria used in designing and evaluating an ORC-SDPS TES, as well as the automated test facility employed. It is found that a substantial data base exists for the design of an ORC-SDPS TES subsystem.

  7. Mechanism of the extraction of nitric acid and water by organic solutions of tertiary alkyl-amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourisse, D.

    1966-06-01

    The micellar aggregation of tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrates in low polarity organic solvents has been verified by viscosity, conductivity and sedimentation velocity measurements. The aggregation depends upon the polarity of solvent, the length of the alkyl radicals and the organic concentration of the various constituents (tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate, tri-alkyl-amine, nitric acid, water). The amine salification law has been established and the excess nitric acid and water solubilities in the organic solutions have been measured. Nitric acid and water are slightly more soluble in micellar organic solutions than in molecular organic solutions. A description of excess nitric acid containing tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate solutions is proposed. (author) [fr

  8. Can Carbon Fluxes Explain Differences in Soil Organic Carbon Storage under Aspen and Conifer Forest Overstories?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antra Boča

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate- and management-induced changes in tree species distributions are raising questions regarding tree species-specific effects on soil organic carbon (SOC storage and stability. Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. is the most widespread tree species in North America, but fire exclusion often promotes the succession to conifer dominated forests. Aspen in the Western US have been found to store more SOC in the mineral soil than nearby conifers, but we do not yet fully understand the source of this differential SOC accumulation. We measured total SOC storage (0–50 cm, characterized stable and labile SOC pools, and quantified above- and belowground litter inputs and dissolved organic carbon (DOC fluxes during snowmelt in plots located in N and S Utah, to elucidate the role of foliage vs. root detritus in SOC storage and stabilization in both ecosystems. While leaf litterfall was twice as high under aspen as under conifers, input of litter-derived DOC with snowmelt water was consistently higher under conifers. Fine root (<2 mm biomass, estimated root detritus input, and root-derived DOC fluxes were also higher under conifers. A strong positive relationship between root and light fraction C content suggests that root detritus mostly fueled the labile fraction of SOC. Overall, neither differences in above- and belowground detritus C inputs nor in detritus-derived DOC fluxes could explain the higher and more stable SOC pools under aspen. We hypothesize that root–microbe–soil interactions in the rhizosphere are more likely to drive these SOC pool differences.

  9. Causative organisms in chronic suppurative otitis media and their drug sensitivity in a tertiary hospital of southern punjab, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydri, A.S.; Alam, M.J.; Anwar, K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To diagnose common organisms causing Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) and their in vitro sensitivity. Methodology: This descriptive study was carried out at Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) Department, Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Multan from July 2014 to June 2015. A total of 140 patients with active CSOM were included in this study. Ear swabs were collected from the discharging ear and sent for aerobic cultures only. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was done with standard antibiotic discs using Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Results: Pathogens were isolated in all except 13 ears. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism isolated alone in 76 ears and in combination with other micro-organisms in 18 ears, followed by staphylococcus aureus in 23 and MRSA in four ears. Mixed organisms were found in 20 patients. Antibiotic sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed that 100% isolates were sensitive to imipenem and meropenem while Staphylococcus aureus was 100% sensitive to Chloramphenicol. Conclusion: Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococcus aureus were commonest organism isolated in CSOM. Similar studies should periodically be conducted in various regions to have a current knowledge of the offending organisms and their sensitivity patterns against various antibiotics before commencing treatment of CSOM. (author)

  10. [Effect of straw-returning on the storage and distribution of different active fractions of soil organic carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hul; Wang, Xu-dong; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2014-12-01

    The impacts of straw mulching and returning on the storage of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral associated organic carbon (MOC), and their proportions to the total organic carbon (TOC) were studied based on a field experiment. The results showed that compared to the treatment of wheat straw soil-returning (WR), the storage of TOC and MOC decreased by 4.1% and 9.7% respectively in 0-20 cm soil in the treatment with wheat straw mulching (WM), but the storage of DOC and POC increased by 207.7% and 11.9%, and TOC and POC increased significantly in 20-40 cm soil. Compared to the treatment with maize straw soil-returning (MR), the storage of TOC and MOC in the plough pan soil of the treatment with maize straw mulching (MM) increased by 13.6% and 14.6% , respectively. Compared to the WR-MR treatment, the storage of TOC and MOC in top soil (0-20 icm) significantly decreased by 8.5% and 10.3% respectively in WM-MM treatment. The storage of TOC, and POC in top soil was significantly higher in the treatments with maize straw soil-returning or mulching than that with wheat straw. Compared to the treatment without straw (CK), the storage of TOC in top soil increased by 5.2% to 18.0% in the treatments with straw returning or mulching in the six modes (WM, WR, MM, MR, WM-MM,WR-MR) (Porganic carbon fraction in soil, straw soil-returning had the potential to accumulate stable organic carbon fraction. Considering organic carbon sequestration in cropland in the region of Guanzhong plain, maize straw mulching or soil-returning was better than wheat straw, and wheat straw and maize straw soil-returning (WR-MR) were better than wheat and maize straw mulching (WM-MM).

  11. Radical covalent organic frameworks: a general strategy to immobilize open-accessible polyradicals for high-performance capacitive energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Wu, Dingcai; Wu, Yang; Liu, Hao; Gu, Cheng; Fu, Ruowen; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-01

    Ordered π-columns and open nanochannels found in covalent organic frameworks (COFs) could render them able to store electric energy. However, the synthetic difficulty in achieving redox-active skeletons has thus far restricted their potential for energy storage. A general strategy is presented for converting a conventional COF into an outstanding platform for energy storage through post-synthetic functionalization with organic radicals. The radical frameworks with openly accessible polyradicals immobilized on the pore walls undergo rapid and reversible redox reactions, leading to capacitive energy storage with high capacitance, high-rate kinetics, and robust cycle stability. The results suggest that channel-wall functional engineering with redox-active species will be a facile and versatile strategy to explore COFs for energy storage. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Distribution of organic carbon and petroleum source rock potential of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary carbonates, South Florida Basin: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacas, James George

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of 134 core samples from the South Florida Basin show that the carbonates of Comanchean age are relatively richer in average organic carbon (0.41 percent) than those of Coahuilan age (0.28 percent), Gulfian age (0.18 percent) and Paleocene age (0.20 percent). They are also nearly twice as rich as the average world, wide carbonate (average 0.24 percent). The majority of carbonates have organic carbons less than 0.30 percent but the presence of many relatively organic rich beds composed of highly bituminous, argillaceous, highly stylolitic, and algal-bearing limestones and dolomites accounts for the higher percentage of organic carbon in some of the stratigraphic units. Carbonate rocks that contain greater than 0.4 percent organic carbon and that might be considered as possible petroleum sources were noted in almost each subdivision of the Coahuilan and Comanchean Series but particularly the units of Fredericksburg 'B', Trinity 'A', Trinity 'F', and Upper Sunniland. Possible source rocks have been ascribed by others to the Lower Sunniland, but lack of sufficient samples precluded any firm assessment in this initial report. In the shallower section of the basin, organic-rich carbonates containing as much as 3.2 percent organic carbon were observed in the lowermost part of the Gulfian Series and carbonate rocks with oil staining or 'dead' and 'live oil' were noted by others in the uppermost Gulfian and upper Cedar Keys Formation. It is questionable whether these shallower rocks are of sufficient thermal maturity to have generated commercial oil. The South Florida basin is still sparsely drilled and produces only from the Sunniland Limestone at an average depth of 11,500 feet (3500 m). Because the Sunniland contains good reservoir rocks and apparently adequate source rocks, and because the success rate of new oil field discoveries has increased in recent years, the chances of finding additional oil reserves in the Sunniland are promising. Furthermore, the

  13. Pattern and change of soil organic carbon storage in China: 1960s-1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaoqiang Wang; Hanqin Tian; Jiyuan Liu; Shufen Pan

    2003-01-01

    Soils, an important component of the global carbon cycle, can be either net sources or net sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). In this study, we use the first and second national soil surveys of China to investigate patterns and changes in soil organic carbon storage (SOC) during the period from the 1960s to the 1980s. Our results show that there is a large amount of variability in SOC density among different soil types and land uses in the 1980s. The SOC density in the wetlands of Southwest China was the highest (45 kg/m 2 ), followed by meadow soils in the South (26 kg/m 2 ), forest and woodlands in the Northwest (19 kg/m 2 ), steppe and grassland in the Northwest (15 kg/m 2 ), shrubs in the Northwest (12 kg/m 2 ), paddy lands in the Northwest (13 kg/m 2 ), and drylands in the Northwest (11 kg/m 2 ). The desert soils of the Western region ranked the lowest (1 kg/m 2 ). The density of SOC was generally higher in the west than other regions. Eastern China had the lowest SOC density, which was associated with a long history of extensive land use in the region. The estimation of SOC storage for the entire nation was 93 Pg C in the 1960s and 92 Pg C in the 1980s. SOC storage decreased about 1 Pg C during the 1960s-1980s. This amount of decrease in SOC for the entire nation is small and statistically insignificant. To adequately characterize spatial variations in SOC, larger sampling sizes of soil profiles will be required in the future analyses

  14. Complex Nanostructures from Materials based on Metal-Organic Frameworks for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Bu Yuan; Yu, Xin Yao; Wu, Hao Bin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2017-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have drawn tremendous attention because of their abundant diversity in structure and composition. Recently, there has been growing research interest in deriving advanced nanomaterials with complex architectures and tailored chemical compositions from MOF-based precursors for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Here, a comprehensive overview of the synthesis and energy-related applications of complex nanostructures derived from MOF-based precursors is provided. After a brief summary of synthetic methods of MOF-based templates and their conversion to desirable nanostructures, delicate designs and preparation of complex architectures from MOFs or their composites are described in detail, including porous structures, single-shelled hollow structures, and multishelled hollow structures, as well as other unusual complex structures. Afterward, their applications are discussed as electrode materials or catalysts for lithium-ion batteries, hybrid supercapacitors, water-splitting devices, and fuel cells. Lastly, the research challenges and possible development directions of complex nanostructures derived from MOF-based-templates for electrochemical energy storage and conversion applications are outlined. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Effect of curd freezing and packaging methods on the organic acid contents of goat cheeses during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Balkir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of freezing and packaging methods on organic acid content of goat cheese during 12 weeks of storage were determined. Goat cheese milk curds were divided into two batches; one of the batches was directly processed in to goat cheese while the other was frozen at -18 °C and stored for six months and processed into cheese after being thawed. Cheese samples were packed in three parts and stored at 4 °C refrigerated control sample and at -18 °C for six months frozen experimental samples. Cheese samples were packed in three different packaging methods: aerobic, vacuum or modified atmosphere. Citric, malic, fumaric, acetic, lactic, pyruvic and propionic acids were analyzed using HPLC method after 1st, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th week of storage period. Lactic acid was the main organic acids while pyruvic acid had the lowest content in all cheese samples. Citric and fumaric acid levels of frozen samples increased during storage whereas malic, acetic, pyruvic and propionic acid amounts were decreased compared to the beginning of storage. Packaging methods and freezing process also effected lactic acid levels statistically (p<0.05. Fumaric, acetic and lactic acid concentration of refrigerated samples were increased but citric, malic and propionic acids decreased during storage. Pyruvic acid level did not change significantly. It was determined that organic acid concentrations were effected by freezing process, storage time and packaging methods significantly (p<0.05.

  16. High-pressure, ambient temperature hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks and porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckner, Matthew; Dailly, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We investigated hydrogen storage in micro-porous adsorbents at ambient temperature and pressures up to 320 bar. We measured three benchmark adsorbents: two metal-organic frameworks, Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2 [Cu3(btc)2; HKUST-1] and Zn4O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate)2 [Zn4O(btb)2; MOF-177], and the activated carbon MSC-30. In this talk, we focus on adsorption enthalpy calculations using a single adsorption isotherm. We use the differential form of the Claussius-Clapeyron equation applied to the Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption model to calculate adsorption enthalpies. Calculation of the adsorption enthalpy in this way gives a temperature independent enthalpy of 5-7 kJ/mol at the lowest coverage for the three materials investigated. Additionally, we discuss the assumptions and corrections that must be made when calculating adsorption isotherms at high-pressure and adsorption enthalpies.

  17. Characterization by fluorescence of dissolved organic matter in rural drinking water storage tanks in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faissal; Ouazzani, Naaila; Mandi, Laila; Assaad, Aziz; Pontvianne, Steve; Poirot, Hélène; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2018-04-01

    Water storage tanks, fed directly from the river through opened channels, are particular systems used for water supply in rural areas in Morocco. The stored water is used as drinking water by the surrounding population without any treatment. UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence) have been tested as rapid methods to assess the quality of the water stored in the reservoirs as well as along the river feeding them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS50), collected with a difference of 50 nm between excitation and emission wavelengths, revealed a high tryptophan-like fluorescence, indicative of a pollution induced by untreated domestic and/or farm wastewater. The best correlations were obtained between the total SFS50 fluorescence and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and biological oxygen demand, showing that the contribution of humic-like fluorescent substances cannot be neglected to rapidly assess reservoir water quality in terms of DOC by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  18. Speciation of organic carbon in Hanford waste storage tanks: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, C.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report is the first in a series to report on speciation of organic carbon in Hanford waste storage tanks. The comparison of the existing total organic carbon with oxalate and limited analyses of other organic species (acetate, formate, and normal paraffin hydrocarbons [NPH]) are reported. All of the data have been previously reported by the Grout and Characterization programs; the information includes all of the publicly available data through October 1996. Oxalate data were reported for 33 tanks, TOC data were reported for 82 tanks, and both oxalate and TOC data were available for 27 tanks. Of these 27 tanks, seven were found to have greater than 80% of the TOC identified as oxalate: 241-BY-104, 241-BY-105, 241-BY-106, 241-BY-110, 241-S-109, and 241-SX-108. Eighty percent accountability has been tentatively established as a minimum goal of the Organic Safety Program for speciation of TOC. Accountability of TOC through speciation will allow more accurate estimate of the potential energy content of the wastes as currently stored. Of the remaining 19 tanks, seven had between 40 and 80% of the TOC identified as oxalate, and eleven had less than 35% of the TOC identified. Of these, only five tanks had segment results that were greater than 1% TOC, and none was above 2%. Since the cur-rent safety criterion outlined in the Safety Analysis is 4.5% TOC, it may be determined that the further analyses of these tank wastes are not necessary. If additional analyses are deemed necessary, minimal work may be required, possibly limited to ion chromatography (IC), ion pair chromatography and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Additional speciation work is planned for this fiscal year in both the Organic Tanks Safety and Characterization programs. The Characterization program reports acetate and formate data in addition to the oxalate data for all the tank cores it processes

  19. Feeding of low birth weight newborns in tertiary care hospitals in pakistan: do they follow the world health organization latest guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, J.; Stafstrom, M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the extent the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the care of Low Birth Weight (LBW) newborns are followed in Pakistani hospitals and analyze any difference in policy compliance between different hospitals. Study Design: Descriptive analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Data was collected from five tertiary care hospitals, one each from Peshawar, Lahore, Quetta, Karachi and Islamabad, from January to June 2012. Methodology: LBW newborns data derived from medical records was used. It was collected using a questionnaire, which encompassed the recent WHO recommendations for feeding of LBW. Twenty questionnaires were collected from each hospital. STATA 11.0 was used to analyze the data. Results: Fifty seven LBW newborns (57%) were fed with mother's own milk, and 9 (9%) were fed on donor human milk. Forty four newborns (44%) were initiated breast feeding within the first hour after birth. Most of the babies not able to be breast fed were fed with intra gastric tube. Feeding practices varied markedly across hospitals, ranging from one hospital where all newborns were fed formula milk to one where all were fed breast milk. Conclusion: The WHO guidelines were only partially implemented, with significant differences between hospitals in level of implementation of recommended practices. Given the benefits expected from the application of the guidelines, efforts should be made for the establishment and promotion of a single national policy for LBW feeding that follows the WHO new guidelines and streamlines the LBW feeding practices across the country. (author)

  20. Feeding of Low Birth Weight Newborns in Tertiary Care Hospitals in Pakistan: Do They Follow the World Health Organization Latest Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Jehangir; Stafstrom, Martin; Martines, Jose Carlos

    2015-08-01

    To determine the extent the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the care of Low Birth Weight (LBW) newborns are followed in Pakistani hospitals and analyze any difference in policy compliance between different hospitals. Descriptive analytical study. Data was collected from five tertiary care hospitals, one each from Peshawar, Lahore, Quetta, Karachi and Islamabad, from January to June 2012. LBW newborns data derived from medical records was used. It was collected using a questionnaire, which encompassed the recent WHO recommendations for feeding of LBW. Twenty questionnaires were collected from each hospital. STATA11.0 was used to analyze the data. Fifty seven LBW newborns (57%) were fed with mother's own milk, and 9 (9%) were fed on donor human milk. Forty four newborns (44%) were initiated breastfeeding within the first hour after birth. Most of the babies not able to be breastfed were fed with intra gastric tube. Feeding practices varied markedly across hospitals, ranging from one hospital where all newborns were fed formula milk to one where all were fed breast milk. The WHO guidelines were only partially implemented, with significant differences between hospitals in level of implementation of recommended practices. Given the benefits expected from the application of the guidelines, efforts should be made for the establishment and promotion of a single national policy for LBW feeding that follows the WHO new guidelines and streamlines the LBW feeding practices across the country.

  1. Mobile phones and computer keyboards: unlikely reservoirs of multidrug-resistant organisms in the tertiary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smibert, O C; Aung, A K; Woolnough, E; Carter, G P; Schultz, M B; Howden, B P; Seemann, T; Spelman, D; McGloughlin, S; Peleg, A Y

    2018-03-02

    Few studies have used molecular epidemiological methods to study transmission links to clinical isolates in intensive care units. Ninety-four multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) cultured from routine specimens from intensive care unit (ICU) patients over 13 weeks were stored (11 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), two vancomycin-resistant enterococci and 81 Gram-negative bacteria). Medical staff personal mobile phones, departmental phones, and ICU keyboards were swabbed and cultured for MDROs; MRSA was isolated from two phones. Environmental and patient isolates of the same genus were selected for whole genome sequencing. On whole genome sequencing, the mobile phone isolates had a pairwise single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) distance of 183. However, >15,000 core genome SNPs separated the mobile phone and clinical isolates. In a low-endemic setting, mobile phones and keyboards appear unlikely to contribute to hospital-acquired MDROs. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Organic petrology and Rock-Eval characteristics in selected surficial samples of the Tertiary Formation, South Sumatra Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Hermiyanto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol4no3.20096Organic petrologic data of the DOM of Talangakar and Muaraenim Formations show that the organic matter consisting mainly of vitrinite group is essentially composed of telocollinite (1.0 – 70.8 % and desmocollinite (0.8 – 66.6 % with minor telinite (0.6 – 9.4 %, detrovitrinite (0.6 – 6.0 %, and cor- pocollinite (0.6 – 2.0 %. Minor exinite (0.4 – 7.8 % and inertinite (0.4 – 8.0 % are also determined. However, mineral matter varies from 0.6 – 99.44 %. Downwards, the increase in vitrinite reflectance (0.33 – 0.48 % is concomitant with the depth of each formation. Furthermore, based on Rock-eval pyrolysis, TOC value of the Talangakar Formation ranges from 0.09 – 15.38 %, Gumai 0.34 – 0.39 %, Airbenakat 0.32 – 4.82 %, and Muaraenim between 0.08 – 15.22 %. Moreover the PY (Potential Yield value variation of the Talangakar, Gumai, Airbenakat, and Muaraenim Formations are between 0.04 – 36.61 mg HC/g rock, 0.53 – 0.81 mg HC/g rock, 0.1 – 4.37 mg HC/g rock, and 0.07 – 129.8 mg HC/g rock respectively. Therefore, on the basis of those two parameters, the four formations are included into a gas - oil prone source rock potential. However, the Talangakar and Muaraenim Formations are poor to excellent category, whereas the Air Benakat tends to indicate a poor – fair category and Gumai Formation are only within a poor category. Tmax value of the Talangakar ranges from 237 – 4380 C, Gumai 316 – 3590 C, Airbenakat 398 – 4340 C with exceptions of 4970 C and 5180 C, and Muaraenim Forma- tions 264 – 4250 C. The Talangakar Formation contains kerogen Type II dan III, with the HI (Hydrogen Index value varies from 45.16 – 365.43. However two samples show value of 0. The organic content of the Gumai and Air Benakat Formations are included into kerogen type III, with HI value ranges from11.87 – 40.82, and 19 – 114 respectively. Moreover the Muaraenim Formation has two category of

  3. Analysis of volatile organic compounds of ‘Fuji’ apples following electron beam irradiation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hyun-Pa; Shim, Sung-Lye; Lee, Sun-Im; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2012-01-01

    The volatile organic compounds of non-irradiated and electron-beam irradiated ‘Fuji’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) at 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy were isolated through simultaneous distillation extractions and analyzed using gas chromatograph–mass spectrometry. A total of 53 volatile organic compounds were characterized in 0 and 1 kGy irradiated samples, whereas two more compounds related to ketone and terpenoid group were identified in 0.5 kGy irradiated samples. The contents of volatile compounds were 24.33, 36.49, and 35.28 mg/kg in 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy irradiated samples, respectively. The major compounds identified were butanol, hexanal, [E]-2-hexenal, and hexanol in all samples. The relative content of alcohol increased after 30 days of storage in all samples, whereas that of aldehyde decreased. Although the contents of some volatile compounds were changed by electron-beam irradiation, the total yield and major flavor compounds of irradiated ‘Fuji’ apples were similar to, or even greater than, those of the control. Therefore, the application of e-beam irradiation if required for microbial decontamination of ‘Fuji’ apples is an acceptable method as it does not bring about any major quantitative changes of volatile organic compounds. - Highlights: ► We analyzed the volatile organic compounds of electron beam irradiated Fuji apples. ► The major compounds of samples were butanol, hexanal, [E]-2-hexenal, and hexanol. ► The contents of major flavor compounds of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were similar.

  4. Fabrication of Flexible, Fully Organic, Degradable Energy Storage Devices Using Silk Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Ramendra K; Kundu, Subhas C; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2018-03-21

    Flexible and thin-film devices are of great interest in epidermal and implantable bioelectronics. The integration of energy storage and delivery devices such as supercapacitors (SCs) with properties such as flexibility, miniaturization, biocompatibility, and degradability are sought for such systems. Reducing e-waste and using sustainable materials and processes are additional desirable qualities. Herein, a silk protein-based biocompatible and degradable thin-film microSC (μSC) is reported. A protein carrier with the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate and reduced graphene oxide dopant is used as a photopatternable biocomposite ink. Active electrodes are fabricated using photolithography under benign conditions, using only water as the solvent. These electrodes are printed on flexible protein sheets to form degradable, organic devices with a benign agarose-NaCl gel electrolyte. High capacitance, power density, cycling stability over 500 cycles, and the ability to power a light-emitting diode are shown. The device is flexible, can sustain cyclic mechanical stresses over 450 cycles, and retain capacitive properties over several days in liquid. Significantly, the μSCs are cytocompatible and completely degraded over the period of ∼1 month. By precise control of the device configuration, these silk protein-based, all-polymer organic devices can be designed to be tunably transient and provide viable alternatives for powering flexible and implantable bioelectronics.

  5. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2014-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  6. Barriers to the widespread adoption of health data standards: an exploratory qualitative study in tertiary healthcare organizations in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkraiji, Abdullah; Jackson, Thomas; Murray, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Although health data standards are perceived to be the essential solution for interoperability barriers within medical IT systems, the level of adoption of those standards still remains frustratingly low. Little is known about the barriers facing their adoption within the healthcare organizations context. In addressing this gap in the literature, based on IT related standards adoption theories such as Diffusion of Innovation Theory and the theories surrounding the Economics of Standards, a qualitative multiple-case study was undertaken in Saudi Arabia to investigate those barriers. The results exposed that few standards were adopted because of four broad reasons, managerial, technical, educational and governmental. While some of the findings can be rooted to those related standards theories, others can be underpinned through the normative literature. Core barriers are the lack of a national regulator and a data exchange plan, and the lack of an adequate policy regarding medical IT systems and information management and national healthcare system; also important are technical barriers and the switching costs to the standards. The outcome of this study can be used in forming effective interventions when planning to use health data standards and, in particular those in developing countries.

  7. Quantification of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) storage in lakes and reservoirs of mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kaishan; Wen, Zhidan; Shang, Yingxing; Yang, Hong; Lyu, Lili; Liu, Ge; Fang, Chong; Du, Jia; Zhao, Ying

    2018-04-04

    As a major fraction of carbon in inland waters, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays a crucial role in carbon cycling on a global scale. However, the quantity of DOC stored in lakes and reservoirs was not clear to date. In an attempt to examine the factors that determine the DOC storage in lakes and reservoirs across China, we assembled a large database (measured 367 lakes, and meta-analyzed 102 lakes from five limnetic regions; measured 144 reservoirs, and meta-analyzed 272 reservoirs from 31 provincial units) of DOC concentrations and water storages for lakes and reservoirs that are used to determine DOC storage in static inland waters. We found that DOC concentrations in saline waters (Mean/median ± S.D: 50.5/30.0 ± 55.97 mg/L) are much higher than those in fresh waters (8.1/5.9 ± 6.8 mg/L), while lake DOC concentrations (25.9/11.5 ± 42.04 mg/L) are much higher than those in reservoirs (5.0/3.8 ± 4.5 mg/L). In terms of lake water volume and DOC storage, the Tibet-Qinghai lake region has the largest water volume (552.8 km 3 ), 92% of which is saline waters, thus the largest DOC (13.39 Tg) is stored in these alpine lake region; followed by the Mengxin lake region, having a water volume of 99.4 km 3 in which 1.75 Tg DOC was stored. Compared to Mengxin lake region, almost the same amount of water was stored in East China lake region (91.9 km 3 ), however, much less DOC was stored in this region (0.43 Tg) due to the lower DOC concentration (Ave: 3.45 ± 2.68 mg/L). According to our investigation, Yungui and Northeast lake regions had water storages of 32.14 km 3 and 19.44 km 3 respectively, but relatively less DOC was stored in Yungui (0.13 Tg) than in Northeast lake region (0.19 Tg). Due to low DOC concentration in reservoirs, especially these large reservoirs having lower DOC concentration (V > 1.0 km 3 : 2.31 ± 1.48 mg/L), only 1.54 Tg was stored in a 485.1 km 3 volume of water contained

  8. Severe Fertility Effects of sheepish Sperm Caused by Failure To Enter Female Sperm Storage Organs in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Tomaru

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, mature sperm are transferred from males to females during copulation, stored in the sperm storage organs of females, and then utilized for fertilization. Here, we report a gene named sheepish (shps of Drosophila melanogaster that is essential for sperm storage in females. shps mutant males, although producing morphologically normal and motile sperm that are effectively transferred to females, produce very few offspring. Direct counts of sperm indicated that the primary defect was correlated to failure of shps sperm to migrate into the female sperm storage organs. Increased sperm motion parameters were seen in the control after transfer to females, whereas sperm from shps males have characteristics of the motion parameters different from the control. The few sperm that occasionally entered the female sperm storage organs showed no obvious defects in fertilization and early embryo development. The female postmating responses after copulation with shps males appeared normal, at least with respect to conformational changes of uterus, mating plug formation, and female remating rates. The shps gene encodes a protein with homology to amine oxidases, including as observed in mammals, with a transmembrane region at the C-terminal end. The shps mutation was characterized by a nonsense replacement in the third exon of CG13611, and shps was rescued by transformants of the wild-type copy of CG13611. Thus, shps may define a new class of gene responsible for sperm storage.

  9. Experimental insights into organic carbon oxidation potential during fluvial transport without floodplain storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Hovius, N.; Sachse, D.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Turowski, J. M.; Hilton, R. G.

    2016-12-01

    Over geologic timescales, the exchange of organic carbon (OC) between the atmosphere, rock, and biosphere is thought to be a major control on global climate. CO2 flux estimates from oxidation of rock-derived OC and sequestration of biospheric OC during fluvial transit from source to sink are approximately the same order of magnitude or larger than those from silicate weathering. Despite field data showing loss of OC moving downstream in lowland rivers, it is unclear if losses occur primarily during active fluvial transport within the river, where OC is in continual motion within an aerated environment, or during longer periods when OC is temporarily stored in river floodplains which may be anoxic. This represents a major knowledge gap, as the unknown location of OC oxidation (i.e., river vs. floodplain) limits our ability to develop process-based models that can be employed to predict OC losses, constrain carbon budgets, and unravel links between climate, tectonics, and erosion. To fill this gap, we investigated the potential for OC oxidation in laboratory experiments simulating fluvial transport without floodplain storage. Mixtures of OC-rich and siliciclastic sediment were transported for distances of 2000 km in annular flumes while making time-series measurements of sediment TOC and water DOC concentrations. Initial results for transport of OC-rich soil show increasing DOC with transport distance to levels that represent a transfer of 2% of the total OC from the solid to the dissolved phase; however, we observed no detectable change in the solid-phase TOC. Similar results were obtained in a control experiment with identical sediment in still water. These preliminary results suggest minimal OC oxidation within our experiment, and, to the extent that such experiments represent natural transport through river systems, are consistent with the hypothesis that OC losses may occur primarily during floodplain storage rather than fluvial transport.

  10. Crystal Engineering of Naphthalenediimide-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks: Structure-Dependent Lithium Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bingbing; Ning, Guo-Hong; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Li-Min; Tang, Wei; Chen, Zhongxin; Su, Chenliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-11-16

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) possess great structural diversity because of the flexible design of linker groups and metal nodes. The structure-property correlation has been extensively investigated in areas like chiral catalysis, gas storage and absorption, water purification, energy storage, etc. However, the use of MOFs in lithium storage is hampered by stability issues, and how its porosity helps with battery performance is not well understood. Herein, through anion and thermodynamic control, we design a series of naphthalenediimide-based MOFs 1-4 that can be used for cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Complexation of the N,N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide (DPNDI) ligand and CdX 2 (X = NO 3 - or ClO 4 - ) produces complexes MOFs 1 and 2 with a one-dimensional (1D) nonporous network and a porous, noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) square-grid structure, respectively. With the DPNDI ligand and Co(NCS) 2 , a porous 1D MOF 3 as a kinetic product is obtained, while a nonporous, noninterpenetrated 2D square-grid structure MOF 4 as a thermodynamic product is formed. The performance of LIBs is largely affected by the stability and porosity of these MOFs. For instance, the initial charge-discharge curves of MOFs 1 and 2 show a specific capacity of ∼47 mA h g -1 with a capacity retention ratio of >70% during 50 cycles at 100 mA g -1 , which is much better than that of MOFs 3 and 4. The better performances are assigned to the higher stability of Cd(II) MOFs compared to that of Co(II) MOFs during the electrochemical process, according to X-ray diffraction analysis. In addition, despite having the same Cd(II) node in the framework, MOF 2 exhibits a lithium-ion diffusion coefficient (D Li ) larger than that of MOF 1 because of its higher porosity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that metal nodes in these MOFs remain intact and only the DPNDI ligand undergoes the revisible redox reaction

  11. A study of soil organic carbon distribution and storage in the Northeast Plain of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohuan Xi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Employing the Unit Soil Carbon Amount (USCA approach, soil carbon storage was calculated across the Northeast Plain of China based on the Multi-purpose Regional Geochemical Survey conducted in 2004–2006 (MRGS. The results indicated that the soil organic carbon (SOC storage in topsoil (0–0.2 m, subsoil (0–1 m and deep soil (0–1.8 m was 768.1 Mt, 2978.4 Mt and 3729.2 Mt with densities of 3327.8 t/km2, 12,904.7 t/km2 and 16,157.5 t/km2, respectively. These values were consistent with national averages, whereas the soil carbon densities showed a clear increasing trend from the southern area of the Northeast Plain (Liaoning, to the middle (Jilin and the northern Plain (Heilongjiang — particularly in terms of topsoil carbon density, which increased from 2284.2, to 3436.7 and 3861.5 t/km2, respectively. In comparison to carbon data obtained from the Second National Soil Survey in 1984–1986 (SNSS, the topsoil SOC storage values from the MRGS were found to have decreased by 320.59 Mt (29.4%, with an average annual decline of 16.0 Mt (l.73% over the 20 years. In the southern, middle and northern areas of the plain, soil carbon densities decreased by 1060.6 t/km2, 1646.4 t/km2 and 1300.2 t/km2, respectively, with an average value of 1389.0 t/km2 for the whole plain. These findings indicate that the decrease in soil carbon density varied according to the different ecosystems and land-use types. Therefore, ratios of soil carbon density were calculated in order to study the carbon dynamic balance between ecosystems, and to further explore distribution characteristics, as well as the sequestration potential of SOC.

  12. STUDY OF THE ISOLATES OF SUSPECTED VAP, PREVALENCE OF THE DIFFERENT ORGANISMS AND MIC PATTERNS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagnik Roy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The development of nosocomial infections mostly ventilator-associated pneumonia due to prolonged stay in the ICUs varies grossly in different outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality. The American Thoracic Society (ATS guidelines recommend that quantitative cultures can be performed on ETA or samples collected either bronchoscopically or nonbronchosopically. 1 More importantly, recent small trials have repeatedly shown that there is no advantage of bronchoscopic cultures over quantitative endotracheal aspirate. 2,3,4 Detection of causative organisms and their antibiotic MIC determination is absolutely necessary to initiate the specific antibiotic with appropriate dose thereby reducing the adverse effects of inadequate antibiotic treatment on the patient prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS The prospective study was carried out during the period from August 2012 to January 2015 in Department of Microbiology from the samples those were received as a routine culture from VAP suspected patients from the ICU. There were 373 samples from which 123 were culture positives. Inclusion criteria were all the patients 18 years and more age group who were intubated in mechanical ventilator and others were excluded in the study. Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS was given to each patient included in the study on daily basis. CPIS of greater than six was used as diagnostic criteria for VAP. 5 Clinically diagnosed ventilator-associated pneumonia were observed and clinical parameters were recorded from their medical records and bedside charts. All patients with clinical and radiological signs suggestive of pneumonia on admission. Endotracheal aspirate was collected by using a 22-inch Romsons suction catheter. Chest vibration or percussion for 10 mins. was used. Only 1 ETA sample was collected from each patient and was immediately taken to the laboratory for processing. RESULTS Klebsiella pneumonia was isolated 39.02%, Pseudomonas

  13. Electroactive and High Dielectric Folic Acid/PVDF Composite Film Rooted Simplistic Organic Photovoltaic Self-Charging Energy Storage Cell with Superior Energy Density and Storage Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swagata; Thakur, Pradip; Hoque, Nur Amin; Bagchi, Biswajoy; Sepay, Nayim; Khatun, Farha; Kool, Arpan; Das, Sukhen

    2017-07-19

    Herein we report a simplistic prototype approach to develop an organic photovoltaic self-charging energy storage cell (OPSESC) rooted with biopolymer folic acid (FA) modified high dielectric and electroactive β crystal enriched poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) composite (PFA) thin film. Comprehensive and exhaustive characterizations of the synthesized PFA composite films validate the proper formation of β-polymorphs in PVDF. Significant improvements of both β-phase crystallization (F(β) ≈ 71.4%) and dielectric constant (ε ≈ 218 at 20 Hz for PFA of 7.5 mass %) are the twosome realizations of our current study. Enhancement of β-phase nucleation in the composites can be thought as a contribution of the strong interaction of the FA particles with the PVDF chains. Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) interfacial polarization approves the establishment of thermally stable high dielectric values measured over a wide temperature spectrum. The optimized high dielectric and electroactive films are further employed as an active energy storage material in designing our device named as OPSESC. Self-charging under visible light irradiation without an external biasing electrical field and simultaneous remarkable self-storage of photogenerated electrical energy are the two foremost aptitudes and the spotlight of our present investigation. Our as fabricated device delivers an impressively high energy density of 7.84 mWh/g and an excellent specific capacitance of 61 F/g which is superior relative to the other photon induced two electrode organic self-charging energy storage devices reported so far. Our device also proves the realistic utility with good recycling capability by facilitating commercially available light emitting diode.

  14. Metal-inorganic-organic matrices as efficient sorbents for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Abdelkrim; Nousir, Saadia; Bouazizi, Nabil; Roy, René

    2015-03-01

    Stabilization of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) without re-aggregation is a major challenge. An unprecedented strategy is developed for achieving high dispersion of copper(0) or palladium(0) on montmorillonite-supported diethanolamine or thioglycerol. This results in novel metal-inorganic-organic matrices (MIOM) that readily capture hydrogen at ambient conditions, with easy release under air stream. Hydrogen retention appears to involve mainly physical interactions, slightly stronger on thioglycerol-based MIOM (S-MIOM). Thermal enhancement of desorption suggests also a contribution of chemical interactions. The increase of hydrogen uptake with prolonged contact times arises from diffusion hindrance, which appears to be beneficial by favoring hydrogen entrapment. Even with compact structures, MIOMs act as efficient sorbents with much higher efficiency factor (1.14-1.17 mmol H 2 m(-2)) than many other sophisticated adsorbents reported in the literature. This opens new prospects for hydrogen storage and potential applications in microfluidic hydrogenation reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A flexible ligand-based wavy layered metal-organic framework for lithium-ion storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Tiance; Wang, Yuhang; Tang, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-05-01

    A substantial challenge for direct utilization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as lithium-ion battery anodes is to maintain the rigid MOF structure during lithiation/delithiation cycles. In this work, we developed a flexible, wavy layered nickel-based MOF (C20H24Cl2N8Ni, designated as Ni-Me4bpz) by a solvothermal approach of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole (H2Me4bpz) with nickel(II) chloride hexahydrate. The obtained MOF materials (Ni-Me4bpz) with metal azolate coordination mode provide 2-dimensional layered structure for Li(+) intercalation/extraction, and the H2Me4bpz ligands allow for flexible rotation feature and structural stability. Lithium-ion battery anodes made of the Ni-Me4bpz material demonstrate excellent specific capacity and cycling performance, and the crystal structure is well preserved after the electrochemical tests, suggesting the potential of developing flexible layered MOFs for efficient and stable electrochemical storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Storage of charge carriers on emitter molecules in organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichsel, Caroline; Burtone, Lorenzo; Reineke, Sebastian; Hintschich, Susanne I.; Gather, Malte C.; Leo, Karl; Lüssem, Björn

    2012-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using the red phosphorescent emitter iridium(III)bis(2-methyldibenzo[f,h]quinoxaline) (acetylacetonate) [Ir(MDQ)2(acac)] are studied by time-resolved electroluminescence measurements. A transient overshoot after voltage turn-off is found, which is attributed to electron accumulation on Ir(MDQ)2(acac) molecules. The mechanism is verified via impedance spectroscopy and by application of positive and negative off-voltages. We calculate the density of accumulated electrons and find that it scales linearly with the doping concentration of the emitter. Using thin quenching layers, we locate the position of the emission zone during normal OLED operation and after voltage turn-off. In addition, the transient overshoot is also observed in three-color white-emitting OLEDs. By time- and spectrally resolved measurements using a streak camera, we directly attribute the overshoot to electron accumulation on Ir(MDQ)2(acac). We propose that similar processes are present in many state-of-the-art OLEDs and believe that the quantification of charge carrier storage will help to improve the efficiency of OLEDs.

  17. Organic carbon storage change in China's urban landfills from 1978-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shidong; Zhao, Shuqing

    2017-10-01

    China has produced increasingly large quantities of waste associated with its accelerated urbanization and economic development and deposited these wastes into landfills, potentially sequestering carbon. However, the magnitude of the carbon storage in China’s urban landfills and its spatial and temporal change remain unclear. Here, we estimate the total amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in China's urban landfills between 1978 and 2014 using a first order organic matter decomposition model and data compiled from literature review and statistical yearbooks. Our results show that total OC stored in China’s urban landfills increased nearly 68-fold from the 1970s to the 2010s, and reached 225.2-264.5 Tg C (95% confidence interval, hereafter) in 2014. Construction waste was the largest OC pool (128.4-157.5 Tg C) in 2014, followed by household waste (67.7-83.8 Tg C), and sewage sludge was the least (19.7-34.1 Tg C). Carbon stored in urban landfills accounts for more than 10% of the country’s carbon stocks in urban ecosystems. The annual increase (i.e. sequestration rate) of OC in urban landfills in the 2010s (25.1 ± 4.3 Tg C yr-1, mean ± 2SD, hereafter) is equivalent to 1% of China's carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production during the same period, but represents about 9% of the total terrestrial carbon sequestration in the country. Our study clearly indicates that OC dynamics in landfills should not be neglected in regional to national carbon cycle studies as landfills not only account for a substantial part of the carbon stored in urban ecosystems but also have a respectable contribution to national carbon sequestration.

  18. Organic carbon storage change in China's urban landfills from 1978 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, S.; Zhao, S.

    2017-12-01

    China has produced increasingly large quantities of waste associated with her accelerated urbanization and economic development and deposited these wastes into landfills potentially sequestering carbon. However, the magnitude of the carbon storage in China's urban landfills and its spatial and temporal change remain unclear. Here, we estimate the total amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in China's urban landfills between 1978 and 2014 using a first order organic matter decomposition model and data compiled from literature review and statistical yearbooks. Our results show that total OC stored in China's urban landfills increased nearly 68 folds from the 1970s to the 2010s, and reached 225.2 - 264.5 Tg C (95% confidence interval, hereafter) in 2014. Construction waste was the largest OC pool (128.4 - 157.5 Tg C) in 2014, followed by household waste (67.7 - 83.8 Tg C), and sewage sludge was the least (19.7 - 34.1 Tg C). Carbon stored in urban landfills accounts for more than 10% of the country's carbon stocks in urban ecosystems. The annual increase (i.e., sequestration rate) of OC in urban landfills in the 2010s (25.1 ± 4.3 Tg C yr-1, mean±2SD, hereafter) is equivalent to 1% of China's carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production during the same period, but represents about 9% of the total terrestrial carbon sequestration in the country. Our study clearly indicates that OC dynamics in landfills should not be neglected in regional to national carbon cycle studies as landfills not only account for a substantial part of the carbon stored in urban ecosystems but also contribute respectably to national carbon sequestration.

  19. Computational Design of Non-natural Sugar Alcohols to Increase Thermal Storage Density: Beyond Existing Organic Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Taichi; Ishida, Toyokazu

    2016-09-14

    Thermal storage, a technology that enables us to control thermal energy, makes it possible to reuse a huge amount of waste heat, and materials with the ability to treat larger thermal energy are in high demand for energy-saving societies. Sugar alcohols are now one promising candidate for phase change materials (PCMs) because of their large thermal storage density. In this study, we computationally design experimentally unknown non-natural sugar alcohols and predict their thermal storage density as a basic step toward the development of new high performance PCMs. The non-natural sugar alcohol molecules are constructed in silico in accordance with the previously suggested molecular design guidelines: linear elongation of a carbon backbone, separated distribution of OH groups, and even numbers of carbon atoms. Their crystal structures are then predicted using the random search method and first-principles calculations. Our molecular simulation results clearly demonstrate that the non-natural sugar alcohols have potential ability to have thermal storage density up to ∼450-500 kJ/kg, which is significantly larger than the maximum thermal storage density of the present known organic PCMs (∼350 kJ/kg). This computational study suggests that, even in the case of H-bonded molecular crystals where the electrostatic energy contributes mainly to thermal storage density, the molecular distortion and van der Waals energies are also important factors to increase thermal storage density. In addition, the comparison between the three eight-carbon non-natural sugar alcohol isomers indicates that the selection of preferable isomers is also essential for large thermal storage density.

  20. Accelerated decay rates drive soil organic matter persistence and storage in temperate forests via greater mineral stabilization of microbial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.; Craig, M.; Turner, B. L.; Liang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate predicts soil organic matter (SOM) stocks at the global scale, yet controls on SOM stocks at finer spatial scales are still debated. A current hypothesis predicts that carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage in soils should be greater when decomposition is slow owing to microbial competition for nutrients or the recalcitrance of organic substrates (hereafter the `slow decay' hypothesis). An alternative hypothesis predicts that soil C and N storage should be greater in soils with rapid decomposition, owing to the accelerated production of microbial residues and their stabilization on soil minerals (hereafter the `stabilization hypothesis'). To test these alternative hypotheses, we quantified soil C and N to 1-m depth in temperate forests across the Eastern and Midwestern US that varied in their biotic, climatic, and edaphic properties. At each site, we sampled (1) soils dominated by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tree species, which typically have fast decay rates and accelerated N cycling, (2) soils dominated by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) tree species, which generally have slow decay rates and slow N cycling, and (3) soils supporting both AM and ECM trees. To the extent that trees and theor associated microbes reflect and reinforce soil conditions, support for the slow decay hypothesis would be greater SOM storage in ECM soils, whereas support for the stabilization hypothesis would be greater SOM storage in AM soils. We found support for both hypotheses, as slow decomposition in ECM soils increased C and N storage in topsoil, whereas fast decomposition in AM soils increased C and N storage in subsoil. However, at all sites we found 57% greater total C and N storage in the entire profile in AM- soils (P stabilization hypothesis. Amino sugar biomarkers (an indicator of microbial necromass) and particle size fractionation revealed that the greater SOM storage in AM soils was driven by an accumulation of microbial residues on clay minerals and metal oxides. Taken together

  1. Heat storage properties of organic phase-change materials confined in the nanospace of mesoporous SBA-15 and CMK-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoono, Tomosuke; Ogura, Masaru

    2014-03-28

    A novel type of material encapsulating phase-change materials (PCMs) is reported concerning their implication for use as thermal energy storage devices. The composites of siliceous SBA-15 or carbonaceous CMK-3 mesoporous assemblies and organic PCMs could be used to make leak-free devices that retain their capabilities over many thermal cycles for heat storage/release. A confinement effect was observed that alters the thermal properties of the encapsulated PCM, especially in CMK-3 without any similar effects in other carbon materials.

  2. 3D organic Na4C6O6/graphene architecture for fast sodium storage with ultralong cycle life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianan; Gu, Yue; Yang, Shubin

    2017-11-23

    Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) have aroused increasing interest as one of the most promising replacements for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Here, a novel organic-inorganic 3D Na 4 C 6 O 6 -graphene architecture was successfully fabricated from commercial Na 2 C 6 O 6 and for the first time applied for sodium storage. Hence, the 3D Na 4 C 6 O 6 -graphene architecture exhibits a high reversible capacity, good cyclic performance and high-rate capability for sodium storage.

  3. Landscape controls and vertical variability of soil organic carbon storage in permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewert, Matthias Benjamin; Hugelius, Gustaf; Heim, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To project the future development of the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in permafrost environments, the spatial and vertical distribution of key soil properties and their landscape controls needs to be understood. This article reports findings from the Arctic Lena River Delta where we sampled 50...... in the permafrost. The major geomorphological units of a subregion of the Lena River Delta were mapped with a land form classification using a data-fusion approach of optical satellite imagery and digital elevation data to upscale SOC storage. Landscape mean SOC storage is estimated to 19.2 ± 2.0 kg C m− 2. Our...... results show that the geomorphological setting explains more soil variability than soil taxonomy classes or vegetation cover. The soils from the oldest, Pleistocene aged, unit of the delta store the highest amount of SOC per m2 followed by the Holocene river terrace. The Pleistocene terrace affected...

  4. Theoretical study of molecular hydrogen and spiltover hydrogen storage on two-dimensional covalent-organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiu-Ying; He Jie; Yu Jing-Xin; Fan Zhi-Qin; Li Zheng-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen and spiltover hydrogen storages on five two-dimensional (2D) covalent-organic frameworks (COFs) (PPy-COF, TP-COF, BTP-COF, COF-18 Å, and HHTP-DPB COF) are investigated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations and the density functional theory (DFT), respectively. The GCMC simulated results show that HHTP-DPB COF has the best performance for hydrogen storage, followed by BTP-COF, TP-COF, COF-18 Å, and PPy-COF. However, their adsorption amounts at room temperature are all too low to meet the uptake target set by US Department of Energy (US-DOE) and enable practical applications. The effects of pore size, surface area, and isosteric heat of hydrogen on adsorption amount are considered, which indicate that these three factors are all the important factors for determining the H 2 adsorption amount. The chemisorptions of spiltover hydrogen atoms on these five COFs represented by the cluster models are investigated using the DFT method. The saturation cluster models are constructed by considering all possible adsorption sites for these cluster models. The average binding energy of a hydrogen atom and the saturation hydrogen storage density are calculated. The large average binding energy indicates that the spillover process may proceed smoothly and reversibly. The saturation hydrogen storage density is much larger than the physisorption uptake of H 2 molecules at 298 K and 100 bar (1 bar = 10 5 Pa), and is close to or exceeds the 2010 US-DOE target of 6 wt% for hydrogen storage. This suggests that the hydrogen storage capacities of these COFs by spillover may be significantly enhanced. Thus 2D COFs studied in this paper are suitable hydrogen storage media by spillover

  5. Hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks: An investigation of structure-property relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowsell, Jesse

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been identified as candidate hydrogen storage materials due to their ability to physisorb large quantities of small molecules. Thirteen compounds (IRMOF-1, -2, -3, -6, -8, -9, -11, -13, -18, -20, MOF-74, MOF-177 and HKUST-1) have been prepared and fully characterized for the evaluation of their dihydrogen (H2) adsorption properties. All compounds display approximately type I isotherms with no hysteresis at 77 K up to 1 atm. The amount adsorbed ranges from 0.89 to 2.54 wt%; however, saturation is not achieved under these conditions. The influences of link functionalization, catenation and topology are examined for the eleven MOFs composed of Zn4O(O2C-)6 clusters. Enhanced H2 uptake by catenated compounds is rationalized by increased overlap of the surface potentials within their narrower pores. This is corroborated by the larger isosteric heat of adsorption of IRMOF-11 compared to IRMOF-1. Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopic analysis of four Zn4O-based materials (IRMOF-1, -8, -11, and MOF-74) under a range of H2 loading suggests the presence of multiple localized adsorption sites on both the inorganic and organic moieties. To determine the structural details of the adsorption sites, variable temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction was used to analyze adsorbed argon and dinitrogen molecules in IRMOF-1. The principle binding site was found to be the same for both adsorbates and is located on faces of the octahedral Zn4O(O2C-)6 clusters with close contacts to three carboxylate groups. A total of eight symmetry-independent adsorption sites were identified for argon at 30 K. Similar sites were observed for dinitrogen, suggesting that they are good model adsorbates for the behaviour of dihydrogen. Two additional materials composed of inorganic clusters with coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (MOF-74, HKUST-1) were examined and their increased capacities and isosteric heats of adsorption provide further evidence that the

  6. Metal–organic frameworks for H2 and CH4 storage: insights on the pore geometry–sorption energetics relationship

    KAUST Repository

    Al Kordi, Mohamed; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cairns, Amy; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to assess the possibility of improving H2 and CH4 binding affinity to the aromatic walls of a designed new Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) through simultaneous dispersive interactions. It is suggested here that desirable H2 and CH4 storage media at low pressures require narrow uniform pores associated with large surface area, a trade-off that is challenging to achieve.

  7. Metal–organic frameworks for H2 and CH4 storage: insights on the pore geometry–sorption energetics relationship

    KAUST Repository

    Al Kordi, Mohamed

    2017-02-09

    This study aims to assess the possibility of improving H2 and CH4 binding affinity to the aromatic walls of a designed new Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) through simultaneous dispersive interactions. It is suggested here that desirable H2 and CH4 storage media at low pressures require narrow uniform pores associated with large surface area, a trade-off that is challenging to achieve.

  8. Long-Cycling Aqueous Organic Redox Flow Battery (AORFB) toward Sustainable and Safe Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; DeBruler, Camden; Rhodes, Zayn; Liu, T Leo

    2017-01-25

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are a viable technology to store renewable energy in the form of electricity that can be supplied to electricity grids. However, widespread implementation of traditional RFBs, such as vanadium and Zn-Br 2 RFBs, is limited due to a number of challenges related to materials, including low abundance and high costs of redox-active metals, expensive separators, active material crossover, and corrosive and hazardous electrolytes. To address these challenges, we demonstrate a neutral aqueous organic redox flow battery (AORFB) technology utilizing a newly designed cathode electrolyte containing a highly water-soluble ferrocene molecule. Specifically, water-soluble (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium chloride (FcNCl, 4.0 M in H 2 O, 107.2 Ah/L, and 3.0 M in 2.0 NaCl, 80.4 Ah/L) and N 1 -ferrocenylmethyl-N 1 ,N 1 ,N 2 ,N 2 ,N 2 -pentamethylpropane-1,2-diaminium dibromide, (FcN 2 Br 2 , 3.1 M in H 2 O, 83.1 Ah/L, and 2.0 M in 2.0 M NaCl, 53.5 Ah/L) were synthesized through structural decoration of hydrophobic ferrocene with synergetic hydrophilic functionalities including an ammonium cation group and a halide anion. When paired with methyl viologen (MV) as an anolyte, resulting FcNCl/MV and FcN 2 Br 2 /MV AORFBs were operated in noncorrosive neutral NaCl supporting electrolytes using a low-cost anion-exchange membrane. These ferrocene/MV AORFBs are characterized as having high theoretical energy density (45.5 Wh/L) and excellent cycling performance from 40 to 100 mA/cm 2 . Notably, the FcNCl/MV AORFBs (demonstrated at 7.0 and 9.9 Wh/L) exhibited unprecedented long cycling performance, 700 cycles at 60 mA/cm 2 with 99.99% capacity retention per cycle, and delivered power density up to 125 mW/cm 2 . These AORFBs are built from earth-abundant elements and are environmentally benign, thus representing a promising choice for sustainable and safe energy storage.

  9. Influence of Beaver-Induced Complexity on Storage of Organic Carbon and Sediment in Colorado Mountain Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurel, D.; Wohl, E.

    2016-12-01

    Beaver meadows (complexes of multiple different aged beaver dams and ponds) influence the storage of water, sediment, and nutrients. Although beaver meadows compose only a small fraction of catchment area, they provide a potentially large role in retaining these fluxes in mountain watersheds. Multiple dams and ponds in beaver meadows increase overbank flows leading to an anastomosing stream channel planform, and deposition of fine sediment along with particulate organic carbon. An earlier study estimated a range of cumulative carbon stored in 27 beaver meadows east of the continental divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Storage ranged from 735,800 to 2.8 x 106 Mg carbon, with the high value estimating storage if all the meadows had active beaver (historic conditions pre-European settlement) and the lower value estimating current conditions where many of the meadows are abandoned. We combined geomorphic surveys, soil depth probing by rebar, and soil cores analyzed for carbon content to investigate the influence of beaver activity, meadow size, and meadow placement within the drainage on catchment-scale fluxes of fine sediment and organic carbon. We found carbon storage in floodplain soils to be highly variable across both active and abandoned meadows; however, active beaver meadows store more carbon on average than abandoned meadows. In addition, active meadows with high levels of beaver activity (multiple colonies) stored greater volumes of fine sediment behind dams and in ponds. These results have implications for the restoration potential of abandoned beaver meadows in mountain environments to store greater volumes of sediment and more organic carbon if beaver are successfully reintroduced.

  10. Hydrogen storage by organic chemical hydrides and hydrogen supply to fuel cells with superheated liquid-film-type catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodoshima, S.; Shono, A.; Sato, K.; Saito, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Organic chemical hydrides, consisting of decalin / naphthalene and tetralin / naphthalene pairs, have been proposed as the storage medium of hydrogen for operating fuel cells in mobile and static modes. The target values in the DOE Hydrogen Plan, U.S., on storage ( 6.5 wt%, 62.0 kg-H 2 / m 3 ) are met with decalin ( 7.3 wt%, 64.8 kg-H 2 / m 3 ). In addition, existing gas stations and tank lorries are available for storage and supply of hydrogen by utilizing the decalin / naphthalene pair, suggesting that decalin is suitable for operating fuel-cell vehicles. Tetralin dehydrogenation proceeds quite rapidly, assuring a predominant power density, though its storage densities ( 3.0 wt%, 28.2 kg-H 2 / m 3 ) are relatively low. Efficient hydrogen supply from decalin or tetralin by heating at 210-280 o C was attained only with the carbon-supported nano-size metal catalysts in the 'superheated liquid-film states' under reactive distillation conditions, where coke formation over the catalyst surface was prevented. The catalyst layer superheated in the liquid-film states gave high reaction rates and conversions, minimizing the evaporation loss under boiling conditions and exergy loss in hydrogen energy systems. (author)

  11. Cold storage as a method for the long-term preservation of tropical dissolved organic carbon (DOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluvial fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC may represent an important loss for terrestrial carbon stores in the tropics. However, there is currently limited guidance on the preservation of tropical water samples for DOC analysis. Commonly employed preservation techniques such as freezing or acidification can limit degradation but may also alter sample properties, complicating DOC analysis. We examined the effects of cold storage at 4 °C on DOC concentration and quality in water samples collected from a tropical peat catchment. Samples were stored in the dark at 4 °C for periods of 6–12 weeks. Freeze/thaw experiments were also made. Mean DOC concentrations in samples stored for six weeks at 4 °C were 6.1 % greater than in samples stored at ambient room temperature (33 °C over the same period. Changes in DOC concentrations, in two sample sets, during cold storage were 2.25 ± 2.9 mg L-1 (8 % to 2.69 ± 1.4 mg L-1 (11 % over a 12-week period. Freeze/thaw resulted in alterations in the optical properties of samples, and this in turn altered the calculated DOC concentrations by an average of 10.9 %. We conclude that cold storage at 4 °C is an acceptable preservation method for tropical DOC water samples, for moderate time periods, and is preferable to freezing or storage at ambient temperatures.

  12. Energy Performance and Economic Evaluation of Heat Pump/Organic Rankine Cycle System with Sensible Thermal Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, C.; Dumont, O.; Nielsen, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    that consists of a ground-source heat pump with possibility of reversing operation as an ORC power cycle combined with solar heating in a single-family building is introduced. The ORC mode enables the use of solar energy in periods of no heat energy demand and reverses the heat pump cycle to supply electrical...... power.This paper combines a dynamic model based on empirical data of the HP/ORC system with lessons learned from 140 heat pump installations operating in real-life conditions in a cold climate. These installations were monitored for a period up to 5 years.Based on the aforementioned model and real......-life conditions knowledge, the paper considers two different sensible energy storage (TES) configurations for the reversible heat pump/organic Rankine cycle (HP/ORC) system: a buffer tank for both space heating and domestic hot water and a hot water storage tank used exclusively for domestic hot water...

  13. An overview of hydrogen storage materials: Making a case for metal organic frameworks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available hydrogen needs to be stored in a safe and compact manner by combining the gas with other materials either chemically or physically. Hydrogen storage is therefore an extremely active area of research worldwide with many different materials being examined...

  14. Review on processing of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials towards system integration for hydrogen storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available materials to form part of a practical hydrogen storage system, knowledge of the ‘processing’ techniques to improve the properties of the powders is essential. However, the processing routes of MOF materials towards system integration are rarely reviewed...

  15. Hydrogen transmission/storage with a metal hydride/organic slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.; McClaine, A. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has developed a new approach for the production, transmission, and storage of hydrogen. In this approach, a chemical hydride slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. The slurry protects the hydride from unanticipated contact with moisture in the air and makes the hydride pumpable. At the point of storage and use, a chemical hydride/water reaction is used to produce high-purity hydrogen. An essential feature of this approach is the recovery and recycle of the spent hydride at centralized processing plants, resulting in an overall low cost for hydrogen. This approach has two clear benefits: it greatly improves energy transmission and storage characteristics of hydrogen as a fuel, and it produces the hydrogen carrier efficiently and economically from a low cost carbon source. The preliminary economic analysis of the process indicates that hydrogen can be produced for $3.85 per million Btu based on a carbon cost of $1.42 per million Btu and a plant sized to serve a million cars per day. This compares to current costs of approximately $9.00 per million Btu to produce hydrogen from $3.00 per million Btu natural gas, and $25 per million Btu to produce hydrogen by electrolysis from $0.05 per Kwh electricity. The present standard for production of hydrogen from renewable energy is photovoltaic-electrolysis at $100 to $150 per million Btu.

  16. Latent heat storage by silica-coated polymer beads containing organic phase change materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feczkó, T.; Trif, L.; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 132, July (2016), s. 405-414 ISSN 0038-092X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14318 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : latent heat storage * phase change materials * porous beads by suspension polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.018, year: 2016

  17. Microporous metal-organic frameworks for storage and separation of small hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Y.; Zhou, W.; Krishna, R.; Chen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are very important energy resources and raw materials for some industrially important products and fine chemicals. There is a need for the discovery of better materials that offer enhanced capacities for safe storage of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, the development of improved separation

  18. Crossbar memory array of organic bistable rectifying diodes for nonvolatile data storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asadi, Kamal; Li, Mengyuan; Stingelin, Natalie; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-talk in memories using resistive switches in a cross-bar geometry can be prevented by integration of a rectifying diode. We present a functional cross bar memory array using a phase separated blend of a ferroelectric and a semiconducting polymer as storage medium. Each intersection acts

  19. Impact of metal and anion substitutions on the hydrogen storage properties of M-BTT metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Kenji; Stück, David; Mino, Lorenzo; Chai, Jeng-Da; Bloch, Eric D; Zavorotynska, Olena; Murray, Leslie J; Dincă, Mircea; Chavan, Sachin; Bordiga, Silvia; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-23

    Microporous metal-organic frameworks are a class of materials being vigorously investigated for mobile hydrogen storage applications. For high-pressure storage at ambient temperatures, the M(3)[(M(4)Cl)(3)(BTT)(8)](2) (M-BTT; BTT(3-) = 1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate) series of frameworks are of particular interest due to the high density of exposed metal cation sites on the pore surface. These sites give enhanced zero-coverage isosteric heats of adsorption (Q(st)) approaching the optimal value for ambient storage applications. However, the Q(st) parameter provides only a limited insight into the thermodynamics of the individual adsorption sites, the tuning of which is paramount for optimizing the storage performance. Here, we begin by performing variable-temperature infrared spectroscopy studies of Mn-, Fe-, and Cu-BTT, allowing the thermodynamics of H(2) adsorption to be probed experimentally. This is complemented by a detailed DFT study, in which molecular fragments representing the metal clusters within the extended solid are simulated to obtain a more thorough description of the structural and thermodynamic aspects of H(2) adsorption at the strongest binding sites. Then, the effect of substitutions at the metal cluster (metal ion and anion within the tetranuclear cluster) is discussed, showing that the configuration of this unit indeed plays an important role in determining the affinity of the framework toward H(2). Interestingly, the theoretical study has identified that the Zn-based analogs would be expected to facilitate enhanced adsorption profiles over the compounds synthesized experimentally, highlighting the importance of a combined experimental and theoretical approach to the design and synthesis of new frameworks for H(2) storage applications.

  20. Storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers and ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Eran; Battin, Tom J.; Fellman, Jason; O'Neel, Shad; Spencer, Robert G. M.

    2015-02-01

    Polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers, which cover roughly 11% of the Earth's land surface, store organic carbon from local and distant sources and then release it to downstream environments. Climate-driven changes to glacier runoff are expected to be larger than climate impacts on other components of the hydrological cycle, and may represent an important flux of organic carbon. A compilation of published data on dissolved organic carbon from glaciers across five continents reveals that mountain and polar glaciers represent a quantitatively important store of organic carbon. The Antarctic Ice Sheet is the repository of most of the roughly 6 petagrams (Pg) of organic carbon stored in glacier ice, but the annual release of glacier organic carbon is dominated by mountain glaciers in the case of dissolved organic carbon and the Greenland Ice Sheet in the case of particulate organic carbon. Climate change contributes to these fluxes: approximately 13% of the annual flux of glacier dissolved organic carbon is a result of glacier mass loss. These losses are expected to accelerate, leading to a cumulative loss of roughly 15 teragrams (Tg) of glacial dissolved organic carbon by 2050 due to climate change -- equivalent to about half of the annual flux of dissolved organic carbon from the Amazon River. Thus, glaciers constitute a key link between terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes, and will be of increasing importance in land-to-ocean fluxes of organic carbon in glacierized regions.

  1. Storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers and ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Eran; Battin, Tom J.; Fellman, Jason; O'Neel, Shad; Spencer, Robert G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers, which cover roughly 11% of the Earth's land surface, store organic carbon from local and distant sources and then release it to downstream environments. Climate-driven changes to glacier runoff are expected to be larger than climate impacts on other components of the hydrological cycle, and may represent an important flux of organic carbon. A compilation of published data on dissolved organic carbon from glaciers across five continents reveals that mountain and polar glaciers represent a quantitatively important store of organic carbon. The Antarctic Ice Sheet is the repository of most of the roughly 6 petagrams (Pg) of organic carbon stored in glacier ice, but the annual release of glacier organic carbon is dominated by mountain glaciers in the case of dissolved organic carbon and the Greenland Ice Sheet in the case of particulate organic carbon. Climate change contributes to these fluxes: approximately 13% of the annual flux of glacier dissolved organic carbon is a result of glacier mass loss. These losses are expected to accelerate, leading to a cumulative loss of roughly 15 teragrams (Tg) of glacial dissolved organic carbon by 2050 due to climate change — equivalent to about half of the annual flux of dissolved organic carbon from the Amazon River. Thus, glaciers constitute a key link between terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes, and will be of increasing importance in land-to-ocean fluxes of organic carbon in glacierized regions.

  2. Costing of severe pneumonia in hospitalized infants and children aged 2-36 months, at a secondary and tertiary level hospital of a not-for-profit organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helle Ostergaard; Hanehøj, Malin; Das, Ashima Rani

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine health care provider cost and household cost of the treatment of severe pneumonia in infants and young children admitted to secondary and tertiary level health care facilities. METHODS: The study was done in a private, not-for-profit medical college hospital, in Vellore...... comprised travel, accommodation and special food during the period of illness, and indirect costs of productivity loss for family members. Patient specific resource consumption and related charges were recorded from charts, nursing records, pharmacy lists and hospital bills, and the providers view point...

  3. A Biomimetic Approach to New Adsorptive Hydrogen Storage Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hongcai J [Texas A& M University

    2015-08-12

    In the past decades, there has been an escalation of interest in the study of MOFs due to their fascinating structures and intriguing application potentials. Their exceptionally high surface areas, uniform yet tunable pore sizes, and well-defined adsorbate-MOF interaction sites make them suitable for hydrogen storage. Various strategies to increase the hydrogen capacity of MOFs, such as constructing pore sizes comparable to hydrogen molecules, increasing surface area and pore volume, utilizing catenation, and introducing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers (UMCs) have been widely explored to increase the hydrogen uptake of the MOFs. MOFs with hydrogen uptake approaching the DOE gravimetric storage goal under reasonable pressure but cryo- temperature (typically 77 K) were achieved. However, the weak interaction between hydrogen molecules and MOFs has been the major hurdle limiting the hydrogen uptake of MOFs at ambient temperature. Along the road, we have realized both high surface area and strong interaction between framework and hydrogen are equally essential for porous materials to be practically applicable in Hydrogen storage. Increasing the isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen through the introduction of active centers into the framework could have great potential on rendering the framework with strong interaction toward hydrogen. Approaches on increasing the surface areas and improving hydrogen affinity by optimizing size and structure of the pores and the alignment of active centers around the pores in frameworks have been pursued, for example: (a) the introduction of coordinatively UMC (represents a metal center missing multiple ligands) with potential capability of multiple dihydrogen-binding (Kubas type, non-dissociative) per UMC, (b) the design and synthesis of proton-rich MOFs in which a + H3 binds dihydrogen just like a metal ion does, and (c) the preparation of MOFs and PPNs with well aligned internal electric fields. We believe the

  4. Organic chemical hydrides as storage medium of hydrogen on the basis of superheated liquid-film concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinya Hodoshima; Atsushi Shono; Kazumi Satoh; Yasukazu Saito

    2006-01-01

    A catalysis pair of tetralin dehydrogenation / naphthalene hydrogenation has been proposed in the present paper as an organic chemical hydride for operating stationary fuel cells. Catalytic naphthalene hydrogenation, having been commercialized since the 1940's, proceeds to generate decalin via tetralin as an intermediate. The storage capacities of tetralin (3.0 wt%, 28.2 kg-H 2 / m 3 ) are lower than decalin (7.3 wt%, 64.8 kg-H 2 / m 3 ) but both tetralin dehydrogenation and naphthalene hydrogenation are much faster than the decalin / naphthalene pair. Moreover, existing infrastructures, e.g., gas station and tank lorry, are available for storage, transportation and supply of hydrogen. As for the stationary fuel cells with large space for hydrogen storage, tetralin as a hydrogen carrier is superior to decalin in terms of fast hydrogen supply. Rapid hydrogen supply from tetralin under mild conditions was only accomplished with the carbon supported metal catalysts in the 'superheated liquid-film states' under reactive distillation conditions. In contrast to the ordinary suspended states, the catalyst layer superheated in the liquid-film state gave high catalytic performances at around 250 C. As a result, serious coke formation over the catalyst surface and excessive exergy consumption were prevented simultaneously. (authors)

  5. Systems engineering study: tank 241-C-103 organic skimming,storage, treatment and disposal options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, M.J.

    1996-10-23

    This report evaluates alternatives for pumping, storing, treating and disposing of the separable phase organic layer in Hanford Site Tank 241-C-103. The report provides safety and technology based preferences and recommendations. Two major options and several varations of these options were identified. The major options were: 1) transfer both the organic and pumpable aqueous layers to a double-shell tank as part of interim stabilization using existing salt well pumping equipment or 2) skim the organic to an above ground before interim stabilization of Tank 241-C-103. Other options to remove the organic were considered but rejected following preliminary evaluation.

  6. Routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities fiscal year 1995 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the data and results of the routine organic air emissions monitoring performed in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facility, WMF-628, from January 4, 1995 to September 3, 1995. The task objectives were to systematically identify and measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations within WMF-628 that could be emitted into the environment. These routine measurements implemented a dual method approach using Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) monitoring and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, Summa reg-sign Canister sampling. The data collected from the routine monitoring of WNF-628 will assist in estimating the total VOC emissions from WMF-628

  7. Changes in the carbohydrate and organic acid contents of tomatoes as a function of radiation dose and storage time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, E.

    1974-01-01

    Sugars and organic acids of tomatoes, variety Original Fruehrot, in different stages of development were examined by gas chromatography after silylation. Changes in the carbohydrate and organic acid content of half-ripe and ripe tomatoes were determined after treatment with different radiation doses (5, 15, 30, 60, 250 and 500 krad). Fructose, glucose, saccharose and malic acid could be detected in the tomato samples. The saccharose and malic acid contents of half-ripe tomatoes decreased as a result of irradiation with doses above 250 krad. In ripe tomatoes, the malic acid content fell most markedly under the influence of irradiation. The sugar content tended to decrease as a function of storage time, except for samples treated with 15 krad which usually delayed decomposition of the components tested. The effect of irradiation was more extensive in half-ripe tomatoes than in ripe ones. (F.J.)

  8. Changes in the carbohydrate and organic acid contents of tomatoes as a function of radiation dose and storage time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, E [Kozponti Elelmiszeripari Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)

    1974-01-01

    Sugars and organic acids of tomatoes, variety Original Fruehrot, in different stages of development were examined by gas chromatography after silylation. Changes in the carbohydrate and organic acid content of half-ripe and ripe tomatoes were determined after treatment with different radiation doses (5, 15, 30, 60, 250 and 500 krad). Fructose, glucose, saccharose and malic acid could be detected in the tomato samples. The saccharose and malic acid contents of half-ripe tomatoes decreased as a result of irradiation with doses above 250 krad. In ripe tomatoes, the malic acid content fell most markedly under the influence of irradiation. The sugar content tended to decrease as a function of storage time, except for samples treated with 15 krad which usually delayed decomposition of the components tested. The effect of irradiation was more extensive in half-ripe tomatoes than in ripe ones.

  9. Initial laboratory studies into the chemical and radiological aging of organic materials in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Babad, H.

    1994-01-01

    The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated over many years from plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct bearing on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. The major portion of organic materials that have been added to the tanks consists of tributyl phosphate, dibutyl phosphate, butyl alcohol, hexone (methyl isobutyl ketone), normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriadetic acid (HEDTA), other complexants, and lesser quantities of ion exchange polymers and minor organic compounds. A study of how thermal and radiological processes that may have changed the composition of organic tanks constituents has been initiated after a review of the open literature revealed little information was available about the rates and products of these processes under basic pH conditions. This paper will detail the initial findings as they relate to gas generation, e.g. H 2 , CO, NH 3 , CH 4 , and to changes in the composition of the organic and inorganic components brought about by ''Aging'' processes

  10. Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Stability in the Aspen-Conifer Ecotone in Montane Forests in Utah, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Román Dobarco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the potential impact of conifer encroachment on soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics and storage in montane aspen-conifer forests from the interior western US, we sampled mineral soils (0–15 cm across the aspen-conifer ecotones in southern and northern Utah and quantified total SOC stocks, stable SOC (i.e., mineral-associated SOC (MoM, labile SOC (i.e., light fraction (LF, decomposable (CO2 release during long-term aerobic incubations and soluble SOC (hot water extractable organic carbon (HWEOC. Total SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha−1 and labile SOC as LF (14.0 ± 7.10 Mg C ha−1, SOC decomposability (cumulative released CO2-C of 5.6 ± 3.8 g C g−1 soil or HWEOC (0.6 ± 0.6 mg C g−1 soil did not differ substantially with vegetation type, although a slight increase in HWEOC was observed with increasing conifer in the overstory. There were statistically significant differences (p = 0.035 in stable MoM storage, which was higher under aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha−1 than under conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha−1, with intermediate values under mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha−1. Texture had the greatest impact on SOC distribution among labile and stable fractions, with increasing stabilization in MoM and decreasing bio-availability of SOC with increasing silt + clay content. Only at lower silt + clay contents (40%–70% could we discern the influence of vegetation on MoM content. This highlights the importance of chemical protection mechanisms for long-term C sequestration.

  11. Hydrogen storage studies on palladium-doped carbon materials (AC, CB, CNMs) @ metal-organic framework-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viditha, V; Srilatha, K; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a rapidly growing class of porous materials and are considered as best adsorbents for their high surface area and extraordinary porosity. The MOFs are synthesized by using various chemicals like triethylamine, terepthalic acid, zinc acetate dihydrate, chloroform, and dimethylformamide (DMF). Synthesized MOFs are intercalated with palladium/activated carbon, carbon black, and carbon nanomaterials by chemical reduction method for the purpose of enhancing the hydrogen adsorption capacities. We have observed that the palladium doped activated carbon on MOF-5 showed high hydrogen storage capacity. This may be due to the affinity of the palladium toward hydrogen molecule. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. We have observed a clear decrease in the BET surface area and pore volume. The obtained results show a better performance for the synthesized sample. To our best knowledge, no one has reported the work on palladium-doped carbon materials (activated carbon, carbon black, carbon nanomaterials) impregnated to the metal-organic framework-5. We have attempted to synthesize carbon nanomaterials using indigenously fabricated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) unit as a support. We have observed an increase in the hydrogen storage capacities.

  12. Content of nitrates in potato tubers depending on the organic matter, soil fertilizer, cultivation simplifications applied and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Pobereżny

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates naturally occur in plant-based food. Nitrates content in consumable plant organs is small and should not raise concern provided that the recommended fertilization and harvest terms of the original plants are observed. The aim was to determine the effect of the application of various organic matter of soil fertilizer and simplifications in growing potato (Solanum tuberosum L. on the content of nitrates in the tubers of mid-early cultivar 'Satina' after harvest and after 6-mo of storage. Introducing cultivation simplification involves limiting mineral fertilization by 50% as well as chemical protection limitation. The soil fertilizer was used: 0.6 (autumn, 0.3 (spring, and 0.3 L ha-1 (during the vegetation period. The content of nitrates, was determined with the use of the ion-selective method (multi-purpose computer device CX-721, Elmetron. The lowest amount of nitrates was recorded in the tubers from the plots without the application of organic matter with a 50% rate of mineral fertilization with soil fertilizer (120.5 mg kg-1 FW. The use of varied organic matter resulted in a significant increase in the content of nitrates in tubers and the lowest effect on their accumulation was reported for straw. The soil fertilizer used significantly decreased the content of nitrates in tubers by 15% for 100% NPK and 10.4% for 50% NPK. After 6-mo storage, irrespective of the experiment factors, the content of nitrates decreased in the fertilization experiment by 26% and in the experiment with a limited protection - by 19.9%.

  13. Secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Sophie A; Miller, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the etiology and management of secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by an increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH) that is appropriate and in response to a stimulus, most commonly low serum calcium. In secondary hyperparathyroidism, the serum calcium is normal and the PTH level is elevated. Tertiary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by excessive secretion of PTH after longstanding secondary hyperparathyroidism, in which hypercalcemia has ensued. Tertiary hyperparathyroidism typically occurs in men and women with chronic kidney disease usually after kidney transplant. The etiology and treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism is relatively straightforward whereas data on the management of tertiary hyperparathyroidism is limited to a few small trials with short follow-up. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lithium doping on covalent organic framework-320 for enhancing hydrogen storage at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Liangzhi; Liu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) combines with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations are performed to explore the effect of Li doping on the hydrogen storage capability of COF-320. The results show that the interaction energy between the H 2 and the Li-doped COF-320 is about three times higher than that of pristine COF-320. GCMC simulations are employed to study the hydrogen uptake of Li-doped COF-320 at ambient temperature, further confirm that the lithium doping can improve the hydrogen uptake at ambient temperature. Our results demonstrate that Li-doped COFs have good potential in the field of hydrogen storage. - Graphical abstract: Fig. 1. The optimized cluster model used here to represent the COF-320 and possible adsorption sites (A, B, C) for adsorption of metals in the COF-320. The dangling bonds are terminated by H atoms. C, H, and N atoms are shown as gray, white, and blue colors, respectively. Fig. 2. The adsorption isotherm of H 2 in the pristine and Li-doped COF-320 at 298 K. - Highlights: • The binding sites of single and two lithium atoms in COF-320 were studied. • The interaction energy between the H 2 and the Li-doped COF-320 is about three times higher than that of pristine COF-320. • H 2 uptakes on the Li-doped COFs obtain significant improvement at ambient temperature. • Lithium-doping is a successful strategy for improving hydrogen uptake.

  15. Spatial changes in soil organic carbon density and storage of cultivated soils in China from 1980 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanyan; Guo, Zhengtang; Wu, Haibin; Kahmann, Julia A.; Oldfield, Frank

    2009-06-01

    We address the spatial changes in organic carbon density and storage in cultivated soils in China from 1980 to 2000 on the basis of measured data from individual studies and those acquired during the second national soil survey in China. The results show a carbon gain in ˜66% of the cultivated area of China as a whole with the increase in soil organic carbon (SOC) density mostly ranging from 10% to 30%. Soil organic carbon density increased in fluvi-aquic soils (fluvisols, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations) in north China, irrigated silting soils (calcaric fluvisols) in northwest China, latosolic red earths (haplic acrisols/alisols), and paddy soils (fluvisols/cambisols) in south China. In contrast, significant decreases are observed in black soils (phaeozems) in northeast China and latosols (haplic acrisols) in southwest China. No significant changes are detected in loessial soils (calcaric regosols) and dark loessial soils (calcisols) in the loess plateau region. The total SOC storage and average density in the upper 20 cm in the late 1990s are estimated to be ˜5.37 Pg C and 2.77 kg/m2, respectively, compared with the values of ˜5.11 Pg C and 2.63 kg/m2 in the early 1980s. This reveals an increase of SOC storage of 0.26 Pg C and suggests an overall carbon sink for cultivated soils in China, which has contributed 2-3% to the global terrestrial ecosystem carbon absorption from 1980 to 2000. Statistical analyses suggest an insignificant contribution to the observed SOC increase from climate change, and we infer that it is mostly attributable to improved agricultural practices. Despite the SOC density increases over 20 years, the SOC density of the cultivated soils in China in the late 1990s is still ˜30% lower compared to their uncultivated counterparts in comparable soil types, suggesting a considerable potential for SOC restoration through improving management practices. Assuming a restoration of ˜50% of the lost SOC in the next 30

  16. Cropland versus Gariga schrubland on soil organic carbon storage under Mediterranen climatic condition of Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Santoro, A.; Poma, I.

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is the largest among the terrestrial pool and it plays a key role to mitigate climate change. The restoration of SOC pool represents a potential sink for atmospheric CO2. Land use is one of the most important factors controlling organic carbon content. The main land uses throughout the Mediterranean are croplands (olive, wheat and vineyards) and scrublands. The land abandonment or the reclamation of land is changing the cover of scrubland and cropland. This will change the carbon cycle. The aim of this work is determining the direction and magnitude of soil organic change associated with land use change under Mediterranean Climatic Conditions. Using both historic record and land cover crop maps we estimated the effect of land cover change on the stock carbon from 1972 to 2008 in Sicily. A system of paired plots was established on Mollic Gypsiric cambisol and Gypsiric cambisol on agriculture and rangeland land uses. The study sites were selected at the natural reserve "Grotta di S. Ninfa", in the West of Sicily. Soil samples (24) were taken at 20 and 40 cm depth, air dried and sieved at 2 mm. Dry aggregate size fractions selected were >1000 µm, 1000-500 µm, 500-250 µm, 250-63 µm, 63-25 µm and <25 µm. The results show that gariga increase the organic matter in soil, mainly on the organic horizon. Key worlds: Land use change, Soil organic Carbon , Mediterranean, aggregates, gariga, cropland.

  17. Lithium doping on covalent organic framework-320 for enhancing hydrogen storage at ambient temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Liangzhi, E-mail: 15004110853@163.com; Liu, Qing

    2016-12-15

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) combines with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations are performed to explore the effect of Li doping on the hydrogen storage capability of COF-320. The results show that the interaction energy between the H{sub 2} and the Li-doped COF-320 is about three times higher than that of pristine COF-320. GCMC simulations are employed to study the hydrogen uptake of Li-doped COF-320 at ambient temperature, further confirm that the lithium doping can improve the hydrogen uptake at ambient temperature. Our results demonstrate that Li-doped COFs have good potential in the field of hydrogen storage. - Graphical abstract: Fig. 1. The optimized cluster model used here to represent the COF-320 and possible adsorption sites (A, B, C) for adsorption of metals in the COF-320. The dangling bonds are terminated by H atoms. C, H, and N atoms are shown as gray, white, and blue colors, respectively. Fig. 2. The adsorption isotherm of H{sub 2} in the pristine and Li-doped COF-320 at 298 K. - Highlights: • The binding sites of single and two lithium atoms in COF-320 were studied. • The interaction energy between the H{sub 2} and the Li-doped COF-320 is about three times higher than that of pristine COF-320. • H{sub 2} uptakes on the Li-doped COFs obtain significant improvement at ambient temperature. • Lithium-doping is a successful strategy for improving hydrogen uptake.

  18. Thermal energy storage properties of mannitol–fatty acid esters as novel organic solid–liquid phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Four kinds of mannitol–fatty acid esters were synthesized as novel organic PCMs for thermal energy storage applications. ► The synthesized PCMs were characterized using FT-IR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, DSC and TGA methods and thermal cycling test. ► The melting temperatures and latent heat values of the PCMs were in the range of 42–65 °C and 145–202 J/g, respectively. ► Thermal conductivity of the PCMs was increased significantly by addition of EG with especially 10 wt%. ► The synthesized PCMs are promising organic PCMs for solar heating applications. - Abstract: In this study, four kinds of mannitol–fatty acid esters were synthesized as novel organic phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage applications. The structural characterization of synthesized mannitol hexastearate (MHS), mannitol hexapalmitate (MHP), mannitol hexamyristate (MHM) and mannitol hexalaurate (MHL) were carried out using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ( 1 H NMR), and 13 C NMR spectroscopy methods. Thermal energy storage properties and thermal reliability of the synthesized PCMs were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) method at a heating rate of 1 °C/min. DSC results showed that the melting temperatures of the PCMs were in the temperature range of 42–65 °C and their latent heat values spanned between 145 and 202 J/g. The latent heats of these PCMs are low compared to mannitol but they fall into the same range as fatty acids. The synthesized PCMs have much lower phase change temperatures and supercooling degree (about 1–8 °C) and compared to the mannitol. They have also better odor, noncorrosivity and thermal durability properties as compared to the fatty acids. Thermal cycling test consisted of repeated 1000 melting/solidification cycles also revealed that the synthesized PCMs have good thermal reliability. In addition, thermal conductivity of the PCMs was increased significantly by

  19. Soil organic carbon storage changes in coastal wetlands of the modern Yellow River Delta from 2000 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating atmospheric CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. The storages and dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC of 0–30 cm soil depth in different landscape types including beaches, reservoir and pond, reed wetland, forest wetland, bush wetland, farmland, building land, bare land (severe saline land and salt field in the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD were studied based on the data of the regional survey and laboratory analysis. The landscape types were classified by the interpretation of remote sensing images of 2000 and 2009, which were calibrated by field survey results. The results revealed an increase of 10.59 km2 in the modem YRD area from 2000 to 2009. The SOC density varied ranging from 0.73 kg m−2 to 4.25 kg m−2 at depth of 0–30 cm. There were approx. 3.559 × 106 t and 3.545 × 106 t SOC stored in the YRD in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The SOC storages changed greatly in beaches, bush wetland, farm land and salt field which were affected dominantly by anthropogenic activities. The area of the YRD increased greatly within 10 years, however, the small increase of SOC storage in the region was observed due to landscape changes, indicating that the modern YRD was a potential carbon sink and anthropogenic activity was a key factor for SOC change.

  20. Bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in wastewaters from animal feedlots and storage lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) transport from animal agriculture to surface waters can lead to eutrophication and dissolved oxygen depletion. Biodegradable DON (BDON) is a portion of DON that is mineralized by bacteria while bioavailable DON (ABDON) is utilized by bacteria and/or algae. This stu...

  1. On-board co2 capture and storage with metal organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama

    2016-01-01

    In general, this disclosure describes method of capturing and storing CO2 on a vehicle. The method includes contacting an vehicle exhaust gas with one or more of a first metal organic framework (MOF) composition sufficient to separate CO2 from

  2. Methane storage in porous solids: From Activated Carbons to Metal Organic Frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Fernández, E. V.

    2014-01-01

    [EN]This paper reviews the most promising Metal Organic frameworks for storing natural gas. I discuss the features that make these materials promising for the application. Furthermore, it also indicates how these materials are evaluated and what requirements need to fulfil for being finally applied.

  3. Study of structural, surface and hydrogen storage properties of boric acid mediated metal (sodium)-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Demet; Köse, Dursun A.; Sahin, Onur; Oztas, Nursen A.

    2018-04-01

    Three boric acid mediated metal organic frameworks were synthesized by solution method with using succinic acid, fumaric acid and acetylene dicarboxylic acid as a ligand source and sodium as a metal source. The complexes were characterized by FT-IR, powder XRD, elemental analyses and single crystal measurements. The complexes with the formula, C4H18B2Na2O14, C4H16B2Na2O14 and C4H14B2Na2O14 were successfully obtained. BET surface area of complexes were calculated and found as 13.474 m2/g for catena-(tetrakis(μ2-hydroxo)-(μ2-trihydrogen borate)-(μ2-succinato)-di-sodium boric acid solvate), 1.692 m2/g for catena-(tetrakis(μ2-hydroxo)-(μ2-trihydrogen borate)-(μ2-fumarato)-di-sodium boric acid solvate) and 5.600 m2/g for catena-(tetrakis(μ2-hydroxo)-(μ2-trihydrogen borate)-(μ2-acetylenedicarboxylato)-di-sodium boric acid solvate). Hydrogen storage capacities of the complexes were also studied at 77 K 1 bar pressure and found as 0.108%, 0.033%, 0.021% by mass. When different ligands were used, the pore volume, pore width and surface area of the obtained complexes were changed. As a consequence, hydrogen storage capacities also changed.

  4. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Luzio, Alessandro; Natali, Dario; Kim, Juhwan; Khim, Dongyoon; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young; Caironi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μe) and hole (μh) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μh = 0.29 cm2/V s and μe = 0.001 cm2/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μe = 0.12 cm2/V s and μh = 8 × 10-4 cm2/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  5. High-performance sodium-organic battery by realizing four-sodium storage in disodium rhodizonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minah; Hong, Jihyun; Lopez, Jeffrey; Sun, Yongming; Feng, Dawei; Lim, Kipil; Chueh, William C.; Toney, Michael F.; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2017-11-01

    Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) for grid-scale applications need active materials that combine a high energy density with sustainability. Given the high theoretical specific capacity 501 mAh g-1, and Earth abundance of disodium rhodizonate (Na2C6O6), it is one of the most promising cathodes for SIBs. However, substantially lower reversible capacities have been obtained compared with the theoretical value and the understanding of this discrepancy has been limited. Here, we reveal that irreversible phase transformation of Na2C6O6 during cycling is the origin of the deteriorating redox activity of Na2C6O6. The active-particle size and electrolyte conditions were identified as key factors to decrease the activation barrier of the phase transformation during desodiation. On the basis of this understanding, we achieved four-sodium storage in a Na2C6O6 electrode with a reversible capacity of 484 mAh g-1, an energy density of 726 Wh kg-1cathode, an energy efficiency above 87% and a good cycle retention.

  6. Characterization and Storage Stability Study of Bixin Extracted from Bixa orellana Using Organic Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husa, N. N.; Hamzah, F.; Said, H. M.

    2018-05-01

    Colorant is one of the additives to give a better appearance or improve the colour of the product. Synthetic colorant has been widely used in industrial due to its readiness in the market and its colour stability. However the arising issues related to the safety, nutrition and also the therapeutic effect has encouraged users to become more concern about the colouring component. Thus, the present research was conducted in order to produce natural colorant called bixin from Bixa orellana or also known as annatto seeds. The study was focusing on the effect of the solvent on the characteristic and concentration of the extracted bixin. While stability of the bixin during different storage condition was determined to further validate the effectiveness of the solvent. The result indicated that methanol and acetone gave darker of the bixin colour as compared to the water. However, the deterioration rate of the bixin in acetone and methanol were faster as compared to the water. The extracted bixin was analysed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectrophotometer analysis. The strong band for the bixin was observed at absorbance range of 1704 – 1740cm-1. The study indicates that the concentration of the extracted bixin was the highest in methanol which gave 817.7 ppm of bixin. Meanwhile, bixin concentration in acetone and water was 602.9 ppm and 477.19 ppm respectively.

  7. Facile Synthesis of a Pentiptycene-Based Highly Microporous Organic Polymer for Gas Storage and Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuangjiang; Zhang, Qinnan; Zhang, Yizhou; Weaver, Kevin P; Phillip, William A; Guo, Ruilan

    2018-05-02

    Rigid H-shaped pentiptycene units, with an intrinsic hierarchical structure, were employed to fabricate a highly microporous organic polymer sorbent via Friedel-Crafts reaction/polymerization. The obtained microporous polymer exhibits good thermal stability, a high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1604 m 2 g -1 , outstanding CO 2 , H 2 , and CH 4 storage capacities, as well as good adsorption selectivities for the separation of CO 2 /N 2 and CO 2 /CH 4 gas pairs. The CO 2 uptake values reached as high as 5.00 mmol g -1 (1.0 bar and 273 K), which, along with high adsorption selectivity values (e.g., 47.1 for CO 2 /N 2 ), make the pentiptycene-based microporous organic polymer (PMOP) a promising sorbent material for carbon capture from flue gas and natural gas purification. Moreover, the PMOP material displayed superior absorption capacities for organic solvents and dyes. For example, the maximum adsorption capacities for methylene blue and Congo red were 394 and 932 mg g -1 , respectively, promoting the potential of the PMOP as an excellent sorbent for environmental remediation and water treatment.

  8. Use of organic precursors and graphenes in the controlled synthesis of carbon-containing nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shubin; Bachman, Robert E; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2013-01-15

    The development of high-performance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices, including supercapacitors, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cells, is an important step on the road to alternative energy technologies. Carbon-containing nanomaterials (CCNMs), defined here as pure carbon materials and carbon/metal (oxide, hydroxide) hybrids with structural features on the nanometer scale, show potential application in such devices. Because of their pronounced electrochemical activity, high chemical and thermal stability and low cost, researchers are interested in CCNMs to serve as electrodes in energy-related devices. Various all-carbon materials are candidates for electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices. Furthermore, carbon-based hybrid materials, which consist of a carbon component with metal oxide- or metal hydroxide-based nanostructures, offer the opportunity to combine the attractive properties of these two components and tune the behavior of the resulting materials. As such, the design and synthesis of CCNMs provide an attractive route for the construction of high-performance electrode materials. Studies in these areas have revealed that both the composition and the fabrication protocol employed in preparing CCNMs influence the morphology and microstructure of the resulting material and its electrochemical performance. Consequently, researchers have developed several synthesis strategies, including hard-templated, soft-templated, and template-free synthesis of CCNMs. In this Account, we focus on recent advances in the controlled synthesis of such CCNMs and the potential of the resulting materials for energy storage or conversion applications. The Account is divided into four major categories based on the carbon precursor employed in the synthesis: low molecular weight organic or organometallic molecules, hyperbranched or cross-linked polymers consisting of aromatic subunits, self-assembling discotic molecules, and graphenes. In each case

  9. Oxidative Damage in Erythrocytes During Cold Storage With Organ Preservation Solution

    OpenAIRE

    MEMMEDOĞLU, Akif B.

    1999-01-01

    It is known that erythrocyte aggregation in renal tissue during preserva-tion is cause of microcirculation defects in the reperfusion period. The aim of our study is to investigate oxidative damage in erythrocytes relative to the time of cold ischemia during organ preservation and relationship between lipid peroxidation and development of these damages. In experiments with a rabbit model, explanted kidneys were exposed to perfusion and 96 hours preservation with Euro-Collins (EC) in the 1...

  10. Thermal analysis on organic phase change materials for heat storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, methodologies based on thermal analysis to evaluate specific heat capacity, phase transition enthalpies, thermal cycling stability and thermal conductivity of organic phase change materials (PCMs) are discussed. Calibration routines for a disc type heat flow differential scanning calorimetry (hf-DSC) are compared and the applied heating rates are adapted due to the low thermal conductivity of the organic PCMs. An assessment of thermal conductivity measurements based on "Laser Flash Analysis" (LFA) and the "Transient Hot Bridge" method (THB) in solid and liquid state has been performed. It could be shown that a disc type hf-DSC is a useful method for measuring specific heat capacity, melting enthalpies and cycling stability of organic PCM if temperature and sensitivity calibration are adapted to the material and quantity to be measured. The LFA method shows repeatable and reproducible thermal diffusivity results in solid state and a high effort for sample preparation in comparison to THB in liquid state. Thermal conductivity results of the two applied methods show large deviations in liquid phase and have to be validated by further experiments.

  11. Soil Organic Matter Stability and Soil Carbon Storage with Changes in Land Use Intensity in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann, L. K.; Grandy, S.; Hartter, J.

    2014-12-01

    As the foundation of soil fertility, soil organic matter (SOM) formation and break-down is a critical factor of agroecosystem sustainability. In tropical systems where soils are quickly weathered, the link between SOM and soil fertility is particularly strong; however, the mechanisms controlling the stabilization and destabilization of SOM are not well characterized in tropical soils. In western Uganda, we collected soil samples under different levels of land use intensity including maize fields, banana plantations and inside an un-cultivated native tropical forest, Kibale National Park (KNP). To better understand the link between land use intensity and SOM stability we measured total soil C and N, and respiration rates during a 369 d soil incubation. In addition, we separated soils into particle size fractions, and mineral adsorbed SOM in the silt (2-50 μm ) and clay (fractions was dissociated, purified and chemically characterized via pyrolysis-GC/MS. Cultivated soil C and N have declined by 22 and 48%, respectively, in comparison to uncultivated KNP soils. Incubation data indicate that over the last decade, relatively accessible and labile soil organic carbon (SOC) pools have been depleted by 55-59% in cultivated soils. As a result of this depletion, the chemical composition of SOM has been altered such that clay and silt associated SOM differed significantly between agricultural fields and KNP. In particular, nitrogen containing compounds were in lower abundance in agricultural compared to KNP soils. This suggests that N depletion due to agriculture has advanced to pools of mineral associated organic N that are typically protected from break-down. In areas where land use intensity is relatively greater, increases in polysaccharides and lipids in maize fields compared to KNP indicate increases in microbial residues and decomposition by-products as microbes mine SOM for organic N. Chemical characterization of post-incubation SOM will help us better understand

  12. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Erba, Giorgio; Natali, Dario [Center for Nano Science and Technology PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Luzio, Alessandro; Caironi, Mario, E-mail: mario.caironi@iit.it, E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu [Center for Nano Science and Technology PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Kim, Juhwan; Khim, Dongyoon; Kim, Dong-Yu [Heeger Center for Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yong-Young, E-mail: mario.caironi@iit.it, E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu [Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, Dongguk University, 26 Pil-dong, 3-ga, Jung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-14

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μ{sub e}) and hole (μ{sub h}) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μ{sub h} = 0.29 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub e} = 0.001 cm{sup 2}/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μ{sub e} = 0.12 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub h} = 8 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  13. The direct heat measurement of mechanical energy storage metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Julien; Beurroies, Isabelle; Loiseau, Thierry; Denoyel, Renaud; Llewellyn, Philip L

    2015-04-07

    In any process, the heat exchanged is an essential property required in its development. Whilst the work related to structural transitions of some flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been quantified and linked with potential applications such as molecular springs or shock absorbers, the heat related to such transitions has never been directly measured. This has now been carried out with MIL-53(Al) using specifically devised calorimetry experiments. We project the importance of these heats in devices such as molecular springs or dampers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. On-board co2 capture and storage with metal organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-17

    In general, this disclosure describes method of capturing and storing CO2 on a vehicle. The method includes contacting an vehicle exhaust gas with one or more of a first metal organic framework (MOF) composition sufficient to separate CO2 from the exhaust gas, contacting the separated CO2 with one or more of a second MOF composition sufficient to store the CO2 and wherein the one or more first MOF composition comprises one or more SIFSIX-n-M MOF and wherein M is a metal and n is 2 or 3. Embodiments also describe an apparatus or system for capturing and storing CO2 onboard a vehicle.

  15. [Storages and distributed patterns of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen during the succession of artificial sand-binding vegetation in arid desert ecosystem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Hong; Li, Xin-Rong; Zhou, Yu-Yan; Li, Yuan-Shou

    2012-03-01

    Soil carbon pool acts as the largest one of carbon pools in the terrestrial ecosystem. The storages and distributed patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) evaluated accurately are helpful to predict the feedback between the terrestrial ecosystem and climate changes. Based on the data about bulk density, content of SOC and TN at 0-100 cm soil profile, the density of SOC and TN at the temporal (chronosequence of artificial vegetation) and spatial (vertical) distributed patterns have been estimated. The results indicated that storages of SOC and TN at 0-100 cm depth increased with the chronosequence of artificial vegetation. The storages of SOC and TN showed the same tendency with the succession time of artificial vegetation. Storages of SOC and TN significantly increased at the early stage of banding sand by artificially vegetation ( 25 a). The variation of storages mainly occurred in the 0-20 cm depth. The storages decreased with the soil vertical depth. At the early stage of banding sand, increase in storage included every depth (0-100 cm). Whereas, at the later stage, increase in storage at 0-20 cm depth was main, and increase in the 20-100 cm was inconspicuous. The accumulation of storage at the shallow soil depth was more notability with the succession of artificial vegetation. The distributed pattern of storage in SOC and TN has been confirmed in arid desert regions below 200 mm annual precipitation. This was beneficial to understand the carbon cycle and to predict the feedback relationship between desert ecosystem and climate changes.

  16. The forgotten part of carbon cycling: Organic matter storage and turnover in subsoils [SUBSOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschner, B.

    2013-12-01

    In the past, carbon flux measurements and modelling have mostly considered the topsoil where C-concentrations, root densities and microbial activities are generally highest. However, depending on climate zone and land use, this soil compartment contains only 30-50% of the C-stocks of the first meter. If the deeper subsoil down to 3 m is also considered, the contribution of topsoil carbon stocks to total soil C-pools is only 20-40%. Another distinct property of subsoil organic matter is its high apparent 14C age. The 14C age of bulk soil organic matter below 30 cm depth generally increases continuously indicating mean residence times of several 103 to 104 years. Large pool size and high radiocarbon age suggest that subsoil OM has accumulated at very low rates over very long time periods and therefore appears to be very stable. In a review, several hypotheses for explaining why subsoil SOM is so seemingly old and inert are presented. Then a recently granted German research unit consisting of 9 subprojects from all soil science disciplines is introduced, which addresses these questions using field measurements of C-fluxes, 14C analyses and conducting field and lab experiments. 40-60% of soil C-pools are found below 40 cm depth (Data from Jobbagy & Jackson 2000).

  17. Fatty acid profile, color and lipid oxidation of organic fermented sausage during chilling storage as influenced by acid whey and probiotic strains addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Maria Wójciak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic fermented sausages typically spoil during long-term storage due to oxidative rancidity. The application of natural antioxidants to meat stuffing is a major practice intended to inhibit the oxidation process and color changes. This study aimed to assess the effect of two unusual starter cultures: three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus casei LOCK 0900, Lactobacillus casei LOCK 0908 and Lactobacillus paracasei LOCK 0919 and lactic acid bacteria from acid whey on model fermented sausage type products focusing on oxidative stability by measuring instrumental color (L*, a*, b* values, conjugated dienes (CD, TBARS immediately after 21 days of ripening (0 and after 90 and 180 days of refrigerated storage (4 ºC. Determination of fatty acid composition, in meat product was performed after ripening and after 180 days of storage. At the end of the storage period, the salted sausages were characterized by the same content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA compared to cured samples. The addition of acid whey and a mixture of probiotic strains to nitrite-free sausage formulation was barely able to protect lipids against oxidation in comparison to nitrite during vacuum storage. Surprisingly, the use of acid whey has an influence on the desired red-pinkish color of organic fermented sausage after ripening and after 180 days of storage period.

  18. 2. Tertiary Foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umbgrove, J.H.F.

    1931-01-01

    In his review of the palaeozoology of Java, K. Martin could in 1919, record 49 foraminifera from tertiary strata of Java, on the strength of a critical study of the existant literature, and especially on the strength of his own studies and knowledge of the above mentioned fossils (Bibl. 49). In

  19. CO2 leakage from carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems affects organic matter cycling in surface marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Amaro, Teresa; Greco, Silvestro; Lo Martire, Marco; Carugati, Laura; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), involving the injection of CO 2 into the sub-seabed, is being promoted worldwide as a feasible option for reducing the anthropogenic CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, the effects on the marine ecosystems of potential CO 2 leakages originating from these storage sites have only recently received scientific attention, and little information is available on the possible impacts of the resulting CO 2 -enriched seawater plumes on the surrounding benthic ecosystem. In the present study, we conducted a 20-weeks mesocosm experiment exposing coastal sediments to CO 2 -enriched seawater (at 5000 or 20,000 ppm), to test the effects on the microbial enzymatic activities responsible for the decomposition and turnover of the sedimentary organic matter in surface sediments down to 15 cm depth. Our results indicate that the exposure to high-CO 2 concentrations reduced significantly the enzymatic activities in the top 5 cm of sediments, but had no effects on subsurface sediment horizons (from 5 to 15 cm depth). In the surface sediments, both 5000 and 20,000 ppm CO 2 treatments determined a progressive decrease over time in the protein degradation (up to 80%). Conversely, the degradation rates of carbohydrates and organic phosphorous remained unaltered in the first 2 weeks, but decreased significantly (up to 50%) in the longer term when exposed at 20,000 ppm of CO 2 . Such effects were associated with a significant change in the composition of the biopolymeric carbon (due to the accumulation of proteins over time in sediments exposed to high-pCO 2 treatments), and a significant decrease (∼20-50% at 5000 and 20,000 ppm respectively) in nitrogen regeneration. We conclude that in areas immediately surrounding an active and long-lasting leak of CO 2 from CCS reservoirs, organic matter cycling would be significantly impacted in the surface sediment layers. The evidence of negligible impacts on the deeper sediments should be

  20. Storage, patterns, and control of soil organic carbon and nitrogen in the northeastern margin of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenjie; Chen Shengyun; Qin Xiang; Zhou Zhaoye; Sun Weijun; Ren Jiawen; Qin Dahe; Baumann, Frank; Scholten, Thomas; Zhang Tongzuo

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) spatial distributions show clear relationships with soil properties and vegetation composition as well as climatic conditions. Further, this study aimed to find the corresponding controlling parameters of SOC and TN storage in high-altitude ecosystems. The study was based on soil, vegetation and climate data from 42 soil pits taken from 14 plots. The plots were investigated during the summers of 2009 and 2010 at the northeastern margin of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau. Relationships of SOC density with soil moisture, soil texture, biomass and climatic variables were analyzed. Further, storage and vertical patterns of SOC and TN of seven representative vegetation types were estimated. The results show that significant relationships of SOC density with belowground biomass (BGB) and soil moisture (SM) can be observed. BGB and SM may be the dominant factors influencing SOC density in the topsoil of the study area. The average densities of SOC and TN at a depth of 1 m were about 7.72 kg C m −2 and 0.93 kg N m −2 . Both SOC and TN densities were concentrated in the topsoil (0–20 cm) and fell exponentially as soil depth increased. Additionally, the four typical vegetation types located in the northwest of the study area were selected to examine the relationship between SOC and environmental factors (temperature and precipitation). The results indicate that SOC density has a negative relationship with temperature and a positive relationship with precipitation diminishing with soil depth. It was concluded that SOC was concentrated in the topsoil, and that SOC density correlates well with BGB. SOC was predominantly influenced by SM, and to a much lower extent by temperature and precipitation. This study provided a new insight in understanding the control of SOC and TN density in the northeastern margin of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau. (letter)

  1. Re-organizing Earth Observation Data Storage to Support Temporal Analysis of Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth Observing System Data and Information System archives many datasets that are critical to understanding long-term variations in Earth science properties. Thus, some of these are large, multi-decadal datasets. Yet the challenge in long time series analysis comes less from the sheer volume than the data organization, which is typically one (or a small number of) time steps per file. The overhead of opening and inventorying complex, API-driven data formats such as Hierarchical Data Format introduces a small latency at each time step, which nonetheless adds up for datasets with O(10^6) single-timestep files. Several approaches to reorganizing the data can mitigate this overhead by an order of magnitude: pre-aggregating data along the time axis (time-chunking); storing the data in a highly distributed file system; or storing data in distributed columnar databases. Storing a second copy of the data incurs extra costs, so some selection criteria must be employed, which would be driven by expected or actual usage by the end user community, balanced against the extra cost.

  2. Detailed north-south cross section showing environments of deposition, organic richness, and thermal maturities of lower Tertiary rocks in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    The Uinta Basin of northeast Utah has produced large amounts of hydrocarbons from lower Tertiary strata since the 1960s. Recent advances in drilling technologies, in particular the development of efficient methods to drill and hydraulically fracture horizontal wells, has spurred renewed interest in producing hydrocarbons from unconventional low-permeability dolomite and shale reservoirs in the lacustrine, Eocene Green River Formation. The Eocene Green River Formation was deposited in Lake Uinta, a long-lived saline lake that occupied the Uinta Basin, the Piceance Basin to the east, and the intervening Douglas Creek arch. The focus of recent drilling activity has been the informal Uteland Butte member of the Green River Formation and to a much lesser extent the overlying R-0 oil shale zone of the Green River Formation. Initial production rates ranging from 500 to 1,500 barrels of oil equivalent per day have been reported from the Uteland Butte member from horizontal well logs that are as long as 4,000 feet (ft);. The cross section presented here extends northward from outcrop on the southern margin of the basin into the basin’s deep trough, located just south of the Uinta Mountains, and transects the area where this unconventional oil play is developing. The Monument Butte field, which is one of the fields located along this line of section, has produced hydrocarbons from conventional sandstone reservoirs in the lower part of the Green River Formation and underlying Wasatch Formation since 1981. A major fluvial-deltaic system entered Lake Uinta from the south, and this new line of section is ideal for studying the effect of the sediments delivered by this drainage on hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Green River Formation. The cross section also transects the Greater Altamont-Bluebell field in the deepest part of the basin, where hydrocarbons have been produced from fractured, highly overpressured marginal lacustrine and fluvial reservoirs in the Green River, Wasatch

  3. Liver Storage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-10-23

    Oct 23, 1971 ... The need for whole-organ preservation has become in- cre.asingly important ... ideally fulfil the same purpose as the circulation of blood through the body, ... Hepatic hypothermia produced by the introduction of cold electrolyte ... Recently, we reported successful hypothermic immersion storage for up to 8 ...

  4. Economic, Energetic, and Environmental Performance of a Solar Powered Organic Rankine Cycle with Electric Energy Storage in Different Commercial Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Spayde

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis to determine the economic, energetic, and environmental benefits that could be obtained from the implementation of a combined solar-power organic Rankine cycle (ORC with electric energy storage (EES to supply electricity to several commercial buildings including a large office, a small office, and a full service restaurant. The operational strategy for the ORC-EES system consists in the ORC charging the EES when the irradiation level is sufficient to generate power, and the EES providing electricity to the building when there is not irradiation (i.e., during night time. Electricity is purchased from the utility grid unless it is provided by the EES. The potential of the proposed system to reduce primary energy consumption (PEC, carbon dioxide emission (CDE, and cost was evaluated. Furthermore, the available capital cost for a variable payback period for the ORC-EES system was determined for each of the evaluated buildings. The effect of the number of solar collectors on the performance of the ORC-EES is also studied. Results indicate that the proposed ORC-EES system is able to satisfy 11%, 13%, and 18% of the electrical demand for the large office, the small office and the restaurant, respectively.

  5. Initial Soil Organic Matter Content Influences the Storage and Turnover of Litter-, Root- and Soil Carbon in Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Xu, S.; Li, P.; Sayer, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Grassland degradation is a worldwide problem that often leads to substantial loss of soil organic matter (SOM). Understanding how SOM content influences the stabilization of plant carbon (C) to form soil C is important to evaluate the potential of degraded grasslands to sequester additional C. We conducted a greenhouse experiment using C3 soils with six levels of SOM content and planted the C4 grass Cleistogenes squarrosa and/or added its litter to investigate how SOM content regulates the storage of new soil C derived from litter and roots, the decomposition of extant soil C, and the formation of soil aggregates. We found that microbial biomass carbon (MBC) increased with SOM content, and increased the mineralization of litter C. Both litter addition and planted treatments increased the amount of new C inputs to soil. However, litter addition had no significant impacts on the mineralization of extant soil C, but the presence of living roots significantly accelerated it. Thus, by the end of the experiment, soil C content was significantly higher in the litter addition treatments, but was not affected by planted treatments. The soil macroaggregate fraction increased with SOM content and was positively related to MBC. Overall, our study suggests that as SOM content increases, plant growth and soil microbes become more active, which allows microbes to process more plant-derived C and increases new soil C formation. The interactions between SOM content and plant C inputs should be considered when evaluating soil C turnover in degraded grasslands.

  6. A π-Conjugation Extended Viologen as a Two-Electron Storage Anolyte for Total Organic Aqueous Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Hu, Bo; Debruler, Camden; Liu, Tianbiao Leo

    2018-01-02

    Extending the conjugation of viologen by a planar thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole (TTz) framework and functionalizing the pyridinium with hydrophilic ammonium groups yielded a highly water-soluble π-conjugation extended viologen, 4,4'-(thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole-2,5-diyl)bis(1-(3-(trimethylammonio)propyl)pyridin-1-ium) tetrachloride, [(NPr) 2 TTz]Cl 4  , as a novel two-electron storage anolyte for aqueous organic redox flow battery (AORFB) applications. Its physical and electrochemical properties were systematically investigated. Paired with 4-trimethylammonium-TEMPO (N Me -TEMPO) as catholyte, [(NPr) 2 TTz]Cl 4 enables a 1.44 V AORFB with a theoretical energy density of 53.7 Wh L -1 . A demonstrated [(NPr) 2 TTz]Cl 4 /N Me -TEMPO AORFB delivered an energy efficiency of 70 % and 99.97 % capacity retention per cycle. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role that energy storage may have on the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of energy storage, thermal energy storage including sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, thermochemical heat storage, and seasonal heat storage, electricity storage including batteries, pumped hydroelectric storage, compressed air energy storage, and superconducting magnetic energy storage, and production and combustion of hydrogen as an energy storage option

  8. Pyrolytic indices of diagenetic transformation of lignin as biogeochemical proxies for soil organic matter quality and C storage potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-González, Marco A.; Almendros, Gonzalo; Álvarez, Ana M.; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Vila, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    The environmental factors involved in soil organic carbon sequestration remain unclear. The functional relationships between the macromolecular structure of the soil organic matter (SOM) and its resilience has been a constant in classical biogeochemical models. Other more recent hypotheses have postulated that preservation by soil minerals may play a chief role in the accumulation of stable SOM forms. However, additional experimental data are required to demonstrate a cause-to-effect relationship between preservation and stabilization. Some authors might consider that models neglecting the role of macromolecular structure are swapping cause and effect i.e., that SOM structurally flexible, weakly condensed and having 'open' structures is the one with high potential to interact with the soil mineral matrix, leading to stable microaggregates. In this study up to 35 topsoil samples (0-5 cm) were collected from different Spanish soils with contrasted values of organic C (the dependent variable), geological substrate and vegetation type. A wide array of uni- and multivariate chemometric models were applied to independent variables consisting of total abundances of the major aromatic compounds, i.e., alkylbenzenes and methoxyphenols released from whole soil samples using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). These two families of compounds were selected since they are classically considered to inform on the degree of microbial reworking of lignins, which is an important precursor of the aromatic moiety of the SOM. A series of pyrolytic surrogate indices (aiming to express SOM diagenetic transformation in relation to the original biogenic molecular composition) were especially successful in forecasting SOC, viz: a) ratio between alkylbenzenes and methoxyphenols, b) ratio between short-chain (C0-C4) and long-chain (>C4) alkylbenzenes, c) ratio between methoxyphenols and short-chain alkylbenzenes, and d) ratios between methoxyphenols with different side

  9. Integrated management of organic wastes for remediation of massive tailings storage facilities under semiarid mediterranean climate type: efficacy of organic pork residues as study case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Arellano, Eduardo; España, Helena; Gardeweg, Rosario; Bas, Fernando; Gandarillas, Mónica

    2016-04-01

    Remediation of large surface areas of massive mine wastes, such as tailings storage facilities (TSFs) is challenging, particularly when no topsoils have been stored for the mine closure stage. Worldwide, it has been demonstrated that the use of organic wastes as substrate amendments for remediation of hard rock mine wastes is a useful alternative to topsoils material. In the case of semi-arid climate conditions of north-central Chile, the copper mining industry has generated massive TSF (between 400 ha and 3,000 ha) which needs now to be properly closed according to recently established mine closure regulations. However, in most of the cases, there have been no topsoils savage that facilitate the initial stage of the site remediation. Industrial organic wastes (i.e. biosolids) are found in the area, but their availability is normally below the demand needed for remediation of TSFs and salt content is normally elevated, thus posing salinization risks to the substrate and negative plant growth. We focused on a large organic waste producing industry, the pork industry, whose growth has been restricted due to the limited possibilities for using pig slurries as amendments for croplands in north-central Chile and the strong odor generated, resulting in conflicts with local communities. Incorporation of pig slurries as amendments to post-operative TSFs has been scarcely evaluated at international level (i.e. Spain) and no evaluation at all exists for the solid organic fraction generated from pig slurry treatment plants (PSTP). In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of both pig slurries (PS) and the solid fraction of PSTP (SF-PSTP) as tailings amendment for creating good plant productivity on TSFs located under semi-arid Mediterranean climate conditions in north-central Chile. A short-term greenhouse study was developed. Copper mine tailings were mixed either with PS (0, 40, 80, and 120 m3 ha-1) or SF-PSTP (0, 25, 50 and 75 t ha-1), distributed in 3 L pots, and

  10. Modelling and simulation of phase change material latent heat storages applied to a solar-powered Organic Rankine Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfrida, Giampaolo; Secchi, Riccardo; Stańczyk, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A mathematical model of a Latent Heat Storage system was developed. • Energy and exergy analysis of the storage system were carried out. • A solar powered ORC unit coupled with the Latent Heat Storage was studied. • The dynamic performance of the overall plant was simulated with TRNSYS. - Abstract: Solar energy is one of the most promising renewable energy sources, but is intermittent by its nature. The study of efficient thermal heat storage technologies is of fundamental importance for the development of solar power systems. This work focuses on a robust mathematical model of a Latent Heat Storage (LHS) system constituted by a storage tank containing Phase Change Material spheres. The model, developed in EES environment, provides the time-dependent temperature profiles for the PCM and the heat transfer fluid flowing in the storage tank, and the energy and exergy stored as well. A case study on the application of the LHS technology is also presented. The operation of a solar power plant associated with a latent heat thermal storage and an ORC unit is simulated under dynamic (time-varying) solar radiation conditions with the software TRNSYS. The performance of the proposed plant is simulated over a one week period, and the results show that the system is able to provide power in 78.5% of the time, with weekly averaged efficiencies of 13.4% for the ORC unit, and of 3.9% for the whole plant (from solar radiation to net power delivered by the ORC expander).

  11. Comparative Effects of Phosphoenolpyruvate, a Glycolytic Intermediate, as an Organ Preservation Agent with Glucose and N-Acetylcysteine against Organ Damage during Cold Storage of Mouse Liver and Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Fukumoto, Yusuke; Kondo, Yuki; Irikura, Mitsuru; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Narita, Yuki; Hirata, Sumio; Moriuchi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toru; Hamasaki, Naotaka; Irie, Tetsumi

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), a glycolytic intermediate with antioxidative and energy supplementation potentials, as an organ preservation agent. Using ex vivo mouse liver and kidney of a static cold storage model, we compared the effects of PEP against organ damage and oxidative stress during cold preservation with those of glucose or N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, histological changes, and oxidative stress parameters (measured as thi...

  12. Yb(OTf){sub 3}-catalyzed one-pot three component synthesis for tertiary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bum Seok; Kim, Ji Hye; Nam, Tae Kyu; Jang, Doo Ok [Dept. of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Tertiary amine functionality is found in many natural bioactive products such as alkaloids, amino acids, nucleic acids, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. Tertiary amines have also been used as building blocks for nitrogen-containing organic compounds and synthetic polymers. A one-pot method for direct reductive amination of aldehydes has been developed to synthesize tertiary amines using HMDS as a nitrogen source in the presence of Yb(OTf ){sub 3}. With a stoichiometric amount of HMDS, the reaction afforded the desired tertiary amines without competitive reduction of the parent carbonyl compounds. This reaction offers a convenient and efficient protocol for synthesizing aromatic and aliphatic tertiary amines under mild reaction conditions.

  13. Metal-Organic Frameworks Triggered High-Efficiency Li storage in Fe-Based Polyhedral Nanorods for Lithium-ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Lisha; Song, Huawei; Wang, Chengxin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, metal organic framework (MOF) nanostructures have been frequently reported in the field of energy storage, specifically for Li-ion or Na-ion storage. By inter-separating the active sites of metal cluster and organic ligands, MOF nanostructures are exceptionally promising for realizing fast ion exchange and high-efficiency transportation and addressing the intricate issues that the energy-intensive Li-ion batteries have faced over many years. The related ion-storage mechanism remains to be explored. Is the traditional redox reaction mechanism operative for these nanostructure, as it is for transitional metal oxide? Herein, taking [Fe_3O(BDC)_3(H_2O)_2(NO_3)]n (Fe-MIL-88B) as an example, an Fe-based metal organic polyhedral nanorods of MIL–88 B structure was designed as an anode for Li-ion storage. When tested at 60 mA g"−"1, the nanoporous Fe-MIL–88 B polyhedral nanorods retained a reversible capacity of 744.5 mAh g"−"1 for more than 400 cycles. Ex situ characterizations of the post-cycled electrodes revealed that both the transition metal ions and the organic ligands contributed to the high reversible specific capacity. The polyhedral nanorods electrodes held the metal-organic skeleton together throughout the battery operation, although in a somewhat different manner than the pristine ones. This further substantiated that some MOF nanostructures are more appropriate than others for stable lithiation/delithiation processes. State-of-the-art CR2032 full cells showed that a high capacity of 86.8 mAh g"−"1 that was retained after 100 cycles (herein, the capacity for the full cell was calculated based on both the weight of the anode and the cathode, and the charge-discharge rate was 0.25C), when commercial LiFePO_4 powders were used as the cathode.

  14. Current use of wild plants with edible underground storage organs in a rural population of Patagonia: between tradition and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Juan José; Ladio, Ana Haydee

    2015-09-25

    Edible plants with underground storage organs (USOs) are neglected resources. We studied the local ecological knowledge edible plants with (USOs) in rural populations of North-Patagonia in order to establish how people are utilizing these plants. Some aspect of corpus-praxis-cosmos complex associated to the local ecological knowledge was documented and discussed. In addition, variation in this ecological knowledge due to age, gender, family structure, ethnic self-determination was also evaluated. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 inhabitants in order to study the relationship between the current use of plants with USOs and the age, sex, family group composition and ethnic self-identification of interviewees. In addition, the Cultural Importance Index for each species was calculated. The current richness of known species in these populations is a total of 9 plants. Plants with USOs tend to be used more frequently as the age of the interviewee increases. Women and men showed no differences in the average richness of species cited. The interviewees who share their homes with other generations use these plants more frequently than those who live alone. Our results indicate that the interviewees who identified themselves as belonging to the Mapuche people use these plants more frequently. For the Mapuche people, wild plants have constituted material and symbolic resources of great importance in their historical subsistence. In addition, they are currently being redefined as elements which present a connection with ancestral practices, produce a strong relationship with the 'land', and become markers which identify the 'natural' (historical) ways of their people; these are key elements in the current political processes of identity revaluation. This research is valuable to stimulate cultural revival and health promotion programs in the communities with their own local, cultural food.

  15. Implementation of Organ Culture storage of donor corneas: a 3 year study of its impact on the corneal transplant wait list at the Lions New South Wales Eye Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasahayam, Raj; Georges, Pierre; Hodge, Christopher; Treloggen, Jane; Cooper, Simon; Petsoglou, Con; Sutton, Gerard; Zhu, Meidong

    2016-09-01

    Organ Culture corneal storage offers an extended storage time and increased donor pool and tissue assessment opportunities. In September 2011, the Lions New South Wales Eye Bank (LNSWEB) moved from hypothermic storage to Organ Culture corneal storage. This study evaluates the impact of implementation of Organ Culture on donor eye retrieval and the corneal transplant waiting list over a 3 year period in NSW, Australia. Retrospective review of the LNSWEB data from September 2011 to August 2014. Tissue collection, waiting list and tissue utilization data were recorded. The data from September 2008 to August 2011 for Optisol-GS storage was used for comparison. The annual donor and cornea collection rate increased 35 % and 44 % respectively with Organ Culture compared to Optisol-GS storage. The utilization rate of corneal tissue increased from 73.4 % with hypothermic storage to 77.2 % with Organ Culture storage. The transplant wait list decreased by 77.3 % from September 2011 to August 2014 and correlated with the increased rate of corneal transplantation (r = -0.9381, p banks. The practical benefits of the extended storage time and increased donor assessment opportunities have directly led to an increase in corneal utilization rate and a significant decrease in recipient wait list time.

  16. Validation of modified World Health Organization classification for pregnant women with heart disease in a tertiary care center in southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwanrath C

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitkasaem Suwanrath,1 Putthaporn Thongphanang,1 Sutham Pinjaroen,1 Saranyou Suwanugsorn2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand Purpose: To validate the modified World Health Organization (WHO classification in pregnant women with congenital and acquired heart diseases. Patients and methods: The database of pregnant women with heart disease, who delivered at Songklanagarind Hospital between January 1995 and December 2016, was retrieved from the Statistical Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, along with the Hospital Information System of Songklanagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University. Each patient was retrospectively classified according to the modified WHO classification of maternal cardiovascular risk. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes among the modified WHO classes were analyzed using the chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test and one-way ANOVA test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 331 cases were studied: 157 cases with congenital heart disease and 174 cases with acquired heart disease. There were 48, 173, 32 and 78 cases in the modified WHO class I, II, III and IV, respectively. Congestive heart failure was the most common complication. The overall maternal mortality rate was 3.6%, all of which were in the modified WHO class IV. Maternal cardiovascular events occurred in 24.2% of cases, increasing rates with higher modified WHO class: 4.2%, 15.0%, 25.0% and 56.4% in class I, II, III and IV, respectively (p<0.001. Adverse fetal outcomes including preterm delivery, low birth weight, small for gestational age and neonatal intensive care unit admission were also significantly increased in class III and IV (p<0.05. Conclusion: The modified WHO classification is useful not only for obtaining a cardiovascular risk assessment in pregnant

  17. Huygens file service and storage architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Mullender, Sape J.; Stabell-Kulo, Tage; Stabell-Kulo, Tage

    1993-01-01

    The Huygens file server is a high-performance file server which is able to deliver multi-media data in a timely manner while also providing clients with ordinary “Unix” like file I/O. The file server integrates client machines, file servers and tertiary storage servers in the same storage

  18. Huygens File Service and Storage Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Mullender, Sape J.; Stabell-Kulo, Tage; Stabell-Kulo, Tage

    1993-01-01

    The Huygens file server is a high-performance file server which is able to deliver multi-media data in a timely manner while also providing clients with ordinary “Unix” like file I/O. The file server integrates client machines, file servers and tertiary storage servers in the same storage

  19. Historical storage budgets of organic carbon, nutrient and contaminant elements in saltmarsh sediments: Biogeochemical context for managed realignment, Humber Estuary, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, J.E.; Samways, G.; Shimmield, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    Biogeochemical data from Welwick marsh (Humber Estuary, UK), an actively accreting saltmarsh, provides a decadal-centennial-scale natural analogue for likely future biogeochemical storage effects of managed realignment sites accreting either intertidal muds or saltmarsh. Marsh topographic profiles and progradation history from aerial photographs were combined with 137 Cs and niobium contamination history to establish and verify chronology and sediment mass accumulation. These data, combined with down-core measurements of particulate organic carbon (C org ), organic nitrogen (N org ), particle reactive phosphorus and selected contaminant metal (Zn, Pb, Cu, As and Nb) contents were then used to calculate sediment and chemical storage terms and to quantify changes in these over time. These data are used to help predict likely future biogeochemical storage changes at managed realignment sites in the estuary. The net effect of returning some 26 km 2 of reclaimed land to intertidal environments now (about 25% of the maximum possible realignment storage identified for the estuary) could result in the storage of some 40,000 tonnes a -1 of sediment which would also bury about 800 tonnes a -1 of C org and 40 tonnes a -1 of N org . Particulate contaminant P burial would be around 25 tonnes a -1 along with ∼ 6 tonnes a -1 contaminant Zn, 3 tonnes a -1 contaminant Pb, and ∼ 1 tonnes a -1 contaminant As and Cu. The study also shows that reclamation activities in the outer estuary since the mid-1700s has prevented, in total, the deposition of about 10 million tonnes of sediment, along with 320,000 tonnes of C org and 16,000 tonnes of N org . The study provides a mid-1990s baseline against which future measurements at the site can determine changes in burial fluxes and improvement or deterioration in contaminant metal contents of the sediments. The data are directly relevant for local managed realignment sites but also broadly indicative for sites generally on the European

  20. Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  1. Geophysical Research in the Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary Basin (Murcia, Spain), as a Natural Analogue of CO{sub 2} Storage and Leakage; Estudio Geofisico del Analogo Natural de Almacenamiento y Escape de CO{sub 2} de la Cuenca Terciaria de Ganuelas-Mazarron (Murcia, Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo-Naharro, J.; Aracil, E.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2013-07-01

    In order to determine the depth, morphology and extent of the CO{sub 2}-enriched deep saline aquifer in the Ganuelas-Mazarron Tertiary basin (Murcia, Spain), it was necessary reprocessing the vertical electrical soundings performed by IGME-ADARO in the eighties and to perform several geophysical campaigns by means of electrical tomography, time domain electromagnetic surveys and gravimetry. Densities of the outcropping lithologies in the studied basin were also determined in order to refine the model obtained from gravimetric data. The geophysical results, particularly from gravimetric data, seem to indicate that the CO{sub 2}-enriched deep saline aquifer, located in the contact or within the carbonate materials of the Nevado-Filabride Complex, could reach a depth greater than 800 m. For this reason, the possibility that this CO{sub 2} is in supercritical state in certain areas of the aquifer, is not discardable. Thus, the studied basin would be an excellent natural analogue of a CO{sub 2}-deep geological storage in a deep saline aquifer in volcanic and/or carbonate rocks, anthropogenically perturbed by geothermal exploration wells (La Ermita de El Saladillo and El Alto de El Reventon) and hydrogeological wells for agricultural purposes. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of the HB&L System for the Microbiological Screening of Storage Medium for Organ-Cultured Corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camposampiero, D; Grandesso, S; Zanetti, E; Mazzucato, S; Solinas, M; Parekh, M; Frigo, A C; Gion, M; Ponzin, D

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To compare HB&L and BACTEC systems for detecting the microorganisms contaminating the corneal storage liquid preserved at 31°C. Methods. Human donor corneas were stored at 4°C followed by preservation at 31°C. Samples of the storage medium were inoculated in BACTEC Peds Plus/F (aerobic microorganisms), BACTEC Plus Anaerobic/F (anaerobic microorganisms), and HB&L bottles. The tests were performed (a) after six days of storage, (b) end of storage, and (c) after 24 hours of preservation in deturgescent liquid sequentially. 10,655 storage and deturgescent media samples were subjected to microbiological control using BACTEC (6-day incubation) and HB&L (24-hour incubation) systems simultaneously. BACTEC positive/negative refers to both/either aerobic and anaerobic positives/negatives, whereas HB&L can only detect the aerobic microbes, and therefore the positives/negatives depend on the presence/absence of aerobic microorganisms. Results. 147 (1.38%) samples were identified positive with at least one of the two methods. 127 samples (134 identified microorganisms) were positive with both HB&L and BACTEC. 14 HB&L+/BACTEC- and 6 BACTEC+/HB&L- were identified. Sensitivity (95.5%), specificity (99.8%), and positive (90.1%) and negative predictive values (99.9%) were high with HB&L considering a 3.5% annual contamination rate. Conclusion. HB&L is a rapid system for detecting microorganisms in corneal storage medium in addition to the existing methods.

  3. Storage effects on quantity and composition of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen of lake water, leaf leachate and peat soil water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Marlen; Zak, Dominik

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of freezing and cold storage at 4 °C on bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) concentration and SEC fractions determined with size exclusion chromatography (SEC), as well as on spectral properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) analyzed with fluorescence spectroscopy. In order to account for differences in DOM composition and source we analyzed storage effects for three different sample types, including a lake water sample representing freshwater DOM, a leaf litter leachate of Phragmites australis representing a terrestrial, 'fresh' DOM source and peatland porewater samples. According to our findings one week of cold storage can bias DOC and DON determination. Overall, the determination of DOC and DON concentration with SEC analysis for all three sample types were little susceptible to alterations due to freezing. The findings derived for the sampling locations investigated here may not apply for other sampling locations and/or sample types. However, DOC size fractions and DON concentration of formerly frozen samples should be interpreted with caution when sample concentrations are high. Alteration of some optical properties (HIX and SUVA 254 ) due to freezing were evident, and therefore we recommend immediate analysis of samples for spectral analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Banking carbon: A review of organic carbon storage and physical factors influencing retention in floodplains and riparian ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas A. Sutfin; Ellen E. Wohl; Kathleen A. Dwire

    2016-01-01

    Rivers are dynamic components of the terrestrial carbon cycle and provide important functions in ecosystem processes. Although rivers act as conveyers of carbon to the oceans, rivers also retain carbon within riparian ecosystems along floodplains, with potential for long-term (> 102 years) storage. Research in ecosystem processing emphasizes the...

  5. Energy storage in hybrid organic-inorganic materials hexacyanoferrate-doped polypyrrole as cathode in reversible lithium cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Gomez, G,; Skaarup, Steen; West, Keld

    2000-01-01

    A study of the hybrid oganic-inorganic hexacyanoferrate-polypyrrole material as a cathode in rechargeable lithium cells is reported as part of a series of functional hybrid materials that represent a new concept in energy storage. The effect of synthesis temperatures of the hybrid in the specific...

  6. Development of a Practical Hydrogen Storage System Based on Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers and a Homogeneous Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Brayton, Daniel [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Jorgensen, Scott W. [General Motors, LLC, Warren, MI (United States). Research and Development Center. Chemical and Material Systems Lab.; Hou, Peter [General Motors, LLC, Warren, MI (United States). Research and Development Center. Chemical and Material Systems Lab.

    2017-03-24

    The objectives of this project were: 1) optimize a hydrogen storage media based on LOC/homogeneous pincer catalyst (carried out at Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC) and 2) develop space, mass and energy efficient tank and reactor system to house and release hydrogen from the media (carried out at General Motor Research Center).

  7. A more efficient way to shape metal-organic framework (MOF) powder materials for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available operation time. This granulation approach is a more efficient way to shape MOF-type powder materials into application-specific configurations compared to the mechanical pressing method. The pellets could be conveniently packed in a small hydrogen storage...

  8. Storage and export of organic matter in a headwater stream: responses to long-term detrital manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue L. Eggert; J. Bruce Wallace; Judy L. Meyer; Jackson R. Webster

    2012-01-01

    Riparian habitats provide organic matter inputs that influence stream biota and ecosystem processes in forested watersheds. Over a 13-yr period, we examined the effects of litter exclusion, small- and large-wood removal, and the addition of leaf species of varying detrital quality on organic matter standing crop and export of organic and inorganic particles in a high-...

  9. Investigations of freezing and cold storage for the analysis of peatland dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and absorbance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Mike; Freeman, Chris; Gauci, Vincent; Lebron, Inma; Evans, Chris D

    2015-07-01

    Although measured rates of biological degradation of DOC are typically low under dark conditions, it is assumed that water samples must be analysed soon after collection to provide an accurate measure of DOC concentration and UV-visible absorbance. To examine the impact of storage on DOC quality and quantity, we took water samples from an ombrotrophic peatland, and stored them in the dark at 4 °C for 138-1082 days. A median of 29% of DOC was lost during storage, but losses of absorbance at 254 nm were less. DOC loss followed a first-order exponential decay function, and was dependent on storage time. DOC half-life was calculated as 1253 days. Specific absorbance at 254 nm suggested that samples containing more aromatic DOC were more resistant to degradation, although time functioned as the primary control. Samples from two fens showed that loss of absorbance was greater at 400 nm rather than 254 nm, after 192 days storage, suggesting that non-aromatic DOC is preferentially degraded. These results suggest that samples can be stored for several months before losses of DOC become detectable, and that it is possible to back-calculate initial DOC concentrations in long-term stored samples based on known decay rates. Freeze/thaw experiments using samples from a range of peatlands suggested that DOC concentration was mostly unaffected by the process, but DOC increased 37% in one sample. Freezing had unpredictable and sometimes strong effects on absorbance, SUVA and E ratios, therefore freezing is not recommended as a method of preservation for these analyses.

  10. Technology for organization of the onboard system for processing and storage of ERS data for ultrasmall spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotov, Valery V.; Taganov, Alexander I.; Konkin, Yuriy V.; Kolesenkov, Aleksandr N.

    2017-10-01

    Task of processing and analysis of obtained Earth remote sensing data on ultra-small spacecraft board is actual taking into consideration significant expenditures of energy for data transfer and low productivity of computers. Thereby, there is an issue of effective and reliable storage of the general information flow obtained from onboard systems of information collection, including Earth remote sensing data, into a specialized data base. The paper has considered peculiarities of database management system operation with the multilevel memory structure. For storage of data in data base the format has been developed that describes a data base physical structure which contains required parameters for information loading. Such structure allows reducing a memory size occupied by data base because it is not necessary to store values of keys separately. The paper has shown architecture of the relational database management system oriented into embedment into the onboard ultra-small spacecraft software. Data base for storage of different information, including Earth remote sensing data, can be developed by means of such database management system for its following processing. Suggested database management system architecture has low requirements to power of the computer systems and memory resources on the ultra-small spacecraft board. Data integrity is ensured under input and change of the structured information.

  11. Metal Nanoparticles Covered with a Metal-Organic Framework: From One-Pot Synthetic Methods to Synergistic Energy Storage and Conversion Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Mitsuka, Yuko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid materials composed of metal nanoparticles and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted much attention in many applications, such as enhanced gas storage and catalytic, magnetic, and optical properties, because of the synergetic effects between the metal nanoparticles and MOFs. In this Forum Article, we describe our recent progress on novel synthetic methods to produce metal nanoparticles covered with a MOF (metal@MOF). We first present Pd@copper(II) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate (HKUST-1) as a novel hydrogen-storage material. The HKUST-1 coating on Pd nanocrystals results in a remarkably enhanced hydrogen-storage capacity and speed in the Pd nanocrystals, originating from charge transfer from Pd nanocrystals to HKUST-1. Another material, Pd-Au@Zn(MeIM)2 (ZIF-8, where HMeIM = 2-methylimidazole), exhibits much different catalytic activity for alcohol oxidation compared with Pd-Au nanoparticles, indicating a design guideline for the development of composite catalysts with high selectivity. A composite material composed of Cu nanoparticles and Cr3F(H2O)2O{C6H3(CO2)3}2 (MIL-100-Cr) demonstrates higher catalytic activity for CO2 reduction into methanol than Cu/γ-Al2O3. We also present novel one-pot synthetic methods to produce composite materials including Pd/ZIF-8 and Ni@Ni2(dhtp) (MOF-74, where H4dhtp = 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalic acid).

  12. Influence of accelerated thermal charging and discharging cycles on thermo-physical properties of organic phase change materials for solar thermal energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raam Dheep, G.; Sreekumar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Identification of organic phase change materials namely benzamide and sebacic acid. • Thermal reliability studies on identified phase change materials. • Measurement of phase transition temperature and latent heat of fusion. • Analysis of relative percentage difference (RPD%) in heat of fusion and melting temperature of benzamide and sebacic acid. - Abstract: Integration of appropriate thermal energy storage system plays a predominant role in upgrading the efficiency of solar thermal energy devices by reducing the incongruity between energy supply and demand. Latent heat thermal energy storage based on phase change materials (PCM) is found to be the most efficient and prospective method for storage of solar thermal energy. Ensuring the thermal reliability of PCM through large number of charging (melting) and discharging (solidification) cycles is a primary prerequisite to determine the suitability of PCM for a specific thermal energy storage applications. The present study explains the experimental analysis carried out on two PCM’s namely benzamide and sebacic acid to check the compatibility of the material in solar thermal energy storage applications. The selected materials were subjected to one thousand accelerated melting and solidification cycles in order to investigate the percentage of variation at different stages on latent heat of fusion, phase transition temperature, onset and peak melting temperature. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) was used to determine the phase transition temperature and heat of fusion upon completion of every 100 thermal cycles and continued up to 1000 cycles. Relative Percentage Difference (RPD%) is calculated to find out the absolute deviation of melting temperature and latent heat of fusion with respect to zeroth cycle. The experimental study recorded a melting temperatures of benzamide and sebacic acid as 125.09 °C and 135.92 °C with latent heat of fusion of 285.1 (J/g) and 374.4 (J/g). The

  13. Organic, cross-linking, and shape-stabilized solar thermal energy storage materials: A reversible phase transition driven by broadband visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yunming; Tang, Bingtao; Zhang, Shufen

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Organic shape-stabilized solar thermal energy storage materials (OCSPCMs) with broadband harvesting for visible light were obtained by crosslinking and color matching, which provided a new platform for improving the efficiency of solar radiation utilization. - Highlights: • Novel phase change materials (OCSPCMs) were obtained by crosslinking and color matching. • The η of the OCSPCM was higher than 0.74 (visible light from 400 nm to 700 nm). • The phase change latent heats of the OCSPCMs were more than 120 J/g. • The OCSPCM has excellent form-stable effect during phase change process. - Abstract: Broadband visible sunlight usage and shape-stabilized effect were achieved using organic, cross-linking, and shape-stabilized phase-changed materials (OCSPCMs) with broadband visible light absorption, which were obtained by cross-linking reticulation and color matching (yellow, red, and blue) according to solar irradiation energy density. The obtained OCSPCMs exhibited excellent form-stable phase-change energy storage and broadband visible light-harvesting. Under broadband irradiation (from 400 nm to 700 nm), the light-to-heat conversion and the thermal energy storage efficiency (η > 0.74) of the OCSPCMs were significantly improved upon solar irradiation by color matching compared with those of OCSPCMs with single-band selective absorption of visible light (yellow, red, or blue). Differential scanning calorimetric results indicated that the phase change temperatures and latent heats of OCSPCMs ranged from 32.6 °C to 60.2 °C and from 120.1 J/g to 132.7 J/g, respectively. The novel materials show a reversible (more than 200 cycles) phase transition via ON/OFF switching of visible light irradiation

  14. Potential reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from the use of electric energy storage on a power generation unit/organic Rankine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mago, Pedro J.; Luck, Rogelio

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A power generation organic Rankine cycle with electric energy storage is evaluated. • The potential carbon dioxide emissions reduction of the system is evaluated. • The system performance is evaluated for a building in different climate zones. • The system emissions and cost are compared with those of conventional systems. • Use of carbon emissions cap and trade programs on the system is evaluated. - Abstract: This paper evaluates the potential carbon dioxide emissions reduction from the implementation of electric energy storage to a combined power generation unit and an organic Rankine cycle relative to a conventional system that uses utility gas for heating and utility electricity for electricity needs. Results indicate that carbon dioxide emission reductions from the operation of the proposed system are directly correlated to the ratio of the carbon dioxide emission conversion factor for electricity to that of the fuel. The location where the system is installed also has a strong influence on the potential of the proposed system to save carbon dioxide emissions. Finally, it is shown that by using carbon emissions cap and trade programs, it is possible to establish a frame of reference to compare/exchange operational cost gains with carbon dioxide emission reductions/gains.

  15. Tertiary climatic fluctuations and methods of analysis of tertiary floras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, J.A.

    1971-01-01

    On theoretical grounds, an analysis of the physiognomy of a Tertiary leaf assemblage is more direct and reliable than a circuitous floristic analysis in assigning thermal regimes to fossil assemblages. Using primarily foliar physiognomy and secondarily floristic composition, it can be shown that: (1) some middle latitude Tertiary assemblages probably lived under meteoroligically tropical climates; (2) a major and rapid climatic deterioration occurred in the Oligocene; and (3) a major climatic fluctuation probably occurred in the Late Eocene. These analyses thus substantiate the conclusions of several other paleobotanists regarding climatic fluctuations. Recent criticisms of these analyses are shown to be invalid and to be based largely on misinterpretations. ?? 1971.

  16. Automated Stock Control System for Bookshops in Tertiary Institutions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recent need for automated stock control system for bookshops in tertiary institutions was generated by unequal availability of books and stiff scarcity of books in some areas while in ... This approach provides for faster response times for users because the database is local to each business unit within the organization.

  17. The influence of the fungal pathogen Mycocentrospora acerina on the proteome and polyacetylenes and 6-methoxymellein in organic and conventionally cultivated carrots (Daucus carota) during post harvest storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louarn, Sébastien; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Edelenbos, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Many carrots are discarded during post harvest cold storage due to development of fungal infections, caused by, e.g., Mycocentrospora acerina (liquorice rot). We compared the susceptibility of carrots grown under conventional and organic agricultural practices. In one year, organically cultivated...

  18. Memory mass storage

    CERN Document Server

    Campardo, Giovanni; Iaculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Covering all the fundamental storage technologies such as semiconductor, magnetic, optical and uncommon, this volume details their core characteristics. In addition, it includes an overview of the 'biological memory' of the human brain and its organization.

  19. Thermal properties and heat storage analysis of palmitic acid-TiO_2 composite as nano-enhanced organic phase change material (NEOPCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.K.; Ganesan, P.; Tyagi, V.V.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; Sandaran, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel composite of palmitic acid and TiO_2 nanoparticles with enhanced thermal energy storage capabilities • The composite is thermally reliable and chemically stable. • Thermal conductivity of the composite increases significantly with the loading. - Graphical Abstract: - Abstract: In the present study, the phase change behavior of prepared novel composites of palmitic acid and solid nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TiO_2) for thermal energy storage has been investigated. The nanoparticles are dispersed into the base fluid in various mass fractions (0.5, 1, 3, and 5%), and their effects on the thermo-physical properties have been investigated. Structural analysis has been carried out by using FESEM, and crystallography was checked by XRD technique. The chemical/functional groups of the base fluid and composite PCMs have been analyzed by using FT-IR spectrum. The observations showed that the TiO_2 nanoparticles do not affect the chemical structure of palmitic acid; however they improve the chemical stability. The phase transition temperature and latent heat of fusion has shown the significant stability with the increase in nanoparticle weight fractions. The accelerated thermal cycle test of the composite shows good thermal reliability for 1500 melt/freeze cycles. Thermal conductivity of palmitic acid increased gradually by 12.7, 20.6, 46.6, and 80% for the nanoparticle weight fractions of 0.5, 1, 3, and 5% respectively. Based on the results, it can be mentioned that the prepared palmitic acid based nano-enhanced organic phase change composite materials can be very well used as potential solar thermal energy storage materials.

  20. Aspects of middle cretaceous pelagic sedimentation in Southern Europe : production and storage of organic matter, stable isotopes, and astronomical influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.L. de

    1983-01-01

    Large amounts of organic carbon were stored as black shales in pelagic sediments during the Lower and Middle Cretaceous, especially within the Tethyan and North Atlantic oceans and their marginal basins (Schlanger & Jenkyns, 1976; Fischer &Arthur, 1977; Ryan & Cita, 1977; Thiede & van

  1. Microwave-assisted modulated synthesis of zirconium-based metal–organic framework (Zr-MOF) for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium-based metal–organic framework (Zr-MOF) was synthesized using a microwave-assisted modulated method in a short reaction time of 5 min. The Zr-MOF material was highly crystalline with well-defined octahedral shaped crystals, and it exhibited...

  2. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of urinary volatile organic metabolites: Optimization of the HS-SPME procedure and sample storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković Semren, Tanja; Brčić Karačonji, Irena; Safner, Toni; Brajenović, Nataša; Tariba Lovaković, Blanka; Pizent, Alica

    2018-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics research of human volatile urinary metabolome can be used to identify potential biomarkers associated with the changes in metabolism related to various health disorders. To ensure reliable analysis of urinary volatile organic metabolites (VOMs) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), parameters affecting the headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) procedure have been evaluated and optimized. The influence of incubation and extraction temperatures and times, coating fibre material and salt addition on SPME efficiency was investigated by multivariate optimization methods using reduced factorial and Doehlert matrix designs. The results showed optimum values for temperature to be 60°C, extraction time 50min, and incubation time 35min. The proposed conditions were applied to investigate urine samples' stability regarding different storage conditions and freeze-thaw processes. The sum of peak areas of urine samples stored at 4°C, -20°C, and -80°C up to six months showed a time dependent decrease over time although storage at -80°C resulted in a slight non-significant reduction comparing to the fresh sample. However, due to the volatile nature of the analysed compounds, more than two cycles of freezing/thawing of the sample stored for six months at -80°C should be avoided whenever possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A theoretical study of the hydrogen-storage potential of (H2)4CH4 in metal organic framework materials and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Thonhauser, T

    2012-10-24

    The hydrogen-methane compound (H(2))(4)CH(4)-or for short H4M-is one of the most promising hydrogen-storage materials. This van der Waals compound is extremely rich in molecular hydrogen: 33.3 mass%, not including the hydrogen bound in CH(4); including it, we reach even 50.2 mass%. Unfortunately, H4M is not stable under ambient pressure and temperature, requiring either low temperature or high pressure. In this paper, we investigate the properties and structure of the molecular and crystalline forms of H4M, using ab initio methods based on van der Waals DFT (vdW-DF). We further investigate the possibility of creating the pressures required to stabilize H4M through external agents such as metal organic framework (MOF) materials and carbon nanotubes, with very encouraging results. In particular, we find that certain MOFs can create considerable pressure for H4M in their cavities, but not enough to stabilize it at room temperature, and moderate cooling is still necessary. On the other hand, we find that all the investigated carbon nanotubes can create the high pressures required for H4M to be stable at room temperature, with direct implications for new and exciting hydrogen-storage applications.

  4. Clues for discovering a new biological function of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin in organisms: potential sulfide receptor and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dandan; Liu, Li; Wang, Hui; Xu, Haoran; Chen, Lei; Ma, Li; Li, Zhengqiang

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between H2 S and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has been studied by UV-Vis and Resonance Raman spectroscopes to confirm the binding between the ligand and the protein. Kinetic constants, kon = 1.2 × 10(5) m(-1) ·s(-1) and koff = 2.5 × 10(-4) ·s(-1) , have been determined and compared with those for mammalian hemoglobins. Density Functional Theory study supports the binding of H2 S by modeling the configurations of HOMO dispersions. We hypothesized that VHb is involved in H2 S reception and storage. Different from Lucina pectinata HbI, a typical H2 S-binding hemoglobin, VHb, exhibits unusual properties on H2 S reactivity such as steric constraints playing an important role in modulating H2 S entry. A distinct mechanism of VHb interaction with H2 S is supported by studies of variant forms of VHb. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Rethinking the Tertiary Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petocz, Peter; Reid, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics curriculum at the tertiary level is located within a range of social and cultural theories, and is often constructed by academics seeking to promulgate a particular view of mathematics. We argue that such a curriculum should incorporate a real acknowledgement of the different ways in which students understand the nature of mathematics…

  6. Tritium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hircq, B.

    1990-01-01

    This document represents a synthesis relative to tritium storage. After indicating the main storage particularities as regards tritium, storages under gaseous and solid form are after examined before establishing choices as a function of the main criteria. Finally, tritium storage is discussed regarding tritium devices associated to Fusion Reactors and regarding smaller devices [fr

  7. Influence of electro-activated solutions of weak organic acid salts on microbial quality and overall appearance of blueberries during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liato, Viacheslav; Hammami, Riadh; Aïder, Mohammed

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the potential of diluted electro-activated solutions of weak organic acid salts (potassium acetate, potassium citrate and calcium lactate) to extend the shelf life of blueberries during post-harvest storage. The sanitizing capacity of these solutions was studied against pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 as well as phytopathogenic fungi A. alternata, F. oxysporum and B. cinerea. The results showed that a 5-min treatment of inoculated blueberries with electro-activated solutions resulted in a 4 log CFU/g reduction in Listeria monocytogenes for all solutions. For E. coli O157:H7, the electro-activated potassium acetate and potassium citrate solutions achieved a decrease of 3.5 log CFU/g after 5 min of berry washing. The most important fungus reduction was found when blueberries were washed with an electro-activated solution of potassium acetate and a NaOCl solution. After 5 min of blueberry washing with an electro-activated potassium acetate solution, a very high reduction effect was observed for A. alternata, F. oxysporum and B. cinerea, which showed survival levels of only 2.2 ± 0.16, 0.34 ± 0.15 and 0.21 ± 0.16 log CFU/g, respectively. Regarding the effect of the washing on the organoleptic quality of blueberries, the obtained results showed no negative effect on the product color or textural profile. Finally, this work suggests that washing with electro-activated solutions of weak organic acid salts can be used to enhance the shelf-life of blueberries during post-harvest storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cropping practices, soil properties, pedotransfer functions and organic carbon storage at Kuanria canal command area in India

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Krishna Gopal; Kundu, Dilip Kumar; Singh, Ravender; Kumar, Ashwani; Rout, Rajalaxmi; Padhi, Jyotiprakash; Majhi, Pradipta; Sahoo, Dillip Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Effects of cropping practices on soil properties viz. particle size distribution, pH, bulk density (BD), field capacity (FC, -33 kPa), permanent wilting point (PWP, -1500 kPa), available water capacity (AWC) and soil organic carbon (SOC) were assessed. The pedotransfer functions (PTFs) were developed for saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), water retention at FC and PWP of soils for different sites under major cropping system in a canal irrigated area. The results revealed that the soils ar...

  9. Synthesis of copolymerized porous organic frameworks with high gas storage capabilities at both high and low pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Pei, Cuiying

    2014-01-01

    A series of copolymerized porous organic frameworks (C-POFs) were synthesized with monomers of tetrakis(4-bromophenyl)methane and tris(4-bromophenyl)amine in different ratios by a Yamamoto-type Ullmann cross-coupling reaction. These C-POFs exhibit high physicochemical stability, large surface areas and excellent H2, CH4 and CO 2 adsorption properties both at low and high pressures. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  10. High organic inputs explain shallow and deep SOC storage in a long-term agroforestry system – combining experimental and modeling approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cardinael

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Agroforestry is an increasingly popular farming system enabling agricultural diversification and providing several ecosystem services. In agroforestry systems, soil organic carbon (SOC stocks are generally increased, but it is difficult to disentangle the different factors responsible for this storage. Organic carbon (OC inputs to the soil may be larger, but SOC decomposition rates may be modified owing to microclimate, physical protection, or priming effect from roots, especially at depth. We used an 18-year-old silvoarable system associating hybrid walnut trees (Juglans regia  ×  nigra and durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum and an adjacent agricultural control plot to quantify all OC inputs to the soil – leaf litter, tree fine root senescence, crop residues, and tree row herbaceous vegetation – and measured SOC stocks down to 2 m of depth at varying distances from the trees. We then proposed a model that simulates SOC dynamics in agroforestry accounting for both the whole soil profile and the lateral spatial heterogeneity. The model was calibrated to the control plot only. Measured OC inputs to soil were increased by about 40 % (+ 1.11 t C ha−1 yr−1 down to 2 m of depth in the agroforestry plot compared to the control, resulting in an additional SOC stock of 6.3 t C ha−1 down to 1 m of depth. However, most of the SOC storage occurred in the first 30 cm of soil and in the tree rows. The model was strongly validated, properly describing the measured SOC stocks and distribution with depth in agroforestry tree rows and alleys. It showed that the increased inputs of fresh biomass to soil explained the observed additional SOC storage in the agroforestry plot. Moreover, only a priming effect variant of the model was able to capture the depth distribution of SOC stocks, suggesting the priming effect as a possible mechanism driving deep SOC dynamics. This result questions the potential of soils to

  11. High organic inputs explain shallow and deep SOC storage in a long-term agroforestry system - combining experimental and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinael, Rémi; Guenet, Bertrand; Chevallier, Tiphaine; Dupraz, Christian; Cozzi, Thomas; Chenu, Claire

    2018-01-01

    Agroforestry is an increasingly popular farming system enabling agricultural diversification and providing several ecosystem services. In agroforestry systems, soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks are generally increased, but it is difficult to disentangle the different factors responsible for this storage. Organic carbon (OC) inputs to the soil may be larger, but SOC decomposition rates may be modified owing to microclimate, physical protection, or priming effect from roots, especially at depth. We used an 18-year-old silvoarable system associating hybrid walnut trees (Juglans regia × nigra) and durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum) and an adjacent agricultural control plot to quantify all OC inputs to the soil - leaf litter, tree fine root senescence, crop residues, and tree row herbaceous vegetation - and measured SOC stocks down to 2 m of depth at varying distances from the trees. We then proposed a model that simulates SOC dynamics in agroforestry accounting for both the whole soil profile and the lateral spatial heterogeneity. The model was calibrated to the control plot only. Measured OC inputs to soil were increased by about 40 % (+ 1.11 t C ha-1 yr-1) down to 2 m of depth in the agroforestry plot compared to the control, resulting in an additional SOC stock of 6.3 t C ha-1 down to 1 m of depth. However, most of the SOC storage occurred in the first 30 cm of soil and in the tree rows. The model was strongly validated, properly describing the measured SOC stocks and distribution with depth in agroforestry tree rows and alleys. It showed that the increased inputs of fresh biomass to soil explained the observed additional SOC storage in the agroforestry plot. Moreover, only a priming effect variant of the model was able to capture the depth distribution of SOC stocks, suggesting the priming effect as a possible mechanism driving deep SOC dynamics. This result questions the potential of soils to store large amounts of carbon, especially at depth. Deep

  12. Oxygen vacancy induced fast lithium storage and efficient organics photodegradation over ultrathin TiO{sub 2} nanolayers grafted graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu, E-mail: xieyu_121@163.com [Nanchang Hangkong University, Department of Material Chemistry, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province (China); Hu, Dongsheng [Nanchang Hangkong University, Department of Material Chemistry, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province (China); Liu, Lianjun, E-mail: liul@uwm.edu [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Mechanical Engineering Department, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Zhou, Panpan; Xu, Jiangwei; Ling, Yun [Nanchang Hangkong University, Department of Material Chemistry, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Oxygen vacancy is tailored by adjusting the treatment conditions. • Unltrathin TiO{sub 2} nanolayers are grafted on the graphene sheets. • Oxygen vacancy is located on the surface of TiO{sub 2}/graphene treated by H{sub 2}. • Improved lithium storage and organic pollutants removal efficiency. - Abstract: In this work we have developed a unique structure of ultrathin (5 nm) TiO{sub 2} nanolayers grafted graphene nanosheets (TiO{sub 2}/G) and integrated oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) into TiO{sub 2} to enhance its lithium storage and photocatalytic performances. The defective TiO{sub 2}/G was synthesized by a solvothermal and subsequent thermal treatment method. When treated in a H{sub 2} atmosphere, the resulting TiO{sub 2-x}/G(H{sub 2}) has lower crystallinity, smaller crystal size, richer surface V{sub O}, higher surface area, larger pore volume, and lower charge transfer resistance than that reduced by NaBH{sub 4} solid, i.e., TiO{sub 2-x}/G(NaBH{sub 4}). More importantly, the surface V{sub O} in the TiO{sub 2-x}/G(H{sub 2}) could remarkably inhibit the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs compared with the bulk Vo in the TiO{sub 2-x}/G(NaBH{sub 4}). As a result, the combination of all the factors contributed to the superiority of TiO{sub 2-x}/G(H{sub 2}), which demonstrated not only 70% higher specific capacity, longer cycling performance (1000 cycles) and better rate capability for lithium-ion battery, but also higher photocatalytic activity and 1.5 times faster degradation rate for organic pollutants removal than TiO{sub 2-x}/G(NaBH{sub 4}). The findings in this work will benefit the fundamental understanding of TiO{sub 2}/G surface chemistry and advance the design and preparation of functional materials for energy storage and water treatment.

  13. The influence of tree species composition on the storage and mobility of semivolatile organic compounds in forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komprdová, Klára, E-mail: komprdova@recetox.muni.cz [RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Kamenice 753/5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Komprda, Jiří [RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Kamenice 753/5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Menšík, Ladislav [Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 3, Brno 613 00 (Czech Republic); Vaňková, Lenka [RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Kamenice 753/5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kulhavý, Jiří [Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 3, Brno 613 00 (Czech Republic); Nizzetto, Luca [RECETOX (Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment), Kamenice 753/5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-05-15

    Soil contamination with PCBs and PAHs in adjacent forest plots, characterized by a distinct composition in tree species (spruce only, mixed and beech only), was analyzed to investigate the influence of ecosystem type on contaminant mobility in soil under very similar climate and exposure conditions. Physical-chemical properties and contaminant concentrations in litter (L), organic (F, H) and mineral (A, B) soil horizons were analyzed. Contaminant distribution in the soil core varied both in relation to forest type and contaminant group/properties. Contaminant mobility in soil was assessed by examining the ratios of total organic carbon (TOC)-standardized concentrations across soil horizons (Enrichment factors, EF{sub TOC}) and the relationship between EF{sub TOC} and the octanol-water equilibrium partitioning coefficient (K{sub OW}). Contaminant distribution appeared to be highly unsteady, with pedogenic/biogeochemical drivers controlling contaminant mobility in organic layers and leaching controlling accumulation in mineral layers. Lighter PCBs displayed higher mobility in all forest types primarily controlled by leaching and, to a minor extent, diffusion. Pedogenic processes controlling the formation of soil horizons were found to be crucial drivers of PAHs and heavier PCBs distribution. All contaminants appeared to be more mobile in the soil of the broadleaved plot, followed by mixed canopy and spruce forest. Increasing proportion of deciduous broadleaf species in the forest can thus lead to faster degradation or the faster leaching of PAHs and PCBs. The composition of humic substances was found to be a better descriptor of contaminant concentration than TOC. - Highlights: • Tree species composition influences vertical distribution of PCBs and PAHs in soils. • PCBs and PAHs were more mobile in the soil of the broadleaved plot. • Low molecular weight PCBs displayed higher mobility in all forest types. • Humic substances were important descriptors of

  14. The influence of tree species composition on the storage and mobility of semivolatile organic compounds in forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komprdová, Klára; Komprda, Jiří; Menšík, Ladislav; Vaňková, Lenka; Kulhavý, Jiří; Nizzetto, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Soil contamination with PCBs and PAHs in adjacent forest plots, characterized by a distinct composition in tree species (spruce only, mixed and beech only), was analyzed to investigate the influence of ecosystem type on contaminant mobility in soil under very similar climate and exposure conditions. Physical-chemical properties and contaminant concentrations in litter (L), organic (F, H) and mineral (A, B) soil horizons were analyzed. Contaminant distribution in the soil core varied both in relation to forest type and contaminant group/properties. Contaminant mobility in soil was assessed by examining the ratios of total organic carbon (TOC)-standardized concentrations across soil horizons (Enrichment factors, EF_T_O_C) and the relationship between EF_T_O_C and the octanol-water equilibrium partitioning coefficient (K_O_W). Contaminant distribution appeared to be highly unsteady, with pedogenic/biogeochemical drivers controlling contaminant mobility in organic layers and leaching controlling accumulation in mineral layers. Lighter PCBs displayed higher mobility in all forest types primarily controlled by leaching and, to a minor extent, diffusion. Pedogenic processes controlling the formation of soil horizons were found to be crucial drivers of PAHs and heavier PCBs distribution. All contaminants appeared to be more mobile in the soil of the broadleaved plot, followed by mixed canopy and spruce forest. Increasing proportion of deciduous broadleaf species in the forest can thus lead to faster degradation or the faster leaching of PAHs and PCBs. The composition of humic substances was found to be a better descriptor of contaminant concentration than TOC. - Highlights: • Tree species composition influences vertical distribution of PCBs and PAHs in soils. • PCBs and PAHs were more mobile in the soil of the broadleaved plot. • Low molecular weight PCBs displayed higher mobility in all forest types. • Humic substances were important descriptors of contaminant

  15. Storage and stability of biochar-derived carbon and total organic carbon in relation to minerals in an acid forest soil of the Spanish Atlantic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ugalde, Oihane; Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Arostegi, Javier; Moragues, Lur; Arias-González, Ander

    2017-06-01

    Biochar can largely contribute to enhance organic carbon (OC) stocks in soil and improve soil quality in forest and agricultural lands. Its contribution depends on its recalcitrance, but also on its interactions with minerals and other organic compounds in soil. Thus, it is important to study the link between minerals, natural organic matter and biochar in soil. In this study, we investigated the incorporation of biochar-derived carbon (biochar-C) into various particle-size fractions with contrasting mineralogy and the effect of biochar on the storage of total OC in the particle-size fractions in an acid loamy soil under Pinus radiata (C3 type) in the Spanish Atlantic area. We compared plots amended with biochar produced from Miscanthus sp. (C4 type) with control plots (not amended). We separated sand-, silt-, and clay-size fractions in samples collected from 0 to 20-cm depth. In each fraction, we analyzed clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides, total OC and biochar-C. The results showed that 51% of the biochar-C was in fractions fractions (0.2-2μm, 0.05-0.2μm, fractions, as it occurred with the vermiculitic phases and metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides. Biochar also affected to the distribution of total OC among particle-size fractions. Total OC concentration was greater in fractions 2-20μm, 0.2-2μm, 0.05-0.2μm in biochar-amended plots than in control plots. This may be explained by the adsorption of dissolved OC from fraction organic matter already occurred in the first year. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL (TBA) IN GROUND WATER AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The state agencies that implement the Underground Storage Tank program rely heavily on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) to clean up contaminants such as benzene and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) at gasoline spill sites. This is possible because the contaminants are biolo...

  17. Performance Evaluation of HP/ORC (Heat Pump/Organic Rankine Cycle) System with Optimal Control of Sensible Thermal Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Carmo, Carolina Madeira Ramos; Dumont, Olivier; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2016-01-01

    In energy systems with high share of renewable energy sources, like wind and solar power, it is paramount to deal with their intrinsic variability. The interaction between electric and thermal energy (heating and cooling) demands represent a potential area for balancing supply and demand that could...... come to contribute to the integration of intermittent renewables.This paper describes an innovative concept that consists of the addition of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) to a combined solar system coupled to a ground-source heat pump (HP) in a single-family building. The ORC enables the use of solar...... energy in periods of no thermal energy demand and reverses the heat pump cycle to supply electrical power. A dynamic model based on empirical data of this system is used to determine the annual performance. Furthermore, this work assesses the benefits of different control strategies that address...

  18. Transformation of organic matter and the emissions of methane and ammonia during storage of liquid manure as affected by acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sven G.; Clough, Timothy J.; Balaine, Nimlesh

    2017-01-01

    ), suggesting that DOC may be a predictor for CH4 emission from dilute slurries. volatile fatty acid and total ammoniacal nitrogen concentrations in surface layers were substantially higher than at the center of stored liquid manure, perhaps resulting from microbial activity at the surface. This pattern......Acidification of livestock manure can reduce emission of the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as ammonia (NH3). We examined the relation between emission of these gases and transformation of organic matter as affected by acidification. Liquid cattle manure......, probably due to the absence of a surface crust. Reductions in NH3 and CH4 emission were highest at the start but declined over time concomitantly with a gradual increase in the stored liquid manure pH. Acidification did not significantly affect CO2 emissions. Emission of CO2 was high, fiveto ten-fold of CH...

  19. Chemical Characterization of the Degradation of Necromass from Four Ascomycota Fungi: Implications for Soil Organic Carbon Turnover and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, V. J.; Schreiner, K. M.; Blair, N. E.; Egerton, L.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial soils store vast amounts of organic carbon, approximately twice as much carbon as is currently in the atmospheric CO2 pool. Despite its importance in the global carbon cycle, much is still unknown about the source, turnover, and stability of this soil organic carbon (SOC) pool. For example, fungi are known to play an important role in shaping the chemistry of SOC by degrading common biopolymers, and fungal biomass has been found to be a significant portion of living microbial SOC, dominating over bacteria in some soils by as much as 90%. And yet, despite growing evidence that microbial necromass may be larger contributors to SOC than previously thought, very little is known about the specific degradation patterns of fungal necromass and subsequently its potential chemical contributions to long-lived SOC pools. This study addresses these knowledge gaps through a time-series analysis of the degradation patterns of fungal tissue from four different saprotrophic Ascomyota species in temperate restored prairie soils. Fungal tissue was buried in soils both within a temperature- and light-controlled laboratory environment, and in a field environment, and harvested at intervals from 1 day to two months. After harvest, chemical analysis of the dried tissue by thermochemolysis pyrolysis-GCMS was used for relative quantitation of a variety of common biomolecules and biopolymers within the fungal tissue that may be long lived in soils, including chitin, glucan, mannan, ergosterol, and melanin. The degradation of these specific molecules, bulk fungal tissue, and bulk C and N within the tissue, is modeled to (1) show that a small portion of fungal necromass persists in the environment even after the period of the experiment and could serve as a contributor to long-lived SOC, and (2) provide quantitative information on the contribution of fungal tissue to global SOC pools.

  20. Parathyroid carcinoma in tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Seup; Ryu, Han Suk; Kang, Kyung Ho; Park, Sung Jun

    2016-10-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. This study presents a case of parathyroid carcinoma in a patient with tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Despite a successful kidney transplantation, the intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level of the patient was elevated consistently and could not be controlled by medical therapy. Due to the development of tertiary hyperparathyroidism with bone pain and osteoporosis, subtotal parathyroidectomy was performed 4 months after the kidney transplantation. Histological evaluation revealed that one of four parathyroid lesions was a parathyroid carcinoma, while the others were diffuse hyperplasia. Postoperative laboratory studies indicated a decreased level of iPTH. A positron emission tomography-computed tomography performed 6 months after the operation revealed no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  1. Storage of hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide in highly porous covalent organic frameworks for clean energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Yaghi, Omar M

    2009-07-01

    Dihydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide isotherm measurements were performed at 1-85 bar and 77-298 K on the evacuated forms of seven porous covalent organic frameworks (COFs). The uptake behavior and capacity of the COFs is best described by classifying them into three groups based on their structural dimensions and corresponding pore sizes. Group 1 consists of 2D structures with 1D small pores (9 A for each of COF-1 and COF-6), group 2 includes 2D structures with large 1D pores (27, 16, and 32 A for COF-5, COF-8, and COF-10, respectively), and group 3 is comprised of 3D structures with 3D medium-sized pores (12 A for each of COF-102 and COF-103). Group 3 COFs outperform group 1 and 2 COFs, and rival the best metal-organic frameworks and other porous materials in their uptake capacities. This is exemplified by the excess gas uptake of COF-102 at 35 bar (72 mg g(-1) at 77 K for hydrogen, 187 mg g(-1) at 298 K for methane, and 1180 mg g(-1) at 298 K for carbon dioxide), which is similar to the performance of COF-103 but higher than those observed for COF-1, COF-5, COF-6, COF-8, and COF-10 (hydrogen at 77 K, 15 mg g(-1) for COF-1, 36 mg g(-1) for COF-5, 23 mg g(-1) for COF-6, 35 mg g(-1) for COF-8, and 39 mg g(-1) for COF-10; methane at 298 K, 40 mg g(-1) for COF-1, 89 mg g(-1) for COF-5, 65 mg g(-1) for COF-6, 87 mg g(-1) for COF-8, and 80 mg g(-1) for COF-10; carbon dioxide at 298 K, 210 mg g(-1) for COF-1, 779 mg g(-1) for COF-5, 298 mg g(-1) for COF-6, 598 mg g(-1) for COF-8, and 759 mg g(-1) for COF-10). These findings place COFs among the most porous and the best adsorbents for hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide.

  2. Effects of Revegetation on Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Erosion-Induced Carbon Loss under Extreme Rainstorms in the Hill and Gully Region of the Loess Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Loess Plateau, an ecologically vulnerable region, has long been suffering from serious soil erosion. Revegetation has been implemented to control soil erosion and improve ecosystems in the Loess Plateau region through a series of ecological recovery programs. However, the increasing atmospheric CO2 as a result of human intervention is affecting the climate by global warming, resulting in the greater frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, such as storms that may weaken the effectiveness of revegetation and cause severe soil erosion. Most research to date has evaluated the effectiveness of revegetation on soil properties and soil erosion of different land use or vegetation types. Here, we study the effect of revegetation on soil organic carbon (SOC storage and erosion-induced carbon loss related to different plant communities, particularly under extreme rainstorm events. Materials and methods: The erosion-pin method was used to quantify soil erosion, and soil samples were taken at soil depths of 0–5 cm, 5–10 cm and 10–20 cm to determine the SOC content for 13 typical hillside revegetation communities in the year of 2013, which had the highest rainfall with broad range, long duration and high intensity since 1945, in the Yanhe watershed. Results and discussion: The SOC concentrations of all plant communities increased with soil depth when compared with slope cropland, and significant increases (p < 0.05 were observed for most shrub and forest communities, particularly for natural ones. Taking the natural secondary forest community as reference (i.e., soil loss and SOC loss were both 1.0, the relative soil loss and SOC loss of the other 12 plant communities in 2013 ranged from 1.5 to 9.4 and 0.30 to 1.73, respectively. Natural shrub and forest communities showed greater resistance to rainstorm erosion than grassland communities. The natural grassland communities with lower SOC content produced lower SOC loss even

  3. Effects of Revegetation on Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Erosion-Induced Carbon Loss under Extreme Rainstorms in the Hill and Gully Region of the Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujin; Jiao, Juying; Wang, Zhijie; Cao, Binting; Wei, Yanhong; Hu, Shu

    2016-04-29

    The Loess Plateau, an ecologically vulnerable region, has long been suffering from serious soil erosion. Revegetation has been implemented to control soil erosion and improve ecosystems in the Loess Plateau region through a series of ecological recovery programs. However, the increasing atmospheric CO₂ as a result of human intervention is affecting the climate by global warming, resulting in the greater frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, such as storms that may weaken the effectiveness of revegetation and cause severe soil erosion. Most research to date has evaluated the effectiveness of revegetation on soil properties and soil erosion of different land use or vegetation types. Here, we study the effect of revegetation on soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and erosion-induced carbon loss related to different plant communities, particularly under extreme rainstorm events. The erosion-pin method was used to quantify soil erosion, and soil samples were taken at soil depths of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm to determine the SOC content for 13 typical hillside revegetation communities in the year of 2013, which had the highest rainfall with broad range, long duration and high intensity since 1945, in the Yanhe watershed. The SOC concentrations of all plant communities increased with soil depth when compared with slope cropland, and significant increases (p soil loss and SOC loss were both 1.0), the relative soil loss and SOC loss of the other 12 plant communities in 2013 ranged from 1.5 to 9.4 and 0.30 to 1.73, respectively. Natural shrub and forest communities showed greater resistance to rainstorm erosion than grassland communities. The natural grassland communities with lower SOC content produced lower SOC loss even with higher soil loss, natural secondary forest communities produced higher SOC loss, primarily because of their higher SOC content, and the artificial R. pseudoacacia community with greater soil loss produced higher SOC loss. These results

  4. Laser-driven coating of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with manganese oxide from metal organic precursors for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez del Pino, A.; György, E.; Alshaikh, I.; Pantoja-Suárez, F.; Andújar, J. L.; Pascual, E.; Amade, R.; Bertran-Serra, E.

    2017-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes-transition metal oxide systems are intensively studied due to their excellent properties for electrochemical applications. In this work, an innovative procedure is developed for the synthesis of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) coated with transition metal oxide nanostructures. VACNTs are grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and coated with a manganese-based metal organic precursor (MOP) film based on manganese acetate solution. Subsequent UV pulsed laser irradiation induces the effective heating-decomposition of the MOP leading to the crystallization of manganese oxide nanostructures on the VACNT surface. The study of the morphology, structure and composition of the synthesized materials shows the formation of randomly oriented MnO2 crystals, with few nanometers in size, and to their alignment in hundreds of nm long filament-like structures, parallel to the CNT’s long axis. Electrochemical measurements reveal a significant increase of the specific capacitance of the MnO2-VACNT system (100 F g-1) as compared to the initial VACNT one (21 F g-1).

  5. Beeswax-Colophony Blend: A Novel Green Organic Coating for Protection of Steel Drinking Water Storage Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Abdikheibari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Beeswax-colophony blend is mainly used as a sealant mixture for preservation applications. The beeswax itself, however, has had a long way in history taking part in conservation processes including mummification. In this research, this blend was used as a protective coating for drinking water distribution tanks. Initially, a layer with 400 μm thickness was applied on a sand blasted mild steel plate. The long-term electrochemical behavior of the coating was investigated by open circuit potential (OCP and electrochemical microbiological characteristics of the coating, microbial and chemical examinations were performed on drinking water samples that had been in contact with the coating. Furthermore, its behavior in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBR in a wastewater treatment plant was investigated using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM technique. Regarding the consistency of experimental results, it was concluded that this proposed recyclable blend could be considered as a novel green organic coating and also a good corrosion barrier even in aggressive environments.

  6. Tree mycorrhizal type predicts within-site variability in the storage and distribution of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Matthew E; Turner, Benjamin L; Liang, Chao; Clay, Keith; Johnson, Daniel J; Phillips, Richard P

    2018-03-24

    Forest soils store large amounts of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), yet how predicted shifts in forest composition will impact long-term C and N persistence remains poorly understood. A recent hypothesis predicts that soils under trees associated with arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) store less C than soils dominated by trees associated with ectomycorrhizas (ECM), due to slower decomposition in ECM-dominated forests. However, an incipient hypothesis predicts that systems with rapid decomposition-e.g. most AM-dominated forests-enhance soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization by accelerating the production of microbial residues. To address these contrasting predictions, we quantified soil C and N to 1 m depth across gradients of ECM-dominance in three temperate forests. By focusing on sites where AM- and ECM-plants co-occur, our analysis controls for climatic factors that covary with mycorrhizal dominance across broad scales. We found that while ECM stands contain more SOM in topsoil, AM stands contain more SOM when subsoil to 1 m depth is included. Biomarkers and soil fractionations reveal that these patterns are driven by an accumulation of microbial residues in AM-dominated soils. Collectively, our results support emerging theory on SOM formation, demonstrate the importance of subsurface soils in mediating plant effects on soil C and N, and indicate that shifts in the mycorrhizal composition of temperate forests may alter the stabilization of SOM. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An Innovative Application of a Solar Storage Wall Combined with the Low-Temperature Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chen Hung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to collect energy on the waste heat from air produced by solar ventilation systems. This heat used for electricity generation by an organic Rankine cycle (ORC system was implemented. The advantages of this method include the use of existing building’s wall, and it also provides the region of energy scarcity for reference. This is also an innovative method, and the results will contribute to the efforts made toward improving the design of solar ventilation in the field of solar thermal engineering. In addition, ORC system would help generate electricity and build a low-carbon building. This study considered several critical parameters such as length of the airflow channel, intensity of solar radiation, pattern of the absorber plate, stagnant air layer, and operating conditions. The simulation results show that the highest outlet temperature and heat collecting efficiency of solar ventilation system are about 120°C and 60%, respectively. The measured ORC efficiency of the system was 6.2%. The proposed method is feasible for the waste heat from air produced by ventilation systems.

  8. Isoreticular metal-organic frameworks, process for forming the same, and systematic design of pore size and functionality therein, with application for gas storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Li, Hailian; Kim, Jaheon; Rosi, Nathaniel

    2007-03-27

    The ability to design and construct solid-state materials with pre-determined structures is a grand challenge in chemistry. An inventive strategy based on reticulating metal ions and organic carboxylate links into extended networks has been advanced to a point that has allowed the design of porous structures in which pore size and functionality can be varied systematically. MOF-5, a prototype of a new class of porous materials and one that is constructed from octahedral Zn--O--C clusters and benzene links, was used to demonstrate that its 3-D porous system can be functionalized with the organic groups, --Br, --NH2, --OC3H7, --OC5H11, --H4C2, and --H4C4, and its pore size expanded with the long molecular struts biphenyl, tetrahydropyrene, pyrene, and terphenyl. The ability to direct the formation of the octahedral clusters in the presence of a desired carboxylate link is an essential feature of this strategy, which resulted in the design of an isoreticular (having the same framework topology) series of sixteen well-defined materials whose crystals have open space representing up to 91.1% of the crystal volume, and homogeneous periodic pores that can be incrementally varied from 3.8 to 28.8 angstroms. Unlike the unpredictable nature of zeolite and other molecular sieve syntheses, the deliberate control exercised at the molecular level in the design of these crystals is expected to have tremendous implications on materials properties and future technologies. Indeed, data indicate that members of this series represent the first monocrystalline mesoporous organic/inorganic frameworks, and exhibit the highest capacity for methane storage (155 cm3/cm3 at 36 atm) and the lowest densities (0.41 to 0.21 g/cm3) attained to date for any crystalline material at room temperature.

  9. Energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  10. Storage and stability of organic carbon in soils as related to depth, occlusion within aggregates, and attachment to minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schrumpf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models suggest that stability of organic carbon (OC in soil depends on the source of plant litter, occlusion within aggregates, incorporation in organo-mineral complexes, and location within the soil profile. Density fractionation is a useful tool to study the relevance of OC stabilization in aggregates and in association with minerals, but it has rarely been applied to full soil profiles. We aim to determine factors shaping the depth profiles of physically unprotected and mineral associated OC and test their relevance for OC stability across a range of European soils that vary in vegetation, soil types, parent material, and land use. At each of the 12 study sites, 10 soil cores were sampled to 60 cm depth and subjected to density separation. Bulk soil samples and density fractions (free light fractions – fLF, occluded light fractions – oLF, heavy fractions – HF were analysed for OC, total nitrogen (TN, δ14C, and Δ14C. Bulk samples were also incubated to determine CO2 evolution per g OC in the samples (specific mineralization rates as an indicator for OC stability. Depth profiles of OC in the light fraction (LF-OC matched those of roots for undisturbed grassland and forest sites, suggesting that roots are shaping the depth distribution of LF-OC. Organic C in the HF declined less with soil depth than LF-OC and roots, especially at grassland sites. The decrease in Δ14C (increase in age of HF-OC with soil depth was related to soil pH as well as to dissolved OC fluxes. This indicates that dissolved OC translocation contributes to the formation of subsoil HF-OC and shapes the Δ14C profiles. The LF at three sites were rather depleted in 14C, indicating the presence of fossil material such as coal and lignite, probably inherited from the parent material. At the other sites, modern Δ14C signatures and positive correlations between specific mineralization rates and fLF-OC indicate the fLF is a potentially available energy and

  11. Impact of Restoration of Soil in a Humid Tropical Region on Storage of Organic Carbon in a Recalcitrant Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Nath, Arun; Brahma, Biplab; Lal, Rattan; Das, Ashesh Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) changes through restoration of degraded lands is important to assessing the changes in soil properties. However, SOC measures all C fractions and its assessment is not adequate to distinguish between the more dynamic or active C (AC) fractions and the recalcitrant or passive C (PC) form. SOC fractions comprising of the recalcitrant pools have been suggested as a driver for long term soil C sink management. Therefore, the present study was undertaken at a site within the North Eastern India (NEI) region with an objective to explore whether or not SOC fractions change with restoration of degraded lands under humid tropical climate. An age-chronosequence study was established comprising of four different aged rubber plantations (6, 15, 27 and 34 yr. old) planted on Imperata grasslands. The site was selected to study changes in the different fractions of SOC and total SOC stock, and the data were compared with that of a native forest. The data indicated that the SOC stock increased from 106 Mg ha-1 under 6 yr. to 130 Mg ha-1 under 34 yr. old plantations. The SOC stock after 34 yr. of plantation was 20% higher than that under Imperata grassland, but was 34% lower than that under the native forest soil. With respect to lability of C fractions, proportion of AC pool decreased linearly with increase in plantation age from 59 % under 6 yr to 33 % under 34 yr. old plantations. In contrast, proportion of PC pool increased from 41 % of SOC stock under 6 yr. to 67 % of SOC under 34 yr. old plantations, suggesting the significant role of old aged plantation in C sink management.

  12. Extended storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This document is the final report on the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Behaviour of Spent Fuel and Storage Facility Components during Long Term Storage (BEFAST-II, 1986-1991). It contains the results on wet and dry spent fuel storage technologies obtained from 16 organizations representing 13 countries who participated in the co-ordinated research programme. Considerable quantities of spent fuel continue to arise and accumulate. Many countries are investigating the option of extended spent fuel storage prior to reprocessing or fuel disposal. Wet storage continues to predominate as an established technology with the construction of additional away-from-reactor storage pools. However, dry storage is increasingly used with most participants considering dry storage concepts for the longer term. Depending on the cladding type options of dry storage in air or inert gas are proposed. Dry storage is becoming widely used as a supplement to wet storage for zirconium alloy clad oxide fuels. Storage periods as long as under wet conditions appear to be feasible. Dry storage will also continue to be used for Al clad and Magnox type fuel. Enhancement of wet storage capacity will remain an important activity. Rod consolidation to increase wet storage capacity will continue in the UK and is being evaluated for LWR fuel in the USA, and may start in some other countries. High density storage racks have been successfully introduced in many existing pools and are planned for future facilities. For extremely long wet storage (≥50 years), there is a need to continue work on fuel integrity investigations and LWR fuel performance modelling. it might be that pool component performance in some cases could be more limiting than the FA storage performance. It is desirable to make concerted efforts in the field of corrosion monitoring and prediction of fuel cladding and poll component behaviour in order to maintain good experience of wet storage. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Laboratory simulation system, using Carcinus maenas as the model organism, for assessing the impact of CO2 leakage from sub-seabed injection and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Araceli; Jiménez-Tenorio, Natalia; Riba, Inmaculada; Blasco, Julián

    2016-01-01

    The capture and storage of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations has been proposed as one of the potential options to decrease atmospheric CO2 concentrations in order to mitigate the abrupt and irreversible consequences of climate change. However, it is possible that CO2 leakages could occur during the injection and sequestration procedure, with significant repercussions for the marine environment. We investigate the effects of acidification derived from possible CO2 leakage events on the European green crab, Carcinus maenas. To this end, a lab-scale experiment involving direct release of CO2 was conducted at pH values between 7.7 and 6.15. Female crabs were exposed for 10 days to sediment collected from two different coastal areas, one with relatively uncontaminated sediment (RSP) and the other with known contaminated sediment (MZ and ML), under the pre-established seawater pH conditions. Survival rate, histopathological damage and metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd and Pb) and As accumulation in gills and hepatopancreas tissue were employed as endpoints. In addition, the obtained results were compared with the results of the physico-chemical characterization of the sediments, which included the determination of the metals Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb and Cd, the metalloid As, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as nonchemical sediment properties (grain size, organic carbon and total organic matter). Significant associations were observed between pH and the histological damage. Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cr, Pb, Cd and PAHs in sediment, presented significant negative correlations with the damage to gills and hepatopancreas, and positive correlations with metal accumulation in both tissues. The results obtained in this study reveal the importance of sediment properties in the biological effects caused by possible CO2 leakage. However, a clear pattern was not observed between metal accumulation in tissues and p

  14. Mass storage at NSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    The need to manage large amounts of data on robotically controlled devices has been critical to the mission of this Agency for many years. In many respects this Agency has helped pioneer, with their industry counterparts, the development of a number of products long before these systems became commercially available. Numerous attempts have been made to field both robotically controlled tape and optical disk technology and systems to satisfy our tertiary storage needs. Custom developed products were architected, designed, and developed without vendor partners over the past two decades to field workable systems to handle our ever increasing storage requirements. Many of the attendees of this symposium are familiar with some of the older products, such as: the Braegen Automated Tape Libraries (ATL's), the IBM 3850, the Ampex TeraStore, just to name a few. In addition, we embarked on an in-house development of a shared disk input/output support processor to manage our every increasing tape storage needs. For all intents and purposes, this system was a file server by current definitions which used CDC Cyber computers as the control processors. It served us well and was just recently removed from production usage.

  15. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    After having outlined the importance of energy storage in the present context, this document outlines that it is an answer to economic, environmental and technological issues. It proposes a brief overview of the various techniques of energy storage: under the form of chemical energy (hydrocarbons, biomass, hydrogen production), thermal energy (sensitive or latent heat storage), mechanical energy (potential energy by hydraulic or compressed air storage, kinetic energy with flywheels), electrochemical energy (in batteries), electric energy (super-capacitors, superconductor magnetic energy storage). Perspectives are briefly evoked

  16. Optical storage networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Ulrich

    2001-11-01

    For efficient business continuance and backup of mission- critical data an inter-site storage network is required. Where traditional telecommunications costs are prohibitive for all but the largest organizations, there is an opportunity for regional carries to deliver an innovative storage service. This session reveals how a combination of optical networking and protocol-aware SAN gateways can provide an extended storage networking platform with the lowest cost of ownership and the highest possible degree of reliability, security and availability. Companies of every size, with mainframe and open-systems environments, can afford to use this integrated service. Three mayor applications are explained; channel extension, Network Attached Storage (NAS), Storage Area Networks (SAN) and how optical networks address the specific requirements. One advantage of DWDM is the ability for protocols such as ESCON, Fibre Channel, ATM and Gigabit Ethernet, to be transported natively and simultaneously across a single fiber pair, and the ability to multiplex many individual fiber pairs over a single pair, thereby reducing fiber cost and recovering fiber pairs already in use. An optical storage network enables a new class of service providers, Storage Service Providers (SSP) aiming to deliver value to the enterprise by managing storage, backup, replication and restoration as an outsourced service.

  17. First report of tertiary syphilis presenting as lipoatrophic panniculitis in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Tomasini, Carlo F; Calamaro, Paola; Boggio, Maurizio; Rebora, Alfredo; Parodi, Aurora

    2017-03-01

    We describe herein a woman who developed subcutaneous gummas in her trochanteric regions, bilaterally, although she had been treated for syphilis two decades earlier. Evidence of Treponema pallidum latent late infection was the presence of IgG antibodies against T. pallidum and the positive non-treponemal and treponemal tests. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum detected some spirochetes close to the atrophic adipocytes allowing the diagnosis of lypo-atrophic panniculitis tertiary syphilis. This is the first case of tertiary syphilis presenting as panniculitis in an immunocompetent patient, demonstrating that subcutaneous fat may be another organ infected in tertiary syphilis.

  18. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bergomas, Francesca; Grizzi, Fabio; Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha; Laghi, Luigi; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Marchesi, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of ly...

  19. High storage capacity and separation selectivity for C2hydrocarbons over methane in the metal-organic framework Cu-TDPAT

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Kang

    2014-01-01

    We report on the storage capacity and separation selectivity of an rht-type metal-organic framework, Cu-TDPAT [TDPAT = 2,4,6-tris(3,5-dicarboxylphenylamino)-1,3,5-triazine], for C2hydrocarbons over CH4. Henry\\'s constant, the isosteric heat of adsorption and the ideal adsorbed solution theory selectivity were calculated based on single-component sorption isotherms. Theoretical calculations indicate that both the open metal sites and the Lewis basic sites have strong interactions with the C2molecules. The combination of these two kinds of sites lead to the highest C2H2-CH4selectivity of 127.1 as well as record high values for C2H4adsorption enthalpies. To mimic real-world conditions, breakthrough experiments were conducted on an equimolar four-component mixture containing C2H2, C2H4, C2H6and CH4at room temperature and 1 atm pressure. Our results show that Cu-TDPAT is a promising candidate for CH4capture and purification. This journal is

  20. High storage capacity and separation selectivity for C2hydrocarbons over methane in the metal-organic framework Cu-TDPAT

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Kang; Ma, Dingxuan; Li, Baiyan; Li, Yi; Yao, Kexin; Zhang, Zhijuan; Han, Yu; Shi, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    We report on the storage capacity and separation selectivity of an rht-type metal-organic framework, Cu-TDPAT [TDPAT = 2,4,6-tris(3,5-dicarboxylphenylamino)-1,3,5-triazine], for C2hydrocarbons over CH4. Henry's constant, the isosteric heat of adsorption and the ideal adsorbed solution theory selectivity were calculated based on single-component sorption isotherms. Theoretical calculations indicate that both the open metal sites and the Lewis basic sites have strong interactions with the C2molecules. The combination of these two kinds of sites lead to the highest C2H2-CH4selectivity of 127.1 as well as record high values for C2H4adsorption enthalpies. To mimic real-world conditions, breakthrough experiments were conducted on an equimolar four-component mixture containing C2H2, C2H4, C2H6and CH4at room temperature and 1 atm pressure. Our results show that Cu-TDPAT is a promising candidate for CH4capture and purification. This journal is

  1. Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  3. Environmental Protection: Improved Inspections and Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephenson, John

    2001-01-01

    ...) Underground Storage Tank (UST) program. 1 The program is relevant to today's hearing because studies have shown that tanks that leak hazardous substances, such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE...

  4. Neutron storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelkov, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The report is devoted to neutron storage (NS) and describes the history of experiments on the NS development. Great attention is paid to ultracold neutron (UCN) storage. The experiments on the UCN generation, transport, spectroscopy, storage and detection are described. Experiments on searching the UCN electric-dipole moment and electric charge are continued. Possible using of UCN for studying the nanoparticles is discussed [ru

  5. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odru, P.

    2010-01-01

    This book proposes a broad overview of the technologies developed in the domains of on-board electricity storage (batteries, super-capacitors, flywheels), stationary storage (hydraulic dams, compressed air, batteries and hydrogen), and heat storage (sensible, latent and sorption) together with their relative efficiency, their expected developments and what advantages they can offer. Eminent specialists of this domain have participated to the redaction of this book, all being members of the Tuck's Foundation 'IDees' think tank. (J.S.)

  6. Energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Brunet, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Energy storage examines different applications such as electric power generation, transmission and distribution systems, pulsed systems, transportation, buildings and mobile applications. For each of these applications, proper energy storage technologies are foreseen, with their advantages, disadvantages and limits. As electricity cannot be stored cheaply in large quantities, energy has to be stored in another form (chemical, thermal, electromagnetic, mechanical) and then converted back into electric power and/or energy using conversion systems. Most of the storage technologies are examined: b

  7. Tritium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hircq, B.

    1989-01-01

    A general synthesis about tritium storage is achieved in this paper and a particular attention is given to practical application in the Fusion Technology Program. Tritium, storage under gaseous form and solid form are discussed (characteristics, advantages, disadvantages and equipments). The way of tritium storage is then discussed and a choice established as a function of a logic which takes into account the main working parameters

  8. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  9. Highly porous ionic rht metal-organic framework for H2 and CO2 storage and separation: A molecular simulation study

    KAUST Repository

    Babarao, Ravichandar

    2010-07-06

    The storage and separation of H2 and CO2 are investigated in a highly porous ionic rht metal-organic framework (rht-MOF) using molecular simulation. The rht-MOF possesses a cationic framework and charge-balancing extraframework NO3 - ions. Three types of unique open cages exist in the framework: rhombicuboctahedral, tetrahedral, and cuboctahedral cages. The NO3 - ions exhibit small mobility and are located at the windows connecting the tetrahedral and cuboctahedral cages. At low pressures, H2 adsorption occurs near the NO 3 - ions that act as preferential sites. With increasing pressure, H2 molecules occupy the tetrahedral and cuboctahedral cages and the intersection regions. The predicted isotherm of H2 at 77 K agrees well with the experimental data. The H2 capacity is estimated to be 2.4 wt % at 1 bar and 6.2 wt % at 50 bar, among the highest in reported MOFs. In a four-component mixture (15:75:5:5 CO2/H 2/CO/CH4) representing a typical effluent gas of H 2 production, the selectivity of CO2/H2 in rht-MOF decreases slightly with increasing pressure, then increases because of cooperative interactions, and finally decreases as a consequence of entropy effect. By comparing three ionic MOFs (rht-MOF, soc-MOF, and rho-ZMOF), we find that the selectivity increases with increasing charge density or decreasing free volume. In the presence of a trace amount of H2O, the interactions between CO2 and NO3 - ions are significantly shielded by H2O; consequently, the selectivity of CO 2/H2 decreases substantially. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. The response of soil carbon storage and microbially mediated carbon turnover to simulated climatic disturbance in a northern peatland forest. Revisiting the concept of soil organic matter recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostka, Joel [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The goal of this project was to investigate changes in the structure of dissolved and solid phase organic matter, the production of CO2 and CH4, and the composition of decomposer microbial communities in response to the climatic forcing of environmental processes that determine the balance between carbon gas production versus storage and sequestration in peatlands. Cutting-edge analytical chemistry and next generation sequencing of microbial genes were been applied to habitats at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF), where the US DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USDA Forest Service are constructing a large-scale ecosystem study entitled, “Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change”(SPRUCE). Our study represented a comprehensive characterization of the sources, transformation, and decomposition of organic matter in the S1 bog at MEF. Multiple lines of evidence point to distinct, vertical zones of organic matter transformation: 1) the acrotelm consisting of living mosses, root material, and newly formed litter (0-30 cm), 2) the mesotelm, a mid-depth transition zone (30-75 cm) characterized by labile organic C compounds and intense decomposition, and 3) the underlying catotelm (below 75cm) characterized by refractory organic compounds as well as relatively low decomposition rates. These zones are in part defined by physical changes in hydraulic conductivity and water table depth. O-alkyl-C, which represents the carbohydrate fraction in the peat, was shown to be an excellent proxy for soil decomposition rates. The carbon cycle in deep peat was shown to be fueled by modern carbon sources further indicating that hydrology and surface vegetation play a role in belowground carbon cycling. We provide the first metagenomic study of an ombrotrophic peat bog, with novel insights into microbial specialization and functions in this unique terrestrial ecosystem. Vertical structuring of microbial communities

  11. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  12. 12 years of irrigation in a drought stressed pine forest speeds up carbon cycling and alters the soil biome but has negligible effects on soil organic matter storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Frank; Hartmann, Martin; Brunner, Ivano; Rigling, Andreas; Herzog, Claude; Schaub, Marcus; Frey, Beat

    2017-04-01

    Inneralpine valleys are experiencing repeated summer droughts, which have caused a die-back of pine forests since the 1990s. Drought limits the metabolic activity and hence C cycling in the plant and soil system. The net effects of drought on soil organic matter (SOM) storage is, however, ambiguous as drought affects both C inputs and outputs. Moreover, in the long-term, water limitation is also altering above- and belowground diversity due to species-dependent resistance and adaptation to drought. In our study, we explored how ten years of irrigation of a water-limited pine forest in the central European Alps altered above- and belowground diversity and C cycling in the plant and soil systems. The decadal long irrigation during summer time strongly increased ecosystem productivity with litter fall and fine root biomass being increased by +50 and +40%, respectively. At the same time, soil CO2 efflux was stimulated by 60%, indicating that the removal of water limitation enhanced both the inputs and outputs of C into soils. The accelerated C cycling was also mirrored by compositional shifts in the soil microbiome. 454-pyrosequencing of ribosomal marker genes indicated that irrigation promoted bacteria and fungi with more copiotrophic life style strategies, that are typical for nutrient-rich conditions associated with a higher decomposition. Determination of SOM pools revealed a C loss in the organic layer under irrigation (-900 gC m-2) but a C gain in the mineral soil (+970 gC m-2), resulting in a negligible net effect. The likely mechanisms for the altered vertical SOM distribution might be (1) an accelerated mineralization of litter in conjunction with higher C inputs from the rhizosphere and/or (2) an increased incorporation of litter in the mineral soil as suggested by a litter bag experiment showing a stimulated activity of the macrofauna with a 5-fold increase of the earthworm density. In summary, our long-term irrigation experiment revealed that the removal of

  13. Interactions to the fifth trophic level: secondary and tertiary parasitoid wasps show extraordinary efficiency in utilizing host resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, J.A.; Wagenaar, R.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    1. Parasitoid wasps are highly efficient organisms at utilizing and assimilating limited resources from their hosts. This study explores interactions over three trophic levels, from the third (primary parasitoid) to the fourth (secondary parasitoid) and terminating in the fifth (tertiary

  14. Energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-07-01

    The papers on energy storage problems, given to the United Nations Conference on New Sources of Energy, Rome, 1961, are reviewed. Many aspects of the subject are discussed: comparisons between the costs of storing energy in batteries and in fuel cells; the use, efficiency and expected improvement of fuel cells; the principles involved in the chemical conversion of solar energy to chemical energy; the use of metal hydride fuel cells; the chemical conversion and storage of concentrated solar energy for which the solar furnace is used for photochemical reactions. Finally, the general costs of storing energy in any form and delivering it are analyzed with particular reference to storage batteries and fuel cells.

  15. Spectrum Of Inherited Metabolic Disorders In Pakistani Children Presenting At A Tertiary Care Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheema, H. A.; Malik, H. S.; Parkash, A.; Fayyaz, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency, presentation and outcome of various inherited metabolic diseases in children presenting in a tertiary care hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Department of The Children Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from January 2011 to October 2014. Methodology: All children aged < 14 years with high suspicion of a metabolic disorder were inducted. Routine and radiological investigation were carried out at the study place. Comprehensive diagnostic testing of particular metabolic disorder was sent abroad. Those with a specific metabolic disorder were included in the study while those with normal metabolic work-up were excluded. All data was collected on preformed proforma. Result: A total of 239 patients were enrolled. Nineteen different types of inherited metabolic disorders were diagnosed in 180 patients; age ranged from 8 days to 14 years. Consanguinity was positive in 175 (97 percentage) among the parents of the affected children, with previously affected siblings in 64 (35.5 percentage). The most frequent disorders were inherited disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (92, 51 percentage), lipid storage disease (59, 32.7 percentage), organic acidemia and energy defects (18, 10 percentage), amino acid disorder (6, 3.3 percentage), and miscellaneous (4, 2.2 percentage). Fifty-eight (32.2 percentage) presented with acute metabolic crisis, 28 (15.5 percentage) patients presented with early onset liver failure, and 24 (13.3 percentage) with mental retardation. Out of these, 16 (8.8 percentage) expired. Conclusion: Glycogen storage disorders being the commonest followed by Gaucher disease and Galactosemia. The associated complications resulted in high morbidity and mortality. (author)

  16. Mechanism of the extraction of nitric acid and water by organic solutions of tertiary alkyl-amines; Mecanisme d'extraction de l'acide nitrique et de l'eau par les solutions organiques d'alcoylamines tertiaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourisse, D

    1966-06-01

    The micellar aggregation of tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrates in low polarity organic solvents has been verified by viscosity, conductivity and sedimentation velocity measurements. The aggregation depends upon the polarity of solvent, the length of the alkyl radicals and the organic concentration of the various constituents (tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate, tri-alkyl-amine, nitric acid, water). The amine salification law has been established and the excess nitric acid and water solubilities in the organic solutions have been measured. Nitric acid and water are slightly more soluble in micellar organic solutions than in molecular organic solutions. A description of excess nitric acid containing tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate solutions is proposed. (author) [French] Mecanisme d'extraction de l'acide nitrique et de l'eau par les solutions organiques d'alcoylamines tertiaires. L'agregation micellaire des nitrates de trialcoylammonium dans les solvants peu polaires a ete verifiee par viscosimetrie, conductimetrie et ultracentrifugation des solutions organiques. L'agregation depend de la polarite du solvant, de la longueur des radicaux alcoyle, et des concentrations des differents constituants de la solution organique (nitrate de trialcoylammonium, alcoylamine tertiaire, acide nitrique, eau). La loi de salification de l'amine a ete determinee et les solubilites de l'acide nitrique en exces et de l'eau dans les solutions organiques ont ete mesurees. L'acide nitrique et l'eau sont legerement plus solubles dans les organiques micellaires que dans les solutions organiques moleculaires. Une description des solutions de nitrate de trialcoylammonium contenant de l'acide nitrique en exces est proposee. (auteur)

  17. Regionalised tertiary psychiatric residential facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Alain; Groden, David; Goldner, Elliot M; Gelinas, Daniel; Arnold, Leslie M

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitals remain the main venue for long-term mental health care and, despite widespread closures and downsizing, no country that built asylums in the last century has done away with them entirely--with the recent exception of Italy. Differentiated community-based residential alternatives have been developed over the past decades, with staffing levels that range from full-time professional, to daytime only, to part-time/on-call. This paper reviews the characteristics of community-based psychiatric residential care facilities as an alternative to long-term care in psychiatric hospitals. It describes five factors decision makers should consider: 1. number of residential places needed; 2. staffing levels; 3. physical setting; 4. programming; and 5. governance and financing. In Italy, facilities with full-time professional staff have been developed since the mid-1990s to accommodate the last cohorts of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals. In the United Kingdom, experiments with hostel wards since the 1980s have shown that home-like, small-scale facilities with intensive treatment and rehabilitation programming can be effective for the most difficult-to-place patients. More recently in Australia, Community Care Units (CCUs) have been applying this concept. In the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC), Tertiary Psychiatric Residential Facilities (TPRFs) have been developed as part of an effort to regionalise health and social services and downsize and ultimately close its only psychiatric hospital. This type of service must be further developed in addition to the need for forensic, acute-care and intermediate-level beds, as well as for community-based care such as assertive community treatment and intensive case management. All these types of services, together with long-term community-based residential care, constitute the elements of a balanced mental health care system. As part of a region's balanced mental health care plan, these Tertiary

  18. Recruitment Of International Students Into Cameroon Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recruitment Of International Students Into Cameroon Tertiary Institutions In The Absence Of International Offices. ... The present system of recruiting international students is haphazardly been handled by ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  19. Learning Enhancement in Tertiary Institutions Using Mobile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... model that is still by far the dominant mode of education and learning in tertiary institutions. In addition to identifying ... education has there been a technology that ..... Determinant of Mobile Learning Acceptance: An Empirical.

  20. Green synthesis of chromium-based metal-organic framework (Cr-MOF) from waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is of great economic value to produce high-value PET-based MOF materials by the veritable elimination of waste PET, and provide sufficient MOF materials for hydrogen storage applications. Consequently, this work demonstrates the use of waste PET...

  1. Radioguided parathyroidectomy for tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnay, Yash R; Weinlander, Eric; Alfhefdi, Amal; Schneider, David; Sippel, Rebecca S; Chen, Herbert

    2015-05-15

    Tertiary hyperparathyroidism (3HPT) is defined as the persistent hyperproduction of parathyroid hormone and resulting hypercalcemia after renal transplantation. Here, we examine the utility of radioguided parathyroidectomy (RGP) in patients with 3HPT. We reviewed a prospective surgery database containing 80 3HPT patients who underwent RGP from January 2001-July 2014 at our institution. We evaluated patient demographics, operative management, radioguided neoprobe utilization, and operative outcomes. Data are reported as mean ± standard error of the mean. The mean age of the patients was 52 ± 1 y, and 46% were male. A total of 69 patients had hyperplasia and received subtotal parathyroidectomy, whereas 5 patients had double adenomas and 6 patients had single adenomas. The average calcium level among 3HPT patients was 10.8 ± 0.1 mg/dL preoperatively and 8.7 ± 0.1 mg/dL postoperatively. In vivo radioguided counts normalized to background counts averaged 145 ± 4%, whereas ex vivo counts normalized to background counts averaged 69 ± 5%. All but one ex vivo count was >20%. Ectopically located glands were successfully localized in 38 patients using the gamma probe. Ex vivo percentage did not correlate with parathyroid gland weight, preoperative parathyroid hormone, or preoperative calcium. Our radioguided approach achieved normocalcemia in 96% of 3HPT patients undergoing RGP; two patients developed recurrent disease. In this series, all enlarged parathyroid glands were localized and resected using the gamma probe. Thus, RGP reliably localizes adenomatous, hyperplastic, and ectopically located glands in patients with 3HPT, resulting in high cure rate after resection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Energy Storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bladergroen, B

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In commercial arena, the most recent developments in EES are in electrochemical storage, singling out Li-ion batteries and Vanadium Redox flow batteries, while power-to-gas/-fuels (electrolysis of water into hydrogen and subsequent methanisation...

  3. Dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, Don.

    1985-01-01

    The environmental movement has consistently argued against disposal of nuclear waste. Reasons include its irretrievability in the event of leakage, the implication that reprocessing will continue and the legitimacy attached to an expanding nuclear programme. But there is an alternative. The author here sets out the background and a possible future direction of a campaign based on a call for dry storage. (author)

  4. Large mass storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Arnold M.

    1978-08-01

    This is the final report of a study group organized to investigate questions surrounding the acquisition of a large mass storage facility. The programatic justification for such a system at Brookhaven is reviewed. Several candidate commercial products are identified and discussed. A draft of a procurement specification is developed. Some thoughts on possible new directions for computing at Brookhaven are also offered, although this topic was addressed outside of the context of the group's deliberations. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10 -6 eV to 3.5 x 10 12 eV (LHC, 7 x 10 12 eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron beams

  6. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the

  7. System for radiation emergency medicine. Activities of tertiary radiation emergency hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Tanigawa, Koichi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Japanese system for radiation emergency medicine is primarily built up by Cabinet Nuclear Safety Commission in 2001 based on previous Tokai JCO Accident (1999) and is composed from the primary, secondary and tertiary medical organizations. This paper describes mainly about roles and actions of the tertiary facilities at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident and tasks to be improved in future. The primary and secondary organizations in the system above are set up in the prefectures with or neighboring the nuclear facility, and tertiary ones, in two parts of western and eastern Japan. The western organization is in Hiroshima University having its cooperating 7 hospitals, and is responsible for such patients as exposed to high dose external radiation, having serious complication, and difficult to treat in the primary/secondary hospitals. The eastern is in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with 6 cooperating hospitals and responsible for patients with internal radiation exposure difficult to treat, with contaminated body surface with difficulty in decontamination and/or with causable of secondary contamination, and difficult to treat in the secondary hospitals. The tertiary organizations have made efforts for the education and training of medical staff, for network construction among the primary, secondary and other medicare facilities, for establishment of transferring system of patients, and for participation to the international network by global organizations like Response Assistance Network (RANET) in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Radiation Emergency Preparedness and Network (REMPAN) in World Health Organization (WHO). At the Fukushima Accident, staffs of the two tertiary hospitals began to conduct medicare on site (Mar. 12-) and learned following tasks to be improved in future: the early definition of medicare and its network system, and Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ); urgent evacuation of residents weak to disaster like elderly

  8. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  9. Study on tertiary in-situ leachable uranium mineralization conditions in South Songliao basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenqiang; Li Guokuan; Zhao Zonghua; Zhang Jingxun

    2001-01-01

    Tertiary in-situ leachable mineralization in Songliao Basin was analyzed in theory in the past. Since 1998, regional investigation at 1:200000 scale has been done with about 120 holes drilled. Based on drill holes recording, section compiling and sample analysis, the authors investigate into the Tertiary in-situ leachable conditions including rock character, sedimentary facies, rock chemistry, organic substances, uranium content, sandstone porosity, sandstone bodies, interlayer oxidation, and hydro-dynamic value. The study would play important role in prospecting for in-situ leachable uranium in South Songliao basin

  10. Electron beam cooling at a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, and an electrostatic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tetsumi

    2006-01-01

    At the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, with an electron cooler was operated from 1989 to 1999, while an electrostatic storage ring with a small electron cooler has been operational since 2000. In this paper, the electron cooling at TARN II and the electrostatic storage ring is described. (author)

  11. Tertiary recovery and tritide injection equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin

    1989-01-01

    The exploitation of an oil field is a continously developing process, undergoing seveal stages, such as the low production, the high production, the stable production and the decline. The tertiary recovery is an important means of the enhanced oil recovery. Since the object of the tertiary recovery is to treat the oil in micropores which is difficult to be produced, it is more necessary to know further the reservoir. Tritide can be used as a tracer and is an ideal marker of knowing the reservoir and the state of the fluid movement. The paper presents the tritide injection equipment

  12. A rationally designed amino-borane complex in a metal organic framework: A novel reusable hydrogen storage and size-selective reduction material

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xinbo

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino-borane complex inside a stable metal organic framework was synthesized for the first time. It releases hydrogen at a temperature of 78 °C with no volatile contaminants and can be well reused. Its application as a size-selective reduction material in organic synthesis was also demonstrated. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  13. Constructivism in Teaching English for Special Purposes at Tertiary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Y. Polenova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article looks at some principles of constructivism philosophy and the ways they are realized in ESP teaching at tertiary school. The purpose of this article is to describe constructivist teaching approach in enhancing students’ use of appropriate ESP learning strategies. Constructivism is a theory that emphasizes the active role of students in building understanding and making sense of the information. The constructivist teaching is learner-centered where students are actively involved in knowledge construction rather than passive listeners. Students construct knowledge by transforming, organizing, reorganizing previous knowledge through social interaction in construction of knowledge and understanding. The paper is an attempt to examine the principles of constructivist teaching and learning by providing analysis of features of constructivist theory and the organization of a constructivist classroom.

  14. Knowledge Management Enablers and Process in Hospital Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Sook

    2017-02-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of knowledge management enablers, such as organizational structure, leadership, learning, information technology systems, trust, and collaboration, on the knowledge management process of creation, storage, sharing, and application. Using data from self-administered questionnaires in four Korean tertiary hospitals, this survey investigated the main organizational factors affecting the knowledge management process in these organizations. A total of 779 questionnaires were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18.0. The results showed that organizational factors affect the knowledge management process differently in each hospital organization. From a managerial perspective, the implications of these factors for developing organizational strategies that encourage and foster the knowledge management process are discussed.

  15. Fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, C.; Alvarez-Miranda, A.

    2009-01-01

    ENSA is a well known manufacturer of multi-system primary components for the nuclear industry and is totally prepared to satisfy future market requirements in this industry. At the same time that ENSA has been gaining a reputation world wider for the supply of primary components, has been strengthening its commitment and experience in supplying spent fuel components, either pool racks or storage and transportation casks, and offers not only fabrication but also design capabilities for its products. ENSA has supplied Spent Fuel Pool Racks, in spain, Finland, Taiwan, Korea, China, and currently it is in the process of licensing its own rack design in the United States of America for the ESBWR along with Ge-Hitachi. ENSA has supplied racks for 20 pools and 22 different reactors and it has also manufactured racks under all available technologies and developed a design known as Interlock Cell Matrix whose main features are outlined in this article. Another ENSA achievement in rack technology is the use of remote control for re-racking activities instead of using divers, which improves the ALARA requirements. Regarding casks for storage and transportation, ENSA also has al leading worldwide position, with exports prevailing over the Spanish market where ENSA has supplied 16 storage and transportation casks to the Spanish nuclear power Trillo. In some cases, ENSA acts as subcontractor for other clients. Foreign markets are still a major challenge for ENSA. ENSA-is well known for its manufacturing capabilities in the nuclear industry, but has been always involved in design activities through its engineering division, which carries out different tasks: components Design; Tooling Design; Engineering and Documentation; Project Engineering; Calculations, Design and Development Engineering. (Author)

  16. Solvent effects on the magnetic shielding of tertiary butyl alcohol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )4 and tetramethyl ammonium cation N(CH3)4(+) have also been presented. KEY WORDS: Solvent effects, Magnetic shielding, Tertiary butyl alcohol, Tertiary butyl amine, Continuum solvation calculations, Chemical shift estimation methods

  17. Modelling the harmonized tertiary Institutions Salary Structure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analyses the Harmonized Tertiary Institution Salary Structure (HATISS IV) used in Nigeria. The irregularities in the structure are highlighted. A model that assumes a polynomial trend for the zero step salary, and exponential trend for the incremental rates, is suggested for the regularization of the structure.

  18. American Tertiary mollusks of the genus Clementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodring, W.P.

    1927-01-01

    Aside from its value as an aid in determining the age of Tertiary beds, the chief interest of the genus Clementia lies in the anomalous features of its present and former distribution. An attempt is made in this paper to trace its geologic history, to point out its paleobiologic significance, and to describe all the known American Tertiary species. The fossils from Colombia used in preparing this report were collected during explorations made under the direction of Dr. 0. B. Hopkins, chief geologist of the Imperial Oil Co. (Ltd.), who kindly donated them to the United States National Museum. Dr. T. Wayland Vaughan, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, furnished information relating to specimens collected by him in Mexico. Dr. Bruce L. Clark, of the University of California; Dr. G. Dallas Hanna, of the California Academy of Sciences; Dr. H. A. Pilsbry, of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences; and Dr. W. D. Matthew, of the American Museum of Natural History, generously loaned type specimens and other material. Doctor Clark and Doctor Hanna also gave information concerning the Tertiary species from California. Mr. Ralph B. Stewart, of the University of California, read the manuscript, and I have taken advantage of his suggestions. I am also indebted to Mr. L. R. Cox, of the British Museum, for information relating to the fossil species from Persia, Zanzibar, and Burma, and to Dr. Axel A. Olsson, of the International Petroleum Co., for data concerning undescribed Tertiary species from Peru.

  19. Misconception of emergency contraception among tertiary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the degree of awareness and use of emergency contraception among tertiary school students in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Design: A self-administered questionnaire survey. Setting: The Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, located on the outskirts of Ikot Ekpene local government area between ...

  20. Understanding Australian Aboriginal Tertiary Student Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith; Bennell, Debra; Anderson, Roz; Cooper, Inala; Forrest, Simon; Exell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from a study of the experiences of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander university students, this paper presents an overview of the specific needs of these students as they enter and progress through their tertiary education. Extracts from a set of case studies developed from both staff and student interviews and an online…

  1. Indigenous Students in the Tertiary Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandias, Susan; Fuller, Don; Larkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Important recent objectives of indigenous education policy in Australia have been aimed at redressing indigenous economic and social disadvantage through increasing student retention, progression and completion rates in both compulsory and post-compulsory education. The two sectors of the tertiary education system, vocational education and…

  2. SECTORAL ANALYSIS: GROWTH ACCOUNTING OF TERTIARY INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Z. ALSHEHHI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The tertiary sector is one of the modern styles of economic systems in view of the share it occupies in the field of production as well as employment occupied share. Hence, just like other lands, the UAE, witnessed an economic structural change similar to developed and developing nations, where the tertiary industries contributed 55.4% in 2015 to total country’s income. The empirical study aimed to analyze the contribution portion of growth in the tertiary industries through using the growth accounting framework in time-series from 1990 to 2015. The empirical study found that most of the industries contributed significantly to the growth of the tertiary sector. The contribution shares of growth due to labor and capital varied among industries. The main observed results show that there was a vice versa relationship between TFP performance and the size of labor, where the TFP positively corresponded with the decline in the size of labor specifically from 2010-2015.

  3. Underground storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-06-10

    A procedure is described for making an underground storage cavity in a soluble formation. Two holes are drilled, and fluid is pumped into the first hole. This fluid is a non-solute for the formation material. Then pressure is applied to the fluid until the formation is fractured in the direction of the second hole. More non-solute fluid is injected to complete the fracture between the 2 holes. A solute fluid is then circulated between the 2 holes, which results in removal of that part of the formation next to the fracture and the forming of a chamber.

  4. Pumped storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    The privately financed 1,000 MW Rocky Point Pumped Storage Project located in central Colorado, USA, will be one of the world's highest head, 2,350 feet reversible pump/turbine projects. The project will offer an economical supply of peaking power and spinning reserve power to Colorado and other southwestern states. This paper describes how the project will be made compatible with the environmental conditions in the project area and the type of terrestrial mitigation measures that are being proposed for those situations where the project impacts the environment, either temporarily or permanently

  5. Storage and Disposal of Solid Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomarola, J. [Head of Technical Section, Monitoring and Protection Division, Atomic Energy Commission, Saclay (France)

    1960-07-01

    This paper deals with solutions for the problem of final disposal of solid radioactive waste. I. It is first essential to organize a proper system of temporary storage. II. Final Storage In order to organize final storage, it is necessary to fix, according to the activity and form of the waste, the site and the modes of transport to be used within and outside the nuclear centre. The choice of solutions follows from the foregoing essentials. The paper then considers, in turn, final storage, on the ground, in the sub-soil and in the sea. Economic considerations are an important factor in determining the choice of solution. (author)

  6. Economics of Tertiary Education - Challenges and dynamics of the public tertiary education in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gledian Llatja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The tertiary education is a critic mechanism for the socio-economic progress, for individuals who aspire a brighter future and it is also considered an important catalyzer of the economic mobility (Department of Treasury and Department of Education, 2012, 2. Based on the positive role and impact that the tertiary education has on the sustainable development, President Obama once stated that it is of damage to treat education as a luxurious public service. In line with the general considerations about the tertiary education in the U.S. the parallel comparison with Albania comes as a direct interpretation of utopia in the education policy-making. As policies are usually drafted based on data and findings, in the case of Albania there is a lack of data on expenses on tertiary education as share of GDP. This stands also for the main limitation of the paper.

  7. A new look on protein-polyphenol complexation during honey storage: is this a random or organized event with the help of dirigent-like proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Brudzynski

    Full Text Available Honey storage initiates melanoidin formation that involves a cascade of seemingly unguided redox reactions between amino acids/proteins, reducing sugars and polyphenols. In the process, high molecular weight protein-polyphenol complexes are formed, but the mechanism involved remains unknown. The objective of this study was twofold: to determine quantitative and qualitative changes in proteins in honeys stored for prolonged times and in different temperatures and to relate these changes to the formation of protein-polyphenol complexes. Six -month storage decreased the protein content by 46.7% in all tested honeys (t-test, p<0.002 with the rapid reduction occurring during the first three month. The changes in protein levels coincided with alterations in molecular size and net charge of proteins on SDS -PAGE. Electro-blotted proteins reacted with a quinone-specific nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT on nitrocellulose membranes indicating that quinones derived from oxidized polyphenols formed covalent bonds with proteins. Protein-polyphenol complexes isolated by size-exclusion chromatography differed in size and stoichiometry and fall into two categories: (a high molecular weight complexes (230-180 kDa enriched in proteins but possessing a limited reducing activity toward the NBT and (b lower molecular size complexes (110-85 kDa enriched in polyphenols but strongly reducing the dye. The variable stoichiometry suggest that the large, "protein-type" complexes were formed by protein cross-linking, while in the smaller, "polyphenol-type" complexes polyphenols were first polymerized prior to protein binding. Quinones preferentially bound a 31 kDa protein which, by the electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Qtof-MS analysis, showed homology to dirigent-like proteins known for assisting in radical coupling and polymerization of phenolic compounds. These findings provide a new look on protein-polyphenol interaction in honey where the

  8. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergomas, Francesca [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Laghi, Luigi [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan 20089 (Italy); Marchesi, Federica, E-mail: federica.marchesi@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-28

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21{sup +} follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  9. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Marchesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic (or tertiary lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC. We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS. B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV. Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  10. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergomas, Francesca; Grizzi, Fabio; Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha; Laghi, Luigi; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Marchesi, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21 + follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response

  11. Diversification Management at Tertiary Education Level: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takwate, Kwaji Tizhe

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of management of diversification at tertiary education level in view of the growth of national secondary education system which vested high scramble for tertiary education was made in relation to question of access and expansion. This paper examines management of diversification at tertiary education level as a…

  12. Tertiary Education in the Czech Republic: The Pathway to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, Richard; Gounko, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes recent policy proposals to reform Czech tertiary education. A brief overview of the evolution of Czech tertiary education presents the background against which emerging policy trends in education are examined. We relate the changes in tertiary education to the policy framework and recommendations of the OECD, underpinned by…

  13. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  14. Nuclear materials management storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The Office of Weapons and Materials Planning (DP-27) requested the Planning Support Group (PSG) at the Savannah River Site to help coordinate a Departmental complex-wide nuclear materials storage study. This study will support the development of management strategies and plans until Defense Programs' Complex 21 is operational by DOE organizations that have direct interest/concerns about or responsibilities for nuclear material storage. They include the Materials Planning Division (DP-273) of DP-27, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Facilities (DP-60), the Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (DP-40), and other program areas, including Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). To facilitate data collection, a questionnaire was developed and issued to nuclear materials custodian sites soliciting information on nuclear materials characteristics, storage plans, issues, etc. Sites were asked to functionally group materials identified in DOE Order 5660.1A (Management of Nuclear Materials) based on common physical and chemical characteristics and common material management strategies and to relate these groupings to Nuclear Materials Management Safeguards and Security (NMMSS) records. A database was constructed using 843 storage records from 70 responding sites. The database and an initial report summarizing storage issues were issued to participating Field Offices and DP-27 for comment. This report presents the background for the Storage Study and an initial, unclassified summary of storage issues and concerns identified by the sites

  15. ALICE bags data storage accolades

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    ComputerWorld has recognized CERN with an award for the 'Best Practices in Storage' for ALICE's data acquisition system, in the category of 'Systems Implementation'. The award was presented to the ALICE DAQ team on 18 April at a ceremony in San Diego, CA. (Top) ALICE physicist Ulrich Fuchs. (Bottom) Three of the five storage racks for the ALICE Data Acquisition system (Photo Antonio Saba). Between 16 and19 April, one thousand people from data storage networks around the world gathered to attend the biannual Storage Networking World Conference. Twenty-five companies and organizations were celebrated as finalists, and five of those were given honorary awards-among them CERN, which tied for first place in the category of Systems Implementation for the success of the ALICE Data Acquisition System. CERN was one of five finalists in this category, which recognizes the winning facility for 'the successful design, implementation and management of an interoperable environment'. 'Successful' could include documentati...

  16. Organic-Carbon Sequestration in Soil/Sediment of the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain - Data; Landscape Distribution, Storage, and Inventory; Accumulation Rates; and Recent Loss, Including a Post-Katrina Preliminary Analysis (Chapter B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, Helaine W.; Buell, Gary R.; Britsch, Louis D.; McGeehin, John P.; Robbins, John A.; Wrenn, John H.; Dillon, Douglas L.; Fries, Terry L.; Morehead, Nancy R.

    2007-01-01

    Soil/sediment of the Mississippi River deltaic plain (MRDP) in southeastern Louisiana is rich in organic carbon (OC). The MRDP contains about 2 percent of all OC in the surface meter of soil/sediment in the Mississippi River Basin (MRB). Environments within the MRDP differ in soil/sediment organic carbon (SOC) accumulation rate, storage, and inventory. The focus of this study was twofold: (1) develop a database for OC and bulk density for MRDP soil/sediment; and (2) estimate SOC storage, inventory, and accumulation rates for the dominant environments (brackish, intermediate, and fresh marsh; natural levee; distributary; backswamp; and swamp) in the MRDP. Comparative studies were conducted to determine which field and laboratory methods result in the most accurate and reproducible bulk-density values for each marsh environment. Sampling methods included push-core, vibracore, peat borer, and Hargis1 sampler. Bulk-density data for cores taken by the 'short push-core method' proved to be more internally consistent than data for samples collected by other methods. Laboratory methods to estimate OC concentration and inorganic-constituent concentration included mass spectrometry, coulometry, and loss-on-ignition. For the sampled MRDP environments, these methods were comparable. SOC storage was calculated for each core with adequate OC and bulk-density data. SOC inventory was calculated using core-specific data from this study and available published and unpublished pedon data linked to SSURGO2 map units. Sample age was estimated using isotopic cesium (137Cs), lead (210Pb), and carbon (14C), elemental Pb, palynomorphs, other stratigraphic markers, and written history. SOC accumulation rates were estimated for each core with adequate age data. Cesium-137 profiles for marsh soil/sediment are the least ambiguous. Levee and distributary 137Cs profiles show the effects of intermittent allochthonous input and/or sediment resuspension. Cesium-137 and 210Pb data gave the most

  17. Multiplying Forest Garden Systems with biochar based organic fertilization for high carbon accumulation, improved water storage, nutrient cycling, and increased food diversity and farm productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Pandit, Bishnu Hari; Lucht, Wolfgang; Gerten, Dieter; Kammann, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    On abandoned, erosion prone terraces in the middle hills of Nepal, 86 participating farmer families planted >25,000 mixed trees in 2015/16. Since it was convincingly demonstrated by more than 20 field trials in this region that this was the most plant-growth promoting method, all trees were planted with farmer-made organic biochar-based fertilizer. Planting pits were mulched with rice straw and were pipe irrigated from newly established water retention ponds during the 7 months of the dry season. A peer control system of farmer triads ensured an efficient maintenance of the plantations. Tree survival rate was above 80% after one year compared to below 50% on average for countrywide forestation projects over the last 30 years. In between the young Cinnamon, Moringa, Mulberry, Lemon, Michelia, Paulownia, nut and other trees, other secondary crops were cultivated such as ginger, turmeric, black beans, onions, lentils, all with organic biochar-based fertilizer and mulching. The objective of this forest garden project was to establish robust social-agronomic systems that can be multiplied from village to village for increasing soil fertility, protecting abandoned terraces from erosion, replenishing natural water resources, generating a stable income with climate-smart agriculture, as well as capturing and sequestering atmospheric carbon. The initial financing of the set-up of the forest garden systems (tree nursery, plantation, preparation of organic biochar based fertilizer, mulching materials, building of irrigation pits and pipe irrigation system, and general maintenance) was covered by carbon credits paid in advance by the international community in the form of a monthly carbon compensation subscription. All planted trees are GIS inventoried and the yearly biomass carbon uptake will be calculated as an average value of the first ten years of tree growth. The 25,000 mixed trees accumulated the equivalent of 350 t CO2 per year (10 years total C-accumulation divided by

  18. Tertiary Treatment Process of Preserved Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the composite coagulants on coagulation sedimentation for the preserved wastewater was investigated by changing the composite coagulant dosages, and the coagulant was composed of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS, polyaluminium chloride (PAC, and polyaluminum ferric silicate (PAFSC, while the effect of the tertiary treatment process on the preserved wastewater was tested, which was exceeded the standard seriously. The results showed that 400 mg/L was the optimum composite coagulant dosage. The removal rates of salt and sugar were as high as 99.1% and 99.5% respectively, and the removal rates of CODCr and SS were 99.3% and 96.0%, respectively after the preserved wastewater was treated by the tertiary treatment technology, which both reached the primary standard of “The Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard” (GB8978-1996.

  19. Comparison of compostable bags and aerated bins with conventional storage systems to collect the organic fraction of municipal solid waste from homes. a Catalonia case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyuelo, Belén; Colón, Joan; Martín, Patrícia; Sánchez, Antoni

    2013-06-01

    The separation of biowaste at home is key to improving, facilitating and reducing the operational costs of the treatment of organic municipal waste. The conventional method of collecting such waste and separating it at home is usually done by using a sealed bin with a plastic bag. The use of modern compostable bags is starting to be implemented in some European countries. These compostable bags are made of biodegradable polymers, often from renewable sources. In addition to compostable bags, a new model of bin is also promoted that has a perforated surface that, together with the compostable bag, makes the so-called "aerated system". In this study, different combinations of home collection systems have been systematically studied in the laboratory and at home. The results obtained quantitatively demonstrate that the aerated bin and compostable bag system combination is effective at improving the collection of biowaste without significant gaseous emissions and preparing the organic waste for further composting as concluded from the respiration indices. In terms of weight loss, temperature, gas emissions, respiration index and organic matter reduction, the best results were achieved with the aerated system. At the same time, a qualitative study of bin and bag combinations was carried in 100 homes in which more than 80% of the families participating preferred the aerated system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimising Tertiary Student Accommodation within University Neighbourhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Ike, Nnenna; Baldwin, Claudia; Lathouras, Athena

    2017-01-01

    Tertiary students’ activities within neighbourhoods adjacent to universities engender positive and negative impacts that have consequences for neighbourhood sustainability. This might lead to studentification, a process that triggers physical, economic and socio-cultural transformation of university towns. Where non-student residents perceive negative impacts, it can lead to conflict and resentment towards the student population, mistrust between student and local resident groups and a decrea...

  1. AAV8-mediated expression of glucocerebrosidase ameliorates the storage pathology in the visceral organs of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Kerry Anne; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Armentano, Donna; Johnson, Jennifer; Hutto, Elizabeth; Grabowski, Gregory A; Cheng, Seng H; Marshall, John

    2006-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most common of the lysosomal storage disorders. The primary manifestation is the accumulation of glucosylceramide (GL-1) in the macrophages of liver and spleen (Gaucher cells), due to a deficiency in the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GC). A Gaucher mouse model (D409V/null) exhibiting reduced GC activity and accumulation of GL-1 was used to evaluate adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene therapy. A recombinant AAV8 serotype vector bearing human GC (hGC) was administered intravenously to the mice. The levels of hGC in blood and tissues were determined, as were the effects of gene transfer on the levels of GL-1. Histopathological evaluation was performed on liver, spleen and lungs. Vector administration to pre-symptomatic Gaucher mice resulted in sustained hepatic secretion of hGC at levels that prevented GL-1 accumulation and the appearance of Gaucher cells in the liver, spleen and lungs. AAV administration to older mice with established disease resulted in normalization of GL-1 levels in the spleen and liver and partially reduced that in the lung. Analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from treated mice showed significant correction of the abnormal cellularity and cell differentials. No antibodies to the expressed hGC were detected following a challenge with recombinant enzyme suggesting the animals were tolerized to human enzyme. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of AAV-mediated gene therapy at preventing and correcting the biochemical and pathological abnormalities in a Gaucher mouse model, and thus support the continued consideration of this vector as an alternative approach to treating Gaucher disease. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Liver Storage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-10-23

    Oct 23, 1971 ... ... organ, or increase its metabolic supply; and most investigators who are currently storing ... and continuous or intermittent perfusion. mSTORY ... in ordinary river water in an attempt to keep fish 'alive' in a frozen state. Hunter ...

  3. Organic storage of CO/sub 2/ on the continental slope off the mid-Atlantic bight, the southeastern Bering Sea, and the Peru coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.; Premuzic, E.T.; Gaffney, J.S.; Rowe, G.T.; Harbottle, G.; Stoenner, R.W.; Balsam, W.L.; Betzer, P.R.; Macko, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is made of organic content, sedimentation rates derived from /sup 14/C and /sup 210/Pb analyses, /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N isotope ratios, amorphous silica, particle size, and calcium carbonate within sediments from slopes off the mid-Atlantic bight, the southeastern Bering Sea, and the Peru coast. These sediments are mainly marine, diatom-rich, and about one-third of the organic carbon is recent, reflecting a possible transient of shelf export in response to man's increased activities since the industrial revolution. Using a combination of sedimentation and mixing rates of carbon, the C:N ratio of sediments within the upper 50 cm, and the amount of nitrogen thought to be released from the coastal zone, independent estimates suggest a carbon loading to world slopes of approx. 0.3 to 0.5 x 10/sup 9/ tons C y/sup -1/. The Bering slope exhibits no anthropogenic transients, however, while increased carbon loading may have occurred off Peru in response to overfishing and off the mid-Atlantic bight in response to eutrophication. The generality of their results depends on which of the three systems is most representative of world slopes.

  4. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  5. Geochemical characteristics of Tertiary saline lacustrine oils in the Western Qaidam Basin, northwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yangming; Weng Huanxin; Su Aiguo; Liang Digang; Peng Dehua

    2005-01-01

    Based on the systematic analyses of light hydrocarbon, saturate, aromatic fractions and C isotopes of over 40 oil samples along with related Tertiary source rocks collected from the western Qaidam basin, the geochemical characteristics of the Tertiary saline lacustrine oils in this region was investigated. The oils are characterized by bimodal n-alkane distributions with odd-to-even (C 11 -C 17 ) and even-to-odd (C 18 -C 28 ) predominance, low Pr/Ph (mostly lower than 0.6), high concentration of gammacerane, C 35 hopane and methylated MTTCs, reflecting the high salinity and anoxic setting typical of a saline lacustrine depositional environment. Mango's K 1 values in the saline oils are highly variable (0.99-1.63), and could be associated with the facies-dependent parameters such as Pr/Ph and gammacerane indexes. Compared with other Tertiary oils, the studied Tertiary saline oils are marked by enhanced C 28 sterane abundance (30% or more of C 27 -C 29 homologues), possibly derived from halophilic algae. It is noted that the geochemical parameters of the oils in various oilfields exhibit regular spatial changes, which are consistent with the depositional phase variations of the source rocks. The oils have uncommon heavy C isotopic ratios (-24%o to -26%o) and a flat shape of the individual n-alkane isotope profile, and show isotopic characteristics similar to marine organic matter. The appearance of oleanane and high 24/(24 + 27)-norcholestane ratios (0.57-0.87) in the saline oils and source rocks confirm a Tertiary organic source

  6. Performance Evaluation of a HP/ORC (Heat Pump/Organic Rankine Cycle) System with Optimal Control of Sensible Thermal Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, Carolina; Nielsen, Mads P.; Elmegaard, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In energy systems with high share of renewable energy sources, like wind and solar power, it is paramount to deal with their intrinsic variability. The interaction between electric and thermal energy (heating and cooling) demands representa potential area for balancing supply and demand that could...... come to contribute to the integration of intermittent renewables.This paper describes an innovative concept that consists of the addition of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) toa combined solar system coupled to a ground-source heat pump (HP) in a single-family building. The ORC enables the use of solar...... energy in periods of no thermal energy demand and reverses the heat pump cycle to supply electricalpower. A dynamic model based on empirical data of this system is used to determine the annual performance. Furthermore, this work assesses the benefits of different control strategies that address...

  7. Organic compost in physiological potential of broccoli seeds after storage Composto orgânico no potencial fisiológico de sementes de brócolis após o armazenamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Oliveira Magro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out with the objective to evaluate the broccoli seeds (cultivar Ramoso Santana germination and vigor from plants cultivated with different organic compost levels and after storage in dry chamber. At seed production stage, the experiment was conducted in randomized complete blocks design, with five treatments (0; 30; 60; 90 and 120 t ha-1 of Biomix® organic compost and four replications. Soon after harvesting and after 12 and 24 months of conservation in dry chamber room (20ºC and 40% relative humidity it was evaluated germination, following seed analisys rules, and vigor (first count of germination and germination speed index – IVG. There were no differences in germination and vigor in seeds as soon as they were harvested and after 12 month of storage. After 24 months of storage, the lesser the organic compost rates, the lesser seed germination and IVG, with respective values, without compost, of 69% and 12,3. For another hand, the highest values for germination and IVG, 82% and 16,1, respectively, were obtained with the highest rate of organic compost (120 t ha-1.O trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar a germinação e o vigor de sementes de brócolis (cultivar Ramoso Santana obtidas de plantas cultivadas com diferentes doses de composto orgânico e armazenadas em câmara seca. O delineamento experimental utilizado na produção de sementes foi o de blocos casualizados, com cinco tratamentos (0; 30; 60; 90 e 120 t ha-1 de composto orgânico marca comercial Biomix® e quatro repetições. Logo após a colheita e durante a armazenagem aos 12 e 24 meses em câmara seca (20ºC e 40% UR foi avaliada a germinação e o vigor (primeira contagem da germinação e índice de velocidade de germinação – IVG. Não houve diferenças na germinação e vigor nas sementes recém colhidas e aos 12 meses de armazenamento. Aos 24 meses de armazenamento das sementes, quanto menores as doses de composto orgânico, menores

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  9. Thermophysical Parameters of Organic PCM Coconut Oil from T-History Method and Its Potential as Thermal Energy Storage in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silalahi, Alfriska O.; Sukmawati, Nissa; Sutjahja, I. M.; Kurnia, D.; Wonorahardjo, S.

    2017-07-01

    The thermophysical parameters of organic phase change material (PCM) of coconut oil (co_oil) have been studied by analyzing the temperature vs time data during liquid-solid phase transition (solidification process) based on T-history method, adopting the original version and its modified form to extract the values of mean specific heats of the solid and liquid co_oil and the heat of fusion related to phase transition of co_oil. We found that the liquid-solid phase transition occurs rather gradually, which might be due to the fact that co_oil consists of many kinds of fatty acids with the largest amount of lauric acid (about 50%), with relatively small supercooling degree. For this reason, the end of phase transition region become smeared out, although the inflection point in the temperature derivative is clearly observed signifying the drastic temperature variation between the phase transition and solid phase periods. The data have led to the values of mean specific heat of the solid and liquid co_oil that are comparable to the pure lauric acid, while the value for heat of fusion is resemble to those of the DSC result, both from references data. The advantage of co_oil as the potential sensible and latent TES for room-temperature conditioning application in Indonesia is discussed in terms of its rather broad working temperature range due to its mixture composition characteristic.

  10. Organic waste treatment with organically modified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pancoski, S.E.; Alther, G.

    1989-01-01

    The use of organically modified clays in hazardous waste management applications offers a significant new and untapped potential. These clays may be used in the stabilization of organic wastes and organically contaminated soils, for waste water treatment, for oil spill control, for liner systems beneath fuel oil storage tanks, and as a component within liner systems of hazardous waste storage treatment and disposal facilities. Organically modified clays (organophilic clays) may be employed in each of these systems to adsorb organic waste constituents, enhancing the performance of the applications

  11. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  12. Carbon storage in soil: how different land uses affect particulate organic matter composition. A molecular approach using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Marco; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Rumpel, Cornelia; Dignac, Marie-France; Doumert, Bertrand; Chabbi, Abad

    2017-04-01

    The future soil carbon stocks in a climate change scenario is being closely monitored. However, the huge edaphoclimatic variability impedes to disclose the mechanisms which underlie the cycle of accumulation/mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil environment could be described as a complex three phases matrix in which gases, liquids, and solids are not uniformly mixed, and in which microbes, fungi, vegetal residues, and roots are continuously interacting with the soil matrix and with each other. Molecular analyses on soil samples are crucial to estimate how stable those pools are and to predict which practices may accumulate larger C stocks. However, the study of land use impact through molecular characterization of a complex mixture like SOM is a challenge that requires a multidisciplinary approach. The present study applied a combination of soil physical fractionation (separation by density of the particulate organic matter (POM) within water stable aggregate fractions) followed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a way to overcome spatial variability and to quantify the changes in the composition of SOM induced by land-use changes. The objective of the study was to assess, at a molecular level, the impact of different land managements, i.e. the introduction of temporary (ley) grassland into cropping cycles, on the chemical composition of SOM. Soil samples were collected at the long-term experimental observatory in Lusignan (http://www.soere-acbb.com/), in which control plots under permanent grassland, permanent cropland, and bare fallow are part of the experiment. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio (especially in the aromatic-C region), samples were analyzed using a ramped cross polarization-single pulse/magic angle spinning (CPSP/MAS) experiment. Peak integrals of different spectral regions (indicating different compound classes) were compared between treatments and two different molecular mixing models, calibrated against standard

  13. Storage of soil organic carbon in coffee (Coffea arabica L. production systems in the municipality of Líbano, Tolima, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Jair Andrade Castañeda

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase in greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources has resulted in climate change, which affects all living beings. Coffee (Coffea arabica L. plantations, in monoculture or together with timber species such as salmwood (Cordia alliodora, mitigate climate change due to fixation of atmospheric CO2 that is deposited in biomass and soils. This study was carried out in the municipality of Líbano, Tolima, Colombia with the objective of defining which of the following coffee production systems store more soil organic carbon (SOC: 1 monoculture, 2 agroforestry systems (AFS with salmwood, and 3 AFS with plantain. Farms with those systems that are the most dominant in the study zone were selected. From each system, five repetitions were identified to be analyzed with a completely randomized design. In each plot or repetition, five samples for bulk density (BD using the cylinder method and a composite sample for concentration of SOC were taken and analyzed using the Walkley and Black approach. The systems of production did not significantly (p > 0.05 affect either the BD or the concentration of SOC. However, AFS with plantain tended to have less BD than monoculture and AFS with salmwood (0.83 ± 0.03 vs 0.88 ± 0.03 vs 0.92 ± 0.04 g·cm-3, respectively. These systems of production stored between 50 and 54 t·ha-1 of SOC in the top 30 cm, which indicates their capacity for climate change mitigation.

  14. Postharvest application of organic and inorganic salts to control potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) storage soft rot: plant tissue-salt physicochemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaganza, E S; Tweddell, R J; Arul, J

    2014-09-24

    Soft rot caused by Pectobacterium sp. is a devastating disease affecting stored potato tubers, and there is a lack of effective means of controlling this disease. In this study, 21 organic and inorganic salts were tested for their ability to control soft rot in potato tubers. In the preventive treatment, significant control of soft rot was observed with AlCl3 (≥66%) and Na2S2O3 (≥57%) and to a lesser extent with Al lactate and Na benzoate (≥34%) and K sorbate and Na propionate (≥27%). However, only a moderate control was achieved by curative treatment with AlCl3 and Na2S2O3 (42%) and sodium benzoate (≥33%). Overall, the in vitro inhibitory activity of salts was attenuated in the presence of plant tissue (in vivo) to different degrees. The inhibitory action of the salts in the preventive treatment, whether effective or otherwise, showed an inverse linear relationship with water ionization capacity (pK') of the salt ions, whereas in the curative treatment, only the effective salts showed this inverse linear relationship. Salt-plant tissue interactions appear to play a central role in the attenuated inhibitory activity of salts in potato tuber through reduction in the availability of the inhibitory ions for salt-bacteria interactions. This study demonstrates that AlCl3, Na2S2O3, and Na benzoate have potential in controlling potato tuber soft rot and provides a general basis for understanding of specific salt-tissue interactions.

  15. Stereoinversion of tertiary alcohols to tertiary-alkyl isonitriles and amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronin, Sergey V; Reiher, Christopher A; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2013-09-12

    The SN2 reaction (bimolecular nucleophilic substitution) is a well-known chemical transformation that can be used to join two smaller molecules together into a larger molecule or to exchange one functional group for another. The SN2 reaction proceeds in a very predictable manner: substitution occurs with inversion of stereochemistry, resulting from the 'backside attack' of the electrophilic carbon by the nucleophile. A significant limitation of the SN2 reaction is its intolerance for tertiary carbon atoms: whereas primary and secondary alcohols are viable precursor substrates, tertiary alcohols and their derivatives usually either fail to react or produce stereochemical mixtures of products. Here we report the stereochemical inversion of chiral tertiary alcohols with a nitrogenous nucleophile facilitated by a Lewis-acid-catalysed solvolysis. The method is chemoselective against secondary and primary alcohols, thereby complementing the selectivity of the SN2 reaction. Furthermore, this method for carbon-nitrogen bond formation mimics a putative biosynthetic step in the synthesis of marine terpenoids and enables their preparation from the corresponding terrestrial terpenes. We expect that the general attributes of the methodology will allow chiral tertiary alcohols to be considered viable substrates for stereoinversion reactions.

  16. managing tertiary institutions for the promotion of lifelong learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    KEYWORDS: Managing, tertiary institutions, promotion, lifelong learning. INTRODUCTION ... science, medicine and technology towards the ... different environments, whether formal, informal ... schools considering that each day gives birth to.

  17. Peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection of primary, secondary and tertiary treated municipal wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, J; Heinonen-Tanski, H

    2005-11-01

    The efficiency of peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection against enteric bacteria and viruses in municipal wastewaters was studied in pilot-scale. Disinfection pilot-plant was fed with the primary or secondary effluent of Kuopio municipal wastewater treatment plant or tertiary effluent from the pilot-scale dissolved air flotation (DAF) unit. Disinfectant doses ranged from 2 to 7 mg/l PAA in the secondary and tertiary effluents, and from 5 to 15 mg/l PAA in the primary effluents. Disinfection contact times were 4-27 min. Disinfection of secondary and tertiary effluents with 2-7 mg/l PAA and 27 min contact time achieved around 3 log reductions of total coliforms (TC) and enterococci (EC). PAA disinfection also significantly improved the hygienic quality of the primary effluents: 10-15 mg/l PAA achieved 3-4 log reductions of TC and EC, 5 mg/l PAA resulting in below 2 log reductions. F-RNA coliphages were more resistant against the PAA disinfection and around 1 log reductions of these enteric viruses were typically achieved in the disinfection treatments of the primary, secondary and tertiary effluents. Most of the microbial reductions occurred during the first 4-18 min of contact time, depending on the PAA dose and microorganism. The PAA disinfection efficiency remained relatively constant in the secondary and tertiary effluents, despite of small changes of wastewater quality (COD, SS, turbidity, 253.7 nm transmittance) or temperature. The disinfection efficiency clearly decreased in the primary effluents with substantially higher microbial, organic matter and suspended solids concentrations. The results demonstrated that PAA could be a good alternative disinfection method for elimination of enteric microbes from different wastewaters.

  18. Characterization of molybdenum interfacial crud in a uranium mill that employs tertiary-amine solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, B.; McDowell, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    In the present work, samples of a molybdenum-caused green gummy interfacial crud from an operating western US uranium mill have been physically and chemically examined. Formaton of cruds of this description has been a long-standing problem in the use of tertiary amine solvent extraction for the recovery of uranium from low-grade ores (Amex Process). The crud is essentially an organic-continuous dispersion containing about 10 wt % aqueous droplets and about 37 wt % greenish-yellow crystalline solids suspended in kerosene-amine process solvent. The greenish-yellow crystals were found to be a previously unknown double salt of tertiary amine molybdophosphate with three tertiary amine chlorides having the empirical formula (R 3 NH) 3 [PMo 12 O 40 ].3(R 3 NH)Cl. To confirm the identification of the compound, a pure trioctylamine (TOA) analog was synthesized. In laboratory extraction experiments, it was demonstrated that organic-soluble amine molydophosphate forms slowly upon contact of TOA solvent with dilute sulfuric acid solutions containing low concentrations of molybdate and phosphate. If the organic solutions of amine molybdophosphate were then contacted with aqueous NaCl solutions, a greenish-yellow precipitate of (TOAH) 3 [PMo 12 O 40 ].3(TOAH)Cl formed at the interface. The proposed mechanism for the formation of the crud under process conditions involves build up of molybdenum in the solvent, followed by reaction with extracted phosphate to give dissolved amine molybdophosphate. The amine molybdophosphate then co-crystallizes with amine chloride, formed during the stripping cycle, to give the insoluble double salt, which precipitates as a layer of small particles at the interface. The proposed solution to the problem is the use of branched-chain, instead of straight-chain, tertiary amine extractants under the expectation that branching would increase the solubility of the double salt. 2 figures, 5 tables

  19. Feasibility of a subsurface storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This report analyses the notion of subsurface storage under the scientifical, technical and legal aspects. This reflection belongs to the studies about long duration storage carried out in the framework of the axis 3 of the December 30, 1991 law. The report comprises 3 parts. The first part is a synthesis of the complete subsurface storage study: definitions, aim of the report, very long duration storage paradigm, description files of concepts, thematic synthesis (legal aspects, safety, monitoring, sites, seismicity, heat transfers, corrosion, concretes, R and works, handling, tailings and dismantlement, economy..), multi-criteria/multi-concept cross-analysis. The second part deals with the technical aspects of the subsurface storage: safety approach (long duration impact, radiation protection, mastery of effluents), monitoring strategy, macroscopic inventory of B-type waste packages, inventory of spent fuels, glasses, hulls and nozzles, geological contexts in the French territory (sites selection and characterization), on-site activities, hydrogeological and geochemical aspects, geo-technical works and infrastructures organization, subsurface seismic effects, cooling modes (ventilation, heat transfer with the geologic environment), heat transfer research programs (convection, poly-phase cooling in porous media), handling constraints, concretes (use, behaviour, durability), corrosion of metallic materials, technical-economical analysis, international context (experience feedback from Sweden (CLAB) and the USA (Yucca Mountain), other European and French facilities). The last part of the report is a graphical appendix with 3-D views and schemes of the different concepts. (J.S.)

  20. Chemical Properties, Decomposition, and Methane Production of Tertiary Relict Plant Litters: Implications for Atmospheric Trace Gas Production in the Early Tertiary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavitt, J. B.; Bartella, T. M.; Williams, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    Throughout the early Tertiary (ca. 65-38 Ma) Taxodiaceae-dominated (redwood) wetland forests occupied the high latitudes and were circumpolar in their distribution. Many of these forests had high standing biomass with moderate primary productivity. The geographic extent and amount of Tertiary coals and fossil forests throughout Arctic Canada suggests large areas of wetland forests that may have cycled substantial quantities of carbon, particularly methane until they were replaced by cold tolerant Pinus, Picea, and Larix following climatic cooling associated with the Terminal Eocene Event. To test this hypothesis we compared physiochemical properties, decomposition, and trace gas production of litter from extant Metasequoia, Pinus, Picea, and Larix. Initial results from plantation-grown trees indicate Metasequoia litter is a better source of labile organic substrate than pinaceous litter. Metasequoia litter contained the least lignin and highest amounts of water-soluble compounds of the four litter types studied. Analysis of the lignin structure using cupric oxide oxidation indicates that Metasequoia lignin is enriched in 4'-hydroxyacetophenone and 4'- Hydroxy-3'-methoxyacetophenone relative to the pinaceous litter. In a 12-month decomposition study using litterbags, average litter mass loss was greater for Metasequoia litter (62%) compared to the pinaceous species (50%). Moreover, Metasequoia litter incubated under anoxic conditions produced nearly twice as much CO2 (ca. 4.2 umol/g.day) and CH4 (2.1 umol/g.day) as the pinaceous litter (2.4 umol/g.day for CO2; 1.2 umol/g.day for CH4). Our results support the idea of greater decomposability and palatability of Metasequoia litter as compared to Larix, Picea, or Pinus. Provided that the biochemical properties of Metasequoia have remained relatively stable through geologic time, it appears that early Tertiary Metasequoia-dominated wetland forests may have had higher microbial driven trace gas production than the

  1. Underground storage of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shoichi [Univ. of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Desk studies on underground storage of CO{sub 2} were carried out from 1990 to 1991 fiscal years by two organizations under contract with New Energy and Indestrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). One group put emphasis on application of CO{sub 2} EOR (enhanced oil recovery), and the other covered various aspects of underground storage system. CO{sub 2} EOR is a popular EOR method in U.S. and some oil countries. At present, CO{sub 2} is supplied from natural CO{sub 2} reservoirs. Possible use of CO{sub 2} derived from fixed sources of industries is a main target of the study in order to increase oil recovery and storage CO{sub 2} under ground. The feasibility study of the total system estimates capacity of storage of CO{sub 2} as around 60 Gton CO{sub 2}, if worldwide application are realized. There exist huge volumes of underground aquifers which are not utilized usually because of high salinity. The deep aquifers can contain large amount of CO{sub 2} in form of compressed state, liquefied state or solution to aquifer. A preliminary technical and economical survey on the system suggests favorable results of 320 Gton CO{sub 2} potential. Technical problems are discussed through these studies, and economical aspects are also evaluated.

  2. Uniqueness of Co3O4/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nano-spheres Derived from Metal-Organic Framework: Insight of Superior Lithium Storage Capabilities Beyond Theoretical and Electrochemical Features in High Voltage Battery

    KAUST Repository

    Ming, Jun

    2018-05-24

    Developing versatile strategy to create new structured materials with hetero-atomic doping has become one of the fascinating research topics owing to their fantastic properties, while the popular metal-organic-framework opens a promising avenue to design diverse architectures. Herein, an intriguing kind of spherical N-doped porous carbon (i.e., N-C) particles containing numerous Co3O4 nanocrystals (i.e., Co3O4/N-C) is introduced, in which the Zn-Co based Prussian blue analogue act as a sacrificial template and carbon source while the volatilization of zinc and oxidation of Co can produce rich pores and form highly active Co3O4 nanocrystals. The resultant Co3O4/N-C particles has an extremely high lithium storage capacity of 1255 mA h g-1 and excellent rate capability even to the current of 2000 mA g-1. The long cycle life over 500 cycles at 1000 mA g-1 with the high capacity of 798 mAh g-1 further demonstrates its prominent properties. Our kinetics analysis reveals that the high performances beyond theoretical mainly stem from the active Co3O4 nanocrystals, fast diffusion of lithium ions within the structure and pseudocapacitive behaviors; therefore it further demonstrates impressive stability and rate capabilities in lithium ion battery versus the cathode of lithium layered oxide even at high voltage conditions.

  3. The effectiveness of organic PCM based on lauric acid from coconut oil and inorganic PCM based on salt hydrate CaCl2.6H2o as latent heat energy storage system in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    U, Sri Rahayu A.; Putri, Widya A.; Sutjahja, I. M.; Kurnia, D.; Wonorahardjo, S.

    2016-08-01

    A latent heat energy storage system utilizing phase change materials (PCM) is an alternative strategy to reduce the use of Air Conditioning (AC) system in big cities in Indonesia in order for energy conservation in the future. In this research we used two kinds of materials, namely organic PCM based on lauric acid from coconut oil (CO) and inorganic PCM based on salt hydrate CaCl2.6H2O, because they have thermophysical parameters suitable for human's thermal comfort application in the building. The CO which contained more than 50% lauric acid has the melting temperature (Tm ) of about 26 °C and heat entalphy (ΔH) around 103 kJ/kg, while CaCl2.6H2O has the melting point of 29 °C and heat entalphy of 190 kJ/kg. In this paper we report the effectiveness of those two kinds of PCM in reducing the air temperature as one of some criteria for human's thermal comfort. The experiments were performed in a close and adiabatic room and the time-temperature measurements were done automatically using Arduino microcontroller and LM35 temperature sensor connected to the PC.

  4. Globally distributed software defined storage (proposal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevel, A.; Khoruzhnikov, S.; Grudinin, V.; Sadov, O.; Kairkanov, A.

    2017-10-01

    The volume of the coming data in HEP is growing. The volume of the data to be held for a long time is growing as well. Large volume of data - big data - is distributed around the planet. The methods, approaches how to organize and manage the globally distributed data storage are required. The distributed storage has several examples for personal needs like own-cloud.org, pydio.com, seafile.com, sparkleshare.org. For enterprise-level there is a number of systems: SWIFT - distributed storage systems (part of Openstack), CEPH and the like which are mostly object storage. When several data center’s resources are integrated, the organization of data links becomes very important issue especially if several parallel data links between data centers are used. The situation in data centers and in data links may vary each hour. All that means each part of distributed data storage has to be able to rearrange usage of data links and storage servers in each data center. In addition, for each customer of distributed storage different requirements could appear. The above topics are planned to be discussed in data storage proposal.

  5. Liquid hydrocarbon generation potential from Tertiary Nyalau Formation coals in the onshore Sarawak, Eastern Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah

    2013-01-01

    Tertiary coals exposed in the north-central part of onshore Sarawak are evaluated, and their depositional environments are interpreted. Total organic carbon contents (TOC) of the coals range from 58.1 to 80.9 wt. % and yield hydrogen index values ranging from 282 to 510 mg HC/g TOC with low oxygen index values, consistent with Type II and mixed Type II-III kerogens. The coal samples have vitrinite reflectance values in the range of 0.47-0.67 Ro %, indicating immature to early mature (initial oil window). T max values range from 428 to 436 °C, which are good in agreement with vitrinite reflectance data. The Tertiary coals are humic and generally dominated by vitrinite, with significant amounts of liptinite and low amounts of inertinite macerals. Good liquid hydrocarbons generation potential can be expected from the coals with rich liptinitic content (>35 %). This is supported by their high hydrogen index of up to 300 mg HC/g TOC and Py-GC ( S 2) pyrograms with n-alkane/alkene doublets extending beyond C30. The Tertiary coals are characterised by dominant odd carbon numbered n-alkanes ( n-C23 to n-C33), high Pr/Ph ratio (6-8), high T m / T s ratio (8-16), and predominant regular sterane C29. All biomarkers parameters clearly indicate that the organic matter was derived from terrestrial inputs and the deposited under oxic condition.

  6. Determinants of propensity of tertiary agricultural students in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to identify factors that affect the decision of tertiary agricultural students in Ghana to enter agribusiness as a self-employment venture after graduation. The results showed that tertiary agricultural students in Ghana were predominantly males with little or no farming background. They had a rather moderate ...

  7. Crime and Crime Management in Nigeria Tertiary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebanjo, Margaret Adewunmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines crime and its management in Nigerian tertiary institutions. Tertiary institutions today have become arenas for crime activities such as rape, cultism, murder, theft, internet fraud, drug abuse, and examination malpractices. This paper delves into what crime is, and its causes; and the positions of the law on crime management.…

  8. Massification and Quality Assurance in Tertiary Education: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sets out to examine massification and its impact on quality assurance in tertiary education and the extent to which lecturer–student ratio, adequacy of infrastructure and pedagogical resources affect quality in tertiary institutions. Two research questions and one hypothesis were posed to guide the investigation.

  9. Pushing the frontiers of atomic models for protein tertiary structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as an NP complete or NP hard problem.4,5 This notwith- standing, the dire need for tertiary structures of proteins in drug discovery and other areas6–8 has propelled the development of a multitude of computational recipes. In this article, we focus on ab initio/de novo strategies,. Bhageerath in particular, for protein tertiary ...

  10. Academic mentoring and the future of tertiary education in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tertiary education is a major outlet for the provision of high manpower for national development. This paper therefore highlighted the challenges of tertiary education in Nigeria, early perspectives of mentoring undergraduates, the rationale for academic mentoring, the role of a mentor, and the role of library as catalyst in the ...

  11. Ensuring Effective Mentoring in Tertiary Institutions in Anambra State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper concerns itself only with ascertaining the strategies that could ensure effective mentoring in tertiary institutions. The survey method was employed. The study population comprised 78 teacher educators in tertiary institutions in Anambra State. One research question guided the study while one null hypothesis was ...

  12. 10 CFR 212.78 - Tertiary incentive crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tertiary incentive crude oil. 212.78 Section 212.78 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MANDATORY PETROLEUM PRICE REGULATIONS Producers of Crude Oil § 212.78 Tertiary incentive crude oil. Annual prepaid expenses report. By January 31 of each year after 1980, the project...

  13. Literacy Skills Development for Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literacy Skills Development for Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of the University of Calabar. ... These were drawn from five faculties, namely Education, Social Sciences, Law, Arts and Agriculture. The study observed that there is a ... more literacy skills. Key Words: Literacy skills, university, Nigeria, tertiary institution ...

  14. Carcinogenicity of methyl-tertiary butyl ether in gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2002-12-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was added to gasoline on a nationwide scale in 1992 without prior testing of adverse, toxic, or carcinogenic effects. Since that time, numerous reports have appeared describing adverse health effects of individuals exposed to MTBE, both from inhalation of fumes in the workplace and while pumping gasoline. Leakage of MTBE, a highly water-soluble compound, from underground storage tanks has led to contamination of the water supply in many areas of the United States. Legislation has been passed by many states to prohibit the addition of MTBE to gasoline. The addition of MTBE to gasoline has not accomplished its stated goal of decreasing air pollution, and it has posed serious health risks to a large portion of the population, particularly the elderly and those with respiratory problems, asthma, and skin sensitivity. Reports of animal studies of carcinogenicity of MTBE began to appear in the 1990s, prior to the widespread introduction of MTBE into gasoline. These reports were largely ignored. In ensuing years, further studies have shown that MTBE causes various types of malignant tumors in mice and rats. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors' Report on Carcinogens Subcommittee met in December 1998 to consider listing MTBE as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen." In spite of recommendations from Dr. Bailer, the primary reviewer, and other scientists on the committee, the motion to list MTBE in the report was defeated by a six to five vote, with one abstention. On the basis of animal studies, it is widely accepted that if a chemical is carcinogenic in appropriate laboratory animal test systems, it must be treated as though it were carcinogenic in humans. In the face of compelling evidence, NTP Committee members who voted not to list MTBE as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" did a disservice to the general public; this action may cause needless exposure of many to health risks

  15. Long-term plutonium storage: Design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkey, D.D.; Wood, W.T.; Guenther, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    An important part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Program is the development of facilities for long-term storage of plutonium. The WCR design goals are to provide storage for metals, oxides, pits, and fuel-grade plutonium, including material being held as part of the Strategic Reserve and excess material. Major activities associated with plutonium storage are sorting the plutonium inventory, material handling and storage support, shipping and receiving, and surveillance of material in storage for both safety evaluations and safeguards and security. A variety of methods for plutonium storage have been used, both within the DOE weapons complex and by external organizations. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of proposed storage concepts based upon functional criteria. The concepts discussed include floor wells, vertical and horizontal sleeves, warehouse storage on vertical racks, and modular storage units. Issues/factors considered in determining a preferred design include operational efficiency, maintenance and repair, environmental impact, radiation and criticality safety, safeguards and security, heat removal, waste minimization, international inspection requirements, and construction and operational costs

  16. Factors influencing phase-disengagement rates in solvent-extraction systems employing tertiary amine extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, B.A.; McDowell, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present investigation was to examine the effects of amine size and structure on phase disengagement. Nine commercial tertiary amines were tested together with four laboratory-quality amines for uranium extraction and both organic-continuous (OC) and aqueous-continuous (AC) phase disengagement under Amex-type conditions. Synthetic acid sulfate solutions with and without added colloidal silica and actual ore leach solutions were used as the aqueous phases. Phase disengagement results were correlated with amine size and branching and solution wetting behavior on a silicate (glass) surface. The results suggest that the performance of some Amex systems may be improved by using branched chain tertiary amine extractants of higher molecular weight than are now normally used

  17. Seepage characteristics of the second tertiary combined model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan ZHAO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The second tertiary combined model experiment zone has been developed in Block B, Field L. The percolation feature of the second tertiary combined develop model shows great importance to rational and efficient development of the reservoir. In order to clearly illuminate its percolation feature, the typical reservoir numerical model is built by Eclipse, which is a reservoir numerical simulation software. The percolation features of original and added perforation interval under the second tertiary combined model are studied, and the variation features of general water-cut, recovery percentage, wellbore pressure, reservoir pressure and water saturation on condition of higher injection rate under the second tertiary combined model are analyzed. The research indicates that the second tertiary combined enhances the recovery of remaining oil on top of thick reservoir by developing and enhancing original perforation interval under water drive, then improves development results by polymer flooding, and gains higher recovery rate by synthetic action of water driver and polymer flooding.

  18. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  19. Tertiary lymphoid structures in cancer and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Goc, Jérémy; Giraldo, Nicolas A; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fridman, Wolf Herman

    2014-11-01

    Tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) are ectopic lymphoid formations found in inflamed, infected, or tumoral tissues. They exhibit all the characteristics of structures in the lymph nodes (LN) associated with the generation of an adaptive immune response, including a T cell zone with mature dendritic cells (DC), a germinal center with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and proliferating B cells, and high endothelial venules (HEV). In this review, we discuss evidence for the roles of TLS in chronic infection, autoimmunity, and cancer, and address the question of whether TLS present beneficial or deleterious effects in these contexts. We examine the relationship between TLS in tumors and patient prognosis, and discuss the potential role of TLS in building and/or maintaining local immune responses and how this understanding may guide therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Navigating the global space of tertiary education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne

    , and to the development of transnational elites. This is especially true for mobile students who attend “elite universities” in the USA, UK and France. As pointed out by sociologist Michael Börjesson (2005), an investment in an education at one of the American Ivy League universities or France’s Grand Ecoles, is not only......Over the past ten years the number of students who go abroad to pursue tertiary education has more than doubled, from 1, 9 million in 2000 to 4.1 million in 2010 (OECD 2012). This growing number of students studying abroad contributes to the overall flow of individuals and ideas across borders...... an investment in a significant educational capital with global applicability, but also an investment in an institutionalized transnational social capital that stretches across most of the world. It is less clear to what extent this also applies to students who go abroad to attend international programs...

  1. Peptide oligomers for holographic data storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf Henrik; Hvilsted, Søren; Ramanujam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    SEVERAL classes of organic materials (such as photoanisotropic liquid-crystalline polymers(1-4) and photorefractive polymers(5-7)) are being investigated for the development of media for optical data storage. Here we describe a new family of organic materials-peptide oligomers containing azobenzene...

  2. The impact of tertiary wastewater treatment on copper and zinc complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, C; Gardner, M; Comber, S D W; Scrimshaw, M D; Ellor, B

    2015-01-01

    Tightening quality standards for European waters has seen a move towards enhanced wastewater treatment technologies such as granulated organic carbon treatment and ozonation. Although these technologies are likely to be successful in degrading certain micro-organic contaminants, these may also destroy compounds which would otherwise complex and render metals significantly less toxic. This study examined the impact of enhanced tertiary treatment on the capacity of organic compounds within sewage effluents to complex copper and zinc. The data show that granulated organic carbon treatment removes a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fraction that is unimportant to complexation such that no detrimental impact on complexation or metal bioavailability is likely to occur from this treatment type. High concentrations of ozone (>1 mg O3/mg DOC) are, however, likely to impact the complexation capacity for copper although this is unlikely to be important at the concentrations of copper typically found in effluent discharges or in rivers. Ozone treatment did not affect zinc complexation capacity. The complexation profiles of the sewage effluents show these to contain a category of non-humic ligand that appears unaffected by tertiary treatment and which displays a high affinity for zinc, suggesting these may substantially reduce the bioavailability of zinc in effluent discharges. The implication is that traditional metal bioavailability assessment approaches such as the biotic ligand model may overestimate zinc bioavailability in sewage effluents and effluent-impacted waters.

  3. Fuel assembly storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiranuma, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To remove limitation of the number of storage of fuel assemblies to increase the number of storage thereof so as to relatively reduce the water depth required for shielding radioactive rays. Structure: Fuel assembly storage rack containers for receiving a plurality of spent fuel assembly racks are stacked in multi-layer fashion within a storage pool filled with water for shielding radioactive rays and removing heat. (Furukawa, Y.)

  4. Heat transport and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despois, J.

    1977-01-01

    Recalling the close connections existing between heat transport and storage, some general considerations on the problem of heat distribution and transport are presented 'in order to set out the problem' of storage in concrete form. This problem is considered in its overall plane, then studied under the angle of the different technical choices it involves. The two alternatives currently in consideration are described i.e.: storage in a mined cavity and underground storage as captive sheet [fr

  5. Storage in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabanes, J.M.; Rottenberg, J.; Abiad, A.; Caudron, S.; Girault, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    Storage represents one of the key elements among the different modulation tools. How the problem of storage is put forward in Europe in front of the increasing uncertainty of the gas demand and prices? What are the policies implemented by storage facility operators? To what extend storage can amortize gas prices volatility or allow the market actors to take the best profit of this volatility? These are the questions debated at this workshop by four specialists of this domain. (J.S.)

  6. Pit Water Storage Ottrupgaard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred

    2000-01-01

    The pit water storage, a seasonal thermal storage, was built in 1993 with floating lid and hybrid clay-polymer for pit lining. The storage was leaking severe and solutions were to be found. In the paper solutions for pit lining and floating lids are discussed, cost estimations given and coming...

  7. An introduction to direct access storage devices

    CERN Document Server

    Sierra, Hugh M

    2012-01-01

    This book presents an exposition of the technology, design, organization, and structure of direct access storage devices (disk drives). It includes a discussion of the evolution of the technology (magnetic recording) and an assessment of other storage technologies, including optical recording. Examples of codes used in past implementations of disk drives as well as an application of disk drive usage dictated by reliability considerations are also included. The presentation assumes a minimum knowledge of magnetic recording, servomechanism design, and coding.

  8. EPRI's pumped storage planning and evaluation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    EPRI's Hydropower Pumped Storage Planning and Evaluation Guide was published in 1990. The Guide provides step-by-step procedures to: evaluate pumped-storage operation in a utility system, establish site development concept, estimate capital cost, and conduct economic analysis. The Guide provides a floppy diskette containing a production costing model simulating the chronologic operation of pumped storage in a generating system. It provides a series of estimating curves for the preparation of capital cost estimates. The paper presents how the Guide was organized and prepared, and highlights its contents

  9. Production of organic-semiconductor nanostructures by solid-phase wetting. Guided growth, molecular data storage, and local coadsorption; Erzeugung organischer Halbleiter-Nanostrukturen durch Festphasenbenetzung. Gefuehrtes Wachstum, molekulare Datenspeicherung und lokale Koadsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trixler, Frank

    2007-09-10

    The present thesis treats questions from the interdisciplinary field of nanosciences by studies by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and computer chemistry. The main part of this thesis is the presentation of a novel structure formation process on molecular level. The presented model describes this process by nanocrystals, which show - suspended in a matrix - in contact with a crystal surface a behaviour, which is in spite present solid-state properties (crystalline order) similar to the behaviour of liquid drops in the wetting of surfaces. Starting from this the technological potential of this new process is made accessible.: 1.) Adsorbate structures of a series of organic semiconductors are described for the first time. By this it is additionally shown that by supramolecular solid-phase wetting unsolvable semiconductor molecules can be very simply and under environmental conditions orderedly adsorbed. 2.) An explanation model is developed, by which the hitherto not understandable molecular data storage by means of PTCDA molecules can be theoretically explained and extended to further molecules. 3.) The development of a nanofabrication concept is presented, which allows a local control of the growth of nanostructures. The advance against a classical molecule-for-molecule performed nanostructuration lies therein that by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope solely the information of growth directions is locally to be brought into the system, the actual formation of the structures however takes place by independently running and by this qualitatively and timely highly efficient growth processes. 4.) A procedure is presented, which allows a local adsorption of molecules to ordered layers within a layer of other molecules and by this makes possible the formation of heterogeneous adsorbate layers.

  10. Wind turbine storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, H.; Ilinca, A.; Perron, J.

    2005-01-01

    Electric power is often produced in locations far from the point of utilization which creates a challenge in stabilizing power grids, particularly since electricity cannot be stored. The production of decentralized electricity by renewable energy sources offers a greater security of supply while protecting the environment. Wind power holds the greatest promise in terms of environmental protection, competitiveness and possible applications. It is known that wind energy production is not always in phase with power needs because of the uncertainty of wind. For that reason, energy storage is the key for the widespread integration of wind energy into the power grids. This paper proposed various energy storage methods that can be used in combination with decentralized wind energy production where an imbalance exists between electricity production and consumption. Energy storage can play an essential role in bringing value to wind energy, particularly if electricity is to be delivered during peak hours. Various types of energy storage are already in use or are being developed. This paper identified the main characteristics of various electricity storage techniques and their applications. They include stationary or embarked storage for long or short term applications. A comparison of characteristics made it possible to determine which types of electricity storage are best suited for wind energy. These include gravity energy; thermal energy; compressed air energy; coupled storage with natural gas; coupled storage with liquefied gas; hydrogen storage for fuel cells; chemical energy storage; storage in REDOX batteries; storage by superconductive inductance; storage in supercondensers; and, storage as kinetic energy. 21 refs., 21 figs

  11. Fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peehs, M.; Stehle, H.; Weidinger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The stationary fuel storage tank is immersed below the water level in the spent fuel storage pool. In it there is placed a fuel assembly within a cage. Moreover, the storage tank has got a water filling and a gas buffer. The water in the storage tank is connected with the pool water by means of a filter, a surge tank and a water purification facility, temperature and pressure monitoring being performed. In the buffer compartment there are arranged catalysts a glow plugs for recombination of radiolysis products into water. The supply of water into the storage tank is performed through the gas buffer compartment. (DG) [de

  12. Public storage for the Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levshina, T; Guru, A

    2014-01-01

    The Open Science Grid infrastructure doesn't provide efficient means to manage public storage offered by participating sites. A Virtual Organization that relies on opportunistic storage has difficulties finding appropriate storage, verifying its availability, and monitoring its utilization. The involvement of the production manager, site administrators and VO support personnel is required to allocate or rescind storage space. One of the main requirements for Public Storage implementation is that it should use SRM or GridFTP protocols to access the Storage Elements provided by the OSG Sites and not put any additional burden on sites. By policy, no new services related to Public Storage can be installed and run on OSG sites. Opportunistic users also have difficulties in accessing the OSG Storage Elements during the execution of jobs. A typical users' data management workflow includes pre-staging common data on sites before a job's execution, then storing for a subsequent download to a local institution the output data produced by a job on a worker node. When the amount of data is significant, the only means to temporarily store the data is to upload it to one of the Storage Elements. In order to do that, a user's job should be aware of the storage location, availability, and free space. After a successful data upload, users must somehow keep track of the data's location for future access. In this presentation we propose solutions for storage management and data handling issues in the OSG. We are investigating the feasibility of using the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System developed at RENCI as a front-end service to the OSG SEs. The current architecture, state of deployment and performance test results will be discussed. We will also provide examples of current usage of the system by beta-users.

  13. Public storage for the Open Science Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levshina, T.; Guru, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Open Science Grid infrastructure doesn't provide efficient means to manage public storage offered by participating sites. A Virtual Organization that relies on opportunistic storage has difficulties finding appropriate storage, verifying its availability, and monitoring its utilization. The involvement of the production manager, site administrators and VO support personnel is required to allocate or rescind storage space. One of the main requirements for Public Storage implementation is that it should use SRM or GridFTP protocols to access the Storage Elements provided by the OSG Sites and not put any additional burden on sites. By policy, no new services related to Public Storage can be installed and run on OSG sites. Opportunistic users also have difficulties in accessing the OSG Storage Elements during the execution of jobs. A typical users' data management workflow includes pre-staging common data on sites before a job's execution, then storing for a subsequent download to a local institution the output data produced by a job on a worker node. When the amount of data is significant, the only means to temporarily store the data is to upload it to one of the Storage Elements. In order to do that, a user's job should be aware of the storage location, availability, and free space. After a successful data upload, users must somehow keep track of the data's location for future access. In this presentation we propose solutions for storage management and data handling issues in the OSG. We are investigating the feasibility of using the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System developed at RENCI as a front-end service to the OSG SEs. The current architecture, state of deployment and performance test results will be discussed. We will also provide examples of current usage of the system by beta-users.

  14. Mixed La-Li heterobimetallic complexes for tertiary nitroaldol resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosaki, Shin-ya; Hara, Keiichi; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shinji; Sugita, Mari; Yamagiwa, Noriyuki; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2006-09-13

    A kinetic resolution of tertiary nitroaldols derived from simple ketones is described. Mixed BINOL/biphenol La-Li heterobimetallic complexes gave the best selectivity in retro-nitroaldol reactions of racemic tertiary nitroaldols. By using a mixture of La-Li3-(1a)3 complex (LLB 2a) and La-Li3-(1b)3 (LLB* 2b) complex in a ratio of 2/1, chiral tertiary nitroaldols were obtained in 80-97% ee and 30-47% recovery yield.

  15. National Storage Laboratory: a collaborative research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Robert A.; Hulen, Harry; Watson, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The grand challenges of science and industry that are driving computing and communications have created corresponding challenges in information storage and retrieval. An industry-led collaborative project has been organized to investigate technology for storage systems that will be the future repositories of national information assets. Industry participants are IBM Federal Systems Company, Ampex Recording Systems Corporation, General Atomics DISCOS Division, IBM ADSTAR, Maximum Strategy Corporation, Network Systems Corporation, and Zitel Corporation. Industry members of the collaborative project are funding their own participation. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through its National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) will participate in the project as the operational site and provider of applications. The expected result is the creation of a National Storage Laboratory to serve as a prototype and demonstration facility. It is expected that this prototype will represent a significant advance in the technology for distributed storage systems capable of handling gigabyte-class files at gigabit-per-second data rates. Specifically, the collaboration expects to make significant advances in hardware, software, and systems technology in four areas of need, (1) network-attached high performance storage; (2) multiple, dynamic, distributed storage hierarchies; (3) layered access to storage system services; and (4) storage system management.

  16. Assessing storage adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirault, P.

    2004-01-01

    Government policy encourages the use of natural gas. It is expected that liquefied natural gas (LNG) and Arctic gas will make up 20 to 25 per cent of supply. This presentation provided an outlook of storage value based on a technical analysis by the National Petroleum Counsel (NPC) report. A moderately robust growth is expected in the residential and commercial load which may be partially offset by robust growth in electricity. The net result is an increase in storage requirements. It was concluded that there is a strong case for growth in storage demand but a lack of good sites for additional capacity. This will lead to higher storage values. The NPC sees the need for 1 Tcf more storage use by 2025, of which 700 Bcf will need to come from new storage. In particular, current storage levels may not be sufficient to meet a colder than normal winter, and deliverability is affected by field inventory. Most storage capacity was built before 1985, mostly by regulated entities. It is expected that only 250 to 400 Bcf will be added over the next 25 years in North America. If storage becomes scarce, prices will move to the marginal cost of new additions, and the upper limit on price will be determined by salt cavern storage. An increase of $1.00 in the price of leasing storage would add about $0.11 to the average price of consumed gas. tabs., figs

  17. Spent fuel storage rack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Matsuo; Uchiyama, Yuichi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety and facilitate the design by limiting the relative displacement in a storage rack. Constitution: The outer wall of a storage rack disposed in water within a fuel pool, the pool wall opposing to the storage rack and the structure between the opposing storages racks are made as a space for confining the pool water or a structure formed with a slight gap, for example, a combination of a recessed structure and a protruded structure. In such a constitution, a space for confirming the pool water is established and the pool water thus confined forms a flow resistance when the storage rack vibrates upon earthquakes, serves as a damper and significantly reduces the responsivity. Furthermore, the relative displacement in the storage rack is limited to inhibit excess earthquake forces to exert on setting bolts and rack clamping bolts of the storage rack. (Sekiya, K.)

  18. Social Activities and Manifest Anxiety among Freshmen in Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in tertiary institutions in Lagos state of Nigeria were analysed to determine the relationship between social activities and manifest anxiety. Social activities in the study were measured in terms of freshmen adjustment to religious activities and ...

  19. Factors affecting utilization of University health services in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-16

    Jan 16, 2013 ... Objective: To determine students' perception of health care services provided in a tertiary institution and ... evaluation of health services utilization among students in the .... African culture and health. ... Asian Am Pac Isl J.

  20. Assessment of job satisfaction among health workers in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of job satisfaction among health workers in a tertiary hospital in Zaria ... factors affecting job satisfaction and retention of health professionals working in ... help the hospital management to increase their employee's job satisfaction.

  1. Employees' Assessment Of Customer Focus In A Tertiary Hospital In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employees' Assessment Of Customer Focus In A Tertiary Hospital In ... tool 'Are we making progress?' were used by respondents to rate customer focus. ... that they were allowed to take decisions to solve problems for customers (p < 0.001).

  2. Helpless patients' perception of bed-bath in tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helpless patients' perception of bed-bath in tertiary health institutions in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria. ... Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (2005) > ... patients to bed bathing by nurses is a very important aspect of quality assurance in nursing care.

  3. Enhancing learning in tertiary institutions through multimedia based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing learning in tertiary institutions through multimedia based ... convenient and cost-effective courseware reengineering methodology of our age. ... Also discussed are the reasons for converting classroom courses to e-learning format.

  4. Effect of health education on knowledge and attitude of tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In order to make good decisions about their sexual and ... of health education on the knowledge and attitude of tertiary school students towards sexually ... Methods: The study employed a quasi-experimental study design in which ...

  5. Integrated Identity and Access Management System for Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology ... identity management and access control and the unavailability of actionable information on pattern of ... This Tertiary Identity and Access Management System (T-IAMS) is a fingerprint biometric database that ...

  6. Sexism and Sexual Harassment in Tertiary Institutions | Akpotor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender and Behaviour ... Sexual harassment is a recurring decimal in tertiary institutions. The paper therefore investigates the effects of sexual harassment on the academic performance of female students, using Delta State University, Abraka, ...

  7. On Network Coded Distributed Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera Guerrero, Juan Alberto; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Fitzek, Frank Hanns Paul

    2016-01-01

    systems typically rely on expensive infrastructure with centralized control to store, repair and access the data. This approach introduces a large delay for accessing and storing the data driven in part by a high RTT between users and the cloud. These characteristics are at odds with the massive increase......This paper focuses on distributed fog storage solutions, where a number of unreliable devices organize themselves in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks with the purpose to store reliably their data and that of other devices and/or local users and provide lower delay and higher throughput. Cloud storage...... of devices and generated data in coming years as well as the requirements of low latency in many applications. We focus on characterizing optimal solutions for maintaining data availability when nodes in the fog continuously leave the network. In contrast with state-of-the-art data repair formulations, which...

  8. Challenges with Tertiary-Level Mechatronic Fluid Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dransfield, Peter; Conrad, Finn

    1996-01-01

    As authors we take the view that mechatronics, as it relates to fluid power, has three levels which we designate as primary, secondary and tertiary. A brief review of the current status of fluid power, hydraulic and pneumatic, and of electronic control of it is presented and discussed. The focus...... is then on tertiary-level mechatronic fluid power and the challenges to it being applied successfully....

  9. Interactive Intranet Portal for effective Management in Tertiary Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Idogho O. Philipa; Akpado Kenneth; James Agajo

    2011-01-01

    Interactive Intranet Portal for effective management in Tertiary Institution is an enhanced and interactive method of managing and processing key issues in Tertiary Institution, Problems of result processing, tuition fee payment, library resources management are analyzed in this work. An interface was generated to handle this problem; the software is an interactive one. Several modules are involved in the paper, like: LIBRARY CONSOLE, ADMIN, STAFF, COURSE REGISTRATION, CHECKING OF RESULTS and...

  10. Tertiary colleges: a study of perspectives on organizational innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Preedy, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore organisational innovation in education with reference to one particular type of organisation - the tertiary college. The research sought to examine the extent to which the intended objectives for new educational organisations are realised in practice, and how far the goals and ethos which organisational leaders seek to promote are shared by organisational members. The study focused on eleven tertiary colleges, comparing the 'official' view of ...

  11. Assessment Quality in Tertiary Education: An Integrative Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen-van Leeuwenkamp, Karin; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kester, Liesbeth

    2018-01-01

    In tertiary education, inferior assessment quality is a problem that has serious consequences for students, teachers, government, and society. A lack of a clear and overarching conceptualization of assessment quality can cause difficulties in guaranteeing assessment quality in practice. Thus, the aim of this study is to conceptualize assessment quality in tertiary education by providing an overview of the assessment quality criteria, their influences, the evaluation of the assessment quality ...

  12. Clinicians and their cameras: policy, ethics and practice in an Australian tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kara; Belton, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    Medical photography illustrates what people would prefer to keep private, is practiced when people are vulnerable, and has the power to freeze a moment in time. Given it is a sensitive area of health, lawful and ethical practice is paramount. This paper recognises and seeks to clarify the possibility of widespread clinician-taken medical photography in a tertiary hospital in northern Australia, examining the legal and ethical implications of this practice. A framework of Northern Territory law, state Department of Health policy and human rights theory were used to argue the thesis. Clinicians from 13 purposively chosen wards were asked to participate in an anonymous survey and confidential in-depth interviews. Questions were generated from the literature and local knowledge on the topics of 'occurrence', 'image use', 'quality of consent', 'cameras and technology', 'confidentiality', 'data storage and security', 'hospital policy and law' and 'cultural issues'. One hundred and seventy surveys and eights interviews were analysed using descriptive statistics and theme and content analysis, then triangulated for similarity, difference and unique responses. Forty-eight percent of clinicians surveyed take medical photographs, with the majority using hospital-owned cameras. However, one-fifth of clinicians reported photographing with personal mobile phones. Non-compliance with written consent requirements articulated in policy was endemic, with most clinicians surveyed obtaining only verbal consent. Labeling, storage, copyright and cultural issues were generally misunderstood, with a significant number of clinicians risking the security of patient information by storing images on personal devices. If this tertiary hospital does not develop a clinical photography action plan to address staff lack of knowledge, and noncompliance with policy and mobile phone use, patients' data is at risk of being distributed into the public domain where unauthorised publication may cause

  13. PC-Cluster based Storage System Architecture for Cloud Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Tin Tin; Naing, Thinn Thu

    2011-01-01

    Design and architecture of cloud storage system plays a vital role in cloud computing infrastructure in order to improve the storage capacity as well as cost effectiveness. Usually cloud storage system provides users to efficient storage space with elasticity feature. One of the challenges of cloud storage system is difficult to balance the providing huge elastic capacity of storage and investment of expensive cost for it. In order to solve this issue in the cloud storage infrastructure, low ...

  14. Large mass storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    The report of a committee to study the questions surrounding possible acquisition of a large mass-storage device is presented. The current computing environment at BNL and justification for an online large mass storage device are briefly discussed. Possible devices to meet the requirements of large mass storage are surveyed, including future devices. The future computing needs of BNL are prognosticated. 2 figures, 4 tables

  15. CLINICAL SPECTRUM OF HYPONATRAEMIA IN TERTIARY CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chincholi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hyponatraemia is defined as a serum sodium level less than 135 mEq/L. High mortality among the patients of hyponatraemia is secondary to the underlying medical condition. Frequency is high in elderly patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted at a tertiary care centre (Basaveshwar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, from the period September 2014 to August 2016. These patients were evaluated for the underlying cause of hyponatraemia, which included detailed history and physical examination followed by appropriate laboratory investigations. Patients were followed up till the hyponatraemia was treated or patients were discharged from the hospital. RESULTS 100 patients of hyponatraemia were included in the study. 46% of the patients were asymptomatic. 33% patients had lethargy, 28% patients had postural dizziness and 19% had abnormal behaviour. Overall incidence of hyponatraemia was 4.58% in the hospitalised population, whereas its incidence in ICU patients was 22.4%. Twelve patients of symptomatic severe hyponatraemia were treated with hypertonic saline infusion, 25% patients were given loop diuretics with oral supplementation of sodium chloride for free water excretion in SIADH cases and in patients with hypervolaemia, hyponatraemia, fluid restriction was advised to 44 patients, oral supplementation of sodium chloride was given in 36 patients and 64 patients received normal saline. 9 patients included in the study died, 5 of which had advanced cirrhosis of liver as underlying cause. One patient developed Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome (ODS. CONCLUSION The possible cause of hyponatraemia should always be sought as outcome in severe hyponatraemia is governed by aetiology, and not by the serum sodium level. Treatment of severe symptomatic hyponatraemia with hypertonic saline is safe if recommendation for the rate of correction of hyponatraemia is strictly followed.

  16. Carbon isotope geochemistry of the Cretaceous-Tertiary section of the Wasserfallgraben, Lattengebirge, southeast Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneth, J.D.; Matzigkeit, U.; Boos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Carbonates and organic matter in sediments of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (C/T) section of the Wasserfallgraben, Lattengebirge (Bavaria) have been investigated. All parameters - the carbonate content (Csub(carb)), its isotopic composition (delta 13 Csub(carb),delta 18 Osub(carb)) as well as the organic carbon content (Csub(org)), its isotopic composition (delta 13 Csub(org)) and the H/C ratio of the sedimentary organic matter - display systematic variations across the C/T boundary which cannot be attributed to a single cause. The boundary zone as a whole is tectonically disturbed and shows significant features of detrital contaminations. Unidirectional shift in delta 13 Csub(carb) and delta 13 Csub(org) are observed when directly comparing Maastrichtian (latest Cretaceous) and Danian (earliest Tertiary) sediments. These synchronous isotope displacements towards more negative readings are interpreted to reflect the reduced photosynthetic activity as consequence of the mass extinction at the C/T boundary. The results may have some bearings on other C/T profiles investigated where measurements on the reduced carbon species are still lacking. (orig.)

  17. Benchmarking Cloud Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of cloud computing, many cloud storage systems like Dropbox, Google Drive and Mega have been built to provide decentralized and reliable file storage. It is thus of prime importance to know their features, performance, and the best way to make use of them. In this context, we introduce BenchCloud, a tool designed as part of this thesis to conveniently and efficiently benchmark any cloud storage system. First, we provide a study of six commonly-used cloud storage systems to ident...

  18. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  19. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby

    2010-01-01

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  20. A new storage-ring light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  1. Evaluation of effects of phenol recovery on biooxidation and tertiary treatment of SRC-I wastewater. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Watt, J.C.; Cowan, W.F.; Schuyler, S.E.

    1983-09-01

    Addition of phenol recovery to the wastewater treatment scheme in the Baseline Design for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant was evaluated as a major post-Baseline effort. Phenol recovery affects many downstream processes, but this study was designed to assess primarily its effects on biooxidation and subsequent tertiary treatment. Two parallel treatment schemes were set up, one to treat dephenolated wastewaters and the other for processed nondephenolated wastewaters, a simulation of the Baseline Design. The study focused on comparisons of five areas: effluent quality; system stability; the need for continuous, high-dose powdered activated carbon (PAC) augmentation to the bioreactor; minimum bioreactor hydraulic residence time (HRT); and tertiary treatment requirements. The results show that phenol recovery improves the quality of the bioreactor effluent in terms of residual organics and color. With phenol recovery, PAC augmentation is not required; without phenol recovery, PAC is needed to produce a comparable effluent. Dephenolization also enhances the stability of biooxidation, and reduces the minimum HRT required. With tertiary treatment, both schemes can meet the effluent concentrations published in the SRC-I Final Envivornmental Impact Statement, as well as the anticipated effluent limits. However, phenol recovery does provide a wider safety margin and could eliminate the need for some of the tertiary treatment steps. Based solely on the technical merits observed in this study, phenol recovery is recommended. The final selection should, however, also consider economic tradeoffs and results of other studies such as toxicology testing of the effluents. 34 references, 30 figures and 26 tables.

  2. Water Storage: Quo Vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smakhtin, V.

    2017-12-01

    Humans stored water - in various forms - for ages, coping with water resources variability, and its extremes - floods and droughts. Storage per capita, and other storage-related indicators, have essentially become one way of reflecting the progress of economic development. Massive investments went into large surface water reservoirs that have become the characteristic feature of the earth's landscapes, bringing both benefits and controversy. As water variability progressively increases with changing climate, globally, on one hand, and the idea of sustainable development receives strong traction, on another - it may be worth the while to comprehensively examine current trends and future prospects for water storage development. The task is surely big, to say the least. The presentation will aim to initiate a structured discussion on this multi-facet issue and identify which aspects and trends of water storage development may be most important in the context of Sustainable Development Goals, Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, Paris Agreement on Climate Change, and examine how, where and to what extent water storage planning can be improved. It will cover questions like i) aging of large water storage infrastructure, the current extent of this trend in various geographical regions, and possible impacts on water security and security of nations; ii) improved water storage development planning overall in the context of various water development alternatives and storage options themselves and well as their combinations iii) prospects for another "storage revolution" - speed increase in dam numbers, and where, if at all this is most likely iv) recent events in storage development, e.g. is dam decommissioning a trend that picks pace, or whether some developing economies in Asia can do without going through the period of water storage construction, with alternatives, or suggestions for alleviation of negative impacts v) the role of subsurface storage as an

  3. Cool episodes in Early Tertiary Arctic climate: Evidence from Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielhagen, R. F.; Tripati, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Arctic is a climatically sensitive and important region. However, very little is known about the climatic and oceanographic evolution of the area, particularly prior to the Neogene. Until recently, the Arctic was assumed to be characterized by relatively warm conditions during the early Cenozoic. The Early Tertiary sedimentary sequence on Svalbard contains several layers with coal seams and broad-leaved plants which were commonly accepted as indicators of a generally temperate-warm climate. Here we report on the intermittent occurrence of certain temperature indicators in the succession, which may represent the first northern high-latitude record of near-freezing temperatures for the early Cenozoic. Besides the findings of probably ice-rafted erratic clasts in the Paleocene and Eocene sandstones and shales, we note especially the occurrence of glendonites which are pseudomorphs of calcite after ikaite (calcium carbonate hexahydrate). We measured the chemical composition of Svalbard glendonites which is almost identical to that of similar pseudomorphs from the Lower Cretaceaous of Northern Canada. Mass spectrometric analyses of the glendonite calcite gave very low carbon isotope values. These values suggest a provenance of the calcium carbonate from marine organic carbon and connect our glendonites to the precursor mineral ikaite which has similar low values. Since a variety of studies has demonstrated that ikaite is stable only at temperatures close to freezing point, we have to infer low temperatures also for the deepositional environment of which the sediments were deposited that now hold glendonites. These results imply the occurrence of cooling phases episodically during the warm background climate of the Paleocene and Eocene, suggesting that temperature variability was much greater than previously recognized.

  4. Properties of thermoplastic polymers used for hydrogen storage under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jousse, F.; Mazabraud, P.; Icard, B.; Mosdale, R.; Serre-Combe, P.

    2000-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen is one of the points of development of industrial applications of fuel cells of type PEMFC ( Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell). Developing an effective system of storage remains major. Ameliorations concerning the storage density of energy, the cost and facilities and the storage must be considered especially for the mobile applications. Among different approaches possible, the absorption on carbon nanotubes, the production by hydrides in the organic solutions or storage hyperbar in the gas state seem the most promising way. The storage of hydrogen gas at ambient temperature today appears as the simplest technical solution, the most advanced and the most economic solution. However, the energy density of hydrogen being weaker than that of the traditional fuels, of the quantities more important must be stored at equivalent rate. Hyperbar storage (higher pressure has 350 bar) of hydrogen makes it possible to reduce the volume of the tanks and strengthens the argument for their weights and cost

  5. Value and cost analyses for solar thermal-storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luft, W.; Copeland, R.J.

    1983-04-01

    Value and cost data for thermal energy storage are presented for solar thermal central receiver systems for which thermal energy storage appears to be attractive. Both solar thermal electric power and industrial process heat applications are evaluated. The value of storage is based on the cost for fossil fuel and solar thermal collector systems in 1990. The costing uses a standard lifetime methodology with the storage capacity as a parameter. Both value and costs are functions of storage capacity. However, the value function depends on the application. Value/cost analyses for first-generation storage concepts for five central receiver systems (molten salt, water/steam, organic fluid, air, and liquid metal) established the reference against which new systems were compared. Some promising second-generation energy storage concepts have been identified, and some more advanced concepts have also been evaluated.

  6. Patterns of Antimicrobial Prescribing in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Al-Yamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been designed to measure and improve the use of antimicrobials to achieve optimal clinical outcomes and reduce bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to review patterns of antimicrobial prescribing for hospitalized patients in the acute care setting and assess the appropriateness of antimicrobial use among prescribers in a tertiary care hospital in Oman. Methods: We conducted a retrospective audit of the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing in patients admitted to acute care settings in a tertiary care hospital in Oman over a four-week period (1 November to 28 November 2012. The data of all discharged patients were retrieved from the department databases. Patient records and prescriptions were reviewed by an infectious disease consultant. The rationality of antimicrobial use was evaluated, analyzed, and judged based on local standard guidelines and the experience of the evaluating consultant. Results: There were 178 patients discharged from acute medical teams over the study period. Sixty-four percent of the patients received a total of 287 antimicrobial agents during admission. The average number of antimicrobials prescribed per patient in those prescribed antimicrobials was 2.5±1.1. The most commonly prescribed antimicrobial agent was piperacillin/tazobactam. Most patients had infections from gram-negative organisms, and high rates of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing organisms were observed. Cultures were obtained before antimicrobial initiation in 25% of patients. Variability in antimicrobial selection for common infections was observed. Conclusions: National guidelines for the management of common infections are needed to minimize the overuse and misuse of antimicrobial agents in tertiary care hospitals. A large surveillance study on antimicrobial prescribing appropriateness in different hospital settings is warranted.

  7. Load leveling of the Tohoku Electric Power Co. Development of ice storage cold-water manufacturing unit/solid organic waste treatment equipment using midnight power for cold district; Tohoku Denryoku no fuka heijunka. Kori chikunetsu reisui seizo unit no kaihatsu, shin`ya denryoku riyo kanreichi muke kokei yuki haikibutsu shori sochi no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    An ice storage cold-water manufacturing unit that can manufacture cold water at a stable temperature near 0degC by using midnight power and a solid organic waste treatment facility were developed. The high-speed melting of ice is required to stabilize the cold-water temperature. Therefore, experimental investigation was performed. A piece of flake-shaped ice whose surface area and storage quality are balanced was used. A system that melts ice using the melting tank installed outside an icebox, and a high-speed melting system of ice based on the mixing unit installed in a melting tank were also used together. In the validation test of a prototype for smaller food factories, the following was confirmed. Manufacturing of cold water at about 1degC, amount of cooled water, stability of output water temperature for a change in water temperature, and good storage of ice in an icebox. In the prototype developed for a solid organic waste treatment facility, satisfactory performance was confirmed for following. Temperature in a fermenter when wastes were put, moisture content in a fermenter, pH value, net loss when the refuse of fish is put, and saving of an electricity rate. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Energy Storage Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgqvist, Emma M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-07

    This presentation provides an overview on energy storage economics including recent market trends, battery terminology and concepts, value streams, challenges, and an example of how photovoltaics and storage can be used to lower demand charges. It also provides an overview of the REopt Lite web tool inputs and outputs.

  9. System for secure storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    A system (100) comprising read means (112) for reading content data and control logic data from a storage medium (101), the control logic data being uniquely linked to the storage medium (101), processing means (113-117), for processing the content data and feeding the processed content data to an

  10. Grain Handling and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Troy G.; Minor, John

    This text for a secondary- or postecondary-level course in grain handling and storage contains ten chapters. Chapter titles are (1) Introduction to Grain Handling and Storage, (2) Elevator Safety, (3) Grain Grading and Seed Identification, (4) Moisture Control, (5) Insect and Rodent Control, (6) Grain Inventory Control, (7) Elevator Maintenance,…

  11. Wind-energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    Program SIMWEST can model wind energy storage system using any combination of five types of storage: pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel, and pneumatic. Program is tool to aid design of optional system for given application with realistic simulation for further evaluation and verification.

  12. Red Blood Cell Storage Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl J. Kor

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have witnessed increased scrutiny regarding efficacy and risk of the once unquestioned therapy of red blood cell (RBC transfusion. Simultaneously, a variety of changes have been identified within the RBC and storage media during RBC preservation that are correlated with reduced tissue oxygenation and transfusion-associated adverse effects. These alterations are collectively termed the storage lesion and include extensive biochemical, biomechanical, and immunologic changes involving cells of diverse origin. Time-dependent falls is 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, intracellular RBC adenosine triphosphate, and nitric oxide have been shown to impact RBC deformability and delivery of oxygen to the end-organ. The accumulation of biologic response modifiers such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC, and Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES have been associated with altered recipient immune function as well. This review will address the alterations occurring within the RBC and storage media during RBC preservation and will address the potential clinical consequence thereof.

  13. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  14. ERDA's Chemical Energy Storage Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, J. H.; Kelley, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Chemical Energy Storage Program is described with emphasis on hydrogen storage. Storage techniques considered include pressurized hydrogen gas storage, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage, storage in hydride compounds, and aromatic-alicyclic hydrogen storage. Some uses of energy storage are suggested. Information on hydrogen production and hydrogen use is also presented. Applications of hydrogen energy systems include storage of hydrogen for utilities load leveling, industrial marketing of hydrogen both as a chemical and as a fuel, natural gas supplementation, vehicular applications, and direct substitution for natural gas.

  15. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  16. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  17. Electricity Storage. Technology Brief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbolotti, G. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development ENEA, Rome (Italy); Kempener, R. [International Renewable Energy Agency IRENA, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Electricity storage is a key technology for electricity systems with a high share of renewables as it allows electricity to be generated when renewable sources (i.e. wind, sunlight) are available and to be consumed on demand. It is expected that the increasing price of fossil fuels and peak-load electricity and the growing share of renewables will result in electricity storage to grow rapidly and become more cost effective. However, electricity storage is technically challenging because electricity can only be stored after conversion into other forms of energy, and this involves expensive equipment and energy losses. At present, the only commercial storage option is pumped hydro power where surplus electricity (e.g. electricity produced overnight by base-load coal or nuclear power) is used to pump water from a lower to an upper reservoir. The stored energy is then used to produce hydropower during daily high-demand periods. Pumped hydro plants are large-scale storage systems with a typical efficiency between 70% and 80%, which means that a quarter of the energy is lost in the process. Other storage technologies with different characteristics (i.e. storage process and capacity, conversion back to electricity and response to power demand, energy losses and costs) are currently in demonstration or pre-commercial stages and discussed in this brief report: Compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems, Flywheels; Electrical batteries; Supercapacitors; Superconducting magnetic storage; and Thermal energy storage. No single electricity storage technology scores high in all dimensions. The technology of choice often depends on the size of the system, the specific service, the electricity sources and the marginal cost of peak electricity. Pumped hydro currently accounts for 95% of the global storage capacity and still offers a considerable expansion potential but does not suit residential or small-size applications. CAES expansion is limited due to the lack of suitable

  18. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  19. Compact nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.; Churakov, Yu.A.; Danchenko, Yu.V.; Bylkin, B.K.; Tsvetkov, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Different constructions of racks for compact storage of spent fuel assemblies (FA) in ''coolin''g pools (CP) of NPPs with the BWR and PWR type reactors are described. Problems concerning nuclear and radiation safety and provision of necessary thermal conditions arising in such rack design are discussed. It is concluded that the problem of prolonged fuel storage at NPPs became Very actual for many countries because of retapdation of the rates of fuel reprocessing centers building. Application of compact storage racks is a promising solution of the problem of intermediate FA storage at NPPs. Such racks of stainless boron steel and with neutron absorbers in the from of boron carbide panels enable to increase the capacity of the present CP 2-2.6 times, and the period of FA storage in them up to 5-10 years

  20. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-02-28

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storage applications, but later on it was found to be unable to store enough amounts of hydrogen under ambient conditions. New arrangements of carbon nanotubes were constructed and hydrogen sorption properties were investigated using state-of-the-art simulation methods. The simulations indicate outstanding total hydrogen uptake (up to 19.0 wt.% at 77 K and 5.52wt.% at 300 K), which makes these materials excellent candidates for storage applications. This reopens the carbon route to superior materials for a hydrogen-based economy. Zeolite imidazolate frameworks are subclass of MOFs with an exceptional chemical and thermal stability. The hydrogen adsorption in ZIFs was investigated as a function of network geometry and organic linker exchange. Ab initio calculations performed at the MP2 level to obtain correct interaction energies between hydrogen molecules and the ZIF framework. Subsequently, GCMC simulations are carried out to obtain the hydrogen uptake of ZIFs at different thermodynamic conditions. The best of these materials (ZIF-8) is found to be able to store up to 5 wt.% at 77 K and high pressure. We expected possible improvement of hydrogen capacity of ZIFs by substituting the metal atom (Zn{sup 2+}) in the structure by lighter elements such as B or Li. Therefore, we investigated the energy landscape of LiB(IM)4 polymorphs in detail and analyzed their hydrogen storage capacities. The structure with the fau topology was shown to be one of the best materials for hydrogen storage. Its

  1. Electricity storage using a thermal storage scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Alexander, E-mail: ajw36@cam.ac.uk [Hopkinson Laboratory, Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge. CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-22

    The increasing use of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation, many of which have an unpredictably intermittent nature, will inevitably lead to a greater demand for large-scale electricity storage schemes. For example, the expanding fraction of electricity produced by wind turbines will require either backup or storage capacity to cover extended periods of wind lull. This paper describes a recently proposed storage scheme, referred to here as Pumped Thermal Storage (PTS), and which is based on “sensible heat” storage in large thermal reservoirs. During the charging phase, the system effectively operates as a high temperature-ratio heat pump, extracting heat from a cold reservoir and delivering heat to a hot one. In the discharge phase the processes are reversed and it operates as a heat engine. The round-trip efficiency is limited only by process irreversibilities (as opposed to Second Law limitations on the coefficient of performance and the thermal efficiency of the heat pump and heat engine respectively). PTS is currently being developed in both France and England. In both cases, the schemes operate on the Joule-Brayton (gas turbine) cycle, using argon as the working fluid. However, the French scheme proposes the use of turbomachinery for compression and expansion, whereas for that being developed in England reciprocating devices are proposed. The current paper focuses on the impact of the various process irreversibilities on the thermodynamic round-trip efficiency of the scheme. Consideration is given to compression and expansion losses and pressure losses (in pipe-work, valves and thermal reservoirs); heat transfer related irreversibility in the thermal reservoirs is discussed but not included in the analysis. Results are presented demonstrating how the various loss parameters and operating conditions influence the overall performance.

  2. Behavior of spent nuclear fuel and storage system components in dry interim storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been handled under dry conditions since the early days of nuclear reactor operation, and use of dry storage facilities for extended management of irradiated fuel began in 1964. Irradiated fuel is currently being stored dry in four types of facilities: dry wells, vaults, silos, and metal casks. Essentially all types of irradiated nuclear fuel are currently stored under dry conditions. Gas-cooled reactor (GCR) and liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuels are stored in vaults and dry wells. Certain types of fuel are being stored in licensed dry storage facilities: Magnox fuel in vaults in the United Kingdom and organic-cooled reactor (OCR) fuel in silos in Canada. Dry storage demonstrations are under way for Zircaloy-clad fuel from boiling water reactors BWR's, pressurized heavy-water reactors (PHWRs), and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in all four types of dry storage facilities. The demonstrations and related hot cell and laboratory tests are directed toward expanding the data base and establishing a licensing basis for dry storage of water reactor fuel. This report reviews the scope of dry interim storage technology, the performance of fuel and facility materials, the status of programs in several countries to license dry storage of water reactor fuel, and the characteristics of water reactor fuel that relate to dry storage conditions.

  3. Survey of experience with dry storage of spent nuclear fuel and update of wet storage experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Spent fuel storage is an important part of spent fuel management. At present about 45,000 t of spent water reactor fuel have been discharged worldwide. Only a small fraction of this fuel (approximately 7%) has been reprocessed. The amount of spent fuel arisings will increase significantly in the next 15 years. Estimates indicate that up to the year 2000 about 200,000 t HM of spent fuel could be accumulated. In view of the large quantities of spent fuel discharged from nuclear power plants and future expected discharges, many countries are involved in the construction of facilities for the storage of spent fuel and in the development of effective methods for spent fuel surveillance and monitoring to ensure that reliable and safe operation of storage facilities is achievable until the time when the final disposal of spent fuel or high level wastes is feasible. The first demonstrations of final disposal are not expected before the years 2000-2020. This is why the long term storage of spent fuel and HLW is a vital problem for all countries with nuclear power programmes. The present survey contains data on dry storage and recent information on wet storage, transportation, rod consolidation, etc. The main aim is to provide spent fuel management policy making organizations, designers, scientists and spent fuel storage facility operators with the latest information on spent fuel storage technology under dry and wet conditions and on innovations in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Behavior of spent nuclear fuel and storage-system components in dry interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been handled under dry conditions since the early days of nuclear reactor operation, and use of dry storage facilities for extended management of irradiated fuel began in 1964. Irradiated fuel is currently being stored dry in four types of facilities: dry wells, vaults, silos, and metal casks. Essentially all types of irradiated nuclear fuel are currently stored under dry conditions. Gas-cooled reactor (GCR) and liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuels are stored in vaults and dry wells. Certain types of fuel are being stored in licensed dry storage facilities: Magnox fuel in vaults in the United Kingdom and organic-cooled reactor (OCR) fuel in silos in Canada. Dry storage demonstrations are under way for Zircaloy-clad fuel from boiling water reactors BWR's, pressurized heavy-water reactors (PHWRs), and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in all four types of dry storage facilities. The demonstrations and related hot cell and laboratory tests are directed toward expanding the data base and establishing a licensing basis for dry storage of water reactor fuel. This report reviews the scope of dry interim storage technology, the performance of fuel and facility materials, the status of programs in several countries to license dry storage of water reactor fuel, and the characteristics of water reactor fuel that relate to dry storage conditions

  5. Transparent Distribution in a Storage Manager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Karlsson; M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractScalable Distributed Data Structures (SDDSs) provide a self-managing and self-organizing data storage of potentially unbounded size. This stands in contrast to common distribution schemas deployed in conventional distributed DBMS. SDDSs, however, have mostly been used in synthetic

  6. Advantages of storage in a fluctuating environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.W.; Troost, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    We will elaborate the evolutionary course of an ecosystem consisting of a population in a chemostat environment with periodically fluctuating nutrient supply. The organisms that make up the population consist of structural biomass and energy storage compartments. In a constant chemostat environment

  7. Defining proximity relationships in the tertiary structure of the dopamine transporter. Identification of a conserved glutamic acid as a third coordinate in the endogenous Zn(2+)-binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løland, Claus Juul; Norregaard, L; Gether, U

    1999-01-01

    , high affinity Zn(2+)-binding site. To achieve further insight into the tertiary organization of hDAT, we set out to identify additional residues involved in Zn(2+) binding and subsequently to engineer artificial Zn(2+)-binding sites. Ten aspartic acids and glutamic acids, predicted...

  8. Hybrid radical energy storage device and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Ginley, David S; Braunecker, Wade; Ban, Chunmei; Owczarczyk, Zbyslaw

    2015-01-27

    Hybrid radical energy storage devices, such as batteries or electrochemical devices, and methods of use and making are disclosed. Also described herein are electrodes and electrolytes useful in energy storage devices, for example, radical polymer cathode materials and electrolytes for use in organic radical batteries.

  9. Effect of different storage temperatures on bacterial spoilage of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the bacterial organisms associated with Oreochromis niloticus spoilage at two storage temperatures (6 and 20°C) and also assessed the ability of the individual bacterial isolates to cause spoilage at the two storage temperatures. Bacteriological analysis revealed the association of five bacteria ...

  10. The storage center of very-low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The low level radioactive wastes have a radioactivity level as same as the natural radioactivity. This wastes category and their storage has been taken into account by the french legislation. This document presents the storage principles of the site, containment, safety and the Center organization. (A.L.B.)

  11. Mechanisms of carbon storage in mountainous headwater rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen Wohl; Kathleen Dwire; Nicholas Sutfin; Lina Polvi; Roberto Bazan

    2012-01-01

    Published research emphasizes rapid downstream export of terrestrial carbon from mountainous headwater rivers, but little work focuses on mechanisms that create carbon storage along these rivers, or on the volume of carbon storage. Here we estimate organic carbon stored in diverse valley types of headwater rivers in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, USA. We show that...

  12. Primary energy savings using heat storage for biomass heating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Dejan M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available District heating is an efficient way to provide heat to residential, tertiary and industrial users. The heat storage unit is an insulated water tank that absorbs surplus heat from the boiler. The stored heat in the heat storage unit makes it possible to heat even when the boiler is not working, thus increasing the heating efficiency. In order to save primary energy (fuel, the boiler operates on nominal load every time it is in operation (for the purpose of this research. The aim of this paper is to analyze the water temperature variation in the heat storage, depending on the heat load and the heat storage volume. Heat load is calculated for three reference days, with average daily temperatures from -5 to 5°C. The primary energy savings are also calculated for those days in the case of using heat storage in district heating.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 33051: The concept of sustainable energy supply of settlements with energy efficient buildings

  13. Removal of micropollutants during tertiary wastewater treatment by biofiltration: Role of nitrifiers and removal mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattier, M; Reungoat, J; Keller, J; Gernjak, W

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which a suite of organic micropollutants (MPs) can be removed by biological filtration and the role of bioavailability and ammonia oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs) in the biodegradation process. During approximately one year, laboratory-scale columns with 8 min empty bed contact time (EBCT) and packed with anthracite as filter media were used for treating a tertiary effluent spiked with a broad range of MPs at a target concentration of 2 μg L(-1). In parallel columns, aerobic biomass growth was inhibited by using either the biocide sodium azide (500 mg L(-1) NaN3) or allylthiourea (5 mg L(-1) ATU), specifically inhibiting nitrifying bacteria. Once the biomass had colonized the media, around 15% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contained in the untreated tertiary effluent was removed by non-inhibited columns. The removal of several MPs increased over time indicating the relevance of biological activity for the removal of MPs, while the negative control, the NaN3 inhibited column, showed no significant removal. Out of 33 MPs, 19 were recalcitrant (granular activated carbon (GAC) and their removal efficiency by biodegradation on anthracite was observed. This result suggested that the affinity of the MPs for GAC media could be a useful indicator of the bioavailability of compounds during biofiltration on anthracite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ectopic Tertiary Lymphoid Tissue in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Protective or Provocateur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eoin Neil McNamee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Organized lymphoid tissues like the thymus first appeared in jawed vertebrates around 500 million years ago and have evolved to equip the host with a network of specialized sites, strategically located to orchestrate strict immune-surveillance and efficient immune responses autonomously. The gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT maintain a mostly tolerant environment to dampen our responses to daily dietary and microbial products in the intestine. However, when this homeostasis is perturbed by chronic inflammation, the intestine is able to develop florid organized tertiary lymphoid tissues (TLT, which heralds the onset of regional immune dysregulation. While TLT are a pathologic hallmark of Crohn’s disease (CD, their role in the overall process remains largely enigmatic. A critical question remains; are intestinal TLT generated by the immune infiltrated intestine to modulate immune responses and rebuild tolerance to the microbiota or are they playing a more sinister role by generating dysregulated responses that perpetuate disease? Herein we discuss the main theories of intestinal tertiary lymphoid tissue neogenesis and focus on the most recent findings that open new perspectives to their role in inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  16. Storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Even if the best waste minimization measures are undertaken throughout radioisotope production or usage, significant radioactive wastes arise to make management measures essential. For developing countries with low isotope usage and little or no generation of nuclear materials, it may be possible to handle the generated waste by simply practicing decay storage for several half-lives of the radionuclides involved, followed by discharge or disposal without further processing. For those countries with much larger facilities, longer lived isotopes are produced and used. In this situation, storage is used not only for decay storage but also for in-process retention steps and for the key stage of interim storage of conditioned wastes pending final disposal. The report will serve as a technical manual providing reference material and direct step-by-step know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in the developing Member States without nuclear power generation. Considerations are limited to the simpler storage facilities. The restricted quantities and low activity associated with the relevant wastes will generally permit contact-handling and avoid the need for shielding requirements in the storage facilities or equipment used for handling. A small quantity of wastes from some radioisotope production cells and from reactor cooling water treatment may contain sufficient short lived activity from activated corrosion products to require some separate decay storage before contact-handling is suitable. 16 refs, 12 figs, 8 tabs

  17. Aflatoxins & Safe Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eVillers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb before versus after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field versus after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described.

  18. The equity imperative in tertiary education: Promoting fairness and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil; Bassett, Roberta Malee

    2014-06-01

    While the share of the tertiary education age cohort (19-25) which is being given the opportunity to study has increased worldwide over the past two decades, this does not in fact translate into reduced inequality. For many young people, especially in the developing world, major obstacles such as disparities in terms of gender, minority population membership or disabilities as well as academic and financial barriers are still standing in their way. The authors of this article propose a conceptual framework to analyse equity issues in tertiary education and document the scope, significance and consequences of disparities in tertiary education opportunities. They throw some light on the main determinants of these inequalities and offer suggestions about effective equity promotion policies directed towards widening participation and improving the chances of success of underprivileged youths in order to create societies which uphold humanistic values.

  19. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed

  20. Magnox waste storage complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This article looks at the design and construction of British Nuclear Fuel Limited's (BNFL) Magnox waste storage complex by Costain Engineering Limited. Magnox swarf from fuel decanning is stored underwater in specially designed silos. Gas processing capabilities from Costain Engineering Limited and the experience of BNFL combined in this project to provide the necessary problem-solving skills necessary for this waste storage upgrading and extension project. A retrofitted inerting facility was fitted to an existing building and a new storage extension was fitted, both without interrupting reprocessing operations at Sellafield. (UK)

  1. Tiered Storage For LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Hanushevsky, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    For more than a year, the ATLAS Western Tier 2 (WT2) at SLAC National Accelerator has been successfully operating a two tiered storage system based on Xrootd's flexible cross-cluster data placement framework, the File Residency Manager. The architecture allows WT2 to provide both, high performance storage at the higher tier to ATLAS analysis jobs, as well as large, low cost disk capacity at the lower tier. Data automatically moves between the two storage tiers based on the needs of analysis jobs and is completely transparent to the jobs.

  2. Next generation storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    With diminishing requirements for plutonium, a substantial quantity of this material requires special handling and ultimately, long-term storage. To meet this objective, we at Los Alamos, have been involved in the design of a storage facility with the goal of providing storage capabilities for this and other nuclear materials. This paper presents preliminary basic design data, not for the structure and physical plant, but for the container and arrays which might be configured within the facility, with strong emphasis on criticality safety features

  3. Monitored retrievable storage design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) established a national policy for the safe storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA requires that DOE... ''submit a proposal to Congress on the need for and feasibility of one or more Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facilities''... In subsequent evaluations of the commercial nuclear waste management system, DOE has identified important advantages in providing an MRS Facility as an integral part of the total system. The integral MRS Facility serves as an independent, centralized spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste handling and packaging facility with a safe temporary storage capacity

  4. Spatio-temporal observations of the tertiary ozone maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We present spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum (TOM, based on GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars ozone measurements in 2002–2006. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically observed in the high-latitude winter mesosphere at an altitude of ~72 km. Although the explanation for this phenomenon has been found recently – low concentrations of odd-hydrogen cause the subsequent decrease in odd-oxygen losses – models have had significant deviations from existing observations until recently. Good coverage of polar night regions by GOMOS data has allowed for the first time to obtain spatial and temporal observational distributions of night-time ozone mixing ratio in the mesosphere.

    The distributions obtained from GOMOS data have specific features, which are variable from year to year. In particular, due to a long lifetime of ozone in polar night conditions, the downward transport of polar air by the meridional circulation is clearly observed in the tertiary ozone maximum time series. Although the maximum tertiary ozone mixing ratio is achieved close to the polar night terminator (as predicted by the theory, TOM can be observed also at very high latitudes, not only in the beginning and at the end, but also in the middle of winter. We have compared the observational spatio-temporal distributions of the tertiary ozone maximum with that obtained using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model and found that the specific features are reproduced satisfactorily by the model.

    Since ozone in the mesosphere is very sensitive to HOx concentrations, energetic particle precipitation can significantly modify the shape of the ozone profiles. In particular, GOMOS observations have shown that the tertiary ozone maximum was temporarily destroyed during the January 2005 and December 2006 solar proton events as a result of the HOx enhancement from the increased ionization.

  5. Storage-ring FEL for the vuv

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.M.; Bisognano, J.J.; Garren, A.A.; Halbach, K.; Kim, K.J.; Sah, R.C.

    1984-09-01

    A free-electron laser for the vuv operating in a storage ring requires an electron beam of high density and low energy spread and a short wavelength, narrow-gap undulator. These conditions tend to produce longitudinal and transverse beam instabilities, excessive beam growth through multiple intrabeam scattering, and a short gas-scattering lifetime. Passing the beam only occasionally through the undulator in a by-pass straight section, as proposed by Murphy and Pellegrini, allows operation in a high-gain, single-pass mode and a long gas-scattering lifetime. Several storage ring designs have been considered to see how best to satisfy the several requirements. Each features a by-pass, a low-emittance lattice, and built-in wigglers for enhanced damping to counteract the intra-beam scattering. 15 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  6. The effect of storage on Physical, Chemical and Bacteriological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Ten (10) different companies' water samples each of bottled water (B) and ... after storage as with other chemical element except that lead showed ... Although it is true that soil generally ... organic pollutants, heavy metals and radioactive.

  7. Hybrid dual gate ferroelectric memory for multilevel information storage

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser; Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus Alfonso; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report hybrid organic/inorganic ferroelectric memory with multilevel information storage using transparent p-type SnO semiconductor and ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) polymer. The dual gate devices include a top ferroelectric field

  8. Discovery of tertiary sulfonamides as potent liver X receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, William J; Buckholz, Richard G; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L; Galardi, Cristin M; Gampe, Robert T; Hyatt, Stephen M; Merrihew, Susan L; Moore, John T; Oplinger, Jeffrey A; Reid, Paul R; Spearing, Paul K; Stanley, Thomas B; Stewart, Eugene L; Willson, Timothy M

    2010-04-22

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  9. Usability of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a tertiary memory clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.; Bahl, J.C.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assays for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid 1-42 have been available for some years. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of these biomarkers in a mixed population of tertiary dementia referral patients in a university-based memory......, the sensitivity of a single abnormal value was between 33 and 66%. The specificity was high except when discriminating AD from amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Two or more abnormal markers further increased the specificity and decreased the sensitivity. CONCLUSION: In a tertiary setting, abnormal CSF biomarker...

  10. Sexual harassment in tertiary institutions: A comparative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Janice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual harassment is not a new phenomenon in tertiary institutions. It has been receiving considerable attention in research and the media and public awareness has increased dramatically. However, the term sexual harassment is not used uniformly across the globe because countries have defined it differently. Consequently, prevalence of sexual harassment in education varies across cultures. This paper examines sexual harassment from a comparative perspective. It specifically focuses on the definition of sexual harassment, incidence of sexual harassment of students in tertiary institutions, effects of sexual harassment on victims; and victims’ responses to sexual harassment. It also offers suggestions for curtailing sexual harassment in these institutions.

  11. Evaluation of pneumococcal vaccination rates after vaccine protocol changes and nurse education in a tertiary care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer G; Metzger, Nicole L

    2011-11-01

    Pneumococcal vaccination in eligible patients is recommended by the Infectious Disease Society of America and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Because hospitalization provides an opportunity to vaccinate patients at high risk for developing serious pneumonia complications, eligibility screening and administration of the pneumococcal vaccine prior to discharge in qualified patients are evaluated by the Joint Commission and the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services (CMS) as part of pneumococcal vaccination core quality measures. Among patients with an inpatient diagnosis of pneumonia in 2008, 56% in our 580-bed tertiary care teaching hospital, compared with 84% nationwide, received pneumococcal vaccination. To improve pneumococcal vaccination rates for all patients in the study facility and not just those with pneumonia, a multifaceted intervention including a revised nurse screening tool, rescheduling of the vaccine order, storage of the vaccine in automated dispensing cabinets on the nursing unit, and creation of a vaccine tracking system was developed and implemented between August 2009 and October 2009. To determine the impact of a multifaceted intervention on pneumococcal vaccine screening and administration rates in eligible patients according to the CDC recommendations who were admitted to an internal medicine unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. All patients aged 18 years or older from 2 internal medicine units were identified during 4-month time intervals before (pre-intervention, April through July 2009) and after (post-intervention, November 2009 through February 2010) implementation of the multifaceted pneumococcal vaccine protocol. Of these, 150 patients from each 4-month period were randomly selected for electronic medical record review. Eligibility for pneumococcal vaccination was derived from the CDC recommendations and consensus of the vaccine steering committee at the study institution; the

  12. Development of volatile compounds in processed cheese during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Lars Oddershede; Lund, Pia; Sørensen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work teas to study tire impact of storage conditions, such as light and temperature, on the development of volatile compounds to processed cheese. Cheese in glass containers was stored at 5, 20 or 37 degreesC in light or darkness for up to 1 yr. Dynamic headspace and gas...... chromatography/mass spectrometry leas used for quantifying 28 volatile organic compounds at eight stages during tree storage period. Through principal component analysis, three important storage parameters could be identified. Principal components 1, 2 and 3 reflected storage tinge, conditions of light...

  13. Transportation and storage of foreign spent power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report describes the generic actions to be taken by the Department of Energy, in cooperation with other US government agencies, foreign governments, and international organizations, in support of the implementation of Administration policies with respect to the following international spent fuel management activities: bilateral cooperation related to expansion of foreign national storage capacities; multilateral and international cooperation related to development of multinational and international spent fuel storage regimes; fee-based transfer of foreign spent power reactor fuel to the US for storage; and emergency transfer of foreign spent power reactor fuel to the US for storage

  14. Storage of strawberry pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafet Aslantaş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine storage ability of strawberry pollen at different temperatures for three different strawberry cultivars 'Aliso', 'Brio', and 'Cruz'. Strawberry pollen was stored at room temperature (22 ±2°C, +4°C, -4°C and -18°C in stabile humidity conditions. Strawberry poIlen was germinated using the hanging drop method in a 20% sucrose solution. Pollen germination rate increased because of low temperature storage. Pollen stored at room temperature and +4°C, -4°C, and -18°C was kept for 8 months, about one year, and 20 months, respectively. Pollen germination rates decreased as the length of storage period increased. The reaction of all cultivars tested on the duration and temperature of storage was similar.

  15. Hydrogen storage compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  16. Cryptography from noisy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Stephanie; Schaffner, Christian; Terhal, Barbara M

    2008-06-06

    We show how to implement cryptographic primitives based on the realistic assumption that quantum storage of qubits is noisy. We thereby consider individual-storage attacks; i.e., the dishonest party attempts to store each incoming qubit separately. Our model is similar to the model of bounded-quantum storage; however, we consider an explicit noise model inspired by present-day technology. To illustrate the power of this new model, we show that a protocol for oblivious transfer is secure for any amount of quantum-storage noise, as long as honest players can perform perfect quantum operations. Our model also allows us to show the security of protocols that cope with noise in the operations of the honest players and achieve more advanced tasks such as secure identification.

  17. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  18. Hydrogen storage using borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard BONNETOT; Laetitia LAVERSENNE

    2006-01-01

    The possibilities of hydrogen storage using borohydrides are presented and discussed specially in regard of the recoverable hydrogen amount and related to the recovering conditions. A rapid analysis of storage possibilities is proposed taking in account the two main ways for hydrogen evolution: the dehydrogenation obtained through thermal decomposition or the hydrolysis of solids or solutions. The recoverable hydrogen is related to the dehydrogenation conditions and the real hydrogen useful percentage is determined for each case of use. The high temperature required for dehydrogenation even when using catalyzed compounds lead to poor outlooks for this storage way. The hydrolysis conditions direct the chemical yield of the water consuming, and this must be related to the experimental conditions which rule the storage capacity of the 'fuel' derived from the borohydride. (authors)

  19. Wet storage integrity update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables

  20. Spent fuel storage requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.

    1982-06-01

    Spent fuel storage requirements, as projected through the year 2000 for U.S. LWRs, were calculated using information supplied by the utilities reflecting plant status as of December 31, 1981. Projections through the year 2000 combined fuel discharge projections of the utilities with the assumed discharges of typical reactors required to meet the nuclear capacity of 165 GWe projected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the year 2000. Three cases were developed and are summarized. A reference case, or maximum at-reactor (AR) capacity case, assumes that all reactor storage pools are increased to their maximum capacities as estimated by the utilities for spent fuel storage utilizing currently licensed technologies. The reference case assumes no transshipments between pools except as currently licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This case identifies an initial requirement for 13 MTU of additional storage in 1984, and a cumulative requirement for 14,490 MTU additional storage in the year 2000. The reference case is bounded by two alternative cases. One, a current capacity case, assumes that only those pool storage capacity increases currently planned by the operating utilities will occur. The second, or maximum capacity with transshipment case, assumes maximum development of pool storage capacity as described above and also assumes no constraints on transshipment of spent fuel among pools of reactors of like type (BWR, PWR) within a given utility. In all cases, a full core discharge capability (full core reserve or FCR) is assumed to be maintained for each reactor, except that only one FCR is maintained when two reactors share a common pool. For the current AR capacity case the indicated storage requirements in the year 2000 are indicated to be 18,190 MTU; for the maximum capacity with transshipment case they are 11,320 MTU

  1. Flywheel energy storage; Schwungmassenspeicher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornemann, H.J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Energy storages may be chemical systems such as batteries, thermal systems such as hot-water tanks, electromagnetic systems such as capacitors and coils, or mechanical systems such as pumped storage power systems or flywheel energy storages. In flywheel energy storages the energy is stored in the centrifugal mass in the form of kinetic energy. This energy can be converted to electricity via a motor/generator unit and made available to the consumer. The introduction of magnetic bearings has greatly enhanced the potential of flywheel energy storages. As there is no contact between the moving parts of magnetic bearings, this technology provides a means of circumventing the engineering and operational problems involved in the we of conventional bearings (ball, roller, plain, and gas bearings). The advantages of modern flywheel energy storages over conventional accumulators are an at least thousandfold longer service life, low losses during long-time storage, greater power output in the case of short-time storage, and commendable environmental benignity. (orig./HW) [Deutsch] Als Enegiespeicher kommen chemische Systeme, z.B. Batterien, thermische Systeme, z.B. Warmwassertanks, elektromagnetische Systeme, z.B. Kondensatoren und Spulen, sowie mechanische Systeme, z.B. Pumpspeicherwerke und Schwungmassenspeicher in Frage. In einem Schwungmassenspeicher wird Energie in Form von kinetischer Energie in der Schwungmasse gespeichert. Ueber eine Moter/Generator Einheit wird diese Energie in elektrischen Strom umgewandelt und dem Verbraucher zugefuehrt. Mit der Einfuehrung von magnetischen Lagern konnte die Leistungsfaehigkeit von Schwungmassenspeichern erheblich gesteigert werden. Da in einem Magnetlager keine Beruehrung zwischen sich bewegenden Teilen besteht, wird ein Grossteil der mit dem Einsatz konventioneller Lager (Kugel- und Rollenlager, Gleitlager und Gaslager) verbundenen ingenieurtechnischen und betriebstechnischen Probleme vermieden. Die Vorteile von modernen

  2. Optimization of Munitions Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    zones of land around each facility place a significant economic cost on the storage of munitions (Schreyer, 1970: 1). Munitions storage is a subject...ADDTOT, BTOTAL 353 REAL MPH,MW ,MPD, MPU ,4,MPNEW,MCD 354 IF (SW2.NE.0) GO TO 1 355 SW2 - 1 356 WRITE (6,2) 357 GO TO 3 358 1 IF (REC.EQ.0) GO TO 4 359 IF

  3. Spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert

    1976-01-01

    To begin with, the author explains the reasons for intermediate storage of fuel elements in nuclear power stations and in a reprocessing plant and gives the temperature and radioactivity curves of LWR fuel elements after removal from the reactor. This is followed by a description of the facilities for fuel element storage in a reprocessing plant and of their functions. Futher topics are criticality and activity control, the problem of cooling time and safety systems. (HR) [de

  4. Analog storage integrated circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  5. Annual Report: Carbon Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strazisar, Brian [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Guthrie, George [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Activities include laboratory experimentation, field work, and numerical modeling. The work is divided into five theme areas (or first level tasks) that each address a key research need: Flow Properties of Reservoirs and Seals, Fundamental Processes and Properties, Estimates of Storage Potential, Verifying Storage Performance, and Geospatial Data Resources. The project also includes a project management effort which coordinates the activities of all the research teams.

  6. Forensic analysis of tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA) detections in a hydrocarbon-rich groundwater basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Konrad W; Levine, Audrey D; Kester, Janet E; Fordham, Carolyn L

    2016-04-01

    Tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA), a high-production volume (HPV) chemical, was sporadically detected in groundwater and coalbed methane (CBM) wells in southeastern Colorado's hydrocarbon-rich Raton Basin. TBA concentrations in shallow water wells averaged 75.1 μg/L, while detections in deeper CBM wells averaged 14.4 μg/L. The detection of TBA prompted a forensic investigation to try to identify potential sources. Historic and recent data were reviewed to determine if there was a discernable pattern of TBA occurrence. Supplemental samples from domestic water wells, monitor wells, CBM wells, surface waters, and hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluids were analyzed for TBA in conjunction with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE), proxies for evidence of contamination from reformulated gasoline or associated oxygenates. Exploratory microbiological sampling was conducted to determine if methanotrophic organisms co-occurred with TBA in individual wells. Meaningful comparisons of historic TBA data were limited due to widely varying reporting limits. Mapping of TBA occurrence did not reveal any spatial patterns or physical associations with CBM operations or contamination plumes. Additionally, TBA was not detected in HF fluids or surface water samples. Given the widespread use of TBA in industrial and consumer products, including water well completion materials, it is likely that multiple diffuse sources exist. Exploratory data on stable isotopes, dissolved gases, and microbial profiling provide preliminary evidence that methanotrophic activity may be producing TBA from naturally occurring isobutane. Reported TBA concentrations were significantly below a conservative risk-based drinking water screening level of 8000 μg/L derived from animal toxicity data.

  7. Storage of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstroem, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Swedish system of handling and storage of nuclear wastes is well-developed. Existing plants and systems provide great freedom of action and flexibility regarding future development and decisions of ultimate storage of the spent fuel. The interim storage in CLAB - Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel - could continue without any safety related problems for more than 40 years. In practice the choice of ultimate treatment system is not locked until the encapsulation of the fuel starts. At the same time it is of importance that the generation benefiting by the nuclear power production also be responsible for the development of the ultimate storage system and not unnecessarily postpones important decisions. The ultimate storage system for spent fuel could and should be developed within existing schedule. At the same time is should be worked out to provide coming generations with possibilities to do the type of supervision they like without maintenance and supervision requiring to become a prerequisite for a safe function. (O.S.)

  8. Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David

    2017-07-01

    As renewable energy use expands there will be a need to develop ways to balance its variability. Storage is one of the options. Presently the main emphasis is for systems storing electrical power in advanced batteries (many of them derivatives of parallel developments in the electric vehicle field), as well as via liquid air storage, compressed air storage, super-capacitors and flywheels, and, the leader so far, pumped hydro reservoirs. In addition, new systems are emerging for hydrogen generation and storage, feeding fuel cell power production. Heat (and cold) is also a storage medium and some systems exploit thermal effects as part of wider energy management activity. Some of the more exotic ones even try to use gravity on a large scale. This short book looks at all the options, their potentials and their limits. There are no clear winners, with some being suited to short-term balancing and others to longer-term storage. The eventual mix adopted will be shaped by the pattern of development of other balancing measures, including smart-grid demand management and super-grid imports and exports.

  9. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for diurnal load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks are being developed. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is also being developed by LASL. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch and 1-to-2-s slow tokamak energy transfer systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of an SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given for a 1-GWh reference design load-leveling unit, for a 30-MJ coil proposed stabilization unit, and for tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are also presented. The common technology base for the systems is discussed

  10. Secure Storage Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderholdt, Ferrol [Tennessee Technological University; Caldwell, Blake A [ORNL; Hicks, Susan Elaine [ORNL; Koch, Scott M [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Pogge, James R [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Stephen L [Tennessee Technological University; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Sorrillo, Lawrence [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to clarify the challenges associated with storage for secure enclaves. The major focus areas for the report are: - review of relevant parallel filesystem technologies to identify assets and gaps; - review of filesystem isolation/protection mechanisms, to include native filesystem capabilities and auxiliary/layered techniques; - definition of storage architectures that can be used for customizable compute enclaves (i.e., clarification of use-cases that must be supported for shared storage scenarios); - investigate vendor products related to secure storage. This study provides technical details on the storage and filesystem used for HPC with particular attention on elements that contribute to creating secure storage. We outline the pieces for a a shared storage architecture that balances protection and performance by leveraging the isolation capabilities available in filesystems and virtualization technologies to maintain the integrity of the data. Key Points: There are a few existing and in-progress protection features in Lustre related to secure storage, which are discussed in (Chapter 3.1). These include authentication capabilities like GSSAPI/Kerberos and the in-progress work for GSSAPI/Host-keys. The GPFS filesystem provides native support for encryption, which is not directly available in Lustre. Additionally, GPFS includes authentication/authorization mechanisms for inter-cluster sharing of filesystems (Chapter 3.2). The limitations of key importance for secure storage/filesystems are: (i) restricting sub-tree mounts for parallel filesystem (which is not directly supported in Lustre or GPFS), and (ii) segregation of hosts on the storage network and practical complications with dynamic additions to the storage network, e.g., LNET. A challenge for VM based use cases will be to provide efficient IO forwarding of the parallel filessytem from the host to the guest (VM). There are promising options like para-virtualized filesystems to

  11. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio

    2005-01-01

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  12. Underground storage of natural gas and LPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Symposium attended by over 200 participants from 23 member countries of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE), representatives from Australia, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait as well as from 5 international organizations, provided an opportunity for existing and prospective gas markets in the ECE region to exchange experience and information on current trends and developments in natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas underground storage, especially in technical and regulatory matters, including economic, market and social considerations, that influence the planning, development and operations of gas storage facilities. Environmental and safety factors associated with such operations were also examined. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the presented papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Neutrino Signals in Electron-Capture Storage-Ring Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham Gal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino signals in electron-capture decays of hydrogen-like parent ions P in storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the storage-ring quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions D in two-body decays P → D + ν e . It is argued that, to the extent that daughter ions are detected, these detection rates might exhibit modulations with periods of order seconds, similar to those reported in the GSI storage-ring experiments for two-body decay rates. New dedicated experiments in storage rings, or using traps, could explore these modulations.

  14. SOLID-STATE STORAGE DEVICE WITH PROGRAMMABLE PHYSICAL STORAGE ACCESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    a storage device action request, and the storage device evaluating a first rule of the one or more rules by determining if the received request fulfills request conditions comprised in the first rule, and in the affirmative the storage device performing request actions comprised in the first rule......Embodiments of the present invention includes a method of operating a solid-state storage device, comprising a storage device controller in the storage device receiving a set of one or more rules, each rule comprising (i) one or more request conditions to be evaluated for a storage device action...... request received from a host computer, and (ii) one or more request actions to be performed on a physical address space of a non-volatile storage unit in the solid-state storage device in case the one or more request conditions are fulfilled; the method further comprises: the storage device receiving...

  15. Developing new transportable storage casks for interim dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Iwasa, K.; Araki, K.; Asano, R.

    2004-01-01

    Transportable storage metal casks are to be consistently used during transport and storage for AFR interim dry storage facilities planning in Japan. The casks are required to comply with the technical standards of regulations for both transport (hereinafter called ''transport regulation'') and storage (hereafter called ''storage regulation'') to maintain safety functions (heat transfer, containment, shielding and sub-critical control). In addition to these requirements, it is not planned in normal state to change the seal materials during storage at the storage facility, therefore it is requested to use same seal materials when the casks are transported after storage period. The dry transportable storage metal casks that satisfy the requirements have been developed to meet the needs of the dry storage facilities. The basic policy of this development is to utilize proven technology achieved from our design and fabrication experience, to carry out necessary verification for new designs and to realize a safe and rational design with higher capacity and efficient fabrication

  16. EVALUATION OF BIOMEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN MULTI-SPECIALITY TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Srivastav

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomedical Waste (BMW, collection and proper disposal has become a significant concern for both the medical and the general community The scientific “Hospital waste Management “is of vital importance as its improper management poses risks to the health care workers ,waste handlers patients, community in general and largely the environment. Objectives: (i To assess current practices of Bio-medical Waste management including generation, collection, transportation storage, treatment and disposal technologies in tertiary health care center. (ii To assess health andsafetypracticesfor the health care personnel involved in Bio-Medical waste Management. Materials and Methods: Waste management practices in tertiary care-centre was studied during May 2010 June 2010. The information/data regarding Bio-Medical Waste Management practices and safety was collected by way of semi structured interview, proforma being the one used for WASTE AUDITING QUESTIONNAIRE. The information collected was verified by personal observations of waste management practices in each ward of hospital. Results : SRMS-IMS generates 1. 25Kgs waste per bed per day and maximum waste is generated in wards. The institute has got separate color coded bins in each ward for collection of waste but segregation practices needs to be more refined. The safety measures taken by health care workers was not satisfactory it was not due to unavailability of Personal protective measures but because of un-awareness of health hazards which may occur due to improper waste management practices. Thus it is concluded that there should be strict implementation of a waste management policy set up in the institute, training and motivation must be given paramount importance to meet the current needs and standard of bio-medical waste management.

  17. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by

  18. Montane pollen from the Tertiary of NW. Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, J.

    1966-01-01

    In NW. Borneo thick series of Tertiary sediments occur which are rich in fossil pollen and spores. The majority of these plant microfossils were derived from the various types of tropical lowland vegetation such as mangrove (Muller, 1964), mixed peat swamp forest and mixed Dipterocarp forest. Some

  19. Adults Studying Pure Mathematics in Adult Tertiary Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennison, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the experiences of a group of adults enrolled in the Pure Mathematics module of the Certificate IV in Adult Tertiary Preparation in 2000 at one of the Institutes of TAFE in Brisbane, Australia. Classroom learning experiences, exposure to technology, and the impact of returning to study on other facets of students' lives were…

  20. Indications for and outcomes of tertiary referrals in refractive surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patryn, Eliza K.; Vrijman, Violette; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    To review the spectrum of disease, symptomatology, and management offered to patients referred for a second opinion after refractive surgery. A prospective cohort study was done on all patients referred from October 1, 2006, to September 30, 2011, to a tertiary eye clinic after refractive surgery of